WorldWideScience

Sample records for education piloting strategies

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Systems Thinking Education Strategy for Baccalaureate Nursing Curriculum: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, Louise A; Wisser, Kathleen Z

    Nurse educators are charged to develop and evaluate curricula on systems thinking to prepare future nurses to provide safe nursing care. The goal of this pilot study was to design and evaluate a four-hour educational strategy that prepares future professional nurses to use systems thinking approaches in the delivery of safe patient care. This study exposed prelicensure baccalaureate nursing students to systems thinking principles, which included didactic and experiential activities. A descriptive design was used to determine the effect of an on-campus educational strategy. A paired samples t-test revealed statistical significance from pretest to posttest.

  2. Why clinical nurse educators adopt innovative teaching strategies: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Janet M; Vinten, Sharon A

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to describe intentions to adopt innovative teaching strategies in clinical educators who have participated in an online course focusing on the role of clinical teaching (N = 71). Innovative teaching strategies were defined as those that embrace the tenets of sociocultural theory, a student-centered approach whereby the role of the nurse educator is to motivate and support the student and, in mutual process, to push students to reach toward their learning potential by using guiding techniques that can be erected or gradually reduced based on the individual student's learning needs. Participants stated that three factors proposed in the Rogers theory of diffusion of innovation (compatibility, trialability, and relative advantage) would be most influential in the adoption of innovative teaching strategies. Encouraging students to explore and apply new knowledge was described as the teaching strategy most likely to be adopted. Intent to adopt innovative teaching strategies may provide insight into the development of organizational climates in schools of nursing that could foster needed changes in clinical teaching.

  3. Piloting an integrated education pathway as a strategy to prepare for and encourage oncology specialty certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Pamela; Fitzgerald, Barbara; Lee, Charlotte T

    2015-01-01

    Although continuing nursing education is crucial to improve professional and patient outcomes, programs in oncology nursing remain scarce, piecemeal, and focused on one modality of treatment, which limits the effectiveness of education interventions. The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of a longitudinal specialized oncology nursing education pathway program, and the evaluation results of a year-long pilot of the first stage of the program at a large university-affiliated cancer centre. Preliminary findings indicated that participants' perceived competence in health assessment and symptom management was improved after one year of enrolment in the education pathway. Next steps following this pilot, including implications for participants with regards to attaining oncology certification are also discussed.

  4. Tailored education for older patients to facilitate engagement in falls prevention strategies after hospital discharge--a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Hill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aims of the study were to evaluate the effect of providing tailored falls prevention education in hospital on: i engagement in targeted falls prevention behaviors in the month after discharge: ii patients' self-perceived risk and knowledge about falls and falls prevention strategies after receiving the education. METHODS: A pilot randomized controlled trial (n = 50: baseline and outcome assessments conducted by blinded researchers. PARTICIPANTS: hospital inpatients 60 years or older, discharged to the community. Participants were randomized into two groups. The intervention was a tailored education package consisting of multimedia falls prevention information with trained health professional follow-up, delivered in addition to usual care. Outcome measures were engagement in falls prevention behaviors in the month after discharge measured at one month after discharge with a structured survey, and participants' knowledge, confidence and motivation levels before and after receiving the education. The feasibility of providing the intervention was examined and falls outcomes (falls, fall-related injuries were also collected. RESULTS: Forty-eight patients (98% provided follow-up data. The complete package was provided to 21 (84% intervention group participants. Participants in the intervention group were significantly more likely to plan how to safely restart functional activities [Adjusted odds ratio 3.80, 95% CI (1.07, 13.52, p = 0.04] and more likely to complete other targeted behaviors such as completing their own home exercise program [Adjusted odds ratio 2.76, 95% CI (0.72, 10.50, p = 0.14] than the control group. The intervention group was significantly more knowledgeable, confident and motivated to engage in falls prevention strategies after receiving the education than the control group. There were 23 falls (n = 5 intervention; n = 18 control and falls rates were 5.4/1000 patient days (intervention; 18.7/1000 patient days

  5. TASKILLAN II - Pilot strategies for workload management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Leon D.; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1990-01-01

    This study focused on the strategies used by pilots in managing their workload level, and their subsequent task performance. Sixteen licensed pilots flew 42 missions on a helicopter simulation, and were evaluated on their performance of the overall mission, as well as individual tasks. Pilots were divided in four groups, defined by the presence or absence of scheduling control over tasks and the availability of intelligence concerning the type and stage of difficulties imposed during the flight. Results suggest that intelligence supported strategies that yielded significant higher performance levels, while scheduling control seemed to have no impact on performance. Both difficulty type and the stage of difficulty impacted performance significantly, with strongest effects for time stresss and difficulties imposed late in the flight.

  6. An ICT and mobile health integrated approach to optimize patients' education on hypertension and its management by physicians: The Patients Optimal Strategy of Treatment(POST) pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Fabio; Xiaoqiu Liu; Torlasco, Camilla; Soranna, Davide; Faini, Andrea; Ciminaghi, Renata; Celsi, Ada; Benedetti, Matteo; Zambon, Antonella; di Rienzo, Marco; Parati, Gianfranco

    2016-08-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension is largely attributed to unsatisfactory doctor's engagement in its optimal management and to poor patients' compliance to therapeutic interventions. ICT and mobile Health solutions might improve these conditions, being widely available and providing highly effective communication strategies. To evaluate whether ICT and mobile Health tools are able to improve hypertension control by improving doctors' engagement and by increasing patients' education and involvement, and their compliance to lifestyle modification and prescribed drug therapy. In a pilot study, we have included 690 treated hypertensive patients with uncontrolled office blood pressure (BP), consecutively recruited by 9 general practitioners over 3 months. Patients were alternatively assigned to routine management based on repeated office visits or to an integrated ICT-based Patients Optimal Strategy for Treatment (POST) system including Home BP monitoring teletransmission, a dedicated web-based platform for patients' management by physicians (Misuriamo platform), and a smartphone mobile application (Eurohypertension APP, E-APP), over a follow-up of 6 months. BP values, demographic and clinical data were collected at baseline and at all follow-up visits (at least two). BP control and cardiovascular risk level have been evaluated at the beginning and at the end of the study. 89 patients did not complete the follow-up, thus data analysis was carried out in 601 of them (303 patients in the POST group and 298 in the control group). Office BP control (ICT based tools might be effective in improving hypertension management, implementing positive patients' involvement with better adherence to treatment prescriptions and providing the physicians with dynamic control of patients' home BP measurements, resulting in lesser clinical inertia.

  7. Age Learning Factors Affecting Pilot Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbert, Brison

    This document, intended for pilot education and flight safety specialists, consists chiefly of a review of the literature on physiological factors that affect pilot education and an examination of environmental factors that should be scrutinized in order to improve the effectiveness of aviation learning facilities. The physiological factors…

  8. Environmental Education Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootrach, Pradit; Thiengkamol, Nongnapas; Thiengkamol, Tanarat Khoowaranyoo

    2015-01-01

    Data was collected from 403 primary school administrators in Maha Sarakham Province, Thailand, to develop causal relationship model of Administrator Characteristics (AC), Teacher Characteristics (TC) and Environmental Education Principle (EE) that affect Environmental Education Strategy (EES) through Inspiration of Public Mind for Environmental…

  9. Teddy and I Get a Check-Up: A Pilot Educational Intervention Teaching Children Coping Strategies for Managing Procedure-Related Pain and Fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalley, Jessica S; McMurtry, C Meghan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pediatric medical information provision literature focuses on hospitalization and surgical procedures, but children would also benefit from an educational program regarding more commonly experienced medical procedures (e.g., needles, general check-up). Objective. To determine whether an evidence-based educational program reduced children's ratings of fear of and expected pain from medical stimuli and increased their knowledge of procedural coping strategies. Methods. An educational, interactive, developmentally appropriate Teddy Bear Clinic Tour was developed and delivered at a veterinary clinic. During this tour, 71 5-10-year-old children (Mage = 6.62 years, SD = 1.19) were taught about medical equipment, procedures, and coping strategies through modelling and rehearsal. In a single-group, pretest posttest design, participants reported their fear of and expected pain from medical and nonmedical stimuli. Children were also asked to report strategies they would use to cope with procedural fear. Results. Children's ratings for expected pain during a needle procedure were reduced following the intervention. No significant change occurred in children's fear of needles. Children reported more intervention-taught coping strategies at Time 2. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that an evidence-based, interactive educational program can reduce young children's expectations of needle pain and may help teach them procedural coping strategies.

  10. Teaching and Learning Simplification Strategies in a Philippine Classroom: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibayan, Bonifacio P.; And Others

    This paper discusses the use of English as the main language of instruction in higher education in many developing nations, and reports on a pilot study of learning and teaching strategies used in Filipino- and English-language classrooms at De La Salle University in Manila, The Philippines. The study examined the "teacher talk" and…

  11. Quality Assurance Strategies of Higher Education in Iraq and Kurdistan: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaghed, Nabeel; Dezaye, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on two different strategies that have been implemented in Iraq to improve quality assurance in the higher education sector in Iraq. One strategy has been developed by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research in Baghdad. It involved conducting a pilot study at the University of Babylon. This pilot included…

  12. The NCI Digital Divide Pilot Projects: implications for cancer education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L; Gustafson, David; Salovey, Peter; Perocchia, Rosemarie Slevin; Wilbright, Wayne; Bright, Mary Anne; Muha, Cathy

    2007-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) supported four innovative demonstration research projects, "The Digital Divide Pilot Projects," to test new strategies for disseminating health information via computer to vulnerable consumers. These projects involved active research collaborations between the NCI's Cancer Information Service (CIS) and regional cancer control researchers to field test new approaches for enhancing cancer communication in vulnerable communities. The projects were able to use computers to successfully disseminate relevant cancer information to vulnerable populations. These demonstration research projects suggested effective new strategies for using communication technologies to educate underserved populations about cancer prevention, control, and care.

  13. Personality profiles and stress-coping strategies of Slovenian military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Meško

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a pilot also depends on the pilot's personality profile and their stresscoping style. In our study we aimed to analyze, by means of the Big Five Questionnaire (BFQ and the Coping Responses Inventory (CRI, the personality profiles, stress-coping strategies and the relationship between them among Slovenian military pilots. The study involved 120 respondents: 30 of whom were military pilots in the experimental group, while the other 90 were in the control groups. The control groups included sport pilots, the general population and soldiers with no involvement in aviation. The members of the control group were selected with regard to the characteristics of the experimental group members, so that both groups were equivalent in terms of relevant factors (e.g. gender, age, health state, level of education etc, thus participating in a study of equivalent pairs. A statistical analysis identified statistically significant differences between the groups in the following BFQ dimensions: energy, conscientiousness and emotional stability; in the dimensions of CRI 'cognitive avoidance' (cognitive effort to avoid realistic consideration of a problem; and 'emotional discharge or emptying' (behavioural attempts to alleviate tension by venting negative emotions. Results revealed that certain personality characteristics were differentially and significantly related to specific stress coping strategies adopted by military pilots.

  14. National Strategies of Adult Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Jelenc

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that there is no agreement among adult educators on the issue whether the systemic regulation of adult education by the state is advantageous or not, there are indicators that several countries are trying to cletermine their national strategies of the adult education development. Creating such a strategy has been recently recommended in several international documents, i. e. OECD (1996, Unesco - CONFINTEA V (1997, connectecl as a ruJe with the life­long learning strategy. Such a strategy should incorporate the systemic regulation of aclult education as well. In our comparative analysis we tried to identify those national projects of different countries which could be defined as national strategies for the development of adult education in particular countries. After having identified them we made a comparative analysis to find out the basic elements which should be applied if the strategy is to be designated as entire and cohesive one. These elements are: a/ broad social, political and scientific schemes; b/ basic objectives of the programme; c/ a scientific-conceptual scheme of adult education; d/ a need for adult education; e/ functioning of the system and organisation of adult education in a country; g/ the present systemic regulation of adult education; hi a national programme; i/ the strategy of life-long learning. The results of the research show that the majority of the reviewed programmes can not be designated as entire and coherent strategies of aclult education although most of them applied most of the elements. Therefore they should rather be designated as programmes, agendas, campaigns etc. as they mostly satisfy the current societal needs of the particular country. In Slovenia we are trying to submit a strategy which will apply all the elements quoted.

  15. Teaching Strategies in Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Anthony E.

    Teachers of technology education need to relate their teaching strategies to learning theory, student needs, and Bloom's taxonomy. In learning, students take in information and apply it to the real world through accommodation. Teaching strategies must allow for this process of accommodation. Student needs involve sustenance (physiological needs),…

  16. Strategies for Reforming Initial Vocational Education and Training in Europe. Final Report of the Project. Leonardo da Vinci/Transnational Pilot Projects: Multiplier Effect, Strand III.3.a. Sharpening Post-16 Education Strategies by Horizontal and Vertical Networking (1997-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenstrom, Marja-Leena, Ed.; Lasonen, Johanna, Ed.

    This document contains 24 papers examining strategies for reforming initial vocational education and training (VET) in Europe. The following papers are included: "Reassessing VET Reform Strategies in a New Context: Implementation of the SPES-NET (Sharpening Post-16 Education Strategies by Horizontal and Vertical Networking) Project"…

  17. Health education: concepts and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T

    1996-03-01

    Physicians have a responsibility to educate people about their health as well as to treat them. In fact, achievement of "Health for All" requires that people become educated about immunization, nutrition, family planning, and environmental sanitation. The goal of health education is to change behavior by changing attitudes. Health education encourages self-reliance and motivates people to make their own health-related decisions. In order to reach patients, physicians must bridge the social gap created by the gulf between technical priorities and what is really possible for people to achieve. The process of health education moves from the sender to the message to the channel to the receivers to the effects. Appropriate methods can be used for individual or group communication and methods can focus on information provision and/or behavior change. Participatory methods are effective in changing behavior and include group analysis of a situation, group dialogue, persuasion, and educational games. An effective strategy for individual instruction is woman-to-woman or child-to-child communication, which depends upon the identification of "key" women and children. Development of a community-based health education strategy relies on community participation and the involvement of influential members of the community. After a message has been transmitted, innovators will begin the new practice, early adopters will follow, and slow adopters will wait and watch. The innovators and early adopters can help reduce resistance to the innovation. While it is a slow process, health education can improve attitudes and behavior.

  18. PRACCIS: a didactic strategy based on hermeneutic for knowledge circulation or about a pilot test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Agudelo, Elvia Maria; Aguirre Ramirez, Nestor Jaime; Grisales Franco, Lina Maria; Giraldo Mejia, Gloria Eugenia; Villabona, Silvia Lucia; Uribe Rozo, Erika Gissell; Velasquez, Diana

    2012-01-01

    This article shows how to apply the teaching strategy called PRACCIS through an educational booklet entitled Zooplankton Ayapel Swamp and its role in the ecology of this ecosystem as a product of the research entitled Spatial and temporal dynamics of Zooplankton associated with macrophyte in the wetland complex Ayapel, Cordoba; Colombia. Implementation of this strategy was envelopment as a pilot where the information was collected through various texts, namely: two field journals, five cards completed applications, 52 surveys processed by the non-scientific community and a conversation with the coordinator the workshop. These texts are read from a hermeneutic perspective, where from prejudice, are reflected, analyzed, compared, understood and interpreted, the situations and the occurrences of the event participants to find meaning units on course to achieve unity sense, ie, to endorse the teaching strategy to facilitate the movement of scientific knowledge in non-scientific communities and be able to generate culture, in this case, around the object water

  19. Critical Thinking in Nurse Anesthesia Education: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shari; Mendel, Shaun; Fisher, Rodney; Cooper, Kimball; Fisher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Critical thinking is pivotal for student success in health professions education. Knowing the critical thinking ability of the learner helps educators tailor curriculum to enhance critical thinking. A quantitative comparative pilot study assessed critical thinking ability for students at two distinct points in a nurse anesthesia program…

  20. Educate a Hang Glider Pilot, a Backpacker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Robert B.

    1983-01-01

    Outdoor education should educate people in, about, and for the out-of-doors, regardless of age or activity setting, and must document the effects technology has had on leisure as well as on outdoor education. (Author/MH)

  1. School-based violence prevention strategy: a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Rachel V; Apfeld, Jordan C; Johnson, Ronald K; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Jahangir, A Alex; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-07-01

    Violence has recently been reported among a primarily young, minority population in Nashville, Tennessee. School-based programs have been proven as effective methods of reducing violent behavior, beliefs, and actions that lead to violence among adolescents. Investigators implemented a rigorous search for an appropriate school-based violence prevention program for Metropolitan Nashville middle school students utilizing a systematic review and discussion group with victims of violence. 27 programs nation-wide were reviewed and 2 discussion groups with African American males under the age of 25 admitted to a level 1 trauma center for assault-related injuries were conducted. Our findings led to a single, evidence-based conflict resolution program. In conjunction with educators, we evaluated the program's effectiveness in a pilot study in a Nashville middle school with high rates of violence. 122 students completed the conflict resolution program and described their behavior and experiences with violence in a pre-test/post-test self-rate questionnaire. Results showed a significant decrease in violent behavior and an increase in students' competencies to deal with violence (p less than 0.05). This study shows that a reduction in violent behavior and beliefs among middle school students can be achieved through the implementation of a targeted violence intervention program. A larger-scale intervention is needed to develop more conclusive evidence of effectiveness. © 2015 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  2. Piloting an Educational Response to Violence in Uganda: Prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This pilot study assessed Mato-Oput5 (hereafter the curriculum), a new peace education curriculum, for indications of beneficial efficacy, specifically the capacity to reduce negative attitudes towards conflict and violence, and injury and violence rates. A cluster randomised control design was used. Three of the six ...

  3. Living Smart Homes: A Pilot Australian Sustainability Education Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Evonne; Buys, Laurie; Bell, Lorraine

    2009-01-01

    This article documents the rationale and experience of a pilot Australian sustainability education programme, "Living Smart Homes" (LSH) based on a community-based social marketing model. Inspired by the Australian "Land for Wildlife" scheme, LSH is designed to engage homeowners with sustainable practices through face-to-face…

  4. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  5. Marketizing higher education: neoliberal strategies and counter-strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Levidow, Les

    2002-01-01

    [The article had no abstract; the following text is drawn from the Introduction and Conclusion.] \\ud \\ud Higher education has become a terrain for marketization agendas. Since the 1980s universities have been urged to adopt commercial models of knowledge, skills, curriculum, finance, accounting, and management organization. Neoliberal strategies for higher education have the following features: all constituencies are treated through business relationships; educational efficiency, accountabili...

  6. NASA Desert RATS 2011 Education Pilot Project and Classroom Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruener, J. E.; McGlone, M.; Allen, J.; Tobola, K.; Graff, P.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of tests of hardware and operations carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona, as an analog to future exploration activities beyond low Earth orbit [1]. For the past several years, these tests have occurred in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, north of Flagstaff. For the 2011 Desert RATS season, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) at NASA headquarters provided support to develop an education pilot project that would include student activities to parallel the Desert RATS mission planning and exploration activities in the classroom, and educator training sessions. The development of the pilot project was a joint effort between the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate and the Aerospace Education Services Project (AESP), managed at Penn State University.

  7. Educational Optimism among Parents: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räty, Hannu; Kasanen, Kati

    2016-01-01

    This study explored parents' (N = 351) educational optimism in terms of their trust in the possibilities of school to develop children's intelligence. It was found that educational optimism could be depicted as a bipolar factor with optimism and pessimism on the opposing ends of the same dimension. Optimistic parents indicated more satisfaction…

  8. New Strategy of the Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyatova, Fatma Khanim; Salamov, Gulbala

    2014-01-01

    This article is dedicated to new strategy of distance education. The article deals with the possibilities of ICT (Information and Communication Technologies) in teaching specially distance education. In the article, ICT technological tools and their methods of application in educational process are looked over; discrepancy of intellectual…

  9. Career Education: Strategies for Methods Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastern Washington Univ., Cheney.

    Professors at Eastern Washington State College participated in a two-day conference on the Development of Strategies for Incorporating Career Education in Methods Classes. Speakers from the areas of economics, foreign languages, industrial education and technology, physical education, psychology, sociology, and anthropology briefly described their…

  10. Strategies for Fostering Creativity Among Business Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to find out the strategies for fostering creativity among business education graduates in Nigeria. The instrument that was used to collect the data for this study was a questionnaire. The study sample comprised all the 71 Business Education lecturers in the universities and colleges of Education in ...

  11. Strategies for piloting a breast health promotion program in the Chinese-Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Fung Kuen; Kwok, Cannas; White, Kate; D'Abrew, Natalie; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2012-01-01

    In Australia, women from non-English-speaking backgrounds participate less frequently in breast cancer screening than English-speaking women, and Chinese immigrant women are 50% less likely to participate in breast examinations than Australian-born women. Chinese-born Australians comprise 10% of the overseas-born Australian population, and the immigrant Chinese population in Australia is rapidly increasing. We report on the strategies used in a pilot breast health promotion program, Living with Healthy Breasts, aimed at Cantonese-speaking adult immigrant women in Sydney, Australia. The program consisted of a 1-day education session and a 2-hour follow-up session. We used 5 types of strategies commonly used for cultural targeting (peripheral, evidential, sociocultural, linguistic, and constituent-involving) in a framework of traditional Chinese philosophies (Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism) to deliver breast health messages to Chinese-Australian immigrant women. Creating the program's content and materials required careful consideration of color (pink to indicate femininity and love), symbols (peach blossoms to imply longevity), word choice (avoidance of the word death), location and timing (held in a Chinese restaurant a few months after the Chinese New Year), communication patterns (the use of metaphors and cartoons for discussing health-related matters), and concern for modesty (emphasizing that all presenters and team members were female) to maximize cultural relevance. Using these strategies may be beneficial for designing and implementing breast cancer prevention programs in Cantonese-speaking Chinese immigrant communities.

  12. Developing Strategies for Networked Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregoy, Richard; Kroder, Stanley

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of the distance learning approach to education, and discusses how one institution, the University of Dallas Graduate School of Management, has developed a progressively expanding networked distance education program. Includes quotes from three students that suggest the quality of…

  13. Biotechnology Education: A Multiple Instructional Strategies Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Trey; Wells, John; White, Karissa

    2002-01-01

    Provides a rationale for inclusion of biotechnology in technology education. Describes an instructional strategy that uses behaviorist, cognitive, and constructivist learning theories in two activities involving photobioreactors and bovine somatotropin (growth hormone). (Contains 39 references.) (SK)

  14. Creating marketing strategies for higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Białoń

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a thesis that the primary premise of creating marketing strategies for higher education institution is a three-dimensional notion of marketing. The first dimension lies in the theoretical notions of the essence of marketing, including the transactional marketing (1.0, relationship marketing (2.0 and spiritual marketing (3.0. The second dimension is formed by methods of marketing research and accurate notions of marketing, while the third are channels of marketing information. Harmonizing these three dimensions is a precondition for effective marketing. Among other conditions for effective strategies there are: aligning goals of the chosen strategy with the mission of higher education institution, correct choice of targeted segments of the market and of marketing tools. The article also gives a sample classification of marketing strategies based on these criteria, with emphasis on the fact, that every higher education institution employs its own strategy.

  15. A pilot study to evaluate an efficient testing strategy for surveillance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Control strategies for schistosomiasis depend on the understanding of the population specific magnitude of the infection. We present pilot results of a testing strategy suggested by theoretical statistical investigation that lowers cost yet retains similar accuracy profile as the standard Kato-Katz technique.

  16. Education: Opportunity through Learning. USAID Education Strategy, 2011-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In late 2010, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Rajiv Shah commissioned a new Agency-wide Education Strategy to ensure that USAID's global education investments would be informed by recent Presidential policy guidance; grounded in the most current evidence-based analysis of educational effectiveness; and aimed at…

  17. Strategies for Programmed Instruction: An Educational Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, J., Ed.

    The purpose of this book is to compare, contrast, and evaluate various strategies of programed instruction (PI). The underlying view is that programed instruction implies a systematic methodological approach to education and training, an approach which bases its decisions on facts rather than value judgements. Several strategies for task analysis…

  18. Supervision and Quality Assurance Strategies in Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the need for quality assurance and quality control strategies in improving the effectiveness of educational provision and teacher performance in schools. Governments all over the word in an attempt to educate and develop their citizens spend huge amount of money on teachers and schools but in most ...

  19. Teaching strategies for moral education: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitema, J.; ten Dam, G.; Veugelers, W.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a literature review of studies on teaching strategies for moral education in secondary schools (1995-2003). The majority of the studies focus on the 'what' and 'why', i.e. the objectives, of curriculum-oriented moral education. Attention to the instructional formats for

  20. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  1. WTO and Lifelong Education Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-guo; Zheng, Yu

    2006-01-01

    After China's entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO), teachers have been confronted with many opportunities and challenges. Lifelong education strategies are problems we should take into account carefully. This article expounds the objective demands, ideas, content, measures and functions of lifelong education.

  2. Evaluation of a pilot police-led suicide early alert surveillance strategy in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeechan, Grant James; Richardson, Catherine; Weir, Kevin; Wilson, Lynn; O'Neill, Gillian; Newbury-Birch, Dorothy

    2017-07-19

    Those bereaved by suicide are at increased risk of psychological harm, which can be reduced with the provision of timely support. This paper outlines an evaluation of a pilot police-led suicide strategy, in comparison to a coroner-led suicide strategy looking at the number, and length of time it takes for deaths to be recorded for each strategy. Additionally, the police-led strategy offers timely contact from support services for bereaved individuals. We examined what impact this offer of support had on the capacity of support services. A mixed methods evaluation compared how long it took for suspected suicides to be recorded using both strategies. The number of referrals received by support services during the pilot strategy were compared with those from previous years. A feedback focus group, and interviews, were held with key stakeholders. The coroner strategy was more consistent at identifying suspected suicides; however, reports were filed quicker by the police. Bereaved individuals were willing to share contact details with police officers and consent for referral to support services which lead to increased referrals. The focus group and interviews revealed that the pilot police strategy needs better integration into routine police practice. This strategy has the potential to deliver a real benefit to those bereaved by suicide; however, there are still aspects which could be improved. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Dental education economics: challenges and innovative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary P; Duley, Susan I; Beach, M Miles; Deem, Lisa; Pileggi, Roberta; Samet, Nachum; Segura, Adriana; Williams, John N

    2008-12-01

    This article reviews current dental education economic challenges such as increasing student tuition and debt, decreasing funds for faculty salaries and the associated faculty shortage, and the high cost of clinic operations and their effect on the future of dentistry. Management tactics to address these issues are also reviewed. Despite recent efforts to change the clinical education model, implementation of proposed faculty recruitment and compensation programs, and creation of education- corporate partnerships, the authors argue that the current economics of public dental education is not sustainable. To remain viable, the dental education system must adopt transformational actions to re-engineer the program for long-term stability. The proposed re-engineering includes strategies in the following three areas: 1) educational process redesign, 2) reduction and redistribution of time in dental school, and 3) development of a regional curriculum. The intent of these strategies is to address the financial challenges, while educating adequate numbers of dentists at a reasonable cost to both the student and the institution in addition to maintaining dental education within research universities as a learned profession.

  4. Searching in clutter : visual attention strategies of expert pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    Clutter can slow visual search. However, experts may develop attention strategies that alleviate the effects of clutter on search performance. In the current study we examined the effects of global and local clutter on visual search performance and a...

  5. Medical educators working abroad: a pilot study of educators' experiences in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Michelle; McKimm, Judy; Major, Stella

    2014-09-01

    Medical education is now a global enterprise, with many medical educators working internationally, either for short or longer periods or even permanently. In parallel, many medical schools are now involved in collaborations and partnerships with schools in other countries. With this in mind, we set out to explore what motivates, supports and inhibits medical educators who wish to or might work outside their "home country". This article reports on the pilot stage (in specific organizational contexts in Middle East) of a longitudinal project aimed at canvassing medical educators on a broader global scale, using reflective accounts and a questionnaire survey. The findings from this pilot study raise interesting issues about the lived experience of medical educators who have chosen to work in a different culture from their own. Respondents identify many advantages around skills, personal and professional development. Three main issues emerged in terms of educators' experiences: the academic environment, medical practice in a different cultural context and personal matters. Adapting to the local culture, gender segregation and the impact on learning and teaching was an overarching factor. We introduce an explanatory framework to explain the development of international educator identity, a cyclical process in which, through experiences and reflection, individual world views and perspectives are continually modified and developed. This pilot study tested the methodologies and developed a new conceptual model that will be used in a wider study across different cultures.

  6. Strategies to enhance venous thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients (SENTRY: a pilot cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai Menaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a common preventable cause of mortality in hospitalized medical patients. Despite rigorous randomized trials generating strong recommendations for anticoagulant use to prevent VTE, nearly 40% of medical patients receive inappropriate thromboprophylaxis. Knowledge-translation strategies are needed to bridge this gap. Methods We conducted a 16-week pilot cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT to determine the proportion of medical patients that were appropriately managed for thromboprophylaxis (according to the American College of Chest Physician guidelines within 24 hours of admission, through the use of a multicomponent knowledge-translation intervention. Our primary goal was to determine the feasibility of conducting this study on a larger scale. The intervention comprised clinician education, a paper-based VTE risk assessment algorithm, printed physicians’ orders, and audit and feedback sessions. Medical wards at six hospitals (representing clusters in Ontario, Canada were included; three were randomized to the multicomponent intervention and three to usual care (i.e., no active strategies for thromboprophylaxis in place. Blinding was not used. Results A total of 2,611 patients (1,154 in the intervention and 1,457 in the control group were eligible and included in the analysis. This multicomponent intervention did not lead to a significant difference in appropriate VTE prophylaxis rates between intervention and control hospitals (appropriate management rate odds ratio = 0.80; 95% confidence interval: 0.50, 1.28; p = 0.36; intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.022, and thus was not considered feasible. Major barriers to effective knowledge translation were poor attendance by clinical staff at education and feedback sessions, difficulty locating preprinted orders, and lack of involvement by clinical and administrative leaders. We identified several factors that may increase uptake of a VTE

  7. Team Development Measure in Interprofessional Graduate Education: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Lora Humphrey; Roman, Marian; Skolits, Gary; Raynor, Hollie; Thompson, Dixie; Franks, Andrea

    2018-01-11

    A faculty team developed the 4-week Recovery-Based Interprofessional Distance Education (RIDE) rotation for graduate students in their disciplines. The evaluation team identified the Team Development Measure (TDM) as a potential alternative to reflect team development during the RIDE rotation. The TDM, completed anonymously online, was piloted on the second student cohort (N = 18) to complete the RIDE rotation. The overall pretest mean was 60.73 points (SD = 11.85) of a possible 100 points, indicating that students anticipated their RIDE team would function at a moderately high level during the 4-week rotation. The overall posttest mean, indicating student perceptions of actual team functioning, was 72.71 points (SD = 23.31), an average increase of 11.98 points. Although not statistically significant, Cohen's effect size (d = 0.43) indicates an observed difference of large magnitude. No other published work has used the TDM as a pre-/posttest measure of team development. The authors believe the TDM has several advantages as a measure of student response to interprofessional education offerings, particularly in graduate students with prior experience on health care teams. Further work is needed to validate and extend the findings of this pilot study. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Educational Strategies to Increase Racial Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchignani, Norman

    This paper reviews the effectiveness and practicality of various educational approaches for increasing racial tolerance and calls for developing strategies that have been formally evaluated to avoid the waste of time and limited resources. The first section discusses the racial inadequacies of most programs which purport to affect racial…

  9. Organizational Communication Strategies in Elementary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badal, Alen

    Organizations, regardless of size and complexities, must depend on communication as a medium to effectively function. Regardless of the best-laid strategies, lack of communication may yield unfavorable results. Needless to state, organizational communication has been perceived as a challenge within many educational organizations. The intent of…

  10. Community strategies of women in educational management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    under representation of women in education management abroad and in South Africa, gender differences in communication as a managerial function are discussed and the implications for the workplace outlined by means of a literature review. A qualitative investigation explored the communication strategies of a woman ...

  11. Equal Educational Opportunity Strategies for Today's Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, William Bradford

    Presented here are the remarks of William Bradford Reynolds, Assistant Attorney General, Civil Rights Division at the Education Commission of the States National Project on Desegregation Strategies' Workshop. Reynolds states that mandatory busing and other remedial techniques to achieve racial balance in schools (measures tentatively sanctioned by…

  12. Educators' Perceptions on Bullying Prevention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, Corene

    2017-01-01

    I report on an investigation into a group of Free State educators' recognition of bullying, their reactions to incidences of bullying, and their perceptions of the effectiveness of a number of bullying prevention strategies. The research instrument was a synthesis of the Delaware Research Questionnaire and questions based on findings from previous…

  13. Social media in adolescent health literacy education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Carrie Kw; Bridges, Susan M; Srinivasan, Divya Parthasarathy; Cheng, Brenda Ss

    2015-03-09

    While health literacy has gained notice on a global stage, the initial focus on seeking associations with medical conditions may have overlooked its impact across generations. Adolescent health literacy, specifically in dentistry, is an underexplored area despite the significance of this formative stage on an individual's approach to healthy lifestyles and behaviors. The aim is to conduct a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of three major social media outlets - Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube - in supporting adolescents' oral health literacy (OHL) education. A random sample of 22 adolescents (aged 14-16 years) from an English-medium international school in Hong Kong provided informed consent. Sociodemographic information, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience were collected via a questionnaire. A pre- and post-test of OHL (REALD-30) was administered by two trained, calibrated examiners. Following pre-test, participants were randomly assigned to one of three social media outlets: Twitter, Facebook, or YouTube. Participants received alerts posted daily for 5 consecutive days requiring online accessing of modified and original OHL education materials. One-way ANOVA ( analysis of variance) was used to compare the mean difference between the pre- and the post-test results among the three social media. No associations were found between the social media allocated and participants' sociodemographics, including English language background, social media usage, and dental experience. Of the three social media, significant differences in literacy assessment scores were evident for participants who received oral health education messages via Facebook (P=.02) and YouTube (P=.005). Based on the results of the pilot study, Facebook and YouTube may be more efficient media outlets for OHL promotion and education among adolescent school children when compared to Twitter. Further analyses with a larger study group is warranted.

  14. Piloting interprofessional education interventions with veterinary and veterinary nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnison, Tierney; Lumbis, Rachel; Orpet, Hilary; Welsh, Perdi; Gregory, Sue; Baillie, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has received little attention in veterinary education even though members of the veterinary and nursing professions work closely together. The present study investigates veterinary and veterinary nursing students' and practitioners' experiences with interprofessional issues and the potential benefits of IPE. Based on stakeholder consultations, two teaching interventions were modified or developed for use with veterinary and veterinary nursing students: Talking Walls, which aimed to increase individuals' understanding of each other's roles, and an Emergency-Case Role-Play Scenario, which aimed to improve teamwork. These interventions were piloted with volunteer veterinary and veterinary nursing students who were recruited through convenience sampling. A questionnaire (the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale [RIPLS]) was modified for use in veterinary education and used to investigate changes in attitudes toward IPE over time (pre-intervention, immediately post-intervention, and four to five months afterward). The results showed an immediate and significant positive change in attitude after the intervention, highlighting the students' willingness to learn collaboratively, their ability to recognize the benefits of IPE, a decreased sense of professional isolation, and reduced hierarchical views. Although nearly half of the students felt concerned about learning with students from another profession before the intervention, the majority (97%) enjoyed learning together. However, the positive change in attitude was not evident four to five months after the intervention, though attitudes remained above pre-intervention levels. The results of the pilot study were encouraging and emphasize the relevance and importance of veterinary IPE as well as the need for further investigation to explore methods of sustaining a change in attitude over time.

  15. Strategy for Passivating Char Efficiently at the Pilot Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Timothy C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-01-18

    Fast pyrolysis is a promising pathway for the commercialization of liquid transportation fuels from biomass. Fast pyrolysis is performed at moderate heat (450-600 degrees Celcius) in an oxygen-deficient environment. One of the products of fast pyrolysis is biochar, which is often used as a heat source or as a soil amendment. Biochar is a partially reacted solid that is created in the production of bio-oil during fast pyrolysis. Biochar produced at these conditions contains significant quantities of carbon that adsorb oxygen when exposed to air. Biochar adsorption of oxygen is an exothermic process that may generate sufficient heat for combustion in ambient air. Biochar is also a self-insulating material which compounds the effects of heat generated internally. These factors lead to safety concerns and material handling difficulties. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory operates a pilot plant that may be configured for fast pyrolysis, gasification, and will be introducing catalytic fast pyrolysis capabilities in 2018. The TCPDU designed and installed a system to introduce oxygen to collected biochar systematically for a controlled passivation. Biochar is collected and cooled in an oxygen deficient environment during fast pyrolysis. Oxygen is then introduced to the biochar on a mass flow basis. A sparger imbedded within the biochar sample near the bottom of the bed flows air diluted with nitrogen into the char bed, and excess gasses are removed from the top of the collection drum, above the char bed. Pressure within the collection drum is measured indicating adequate flow through filters. Sample weight is recorded before and after passivation. During passivation, temperature is measured at 18 points within the char bed. Oxygen content and temperature are measured leaving the char bed. Maximum temperature parameters were established to ensure operator safety during biochar passivation. Extensive passivation data was

  16. Preschool children's social understanding: a pilot study of goals and strategies during conflict situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazura, Kerry; Flanders, Rachel

    2007-10-01

    This pilot study tested a new enactive measure of social information-processing skills and investigated whether preschool children's goals were related to their strategies during hypothetical conflict situations. Children (13 boys, 12 girls) ages 3 to 6 years (three 3-yr.-olds, three 4-yr.-olds, 11 5-yr.-olds, and eight 6-yr.-olds) engaged in a puppet interview of six hypothetical situations. Significant correlations were found between goals and strategies of the adapted version of Chung and Asher's Children's Conflict Resolution Measure, suggesting that preschool children who endorsed friendship goals tended to select more prosocial strategies (.41). Children who endorsed more retaliation goals tended to select more hostile strategies (.67) but fewer prosocial strategies (-.41), and children who endorsed more avoidance goals tended to select more adult-seeking strategies (.45).

  17. Educational Cognitive Technologies as Human Adaptation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Nesterova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modernity is characterized by profound changes in all spheres of human life caused by the global transformations on macro and micro levels of social reality. These changes allow us to speak about the present as the era of civilizational transition in the mode of uncertainty. Therefore, this situation demands qualitative transformations of human adaptive strategies and educational technologies accordingly. The dominant role in the dynamics of pedagogics and andragogy’s landscape belongs to transformative learning. The transformative learning theory is considered as the relevant approach to education of the individual, which is able to become an autonomous communicative actor of the social complexity. The article considers the cognitive technologies of social cohesion development and perspectives of their implementation in the educational dimension. In addition to implementing the principles of inclusion, equity in education, an important factor for improving social cohesion, stability and unity of society is the development of cognitive educational technologies. The key factors and foundations for the cognitive educational technologies are transversal competencies. They create the conditions for civil, public dialogue, non-violent type of communication. These “21st century skills” are extremely important for better human adaptation. One of the aspects and roots of social adaptation is social cohesion. Mutual determinations and connections between social cohesion development and transversal competences have been shown. The perspective direction of further researches is to find a methodological base for the further development of cognitive education technologies and platform for realization of innovative services for educational programs. New educational paradigm offers the concept of human adaptation as cognitive effectiveness and how to reach it through educational technologies. The article includes topics of creative thinking, teambuilding

  18. Handheld computers in nursing education: PDA pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeniger-Donohue, Rebecca

    2008-02-01

    Interest in the use and application of handheld technology at undergraduate and graduate nursing programs across the country is growing rapidly. Personal digital assistants (PDAs) are often referred to as a "peripheral brain" because they can save time, decrease errors, and simplify information retrieval at the point of care. In addition, research results support the notion that PDAs enhance nursing clinical education and are an effective student learning resource. However, most nursing programs lack the full range of technological resources to implement and provide ongoing support for handheld technology use by faculty and students. This article describes a 9-month pilot project for the initial use of PDAs by novice faculty and students at Simmons College.

  19. Creating marketing strategies for higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Lidia Białoń

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a thesis that the primary premise of creating marketing strategies for higher education institution is a three-dimensional notion of marketing. The first dimension lies in the theoretical notions of the essence of marketing, including the transactional marketing (1.0), relationship marketing (2.0) and spiritual marketing (3.0). The second dimension is formed by methods of marketing research and accurate notions of marketing, while the third are channels of marketing infor...

  20. Strategy of water resource protection and indicators: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancini, L.; Pace, G.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental integrated assessment of territorial areas allows to describe the actual status of pollution and ecosystem quality. This information can be considered as a starting point for an appropriate planning of territorial management. Integrated approach strategies will provide the possibility to obtain a sustainable balance among human social and economical needs and natural ecosystem conservation actions, extremely important for people wellness. Despite the national and regional value of these considerations, the Tiber river basin has been chosen as a case study, due to the presence of a complete spectrum of conditions and human pressures in its area. This research can be considered as one of the first studies correlating functional and structural degradation of ecosystems with human health in Italy [it

  1. Free online otolaryngology educational modules: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina; Bryson, Paul C; Sykes, Kevin J; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-04-01

    Otolaryngology residents need concise, easily accessible modules to expand educational opportunities between surgical cases. These modules should be inexpensive to create and improve learning outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether otolaryngology residents at multiple institutions used online video modules to supplement their studying for the Otolaryngology Training Exam, whether the modules had any effect on their Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores, and to obtain survey feedback about the modules. This randomized trial was conducted in 3 academic departments of otolaryngology in the United States among 37 residents enrolled in 3 otolaryngology residency programs. Residents were randomized into 2 groups, one with access to the educational modules and the other with no access. Otolaryngology training examination scores were obtained from the year prior to the intervention (2012) and the year following module access (2013). Residents with access to the modules were also surveyed to assess use and obtain feedback about the modules. Otolaryngology training examination scores improved significantly from 2012 to 2013 among both residents who had access to the modules and those who did not in the sections of head and neck, laryngology, and sleep medicine. However, scores in the sections of pediatric otolaryngology (8% increase, P = .03), otology (7% increase, P = .02), and facial plastic surgery (10% increase, P = .02) improved from 2012 to 2013 only among residents with access to the modules. All respondents rated the videos as very helpful, with a rating of 4 of 5 on a Likert scale. Online otolaryngology educational modules are an inexpensive way to expand resident learning opportunities. Despite the lack of quantifiable improvement in otolaryngology training examination scores in this study, use of online modules sends a message to otolaryngology residents that their education is a priority; self-study outside the hospital

  2. Strategies for Piloting a Breast Health Promotion Program in the Chinese-Australian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Fung Kuen; Kwok, Cannas; White, Kate; D'Abrew, Natalie; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, women from non–English-speaking backgrounds participate less frequently in breast cancer screening than English-speaking women, and Chinese immigrant women are 50% less likely to participate in breast examinations than Australian-born women. Chinese-born Australians comprise 10% of the overseas-born Australian population, and the immigrant Chinese population in Australia is rapidly increasing. We report on the strategies used in a pilot breast health promotion program, Living wi...

  3. Metacognition and Successful Learning Strategies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railean, Elena, Ed.; Alev Elçi, Ed.; Elçi, Atilla, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    Metacognition plays an important role in numerous aspects of higher educational learning strategies. When properly integrated in the educational system, schools are better equipped to build more efficient and successful learning strategies for students in higher education. "Metacognition and Successful Learning Strategies in Higher…

  4. A Pilot Study of an Exercise-Based Patient Education Program in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kersten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that physical exercise leads to numerous positive effects in PwMS. However, long-term effects of exercise may only be achievable if training is implemented in daily routine. Enabling patients to exercise regularly, we developed a patient education program focused on evidence-based information of training. PwMS were educated in neurophysiological effects of physical exercise, exercise-induced benefits for PwMS, and risk factors (e.g., weather. Fifteen PwMS were analyzed before (T0 and after (T1 a 12-week patient education. Afterwards, participants performed their exercises autonomously for 32 weeks and were tested in sustainability tests (T2. Guided interviews were carried out, additionally. Significant improvements from T0 to T1 were found in 6MWT, gait velocity, TUG, fatigue, and quality of life. Significant results of TUG and gait velocity from T1 to T2 demonstrated that participants kept few effects after the 32-week training phase. Qualitative analyses showed improved self-confidence and identified training strategies and barriers. This pilot study provides evidence that PwMS are able to acquire good knowledge about physical exercise and apply this knowledge successfully in training management. One might conclude that this exercise-based patient education seems to be a feasible option to maintain or improve patients’ integral constitution concerning physical and mental health.

  5. Developing and Piloting a Baselining Tool for Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship (ESDGC) in Welsh Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Alison; Jones, Yvonne; Claricoates, Jane; Morgan, Jan; Peters, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Mainstreaming Education for Sustainable Development in higher education is vital if graduates are to possess the abilities, skills, and knowledge needed to tackle the sustainability issues of the future. In this article we explain the development and piloting of a baselining tool, the Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship…

  6. Pilot study on microvascular anastomosis: performance and future educational prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretti, G; Colletti, G; Parrinello, G; Iavarone, A; Vannucchi, P; Deganello, A

    2017-11-30

    The introduction of microvascular free flaps has revolutionised modern reconstructive surgery. Unfortunately, access to training opportunities at standardised training courses is limited and expensive. We designed a pilot study on microvascular anastomoses with the aim of verifying if a short course, easily reproducible, could transmit microvascular skills to participants; if the chosen pre-test was predictive of final performance; and if age could influence the outcome. A total of 30 participants (10 students, 10 residents and 10 surgeons) without any previous microvascular experience were instructed and tested during a single 3 to 5 hour course. The two microanastomoses evaluated were the first ever performed by each participant. More than the half of the cohort was able to produce both patent microanastomoses in less than 2 hours; two-thirds of the attempted microanastomoses were patent. The pretest predicted decent scores from poor performances with a sensitivity of 61.5%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value of 100% and negative predictive value of 40%. Students and residents obtained significantly higher scores than surgeons. Since our course model is short, cost-effective and highly reproducible, it could be introduced and implemented anywhere as an educational prospect for preselecting young residents showing talent and natural predisposition and having ambitions towards microvascular reconstructive surgery. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  7. Strategies for Maintaining Quality in Distance Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sufiana Khatoon

    2015-01-01

    The current paper was produced with the purpose of suggesting strategies for bringing quality in distance education programs at higher education level. In recent times distance education is becoming an indispensable part of education system globally. Every institution is trying to offer their educational course through general as well through…

  8. Piloting Blended Strategies to Resolve Laboratory Capacity Issues in a First-Semester General Chemistry Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchett, Shayna; Hayes, Jack; Pfaff, Annalise; Satterfield, Emmalou T.; Skyles, Amy; Woelk, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory capacity is an issue that has plagued education for more than a century. New buildings, late night classes, and virtual laboratories have offered transitory relief at great expense. Missouri University of Science and Technology is employing blended strategies to increase capacity and student success. Blended strategies expand learning…

  9. Patient Education Strategies in Dermatology: Part 2: Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Zirwas, Matthew J.; Holder, Jessica L.

    2009-01-01

    Patient education is an important aspect of patient care in dermatology. Successful education increases patient satisfaction and results in improved outcomes and adherence. This article individually evaluates several patient-education strategies: verbal education, written information, group-based learning, audiotapes, videotapes, computer-assisted education, and the internet. The review presents the strengths and limitations of each strategy based on recognized barriers to effective patient e...

  10. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies for older mechanically ventilated critically ill patients: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Timothy S; Boyd, Julia A; Watson, Douglas; Hope, David; Lewis, Steff; Krishan, Ashma; Forbes, John F; Ramsay, Pamela; Pearse, Rupert; Wallis, Charles; Cairns, Christopher; Cole, Stephen; Wyncoll, Duncan

    2013-10-01

    To compare hemoglobin concentration (Hb), RBC use, and patient outcomes when restrictive or liberal blood transfusion strategies are used to treat anemic (Hb≤90 g/L) critically ill patients of age≥55 years requiring≥4 days of mechanical ventilation in ICU. Parallel-group randomized multicenter pilot trial. Six ICUs in the United Kingdom participated between August 2009 and December 2010. One hundred patients (51 restrictive and 49 liberal groups). Patients were randomized to a restrictive (Hb trigger, 70 g/L; target, 71-90 g/L) or liberal (90 g/L; target, 91-110 g/L) transfusion strategy for 14 days or the remainder of ICU stay, whichever was longest. Baseline comorbidity rates and illness severity were high, notably for ischemic heart disease (32%). The Hb difference among groups was 13.8 g/L (95% CI, 11.5-16.0 g/L); pliberal group (55%) than in the restrictive group (37%); relative risk was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.44-1.05; p=0.073). This trend remained in a survival model adjusted for age, gender, ischemic heart disease, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and total non-neurologic Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score at baseline (hazard ratio, 0.54 [95% CI, 0.28-1.03]; p=0.061). A large trial of transfusion strategies in older mechanically ventilated patients is feasible. This pilot trial found a nonsignificant trend toward lower mortality with restrictive transfusion practice.

  11. Health Education Strategies for Coping with Academic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to find out the significance of health education strategies for coping with academic stress. Comprehensive health education strategies for coping with academic stress can help students obtain the greatest benefits from education and become healthy and productive adults .One child out of four has an emotional, social,…

  12. Scholar garden: Educational strategy for life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Rodríguez Haros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available About five years ago, and worried about the erosion of knowledge related to the process of food production, access and safety, anagroenvironmental vegetable garden was established and named “Un pasito en grande” (A large baby step, where the use of agrochemicals (fertilizers, insecticides, herbicides, etc. are forbidden. Everything takes place with the participation of boys, girls, fathers and mothers of the Colegio Ateneo nursery school of Tezoyuca, State of Mexico. Childrens' participation has helpedspread the word about the experience and little by little, the strategy has spread to other educational spaces. The school garden has become a space to raise ecological and environmental awareness that is strengthened with daily activities and specific activities that are implemented. The school garden is based on a series of philosophical principles that help reflect upon our learning-doing; in methodological terms, its implementation is based on ethics and on the principles of permaculture.

  13. FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Programs Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, M.; Anzelon, G.; Essner, J.; Dougan, A.; Doyle, J.; Boyer, B.; Hypes, P.; Sokova, E.; Wehling, F.

    2008-01-01

    Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A and M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students

  14. FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

    2008-10-17

    Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were

  15. NICU nurse educators: what evidence supports your teaching strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2013-01-01

    One of our roles as nurse educators is to teach best practices related to patient care. However, have you ever stopped to think about what evidence supports your teaching strategies? Just as our patients deserve care that is based on the best available evidence, our learners also deserve education that is based on evidence.1-3 With so many advances in knowledge, technology, and even life itself, it is interesting that education has changed very little over the past 100 years. A study among 946 nurse educators documented that most teach the way they were taught.4 In addition, even after learning new strategies, educators often continue teaching in the manner they are most comfortable. However, this trend is beginning to change. Nurse educators are becoming increasingly aware of and willing to try new and innovative teaching strategies. Educators are also seeking out evidence-based teaching strategies and are becoming more involved in nursing education research.

  16. Effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Solares, Teodoro; Valle-Guadarrama, Salvador; Bombardiere, John; Domaschko, Max; Easter, Michael

    2009-05-01

    The effect of heating strategy on power consumption and performance of a pilot plant anaerobic digester treating chicken litter, under thermophilic conditions, has been studied. Heating strategy was evaluated using three different spans (0.2 degrees C, 0.6 degrees C, and 1.0 degree C) for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature (56.7 degrees C). The hydraulic retention time in the pilot plant digester was in the range of 32 to 37 days, varying the total solids concentration fed from 5% to 6%. The results showed that under the experimental conditions, heating was the most energy-demanding process with 95.5% of the energy used. Increments up to 7.5% and 3.8%, respectively, on mechanical and heating power consumption, were observed as the span, for triggering the temperature control system from target temperature, was increased. Under the experimental conditions studied here, an increment of 30.6% on the global biodigester performance index was observed when a span of 1.0 degree C was compared to the one of 0.2 degrees C.

  17. Evaluating meaningful learning using concept mapping in dental hygiene education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canasi, Dina M; Amyot, Cynthia; Tira, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Concept mapping, as a teaching strategy, has been shown to promote critical thinking and problem solving in educational settings. Dental clinicians must distinguish between critical and irrelevant characteristics in the delivery of care, thus necessitating reasoning skills to do so. One of the aims of the American Dental Education Association Commission on Change and Innovation (ADEA-CCI) is to identify deficiencies in curriculum which were meant to improve critical thinking and problem solving skills necessary in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to compare 2 teaching strategies, traditional lecture and lecture supported by concept mapping exercises within collaborative working groups, to determine if there is a beneficial effect on meaningful learning. For this pilot study, the study population consisted of students from 2 geographically separated associate level dental hygiene programs in the southeastern U.S. A quasi-experimental control group pre- and post-test design was used. The degree of meaningful learning achieved by both programs was assessed by comparing pre- and post-test results. Both programs experienced a significant degree of meaningful learning from pre- to post-test. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the programs on the post-test. These results were in direct contrast to research in other disciplines on concept mapping and its effect on promoting meaningful learning. Further investigation into the study's outcome was obtained through a follow-up focus group. In spite of careful attention to methodology in the development of this research project, the focus group illuminated methodological failings that potentially impacted the outcome of the study. Recommendations are underscored for future conduct of educational research of this kind.

  18. Strategies for Scientists in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Scientists have had a role in higher education since the very first institutes of higher education. While this role has evolved considerably in the last century, the period that has seen the most significant changes has been the last four decades. The rapid expansion of the higher education sector and the massification of education through the commitment of the state to free education has seen the role of scientists in higher education in Ireland swell to incorporate new responsibilities...

  19. Strategies for improving library user education programme in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determines strategies for improving library user education in universities in Benue State. The main purpose of this study is to determine the strategies for students' positive attitudes towards library user education. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design. Population of the study was 6,253 and ...

  20. Instructional Strategies to Support Creativity and Innovation in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seechaliao, Thapanee

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study focused on the instructional strategies that support creation of creative and innovative education. The sample for this study consisted of 11 experts in the field of instructional strategies that support innovation of education. Among them, five were specialists in design and development of teaching and learning, three…

  1. 2011-2015 USAID Education Strategy Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the USAID Education Strategy set forth an ambitious agenda to help solve one of the most pressing challenges facing developing countries: the lack of access to quality education for children and youth. Through this strategy, with a focus on measurable outcomes and ambitious targets, USAID transformed the conversation in the sector from…

  2. Strategies for Achieving Quality Assurance in Science Education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Strategies for Achieving Quality Assurance in Science. Education in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria. Akinbobola, A. O. & G. A. Ikitde. Abstract. This paper examined the strategies for achieving quality assurance in science education in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria. The design adopted for this study was survey design. A total of ...

  3. Free Education for Open Learning: Open educational policies, strategies & access for all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Invited Speech at the Moscow International Education Fair 2016, Moscow, Russian Federation, by Stracke, C. M. (2016, 15 April): "Free Education for Open Learning: Open educational policies, strategies & access for all"

  4. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use.

  5. Development and pilot of a low-literacy diabetes education book using social marketing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Kavin, Michelle; Añel-Tiangco, Raquel M.; Mauger, David T.; Gabbay, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The primary objective of this work was to develop a diabetes education book, to pilot its use, and to evaluate its impact on patient care. The secondary objective was to compare the value of providing only the book to patients versus providing the book along with a brief tutorial given by a nurse on how to use the book. Methods A diabetes education book was developed through a social marketing approach. The impact of the book was then tested in a pilot, prospective, randomized co...

  6. Improving the oral health of residents with intellectual and developmental disabilities: an oral health strategy and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Catherine J; Johnson, Knowlton W; Abadi, Melissa; Thompson, Kirsten; Shamblen, Stephen R; Young, Linda; Zaksek, Brigit

    2014-12-01

    This article presents an oral health (OH) strategy and pilot study focusing on individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) living in group homes. The strategy consists of four components: (1) planned action in the form of the behavioral contract and caregiver OH action planning; (2) capacity building through didactic and observation learning training; (3) environmental adaptations consisting of additional oral heath devices and strategies to create a calm atmosphere; and (4) reinforcement by post-training coaching. A pilot study was conducted consisting of pre- and post-assessment data collected 1 week before and 1 week after implementing a 1-month OH strategy. The study sample comprised 11 group homes with 21 caregivers and 25 residents with IDD from one service organization in a Midwestern city. A process evaluation found high-quality implementation of the OH strategy as measured by dosage, fidelity, and caregiver reactions to implementing the strategy. Using repeated cross-sectional and repeated measures analyses, we found statistically significant positive changes in OH status and oral hygiene practices of residents. Caregiver self-efficacy as a mechanism of change was not adequately evaluated; however, positive change was found in some but not all types of caregiver OH support that were assessed. Lessons learned from implementing the pilot study intervention and evaluation are discussed, as are the next steps in conducting an efficacy study of the OH strategy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Communication strategies and accommodations utilized by health care providers with hearing loss: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Alanna R; Matt, Susan B; Wojnara, Danuta

    2014-03-01

    Poor communication between health care providers and patients may negatively impact patient outcomes, and enhancing communication is one way to improve outcomes. Effective communication is particularly important for health care providers who have hearing loss. The authors found that a systematic survey of the communication strategies and experiences of health care providers with hearing loss had not yet been conducted. In this pilot study, 32 health care professionals with hearing loss were recruited via the Association of Medical Professionals With Hearing Losses and were asked to complete a 28-question survey. Health care providers with hearing loss already employ strategies that all health care providers are encouraged to use in order to enhance patient–provider communication, and survey participants have found the strategies to be effective. The communication techniques and assistive technologies used by individuals with hearing loss seem to be effective: All participants reported feeling able to communicate effectively with patients at least most of the time. More research is needed to determine if use of these communication techniques has similar results for health care providers without hearing loss.

  8. The Effect of Marketing Strategies Construct on Firm Performance: Results from Pilot Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal Akbar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties that face small and medium organization in any field are severe nowadays. The importance of SMEs is vital. Different researchers have proposed different success factors for small and medium organization, like finance, skilled workforce, technology, innovation and most importantly marketing. Marketing is the spine of any organization, through marketing firms bring innovation, awareness of competitors, awareness of products, building relation with customers. A good marketing strategy increases the sale of product for sure. The small and medium organization face difficulties in doing marketing, because of limited finance, limited or unskilled staff, unawareness of marketing strategies, no or less use of media. This paper presents the pilot survey result for the study of effect of marketing strategies construct (entrepreneurial, guerrilla, relationship, ambush, viral and niche marketing, on firm performance. Descriptive statistics, normality, reliability and preliminary factor analysis (EFA test were run, all the data were presented in tables below. The result shows that all the questionnaire were normally distributed, and the outcomes are all normal.

  9. ICT enabled education and ICT driven e-learning strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper centres on ICT enabled education and ICT driven e-learning strategies: benefits and setbacks in Nigeria education system. It is in fact among the academic struggle to bring to the lime-light, the knowledge of ICT to scholars especially in the domain of education. The paper captured interesting discussion on the ...

  10. Developing complex interventions: lessons learned from a pilot study examining strategy training in acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Dawson, Deirdre R; Whyte, Ellen M; Butters, Meryl A; Dew, Mary Amanda; Grattan, Emily S; Becker, James T; Holm, Margo B

    2014-04-01

    To examine the feasibility of a strategy training clinical trial in a small group of adults with stroke-related cognitive impairments in inpatient rehabilitation, and to explore the impact of strategy training on disability. Non-randomized two-group intervention pilot study. Two inpatient rehabilitation units within an academic health centre. Individuals with a primary diagnosis of acute stroke, who were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation and demonstrated cognitive impairments were included. Individuals with severe aphasia; dementia; major depressive disorder, bipolar, or psychotic disorder; recent drug or alcohol abuse; and anticipated length of stay less than five days were excluded. Participants received strategy training or an attention control session in addition to usual rehabilitation care. Sessions in both groups were 30-40 minutes daily, five days per week, for the duration of inpatient rehabilitation. We assessed feasibility through participants' recruitment and retention; research intervention session number and duration; participants' comprehension and engagement; intervention fidelity; and participants' satisfaction. We assessed disability at study admission, inpatient rehabilitation discharge, 3 and 6 months using the Functional Independence Measure. Participants in both groups (5 per group) received the assigned intervention (>92% planned sessions; >94% fidelity) and completed follow-up testing. Strategy training participants in this small sample demonstrated significantly less disability at six months (M (SE) = 117 (3)) than attention control participants (M(SE) = 96 (14); t 8 = 7.87, P = 0.02). It is feasible and acceptable to administer both intervention protocols as an adjunct to acute inpatient rehabilitation, and strategy training shows promise for reducing disability.

  11. Career Education Strategies: A UAW View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Carroll M.

    1978-01-01

    The UAW (United Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America) education director reviews organized labor's attitude toward career education and suggests a number of cooperative activities in which labor unions could and should be involved in making career education policy. (MF)

  12. Measuring Nurse Educators' Willingness to Adopt Inclusive Teaching Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levey, Janet A

    The purpose of the study was to examine the characteristics and relationships of nurse educators' teaching practices, knowledge, support, and willingness to adopt inclusive teaching strategies (WillAdITS). Adopting more inclusive teaching strategies based on universal design for instruction is an innovative way for educators to reach today's diverse student body. However, the pedagogy has not diffused into nursing education. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical multiple regression were used for analyzing data from 311 nurse educators in prelicensure and RN to BSN programs. The model explained 44.8 percent of the variance in WillAdITS. The best indicators for this pedagogy were knowledge of universal design for instruction, social system support for inclusive teaching strategies, multiple instructional formats, and years of teaching. Knowing factors influencing the adoption of inclusive teaching strategies can inform schools of nursing of areas needing further development in the preparation of novice to experienced educators to teach diverse learners.

  13. Implementation Strategies for Educational Intranet Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herson, Katie; Sosabowski, Michael; Lloyd, Andrew; Flowers, Stephen; Paine, Cameron; Newton, Becci

    2000-01-01

    Describes two alternative strategies for intranet implementation based on experiences at the University of Brighton (United Kingdom). Highlights include differing degrees of staff and student utilization; barriers to success; a unified strategy for effective intranet implementation; and how to manage organizational resistance to change.…

  14. Higher education for refugees: Lessons from a 4-year pilot project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Thomas M.; McFarland, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Refugees experience limited access to adequate education at all levels, but opportunities for higher education are especially lacking. Yet, evidence suggests that education plays an important protective role in helping refugee individuals and communities cope with their daily existence during protracted waiting periods, and the United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR) recently recognised tertiary education as a basic human right. The purpose of this paper is to present findings from the evaluation of a pilot programme, Jesuit Commons: Higher Education at the Margins (JC:HEM), which initially provided higher education to refugees in Kakuma Camp, Kenya and Dzaleka Camp, Malawi; and to urban refugees in Amman, Jordan. The authors of this note review the progress made towards the pilot objectives, as well as student feedback on the benefits and challenges of higher education for refugees and others living at the margins. The refugees interviewed in this study expressed feelings of empowerment, related to their expanded worldview as well as to a specific set of skills obtained through their participation in the programme. Interviewees also noted a number of limitations specific to the context of their living conditions. Particularly in refugee camps, students expressed concerns about what would happen after their having completed their course. The general outcome of the pilot phase, which ended in 2014, was that the programme addresses a critical need and that it should be continued, albeit with key modifications in its design and delivery. Key areas for future growth of the programme include curriculum transformation, integrated service delivery and university engagement.

  15. Strategies to promote evidence-based practice in pediatric physical therapy: a formative evaluation pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Joe; Stern, Perri; Marchetti, Gregory; Provident, Ingrid

    2009-09-01

    The physical therapy profession has been perceived as one that bases its practice largely on anecdotal evidence and that uses treatment techniques for which there is little scientific support. Physical therapists have been urged to increase evidence-based practice behaviors as a means to address this perception and to enhance the translation of knowledge from research evidence into clinical practice. However, little attention has been paid to the best ways in which to support clinicians' efforts toward improving evidence-based practice. The purpose of this study was to identify, implement, and evaluate the effectiveness of strategies aimed at enhancing the ability of 5 pediatric physical therapists to integrate scientific research evidence into clinical decision making. This study was a formative evaluation pilot project. The participants in this study collaborated with the first author to identify and implement strategies and outcomes aimed at enhancing their ability to use research evidence during clinical decision making. Outcome data were analyzed with qualitative methods. The participants were able to implement several, but not all, of the strategies and made modest self-reported improvements in evidence-based practice behaviors, such as reading journal articles and completing database searches. They identified several barriers, including a lack of time, other influences on clinical decision making, and a lack of incentives for evidence-based practice activities. The pediatric physical therapists who took part in this project had positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice and made modest improvements in this area. It is critical for the profession to continue to investigate optimal strategies to aid practicing clinicians in applying research evidence to clinical decision making.

  16. BRAZILIAN EDUCATION AND SURVIVAL STRATEGIES OF CAPITALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Almeida Sales de Melo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In discussing the theme Imperialism, Crisis and education, the essay points out aspects of our historical totality in relation to recent crises through which it passed capitalism, and its relationship to changes in Brazilian educational policies. Education remains at the heart of development projects, as a producer of knowledge, as well as guiding the processes of social conformation. They also discussed the aftermath of the crisis: the rise of social inequality and the increase of labor exploitation. Make clear our project of society and education, as resistance movements to the survival of capitalism is a necessity in building movements of counter-hegemony.

  17. Beliefs of Applied Studio Faculty on Desirable Traits of Prospective Music Education Majors: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royston, Natalie Steele; Springer, D. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the beliefs of applied music faculty on desirable traits of prospective music education majors. Researcher-designed surveys were sent electronically to applied music faculty at 12 National Association of Schools of Music-accredited institutions randomly selected from each of the four major divisions…

  18. Pilot Study of Flow and Meaningfulness as Psychological Learning Concepts in Patient Education: A Short Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicic, Sara; Nørby, Karina; Bruun Johansen, Clea

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this pilot study was to explore patient experiences of meaningfulness and flow related to group based patient education in type 2 diabetes. Meaningfulness and flow are underexposed as psychological learning concepts in patient education, and the ambition...... of this study was to investigate the applicability of these concepts of positive psychological theory in a patient education setting. Methods: This pilot study combines participating observation of group based patient education and 8 qualitative interviews with 4 patients with type 2 diabetes. Meaning...... of importance in relation to life with diabetes. However, patients only reported a few activities and situations that indicated flow states. A sense of meaningfulness occurred when the patients experienced a sense of community and connectedness, which they obtained from being together with the other patients...

  19. Rethinking Education: Strategies for Preparing Educators To Teach in a Multicultural Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Roland L., Jr.; Midgette, Thomas Earl

    1997-01-01

    Considers how institutions of higher learning can plan for change to prepare teachers for teaching in an increasingly multicultural society. Discusses empirical-rational, power-coercive, and normative-re-educative strategies. Reviews why normative-re-educative strategies are most useful for planned change in education, and presents a model of…

  20. DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY OF PARTNERSHIP OF HIGHER EDUCATION, SCIENCE AND BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mazur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the cooperation of higher education, science and business is analysed. A conflict of civilizations wave development in the confrontation of two forces: the "factory of Education" and force change is disclosed. European and Ukrainian higher education quality estimation is analysed. The effect of unsynchronization in time is educed between the necessities of business and possibilities of education and science. Reasons of bribery are exposed at higher school. The development strategy of partnership of higher education, science and business is proposed.

  1. Blue Ocean Strategy for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    In today's higher education world we see a shift in teaching and educational trends that are slowly materializing due to the advent of new technologies, new academic frameworks and the need to adapt to society's incremental advancements. The implementation of reforms, however, did not have the desired outcome since those were applied to an…

  2. Workload Management Strategies for Online Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Tena B.; Wilkinson, Kelly; Hemby, K. Virginia; McCannon, Melinda; Wiedmaier, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    With increased use of online education, both students and instructors are adapting to the online environment. Online educators must adjust to the change in responsibilities required to teach online, as it is quite intensive during the designing, teaching, and revising stages. The purpose of this study is to examine and update workload management…

  3. Social background, credential inflation and educational strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Werfhorst, H.G.; Andersen, R.

    2005-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to examine the impact of credential inflation on educational attainment in twentieth century United States. To do so, we create a measure of 'intergenerational credential inflation' (IIF) and include it in regression models predicting educational transitions. Using

  4. Leadership and Management Education and Training (LMET) Effectiveness: A Pilot Study for Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    leadership / management theory complete with a specific vocabulary. This new vocabulary allows the graduate to be able to converse easier with...AD-AlG 9 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA F/S 5/1 LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT EDUCATION AND TRAINING (LMET) EFFECTI-ECU UNLSIID JUN 81 D L...TITLE (A~d 8ItI. )o------~. .hss COVERED Leadership and Management Education and Training 198 (LMET) Effectiveness: A Pilot-Study for 6-- . *P.W..@*.On

  5. From Conant's Education Strategy to Kuhn's Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Steve

    The seminal influence of Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions on the history, philosophy, and sociology of science illustrates how changes in pedagogical demands can significantly alter patterns of research. Kuhn's book was honed as a teacher in the General Education of Science curriculum designed by Harvard President James Bryant Conant, to whom Structure is dedicated. The courses targeted non-scientists who would have to make policy decisions in the dawning Atomic Age, where science would play an increasing role, despite the public skepticism generated by the atomic bomb (which Conant administered). Conant wanted these future policy makers to be connoisseurs of science who understood problematic Big Science as continuing the basic mindset of culturally valued Little Science. This partly explains why Kuhn presented science as following the same stages, regardless of the specific science and period under discussion. I consider three other senses in Conant's curriculum left its imprint on Kuhn's research practice: the use of case histories to manufacture the internal/external history distinction; the invention of the historiographical mirage known as normal science; the application of the incommensurability thesis to create a more receptive attitude to past scientists.

  6. DEVELOPMENTAL STAGES OF THE EDUCATIONAL STRATEGY OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena I. Lokshyna

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the analysis of the evolution of the educational strategy of EU in the process of its development aimed at the economic stability and security in the region. The author distinguishes key stages of the EU strategy development in the educational area and its present-day concept underlying the importance of correspondence to the requirements of economy and society.

  7. Introducing an Educational Tool for Learning Branch & Bound Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofriesilero Zumaytis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available According to our informal survey, Branch & Bound strategy is considerably difficult to learn compared to other strategies. This strategy consists of several complex algorithmic steps such as Reduced Cost Matrix (RCM calculation and Breadth First Search. Thus, to help students understanding this strategy, AP-BB, an educational tool for learning Branch & Bound is developed. This tool includes four modules which are Brute Force solving visualization, Branch & Bound solving visualization, RCM calculator, and case-based performance comparison. These modules are expected to enhance student’s understanding about Branch & Bound strategy and its characteristics. Furthermore, our work incorporates TSP as its case study and Brute Force strategy as a baseline to provide a concrete impact of Branch & Bound strategy. According to our qualitative evaluation, AP-BB and all of its features fulfil student necessities for learning Branch & Bound strategy.

  8. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Maaytah Mohammed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ, however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70 participated in this study, patients were divided into three groups: the 1st group were involved in an attention placebo CD-ROM (contain anatomical information about the temporomandibular system, the 2nd group received information on CD-ROM designed to increase their control and self efficacy, while the 3rd group received the same programme of the 2nd group added to it an introduction to self-relaxing techniques followed by audio tape of progressive muscle relaxation exercises. Each of the groups was asked to complete a number of questionnaires on the day of initial consultation and six weeks afterwards. Results The two experimental groups (2nd & 3rd were equally effective in reducing pain, disability and distress, and both were more effective than the attention placebo group (1st, however the experimental groups appeared to have improved at follow-up relative to the placebo-group in terms of disability, pain and depressed mood. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of the design. A full, randomized, controlled trial is required to confirm the efficacy of the interventions developed here.

  9. Strategies for Achieving Quality Assurance in Science Education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the strategies for achieving quality assurance in science education in Akwa Ibom State of Nigeria. The design adopted for this study was survey design. A total of 300 science teachers randomly selected from the technical colleges and secondary schools took part in the study. Strategies for Achieving ...

  10. Coping by Copying? Higher Education Institutions' Student Recruitment Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolich, Nicoline; Brandt, Synnove; Hovdhaugen, Elisabeth; Aamodt, Per Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Growing national and international competition for students puts pressure on higher education institutions (HEIs) to develop marketing and student recruitment strategies; these are also driven by financial stress caused by performance-based funding mechanisms. In this paper we explore Norwegian HEIs' student recruitment strategies. What type of…

  11. Corruption in Education Sector Development: A Suggestion for Anticipatory Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shinichiro

    2001-01-01

    Proposes an anticipatory strategy that will help protect education sector development from corruption. The strategy, which may exist as a "hidden agenda" within a project, focuses on diagnosing rather than redressing a system thought to be corrupt, adopting prevention rather than punishment, informal rather than formal approaches, and…

  12. Consumer education and inflation-coping strategies of nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study, aiming at identifying the strategies used by women to cope with inflation, and to determine the influence of consumer education acquired at secondary and post secondary institution on strategies used by women in the study area to cope with inflation,adopted an ex post facto research approach. It found that ...

  13. strategies for implementing human rights education in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    social and emotional development of the child and by introducing democratic values. It helps learners to develop attitudes ... This work therefore attempts to explore strategies for implementing human rights education in our schools which include training of ... to life and nobody is to be denied it. Strategies for Implementing ...

  14. Application of a pilot control strategy identification technique to a joint FAA/NASA ground-based simulation of head-up displays for CTOL aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, W. F.

    1982-01-01

    A technique for measuring a pilot's control strategy was developed, evaluated, and applied to a joint FAA-NASA ground-based simulation of two competing concepts of head-up displays for use in conventional takeoff and landing aircraft. The technique, called the Non-Intrusive Pilot Identification Program (NIPIP), estimates the pilot's input-output describing function and combined pilot-vehicle performance parameters such as crossover frequency and phase margin by using a time domain model of the pilot and a least-squares identification algorithm. NIPIP functions in realtime and uses a sliding time window to maintain freshness in the data; thus time-varying characteristics in the pilot's control strategy can be measured.

  15. Strategies for Integrating Peace Education into Social Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings also identified co-curricular and instructional strategies for use in teaching the identified peace education concepts. It was recommended that the identified peace education concepts could be added to the Social Studies curriculum and the thematic approach should be used in restructuring the Social Studies ...

  16. A Study on Developing Learning Strategies in Violin Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afacan, Senol; Cilden, Seyda

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of developing a valid and reliable learning strategies scale for students receiving violin education in Departments of Music at Fine Arts High Schools. The scale was applied to 391 violin students receiving education in the 11th and 12th grades in Departments of Music at Fine Arts High Schools in the…

  17. Academic Professional Development Strategies to Facilitate Educational Changes in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Alonso, Gloria Amparo

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative within-case study explored how planned educational change in universities can be facilitated through academic professional development strategies. Thus this study attempted to shed some light on the dynamics of educational planned change in universities and their implications for academic professional development of faculty. The…

  18. Strategies to Promote Sustainability in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchin, Issa Ibrahim; Grando, Vanessa dos Santos; Marcon, Gabriela Almeida; Corseuil, Louise; Guerra, José Baltazar Salgueirinho Osório de Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to analyze strategies that promote sustainability in higher education institutions (HEIs), focusing on the case study of a federal institute of higher education in Brazil. Design/methodology/approach: The research was based on a scientific literature review on sustainability in HEIs, to identify the recurrent actions for…

  19. Strategies for Integrating Peace Education into Social Studies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gold

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... resources and resource problems in Nigeria and religion concepts into the social studies curriculum. The findings also identified co-curricular and instructional strategies for use in teaching the identified peace education concepts. It was recommended that the identified peace education concepts could be ...

  20. Corporate real estate strategies for future higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronald Beckers; Driessen Jasper

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the alignment of Corporate Real Estate (CRE) strategies of Dutch Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS) with the developments in higher education. Methodology/approach – The paper first illustrates the key developments in higher education learning and

  1. Exploring community strategies to career education in terms of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article we explore a rural community's strategies for career education from the asset-based approach in order to expand on existing career theory and models of intervention. In a qualitative case study exploring a community's expectations of career education, one of the themes that emerged from four focus group ...

  2. Students’ Performative Strategies in the Practical part of Nursing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The current political agenda has placed practical education in medium cycle education programs on the agenda with emphasis on more structured and organized teaching initiatives. This paper examines what kinds of performative strategies students employ to achieve these goals. ‘Performative...

  3. Strategies for Success in Financial Education. PDP 2009-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberger, Robin G.; Paulson, Anna L.

    2009-01-01

    The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago will host a conference, Financial Literacy, Financial Education, and the Federal Reserve: Strategies for Success, on September 11, 2009. This article reviews some of the financial education activities throughout the Federal Reserve System. The topics these initiatives cover include financial skill building,…

  4. Educations of Vision - relational strategies in visual culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Helene

    2004-01-01

    The article is divided into three parts. Through examples from twentieth century Scandinavian visual arts education the first part ?Epistemological inquiries? discusses how the historical and social construction of dominant modern strategies of vision has occurred. The second part ?Experimentalist...... redescriptions? employs poststructuralist and feminist thinking about visual culture in an attempt to explore alternative understandings of visual education. In the final part ?Educations of vision in late modernity? socialization and self creation are proposed as two different, but supplementary, educational...... functions which contemporary visual education inspired by epistemological and experimentalist approaches should aim to fulfill....

  5. Research on the Competitive Strategy of Cross-Border E-Commerce Comprehensive Pilot Area Based on the Spatial Competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By now, 13 cross-border e-commerce comprehensive pilot areas have been approved by the State Council of China; Dalian and Tianjin are two of them. But with the development of the construction of the cross-border e-commerce comprehensive pilot areas, the competition between those pilot areas is inevitable. Dalian and Tianjin are located in the Bohai Sea and the distance between them is only 800 kilometers. For Dalian and Tianjin they are in thus competitive situations: first they have to compete with each other; second since they are located in Bohai Sea (North China, they have to compete with other cross-border e-commerce comprehensive pilot areas (South China. In this paper, our aim is to build models to provide best price strategies for these two cities. Based on the two-sided market theory and the geographical position, this paper builds two competitive theory models. Through the analyzing of the equilibrium, we get two main results: (1 according to different service area, the cities (Dalian and Tianjin should have different price; (2 the two-sided market characters have an impact on their strategies.

  6. INTERNAL MARKETING STRATEGY IN A HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aléssio Bessa Sarquis

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Internal marketing comprises the set of strategies to enable internally compliance of the organization's marketing promises. This study examines the use of internal marketing strategies in a higher education institution in the process of implementing a new educational model. This is one case study with qualitative and exploratory approach. The data collection techniques used were interviews and document analysis, interpreted through content analysis. The results show that the most commonly used strategies are: implementation of employee training programs; development of materials / guidance handouts; creating web blog; and the application of internal research. The testimonies indicate that the internal marketing strategies contributed to the implementation of new educational model, but there is dissatisfaction among managers with the internal marketing program of the institution.

  7. STRATEGI PEMBERDAYAAN EKONOMI KOMUNITAS WARIA MELALUI LIFE SKILL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rr. Indah Mustikawati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Strategi Pemberdayaan Ekonomi Komunitas Waria Melalui Life Skill Education. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui penurunan jumlah waria yang “turun ke jalan” yang berprofesi sebagai Pekerja Seks Komersial melalui life skill education dan pengaruhnya terhadap jumlah pendapatan yang diterima waria dari sumber yang “halal”, serta penurunan kemiskinan komunitas waria di Kotamadya Yogyakarta. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode Research and Development dengan empat tahapan, yaitu studi pendahuluan pengembangan, penyusunan desain, uji coba model, dan evaluasi hasil pengembangan model life skill education. Keempat tahapan tersebut dilakukan untuk menemukan model yang sesuai untuk strategi pemberdayaan ekonomi bagi komunitas waria. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa semua waria menginginkan untuk memiliki kompetensi tambahan yang dapat digunakan untuk merintis usaha sesuai dengan peminatan mereka, dan menambah penghasilan mereka, dan sebagai bekal di hari tua.   Kata Kunci: Strategi Pemberdayaan Ekonomi, Pengentasan kemiskinan, Waria   Abstract: Economy Empowerment Strategy Trough Life skill Education as Poverty Reduction of Transgender Community. Aims of this research are to determine reduction number of transgender working as prostitute through life skill education and the impact of that reduction on their halal income, to examine poverty reduction among transgender communities in Yogyakarta. This study uses four-steps of research and development approach, namely preliminary study development, design preparation, model test, life skill education model evaluations. The results show that all of the transgender involved in this study yearn for having additional skill to set new business up to increase their income.   Keywords: economic empowerment strategy, poverty eradication, transgender

  8. Innovative Research Strategies for Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Bridget N.

    2007-01-01

    An internal, ongoing debate that all professional areas of study have is how to understand the impact of shifting economies, demographics, technologies, and globalization. Much business education research focuses on describing current practices. To this end, issues are often addressed by using surveys that are analyzed using descriptive analysis…

  9. Community strategies of women in educational management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Against the background of the continued under representation of women in education management abroad and in South Africa, gender differences in communication as a managerial function are discussed and the implications for the workplace outlined by means of a literature review. A qualitative investigation explored the ...

  10. Bullying Prevention Strategies in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2017-01-01

    Bullying is a serious problem that affects the young children's well being. Early childhood educators find it difficult to manage bullying in the classroom. Preschool is the first environment outside of the home setting where children encounter difficulties when they socially interact with their peers. Based on the principles of protecting and…

  11. Sharing Special Education Strategies in Rural Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamberger, Cynthia T.

    2014-01-01

    As a former special education teacher at the elementary, middle and high school levels, many unique and complex learning situations were encountered. The author, who was a junior faculty member on her initial trip to Kenya, experienced a very challenging, yet rewarding, learning opportunity with teachers gathered in a community located in rural…

  12. Brain Research Strategies for Physical Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Connie L.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a follow-up to an article by the author published in the November/December 2003 issue of JOPERD, that examined the research supporting the idea that movement enhances cognitive learning. In this follow-up article the author shows how physical educators can apply this information, in a variety of ways. The following outlines some of…

  13. New Strategies for Early Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Annie L.

    This paper focuses on the humanistic characteristics futurists predict will be needed by individuals who live in a more interdependent world and projects ways early childhood educators can teach children to deal with changing aspects of the world. Briefly discussed are teaching approaches for incorporating the coping and creative characteristics…

  14. Supervision and Quality Assurance Strategies in Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    developing counties the case has been that of continuous falling in the standard and quality of their education. In fact, in some, it is near collapse. This paper found ... regarded as the instrument for development and integration, hence concerted efforts are always made to ensure that the system is on course through effective ...

  15. Repositioning teacher education: Strategy for equipping the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The past decade has seen globalization and emerging technologies fundamentally transforming every society (developing and developed alike) by creating a knowledge economy that influences the way people live and interact with one another. Obviously, the teacher is quite conversant with the processes of education, ...

  16. Higher Education Institutions: A Strategy towards Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarejos, Fabricio; Frota, Mauricio Nogueira; Gustavson, Laura Morten

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to guide higher education institutions (HEIs) in accomplishing sustainability goals while strengthening their associated systems and processes. Pursuing this goal, this study proposes a conceptual framework for modeling the HEI organizational environment; a set of strategic sustainability actions to drive…

  17. Impacts of an In-Service Education Program on Promoting Language Development in Young Children: A Pilot Study with Early Childhood Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, Nerina; Rose, Tanya; Pee, Jerrine; Webb, Kylie

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood educators (ECEs) play an important role in fostering language development in young children. In-service education, led by speech-language pathologists (SLPs), has a potential role in educating ECEs about language development. In this pilot study, 42 ECEs attended an in-service education program and completed pre- and…

  18. Educational Strategies and Extent of Cooperation with Agri-Educators by Selected Agribusinesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubadigbo, Fidelis N.; Gamon, Julia A.

    A study examined the educational strategies used by three Iowa agribusinesses--livestock feed, chemical/fertilizer production and distribution, and seed production and distribution. The goals of the study were to identify (1) different educational strategies used by the three types of agribusinesses, (2) the extent of cooperation between the…

  19. Nursing students' perceptions of a video-based serious game's educational value: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hege M; Fossum, Mariann; Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; Fruhling, Ann; Slettebø, Åshild

    2018-03-01

    Despite an increasing number of serious games (SGs) in nursing education, few evaluation studies specifically address their educational value in terms of face, content, and construct validity. To assess nursing students' perceptions of a video-based SG in terms of face, content, and construct validity. In addition, the study assessed perceptions of usability, individual factors, and preferences regarding future use. A pilot study was conducted. An SG prototype was implemented as part of two simulation courses in nursing education: one for home health care and one for hospital medical-surgical wards. The SG aimed to teach clinical reasoning and decision-making skills to nursing students caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A total of 249second-year nursing students participated in pilot testing of the SG. A paper-based survey was used to assess students' perceptions of the SG's educational value. Overall, students from both simulation courses perceived the SG as educationally valuable and easy to use. No significant differences were found in perceptions of educational value between nursing students with previous healthcare experience versus those with none. However, significantly more students in the home healthcare simulation course indicated that the SG tested their clinical reasoning and decision-making skills. Students from both the medical-surgical and home healthcare simulation courses suggested that more video-based SGs should be developed and used in nursing education. Overall, the survey results indicate that the participants perceived the SG as educationally valuable, and that the SG has potential as an educational tool in nursing education, especially in caring for patients with chronic diseases and in home healthcare simulation. Showing a SG's educational value and user acceptance among nursing students may justify the development and application of more SGs in nursing education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Strategies and opportunities to STOP colon cancer in priority populations: pragmatic pilot study design and outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronado, Gloria D; Turner, Ann; Sanchez, Jennifer; Retecki, Sally; Nelson, Christine; Green, Beverly; Vollmer, William M; Petrik, Amanda; Aguirre, Josue; Kapka, Tanya; DeVoe, Jennifer; Puro, Jon; Miers, Tran; Lembach, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal-cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and Latinos have particularly low rates of screening. Strategies and Opportunities to STOP Colon Cancer in Priority Populations (STOP CRC) is a partnership among two research institutions and a network of safety net clinics to promote colorectal cancer screening among populations served by these clinics. This paper reports on results of a pilot study conducted in a safety net organization that serves primarily Latinos. The study assessed two clinic-based approaches to raise rates of colorectal-cancer screening among selected age-eligible patients not up-to-date with colorectal-cancer screening guidelines. One clinic each was assigned to: (1) an automated data-driven Electronic Health Record (EHR)-embedded program for mailing Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) kits (Auto Intervention); or (2) a higher-intensity program consisting of a mailed FIT kit plus linguistically and culturally tailored interventions delivered at the clinic level (Auto Plus Intervention). A third clinic within the safety-net organization was selected to serve as a passive control (Usual Care). Two simple measurements of feasibility were: 1) ability to use real-time EHR data to identify patients eligible for each intervention step, and 2) ability to offer affordable testing and follow-up care for uninsured patients. The study was successful at both measurements of feasibility. A total of 112 patients in the Auto clinic and 101 in the Auto Plus clinic met study inclusion criteria and were mailed an introductory letter. Reach was high for the mailed component (92.5% of kits were successfully mailed), and moderate for the telephone component (53% of calls were successful completed). After exclusions for invalid address and other factors, 206 (109 in the Auto clinic and 97 in the Auto Plus clinic) were mailed a FIT kit. At 6 months, fecal test completion rates were higher in the Auto (39.3%) and Auto Plus (36.6%) clinics

  1. Strategies for Maintaining Quality in Distance Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufiana Khatoon MALIK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper was produced with the purpose of suggesting strategies for bringing quality in distance education programs at higher education level. In recent times distance education is becoming an indispensable part of education system globally. Every institution is trying to offer their educational course through general as well through distance education means in order to make market for its programs. There is need to introduce quality distance education programs. It can be done through bringing quality in the curriculum and instruction of distance education programs, providing students quality support services, training faculty members in innovative methods of instruction of distance education, provision of technical support for promotion of research culture, adopting multiple ways of assessment of distance students, developing code of ethics for distance education faculty members and students, provision of quality infrastructure and technology, launching courses of distance education only through approval of national accreditation council for distance education (NACDE and taking measures of check at every delivery system of distance education courses through quality control agencies.

  2. Hypertension Education Intervention with Ugandan Nurses Working in Hospital Outpatient Clinic: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs pose a significant global burden in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that, by 2025, 41.7% of males and 38.7% of females in Sub-Saharan Africa will develop high blood pressure (HBP. This is particularly true in Uganda with hypertensive prevalence rates estimated to range from 22.5% to 30.5%. Coupled with low levels of detection, treatment, and control, hypertension represents a Ugandan public health crisis. An innovative WHO-ISH education program culturally was adapted in a pilot study and focused on knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA of nurses caring for hypertensive patients in an outpatient clinic. Pre-post intervention data was collected and analyzed in which significant improvements were noted on all the three outcome measures. This pilot study demonstrated that nurses’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes could be significantly improved with a multimodal education program implemented in a low resource environment.

  3. A listening skill educational intervention for pediatric rehabilitation clinicians: A mixed-methods pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Servais, Michelle; Shepherd, Tracy A; Willoughby, Colleen; Bolack, Linda; Moodie, Sheila; Baldwin, Patricia; Strachan, Deborah; Knickle, Kerry; Pinto, Madhu; Parker, Kathryn; McNaughton, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    To prepare for an RCT by examining the effects of an educational intervention on the listening skills of pediatric rehabilitation clinicians, piloting study procedures, and investigating participants' learning experiences. Six experienced clinicians received the intervention, consisting of video simulations and solution-focused coaching regarding personal listening goals. Self- and observer-rated measures of listening skill were completed and qualitative information was gathered in interviews and a member checking session. Significant change on self-reported listening skills was found from pre- to post-test and/or follow-up. The pilot provided useful information to improve the study protocol, including the addition of an initial orientation to listening skills. Participants found the intervention to be a highly valuable and intense learning experience, and reported immediate changes to their clinical and interprofessional practice. The educational intervention has the potential to be an effective means to enhance the listening skills of practicing pediatric rehabilitation clinicians.

  4. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinira Magali Fortuna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. METHOD: groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". CONCLUSIONS: continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  5. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Matumoto, Silvia; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa; Camargo-Borges, Celiane; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2013-01-01

    to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  6. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Valentina B

    2009-04-01

    There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients' disease management, medication compliance and from there patients' quality of life. To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner's visits and hospitalizations are expected. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71), attending pharmacies - intervention group; and 43 individuals - control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. PARAMETERS ASSESSED DURING THE FOUR STAGES OF THE PROGRAM WERE: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner's visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients' health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients' pain, decrease in the physician's visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care. Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient's quality of life.

  7. Game-based online antenatal breastfeeding education: A pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassley, Jane S; Connor, Kelley C; Bond, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the Healthy Moms intervention on antenatal breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention and to determine the feasibility of using an online game-based learning platform to deliver antenatal breastfeeding education. The Internet has potential for improving breastfeeding rates through improving women's access to antenatal breastfeeding education. Twelve computer-based breastfeeding education modules were developed using an online learning platform. Changes in participants' breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention pre- and post-intervention were measured using descriptive statistics and a one-way ANOVA. Of the 25 women submitting the pretest, four completed zero quests; seven, orientation only; eight, one to six breastfeeding quests; and six, 10 to 12 breastfeeding quests. No significant differences in breastfeeding self-efficacy and intention were found among the groups. Online antenatal breastfeeding education is feasible; however, further research is warranted to determine if it can affect breastfeeding outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pilot Use of Digital Educational Comics in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilikopoulou, M.; Retalis, S.; Nezi, M.; Boloudakis, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a case study about the use of digital comics in teaching modern Greek in high schools (aged 12-13). The ultimate goal of the educational use of digital comics is to promote students' acquisition of language skills and to help them apply their imaginations and reuse their cultural experiences in creating multimodal comic-like…

  9. Athletic training continuing education needs assessment: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, T G

    1994-03-01

    Continuing education for certified athletic trainers is both required and essential. The purpose of this study was to determine the need, including solutions and priorities, for continuing education for athletic trainers in various employment settings. Focus group sessions were conducted during the Spring 1992 District 4 meeting of the National Athletic Trainers Association. Representatives for each of the following employment settings were selected from the preregistration list and invited to participate: high school (7 participated), college/university (8), corporate/industrial (6), professional (3), and clinical (8). Data were compiled from written lists and audio cassette recordings of group discussions. Focus group participants across all employment settings felt that their primary continuing education needs were not being addressed at district meetings. Less traditional topics (eg, ergonomics, budgeting, public relations, and functional capacity evaluations) were identified as the more essential education needs. Focus group opinions varied somewhat regarding specific topics and methods of presentation. Recommendations included a more thematic approach to topics and presentations and ample opportunities for work or discussions in small groups. Results of the focus groups could impact the professional preparation of athletic trainers.

  10. Concussion Education for High School Football Players: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasse-Cohick, Nancy J.; Shapley, Kathy L.

    2014-01-01

    This survey study compared high school football players' knowledge and attitudes about concussion before and after receiving concussion education. There were no significant changes in the Concussion Attitude Index. Results revealed a statistically significant difference in the athletes' scores for the Concussion Knowledge Index, "t"(244)…

  11. Pilot intervention outcomes of an educational program for biospecimen research participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Marc T; Saad-Harfouche, Frances G; Ciupak, Gregory L; Davis, Warren; Moysich, Kirsten; Hargrave, Nikia Clark; Ambrosone, Christine B; Walker, Charles; Erwin, Deborah O

    2013-03-01

    Biospecimen banking programs are critically dependent on participation of diverse population members. The purpose of this study was to test a pilot intervention to enhance recruitment to a biospecimen bank among racially diverse community members. A mixed methods, community-based participatory research (CBPR) orientation was used to develop and pilot an intervention to educate and recruit participants to a biospecimen bank. Pre- and post-assessments of knowledge about research, perceived costs and benefits of participation (expected utility), and emotional states associated with research participation (affective associations) as well as post-intervention participation in biobanking were examined to determine intervention effectiveness. The pilot intervention educated 148 community members; 107 (73 %) donated blood and 77 (52 %) completed a 36-page lifestyle questionnaire. Thirty-two percent of participants were African American and 11 % were Native American. Participating in the educational program significantly reduced negative affect associated with research involving collection of genetic material or completion of a survey. Improved knowledge and understanding of biobanking and research through a CBPR approach are likely to increase participation rates in biobanking for diverse community members. Accurate information and improved knowledge can reduce individual anxiety and concerns that serve as barriers to research participation.

  12. Using pilot data to size a two-arm randomized trial to find a nearly optimal personalized treatment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laber, Eric B; Zhao, Ying-Qi; Regh, Todd; Davidian, Marie; Tsiatis, Anastasios; Stanford, Joseph B; Zeng, Donglin; Song, Rui; Kosorok, Michael R

    2016-04-15

    A personalized treatment strategy formalizes evidence-based treatment selection by mapping patient information to a recommended treatment. Personalized treatment strategies can produce better patient outcomes while reducing cost and treatment burden. Thus, among clinical and intervention scientists, there is a growing interest in conducting randomized clinical trials when one of the primary aims is estimation of a personalized treatment strategy. However, at present, there are no appropriate sample size formulae to assist in the design of such a trial. Furthermore, because the sampling distribution of the estimated outcome under an estimated optimal treatment strategy can be highly sensitive to small perturbations in the underlying generative model, sample size calculations based on standard (uncorrected) asymptotic approximations or computer simulations may not be reliable. We offer a simple and robust method for powering a single stage, two-armed randomized clinical trial when the primary aim is estimating the optimal single stage personalized treatment strategy. The proposed method is based on inverting a plugin projection confidence interval and is thereby regular and robust to small perturbations of the underlying generative model. The proposed method requires elicitation of two clinically meaningful parameters from clinical scientists and uses data from a small pilot study to estimate nuisance parameters, which are not easily elicited. The method performs well in simulated experiments and is illustrated using data from a pilot study of time to conception and fertility awareness. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Strategies of Raising the Quality of Higher Education and Attaining Equality of Educational Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskiy, Igor V.; Agapova, Elena N.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the research is to develop the policy and strategy recommendations to increase the quality of higher education in Russian Federation. The study examines the significance of equal educational opportunities and the influence of this factor on the educational systems of developing countries. Transformational processes in the domain of…

  14. Designing an educational strategy for increasing organ donor registration among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kimberly; Jones, Linda L

    2008-12-01

    Older adults (50-70 years of age) have lower organ donor registration rates than younger adults. Despite recent increases in organ donation registration of adults 18 to 49 years of age, the increase in older adult registrations is less. To use research results from surveys and focus groups to inform an educational strategy and design for the older adult population. Pooled survey data from 3 statewide random-digit dial telephone interview surveys of 6230 adults, including 2631 respondents age 50 or older, were used to identify barriers to organ donor registration and information needs of older adults compared with younger adults. Two focus groups with older adults were used to further identify barriers and to pilot test messages for an educational strategy for older adults. Surveys were conducted with adults in Ohio. Focus groups were conducted in 2 major cities in Ohio with older adults, 50 to 70 years of age. Survey results indicate that older adults and younger adults differ on several factors regarding their beliefs, attitudes, and behavior concerning organ donation. Although older adults express positive attitudes toward donation, they often "opt out" from registering to be organ donors for age and health reasons. Focus groups show similar barriers to organ donor registration and indicate that brochures are a preferred way to educate older adults about organ donation. Using research results to identify barriers and information needs of specific demographic groups is very important in designing a targeted educational strategy. An educational campaign addressing the concerns and information needs of this age group could increase organ donor registration.

  15. Understanding mobile VLE usage in distance education: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Mwanza-Simwami, Daisy; Kirkwood, Adrian; Thomas, Rhodri; Woods, William; Cross, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a mobile virtual learning environment (VLE) usage study conducted at a United Kingdom (UK) based distance education institution. A total of 207 undergraduate students participated in the study over a period of 6 months. Study participants were recruited through email invitation. An online survey was conducted to gather both quantitative and qualitative data about (i) learner characteristics, (ii) awareness about the existence of the mobile VLE system...

  16. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkova VB

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients’ disease management, medication compliance and from there patients’ quality of life.Objective: To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner’s visits and hospitalizations are expected.Methods: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71, attending pharmacies – intervention group; and 43 individuals – control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. Results: Parameters assessed during the four stages of the program were: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner’s visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients’ health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients’ pain, decrease in the physician’s visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care.Conclusions: Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient’s quality of life.

  17. Evidence-informed strategies for undergraduate nutrition education: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Genevieve; Bettger, William; Buchholz, Andrea; Kulak, Verena; Racey, Megan

    2015-07-01

    This review focuses on evidence-informed strategies to enhance learning in undergraduate nutrition education. Here, we describe the general shift in undergraduate education from a teacher-centered model of teaching to a student-centered model and present approaches that have been proposed to address the challenges associated with this shift. We further discuss case-based, project-based, and community-based learning, patient simulation, and virtual clinical trials as educational strategies to improve students' critical thinking and problem-solving skills; these strategies are well suited to the teaching of undergraduate nutrition. The strategies are defined, and we discuss the potential benefits to students and how they can be applied specifically to the teaching of undergraduate nutrition. Finally, we provide a critical analysis of the limitations associated with these techniques and propose several directions for future research, including research methodologies that may best evaluate teaching strategies in terms of both teaching and learning outcomes. Consideration of these evidence-informed strategies is warranted, given their ability to encourage students to develop relevant skills that will facilitate their transition beyond the university classroom.

  18. Web site as a strategy in the education for sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Teresa Dávila Sanabria

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the theoretical and methodological aspects in creating learning environments through the design and the implementation of a website to support research processes conducted in the school vegetable garden are presented. The methodological design was framed in the participatory action research with education and teaching strategies based on the use of information and communication technology (ICT, generating along with children and parents, learning environments that are constitute as tools in teaching education for sustainability.

  19. Spiritual Nursing Care Education An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Hand, Mikel

    The failure of nursing schools to integrate spiritual nursing care education into the curriculum has contributed to a lack in nurses' spiritual care ability. Developing, integrating, and testing a Spiritual Care Nursing Education strategy in an Associates of Science nursing program significantly increased the perceived spiritual care competence of student nurses. Utilizing a faculty team to develop learning activities to address critical spiritual care attributes offers a method to integrate spiritual nursing care content throughout the curriculum in ASN and BSN programs.

  20. Bridging the gap: evaluation of a pilot project to facilitate use of psychosocial strategies across an occupational therapy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Sarah K; Stube, Jan; Bass, Gail

    2015-04-01

     The integration of psychosocial strategies into pediatric and physical disabilities coursework presents an issue of importance to advancing the outcomes for both occupational therapy education and practice. After curriculum mapping and modification to course content, a retrospective student survey and review of educational outcomes were undertaken in one curriculum. The programmatic formative evaluation results demonstrated that all students felt moderately prepared to use cognitive-behavioral strategies in their future practices, preferring behavioral strategies over cognitive strategies for changing client thinking. Implications for the importance of integration of psychosocial content across curricula and for future study of effective teaching methods within classroom learning activities and fieldwork are included.

  1. Effectiveness of a serious game for medical education on insulin therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Leandro A; Gordan, Pedro A; Esteves, Roberto Z; Coelho, Izabel C M M

    2015-10-01

    We report the preliminary assessment of InsuOnline©, a serious game designed for medical education on insulin therapy. We conducted a pilot study with 41 undergraduate medical students and Internal Medicine residents to assess the educational effectiveness of InsuOnline©, as compared to a traditional educational activity (lecture, cases discussion). Knowledge, skills and beliefs on insulin therapy were evaluated by a questionnaire applied before, immediately after, and 3 months after both interventions. Mean knowledge/skills score was improved from 68% to 89% in traditional education group (n = 23; p game group (n = 18; p education group, and to 78% in game group; p game group than in traditional education group at baseline (p = 0.04), no difference remained between groups either immediately or 3 months post-intervention. Score increment was better with the game (29%) than with traditional education (21%; p = 0.04). Beliefs improved in the game group only. InsuOnline© is at least as effective as a traditional educational activity for medical education on insulin therapy, and it can a good option for large-scale continuing medical education on diabetes.

  2. Pilot study of a budget-tailored culinary nutrition education program for undergraduate food science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrison, Dorothy Adair

    The primary objective of this pilot study is to provide evidence that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program is both appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students both in everyday life as well as their future health careers. Two validated programs were combined into one program in order to evaluate their combined effects: Cooking With a Chef and Cooking Matters at the Store. The secondary objective of this pilot study is to evaluate the components and reliability of a questionnaire created specifically for this pilot study. A review of past literature was written, which included culinary nutrition as a source of primary prevention, the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition, and the importance of incorporating cost with culinary nutrition. Based on the literature review, it was determined that a budget-tailored culinary nutrition program was appropriate and applicable to undergraduate food science students interested in pursuing health-related careers. The pilot study design was a semi-crossover study: all four groups received the program, however, two groups were first treated as the control groups. All fifty-four participants received 5 sessions of culinary nutrition information from Cooking With a Chef, collaboratively delivered by a nutrition educator and a chef, and one session of information about shopping healthy on a budget from Cooking Matters at the Store in the form of a grocery store tour led by the nutrition educator. Three questionnaires were administered to the participants that evaluated culinary nutrition and price knowledge, cooking attitudes, and opinions of the programs' relevance to participants' everyday lives and careers. Two of the questionnaires, including a questionnaire developed specifically for the pilot study, were delivered as a pre- and post-test while the third questionnaire was delivered as a post-test. Eight random participants also partook in a focus group session led by the nutrition

  3. Evaluating Boy Scout Geology Education, A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, R. S.; Thomson, B.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated geology knowledge acquisition by Boy Scouts through use of the Boy Scout Geology Merit Handbook. In this study, boys engaged in hands-on interactive learning following the requirements set forth in the Geology Merit Badge Handbook. The purposes of this study were to determine the amount of geology content knowledge engendered in adolescent males through the use of the Geology Merit Badge Handbook published by the Boy Scouts of America; to determine if single sex, activity oriented, free-choice learning programs can be effective in promoting knowledge development in young males; and to determine if boys participating in the Scouting program believed their participation helped them succeed in school. Members of a local Boy Scout Troop between the ages of 11 and 18 were invited to participate in a Geology Merit Badge program. Boys who did not already possess the badge were allowed to self-select participation. The boys' content knowledge of geology, rocks, and minerals was pre- and post-tested. Boys were interviewed about their school and Scouting experiences; whether they believed their Scouting experiences and work in Merit Badges contributed to their success in school. Contributing educational theories included single-sex education, informal education with free-choice learning, learning styles, hands-on activities, and the social cognitive theory concept of self-efficacy. Boys who completed this study seemed to possess a greater knowledge of geology than they obtained in school. If boys who complete the Boy Scout Geology Merit Badge receive additional geological training, their field experiences and knowledge acquired through this learning experience will be beneficial, and a basis for continued scaffolding of geologic knowledge.

  4. Postnatal cytomegalovirus infection: a pilot comparative effectiveness study of transfusion safety using leukoreduced-only transfusion strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Meghan; Mayock, Dennis; Knezevic, Andrea; Norby-Slycord, Colette; Kleine, Elizabeth; Patel, Ravi; Easley, Kirk; Josephson, Cassandra

    2016-08-01

    The optimal mitigation strategy to prevent transfusion transmission of cytomegalovirus (TT-CMV) in preterm very low birthweight infants remains debated. Hospitals caring for this patient population have varied practices. A prospective observational comparative effectiveness pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility for a larger study. The pilot was carried out at hospitals using a leukoreduction (LR)-only transfusion strategy. Specimen and data collection for this study was performed in a similar approach to a study completed at Emory University that employed the CMV-seronegative plus LR approach. All testing was performed at one laboratory. The rates of TT-CMV using the two transfusion strategies were compared. Zero incidence of TT-CMV was detected in infants (n = 20) transfused with LR-only blood (0/8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-25.3%) and is consistent with the previously reported zero incidence of TT-CMV finding in a cohort of infants transfused with CMV-negative plus LR blood (0/310; 95% CI, 0%-0.9%). The seroprevalence rate among enrolled mothers (n = 17) was 60%. Forty percent of those infants (8/20) received 43 transfusions; five were transfused with one or more CMV-seropositive blood components. One infant had tested positive for CMV before receiving blood transfusions; the infant's mother was CMV immunoglobulin (Ig)G positive and IgM negative. Using the LR-only transfusion approach, zero cases of TT-CMV were detected in this pilot study. A larger study is needed to reliably determine the most effective strategy for prevention of TT-CMV in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  5. Targeting Millennials: Social Media Strategies within Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Whitney L.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative survey method with an online questionnaire as the data collection tool, the author surveyed 189 social media managers working at American Higher Education institutions to identify forms of social media in use, along with the most popular strategies that colleges and universities use with Facebook.

  6. The role of educational strategies to reverse the inverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We also present a conceptual framework for developing best practice educational strategies to reverse the inverse performance spiral in academically isolated rural hospitals. Doctors felt that participation in relevant learning activities improved their competence, increased the levels of job satisfaction they experienced ...

  7. Strategies for Implementing Human Rights Education in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human rights education promotes understanding and friendship among people and nations of the world. It is very essential because, it is used to affirm that all individuals, irrespective of status, have moral rights which a society should not deny. This work therefore attempts to explore strategies for implementing human rights ...

  8. Teaching Strategies and Gender in Higher Education Instrumental Studios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, Katie

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates instrumental music teaching strategies in higher education settings, in order to identify those employed and their frequency and context of use. An instrument- and gender-balanced sample of 24 lessons from five institutions was analysed using a researcher-designed observational instrument. The results reveal the…

  9. Strategies for Advising Disabled Students for Postsecondary Education. [Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Rhona C.; Baker, Bonnie

    This fact sheet suggests several strategies for counseling students with disabilities who are considering postsecondary education opportunities. It was designed to assist those who advise or counsel students with disabilities in high school, community and junior colleges, career training schools, vocational technical schools, 4-year colleges,…

  10. Globalisation: Old and New Normative Strategies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulby, David

    2012-01-01

    The recession has concealed from many commentators in the West the overwhelming economic force of the last decade, the inexorable rise of China. Commensurate with this has been the economic and political decline of Europe and especially of the European Union. The European normative strategy in education was always an unrealised ideal. But, if the…

  11. Service Strategies for Higher Educational Institutions Based on Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amit K.; Javalgi, Rajshekhar; Whipple, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, higher education institutions in the U.S. have faced increased competition and expenditures coupled with declines in financial support. Furthermore, they often have been forced to cater to the needs of an increasingly diverse group of students and must design service strategies based on the unique needs of each group. This…

  12. Strategies for Promoting Pluralism in Education and the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Lynne Brodie, Ed.; Cleckley, Betty Jane, Ed.; McClure, Marilyn, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Multiculturalism: A Matter of Essentiality" (Betty Jane Cleckley assisted by Boyd Evans and Jonathan Porter); "A Deconstructionist Approach to Multicultural Education" (Susan Marnell Weaver); "Intercultural Communication Competence: A Strategy for a Multicultural Campus" (Bertram W.…

  13. Health insurance education strategies for increasing the insured ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The older population in most developing countries are uninsured and lack access to health services. This study assessed the extent to which a multi-strategy health insurance education intervention would increase the number of insured among the older population in rural Kenya. Methods: The ...

  14. Comparison of Two Educational Strategies in Teaching Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup-Benham, Christine A.; And Others

    This study assessed the impact of two educational strategies: text only versus text plus small group discussion, among two groups of third-year internal medicine clerkship students in a preventive cardiology course. The course was a required, 12-week Internal Medical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch. The first group reviewed…

  15. Efficacy of learning strategies instruction in adult basic education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Michael F.; Mellard, Daryl F.

    2011-01-01

    Results from randomized controlled trials of learning strategies instruction with 375 adult basic education (AE) participants are reported. Reading outcomes from whole group strategic instruction in one of four learning strategies were compared to outcomes of reading instruction delivered in the context of typical adult education units on social studies, history, and science. Both experimental and control conditions experienced high attrition and low attendance, resulting in only 105 control and 100 experimental participants’ data in outcome analyses for the trials of the four learning strategies. Reading outcomes for these completers were not significantly different between experimental and control conditions, and each group achieved minimal gains. We discuss possible reasons for the non-significant effect from the intervention, including insufficient instructional dosage. PMID:22121409

  16. Future Learning Strategy and ePortfolios in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dorninger

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid change of the information andknowledge Society does no stop at education:communication, teaching and learning are changing due todigital media. Therefore at Austrian schools a “FutureLearning”- strategy was started in October 2007, where newforms of learning are underlined by new media and socialsoftware. This strategy will be presented. An important partof the strategy is the introduction of electronic Portfolios forstudents. Portfolios could be powerful tools to realizeindividualisation in formal education. There are two maintypes, the process portfolio for learning, working andreflection and the application portfolio for assessmentpurposes and job application. It is now possible to collectformal and informal competences and skills-orientedknowledge for the later professional career.

  17. Disability inclusion in higher education in Uganda: Status and strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emong, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Uganda has embraced inclusive education and evidently committed itself to bringing about disability inclusion at every level of education. Both legal and non-legal frameworks have been adopted and arguably are in line with the intent of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on education. The CRPD, in Article 24, requires states to attain a right to education for persons with disabilities without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunities at all levels of education. Objectives Despite Uganda’s robust disability legal and policy framework on education, there is evidence of exclusion and discrimination of students with disabilities in the higher education institutions. The main objective of this article is to explore the status of disability inclusion in higher education and strategies for its realisation, using evidence from Emong’s study, workshop proceedings where the authors facilitated and additional individual interviews with four students with disabilities by the authors. Results The results show that there are discrimination and exclusion tendencies in matters related to admissions, access to lectures, assessment and examinations, access to library services, halls of residence and other disability support services. Conclusion The article recommends that institutional policies and guidelines on support services for students with disabilities and special needs in higher education be developed, data on students with disabilities collected to help planning, collaboration between Disabled Peoples Organisations (DPO’s) strengthened to ensure disability inclusion and the establishment of disability support centres. PMID:28730044

  18. Disability inclusion in higher education in Uganda: Status and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emong, Paul; Eron, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Uganda has embraced inclusive education and evidently committed itself to bringing about disability inclusion at every level of education. Both legal and non-legal frameworks have been adopted and arguably are in line with the intent of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on education. The CRPD, in Article 24, requires states to attain a right to education for persons with disabilities without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunities at all levels of education. Despite Uganda's robust disability legal and policy framework on education, there is evidence of exclusion and discrimination of students with disabilities in the higher education institutions. The main objective of this article is to explore the status of disability inclusion in higher education and strategies for its realisation, using evidence from Emong's study, workshop proceedings where the authors facilitated and additional individual interviews with four students with disabilities by the authors. The results show that there are discrimination and exclusion tendencies in matters related to admissions, access to lectures, assessment and examinations, access to library services, halls of residence and other disability support services. The article recommends that institutional policies and guidelines on support services for students with disabilities and special needs in higher education be developed, data on students with disabilities collected to help planning, collaboration between Disabled Peoples Organisations (DPO's) strengthened to ensure disability inclusion and the establishment of disability support centres.

  19. Disability inclusion in higher education in Uganda: Status and strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Emong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uganda has embraced inclusive education and evidently committed itself to bringing about disability inclusion at every level of education. Both legal and non-legal frameworks have been adopted and arguably are in line with the intent of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD on education. The CRPD, in Article 24, requires states to attain a right to education for persons with disabilities without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunities at all levels of education. Objectives: Despite Uganda’s robust disability legal and policy framework on education, there is evidence of exclusion and discrimination of students with disabilities in the higher education institutions. The main objective of this article is to explore the status of disability inclusion in higher education and strategies for its realisation, using evidence from Emong’s study, workshop proceedings where the authors facilitated and additional individual interviews with four students with disabilities by the authors. Results: The results show that there are discrimination and exclusion tendencies in matters related to admissions, access to lectures, assessment and examinations, access to library services, halls of residence and other disability support services. Conclusion: The article recommends that institutional policies and guidelines on support services for students with disabilities and special needs in higher education be developed, data on students with disabilities collected to help planning, collaboration between Disabled Peoples Organisations (DPO’s strengthened to ensure disability inclusion and the establishment of disability support centres.

  20. Strategies of high-performing EMT-basic educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Gregg S; Studnek, Jonathan R; Fernandez, Antonio R; Mistovich, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this project was to identify the specific educational strategies used by emergency medical technician (EMT) educational programs that have attained consistently high success rates on the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) examination. NREMT data from 2001 to 2005 was analyzed in order to identify consistently high-performing EMT-Basic educational programs. Representatives from each program were invited to participate in a focus group. Using the nominal group technique (NGT), participants were asked to answer the following question: "What are specific strategies that lead to a successful EMT-Basic educational program?" Ten out of the 12 EMS educational programs meeting the eligibility requirements participated. After completing the seven-step NGT process, 12 strategies were identified as leading to a successful EMT-Basic educational program: 1) accept students who are highly motivated to succeed; 2) assure institutional support; 3) administer multiple assessments; 4) develop standardized lesson plans; 5) have a passing standard that is above the minimum competency level; 6) hire qualified/certified instructors; 7) maintain effective communication between didactic, practical, and field instructors; 8) maintain instructional consistency; 9) provide clearly defined objectives; 10) provide immediate feedback for written, practical evaluations to students; 11) require prerequisites; and 12) teach test-taking skills. Twelve specific strategies were identified by high-performing EMT-Basic programs. From these, seven recommendations to improve programmatic pass rates on the NREMT certification exam were derived. Further study should be conducted to determine if implementation of these recommendations improves programmatic pass rates on the NREMT certification exam.

  1. Technology Education in South Africa: Evaluating an Innovative Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stables, Kay; Kimbell, Richard

    2001-02-01

    Researchers from Goldsmiths College were asked to undertake an evaluation of a three year curriculum initiative introducing technology education, through a learner-centred, problem solving and collaborative approach. The program was developed in a group of high schools in the North West Province of South Africa. We visited ten schools involved in the project and ten parallel schools not involved who acted as a control group. We collected data on student capability (demonstrated through an innovative test activity) and on student attitudes towards technology (demonstrated in evaluation questionnaires and in semi-structured interviews). Collectively the data indicate that in areas of knowledge and skill and in certain aspects of procedures (most notably problem solving) the project has had a marked impact. We also illustrate that greater consideration could have been given in the project to developing skills in generating and developing ideas and in graphic communication. Gender differences are noted, particularly in terms of positive attitudes illustrated by both boys and girls from schools involved in the project. Attention is drawn to the critical impact the project has had on transforming the pedagogy of the teachers from a teacher-centred didactic model, to a learner-centred, problem solving model. Some wider implications of the successes of this project are debated.

  2. Educational strategies for the prevention of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alexandre Paulo; Lima, Bruno Muniz; Laureano, Monique Guilharducci; Silva, Pedro Henrique Bauth; Tardin, Giovanna Pereira; Reis, Paulo Silva; Santos, Joyce Sammara; Jácomo, Domingos; D'Artibale, Eliziana Ferreira

    2016-11-01

    The main goal of this work was to produce a review of educational strategies to prevent diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. PubMed database was consulted using combined descriptors such as [Prevention], [Educational Activities], [Diabetes], [Hypertension], and [Obesity]. Data from randomized trials published between 2002 and 2014 were included in spreadsheets for analysis in duplicate by the reviewers. A total of 8,908 articles were found, of which 1,539 were selected about diabetes mellitus (DM, n=369), arterial systemic hypertension (ASH, n=200), and obesity (OBES, n=970). The number of free full text articles available was 1,075 (DM = 276, ASH = 118 and OBES = 681). In most of these studies, demographic characteristics such as gender and age were randomized, and the population mainly composed by students, ethnic groups, family members, pregnant, health or education professionals, patients with chronic diseases (DM, ASH, OBES) or other comorbidities. Group dynamics, physical activity practices, nutritional education, questionnaires, interviews, employment of new technologies, people training and workshops were the main intervention strategies used. The most efficient interventions occurred at community level, whenever the intervention was permanent or maintained for long periods, and relied on the continuous education of community health workers that had a constant interference inside the population covered. Many studies focused their actions in children and adolescents, especially on students, because they were more influenced by educational activities of prevention, and the knowledge acquired by them would spread more easily to their family and to society.

  3. Educational strategies for the prevention of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Paulo Machado

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The main goal of this work was to produce a review of educational strategies to prevent diabetes, hypertension, and obesity. Method: PubMed database was consulted using combined descriptors such as [Prevention], [Educational Activities], [Diabetes], [Hypertension], and [Obesity]. Data from randomized trials published between 2002 and 2014 were included in spreadsheets for analysis in duplicate by the reviewers. Results: A total of 8,908 articles were found, of which 1,539 were selected about diabetes mellitus (DM, n=369, arterial systemic hypertension (ASH, n=200, and obesity (OBES, n=970. The number of free full text articles available was 1,075 (DM = 276, ASH = 118 and OBES = 681. In most of these studies, demographic characteristics such as gender and age were randomized, and the population mainly composed by students, ethnic groups, family members, pregnant, health or education professionals, patients with chronic diseases (DM, ASH, OBES or other comorbidities. Group dynamics, physical activity practices, nutritional education, questionnaires, interviews, employment of new technologies, people training and workshops were the main intervention strategies used. Conclusion: The most efficient interventions occurred at community level, whenever the intervention was permanent or maintained for long periods, and relied on the continuous education of community health workers that had a constant interference inside the population covered. Many studies focused their actions in children and adolescents, especially on students, because they were more influenced by educational activities of prevention, and the knowledge acquired by them would spread more easily to their family and to society.

  4. "Academic Strategy: The Management Revolution in American Higher Education," by George Keller (1983) Can Strategy Work in Higher Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Keller's book was one of the first works to suggest strategic approaches to the management of higher education institutions. His case study method proved popular with readers. However, the limitations of his approach to strategy grew more apparent over time, although many of his insights remain valid today.

  5. Providing Simulated Online and Mobile Learning Experiences in a Prison Education Setting: Lessons Learned from the PLEIADES Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Helen; Murphy, Angela; Bedford, Tasman

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the preliminary findings, design criteria and lessons learned while developing and piloting an alternative to traditional print-based education delivery within a prison environment. PLEIADES (Portable Learning Environments for Incarcerated Distance Education Students), was designed to provide incarcerated students with…

  6. Piloting a Cooperative Extension Service Nutrition Education Program on First-Grade Children's Willingness to Try Foods Containing Legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Cassandra S.; Hermann, Janice R.

    2011-01-01

    Many nutrition education campaigns targeting children in the United States focus on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, but most don't specifically promote legumes. The project described here sought to pilot the effect of an Extension nutrition education program on first grade children's willingness to try foods containing legumes. A…

  7. Applying Foreign Entry Market Strategies to UK Higher Education Transnational Education Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Victoria; Antoniou, Christos

    2016-01-01

    We take a multidisciplinary approach mapping the models used by UK higher education (HE) institutions against established international business foreign market entry strategies. We review the conditions in host markets that facilitate market entry and consider how these will determine foreign market entry strategy. We specifically consider four…

  8. Assessing Development Impacts Associated with Low Emission Development Strategies: Lessons Learned from Pilot Efforts in Kenya and Montenegro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Katz, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wurtenberger, L. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    Low emission development strategies (LEDS) articulate economy-wide policies and implementation plans designed to enable a country to meet its long-term development objectives while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. A development impact assessment tool was developed to inform an analytically robust and transparent prioritization of LEDS actions based on their economic, social, and environmental impacts. The graphical tool helps policymakers communicate the development impacts of LEDS options and identify actions that help meet both emissions reduction and development goals. This paper summarizes the adaptation and piloting of the tool in Kenya and Montenegro. The paper highlights strengths of the tool and discusses key needs for improving it.

  9. International trends and strategies in educational development at universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Wisdom

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article considers four areas of educational development work which may become more significant in the future. The range and quality of professional development for teaching in higher education has expanded in many countries, the investment in academic frameworks of outcomes, credits and standards has yet to be exploited, the research into student learning is both productive and challenging to existing structures, and the practice of educational development is becoming more extensive – for example, practitioners are now expected to contribute to institutional strategy as much as to provide support for individual lecturers. The article notes significant changes in assumptions about the relations between students, their teachers and their courses, the need for revised approaches to assessment, and the importance of the professional development of the program leader and team to support the modernization of higher education.

  10. [Learning Portfolio: A New Strategy in Health Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Chuan; Chen, Ching-Ju; Chang, Yu-Shan; Huang, Li-Chi

    2015-12-01

    Health education is the teaching by healthcare professionals of healthcare-related knowledge and skills to students in order that these students learn to help patients self-manage their disease and maintain health. This article introduces a new strategy in health education known as the learning portfolio and presents the theoretical basis and function of the learning portfolio and the current application of this approach in academic and health education. The learning portfolio is a learner-centric approach that collects evidence related to an individual's learning process systematically. This approach helps educators understand learner needs and conditions, while allowing the learner to observe his / her learning process in a manner that promotes self-reflection, continual inspection, and behavioral modification throughout the learning process. The results enhance the motivation of learners and strengthen their care confidence in accomplishing learning tasks.

  11. Students’ strategies for position-taking in transnational education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jin Hui

    2016-01-01

    The article illuminates the positions distributed and the strategies for position-taking which students pursue in order to transform or preserve their positions in a classroom with a transnational context where students have different national and international education experiences. Furthermore......, how their positions are related to their aspirations for the future will be elucidated. Based on interviews with Danish and Chinese students enrolled at a Sino-Danish university situated in Beijing, the article identifies four different navigation strategies for position-taking in such a classroom...

  12. Impact of European Media Education Strategies on Russian Media Education Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaleva, Galina V.

    2015-01-01

    The article attempts to examine the impact of European media education theories and approaches on Russian media education evolution basing on a comparative analysis of Russian and European media literacy promotion strategies in the historical context. This influence resulted in the appearance and development of socio-cultural models of media…

  13. Open Learning for Smart Education: Open educational policies, strategies & access for all

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    keynote on Open Learning at the International IEEE EDUCON Conference 2016: I will speak about “Open Learning for Smart Education: Open educational policies, strategies and access for all”. This year EDUCON is taking place from 10th to 13th of April 2016 in Abu Dhabi. My questions of the keynote

  14. A pilot study examining experiential learning vs didactic education of abdominal compartment syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Anju; Bach, John; Watson, William D; Elliott, John O; Dominguez, Edward P

    2017-08-01

    Current surgical education relies on simulated educational experiences or didactic sessions to teach low-frequency clinical events such as abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate if simulation would improve performance and knowledge retention of ACS better than a didactic lecture. Nineteen general surgery residents were block randomized by postgraduate year level to a didactic or a simulation session. After 3 months, all residents completed a knowledge assessment before participating in an additional simulation. Two independent reviewers assessed resident performance via audio-video recordings. No baseline differences in ACS experience were noted between groups. The observational evaluation demonstrated a significant difference in performance between the didactic and simulation groups: 9.9 vs 12.5, P = .037 (effect size = 1.15). Knowledge retention was equivalent between groups. This pilot study suggests that simulation-based education may be more effective for teaching the basic concepts of ACS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Management Strategies in Basic Education and Participation of Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johel Furguerle-Rangel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the educational process it is necessary to use management paradigms and active participation of parents. The objective was to determine the use of management strategies by the director of basic education and participation of parents in the educational process. It is a descriptive, transversal and field study, whose instrument was a questionnaire of 26 closed-questions.   The sample comprised 16 directors, 52 teachers and 62 parents. For most managers and faculty the technique of brainstorming, involvement in decision-making, continues knowledge management and radical change are crucial in the educational process of children.   But mothers and fathers believe that managerial groups do not use strategies properly except for reengineering.   The mother and fathers are mainly involved in education management but not in the learning process. It is recommended the deepening of policy management training teaching force, through continuous training provided by the government and the promotion of family participation in the teaching-learning process of children.

  16. Strategies for service-learning assessment in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee

    2013-10-01

    A large body of literature exists on the instructional pedagogy known as service-learning. Service-learning is a teaching and learning approach characterized by the dental hygiene student's practical application of academic studies and occurs within a community setting, to the benefit of both the student and community. Dental hygiene educators use service-learning to enhance student knowledge and application of oral health curriculum. This manuscript reports on the importance of service-learning assessment to the National Dental Hygiene Research Agenda as well as the future of the profession of dental hygiene and the successful strategies in service-learning evaluation available for utilization by dental hygiene educators.

  17. Learning and coping strategies versus standard education in cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayyari Dehbarez, Nasrin; Lynggaard, Vibeke; May, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Background Learning and coping education strategies (LC) was implemented to enhance patient attendance in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. This study assessed the cost-utility of LC compared to standard education (standard) as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients with ischemic heart...... to estimate the net benefit of the LC and to illustrate cost effectiveness acceptability curves. The statistical analysis was based on means and bootstrapped standard errors. Results An additional cost of DKK 6,043 (95 % CI −5,697; 17,783) and a QALY gain of 0.005 (95 % CI −0.001; 0.012) was estimated for LC...

  18. Students’ Performative Strategies in the Practical part of Nursing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The current political agenda has placed practical education in medium cycle education programs on the agenda with emphasis on more structured and organized teaching initiatives. This paper examines what kinds of performative strategies students employ to achieve these goals. ‘Performative...... strategies’ are mainly examined in a Bourdieu perspective where incorporated structures orient the student to act in a specific cultural setting. The study is based on ethnographic field studies at two Danish hospital wards and interviews with nurse students and clinical teachers. The study shows...... that the idea of controlling the learning process in an unstructured and dynamic practice, paired with the ideal of student’s self-directed learning processes, creates performative strategies in counterproductive ways. The students end up underperforming when it comes to producing an individual study plan...

  19. INTEGRATED BUSINESS STRATEGY AND ITS CONSTRUCTS: PILOT STUDY AT HOTELS IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrin Saad; Khulida Kirana Yahya; Faizuniah Pangil

    2012-01-01

    Since hotel industry is major contributor to the growth of Tourism Industry in Malaysia, it is vital to take into consideration of issues that are being carried by the industry. For example the high turnover of employee in hotel due to poor strategy conducted by hotels’ management. This paper explores the new strategy measurement which is the integrated business strategy dimensions in fitting the hotel industry due to the scarce of hospitality strategy at present. The new strategy is develope...

  20. Postsecondary Education Preparation/Career Exploration: Designing a Pilot Educational Counseling Program for Rural Counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Rajinder S.

    2010-01-01

    American students accustomed to standardization in secondary education have experience with fulfilling the requirements imposed upon them, but often these students require further assistance to facilitate their personal decisions about education after high school. Postsecondary education and career preparation programs, educators, and educational…

  1. How effectively do horizontal and vertical response strategies of long-finned pilot whales reduce sound exposure from naval sonar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensveen, Paul J; von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Ainslie, Michael A; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Tyack, Peter L; Miller, Patrick J O

    2015-05-01

    The behaviour of a marine mammal near a noise source can modulate the sound exposure it receives. We demonstrate that two long-finned pilot whales both surfaced in synchrony with consecutive arrivals of multiple sonar pulses. We then assess the effect of surfacing and other behavioural response strategies on the received cumulative sound exposure levels and maximum sound pressure levels (SPLs) by modelling realistic spatiotemporal interactions of a pilot whale with an approaching source. Under the propagation conditions of our model, some response strategies observed in the wild were effective in reducing received levels (e.g. movement perpendicular to the source's line of approach), but others were not (e.g. switching from deep to shallow diving; synchronous surfacing after maximum SPLs). Our study exemplifies how simulations of source-whale interactions guided by detailed observational data can improve our understanding about motivations behind behaviour responses observed in the wild (e.g., reducing sound exposure, prey movement). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. WebQuests: a new instructional strategy for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaie, Ulysses

    2007-01-01

    A WebQuest is a model or framework for designing effective Web-based instructional strategies featuring inquiry-oriented activities. It is an innovative approach to learning that is enhanced by the use of evolving instructional technology. WebQuests have invigorated the primary school (grades K through 12) educational sector around the globe, yet there is sparse evidence in the literature of WebQuests at the college and university levels. WebQuests are congruent with pedagogical approaches and cognitive activities commonly used in nursing education. They are simple to construct using a step-by-step approach, and nurse educators will find many related resources on the Internet to help them get started. Included in this article are a discussion of the critical attributes and main features of WebQuests, construction tips, recommended Web sites featuring essential resources, a discussion of WebQuest-related issues identified in the literature, and some suggestions for further research.

  3. [Educational strategies to modify physician behaviours and health care outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nendaz, Mathieu

    2005-11-23

    The current evolution of medicine requires a sustained effort in continuing medical education to maintain an evidence-based practice. To support this process, several educational strategies are available, including guideline diffusion. Their critical analysis reveals that the dissemination of passive information by conferences or by unsolicited materials is generally ineffective to modify the behaviours in practice or patient outcomes. More effective interventions are practice- and community-based rather than didactic, include an evaluation of learning needs, and enhance active participation in multiple activities. Before investing time and money into an educational activity, one should consider the evidence of its efficacy and make an oriented choice, according to the goals aimed and the available resources.

  4. [Implementing Inter-Professional Education (IPE): Challenges and Strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Lun; Hung, Chich-Hsiu

    2017-12-01

    Inter-professional practice (IPP), necessary in today's healthcare environment, should be guided and practiced through inter-professional education (IPE). Within the context of an effective IPE program, collaborative medical professionals must be cognizant of the demands of patients' integrated care, organize a collaborative inter-professional team, and achieve the objectives of patient-centered care. However, the many challenges of IPE include insufficient understanding of inter-professional care, occupational culture-related boundary issues, lack of a college education, and insufficient support from academic and medical institutions. This article suggests adopting effective strategies to promote inter-professional recognition, create a harmonious medical culture, eliminate barriers to education, and enhance support for academic and medical institutions. Inter-professional collaboration between academic and clinical institutions must provide resources and substantive professional training. Effectively implementing IPE and IPP is expected to elicit trust, respect, and efficient communication from team members.

  5. Educational intervention for parents of adolescents with chronic illness: a pre-post test pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akre, Christina; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Berchtold, André; Suris, Joan-Carles

    2015-08-01

    This pilot experimental study tested the feasibility and intended effect of an educational intervention for parents to help them assist their adolescent child with chronic illness (CI) in becoming autonomous. A two-phase pre-post pilot intervention study targeting parents of adolescents with CI was conducted. Parents were allocated to group 1 and 2 and received the four-module intervention consecutively. Intended effect was measured through online questionnaires for parents and adolescents before, at 2 months after, and at 4-6 months after the intervention. Feasibility was assessed through an evaluation questionnaire for parents. The most useful considered modules concerned the future of the adolescent and parents and social life. The most valued aspect was to exchange with other parents going through similar problems and receiving a new outlook on their relationship with their child. For parents, improvement trends appeared for shared management, parent protection, and self-efficacy, and worsening trends appeared for coping skills, parental perception of child vulnerability, and parental stress. For adolescents, improvement trends appeared for self-efficacy and parental bonding and worsening trends appeared for shared management and coping skills. Parents could benefit from peer-to-peer support and education as they support the needed autonomy development of their child. Future studies should test an online platform for parents to find peer support at all times and places.

  6. Advanced Practice Nursing Simulation for Neonatal Skill Competency: A Pilot Study for Successful Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Evelyn; Salih, Zeynep; Cullen, Deborah L

    2015-07-01

    Skill readiness remains a challenge for all health care professionals who are involved in direct patient care. Researchers suggest that skill retention may decrease within 6 months of an educational session. The purpose of this study was to explore competency retention for high-risk, low-frequency procedures, specifically, managing a difficult airway and placing a laryngeal mask airway, using a web-based content refresher. The pilot study was conducted in two sessions. Session one established clinical skill competency. Six months later, the advanced practice RNs were randomized into two groups. Group 1 reviewed didactic content and participated in a complex airway management simulation. Group 2 participated only in a complex airway management simulation. This study showed a positive trend in maintaining competency for a low-frequency procedure for which complex airway management was given, using web-based content review. It is feasible to maintain competency for low-frequency procedures using web-based content refreshers. This pilot study benefited advanced practice nurses by providing them with the potential to maintain competency in this high-risk, low-frequency procedure. Continuing education is an important consideration for health care organizations. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Teaching dental students about patient communication following an adverse event: a pilot educational module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sheela; Rajagopalan, Chelsea F; Patel, Janki; Van Kanegan, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    Adverse events are an important but understudied area in dentistry. Most dentists will face the issue of an adverse event several times in their clinical careers. The authors implemented a six-hour pilot educational module at one dental school to improve fourth-year dental students' knowledge and confidence in communicating with patients about adverse events. Based on results from the twenty-nine students who completed both the pre- and posttests, the module significantly increased the students' knowledge of the key concepts involved in adverse events. However, the module did not improve the students' confidence that they would be able to implement these communication skills in clinical situations. Based on these results, this article discusses how future educational efforts can be modified to better prepare students for the communication challenges associated with adverse events.

  8. Educational and evaluation strategies in the training of physician specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona-Flores, Verónica Alejandra; Campos-Navarro, Luz Arcelia; Arenas-Osuna, Jesús; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Teaching strategies have been defined as procedures, means or resources that teachers used to promote meaningful learning. Identify teaching strategies and evaluation used by the professor with residents in tertiary hospitals health care. This is a cross-sectional study conducted with full, associate and assistant professors of various medical specialties. A questionnaire was applied to evaluate the strategies used by professors to teach and evaluate students. We included a sample of 90 professors in 35 medical specialties. The most frequent teaching activities were: organizing students to develop presentations on specific subjects, followed by asking questions on previously reviewed subjects, In terms of the strategies employed, the most frequent "always" option was applied to case analyses. The most frequent methods used for the evaluation of theoretical knowledge were: participation in class, topic presentation and exams. Teaching activities were primarily based on the presentation of specific topics by the residents. The most commonly used educational strategies were clinical case analyses followed by problem-based learning and the use of illustrations. Evaluation of the residents' performance in theory knowledge, hinged on class participation, presentation of assigned topics and exams. Copyright: © 2017 SecretarÍa de Salud

  9. Smooth Transition for Advancement to Graduate Education (STAGE) for Underrepresented Groups in the Mathematical Sciences Pilot Project: Broadening Participation through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubanks-Turner, Christina; Beaulieu, Patricia; Pal, Nabendu

    2018-01-01

    The Smooth Transition for Advancement to Graduate Education (STAGE) project was a three-year pilot project designed to mentor undergraduate students primarily from under-represented groups in the mathematical sciences. The STAGE pilot project focused on mentoring students as they transitioned from undergraduate education to either graduate school…

  10. Pilot research on a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulikova, Tatyana I.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the modern world, the environment of any educational institution represents a spectrum of ethnic groups and subcultures: a multicultural educational environment. Pupils who are aware of their national identity often demonstrate intolerance toward students of other nationalities, which threatens pupils’ psychological safety. In this article, we present the results of pilot research examining the level of a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment and identifying the criteria that influence a pupil’s psychological safety. The research sample comprised 127 pupils aged 13–14 years from different schools living in various places that differed by the type of settlement, industrial development and level of science and culture. We isolated the following criteria for a pupil’s psychological safety in the multicultural educational environment: satisfaction with the educational environment, protection from psychological abuse and self-confidence. According to pupils, the essential characteristics of safety in the educational environment, regardless of school category and type, are being able to ask for help, protection of personal dignity, interactions with other students, and self-respect. Empirical data reveal the current status of the psychological safety of the entire sample group (n = 127 and compare indices of psychological safety in the educational institutions under study. Analysis of the results of our research indicates that protecting a pupil’s personality in the multicultural educational environment has the greatest influence on his/her psychological safety. In addition, a comfortable psychological atmosphere, mutual aid and support of pupils and low levels of classmates’ and coevals’ aggression positively influence the protection experience.

  11. EDUCATIONAL ACTIONS TO PREVENT DENGUE: EXPERIENCES AND STRATEGIES WITH ELDERLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosamaria Rodrigues Garcia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe the activities performed on apublic specialized ambulatory care for dengue prevention among elderly. Case report: the epidemiological outlook of dengue is scaring being characterized as a public health problem. The elderly are most at risk for hospitalization and severe forms of the disease, thus health education activities are essential to improve awareness of the need to fight and prevent the disease. A Health Education project was created, evolving communication strategies to raise awareness on the issue. They were performed by a post graduate Gerontology group in activities such as interactive puppet show, myths and truths dynamic, informative folder, parody, posters, training seniors, caregivers and family members, internal and external health professionals, staff and residents of nearby long term care facilities. The materials were available in print and digital version. 2,500 elderly and 350 professionals were trained and encouraged to multiply the information and inspire adoption of preventive measures. The actions provided intergenerational interaction and empowerment of the elderly, whom trained, had the opportunity to exercise social participation and disseminate recommendations for other users. Conclusion: the project enabled the construction of knowledge through interactive educational activities that contributed to strengthen the individual and collective awareness, awareopinion leaderstothe importance of communication/education in the fight against dengue, which emphasized social responsibility in rescuing citizenship in a perspective thateach citizen is responsible for himself and for community. DESCRIPTORS: Dengue. Aged. Disease prevention. Health education.

  12. Effectiveness of Information Processing Strategy Training on Academic Task Performance in Children with Learning Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutinun Juntorn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Learning disabilities (LD can be associated with problems in the four stages of information processing used in learning: input, throughput, output, and feedback. These problems affect the child’s ability to learn and perform activities in daily life, especially during academic activities. This study is a pilot study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of information processing strategy training using a combination of two approaches that address the ability to apply processing strategies during academic activities in children with LD. The two approaches are the Perceive, Recall, Plan, and Perform (PRPP System of Intervention, which is a strategy training intervention, and the Four-Quadrant Model (4QM of Facilitated Learning approach, which is a systematic facilitator technique. Twenty children with LD were assigned to two groups: the experimental group (n=10 and the control group (n=10. Children in the experimental group received the intervention twice a week for 6 consecutive weeks. Each treatment session took approximately 50 minutes. Children in the control group received traditional intervention twice a week for 6 consecutive weeks. The results indicated that the combination of the PRPP System of Intervention and the 4QM may improve the participants’ ability to apply information processing strategies during academic activities.

  13. Evaluation of the content regarding nutrition education on catering services websites: pilot study in the educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Rico-Sapena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To analyze websites quality of catering companies for schools as well as their content in nutrition food education, and to have a first experience with the assessment tool EDALCAT.Material and methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. The study population are the websites of catering companies entrusted with the management of school canteens. The sample was obtained using Google search engine and a ranking of major catering companies financial, choosing those that had websites. Ten websites were selected for a pilot test according to geographic proximity to the city of Alicante and their total revenue. A homemade questionnaire (EDALCAT was designed in order to evaluate the websites. This questionnaire is composed of a block of predictors of quality with 19 variables for reliability, design and navigation; and a second block of specific contents about food education with 19 variables for content and educational activities.Results: Positive results have been obtained in 31 out of 38 questionnaire variables, except for the items: “Search engine”, “Language” (40% and “Help” (10% in the predictors of the quality block; and in the items: “Workshops”, “Recipe book”, “Web nutrition-food” (40% and “Examples” (30% in the specific contents of the food education block. All the evaluated websites exceed 50% of compliance with the quality criteria and with the minimum contents in food education, and only one of them, fails the minimum level of activity established.Conclusions: The predictors of quality and the specific content in food education were successful in all evaluated websites. Most of them got a high score in their assessment, and in their analysis of individual blocks. After the pilot study, EDALCAT questionnaire has been amended and the final EDALCAT has been obtained. Generally speaking, EDALCAT seems appropriate for evaluating the quality of catering companies websites and their content

  14. Collaborative testing as a learning strategy in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Sheryl S

    2010-01-01

    A primary goal of nursing education is to prepare nurses to work collaboratively as members of interprofessional health care teams on behalf of patients. Collaborative testing is a collaborative learning strategy used to foster knowledge development, critical thinking in decision making, and group processing skills. This study incorporated a quasi-experimental design with a comparison group to examine the effect of collaborative testing as a learning strategy on student learning and retention of course content as well as group process skills and student perceptions of their learning and anxiety. The setting was a baccalaureate nursing program; the sample consisted of two groups of senior students enrolled in Medical-Surgical Nursing II. Student learning, as measured by unit examination scores, was greater for students taking examinations collaboratively compared to individually. Retention of course content, as measured by final examination scores, was not greater for students taking examinations collaboratively compared to individually. Student perceptions were overwhelmingly positive, with students reporting increased learning as a result of the collaborative testing experiences. Despite the lack of data to support increased retention, collaborative testing may be a learning strategy worth implementing in nursing education. Students reported more positive interactions and collaboration with their peers, skills required by the professional nurse.

  15. Strategy of Media Education: Philosophical and Pedagogical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya Mikhailovna Nikolaeva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern requirements for educational activities have a binary nature. Thus, on the one hand, educational practice established in the form of a social institution is one of the most conservative areas of social space. On the other hand, comfortable adaptation of a person to the processes occurring in the modern world is impossible without taking into account the phenomena of digital nature. The article provides a philosophical and pedagogical strategy aimed at the development of critical and creative thinking skills and competent reasoning, which can act as a basis for media education. The paper shows that the community of researchers is an interactive form of lesson organization, which makes it possible to develop rationality and ethical-and-democratic behaviour and, thus, to promote information and media literacy among students. The article also presents theoretical justification of the strategy, as well as techniques and materials for its empirical assessment. These can help arrange a lesson according to the principle of research community, which will contribute to the development of both cognitive and ethical-and-social skills in students.

  16. Education and dentistry: advanced synergy in the dental treatment of children with autism; a pilot clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Bossù

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. From the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR, autism is considered a pervasive developmental disorder. It manifests as a behavioral syndrome characterised by impairment in social interaction and communication, restricted interests and activities, as well as repetitive and stereotyped patterns. Such profile renders prevention measures and dental care seriously compromised so that usually autistic children are treated and cared following general anesthesia. Aims. We aimed at developing a target-specific educational approach allowing to avoid general anesthesia in autistic patients subjected to dental care treatments (e.g. sealing, plaque ablation, minimal carious lesions etc.; such protocol should also facilitate the implementation of prevention measures. Design. It is proposed a target-specific educational research protocol adopting individual strategies and methodologies, including Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC for patients with speech and language impairments. The dentists are trained by the educator, who acts as a filter between the patient and the medical team. The team is required until a relationship of trust with the patient is built and the dentist is able to continue independently. Results. We present a pilot clinical trial in which out of 34 patients between 6 and 12 years old showed a positive response to the application of the protocol, allowing the execution of dental therapies together with a long-term prevention programme and in 32 of them the general anesthesia was avoided. Negative results regarded two patients who had not undergone any behavioral, psychomotor or speech rehabilitation therapy. Conclusions. Though the results should be considered as preliminary, the application of the method with the synergistic action of the people in the team allowed the execution of dental therapies. Given the positive outcomes, the Pediatric Dentistry Unit of the Umberto I Hospital

  17. Optimal intervention strategies for cholera outbreak by education and chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Toni

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the control of infectious diseases in the framework of optimal control approach. A case study on cholera control was studied by considering two control strategies, namely education and chlorination. We distinct the former control into one regarding person-to-person behaviour and another one concerning person-to-environment conduct. Model are divided into two interacted populations: human population which follows an SIR model and pathogen population. Pontryagin maximum principle was applied in deriving a set of differential equations which consists of dynamical and adjoin systems as optimality conditions. Then, the fourth order Runge-Kutta method was exploited to numerically solve the equation system. An illustrative example was provided to assess the effectiveness of the control strategies toward a set of control scenarios.

  18. Innovative model of delivering quality improvement education for trainees – a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ramar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: After incorporating quality improvement (QI education as a required curriculum for our trainees in 2010, a need arose to readdress our didactic sessions as they were too long, difficult to schedule, and resulting in a drop in attendance. A ‘flipped classroom’ (FC model to deliver QI education was touted to be an effective delivery method as it allows the trainees to view didactic materials on videos, on their own time, and uses the classroom to clarify concepts and employ learned tools on case-based scenarios including workshops. Methods: The Mayo Quality Academy prepared 29 videos that incorporated the previously delivered 17 weekly didactic sessions, for a total duration of 135 min. The half-day session clarified questions related to the videos, followed by case examples and a hands-on workshop on how to perform and utilize a few commonly used QI tools and methods. Results: Seven trainees participated. There was a significant improvement in knowledge as measured by pre- and post-FC model test results [improvement by 40.34% (SD 16.34, p<0.001]. The survey results were overall positive about the FC model with all trainees strongly agreeing that we should continue with this model to deliver QI education. Conclusions: The pilot project of using the FC model to deliver QI education was successful in a small sample of trainees.

  19. Application of visually based, computerised diagnostic decision support system in dermatological medical education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Wan-Yi; Tien, Peng-Tai; Lin, Fang-Yu; Chiu, Pin-Chi

    2017-05-01

    Medical education has shifted from memory-based practice to evidence-based decisions. The question arises: how can we ensure that all students get correct and systematic information? Visually based, computerised diagnostic decision support system (VCDDSS, VisualDx) may just fit our needs. A pilot study was conducted to investigate its role in medical education and clinical practice. This was a prospective study, including one consultant dermatologist, 51 medical students and 13 dermatology residents, conducted in the dermatology teaching clinic at China Medical University Hospital from 30 December 2014 to 21 April 2015. Clinical diagnoses of 13 patients were made before and after using VCDDSS. Questionnaires were filled out at the end. The consultant dermatologist's diagnosis was defined as the standard answer; the Sign test was used to analyse diagnostic accuracy and the Fisher exact test to analyse questionnaires. There was an 18.75% increase in diagnostic accuracy after use of VCDDSS (62.5-81.25%; p value system in clinical practice, medical education, residency training, and patient education in the future. Further large-scale studies should be planned to confirm its application. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Tourette's syndrome in a special education population: a pilot study involving a single school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlan, R; Whitmore, D; Irvine, C; McDermott, M P; Como, P G

    1994-04-01

    To determine whether children requiring special education represent a high-risk group for identifying Tourette's syndrome (TS), we performed direct examinations for the presence of tics in 35 special education and 35 regular classroom students from a single school district. Of the special education students, nine (26%) had definite or probable tics as compared with only two (6%) of the regular classroom students. About one-third of the students with tics currently meet diagnostic criteria for TS and probably more will do so in the future. About one-half of the subjects with tics have evidence of obsessive-compulsive behavior (OCB) or an attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). For three randomly selected students with definite tics, direct examinations of first-degree relatives revealed the presence of tics in all families. Subjects to the limitations of this pilot study, we conclude that TS and related tic disorders are commonly associated with the need for special education in this single school district. TS might also be an important contributor to school problems in the childhood population at large and may be a highly prevalent condition. In addition, we conclude that childhood tics are associated with OCB and ADHD, are genetically determined, and are part of the TS clinical spectrum.

  1. Strategies to Promote Cultural Competence in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbour, Megan; Kaspar, Rita W; Teall, Alice M

    2015-09-01

    Cultural competence is a mainstay in health care and nursing education. With the expansion in the number of distance-based nursing programs across the country, innovative teaching methods for distance learning faculty are required to instill cultural competence in students. Faculty must be deliberate when planning distance-based learning activities that incorporate cultural experiences. This article describes several such strategies including the creative use of blogging, recorded lectures, the online synchronous classroom, social media, and cultural immersion projects. These methods capitalize on existing information technologies and offer distance-based students the opportunity to connect with one another, as well as develop the awareness, sensitivity, and respect that is required when providing culturally competent care. These teaching methods are modifiable to meet the teaching and learning needs of the faculty and the students, thereby allowing educators to support the integration of cultural competence into patient care for distance students. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Education and screening for chronic kidney disease in Indian youth: pilot program results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao PS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Panduranga S Rao,1 Julie A Wright Nunes,1 Brenda W Gillespie,2 Rachel L Perlman,1 Rajan Ravichandran3 1Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, 2Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Department of Nephrology, Madras Institute of Nephrology, Madras Institute of Orthopedics and Trauma Hospitals, Chennai, India Background: There is a paucity of information on kidney education and screening programs in Indian youth.Methods: Participants (n=2,158 from Chennai colleges were educated about the kidneys and chronic kidney disease (CKD and screened in a pilot program from April to May 2013. This entailed: 1 a presentation and educational video and 2 an on-site assessment of weight, blood pressure, and demographic information. Urinalysis (UA kits were distributed and returned in ≤48 hours. We examined participant characteristics and their association with dipstick proteinuria using logistic regression.Results: The mean (standard deviation [SD] age was 18.9 (1.6 years, and 1,451 (68% were men. Mean (SD body mass index (BMI was 21.9 (4.3 kg/m2; 745 (36% had a BMI consistent with being overweight or obese. Mean (SD systolic blood pressure (SBP was 118.7 (13.1 mm Hg, and 94 (5% of the participants had SBP ≥140. Mean (SD diastolic blood pressure (DBP was 70.9 (11.4 mm Hg, with 119 participants (6% having ≥90 mm Hg. A total of 136 participants had glycosuria (UA≥1+ and 120 (6% had proteinuria (UA≥1+. In unadjusted analyses, sex (odds ratio [OR]=1.64 [confidence interval, CI 1.06–2.55]; p=0.026 men vs. women and age (OR=1.13 per year [CI 1.01–1.26]; p=0.032 were significantly associated with proteinuria. In the analysis adjusted for age, sex, SBP, DBP, glycosuria, and BMI, age remained independently associated with higher odds for proteinuria (OR=1.14 per year [1.02–1.29]; p=0.026. Males showed a trend of higher risk compared

  3. Problem-solving education to prevent depression among low-income mothers of preterm infants: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Michael; Feinberg, Emily; Cabral, Howard; Sauder, Sara; Egbert, Lucia; Schainker, Elisabeth; Kamholz, Karen; Hegel, Mark; Beardslee, William

    2011-08-01

    We sought to assess the feasibility and document key study processes of a problem-solving intervention to prevent depression among low-income mothers of preterm infants. A randomized controlled pilot trial (n = 50) of problem-solving education (PSE) was conducted. We assessed intervention provider training and fidelity; recruitment and retention of subjects; intervention acceptability; and investigators' ability to conduct monthly outcome assessments, from which we could obtain empirical estimates of depression symptoms, stress, and functioning over 6 months. Four of four bachelor-level providers were able to deliver PSE appropriately with standardized subjects within 4 weeks of training. Of 12 randomly audited PSE sessions with actual subjects, all met treatment fidelity criteria. Nineteen of 25 PSE subjects (76%) received full four-session courses; no subjects reported negative experiences with PSE. Eighty-eight percent of scheduled follow-up assessments were completed. Forty-four percent of control group mothers experienced an episode of moderately severe depression symptoms over the follow-up period, compared to 24% of PSE mothers. Control mothers experienced an average 1.19 symptomatic episodes over the 6 months of follow-up, compared to 0.52 among PSE mothers. PSE appears feasible and may be a promising strategy to prevent depression among mothers of preterm infants.

  4. [Construction and Application of Innovative Education Technology Strategies in Nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Li-Fen; Huang, Hsiang-Ping; Ni, Lee-Fen; Tsai, Chia-Lan; Huang, Tsuey-Yuan

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of information and communication technologies has deeply impacted education reform, promoted the development of digital-learning models, and stimulated the development of diverse nursing education strategies in order to better fulfill needs and expand in new directions. The present paper introduces the intelligent-learning resources that are available for basic medical science education, problem-based learning, nursing scenario-based learning, objective structured clinical examinations, and other similar activities in the Department of Nursing at Chang Gung University of Science and Technology. The program is offered in two parts: specialized classroom facilities and cloud computing / mobile-learning. The latter includes high-fidelity simulation classrooms, online e-books, and virtual interactive simulation and augmented reality mobile-learning materials, which are provided through multimedia technology development, learning management systems, web-certificated examinations, and automated teaching and learning feedback mechanisms. It is expected that the teaching experiences that are shared in this article may be used as a reference for applying professional wisdom teaching models into nursing education.

  5. Childhood Obesity Study: A Pilot Study of the Effect of the Nutrition Education Program "Color My Pyramid"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Goldberg, Patricia; Oh, Kyeung Mi; Stoehr, Ana; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2009-01-01

    The need for successful nutrition interventions is critical as the prevalence of childhood obesity increases. Thus, this pilot project examines the effect of a nutrition education program, "Color My Pyramid", on children's nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, activity levels, and nutrition status. Using a pretest-posttest,…

  6. A Pilot Study to Determine the Need for Curriculum Modification in Vocational-Technical Education in New Hampshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annis, William H.; Perrigo, Joseph E.

    A pilot study was conducted to determine if vocational-technical educational curriculums were adequate in a selected portion of New Hampshire and to determine what could be done to correct existing deficiencies. Interviews were conducted with 221 of the 463 agricultural enterprises, heavy industry, restaurant, and service industry businesses in…

  7. Information Literacy: Instrument Development to Measure Competencies and Knowledge Among Nursing Educators, Nursing Administrators, and Nursing Clinicians: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Susan; Pravikoff, Diane; Tanner, Annelle

    2003-01-01

    This poster describes a pilot study conducted to establish validity and reliability of an instrument that will be used in a nationwide needs assessment, implemented to identify gaps in Information Literacy skills, competencies, and knowledge among key nursing groups nationally. Data and information gathered using the tool will guide the profession in developing appropriate education and continuing education programs to close identified gaps and enhance nurses’ readiness for Evidence-Based Practice (EBP). PMID:14728475

  8. Use of a virtual world computer environment for international distance education: lessons from a pilot project using Second Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonheim, Marloes; Heyden, Robin; Wiecha, John M

    2014-02-21

    Virtual worlds (VWs), in which participants navigate as avatars through three-dimensional, computer-generated, realistic-looking environments, are emerging as important new technologies for distance health education. However, there is relatively little documented experience using VWs for international healthcare training. The Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research (GFMER) conducted a VW training for healthcare professionals enrolled in a GFMER training course. This paper describes the development, delivery, and results of a pilot project undertaken to explore the potential of VWs as an environment for distance healthcare education for an international audience that has generally limited access to conventionally delivered education.

  9. Interprofessional education: a pilot study of rehabilitation sciences students participating in interdisciplinary international service-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechak, Celia; Gonzalez, Eugenia; Summers, Connie; Capshaw, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Various models of interprofessional education, including service-learning, are used to teach students how to be effective members of healthcare teams. The purpose of this study was to examine pilot data related to the impact of an elective one-credit global health course with an international service-learning experience (ISL) on the student participants. An interdisciplinary team of 3 faculty accompanied 4 students representing occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology programs for an 8-day ISL experience. Students responded to faculty-developed reflection questions pre-travel, during travel, and 2-weeks and 4-months post travel. Content analysis was used to analyze themes that emerged from the students' written reflections. Three major themes emerged: collaboration, satisfaction, and self-discovery. The most prominent theme was related to interprofessional collaboration.

  10. RADIOLOGY EDUCATION: A PILOT STUDY TO ASSESS KNOWLEDGE OF MEDICAL STUDENTS REGARDING IMAGING IN TRAUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Saad; Saeed, Muhammad Anwar; Shah, Noreen; Nadeem, Naila

    2015-01-01

    Trauma remains one of the most frequent presentations in emergency departments. Imaging has established role in setting of acute trauma with ability to identify potentially fatal conditions. Adequate knowledge of health professionals regarding trauma imaging is vital for improved healthcare. In this work we try to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging in trauma as well as identify most effective way of imparting radiology education. This cross-sectional pilot study was conducted at Aga Khan University Medical College & Khyber Girls Medical College, to assess knowledge of medical students regarding imaging protocols practiced in initial management of trauma patients. Only 40 & 20% respectively were able to identify radiographs included in trauma series. Very few had knowledge of correct indication for Focused abdominal sonography in trauma. Clinical radiology rotation was reported as best way of learning radiology. Change in curricula & restructuring of clinical radiology rotation structure is needed to improve knowledge regarding Trauma imaging.

  11. Training Community Mental Health Therapists to Deliver a Package of Evidence-Based Practice Strategies for School-Age Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookman-Frazee, Lauren I.; Drahota, Amy; Stadnick, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Research on moving evidence-based practice (EBP) intervention strategies to community service settings for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is urgently needed. The current pilot study addresses this need by examining the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary outcomes of training therapists practicing in community mental health…

  12. Pilot Evaluation of the Feasibility and Acceptability of StressOFF Strategies: A Single-Session School-Based Stress Management Program for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Amy J.; Heath, Nancy L.; Carsley, Dana

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the pilot evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of StressOFF Strategies, a "single-session" (45 min) adolescent-targeted, school-based psychoeducational program, which introduces cognitive behavioral techniques and mindfulness-based techniques. Five hundred and sixty-five Grade 9 students (57% female;…

  13. Samba for solar modules. Brazil decides reimbursement strategy and starts pilot projects; Samba fuer Solarmodule. Brasilien macht den Weg fuer die Einspeisung von Solarstrom frei und startet Pilotprojekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosell, Alejandro Diego

    2012-06-15

    Better late than never: After long years of discussion, Brazil recently decided on a reimbursement strategy. Further, pilot projects with a total of 24 MW are in te planning stage. While some expect a major invitation for tender, local experts warn of rough times ahead.

  14. An Analysis of Decision Making Strategies Used By P-3 Pilots in Hazardous Situations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watt, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    .... This thesis analyzes 438 P-3 aviation hazard reports (hazreps) to ascertain which cognitive strategies from either the analytical or naturalistic methodology are more appropriate for handling malfunctions situations...

  15. Interprofessional ethics education seminar for undergraduate health science students: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cino, Kathleen; Austin, Rita; Casa, Cristina; Nebocat, Christine; Spencer, Adele

    2018-03-01

    To prepare for the modern collaborative healthcare system, health science academia is charged with educating future professionals to be competent members of the interprofessional team. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess self-efficacy for interprofessional education (IPE) in medical laboratory technology, dental hygiene, and nursing students before and after an IPE session. The specific topic of ethics was the focus of the session. The interprofessional seminar was designed to compare the codes of ethics from each programme through discussion and a case-based approach. The Self-Efficacy for Interprofessional Experiential Learning scale was used to collect quantitative data. A total of 75 participants rated self-efficacy for IPE before and after the educational offering. A paired sample t-test was used to analyse data. Significant results were found in students' pre- and post-test scores that indicated increased levels of self-efficacy related to working as a collaborative team for the benefit of the patient. Overall, there was an increase in participants' self-efficacy after collaborating with students from different health professions programmes. Healthcare students that learn together are more confident in their abilities to implement a team-structured approach, and understand that doing so will foster optimal patient wellbeing.

  16. Improving clinician competency in communication about schizophrenia: a pilot educational program for psychiatry trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughland, Carmel; Kelly, Brian; Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Vamos, Marina; Outram, Sue; Levin, Tomer

    2015-04-01

    Important gaps are observed in clinicians' communication with patients and families about psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Communication skills can be taught, and models for education in these skills have been developed in other fields of medicine, such as oncology, providing a framework for training communication skills relevant to psychiatric practice. This study evaluated a pilot communication skills education program for psychiatry trainees, focusing on discussing schizophrenia diagnosis and prognosis. Communication skills training modules were developed based on an existing theoretical framework (ComSkil), adapted for discussing a schizophrenia diagnosis and prognosis. Pre-post training rating of self-reported confidence in a range of communication tasks was obtained, along with trainee views on the training methods. Thirty-eight participants completed the training. Significant improvements in confidence were reported post training for discussing schizophrenia prognosis, including an increased capacity to critically evaluate their own communication skills. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. This preliminary study provides support for the translation of a well-established educational model to psychiatric training addressing core clinical communication tasks and provides the foundation for the development of a more comprehensive evaluation and an extended curriculum regarding other aspects of care for patients with schizophrenia: ongoing management and recovery, dealing with conflict, and conducting a family interview.

  17. Urban strategies for Waste Management in Tourist Cities. D2.7: Compendium of waste management practices in pilot cities and best practices in touristic cities

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Iris; Mayerhofer, Johannes; Obersteiner, Gudrun; Ramusch, Roland; Romein, A.; Eriksson, Mattias; Grosse, Juliane; MC. Nascimento, Gisela; Bjorn Olsen, Trine; de Luca, Claudia; Zapata Aranda, Pilar; Kazeroni, Marie; Kovacs, Ernest

    2017-01-01

    This report (Deliverable D2.7) refers to URBANWASTE Work Package 2, Task 2.8. Under this Task the current waste prevention and management practices in the URBANWASTE pilot cases are investigated and best practices coming from the EU context (focussing on touristic processes) are identified. This document shall support the selection of innovative strategies to be carried out within Work Package WP 4. A comparative policy review of national waste management strategies and targets in the Europea...

  18. Dental and Dental Hygiene Intraprofessional Education: A Pilot Program and Assessment of Students' and Patients' Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Vickie E; Karydis, Anastasios; Hottel, Timothy L

    2017-10-01

    Interprofessional and intraprofessional education (when students from two or more professions or within the same profession, respectively, learn about, from, and/or with each other) is crucial for effective interdisciplinary collaboration. The aims of this study were to assess the effectiveness of a clinical intraprofessional education program for dental and dental hygiene students, based on students' expectations and satisfaction with the program and patients' satisfaction with the team-based care. The pilot program was developed at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, where dental hygiene students were paired randomly with dental students scheduled for prophylaxis, scaling and root planing, or periodontal maintenance. Surveys with questions about the students' expectations and satisfaction were distributed to 89 senior dental students and 27 senior dental hygiene students before and after team-based procedures. Another survey was distributed to 17 patients asking about their satisfaction with the team-based care. All 27 dental hygiene students (100% response rate), 51 dental students (57.3% response rate), and all 17 patients (100% response rate) participated in the surveys. The results showed that both the dental and dental hygiene students had high expectations and were overall satisfied with the intraprofessional education. The students' expectations and perceived educational gap (difference between expectations and satisfaction) differed for the dental and dental hygiene students (pstudents were also more satisfied than the female dental students (pstudents' expectations, and the patients were overwhelmingly satisfied with the team-based care. These results suggest that this intraprofessional practice model provided an effective educational experience for both dental and dental hygiene students and patients. The differences between the dental hygiene and dental students' expectations will help in the design of more effective

  19. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H Logie

    Full Text Available Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo (Women Taking Action For Their Health study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti.This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829.Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88% completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26, STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99, condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83, and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39 scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (p<0.05.This pilot study evaluated a PHW psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention among internally displaced women in post-earthquake Haiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific

  20. TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY USING EDUCATIONAL GAMES AND GAMIFICATION STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Rafael de Oliveira Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biotechnology is a new bachelor degree in UFPA, and has been stablished with excellency in the state of Pará. However, there is the need to promote comprehension and learning in Biochemistry, as well as interdisciplinarity, that is an essential part of biotechnology. OBJECTIVES:  To increase learning and interdisciplinarity, educational games were used as tools. The students were instigated to develop educational games in different topics of energy metabolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The games were developed to be used in any teaching environment, since they were made with low-cost and accessible materials. This strategy was applied in three semesters in different Biochemistry classes, between 2012 and 2014. The best games in each class were used in following semesters. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Since the first semester, the failing rates dropped 15% compared to the previous semester, in which educational games were not used. An increase in learning (by observation could be noticed, including comprehension of metabolic pathways and their conections. Twenty games were developed in three semesters, and four of them are still being improved and used in other classes. The participant students answered a questionnaire, in which 47% defined the games as “Relaxing and Instigating”, 33% said the games “Accomplished their didactic and educational role” and 54% said they would recommend the use of these games as a reviewing activity. At the moment, another approach is being used to teach Biochemistry – Gamification, which uses elements found in games, as conflict, cooperation, rules and fun, to improve students’ motivation and engagement. CONCLUSION: As a partial result, there was greater in-class interest and engagement, better comprehension of the course content and the activities gave the students the opportunity to work in groups, to think critically about the themes and to develop opinions based on interdisciplinar and formal

  1. Developing Marketing Higher Education Strategies Based on Students’ Satisfaction Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Orîndaru

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The educational system worldwide is currently under the spotlight as it shows significant signs of an ongoing crisis in its search for resources, visibility in the crowded market and significance to the ever-changing society. Within this framework, higher education institutions (HEIs are taking significant actions for maintaining students as clients of their educational services. As competition on this market is becoming stronger, HEIs face difficulties in keeping students, leading them to a continuous evaluation of student satisfaction indicators. Beyond HEIs’ managers, researchers in marketing higher education have contributed to the development of a comprehensive literature where still very few have forwarded a longitudinal research model for student satisfaction evaluation despite the need for such approaches. Given this context, the current paper presents a first step towards a longitudinal study as it displays, in a compare and contrast vision, the results of two different quantitative research projects developed in the same student community, with the same objective, but conducted in two different years. Among the most significant results of this research refer to an important decline in students’ satisfaction with a significant increase in the number of students that have a neutral perception. This is highly expected to determine a major impact on university’s overall performance and, therefore, it constitutes a strong argument for determining underlying causes, and especially developing the appropriate marketing strategies to tackle with these issues. Based on this result and other similar research outcomes, strategic and tactic recommendations are granted in the final part of this paper.

  2. Integrative medical education: educational strategies and preliminary evaluation of the Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine (ICURAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Christian; Tauschel, Diethard; Neumann, Melanie; Lutz, Gabriele; Cysarz, Dirk; Heusser, Peter; Edelhäuser, Friedrich

    2012-12-01

    the development and preliminary evaluation of a new medical program aimed at educating students in patient-centered integrative care and developing appropriate educational strategies. The Integrated Curriculum for Anthroposophic Medicine (ICURAM) was developed with modules on anthroposophic medicine integrated into the full 6 years of the regular medical curriculum. The educational strategy is the ESPRI(2)T approach, combining Exploratory learning, Supported participation, Patient-based learning, Reflective practice, Integrated learning, an Integrative approach and Team-based learning. The student participation, assessed based on the number of credit points earned per year (ctp/year) through the ICURAM (1 ctp=30 h workload), served as a preliminary indicator of student interest. Of the 412 55%medical students participated in the program: 16% full participation (≥ 4 ctp/year), 18% partial participation (1-3.99 ctp/year) and 22% occasional participation (0.25-0.99 ctp/year). The amount of additional workload taken on by students was between 7.8h/year for occasional participants, 33 h/year for partial participants and 84 h/year for full participants. More than half of medical students were willing to invest a significant amount of additional time in the optional program. An integrative medical curriculum with a student-centered educational strategy seems to be of interest to most medical students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhancing Leadership Quality. TQ Source Tips & Tools: Emerging Strategies to Enhance Educator Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Teaching Quality (TQ) Source Tips & Tools: Emerging Strategies to Enhance Educator Quality is an online resource developed by the TQ Center. It is designed to help education practitioners tap into strategies and resources they can use to enhance educator quality. This publication is based on the TQ Source Tips & Tools topic area "Enhancing…

  4. Forecasting an Inclusive Future: School Counseling Strategies to Deconstruct Educational Heteronormativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strear, Molly M.

    2017-01-01

    This Delphi study engaged a panel of 14 school counselor educators and school counselors in a critical discourse to generate school counseling strategies to deconstruct educational heteronormativity. This study resulted in 51 school counseling strategies that school counselors can employ to deconstruct educational heteronormativity. This article…

  5. Accounting strategy of tritium inventory in the heavy water detritiation pilot plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidica, N.; Stefanescu, I.; Cristescu, I.; Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Lazar, A.; Vasut, F.; Pearsica, C.; Stefan, I.; Prisecaru, I.; Sindilar, G.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology for determination of tritium inventory in a tritium removal facility. The method proposed is based on the developing of computing models for accountancy of the mobile tritium inventory in the separation processes, of the stored tritium and of the trapped tritium inventory in the structure of the process system components. The configuration of the detritiation process is a combination of isotope catalytic exchange between water and hydrogen (LPCE) and the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes (CD). The computing model for tritium inventory in the LPCE process and the CD process will be developed basing on mass transfer coefficients in catalytic isotope exchange reactions and in dual-phase system (liquid-vapour) of hydrogen isotopes distillation process. Accounting of tritium inventory stored in metallic hydride will be based on in-bed calorimetry. Estimation of the trapped tritium inventory can be made by subtraction of the mobile and stored tritium inventories from the global tritium inventory of the plant area. Determinations of the global tritium inventory of the plant area will be made on a regular basis by measuring any tritium quantity entering or leaving the plant area. This methodology is intended to be applied to the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea (Romania) and to the Cernavoda Tritium Removal Facility (which will be built in the next 5-7 years). (authors)

  6. Media literacy as a violence-prevention strategy: a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Theresa; Martin, Kathryn; Afifi, Abdelmonem A; Kraus, Jess

    2010-09-01

    Youth violence is a major unresolved public health problem in the United States and media exposure to violence is a synergistic source of this national problem. One media literacy curriculum designed specifically to address this issue is Beyond Blame: Challenging Violence in the Media. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the curriculum's feasibility as a full-scale intervention. Intervention and control groups were similar with respect to knowledge of the Beyond Blame curriculum at baseline. Intervention students scored much higher on the posttest compared with the control students. The majority (90.2%) of the intervention students reported a significant increase in pre- to posttest score compared with only 18.8% of the control students (p < .0001). The magnitude of the score increase for intervention students was much greater than those in the control group. Several intervention students (N = 49; 19.9%) improved their score by 12 or more points compared with the control students who showed only a 1- to 7-point score increase (N = 3; 18.8%; p < .0001). The pre-and posttest scores were similar for males and females. Three of the six intervention classrooms scored higher on both the pretest and posttest compared with the other three classrooms.

  7. Comparison of between-training-sessions recovery strategies for world-class BMX pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Laurie-Anne; Hausswirth, Christophe; Hays, Arnaud; Vettoretti, Fabrice; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2015-03-01

    To assess the impact of between-training-sessions recovery strategies (passive [PAS], active [ACT], cold-water immersion [CWI], and ingestion of a recovery drink [NUTR]) on maximal cycling performance, perceptions of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and fatigue in world-class BMX riders. Eleven elite BMX athletes, members of the French national team (top country in the 2011 international ranking, 4 medals at the 2012 World Championships, top European country), participated in the study, which involved standardized training periods. Athletes performed 3 maximal-sprint power tests: the first day of the week before the training session and before and after training on the third day of the week (D3). The recovery strategy was randomly assigned to each participant on day 2 immediately after the last training period of the day. Perceptions of DOMS and general fatigue were recorded on D3. After training on D3, the decrease in maximal-sprint power (Pmax) was significantly greater for PAS than with CWI (P=.02) and NUTR (P=.018). Similar results were found with ACT (vs CWI P=.044, and vs NUTR P=.042). Self-reported DOMS and fatigue were significantly greater after PAS than after other strategies. For elite BMX riders, between training days, nutritional and/or CWI recovery strategies appear to be best for reducing muscle fatigue and increasing the capacity to withstand the training schedule.

  8. The use of new technologies for nutritional education in primary schools: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, A; Dall'Asta, M; Brighenti, F; Del Rio, D; Volta, E; Baroni, I; Nalin, M; Coti Zelati, M; Sanna, A; Scazzina, F

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was evaluating if the presence of a humanoid robot could improve the efficacy of a game-based, nutritional education intervention. This was a controlled, school-based pilot intervention carried out on fourth-grade school children (8-10 years old). A total of 112 children underwent a game-based nutritional educational lesson on the importance of carbohydrates. For one group (n = 58), the lesson was carried out by a nutritional educator, the Master of Taste (MT), whereas for another group, (n = 54) the Master of Taste was supported by a humanoid robot (MT + NAO). A third group of children (n = 33) served as control not receiving any lesson. The intervention efficacy was evaluated by questionnaires administered at the beginning and at the end of each intervention. The nutritional knowledge level was evaluated by the cultural-nutritional awareness factor (AF) score. A total of 290 questionnaires were analyzed. Both MT and MT + NAO interventions significantly increased nutritional knowledge. At the end of the study, children in the MT and MT + NAO group showed similar AF scores, and the AF scores of both intervention groups were significantly higher than the AF score of the control group. This study showed a significant increase in the nutritional knowledge of children involved in a game-based, single-lesson, educational intervention performed by a figure that has a background in food science. However, the presence of a humanoid robot to support this figure's teaching activity did not result in any significant learning improvement. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [The Effectiveness of a Strategy for the Flexible Management of Nursing Human Resources: A Pilot Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-I; Lu, Meei-Shiow

    2017-12-01

    The flexibility of a hospital's nursing-related human resource management policies affects the working willingness and retention of nurses. To explore the effectiveness of a flexible nursing-related human resource management strategy. This quasi-experimental research used a one group pretest-posttest design. Supervisors at participating hospitals attended the "Application of Flexible Nursing Human Resources Management Strategies" workshop, which introduced the related measures and assessed nurses' pretest satisfaction. After these measures were implemented at the participating hospitals, implementation-related problems were investigated and appropriate consultation was provided. The posttest was implemented after the end of the project. Data were collected from nurses at the participating hospitals who had served in their present hospital for more than three months. The participating hospitals were all nationally certified healthcare providers, including 13 medical centers, 17 regional hospitals, and 3 district hospitals. A total of nurses 2,810 nurses took the pretest and 2,437 took the posttest. The research instruments included the "Satisfaction with working conditions and system flexibility" scale and the "Flexible nursing human resource management strategies". The effectiveness of the implemented strategy was assessed using independent samples t-test and variance analysis. The result of implementing the flexible strategies shows that the total mean of pretest satisfaction (Likert 5 scores) was 3.47 (SD = 0.65), and the posttest satisfaction was 3.52 (SD = 0.65), with significant statistical differences in task, numerical, divisional, and leading flexibility. Due to the good implementation effectiveness, the authors strongly suggest that all of the participating hospitals continue to apply this strategic model to move toward a more flexible nursing system and work.

  10. A pilot study designed to acquaint medical educators with basic pedagogic principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, P J; Brawer, J; Steinert, Y; Chalk, C; McLeod, A

    2008-02-01

    Faculty development activities in medical schools regularly target teaching behaviours but rarely address basic pedagogic principles underlying those behaviours. Although many teachers have an intuitive or tacit knowledge of basic pedagogic principles, overt knowledge of fundamental educational principles is rare. We conducted a short-term pilot study designed to transform teachers' tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge of pedagogic principles. We hypothesized that conscious awareness of these principles will positively influence their teaching effectiveness. The intervention included a workshop, provision of a workbook on pedagogic principles and free access to educational consultants. For the intervention, we chose a purposive sample of experienced teachers at our medical school. Evaluation of the impact of the intervention using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews revealed three notable findings; 1. Participants were surprised to discover the existence of an extensive body of pedagogic science underlying teaching and learning. 2. They were enthusiastic about the intervention and expressed interest in learning more about basic pedagogic principles. 3. The knowledge acquired had an immediate impact on their teaching.

  11. Being uninformed on informed consent: a pilot survey of medical education faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Rebecca C

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes a pilot survey of faculty involved in medical education. The questionnaire focuses on their understanding of IRB policies at their institution, specifically in relation to the use of student assessment and curriculum evaluation information for scholarship. Methods An anonymous survey was distributed to medical educators in a variety of venues. Two brief scenarios of typical student assessment or curriculum evaluation activities were presented and respondents were asked to indicate their likely course of action related to IRB approval. The questionnaire also asked respondents about their knowledge of institutional policies related to IRB approval. Results A total of 121 completed surveys were obtained; 59 (50% respondents identified themselves as from community-based medical schools. For the first scenario, 78 respondents (66% would have contact with the IRB; this increased to 97 respondents (82% for the second scenario. For both scenarios, contact with the IRB was less likely among respondents from research-intensive institutions. Sixty respondents (55% were unsure if their institutions had policies addressing evaluation data used for scholarship. Fifty respondents (41% indicated no prior discussions at their institutions regarding IRB requirements. Conclusion Many faculty members are unaware of IRB policies at their medical schools related to the use of medical student information. To the extent that policies are in place, they are highly variable across schools suggesting little standardization in faculty understanding and/or institutional implementation. Principles to guide faculty decision-making are provided.

  12. Pediatric palliative care education for medical students: development and evaluation of a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewska-Eksterowicz, Aleksandra; Kedzierska, Bogna; Cynker-McCarthy, Małgorzata; Przysło, Łukasz; Stolarska, Małgorzata; Nowicki, Grzegorz F; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    In Poland, medical curricula cover palliative care for adults, not for children. This paper evaluates feedback of students who participated in a pilot pediatric palliative care education program. An anonymous questionnaire was designed for the students; they were asked to assess each aspect of the program on a scale of 0 to 6 (0 denoted complete dissatisfaction; 6, complete satisfaction). 207 students participated in the program, 197 evaluated it, and 160 formed the research data group. More than 50 percent gave the program 5 points (mean +/- SD; 4.91 +/- 0.9). A total of 79 students (44 percent) assessed the material as 51 to 75 percent new, and 56 students (31 percent) placed it between 76 and 100 percent. A majority indicated that the material would be most useful to them in their future clinical work. Most respondents (78 percent) stated that pediatric palliative care should be included in the pediatrics curriculum. The contribution of the program instructors was given a high score (on average, 5.26 +/- 0.52). The pediatric palliative care education program was feasible, and it was well received by the students who undertook it.

  13. Plagiarism in the Context of Education and Evolving Detection Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Nurmashev, Bekaidar; Seksenbayev, Bakhytzhan; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Kitas, George D

    2017-08-01

    Plagiarism may take place in any scientific journals despite currently employed anti-plagiarism tools. The absence of widely acceptable definitions of research misconduct and reliance solely on similarity checks do not allow journal editors to prevent most complex cases of recycling of scientific information and wasteful, or 'predatory,' publishing. This article analyses Scopus-based publication activity and evidence on poor writing, lack of related training, emerging anti-plagiarism strategies, and new forms of massive wasting of resources by publishing largely recycled items, which evade the 'red flags' of similarity checks. In some non-Anglophone countries 'copy-and-paste' writing still plagues pre- and postgraduate education. Poor research management, absence of courses on publication ethics, and limited access to quality sources confound plagiarism as a cross-cultural and multidisciplinary phenomenon. Over the past decade, the advent of anti-plagiarism software checks has helped uncover elementary forms of textual recycling across journals. But such a tool alone proves inefficient for preventing complex forms of plagiarism. Recent mass retractions of plagiarized articles by reputable open-access journals point to critical deficiencies of current anti-plagiarism software that do not recognize manipulative paraphrasing and editing. Manipulative editing also finds its way to predatory journals, ignoring the adherence to publication ethics and accommodating nonsense plagiarized items. The evolving preventive strategies are increasingly relying on intelligent (semantic) digital technologies, comprehensively evaluating texts, keywords, graphics, and reference lists. It is the right time to enforce adherence to global editorial guidance and implement a comprehensive anti-plagiarism strategy by helping all stakeholders of scholarly communication. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  14. Entrepreneurship and response strategies to challenges in engineering and design education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ulrik; Pineda, Andres Felipe Valderrama

    2012-01-01

    are response strategies from engineering communities, professors and institutions to perceived challenges. We argue that all engineering educators deal in one way or another with the three response strategies when approaching issues of curricular design, academicreform and the international accreditation...

  15. Gender mainstreaming in legal education in Serbia: A pilot analysis of curricula and textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujadinović Dragica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The general aim of this paper is to initiate a long-lasting systemic process of reviewing higher education in Serbia from a gender-sensitive point of view, and to offer initial input for building action plans and policies oriented towards this goal. The main focus is on analyzing legal studies from a gender-sensitive point of view and on initiating gender mainstreaming within law schools. However, this paper can aspire only to modest achievements, dealing solely with preliminary research of legal studies, with a limited but a representative sample. Namely, only two accredited study programs at two public university faculties of law in Serbia - at the Faculty of Law in Belgrade and the Faculty of Law in Niš - were taken into consideration. This pilot analysis is based on an established methodology for gender-sensitive analysis of curricula as well as of syllabi and textbooks for certain legal courses. The mentioned methodology introduces specific gender-sensitive indicators as well as three categories for assessing learning outcomes of study programs, syllabi and textbooks: gender-negative, gender-neutral, and gender-sensitive. The focus of the investigation was on of the following courses: Sociology of Law, Constitutional Law, Family Law, Labor Law, and Criminal Law. The meaning and importance of gender mainstreaming in law schools is explained in the Introduction. The normative and strategic framework for gender mainstreaming in higher education in Serbia is presented in the second chapter. The main focus of analysis - the reconsideration of curricula and textbooks from a gender perspective - is elaborated through the following three chapters: the third chapter explores the main indicators of the gender-sensitive analysis of legal education; the fourth is devoted to the analytical framework and methodology of investigation; chapter five presents the research results and their interpretation. The concluding notes clarify discrepancies between

  16. The Value of Peer Mentorship as an Educational Strategy in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Tannis; Watkins, Kathy

    2018-04-01

    The emphasis of this article is to provide nursing instructors with a valuable educational strategy grounded in andragogical principles for reflection and implementation in their educational practice. An expository review of the value of peer mentorship as an educational strategy that fits within the humanistic adult education philosophy and social constructivism theory was conducted. The value in peer mentorship is greatest for nursing students as mentors and mentees, predominantly in encouraging self-directed learning, building relationships, providing emotional and educational support, and developing collaboration and leadership skills. In addition, peer mentorship provides value to instructors and educational institutions by supporting a positive student-centered learning environment that enhances student success. Peer mentorship as a valuable educational strategy can be recognized for future use within all levels of nursing education and can be applied universally to teaching and learning within other health care educational settings. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(4):217-224.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Pilot study evaluating the effects of an intervention to enhance culturally appropriate hypertension education among healthcare providers in a primary care setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beune, E.J.A.J.; Bindels, P.J.E.; Mohrs, J.; Stronks, K.; Haafkens, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To improve hypertension care for ethnic minority patients of African descent in the Netherlands, we developed a provider intervention to facilitate the delivery of culturally appropriate hypertension education. This pilot study evaluates how the intervention affected the

  18. Pilot study evaluating the effects of an intervention to enhance culturally appropriate hypertension education among healthcare providers in a primary care setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J.A.J. Beune (Erik Jaj); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); J. Mohrs (Jacob); K. Stronks (Karien); J.A. Haafkens (Joke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To improve hypertension care for ethnic minority patients of African descent in the Netherlands, we developed a provider intervention to facilitate the delivery of culturally appropriate hypertension education. This pilot study evaluates how the intervention affected the

  19. Environmental education strategies for decentralized schools in the Colombian educative system: the Medellin experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunia S. Rentería

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental education is a condition to enable an attitudinal and aptitudinal generation of change, a condition that facilitates the balance between man and his surroundings. Environmental education needs the support of almost every discipline. In order to solve environmental problems, one must count on the active participation of a wide set of people and institutions. This article examines environmental education in Colombia focusing on the case of training programs, making emphasis on a case study that took place in Medellín, capital of the department of Antioquia. Results show there is a lack of clear conceptualization about the reasons and ultimate purposes concerning why environmental education is finally accomplished. That situation has conducted to the formulation of objectives and strategies that are too general to be properly fulfilled, and the implementation of detailed, and isolated actions.Lack of coordination between institutions and groups has resulted in duplicity of functions and efforts, which in turn result in a far from rational use of scarce resources. The conclusion is that environmental education in Colombia is still inefficient and must advance to higher levels, taking into account these three main perspectives: environmental, educative and pedagogic.

  20. Strategy for Nuclear Technology Education at Uppsala University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterlund, M.; Hakansson, A.; Tengborn, E.

    2010-01-01

    After the TMI accident 1979, and later the Tjernobyl accident, the future of nuclear power was vividly debated in Sweden. The negative public opinion governed a number of political decisions that marked an ambition to out-phase nuclear power prior to 2010. Due to this, the student's interest in nuclear technology ceased and together with the fact that public funding to nuclear technology was withdrawn, academic research and education within the field were effectively dismounted. In the beginning of 1990 it became clear to the society that nuclear power could not easily be closed down and the issue of the future competence supply to the nuclear industry was initiated. In the mid-nineties the situation became acute due to the fact that personnel in the nuclear industry started to retire in an increasing pace necessitating measures to be taken in order to secure the future operation of the nuclear power plants. In the year 2000, the Swedish nuclear power plants, Westinghouse Electric Sweden and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority embarked a project together with the three major universities in the field, Uppsala University, The Royal Institute of Technology and Chalmers University of Technology. The aim of this project was to define a financial platform for reconstructing the Swedish research and education in nuclear technology. The project, named the Swedish Centre for Nuclear Technology (SKC), has during a decade been the major financier to nuclear technology research and education. Using funding from SKC, Uppsala University formulated a strategy along two tracks: 1) Instead of creating ambitious master programs in nuclear technology, the already existing engineering programs in a wide range of fields were utilized to expose as many students as possible to nuclear technology. 2) A program was initiated together with the nuclear industry aiming at educating newly employed personnel. The result is encouraging; starting from essentially zero, typically 100

  1. Androgen Deprivation Therapy and maintenance of intimacy: a randomized controlled pilot study of an educational intervention for patients and their partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lauren M; Hampton, Amy J; Wassersug, Richard J; Thomas, Bejoy C; Robinson, John W

    2013-03-01

    Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer is associated with many treatment side effects that tend to erode couples' intimacy. We piloted a randomized controlled trial to investigate the effect of an educational intervention designed to preserve couples' intimacy in the face of ADT. Couples were recruited at the time the patient was first prescribed ADT and were randomized to a treatment or control group. Those in the treatment group were asked to read an educational guide and participate in an educational session designed to inform couples about possible ADT side effects and management strategies. To assess changes in the couples' relationships, they were administered the Dyadic Adjustment Scale and the Personal Assessment of Intimacy in Relationships questionnaire prior to randomization and again at 6 months. While results were not statistically significant, trends and effect sizes suggest that the educational intervention helped attenuate declines in intimacy for patients, but not for their partners. Couples who participated in the intervention were more successful at maintaining sexual activity than were couples in the control group. ADT places considerable strain on intimate relationships, particularly for the partners. It appears that patients who receive help in anticipating and managing ADT related changes report better dyadic adjustment and closer intimacy. More efforts are needed to develop interventions to benefit patients' partners. We conclude that the intervention holds promise and that a full-scale evaluation of the intervention is both feasible and warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Education for National Identity: Arab Schools Principals and Teachers Dilemmas and Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid; Ibrahim, Fadia

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses strategies used by Arab principals and teachers in Israel to cope with dilemmas involved in education for national identity stemming from conflict between two national narratives. While the Israeli Ministry of Education expects the Arab education system to educate students according to the Jewish State's values, Palestinian…

  3. Differential use of learning strategies in first-year higher education: the impact of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donche, Vincent; De Maeyer, Sven; Coertjens, Liesje; Van Daal, Tine; Van Petegem, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Although the evidence in support of the variability of students' learning strategies has expanded in recent years, less is known about the explanatory base of these individual differences in terms of the joint influences of personal and contextual characteristics. Previous studies have often investigated how student learning is associated with either personal or contextual factors. This study takes an integrative research perspective into account and examines the joint effects of personality, academic motivation, and teaching strategies on students' learning strategies in a same educational context in first-year higher education. In this study, 1,126 undergraduate students and 90 lecturers from eight professional bachelor programmes in a university college participated. Self-report measures were used to measure students' personality, academic motivation, and learning strategies. Students' processing and regulation strategies are mapped using the Inventory of Learning Styles. Key characteristics of more content-focused versus learning-focused teaching strategies were measured. Multivariate multi-level analysis was used to take the nested data structure and interrelatedness of learning strategies into account. Different personality traits (openness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism) and academic motivation (amotivation, autonomous, and controlled motivation) were found to be independently associated with student learning strategies. Besides these student characteristics, also teaching strategies were found to be directly associated with learning strategies. The study makes clear that the impact of teaching strategies on learning strategies in first-year higher education cannot be overlooked nor overinterpreted, due to the importance of students' personality and academic motivation which also partly explain why students learn the way they do. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Effectiveness of a Mindfulness-Based Childbirth Education pilot study on maternal self-efficacy and fear of childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Jean; Hauck, Yvonne; Fisher, Colleen; Bayes, Sara; Schutze, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study tested the feasibility and effectiveness of using Mindfulness-Based Childbirth Education (MBCE), a novel integration of mindfulness meditation and skills-based childbirth education, for mental health promotion with pregnant women. The MBCE protocol aimed to reduce fear of birth, anxiety, and stress and improve maternal self-efficacy. This pilot study also aimed to determine the acceptability and feasibility of the MBCE protocol. A single-arm pilot study of the MBCE intervention using a repeated-measures design was used to analyze data before and after the MBCE intervention to determine change trends with key outcome variables: mindfulness; depression, anxiety, and stress; childbirth self-efficacy; and fear of childbirth. Pregnant women (18-28 weeks' gestation) and their support companions attended weekly MBCE group sessions over 8 weeks in an Australian community setting. Of the 18 women who began and completed the intervention, missing data allowed for complete data from 12 participants to be analyzed. Statistically significant improvements and large effect sizes were observed for childbirth self-efficacy and fear of childbirth. Improvements in depression, mindfulness, and birth outcome expectations were underpowered. At postnatal follow-up significant improvements were found in anxiety, whereas improvements in mindfulness, stress, and fear of birth were significant at a less conservative alpha level. This pilot study demonstrated that a blended mindfulness and skills-based childbirth education intervention was acceptable to women and was associated with improvements in women's sense of control and confidence in giving birth. Previous findings that low self-efficacy and high childbirth fear are linked to greater labor pain, stress reactivity, and trauma suggest the observed improvements in these variables have important implications for improving maternal mental health and associated child health outcomes. Ways in which these outcomes can be

  5. [Control strategies of nitrogen removal process in a pilot test of the southern WWTP based on the nitrogen balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ying-He; Liu, Pei-Ju; Wang, Lei; Tian, Zhong-Kai; Liu, Xiao-Ying

    2014-04-01

    By building the mass balance of nitrogen in A2/O process, the nitrogen model which raised some strategies on how to control sludge return ratio and mixed liquid return ratio to make the effluent nitrogen achieve the national standard A under different influent total nitrogen (TN) , was set up. And the presumed parameters were verified by the pilot test of the Wuhan's Longwangzui WWTP. The result showed that when the temperature and the TN were over 15 degrees C and below 30 mg x L(-1) respectively, the mixed liquid return ratio was 0. When the temperature was between 10 degrees C and 15 degrees C and TN was over 30 mg x L(-1), higher MLSS and DO elevated N removal. When the temperature was far below 10 degrees C, the mixed liquid return ratio was also at a higher level. Based on the Wuhan's Longwangzui WWTP influent water quality, measures of adjusting the return ratio were well adapted to obtain acceptable nitrogen effluent.

  6. Dietary Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis: Development and Pilot-Testing of an Evidence Based Patient Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Eilers, Marlene; von Geldern, Gloria; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Köpke, Sascha; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Dietary factors have been discussed to influence risk or disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Specific diets are widely used among patients with MS. To design and pilot-test an evidence based patient education program on dietary factors in MS. We performed a systematic literature search on the effectiveness of dietary interventions in MS. A web-based survey among 337 patients with MS and 136 healthy controls assessed knowledge, dietary habits and information needs. An interactive group education program was developed and pilot-tested. Fifteen randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the systematic review. Quality of evidence was low and no clear benefit could be seen. Patients with MS significantly more often adhered to a `Mediterranean Diet`(29.7% versus 14.0%, peducation program with 13 participants showed excellent comprehensibility and the MS-specific content was judged as very important. However, the poor evidence base for dietary approaches in MS was perceived disappointing. Development and pilot-testing of an evidence-based patient education program on nutrition and MS is feasible. Patient satisfaction with the program suffers from the lack of evidence. Further research should focus on generating evidence for the potential influence of lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity) on MS disease course thus meeting the needs of patients with MS.

  7. Provincial/territorial public education and outreach hubs on climate change : evaluation of pilot phase : Manitoba public education and outreach hub : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerry, A.

    2003-01-01

    In January 2001, the Manitoba government established the pilot hub for climate change public education and outreach (PEO) in the province. The PEO is hosted by Manitoba Eco-Network, an affiliate of the Canadian Environmental Network located in Winnipeg. The aim of the PEO is to conduct public education as it relates to the environment. In addition, it aims to enhance communications between various member organizations. The main goal of the Manitoba Hub is to build awareness and empower citizens of Manitoba to act in reducing greenhouse gas emissions at the individual and community level. An evaluation of the pilot was performed, and the results published in this report. The pilot proved successful, according to stakeholder support for continuing this initiative further. Some of the recommendations to improve on the initiative included: (1) development of a new business plan for the next phase, (2) the Climate Change Connection (CCC) should continue to look for opportunities to expand beyond traditional climate change stake holders, (3) negotiations should continue between the Hub and the Province on its appropriate role with the new Climate Change/Greenhouse Gas Community Challenge, and (4) a greater role in capacity building with local groups and members, such as professional development and training opportunities; the provision of tools for others to perform outreach; and, assistance for groups with funding. The valuable lessons learned throughout the pilot phase were discussed in this document. 3 tabs

  8. [Social media: forum webcare as a proactive information strategy in health promotion: Results of a pilot project by the BZgA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, T; Nöcker, Guido

    2015-09-01

    Over several weeks in 2013, the BZgA pilot project "SoMe" (August 2012 to February 2014) tested and investigated various social media interventions in the fields of family planning and sex education. The interventions included the tool "forum webcare," which was used in four forums for pregnant women and three for young people. The term webcare originally described a customer-oriented communication strategy of the web economy. The term includes elements of reputation management, customer care, and online marketing. In the present pilot project, forum webcare has been understood and applied in the sense of "virtual street work," which means that issues on health topics in non-self-operated forums were identified and answered. The design was based on the Precede-Proceed Model. In the phases of analysis, implementation, and evaluation the project used chronologically and methodologically interlaced and mutually controlling methods such as online test groups, intensive interviews, and the evaluation of data on web use. The analysis indicated that the target groups of the project used the forums quite often; that they had a positive attitude toward the idea of webcare providing contributions from experts working for public institutions; and that the risk of reactance was low. Forum webcare allows important supplementary and well-founded information to be brought into the discussions. At the same time the results of the project show that users, when keeping to certain rules, mostly see webcare as a welcome addition to incomplete information and the improvement of faulty information, and appreciate it as quality enhancement for the forum. From the view of the information provider, forum webcare is more a chance to address numerous passive recipients rather than communicating with single users. At the same time the instrument provides the chance to learn from users of the forums, and to become familiar with and be able to respond to their needs and the way in which they

  9. Pre-operative self-efficacy education vs. usual care for patients undergoing joint replacement surgery: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Marie; Walker, Rachel; Aitken, Leanne M; Freeman, Andrea; Pavey, Sharlene; Cantrill, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Hip and knee replacement is a major surgical procedure performed worldwide. Despite 20 or so years of clinical research and care guidelines, the management of acute postoperative pain continues to be a concern. A growing number of self-efficacy strategies are being included in education programs for patients to enable then to have a central role in managing their illness and symptoms. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of testing an education intervention to improve self-efficacy in patients undergoing hip or knee replacement. A single-blinded, parallel, pilot randomised control trial design was used. Ninety-one patients undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Intervention group participants were given a DVD demonstrating self-efficacy activities to undertake four times before admission. Feasibility criteria related to recruitment, protocol adherence and missing data were assessed. Participants were assessed for pain, anxiety, self-efficacy and healthcare utilisation. In relation to recruitment, 55% of screened patients were eligible and of these 81% enrolled (n = 91). Exclusion following randomisation was 10% with missing data ranging from 0 to 20.7%. Nineteen per cent of participants were lost to follow up in the control group and 20% lost to follow up in DVD group. Protocol adherence to components of the intervention varied. Both groups were generally satisfied with pain management during hospitalisation, and there were no differences in groups on clinical outcome measures. Preliminary evidence for the benefits of self-efficacy-based education for patients undergoing hip or knee replacement was identified. Additional findings included a need to strengthen the intervention and reducing the number of data collection points to improve the protocol, missing data and numbers lost to follow up before a larger trial is undertaken. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Mobile application as a prenatal education and engagement tool: A randomized controlled pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Christy J W; Canzona, Mollie Rose; Cafferty, Lauren A; Hodge, Joshua A

    2016-04-01

    Research has shown that mobile applications provide a powerful alternative to traditional paper diaries; however, little data exists in comparing apps to the traditional mode of paper as a patient education and engagement tool in the clinical setting. This study was designed to compare the effectiveness of a mobile app versus a spiral-notebook guide throughout prenatal care. This randomized (n=173) controlled pilot was conducted at an East Coast community hospital. Chi-square and repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to test intervention effects in the sample of 127 pregnant mothers who completed their prenatal care in the healthcare system. Patients who were distributed the mobile application used the tool to record information about pregnancy more frequently (p=.04) and developed greater patient activation (p=.02) than patients who were distributed notebooks. No difference was detected on interpersonal clinical communication. A mobile application successfully activated a patient population in which self-management is a critical factor. This study shows that mobile apps can prompt greater use and result in more activated patients. Findings may be translated to other patient populations who receive recurring care for chronic disease. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. A pilot educational intervention for headache and concussion: The headache and arts program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minen, Mia T; Boubour, Alexandra

    2018-04-13

    Using a science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) curriculum, we developed, piloted, and tested the Headache and Arts Program. This program seeks to increase knowledge and awareness of migraine and concussion among high school students through a visual arts-based curriculum. We developed a 2-week Headache and Arts Program with lesson plans and art assignments for high school visual arts classes and an age-appropriate assessment to assess students' knowledge of migraine and concussion. We assessed students' knowledge through (1) the creation of artwork that depicted the experience of a migraine or concussion, (2) the conception and implementation of methods to transfer knowledge gained through the program, and (3) preassessment and postassessment results. The assessment was distributed to all students prior to the Headache and Arts Program. In a smaller sample, we distributed the assessment 3 months after the program to assess longitudinal effects. Descriptive analyses and p values were calculated using SPSS V.24 and Microsoft Excel. Forty-eight students participated in the research program. Students created artwork that integrated STEAM knowledge learned through the program and applied creative methods to teach others about migraine and concussion. At baseline, students' total scores averaged 67.6% correct. Total scores for the longitudinal preassessment, immediate postassessment, and delayed 3-month postassessment averaged 69.4%, 72.8%, and 80.0% correct, respectively. The use of a visual arts-based curriculum may be effective for migraine and concussion education among high school students. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  12. Banking on Fatherhood: Pilot Studies of a Computerized Educational Tool on Sperm Banking before Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, Eric; Martinetti, Paul; Sui, Dawen; Schover, Leslie R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We conducted pilot studies of the feasibility and efficacy of an interactive, computerized educational tool, Banking on Fatherhood (BOF METHODS Two small randomized trials were conducted, with 20 male cancer patients eligible to bank sperm in Study 1 and 19 oncology fellows or residents in Study 2. In each trial, half of subjects viewed BOF before completing questionnaires, and half viewed it afterwards. Outcome measures included a knowledge test in both trials and a decisional conflict scale in the patient trial. All participants, plus a panel of ten experts, ultimately viewed BOF and completed a form evaluating its usability and value. RESULTS Patients who completed questionnaires after viewing BOF had significantly less decisional conflict about banking sperm than those who had not viewed it(P = 0.0065), but knowledge scores were not significantly different between groups. Physicians who filled out questionnaires after viewing BOF scored significantly higher on the Knowledge Test (P banking. Research with larger groups is needed to validate its effectiveness. PMID:19061198

  13. Comparing Self-Injection Teaching Strategies for Patients With Breast Cancer and Their Caregivers: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Cartlidge, Erica; Romanoff, Sonya; Thom, Bridgette; Burrows Walters, Chasity

    2016-10-01

    A prospective, quasiexperimental pilot study with a sequential design was performed to compare two methods of teaching self-injection. The study examined 50 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant or neoadjuvant treatment and their caregivers to determine if simulation during the teaching experience affects patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, and self-confidence, as well as nurse satisfaction. Structured questionnaires were administered before the teaching, immediately after the teaching, and after the injection was performed at home. Nurses who performed the teaching also completed a questionnaire after the teaching. Use of simulation did not affect patient/caregiver satisfaction, worry, or self-confidence. The largest impact on learner worry was the actual teaching experience, regardless of the methodology used. Nurses reported greater levels of satisfaction when simulation was part of the teaching. Patient/caregiver satisfaction with the teaching experience decreased after performing the injection at home. Additional research is needed to identify the best methodology for teaching patients and caregivers self-injection. Data from this study revealed that the addition of simulation during teaching does not always translate to better education. In addition, based on patient/caregiver reports, no substitution exists for actual injection administration.

  14. Pilot Study of iPad Incorporation Into Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Mark J; Crandley, Edwin F; Rumph, Jake S; Kirk, Susan E; Dunlap, Neal E; Rahimi, Asal S; Turner, A Benton; Larner, James M; Read, Paul W

    2013-03-01

    Increased documentation and charting requirements are challenging for residents, given duty hour limits. Use of mobile electronic devices may help residents complete these tasks efficiently. To collect initial data on usage rates, information technology (IT) support requirements, and resident use of iPads during training. In this pilot study, we provided 12 residents/fellows from various specialties at the University of Virginia with an iPad with IT support. The system used a virtual private network with access to the institution's electronic health record. Participants were allowed to develop their own methods and systems for personalized iPad use, and after 9 months they provided data on the utility of the iPad. Feedback from the IT team also was obtained. Average iPad use was 2.1 h/d (range, 0.5-6 h/d). The average self-reported reduction in administrative work due to the iPad was 2.7 h/wk (range, 0-9 h/wk). A total of 75% (9 of 12) of the users would recommend universal adoption among residents and fellows. More than 90% (11 of 12) of users reported the iPad would improve communication for coordination of care. A total of 68% (8 of 12) of users reported that an iPad facilitated their activities as educators of medical students and junior residents. Residents cited slow data entry into the electronic health record and hospital areas lacking Wi-Fi connectivity as potential drawbacks to iPad use. The IT team reported minimal support time for device setup, maintenance, and upgrades, and limited security risks. The iPad may contribute to increased clinical efficiency, reduced hours spent on administrative tasks, and enhanced educational opportunities for residents, with minimal IT support.

  15. Pilot Study of iPad Incorporation Into Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Mark J.; Crandley, Edwin F.; Rumph, Jake S.; Kirk, Susan E.; Dunlap, Neal E.; Rahimi, Asal S.; Turner, A. Benton; Larner, James M.; Read, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased documentation and charting requirements are challenging for residents, given duty hour limits. Use of mobile electronic devices may help residents complete these tasks efficiently. Objective To collect initial data on usage rates, information technology (IT) support requirements, and resident use of iPads during training. Methods In this pilot study, we provided 12 residents/fellows from various specialties at the University of Virginia with an iPad with IT support. The system used a virtual private network with access to the institution's electronic health record. Participants were allowed to develop their own methods and systems for personalized iPad use, and after 9 months they provided data on the utility of the iPad. Feedback from the IT team also was obtained. Results Average iPad use was 2.1 h/d (range, 0.5–6 h/d). The average self-reported reduction in administrative work due to the iPad was 2.7 h/wk (range, 0–9 h/wk). A total of 75% (9 of 12) of the users would recommend universal adoption among residents and fellows. More than 90% (11 of 12) of users reported the iPad would improve communication for coordination of care. A total of 68% (8 of 12) of users reported that an iPad facilitated their activities as educators of medical students and junior residents. Residents cited slow data entry into the electronic health record and hospital areas lacking Wi-Fi connectivity as potential drawbacks to iPad use. The IT team reported minimal support time for device setup, maintenance, and upgrades, and limited security risks. Conclusions The iPad may contribute to increased clinical efficiency, reduced hours spent on administrative tasks, and enhanced educational opportunities for residents, with minimal IT support. PMID:24404242

  16. Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE): results from two feasibility pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rebecca E; Parker, Nathan H; Soltero, Erica G; Ledoux, Tracey A; Mama, Scherezade K; McNeill, Lorna

    2017-03-10

    Low physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption in early childhood are continued public health challenges. This manuscript describes outcomes from two pilot studies for Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE), a program designed to increase PA and F&V consumption among 3 to 5 year old children. SAGE was developed using community-based participatory research (CBPR) and delivered to children (N = 89) in early care and education centers (ECEC, N = 6) in two US cities. Children participated in 12 one-hour sessions that included songs, games, and interactive learning activities involving garden maintenance and taste tests. We evaluated reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation, and potential for maintenance of SAGE following the RE-AIM framework. Reach was evaluated by comparing demographic characteristics among SAGE participants and residents of target geographic areas. Efficacy was evaluated with accelerometer-measured PA, F&V consumption, and eating in the absence of hunger among children, parenting practices regarding PA, and home availability of F&V. Adoption was evaluated by the number of ECEC that participated relative to the number of ECEC that were recruited. Implementation was evaluated by completion rates of planned SAGE lessons and activities, and potential for maintenance was evaluated with a parent satisfaction survey. SAGE reached ECEC in neighborhoods representing a wide range of socioeconomic status, with participants' sociodemographic characteristics representing those of the intervention areas. Children significantly increased PA during SAGE lessons compared to usual lessons, but they also consumed more calories in the absence of hunger in post- vs. pre-intervention tests (both p nutrition guidelines for young children. SAGE successfully translated national PA guidelines to practice for young children but was less successful with nutrition guidelines. High adoption and implementation and favorable parent

  17. Field Geophysics at SAGE: Strategies for Effective Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, L. W.; Baldridge, W. S.; Jiracek, G. R.; Biehler, S.; Ferguson, J. F.; Pellerin, L.; McPhee, D. K.; Bedrosian, P. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Hasterok, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience) is a unique program of education and research in geophysical field methods for undergraduate and graduate students from any university and for professionals. The core program is held for 4 weeks each summer in New Mexico and for an additional week in the following academic year in San Diego for U.S. undergraduates supported by the NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. Since SAGE was initiated in 1983, 730 students have participated in the program. NSF REU funding for SAGE began in 1990 and 319 REU students have completed SAGE through 2011. The primary objectives of SAGE are to teach the major geophysical exploration methods (seismic, gravity, magnetics, electromagnetics); apply these methods to the solution of specific problems (environmental, archaeological, hydrologic, geologic structure and stratigraphy); gain experience in processing, modeling and interpretation of geophysical data; and integrate the geophysical models and interpretations with geology. Additional objectives of SAGE include conducting research on the Rio Grande rift of northern New Mexico, and providing information on geophysics careers and professional development experiences to SAGE participants. Successful education, field and research strategies that we have implemented over the years include: 1. learn by doing; 2. mix lecture/discussion, field work, data processing and analysis, modeling and interpretation, and presentation of results; 3. a two-tier team approach - method/technique oriented teams and interpretation/integration teams (where each team includes persons representing different methods), provides focus, in-depth study, opportunity for innovation, and promotes teamwork and a multi-disciplinary approach; 4. emphasis on presentations/reports - each team (and all team members) make presentation, each student completes a written report; 5. experiment design discussion - students help design field program and consider

  18. Development and pilot study of a marketing strategy for primary care/internet-based depression prevention intervention for adolescents (the CATCH-IT intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Benjamin W; Watson, Natalie; Bridges, John F P; Fogel, Joshua; Galas, Jill; Kramer, Clarke; Connery, Marc; McGill, Ann; Marko, Monika; Cardenas, Alonso; Landsback, Josephine; Dmochowska, Karoline; Kuwabara, Sachiko A; Ellis, Justin; Prochaska, Micah; Bell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent depression is both common and burdensome, and while evidence-based strategies have been developed to prevent adolescent depression, participation in such interventions remains extremely low, with less than 3% of at-risk individuals participating. To promote participation in evidence-based preventive strategies, a rigorous marketing strategy is needed to translate research into practice. To develop and pilot a rigorous marketing strategy for engaging at-risk individuals with an Internet-based depression prevention intervention in primary care targeting key attitudes and beliefs. A marketing design group was constituted to develop a marketing strategy based on the principles of targeting, positioning/competitor analysis, decision analysis, and promotion/distribution and incorporating contemporary models of behavior change. We evaluated the formative quality of the intervention and observed the fielding experience for prevention using a pilot study (observational) design. The marketing plan focused on "resiliency building" rather than "depression intervention" and was relayed by office staff and the Internet site. Twelve practices successfully implemented the intervention and recruited a diverse sample of adolescents with > 30% of all those with positive screens and > 80% of those eligible after phone assessment enrolling in the study with a cost of $58 per enrollee. Adolescent motivation for depression prevention (1-10 scale) increased from a baseline mean value of 7.45 (SD = 2.05) to 8.07 poststudy (SD = 1.33) (P = .048). Marketing strategies for preventive interventions for mental disorders can be developed and successfully introduced and marketed in primary care.

  19. First "glass" education: telementored cardiac ultrasonography using Google Glass- a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Patrick M; Mallin, Michael; Youngquist, Scott T; Cotton, Jennifer; Aboul-Hosn, Nael; Dawson, Matt

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of telementored instruction in bedside ultrasonography (US) using Google Glass. The authors sought to examine whether first-time US users could obtain adequate parasternal long axis (PSLA) views to approximate ejection fraction (EF) using Google Glass telementoring. This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded study. Eighteen second-year medical students were randomized into three groups and tasked with obtaining PSLA cardiac imaging. Group A received real-time telementored education through Google Glass via Google Hangout from a remotely located expert. Group B received bedside education from the same expert. Group C represented the control and received no instruction. Each subject was given 3 minutes to obtain a best PSLA cardiac imaging using a portable GE Vscan. Image clips obtained by each subject were stored. A second expert, blinded to instructional mode, evaluated images for adequacy and assigned an image quality rating on a 0 to 10 scale. Group A was able to obtain adequate images six out of six times (100%) with a median image quality rating of 7.5 (interquartile range [IQR] = 6 to 10) out of 10. Group B was also able to obtain adequate views six out of six times (100%), with a median image quality rating of 8 (IQR = 7 to 9). Group C was able to obtain adequate views one out of six times (17%), with a median image quality of 0 (IQR = 0 to 2). There were no statistically significant differences between Group A and Group B in the achievement of adequate images for E-point septal separation measurement or in image quality. In this pilot/feasibility study, novice US users were able to obtain adequate imaging to determine a healthy patient's EF through telementored education using Google Glass. These preliminary data suggest telementoring as an adequate means of medical education in bedside US. This conclusion will need to be validated with larger, more powerful studies including evaluation of

  20. Strategy, Performance Evaluation and Process Management in Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Letícia Couto da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The processes of Strategic Planning (SP, Performance Evaluation (PE and Process Management (PM for Higher Education Institutions (HEI are considered more than ever, urgent and necessary, acting as the factors of motivation, awareness and exploratory data collection. The objective of this paper is to identify positive and negative aspects involved in realization of SP, PE and PM in HEI, through a literature review. The study was exploratory and descriptive, accomplished through a bibliographic review in online data bases. It was possible to identify that HEI are considered complex systems which results in implications on execution of the SP, PE and PM. Apart from that, it was identified barriers in the literature, being the main ones: decentralization, autonomy of departments, heterogeneity in the operation of departments, data stored in places that cannot be accessed by everybody, bureaucracy, resistance to change, dissociation between planning and management, lack of participation of university community in the process of planning. It was also found ways to overcome these barriers being the main ones: commitment of high management, clear strategy, wide communication and participation of all people involved.

  1. Teaching Strategies Adopted by Teachers at Higher Education Level in Kerala: A Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesa, M.; Nisha, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    In the special context of entrepreneurship, employability skill development, Higher Education 2.0 and the Kovalam Declaration 2016, the present article presents a brief review of genres of teaching strategies at higher education level and attempts to bring to the attention of the readers an account of the teaching strategies adopted by teachers at…

  2. An Art Museum in the Interest of Publicness: A Discussion of Educational Strategies at Tate Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Scheel, Boel

    2018-01-01

    Influenced by needs to legitimise large collections and the position as public institutions, art museums today are searching to develop rigorous public strategies in order to increase numbers of visitors and public impact. Education is part of those strategies, and the need to discuss art education in relation to publicness and criticality arises.…

  3. An active-learning strategies primer for achieving ability-based educational outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Brenda L; Peeters, Michael J; Resman-Targoff, Beth H; Karr, Samantha; McBane, Sarah; Kelley, Kristi; Thomas, Tyan; Denetclaw, Tina H

    2011-11-10

    Active learning is an important component of pharmacy education. By engaging students in the learning process, they are better able to apply the knowledge they gain. This paper describes evidence supporting the use of active-learning strategies in pharmacy education and also offers strategies for implementing active learning in pharmacy curricula in the classroom and during pharmacy practice experiences.

  4. Adventures in Advocacy: Real World Strategies for Education in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Barbara; De Guzman, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    In the face of compelling challenges, the Asia South Pacific Association for Basic and Adult Education (ASPBAE), the Global Campaign for Education (GCE), as well as the national education coalitions in Asia, have levelled up efforts in the past five years to advance the right of all citizens to quality education and learning opportunities…

  5. Active Learning Methods and Technology: Strategies for Design Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorey, Jillian

    2016-01-01

    The demands in higher education are on the rise. Charged with teaching more content, increased class sizes and engaging students, educators face numerous challenges. In design education, educators are often torn between the teaching of technology and the teaching of theory. Learning the formal concepts of hierarchy, contrast and space provide the…

  6. Internationalization of Higher Education: Challenges, Strategies, Policies and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfaghari, Akbar; Sabran, Mohammad Shatar; Zolfaghari, Ali

    2009-01-01

    In today's changing world, the idea of internationalization of higher education especially in developing countries has been deduced from globalization of education process. The international aspect of higher education is becoming increasingly important, composite, and confusing. The higher education has an effect on the society through…

  7. Coteaching in Physical Education: A Strategy for Inclusive Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Qualitative research methods were used to explore the factors that informed general and adapted physical education teachers' coteaching practices within an inclusive high school physical education program. Two physical education teachers and one adapted physical education teacher were observed over a 16-week period. Interviews, field notes, and…

  8. Structure and strategies in children's educational television: the roles of program type and learning strategies in children's learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linebarger, Deborah L; Piotrowski, Jessica Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Educational TV has been consistently linked to children's learning. In this research, educational TV characteristics were identified, coded, and tested for their influence on children's program-specific comprehension and vocabulary outcomes. Study 1 details a content analysis of TV features including a program's macrostructure (i.e., narrative or expository) and learning strategies embedded in the macrostructure that support learning in print-based contexts. In Study 2, regression analyses were used to predict outcomes involving 71 second and third graders (average age=7.63 years). Strategies were categorized as organizing, rehearsing, elaborating, or affective in function. Outcomes were uniformly higher for narrative macrostructures. Strategies used in narratives predicted relatively homogenous relations across outcomes, whereas strategies in expositories predicted quite heterogeneous relations across outcomes. © 2010 The Authors. Child Development © 2010 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  9. Interprofessional nursing education: a pilot study in the medical intensive care unit and internal medicine outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Hagstrom

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare requires frequent interactions among nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals.  Healthcare students frequently have little or no interaction with other disciplines during their education. Methods: The nursing students in our health sciences center do not have any formal interaction during their education with physicians in the hospital or clinics.  This pilot project allowed senior nursing students to directly observe physicians working in the medical intensive care unit and in the internal medicine clinics.  We used pre-and post-intervention surveys and post-intervention interviews to determine their satisfaction with this clinical experience and to determine any changes in their attitudes or understanding following their observations in the work site. Results: Twenty-two nursing students completed this pilot project.  There were no difficulties with the organization or scheduling of these students, and they found this experience useful and educational.  There were significant changes on two survey questions.  Nursing students thought that physicians had more need for collaboration with other healthcare workers following their observations but also thought that physicians spent less time with patients and family than expected.  During the interviews after the experience, the nursing students indicated that this intervention increased their understanding of the need for communication, collaboration, and planning during patient care. Conclusions: This pilot project demonstrates that it is relatively easy to increase the interprofessional education of nurses by allowing them to observe physicians during routine clinical work in the medical intensive care unit and in the internal medicine clinics.  This did not require significant organization or introduce difficult scheduling problems.  Nursing students found this activity educational and did have important changes in their understanding of physicians

  10. Geochemical Methods of Inference the Thermoregulatory Strategies in Middle Triassic Marine Reptiles - A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmik, Dawid; Pelc, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen stable isotopes investigation to elucidate thermoregulatory strategies in Middle Triassic basal sauropterygians is currently ongoing at University of Silesia and University of Maria Curie-Skłodowska. The results of similar studies on Late Mesozoic marine reptiles indicate that some of fully aquatic reptiles like plesiosaurs or ichthyosaurs could be warm-blooded animals. Our investigation is an important part of the aim of the research project "The Marine and Terrestrial reptiles in the Middle Triassic environmental background of Southern Poland" to solve the thermoregulation issue in basal marine reptiles and show how, and when did homoiothermy evolve in Sauropterygia.. Homeothermy and gigantothermy were important physiological adaptations which allowed sauropterygian ancestors to leave the shores and conquer the open seas and oceans. Badania nad paleofizjologią kopalnych kręgowców ostatnimi laty stały się niezwykle modne. Polegają one na kompilacji danych uzyskanych wieloma komplementarnymi metodami z zakresu fizjologii (badania współczesnych form, zgodnie z zasadą aktualizmu) i geochemii izotopowej. Szczególnie interesujące stały się kwestie gospodarki termicznej u gadów kopalnych, które silnie dyskutowane są w kręgach badaczy dinozaurów (Reid, 1997; Ruben i in., 1996). Badania na izotopach stabilnych tlenu szkliwa zębowego przeprowadzone na obligatoryjnie morskich gadach okresu jurajskiego i kredowego (Bernard i in., 2010; zob. także Motani, 2010) wskazują, że ichtiozaury i plezjozaury późniejszego mezozoiku mogły być zwierzętami stałocieplnymi. Brak obecnie jednoznacznych danych dotyczących gospodarki termicznej bazalnych przedstawicieli gadów morskich z triasu, choć przyjmuje się, że te zamieszkujące nadbrzeżne i marginalne strefy mórz zwierzęta były gadami zmiennocieplnymi (pojkilotermicznymi), podobnie jak współczesny legwan morski, czy też smok z Komodo. Czy przejście z pojkilo- do homojotermii by

  11. Pain biology education and exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Cormac G; Gray, Heather G; Newton, Mary; Granat, Malcolm H

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this single-blind pilot RCT was to investigate the effect of pain biology education and group exercise classes compared to pain biology education alone for individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP). Participants with CLBP were randomised to a pain biology education and group exercise classes group (EDEX) [n = 20] or a pain biology education only group (ED) [n = 18]. The primary outcome was pain (0-100 numerical rating scale), and self-reported function assessed using the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire, measured at pre-intervention, post-intervention and three month follow up. Secondary outcome measures were pain self-efficacy, pain related fear, physical performance testing and free-living activity monitoring. Using a linear mixed model analysis, there was a statistically significant interaction effect between time and intervention for both pain (F[2,49] = 3.975, p education alone was more effective for pain and pain self-efficacy than a combination of pain biology education and group exercise classes. This pilot study highlights the need to investigate the combined effects of different interventions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. History and Nature of Science in High School: Building Up Parameters to Guide Educational Materials and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forato, Thaís Cyrino de Mello; de Andrade Martins, Roberto; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2012-05-01

    This article presents the main results of a research examining the didactic transposition of history and philosophy of science in high school level. The adaptation of history of science to this particular level, addressing some aspects of the nature of science aiming at the students' critical engagement, was analyzed by examining both the historiographic requirements of history of science and the pedagogical recommendations of science teaching. The research included the elaboration of a pilot course on the history of optics, with historical texts and educational activities, and its application in a high school. We used three episodes of the history of optics, addressing some epistemological points, especially criticizing the naive empirical-inductive view of science. It was possible to identify a series of obstacles in using history of science and conveying philosophical views. Their analysis resulted in devising strategies to surmount or to circumvent them. We implemented those strategies in the classroom and analyzed the data that was obtained. As a result, we substantiated several of our proposals and found that some solutions require improvement. We suggest some generalizations, which can be understood as initial parameters for guiding the use of history and philosophy of science in science teaching. We used a qualitative methodology of educational research to plan, to collect and to analyze the data, examining the interaction between students, teacher and knowledge.

  13. Technological Factors, User Characteristics and Didactic Strategies in Educational Virtual Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsis, Antonios; Vrellis, Ioannis; Papachristos, Nikiforos

    2012-01-01

    Technological factors, user characteristics and didactic strategies do not function consistently across Educational Virtual Environments. This study investigates the impact of viewing condition and didactic strategy on attention allocation, suspension of disbelief, spatial presence, and learning...... outcomes in an Educational Virtual Environment concerning ancient Greek pottery. Our results show that the viewing condition does not affect attention allocation, suspension of disbelief, and spatial presence. Learning outcomes are better in the monoscopic viewing condition. Didactic strategy has an impact...... Virtual Environments....

  14. Direct Mail Marketing Strategies for Educational Computer Software and Why Purchase Decisions Are Made.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Myron E.; Miller, William

    1987-01-01

    The study compared effects of two direct-mail educational software marketing strategies: (1) brochure only and (2) brochure and sample program provided by a journal. Those responding to Strategy 1 rated the programs higher because of less knowledge. However, those responding to Strategy 2 exhibited more respect for the journal. (CH)

  15. Teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational university students

    OpenAIRE

    Mena, Alodio; Amayuela Georgina; Mena Alodio A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes a system of teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational students. The modeling of teaching and learning strategies presented is the result of a research project carried out at the University of Camagüey; its results are being employed successfully. A full description of research methods, rationale, and each of the suggested strategies is provided.

  16. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn; Newman, Peter A; Weaver, James; Loutfy, Mona R

    2014-01-01

    Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo) (Women Taking Action For Their Health) study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW) delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti. This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829). Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88%) completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26), STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99), condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83), and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39) scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (pHaiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific impacts of HIV prevention strategies in disaster contexts. Study results may inform HIV prevention interventions among internally displaced women in

  17. Management of the nuclear knowledge and educational strategies in universities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin del Campo M, C.

    2012-10-01

    An introduction is made to the topic of management of the nuclear knowledge and recommendations are presented for its implementation as a curricular subject in the universities and institutions that have post-graduate programs in the engineering and/or nuclear sciences area. The necessity of incorporating a wide variety of tools and innovative techniques of teaching (for example, simulators, didactic games in computer, e-learning) that assure that the learning will be given in an efficient and lasting way is projected. Some strategies are listed to attract the best students toward the academic programs in nuclear engineering or related. Given the great multidisciplinary of the personnel of a nuclear power station, and the other facilities of the fuel cycle, the importance is pointed out of providing the nuclear foundations to all the workers and directive with different formation to the nuclear area, in an attractive way so that they obtain and assimilate the nuclear foundations that will allow him to work efficiently and with all security. Finally, also an analysis is presented about the advantages that represent the education nets that integrate people or institutions in the national, regional or international ambit, which have been created to initiative of the IAEA, having as objective to share ideas, information, study programs, courses, software and resources in general that support the formation of human resources of very high quality, required by the nuclear facilities and the research centers on advanced technologies, as well as to implement programs of nuclear development to short, medium and long period in our country. (Author)

  18. Effects of biobutanol and biobutanol–diesel blends on combustion and emission characteristics in a passenger car diesel engine with pilot injection strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Hyuntae; Choi, Kibong; Lee, Chang Sik

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of biobutanol blends on NOx and soot emission characteristics in a diesel engine. • Comparison of combustion characteristics between biobutanol and diesel fuels. • Effect of pilot injection on combustion and emissions reduction in a diesel engine. - Abstract: In this study, we investigated the effect of biobutanol and biobutanol–diesel blends on the combustion and emission characteristics in a four-cylinder compression ignition engine using pilot injection strategies. The test fuels were a mixture of 10% biobutanol and 90% conventional diesel (Bu10), 20% biobutanol and 80% diesel (Bu20), and 100% diesel fuel (Bu0) based on mass. To study the combustion and emission characteristics of the biobutanol blended fuels, we carried out experimental investigations under various pilot injection timings from BTDC 20° to BTDC 60° with constant main injection timing. As the butanol content in the blended fuel increased, the experimental results indicated that the ignition delay was longer than that of diesel fuel for all pilot injection timings. Also, the indicated specific fuel consumption (ISFC) of the blended fuels was higher than that of diesel at all test conditions. However, the exhaust temperature was lower than that of diesel at all injection timings. Nitrogen oxide (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO) and soot from Bu20 were lower than those from diesel fuel at all test conditions and hydrocarbons (HC) were higher than that from diesel.

  19. Research on the Competitive Strategy of Cross-Border E-Commerce Comprehensive Pilot Area Based on the Spatial Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Bo; Wang, Huipo

    2016-01-01

    By now, 13 cross-border e-commerce comprehensive pilot areas have been approved by the State Council of China; Dalian and Tianjin are two of them. But with the development of the construction of the cross-border e-commerce comprehensive pilot areas, the competition between those pilot areas is inevitable. Dalian and Tianjin are located in the Bohai Sea and the distance between them is only 800 kilometers. For Dalian and Tianjin they are in thus competitive situations: first they have to compe...

  20. Development of self-care educational material for patients with heart failure in Japan: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Naoko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Sano, Miho; Seki, Satomi; Kogure, Asuka; Kobukata, Kihoko; Ochiai, Ryota; Wakita, Sanae; Kazuma, Keiko

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the need for information regarding heart failure and self-care, developed self-care educational material, and investigated the feasibility of the material. A total of 22 hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 63 years) completed a self-administered questionnaire. We found that more than 90% of patients desired information, particularly about heart failure symptoms, time to notify healthcare providers, prognosis, and exercise/physical activity. After examining the eight existing brochures for Japanese heart failure patients, we developed self-care educational material. This was based on heart failure guidelines and on the results of our inquiry regarding information needs. Finally, a pilot study was conducted in nine hospitalized heart failure patients (mean age: 57 years). None of the patients had difficulty reading or understanding the educational material. The self-administrated questionnaire survey revealed that comprehension of the following improved after the educational sessions with the material: heart failure symptoms, medication, weighing, sodium intake, and fluid intake (P failure patients have a great need for information about heart failure. Our pilot study suggests that the material was readable and had a beneficial effect on heart failure comprehension. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Strategies of expert teachers in teaching opportunity identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nab, Jan; van Keulen, Johannes; Pilot, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The process of opportunity identification is under-emphasized in higher education; and there is a need for educational strategies to foster this competence in science students. In a previous study, three design strategies were piloted and evaluated in the classroom: stimulating the use of idea

  2. Strategies Used to Teach Mathematics to Special Education Students from the Teachers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Desline A.

    2016-01-01

    The perspectives of special education teachers on the strategies used to teach mathematics to special education students were examined in this dissertation. Three central research questions that guided the study are: (a) What were New York special education teachers' opinions about the methods they use to teach mathematics to special education…

  3. K-12 Education Nonprofit Employees' Perceptions of Strategies for Recruiting and Retaining Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Tara Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the key reasons individuals who work in K-12 education nonprofit organizations enter the field of K-12 nonprofit education and their motivations for doing so. The purpose of this study was to find new strategies for recruiting and retaining K-12 education nonprofit employees by examining the obstacles that exist to…

  4. Methodology and results of a space station education pilot programme in the primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirra, G.; Mirra, C.

    Potential users of the Space Station Freedom are now still in the Primary School. Subject studies 1 have shown that a robust familiarization programme has to be developed in order to increase public awareness on the microgravity environment and its capabilities to perform unique science. At the same time, several surveys 2 have demonstrated that elementary school students are showing the greatest interest and enthusiasm in space related activities among all school students. With these boundary conditions, a pilot programme, aimed at verifying the capabilities of young primary school pupils (aged between 10 and 12) in understanding why one performs research in space, has been conceived. In order to overcome the lack of space training of school teachers, an expert in space operations joined a group of elementary teachers to activate this program: merging the necessary didactic and technical capabilities. Consequently, the aim of the program becomes two folded: •generate critical thinking and problem solving capacities as well as inventiveness in children making them aware on the use of space to improve life on Earth. •identify the key issues for the definition of a robust space utilization educational programme. The programme has been managed by MARS Center. the Italian User Support Center for the Space Station utilization, and the institute "Speranzas" in the nearby of Naples, Italy. MARS Center, in particular, is responsible towards the national agency ASI, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, of the execution of the promotional activity towards all the possible target groups: young students are among these groups. This programme started in late 1992 and is currently ongoing. The objective of this paper is to provide a description of the methodology and the reasons of such a programme with a snapshot on the preliminary results and future trends. Means used as supporting tools, such as films, posters and role plays are herein depicted as well as statistics on the pupils

  5. The Strategy Of Character Education In Globalization Era

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Fatoni

    2017-01-01

    Education can determine the formation of learners character personality and manners. Therefore education is considered to be the most responsible for juvenile delinquency among students like brawl drugs and free sex. Those deviances and crime indicate the low moral manner and character of the nation. responding that phenomenon the government through the Ministry of National Education made a new effort of establishing character education model to improve the character and manner of learners. T...

  6. Strategies of Educational Planning for the Development of Human Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Kikuo

    This paper seeks to answer the following questions: What is educational planning? In what way can educational development contribute to the socioeconomic development of society? How can a plan be effectively implemented? What are the major characteristics of educational development in Japan as compared to that in other countries? The discussion of…

  7. Collaboration of General and Special Education Teachers: Perspectives and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Fonte, M. Alexandra; Barton-Arwood, Sally M.

    2017-01-01

    Schools today focus on inclusive models of education for students with disabilities that include higher expectations and increased teacher accountability. Within this inclusion framework, both general and special education teachers have responsibilities for the education of diverse learners. Collaboration skills take time to develop, with many…

  8. Constructivist strategies in online distance education in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Timothy J; Adelman, Deborah; Mueller, Dale; Levitt, Cheryle

    2009-02-01

    This article reviews the use of constructivism in traditional brick-and-mortar classrooms, as opposed to the online learning environment. The applicability of constructivism to nursing education is discussed. The article concludes with recommendations for online nursing education programs, offering ways that constructivist methodologies can be applied to online distance education.

  9. Promoting a Positive Image: Public Relations Strategies for Special Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Kathleen B.; Miller, April D.; Brennan, J. Patrick, II

    2000-01-01

    A positive public relations campaign specific to special education can stimulate teacher cooperation and principal support, improve community perceptions of special education students, and increase hiring of special education students by local businesses. A monthly calendar of suggested activities and guidelines for starting a public relations…

  10. Looking for an international strategy for geography education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, Joop|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072719575

    Geography education is under pressure in many countries in the world. Many publications in the field of geography education and a lot of papers presented at geography conferences focus on the problematic position of geography in primary and secondary education. However, describing the problem is

  11. Connected vehicle pilot deployment program phase 1, participant training and education plan - ICF/Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-22

    The Wyoming Department of Transportations (WYDOT) Connected Vehicle (CV) Pilot Deployment Program is intended to develop a suite of applications that utilize vehicle to infrastructure (V2I) and vehicle to vehicle (V2V) communication technology to ...

  12. Pilot evaluation of the use of contract towing and first responder strategies in the Virginia Department of Transportation's Staunton District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated the contract towing and first responder pilot projects in the Virginia Department of Transportations : Staunton District. The evaluation included before and after studies of incident duration and comparisons of clearance time....

  13. Pilot controlled trial of mindfulness meditation and education for dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oken, Barry S; Fonareva, Irina; Haas, Mitchell; Wahbeh, Helane; Lane, James B; Zajdel, Daniel; Amen, Alexandra

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether a mindfulness meditation intervention may be effective in caregivers of close relatives with dementia and to help refine the protocol for future larger trials. The design was a pilot randomized trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a mindfulness meditation intervention adapted from the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy program in relation to two comparison groups: an education class based on Powerful Tools for Caregivers serving as an active control group and a respite-only group serving as a pragmatic control. This study was conducted at the Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. The subjects were community-dwelling caregivers aged 45-85 years of close relatives with dementia. The two active interventions lasted 7 weeks, and consisted of one 90-minute session per week along with at-home implementation of knowledge learned. The respite-only condition provided the same duration of respite care that was needed for the active interventions. Subjects were assessed prior to randomization and again after completing classes at 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a self-rated measure of caregiver stress, the Revised Memory and Behavior Problems Checklist (RMBPC). Secondary outcome measures included mood, fatigue, self-efficacy, mindfulness, salivary cortisols, cytokines, and cognitive function. We also evaluated self-rated stress in the subjects' own environment, expectancy of improvement, and credibility of the interventions. There were 31 caregivers randomized and 28 completers. There was a significant effect on RMBPC by group covarying for baseline RMBPC, with both active interventions showing improvement compared with the respite-only group. Most of the secondary outcome measures were not significantly affected by the interventions. There was an intervention effect on the caregiver self-efficacy measure and on cognitive measures. Although mindfulness was not impacted by the intervention, there

  14. Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE: results from two feasibility pilot studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E. Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low physical activity (PA and fruit and vegetable (F&V consumption in early childhood are continued public health challenges. This manuscript describes outcomes from two pilot studies for Sustainability via Active Garden Education (SAGE, a program designed to increase PA and F&V consumption among 3 to 5 year old children. Methods SAGE was developed using community-based participatory research (CBPR and delivered to children (N = 89 in early care and education centers (ECEC, N = 6 in two US cities. Children participated in 12 one-hour sessions that included songs, games, and interactive learning activities involving garden maintenance and taste tests. We evaluated reach, efficacy, adoption, implementation, and potential for maintenance of SAGE following the RE-AIM framework. Reach was evaluated by comparing demographic characteristics among SAGE participants and residents of target geographic areas. Efficacy was evaluated with accelerometer-measured PA, F&V consumption, and eating in the absence of hunger among children, parenting practices regarding PA, and home availability of F&V. Adoption was evaluated by the number of ECEC that participated relative to the number of ECEC that were recruited. Implementation was evaluated by completion rates of planned SAGE lessons and activities, and potential for maintenance was evaluated with a parent satisfaction survey. Results SAGE reached ECEC in neighborhoods representing a wide range of socioeconomic status, with participants’ sociodemographic characteristics representing those of the intervention areas. Children significantly increased PA during SAGE lessons compared to usual lessons, but they also consumed more calories in the absence of hunger in post- vs. pre-intervention tests (both p < .05. Parent reports did not suggest changes in F&V consumption, parenting PA practices, or home F&V availability, possibly due to low parent engagement. ECEC had moderate

  15. Sex and Relationships Education in Schools--Evaluation of a Pilot Programme for the Certification of Community Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Helen; Tyrer, Paul; Aggleton, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In support of the UK Government's teenage pregnancy and sexual health strategies, a certificated programme of professional development for school nurses and other community nurses was developed to provide support for personal, social and health education (PSHE) work, including sex and relationships education (SRE), for young people.…

  16. The Strategy Of Character Education In Globalization Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fatoni

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Education can determine the formation of learners character personality and manners. Therefore education is considered to be the most responsible for juvenile delinquency among students like brawl drugs and free sex. Those deviances and crime indicate the low moral manner and character of the nation. responding that phenomenon the government through the Ministry of National Education made a new effort of establishing character education model to improve the character and manner of learners. This does not mean that previously there was no character education however todays government emphasizes systematic character education. In this regard teacher is the key factor of the successful implementation of character education because teacher makes direct interaction with learners. Teacher is required to prepare learning device and he then implement character education in the classroom. However most of teachers still do not understand how to prepare Lesson Plan of character education let alone to carry it out. On the other hand an education system that is supposed to be successful in establishing character building is the educational system in pesantren or madrasa. In principle implanting characters is more effective through habituation and good example that is more likely pesantren or boarding school that is directly supervised by the teacher.

  17. Effective clinical education: strategies for teaching medical students and residents in the office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayley, William E

    2011-08-01

    Educating medical students and residents in the office presents the challenges of providing quality medical care, maintaining efficiency, and incorporating meaningful education for learners. Numerous teaching strategies to address these challenges have been described in the medical educational literature, but only a few teaching strategies have been evaluated for their impact on education and office practice. Literature on the impact of office-based teaching strategies on educational outcomes and on office efficiency was selected from a Pub Med search, from review of references in retrieved articles, and from the author's personal files. Two teaching strategies, "one-minute preceptor" (OMP) and "SNAPPS," have been shown to improve educational processes and outcomes. Two additional strategies, "Aunt Minnie" pattern recognition and "activated demonstration," show promise but have not been fully evaluated. None of these strategies has been shown to improve office efficiency. OMP and SNAPPS are strategies that can be used in office precepting to improve educational processes and outcomes, while pattern recognition and activated demonstration show promise but need further assessment. Additional areas of research also are suggested.

  18. The Relationship of a Pilot's Educational Background, Aeronautical Experience and Recency of Experience to Performance In Initial Training at a Regional Airline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Nancy R.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a pilot's educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience relate to their performance during initial training at a regional airline. Results show that variables in pilots' educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience do predict performance in training. The most significant predictors include years since graduation from college, multi-engine time, total time and whether or not a pilot had military flying experience. Due to the pilot shortage, the pilots entering regional airline training classes since August 2013 have varied backgrounds, aeronautical experience and recency of experience. As explained by Edward Thorndike's law of exercise and the law of recency, pilots who are actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit strong performance in those areas and pilots who have not been actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit degraded performance in those areas. Through correlation, chi-square and multiple regression analysis, this study tests this theory as it relates to performance in initial training at a regional airline.

  19. A study protocol for a pilot randomised trial of a structured education programme for the self-management of type 2 diabetes for adults with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, Laurence; Coates, Vivien; Clarke, Mike; Bunting, Brendan; Davies, Melanie; Carey, Marian; Northway, Ruth; Brown, Michael; Truesdale-Kennedy, Maria; Martin-Stacey, Lorraine; Scott, Gillian; Karatzias, Thanos

    2015-04-10

    The need for structured education programmes for type 2 diabetes is a high priority for many governments around the world. One such national education programme in the United Kingdom is the DESMOND Programme, which has been shown to be robust and effective for patients in general. However, these programmes are not generally targeted to people with intellectual disabilities (ID), and robust evidence on their effects for this population is lacking. We have adapted the DESMOND Programme for people with ID and type 2 diabetes to produce an amended programme known as DESMOND-ID. This protocol is for a pilot trial to determine whether a large-scale randomised trial is feasible, to test if DESMOND-ID is more effective than usual care in adults with ID for self-management of their type 2 diabetes, in particular as a means to reduce glycated haemoglobin (Hb1Ac), improve psychological wellbeing and quality of life and promote a healthier lifestyle. This protocol describes the rationale, methods, proposed analysis plan and organisational and administrative details. This trial is a two arm, individually randomised, pilot trial for adults with ID and type 2 diabetes, and their family and/or paid carers. It compares the DESMOND-ID programme with usual care. Approximately 36 adults with mild to moderate ID will be recruited from three countries in the United Kingdom. Family and/or paid carers may also participate in the study. Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions using a secure computerised system with robust allocation concealment. A range of data will be collected from the adults with ID (biomedical, psychosocial and self-management strategies) and from their carers. Focus groups with all the participants will assess the acceptability of the intervention and the trial. The lack of appropriate structured education programmes and educational materials for this population leads to secondary health conditions and may lead to premature deaths. There are

  20. Educators' Perceptions of School-Based Factors That Impact Their Effectiveness in Working with Students with Challenging Behaviors: A Pilot Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Lyndal M.; Zolkoski, Stacie M.; Lusk, Mandy E.; Hovey, Katrina A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to complete a pilot investigation to learn more about how educators who have had experience working with students with challenging behaviors perceive school-related challenges impacting their effectiveness. Further, information was gleaned as to what educators believe to be major issues faced in their…

  1. IT education strategy oriented to the alignment between business and information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Čičin-Šain

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the significance of IT education strategy oriented to the alignment between in - formation systems and business systems. We establish goals and develop concepts, and present a metho - dological frame of strategic IT education. We report the results of our research and investigate the way and intensity of the impact of strategic IT education on the factors influencing the alignment and linking between information systems and business strategies. From the point of view of our research, we have focused on factors that have an influence on the alignment between information systems and business strategies, and factors affecting organisational effectiveness. Factors influencing strategic IT education have also been systematized within the categories of busine - ss/information system alignment, and organisational effectiveness. Since strategic IT education has been recognized and organized in different concepts, we have included three concepts in our questionnaires: strategic IT education for managers, organisational learning and e-learning

  2. Strategies of day care center educators in dealing crying babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Ebner Melchiori

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to explore the views of day care center educators on how they act when babies cry, if they are able to identify the causes of crying and what are the subjection reasons that make them take action or not. Twenty-one caretakers were interviewed about each of the ninety babies, aged 4 to 24 months, under their care, using a semi-structured guide. The results show that overall the proportion of babies that do not cry significantly increases with age. However, crying for primary needs, in the view of the educators, tends to decrease as the average age increases, whilst crying for secondary needs tends to increase. Most of the time, the educators try to eliminate the needs that provoke crying, giving priority to the baby’s welfare. The article discusses the caretakers’ educative practices with data found in literature. Keywords: day care; educative practices; educators.

  3. Teaching nurses how to teach: strategies to enhance the quality of patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidyk, Lisa; Ventura, Kate; Green, Katie

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of a training course for nurses that focused on teach-back as a key strategy for patient education. It describes evaluative methods used to collect feedback and determine effectiveness of education based on nurses' perception and self-assessment of their patient educational skills and improvements made for future courses. Professional Development Specialists can use the concepts in this article to create similar programs to improve the quality of patient education.

  4. Incubating a Space Strategy: The Role of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    education at ACSC change , or are these immutable fields? While the core missions of the Air Force have not changed since 1947, the additions of the...space education at ACSC across five levels of analysis: organization, narrative, doctrine, technology and social . Following this analysis and drawing on...may exist a need to change how the Air Force educates officers at ACSC about space. In analyzing this need, the following chapter provides a

  5. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    OpenAIRE

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation wit...

  6. Distance Education as a Women Empowerment Strategy in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Olugbenga David OJO; Felix Kayode OLAKULEIN

    2006-01-01

    Women emancipation through empowerment all over the world is at its peak and Africans generally are not left out. It is an attempt to make sure that women’s voices are heard and are given their right places in the scheme of things. Nonetheless, the issue of educational attainment of women considering the low level of girls’ education in Africa is at a negative variance to attaining women position since certain educational attainments are required to function effectively in the various availab...

  7. Patient-led training on patient safety: a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, V; Winterbottom, A; Symons, J; Thompson, Z; Quinton, N; Corrado, O J; Melville, C; Watt, I; Torgerson, D; Wright, J

    2013-09-01

    Training in patient safety is an important element of medical education. Most educational interventions on patient safety training adopt a 'health-professional lens' with limited consideration on the impact of safety lapses on the patient and their families and little or no involvement of patients in the design or delivery of the training. This paper describes a pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of implementing a patient-led educational intervention to facilitate safety training amongst newly qualified doctors. Patients and/or carers who had experienced harm during their care shared narratives of their stories with trainees; this was followed by a focused discussion on patient safety issues exploring the causes and consequences of safety incidents and lessons to be learned from these. The intervention, which will be further tested in an NIHR-funded randomised controlled trial (RCT), was successfully implemented into an existing training programme and found acceptance amongst the patients and trainees. The pilot study proved to be a useful step in refining the intervention for the RCT including identifying appropriate outcome measures and highlighting organisational issues.

  8. The LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" - Situation-based learning in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferle, Petra Ina; Van den Stock, Etienne; Nauerth, Annette

    2010-07-01

    E-learning will play an important role in the training portfolio of students in higher and vocational education. Within the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI action programme transnational pilot projects were funded by the European Union, which aimed to improve the usage and quality of e-learning tools in education and professional training. The overall aim of the LEONARDO-DA-VINCI pilot project "e-learning-assistant" was to create new didactical and technical e-learning tools for Europe-wide use in nursing education. Based on a new situation-oriented learning approach, nursing teachers enrolled in the project were instructed to adapt, develop and implement e- and blended learning units. According to the training contents nursing modules were developed by teachers from partner institutions, implemented in the project centers and evaluated by students. The user-package "e-learning-assistant" as a product of the project includes two teacher training units, the authoring tool "synapse" to create situation-based e-learning units, a student's learning platform containing blended learning modules in nursing and an open sourced web-based communication centre. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identifying Effective Strategies for Climate Change Education: The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) Partnership Audiences and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Feldman, A.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Gilbes, F.; Stone, D.; Plank, L.; Reynolds, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Many past educational initiatives focused on global climate change have foundered on public skepticism and disbelief. Some key reasons for these past failures can be drawn directly from recognized best practices in STEM education - specifically, the necessity to help learners connect new knowledge with their own experiences and perspectives, and the need to create linkages with issues or concerns that are both important for and relevant to the audiences to be educated. The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) partnership has sought to follow these tenets as guiding principles in identifying critical audiences and developing new strategies for educating the public living in the low-lying coastal areas of Florida and the Caribbean on the realities, risks, and adaptation and mitigation strategies for dealing with the regional impacts of global climate change. CACCE is currently focused on three key learner audiences: a) The formal education spectrum, targeting K-12 curricula through middle school marine science courses, and student and educator audiences through coursework and participatory research strategies engaging participants in a range of climate-related investigations. b) Informal science educators and outlets, in particular aquaria and nature centers, as an avenue toward K-12 teacher professional development as well as for public education. c) Regional planning, regulatory and business professionals focused on the built environment along the coasts, many of whom require continuing education to maintain licensing and/or other professional certifications. Our current activities are focused on bringing together an effective set of educational, public- and private-sector partners to target the varied needs of these audiences in Florida and the U.S. Caribbean, and tailoring an educational plan aimed at these stakeholder audiences that starts with the regionally and topically relevant impacts of climate change, and strategies for effective adaptation and

  10. An educational strategy for using physician assistant students to provide health promotion education to community adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Cathy C

    2012-01-01

    The "Competencies for the Physician Assistant Profession" identify core competencies that physician assistants (PAs) are expected to acquire and maintain throughout their career (see http://www.nccpa.net/pdfs/Definition%20of%20PA%20Competencies% 203.5%20for%20Publication.pdf). Two categories of competencies relate to patient care and interpersonal and communication skills and articulate the need for PAs to be effective communicators and patient educators. The value of a health education curriculum for the adolescent population has been recognized since the early 1900s. PA student-designed health promotion presentations aimed at the adolescent population are an innovative educational strategy involving students in community education. PA student-designed presentations based upon previously identified topics were presented in the community. Students presented topics including Smoking Cessation, The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol, Self-Esteem, and others to adolescents. Community audiences were varied and included alternative high schools and teens within the Department of Youth Corrections facilities. PA students created 17 portable presentations for community adolescents. Two hundred sixty-eight students gave presentations to more than 700 adolescents ranging from 11-22 years of age between the years 2005-2010. Eighty-two percent (646/791) of adolescent participants either strongly agreed or agreed that they learned at least one new piece of information from the presentations. Sixty percent (12/20) of community leaders requested that the PA students return to give additional health promotion presentations. Analysis of comments by PA students revealed that 98% of students found the experience beneficial. Students identified the experience as helping them better understand how to design presentations to meet the needs of their audience, feel more comfortable with adolescents, and gain confidence in communicating. Seventy-five percent stated they would continue to be

  11. Brief educational strategies for improving contraception use in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Laureen M; Grey, Thomas W; Tolley, Elizabeth E; Chen, Mario

    2016-03-30

    Global high rates of unplanned pregnancy and abortion among young women demonstrate the need for increased access to modern contraceptive services. In sub-Saharan Africa, the birth rate for those aged 15 to 19 years is 121 per 1000. In the USA, 6% of teens aged 15 to 19 years became pregnant in 2010. Most pregnancies among young women to age 25 are unintended. The aim was to identify brief educational interventions for improving contraceptive use among young people that are feasible for implementing in a clinic or similar setting with limited resources. To 7 March 2016, we searched for studies in CENTRAL, PubMed, POPLINE, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov and ICTRP. We considered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assigned individuals or clusters as well as non-randomized studies (NRS). We included young people to age 25.The intervention had to be sufficiently brief for a clinic, i.e. one to three sessions of 15 to 60 minutes plus potential follow-up. The strategy had to emphasize one or more effective methods of contraception. Primary outcomes were pregnancy and contraceptive use. We assessed titles and abstracts identified during the searches. One author extracted and entered the data into Review Manager; a second author verified accuracy. We examined studies for methodological quality.For dichotomous outcomes, we calculated the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). For continuous variables, we computed the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI. We used adjusted measures for cluster RCTs, typically ORs, that the investigators reported. For NRS, which need to control for confounding, we also used reported adjusted measures. We did not conduct meta-analysis due to varied interventions and outcome measures. We found 11 studies, published from 1983 to 2015, that included a total of 8338 participants. Ten were from the USA and one was from China. We focused here on intervention effects for our primary outcomes. Five studies showed some

  12. Entrepreneurial Education as a Strategy for Global Competitiveness: Entrepreneurship Challenge in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraima De Hoyos Ruperto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurial education is important as a diffusion mechanism to foster mind-sets, skills, and behaviors on the entrepreneurship context in Puerto Rico. Entrepreneurial challenges were denoted by interviewing governmental, private and civic sectors’ leaders as well entrepreneurs. Qualitative analysis demonstrates a successful entrepreneurial strategy should be anchored in an inter-organizational process that could build up the adequate entrepreneurial mindset through a formal interdisciplinary educational curriculum. Results suggest the necessity of change from the traditional business education hub to an entrepreneurial education able to develop creative thoughts as a strategy for global competitiveness and sustainable entrepreneurial growth.

  13. Strategies for Research, Education, and Innovation, A University's Considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob Steen

    2004-01-01

    Engineering (BYG•DTU) at The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) to this challenge are described: The Department has been reorganised and a new strategy has been adopted. The strategy was developed in collaboration with industry partners. The Strategy focuses on a) analysis and design of safe and economic......It is argued that the building and construction sector will maintain and even increase its economic and societal importance. In spite of this the private R&D effort in the sector is relatively modest, which in turn makes public research more important. The responds of the Department of Civil...

  14. An Eclectic Approach to Evaluation Strategies in Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, R. E.

    Three evaluation studies are used to illustrate the notion of an eclectic approach to adult education evaluation. The first study, Credit and Non-Credit Offerings in a Federal Penitentiary, evaluated the learning climate in this educational setting using data collected from participating inmates (Questionnaire), non-participating inmates…

  15. Computer Networking Strategies for Building Collaboration among Science Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, Ronald

    The development and dissemination of science materials can be associated with technical delivery systems such as the Unified Network for Informatics in Teacher Education (UNITE). The UNITE project was designed to investigate ways for using computer networking to improve communications and collaboration among university schools of education and…

  16. Strategies for Achieving Quality Assurance in Science Education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Science Education Questionnaire (SAQASEQ) was the instrument used in gathering data for the study and ... assurance in a school setting is made possible through proper planning by the management which involve .... might be due to the fact that the curriculum of science education in technical colleges is more structured ...

  17. State Strategies for Financing Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Laura Rasmussen; Klein, Steve; Elliott, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The "Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006" ("Perkins IV" or "Act") authorizes federal funding for career and technical education (CTE) and specifies a formula for distributing those funds. Allocations at the secondary level are based on the number of youths ages 5-17 who reside within a local…

  18. An Afterschool Director's Educational Leadership Strategies: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs linked to schools provide opportunities to keep children safe and engage them in enrichment activities that can support their growth and development. Often, these programs are led by afterschool directors with a background in youth development and no experience or education in leading in educational environments. These…

  19. A strategy to support educational leaders in developing countries to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The central theoretical argument of this paper is that educational leadership and organisational development and change in educational institutions in developing countries will not be effective unless school leaders are aware of the challenges posed by contextual factors that might have an impact on their professional ...

  20. Strategies for Sustainable Business Models for Open Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Langen, F. H. T.

    2013-01-01

    For several years, the importance of continuous education has been stressed by several governmental and non-governmental institutions (Janssen & Schuwer, 2012; Marshall & Casserly, 2006). Education is seen as important both for personal growth and empowerment for one's personal wellbeing and for developing the professional capabilities…

  1. Alternative Learning Strategies as Part of the Educational Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Considered is the question: Is it desirable to have educational programs that identify/teach specific methodological rules which have been, or might be, used by professional scientists? It's best to have educational programs which don't teach students/teachers specific methodological rules. Schools should provide opportunity to explore and test…

  2. Promoting Critical Thinking among Dental Hygiene Students: Strategies for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan D'Ambrisi, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Dental hygiene education has evolved over the years from dental hygiene professions who provide patient education on oral health care to assuming the responsibility for the assimilation of knowledge that requires judgment, decision making and critical thinking skills. Given that the dental hygiene professions has moved toward evidence-based,…

  3. Distance Education as a Women Empowerment Strategy in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakulein, Felix Kayode; Ojo, Olugbenga David

    2006-01-01

    Women emancipation through empowerment all over the world is at its peak and Africans generally are not left out. It is an attempt to make sure that women's voices are heard and are given their right places in the scheme of things. Nonetheless, the issue of educational attainment of women considering the low level of girls' education in Africa is…

  4. Strategy for the Development of Sex Education in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation meeting report places priority on the development of sex education programs in Latin America. While regional and national circumstances clearly differ, it was felt that the steps described provide valuable guidelines on how a sex education program can be evolved while utilizing formal and non-formal…

  5. Burn Survivors' Perceptions regarding Relevant Sexual Education Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Yolan; Esmail, Shaniff

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the unique issues childhood burn survivors experience in relation to sex education and sexual development. Design/methodology/approach: Using a phenomenological approach, participants described their lived experiences with regards to sex education and the sexuality issues they encountered as child burn…

  6. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Counselor Education: Barriers and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher M.; Puig, Ana; Baggs, Adrienne; Wolf, Cheryl Pence

    2015-01-01

    Despite a professionally recognized need for training in religion/spirituality, literature indicates that religious and spirituality issues continue to be inconsistently addressed in counselor education. Ten experts were asked to identify potential barriers to integrating religion and spirituality into counselor education and indicate strategies…

  7. A Strategy To Infuse a Global Perspective into Consumer Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Sue L. T.; Bourbonniere, Katherine

    2002-01-01

    A four-phase plan for delivering consumer education from a global perspective involves teachers in gaining familiarity with (1) the conventional approach to consumer education; (2) the cultures of globalization, capitalism, and consumerism; (3) the global perspective; and (4) integration of the three to create a global curriculum. (Contains 50…

  8. Helping Educators Grow: Strategies and Practices for Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago-Severson, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    How can we prepare practicing and aspiring education leaders for the complex, adaptive challenges they face? In "Helping Educators Grow," Eleanor Drago-Severson presents a new approach to leadership development. Too often, she argues, we teach leadership development the same way we teach world history: just the facts. Instead, we need to…

  9. Internationalization Motivations and Strategies of Israeli Educational Administration Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemini, Miri; Giladi, Aviva

    2015-01-01

    Internationalization became a mainstreamed goal of almost every higher education institution, and institutions are expected to proactively implement this process. Although as an academic discipline, education is considered to be one of the most context-related and locally oriented ones, it had not avoided pressures to internationalize. Within the…

  10. When Negotiation Fails : Private Education as a Disciplinary Strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weenink, D.; Regt, de A.

    2005-01-01

    This articles deals with the question why Dutch upper-middle-class parents resort to fee-paying private education, a tiny, recently developed sector of the Dutch educational system. The research is based on interviews with 37 parents and 20 students attending private schools, and on a survey among

  11. Strategies to Foster Emotional Intelligence in Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliebe, Sudi Kate

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes five initiatives to foster emotional intelligence (EI) education throughout institutions of Christian higher education. Goleman (1995) identifies self-awareness, managing emotions, motivation, empathy, and social intelligence as the hallmark skills of emotional intelligence. The importance of mastering these skills and their…

  12. Strategies for Ensuring Quality in the Business Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Since businesses are leaders in quality assurance, non-business organizations such as educational institutions can benefit from the important lessons learnt by business. Indeed, QA has implicitly pre- dominated all walks of life from industry, service centre and hospitals to education. The need for quality has therefore ...

  13. An Integrative Literature Review of Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies for Nurse Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breytenbach, Cecile; Ten Ham-Baloyi, Wilma; Jordan, Portia J

    The aim of the study was to explore and describe the best available literature on evidence-based teaching strategies that can be used by nurse educators. Evidence-based teaching strategies in nursing education are fundamental to promote an in-depth understanding of information. Although some teaching strategies for nurse educators were identified, no integrative literature review was found summarizing the best teaching strategies for nurse educators. Integrative literature review. Sixteen studies were included encompassing eight teaching strategies (e-learning, concept mapping, Internet-based learning, web-based learning, gaming, problem-based learning, case studies, and evidence-based learning). Of these, three (concept mapping, Internet-based learning, and evidence-based learning) significantly increased student knowledge. All teaching strategies increased knowledge in some way, indicating that faculties should use a variety of teaching strategies. However, more research is needed to compare the impact of a variety of teaching strategies and the best use of different teaching strategies.

  14. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-05-25

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation with increased time on task, immediate feedback, ability to learn from mistakes without becoming discouraged, and potential for behavior and attitude change. Development of quality games for pharmacy education requires content expertise as well as expertise in the science and design of gaming. When well done, serious gaming provides a valuable additional tool for pharmacy education.

  15. Visual culture as a strategy of reflection in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2004-01-01

    Visual culture is an issue in the current research field of visual arts education. this article investigates how the emergence of the concept of visual culture comes about and how it is usable in an educational contekxt. From at system theory approach, the author investigates how the concept...... of visual culture articulates af phase of art and visual arts education. This phase makes it possible to reconsider the concept of aesthetics as a mode of cognition. Likewise, the phase reflexivly constitutes a viewing on visual phenomena. This viewing requires a reconsidering of the notions of what art...... education means and how visual culture can be performed as a special approach to all areas of education....

  16. Development and Pilot Study of a Marketing Strategy for Primary Care/Internet–Based Depression Prevention Intervention for Adolescents (The CATCH-IT Intervention)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Natalie; Bridges, John F. P.; Fogel, Joshua; Galas, Jill; Kramer, Clarke; Connery, Marc; McGill, Ann; Marko, Monika; Cardenas, Alonso; Landsback, Josephine; Dmochowska, Karoline; Kuwabara, Sachiko A.; Ellis, Justin; Prochaska, Micah; Bell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescent depression is both common and burdensome, and while evidence-based strategies have been developed to prevent adolescent depression, participation in such interventions remains extremely low, with less than 3% of at-risk individuals participating. To promote participation in evidence-based preventive strategies, a rigorous marketing strategy is needed to translate research into practice. Objective: To develop and pilot a rigorous marketing strategy for engaging at-risk individuals with an Internet-based depression prevention intervention in primary care targeting key attitudes and beliefs. Method: A marketing design group was constituted to develop a marketing strategy based on the principles of targeting, positioning/competitor analysis, decision analysis, and promotion/distribution and incorporating contemporary models of behavior change. We evaluated the formative quality of the intervention and observed the fielding experience for prevention using a pilot study (observational) design. Results: The marketing plan focused on “resiliency building” rather than “depression intervention” and was relayed by office staff and the Internet site. Twelve practices successfully implemented the intervention and recruited a diverse sample of adolescents with > 30% of all those with positive screens and > 80% of those eligible after phone assessment enrolling in the study with a cost of $58 per enrollee. Adolescent motivation for depression prevention (1–10 scale) increased from a baseline mean value of 7.45 (SD = 2.05) to 8.07 poststudy (SD = 1.33) (P = .048). Conclusions: Marketing strategies for preventive interventions for mental disorders can be developed and successfully introduced and marketed in primary care. PMID:20944776

  17. Teaching strategies to incorporate genomics education into academic nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo Garcia, Sylvia P; Greco, Karen E; Loescher, Lois J

    2011-11-01

    The translation of genomic science into health care has expanded our ability to understand the effects of genomics on human health and disease. As genomic advances continue, nurses are expected to have the knowledge and skills to translate genomic information into improved patient care. This integrative review describes strategies used to teach genomics in academic nursing programs and their facilitators and barriers to inclusion in nursing curricula. The Learning Engagement Model and the Diffusion of Innovations Theory guided the interpretation of findings. CINAHL, Medline, and Web of Science were resources for articles published during the past decade that included strategies for teaching genomics in academic nursing programs. Of 135 articles, 13 met criteria for review. Examples of effective genomics teaching strategies included clinical application through case studies, storytelling, online genomics resources, student self-assessment, guest lecturers, and a genetics focus group. Most strategies were not evaluated for effectiveness. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Feasibility of a multifaceted educational strategy for strengthening rural primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Gómez-Bernal, Enrique; Gutiérrez-Alba, Gaudencio; Aguilar-Ye, Arturo; Ruiz-Larios, José Arturo; Alonso-Núñez, Gabriel de Jesús

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a comprehensive educational strategy designed to improve care quality in rural areas of Mexico. A demonstration study was performed in 18 public rural health centers in Mexico, including an educational intervention that consists of the following steps: Development of the strategy; Selection and training of instructors (specialist physicians from the referral hospital and multidisciplinary field teams); Implementation of the strategy among health care teams for six priority causes of visit, through workshops, individual tutorials, and round-table case-review sessions. Feasibility and acceptability were evaluated using checklists, direct observation, questionnaires and in-depth interviews with key players. Despite some organizational barriers, the strategy was perceived as worthy by the participants because of the personalized tutorials and the improved integration of health teams within their usual professional practice. The educational strategy proved to be acceptable; its feasibility for usual care conditions will depend on the improvement of organizational processes at rural facilities.

  19. Realization of EEC OON strategy for education in the interest of stable development on the regional level (on the example of elaboration of the system of ecological education at non-core educational institution of higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Melnikova, O.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with the historical prerequisites of forming EEC OON strategy for education in the interest of stable development. Ecological education in the light of the conception of stable development as an integrating factor of education in general is described. The example of the realization of the strategy on the regional level is given. The topicality of making the system of ecological education at non-core educational institution of higher education is shown.

  20. The development of CERDAS learning strategy guide for science education students of distance education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, U.; Darmayanti, T.; Widodo, A.; Redjeki, S.

    2017-02-01

    Self-regulated learning (SRL) is a part of students’ skills in which they manage, regulate, and monitor their learning process so they can reach their study goal. Students of distance education should comprise this skill. The aim of this research is to describe the development of distance students learning guide, namely “CEDAS strategy” designed for science students. The students’ guidance consists of seven principles, they are; selecting and applying learning strategy appropriately, managing time effectively, planning of learning realistically and accurately, achieving study goal, and doing self-evaluation continuously. The research method was qualitative descriptive. The research involved the students of Universitas Terbuka’ Biology education who participated in Animal Embryology course. The data were collected using a questionnaire and interview. Furthermore, it was analyzed by descriptive analyses. Research finding showed that during try out, most of the students stated that the learning guide was easy to understand, concise, interesting and encouraging for students to continue reading and learning. In the implementation stage, most students commented that the guide is easy to understand, long enough, and helpful so it can be used as a reference to study independently and to apply it in the daily basis.

  1. Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) Strategies in Distance Education in Accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Thiago Bruno de Jesus Silva; Luís Antonio Lay; Nelson Hein; Vania Tanira Biavatti; Vinícius Costa da Silva Zonatto

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to identify which are the self-regulated learning strategies used by Accounting students in Distance Education (DE) and analyze how these strategies could be explained based on the student’s stage (semester) in the course. The research sample comprised students of the undergraduate Distance Education course in Accountancy at three institutions that offer hubs in Salvador (BA) / Brazil. To analyze the data, three quantitative procedures were used to reach t...

  2. iPod™ technology for teaching patients about anticoagulation: a pilot study of mobile computer-assisted patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denizard-Thompson, Nancy R; Singh, Sonal; Stevens, Sheila R; Miller, David P; Wofford, James L

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether an educational strategy using a handheld, multimedia computer (iPod™) is practical and sustainable for routine office-based patient educational tasks. With the limited amount of time allotted to the office encounter and the growing number of patient educational tasks, new strategies are needed to improve the efficiency of patient education. Education of patients anticoagulated with warfarin is considered critical to preventing complications. Despite the dangers associated with the use of warfarin, educational practices are variable and often haphazard. During a four-month period, we examined the implementation of a three-part series of iPod™-based patient educational modules delivered to anticoagulated patients at the time of routine INR (International Normalized Ratio) blood tests for outpatients on the anticoagulation registry at an urban community health center. A total of 141 computer module presentations were delivered to 91 patients during the four-month period. In all, 44 patients on the registry had no INR checkups, and thus no opportunity to view the modules, and 32 patients had at least three INR checkups but no modules were documented. Of the 130 patients with at least one INR performed during the study period, 22 (16.9%) patients completed all three modules, 91 (70.0%) patients received at least one module, and nine (7.6%) patients refused to view at least one module. Neither of the two handheld computers was lost or stolen, and no physician time was used in this routine educational activity. Patients reported that the audio and visual quality was very good, (9.0/10); the educational experience of the patient was helpful (7.4/10) compared with the patient's previous warfarin education (6.3/10), and the computer strategy extended the INR visit duration by 1-5 min at most. The computer-assisted patient educational strategy was well received by patients, and uptake of the intervention by the clinic was successful and durable. The i

  3. The relationships among usage of motivation, learning strategies, parents' educational level and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Sadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Current study examines the following question: What is the relationship among Turkish high school students’ motivation and learning strategies use in biology, their gender and parents’ educational level? The aim of this study is to specify the relationships among family environment variables (fathers’ and mothers’ education levels, students’ gender, time/study environmental management, cognitive learning strategies (rehearsal, elaboration, organization and critical thinking and students’ goal orientations (intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientations. The participants were 400 students in 9th and 10th grades in Anatolian high schools in Turkey. So, they were in urban high school students. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ was applied to measure motivational orientations and self-regulated learning strategies use of students. Moreover, a Structural Equation Modeling was used to investigate the relationships among family environment variables, students’ gender, time/study environmental management, cognitive learning strategies and students’ goal orientations by using the LISREL 8.72 program. The results of the study showed that parents’ education level was related to each of the following variables: rehearsal, elaboration, organization, critical thinking, time/study environmental management, intrinsic goal orientation and extrinsic goal orientation. Gender was related to rehearsal, elaboration, organization strategies, intrinsic goal orientation and extrinsic goal orientation. The results showed that students, whose parents have high education level, were also more likely to succeed in using cognitive learning strategies (rehearsal, elaboration, organization and critical thinking and planning the necessary time for learning and making use of time well. The present study revealed that parental education levels and gender should be taken into consideration as major predictors of time/study environmental

  4. Expatriate Parents and Supplementary Education in Japan: Survival Strategy or Acculturation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Melodie

    2013-01-01

    The increase in the use of supplementary education, or "juku," in Japan by Japanese families in order to augment their children's chances of success in entering prestigious pre-tertiary and tertiary institutions is documented (Blumenthal in "Asian Surv" 32(5):448-460, 1992; Bray and Lykins in "Shadow education; private…

  5. Attractive educational strategies in teaching and learning chemistry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Chemical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 3 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Distance Education as a Women Empowerment Strategy in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga David OJO

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Women emancipation through empowerment all over the world is at its peak and Africans generally are not left out. It is an attempt to make sure that women’s voices are heard and are given their right places in the scheme of things. Nonetheless, the issue of educational attainment of women considering the low level of girls’ education in Africa is at a negative variance to attaining women position since certain educational attainments are required to function effectively in the various available organs; be it work place, group or committees of local or international standing. This paper therefore stresses the use of open and distance institution in Nigeria as an avenue to attain knowledge and education that would put women in a better stead toward achieving their aims and aspirations.

  7. Peer Helping: A Promising Strategy for Effective Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacca, John; Appleton, Tina

    1996-01-01

    Reviews selected literature on involving adolescents in providing health education to their peers, providing examples of programs that have used adolescent peers to reduce health risks related to tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, stress, eating behavior, and AIDS. (SM)

  8. Inventing the Future: Options and Strategies for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdin, Joel L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    An overview of alternative futurism and implications and applications for the elementary and secondary grades are provided in this article. The teacher's role is explored in a discussion of development of educational personnel. (DF)

  9. Strategies for Sustainable Business Models for Open Educational Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H.T de Langen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For several years, the importance of continuous education has been stressed by several governmental and non-governmental institutions (Janssen & Schuwer, 2012; Marshall & Casserly, 2006. Education is seen as important both for personal growth and empowerment for one’s personal wellbeing and for developing the professional capabilities needed in today’s society. In his 2011 State of the Union address President Obama put emphasis on the government’s ambitions to “out-innovate and out-educate” the rest of the world. Almost at the same time, at the Davos World Economic Forum (2011, the urgency of appropriate education was stressed, observing that the current lack of adequately educated people hinders prosperity and economic growth in the near future. The OECD is preparing a proposal to translate these intentions into a concrete policy.

  10. Coteaching in physical education: a strategy for inclusive practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle A

    2011-04-01

    Qualitative research methods were used to explore the factors that informed general and adapted physical education teachers' coteaching practices within an inclusive high school physical education program. Two physical education teachers and one adapted physical education teacher were observed over a 16-week period. Interviews, field notes, and documents were collected and a constant comparative approach was used in the analysis that adopted a social model framework. Primary themes included community as the cornerstone for student learning, core values of trust and respect, and creating a natural support structure. Coteaching practices existed because of the shared values of teaching, learning, and the belief that all students should be included. Recommendations include shifting orientations within professional preparation programs to account for the social model of disability.

  11. Educational Strategies to Enhance Reflexivity Among Clinicians and Health Professional Students: A Scoping Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Landy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflexivity involves the ability to understand how one's social locations and experiences of advantage or disadvantage have shaped the way one understands the world. The capacity for reflexivity is crucial because it informs clinical decisions, which can lead to improvements in service delivery and patient outcomes. In this article, we present a scoping study that explored educational strategies designed to enhance reflexivity among clinicians and/or health profession students. We reviewed articles and grey literature that address the question: What is known about strategies for enhancing reflexivity among clinicians and students in health professional training programs? We searched multiple databases using keywords including: reflexivity, reflective, allied health professionals, pedagogy, learning, and education. The search strategy was iterative and involved three reviews. Each abstract was independently reviewed by two team members. Sixty-eight texts met the inclusion criteria. There was great diversity among the educational strategies and among health professions. Commonalities across strategies were identified related to reflective writing, experiential learning, classroom-based activities, continuing education, and online learning. We also summarize the 19 texts that evaluated educational strategies to enhance reflexivity. Further research and education is urgently needed for more equitable and socially-just health care. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1603140

  12. Educational Justice Due to More Education? Requests for a Solution Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grümme, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Why does education fail to realize educational justice? Why does religious education not play a part in contributing to educational justice to some degree, as it is technically located in the logic of its handed down biblical message? On the one hand, education is socially testified as being at a crucial moment of educational justice, on the other…

  13. Authentic Assessment and Pedagogical Strategies in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Yuen Fook; Gurnam Kaur Sidhu

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Researchers have noted that there is a mismatch between curriculum content and assessment practices in higher education. At the moment, the focus is still on the assessment of learning and not much on assessment for learning. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the implementation of authentic assessment in higher education in Malaysia. Approach: The study employed a qualitative research method and involved the use of instruments such as interviews, document analy...

  14. Strategies in traditional higher education: lessons from a newcomer?

    OpenAIRE

    De Jonghe, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    This research project examines an institutional newcomer with a new organisational model for higher education, a virtual university, aspiring to be a “real university”. Carried out over the periods 2002-2003 and 2008-2009, the research process aimed to identify to what extent this virtual university is different and what traditional universities can learn.Based upon a qualitative study of a virtual university, a newcomer in the higher education system in Spain, compared over two different tim...

  15. COMPETITIVE STRATEGY IN THE FIELD OF EDUCATIONAL POTENTIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri F. Shamrai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of market reforms in the Russian economy there has been a trend of weakening its educational potential. The problems of access to education and the possibility of payment have exacerbated. Delay in the development of innovative models and raw primitivization economy resulted in decrease of intelligence needs and the demand for qualified professionals. Further, there arose difficulties in connection with the transition to the so-called two-tier education system – «Bachelor – Master.»On the basis of the circumstances mentioned in the article, the improvement of the Russian educational system in the direction of democratization and individualization of the learning process, referring to giving students a choice between different educational systems and modules, and various ways to improve students’ weight (the development of corporate education, the provision of learning opportunities created in the Russian branches of Western universities, the organization of NSO on market principles, the creation of youth discussion clubs, innovative student enterprises, competitions on market principles, the establishment of universities’ student avenues of glory, etc.. 

  16. Education Reform at the Science University and the New Strategy for Training Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabdulchakov, Valerian F.; Kusainov, Askarbek K.; Kalimullin, Aydar M.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem of designing a new strategy of teacher training due to the reform of education in universities: decrease of pedagogical disciplines, strengthening fundamental (subject) training, etc. The goal of the article lies in identification of the main components of the new strategy of teacher training. A leading approach to the…

  17. Outcomes of a systematically designed strategy for the implementation of sex education in Dutch secondary schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiefferink, C.H.; Poelman, J.; Linthorst, M.; Vanwesenbeeck, I.; Wijngaarden, J.C.M. van; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the effects of a systematically designed innovation strategy on teachers' implementation of a sex education curriculum and its related determinants. A quasi-experimental group design was used to assess the effectiveness of the innovation strategy. Teachers filled in

  18. Aligning corporate real estate with the corporate strategies of higher education institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theo van der Voordt; Geert Dewulf; Ronald Beckers

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore how corporate real estate (CRE) managers of higher education institutions formulate their CRE strategies and CRE operating decisions to align CRE with the corporate strategies of these institutions. Design/methodology/approach – An analytical

  19. Aligning corporate real estate with the corporate strategies of higher education institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, R; van der Voordt, Theo; Dewulf, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose
    The purpose of this paper is to explore how corporate real estate (CRE) managers of higher education institutions formulate their CRE strategies and CRE operating decisions to align CRE with the corporate strategies of these institutions.

    Design/methodology/approach
    An

  20. Strategies for Promoting Autonomous Reading Motivation: A Multiple Case Study Research in Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Naeghel, Jessie; Van Keer, Hilde; Vanderlinde, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    It is important to reveal strategies which foster students' reading motivation in order to break through the declining trend in reading motivation throughout children's educational careers. Consequently, the present study advances an underexposed field in reading motivation research by studying and identifying the strategies of teachers excellent…

  1. Strategies for the Cooperation of Educational Institutions and Companies in Mechanical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Juha

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyse the strategic planning of the Centre for Mechanical Engineering, which is a joint venture of educational institutions and companies in Southwest Finland. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the strategies of focus and cost efficiency and how the selected strategies can be adjusted…

  2. Cost Containment for Higher Education: Strategies for Public Policy and Institutional Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, William Brand

    This book discusses long term strategies for cost containment for higher education that are currently in use or could be employed. Some of the strategies discussed are applicable at various levels of government, some relate to interinstitutional arrangements and some are options of the individual institutions. The chapters are as follows: (1)…

  3. Building Bridges: Seeking Structure and Direction for Higher Education Motivated Learning Strategy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Luke K.

    2017-01-01

    Many of our current higher education (HE) learning strategy models intersect at important points. At the same time, these theories also often demonstrate important unique perspectives on student learning within HE. Currently, research with one learning strategy model rarely leads to developments in others, as each group of researchers works in…

  4. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  5. What do we do? Practices and learning strategies of medical education leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieff, Susan; Albert, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Continuous changes in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education require faculty to assume a variety of new leadership roles. While numerous faculty development programmes have been developed, there is little evidence about the specific practices of medical education leaders or their learning strategies to help inform their design. This study aimed to explore what medical education leaders' actually do, their learning strategies and recommendations for faculty development. A total of 16 medical education leaders from a variety of contexts within the faculty of medicine of a large North American medical school participated in semi-structured interviews to explore the nature of their work and the learning strategies they employ. Using thematic analysis, interview transcripts were coded inductively and then clustered into emergent themes. Findings clustered into four key themes of practice: (1) intrapersonal (e.g., self-awareness), (2) interpersonal (e.g., fostering informal networks), (3) organizational (e.g., creating a shared vision) and (4) systemic (e.g. strategic navigation). Learning strategies employed included learning from experience and example, reflective practice, strategic mentoring or advanced training. Our findings illuminate a four-domain framework for understanding medical education leader practices and their learning preferences. While some of these findings are not unknown in the general leadership literature, our understanding of their application in medical education is unique. These practices and preferences have a potential utility for conceptualizing a coherent and relevant approach to the design of faculty development strategies for medical education leadership.

  6. [Public health strategies in the prevention of induced abortion. An experience of interprofessional education based strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitini, E; Russo, M L; Civitelli, G; Pizzini, E; Marceca, M; Di Foggia, F; Marceca Iascone, M

    2014-01-01

    In Italy recent statistics show a huge difference between abortion rate among Italian and migrant women: is it an inequity in health? The Italian Ministry of Health / Center for Disease Prevention and Control, which recognized this issue as a specific public health problem, has financed a national Project whose aim was the prevention of abortion among migrant women. The Project was characterized by a multitasking approach: 1) information and health education of migrant women and their communities; 2) education of health and social care professionals; 3) analysis and development of new proposals for the networks of services directed towards the improvement of woman's health. In this article the Authors describe the main characteristics of the realized intervention of inter-professional education. It began with a multidisciplinary process for the identification of educational needs which has allowed the identification of educational goals. A Training of Trainers event was then organized in order to involve and make the ten Italian Regions partners of the Project aware of their responsibilities. A DVD collecting all the material of the course and other useful resources was produced in order to support the educational process. At the moment it is not possible to evaluate the medium- and long-time results of the process (e.g. the efficacy of educational interventions or the health outcomes related to the reduction of abortion among migrant women). Nevertheless all the actors involved have made positive evaluations on the usefulness of the process.

  7. Educational research in Sweden: Reform strategies and research policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Inger

    1981-06-01

    Educational R & D in Sweden is to a large extent policy-oriented. It has been an integrated part of the Swedish educational reform system and has brought about a dialogue between politicians, administrators and researchers. Several circumstances have contributed to the `Swedish model'. One is the system with government-appointed committees in which researchers often play an active part. Another is that the Swedish educational system is highly centralized, with the National Board of Education (NBE) as the central authority, responsible for primary, secondary and adult education. A third — and a crucial one — is that, since 1962, the NBE has had increasing funds for educational R & D at its disposal. These funds account for the main part of the economic resources for R & D, along with resources allocated to research appointments at research departments of universities. Educational R & D, conducted primarily within the NBE funds, has recently been evaluated by a government-appointed committee. In its evaluations of the impact of educational R & D, the committee distinguished between the effects of R & D and the effect correlates. It concluded that the impact of R & D is more indirect than direct, more long-term than immediate. The effects are also more easily recognized at levels above the actual school situation. This finding could be interpreted as a consequence of the policy-orientation of educational R & D, which at the same time shows the difficulties in reaching the `school level' with research and development results. There are two general trends in Sweden, which will influence both research planning and research use. First, there is a trend towards the decentralization of decision-making and responsibility for the educational system. Secondly, there is a trend towards the `sectionalization' of the R & D system as a whole. This sectionalization will mean that research will to a great extent be planned to meet needs from different parts of society — labour

  8. Development of training-related health care software by a team of clinical educators: their experience, from conception to piloting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ap Dafydd, Derfel; Williamson, Ruth; Blunt, Philip; Blunt, Dominic M

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties of producing useful, bespoke, and affordable information technology systems for large health care organizations are well publicized, following several high-profile endeavors in the UK. This article describes the experience of a small group of clinical radiologists and their collaborators in producing an information technology system - from conception to piloting. This system, called Trainee Tracker, enables automated target date recalculation of trainee milestones, depending on their work patterns and other individual circumstances. It utilizes an automated email alert system to notify the educational supervisors and trainees of approaching and elapsed target dates, in order to identify trainees in difficulty early and address their training needs accordingly. The challenges and advantages, both common to and contrasting with larger-scale projects, are also considered. The benefits of the development team's "agile" approach to software development and the lessons learned will be of interest to medical educators, particularly those with expertise in e-portfolios and other training-related software.

  9. Teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena, Alodio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a system of teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational students. The modeling of teaching and learning strategies presented is the result of a research project carried out at the University of Camagüey; its results are being employed successfully. A full description of research methods, rationale, and each of the suggested strategies is provided.

  10. Uncovering Web search strategies in South African higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surika Civilcharran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of the enormous amount of information available on the Web and the fact that search engines are continuously evolving to enhance the search experience, students are nevertheless faced with the difficulty of effectively retrieving information. It is, therefore, imperative for the interaction between students and search tools to be understood and search strategies to be identified, in order to promote successful information retrieval. Objectives: This study identifies the Web search strategies used by postgraduate students and forms part of a wider study into information retrieval strategies used by postgraduate students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN, Pietermaritzburg campus, South Africa. Method: Largely underpinned by Thatcher’s cognitive search strategies, the mixed-methods approach was utilised for this study, in which questionnaires were employed in Phase 1 and structured interviews in Phase 2. This article reports and reflects on the findings of Phase 2, which focus on identifying the Web search strategies employed by postgraduate students. The Phase 1 results were reported in Civilcharran, Hughes and Maharaj (2015. Results: Findings reveal the Web search strategies used for academic information retrieval. In spite of easy access to the invisible Web and the advent of meta-search engines, the use of Web search engines still remains the preferred search tool. The UKZN online library databases and especially the UKZN online library, Online Public Access Catalogue system, are being underutilised. Conclusion: Being ranked in the top three percent of the world’s universities, UKZN is investing in search tools that are not being used to their full potential. This evidence suggests an urgent need for students to be trained in Web searching and to have a greater exposure to a variety of search tools. This article is intended to further contribute to the design of undergraduate training programmes in order to deal

  11. Make Your Work Matter: Development and Pilot Evaluation of a Purpose-Centered Career Education Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Bryan J.; Steger, Michael F.; Gibson, Amanda; Peisner, William

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sense of purpose is both salient and desirable for adolescents, and purpose in people's lives and careers is associated with both general and work-related well-being. However, little is known about whether purpose can be encouraged through school-based interventions. This article reports the results of a quasi-experimental pilot study…

  12. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: Pilot Bilingual Program Grades 1-2-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackelduff, Eleanor; Glick, Toby

    This content analysis schedule for the Pilot Bilingual Program of Redwood City, California presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the linguistic…

  13. Evaluation of Human Papilloma Virus Communicative Education Strategies: A Pilot Screening Study for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Clavijo, Lizeth K.; Wiesner-Ceballos, Carolina; Rincón-Martínez, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) is highly prevalent in sexually active men and women; HR-HPV has been classified as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and as a necessary, but not sufficient, causal agent for cervical cancer. Women who test positive for HPV often experience serious psychosocial consequences such as fear,…

  14. Adult Learning in the Queer Nation: A Foucauldian Analysis of Educational Strategies for Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Wayland

    2009-01-01

    Adult education for social change can occur within social movements, and the fight for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered and Queer (LGBTQ) rights has included educational strategies designed to challenge heterosexist and homophobic systems of power. This article explores how the Queer Nation movement of the early 1990s deployed a Foucauldian…

  15. Legalization, Expertise, and Participation: Strategies of Compensatory Legitimation in Educational Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Hans N.

    1983-01-01

    Shows how the concept of legitimacy and, in particular, the theoretical construct of compensatory legitimation as a determinant of policy strategies may be useful for the comparative analysis of educational policy in advanced capitalist societies. Uses examples of educational policy in the Federal Republic of Germany and the United States. (BRR)

  16. Preparing Pre-Service Special Education Teachers in Urban School Settings to Teach Content Literacy Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this concurrent mixed-method study was to explore how special education intern teachers, placed in an urban secondary special education school setting developed an ability to implement content literacy strategies after completion of a professional development graduate seminar and internship experience. This was done by studying both…

  17. Educational Leaders' Doctoral Research That Informed Strategies to Steer Their Organizations towards Cultural Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taysum, Alison

    2016-01-01

    This research generates new knowledge about how 24 educational leaders in the USA and England used their doctoral research to build narrative capital to inform strategies to steer their organizations towards cultural alignment. Cultural alignment prevents forms of segregation rooted in nation-states' wider historiography of education segregation…

  18. Promoting Hong Kong's Higher Education to Asian Markets: Market Segmentations and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C. K.; Yuen, Timothy W. W.; Yuen, Celeste Y. M.; Cheng, Yin Cheong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of this study is threefold: to analyze the current conditions of higher education services offered in the three target markets; to conduct market segmentation analysis of these markets; and to recommend the most appropriate market entry strategies for Hong Kong's education service providers. Design/methodology/approach:…

  19. Stress and Coping Strategies among Distance Education Students at the University of Cape Coast, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaah, Christopher Yaw; Essilfie, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the causes of stress and coping strategies adopted among distance education students at the College of Distance Education in the University of Cape Coast. A total of 332 diploma and post-diploma final year students in 2014/2015 academic year were selected from two study centers using random sampling procedure to…

  20. Multisectoral Strategies for Advancing Girls' Education: Principles and Practice. SAGE Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Howard

    This paper describes issues, experiences, and strategies used in developing successful multisectoral partnerships to advance girls' education, using Guinea and Morocco as examples. Chapter 1 introduces the issue, discussing barriers to girls' education and describing the multisectoral response to interrelated barriers. Chapter 2 defines the…

  1. Investigating the Relationships between Teaching Strategies and Learning Styles in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulbure, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Within this paper, we are focusing on the relationships between teaching strategies, learning styles, and the students' academic achievement in higher education. The main objective of this study is to compare three groups of pre-service teachers having different majors (i.e., Educational Sciences, Economic Sciences, and Foreign Languages) in order…

  2. Global Strategies for International Education Providers in Australia: A Case Study of Tropical North Queensland TAFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Michelle; Haberman, Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The continuing growth of Australia's international education market is causing providers to consider moving from international business approaches to global strategies. This paper examines factors affecting a regional Australian educational provider's approach to the international student market, using Tropical North Queensland TAFE (TNQT) for…

  3. Coding the Biodigital Child: The Biopolitics and Pedagogic Strategies of Educational Data Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Educational data science is an emerging transdisciplinary field formed from an amalgamation of data science and elements of biological, psychological and neuroscientific knowledge about learning, or learning science. This article conceptualises educational data science as a biopolitical strategy focused on the evaluation and management of the…

  4. Expanding the Education Universe: A Fifty-State Strategy for Course Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickman, Michael

    2014-01-01

    After twenty years of expanding school-choice options, state leaders, educators, and families have a new tool: course choice, a strategy for students to learn from unconventional providers that might range from top-tier universities or innovative community colleges to local employers, labs, or hospitals. In "Expanding the Education Universe:…

  5. National Strategy for Promotion of Russian Universities in the World Market of Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushketova, Natalia; Bydanova, Elizaveta; Rouet, Gilles

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The export of Russian educational services worldwide was not considered by the Russian Government as a full-fledged economic sector until recently. However, the situation has changed since the early 2000s, when in 2002, the Russian Government approved the national strategy for higher education promotion abroad and since then has been…

  6. Physical Education and Female Participation: A Case Study of Teachers' Perspectives and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brooke; Dionigi, Rylee A.; Litchfield, Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    We argue that gender issues in physical education (PE) remain in some schools, despite advances in PE research and curricula aimed at engaging females in PE. We interviewed five Australian PE teachers (1 male and 4 females) at a co-educational, regional high school about the factors affecting female participation in PE and the strategies they used…

  7. The Impact of Educational R & D Centers and Laboratories: An Analysis of Effective Organizational Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, J. Victor; Johnson, Rudolph

    The purpose of this research was to study the link between effective management strategies and the impact of educational research and development. The 19 R & D Centers and Regional Laboratories of the United States Office of Education were selected as the focal organizations for analysis. Using document analysis and interviews, the researchers…

  8. The Challenges and Strategies of Internationalizing Hong Kong's Higher Education in a Globalized World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shun-wing; Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study of how to attract students from the Asian markets to pursue higher education in Hong Kong. The study found that the strategies of internationalization, at both the system level and the institutional level, attempted to address problems generated from the barriers of exporting higher education and so build on the…

  9. The Growth Trend in Learning Strategies during the Transition from Secondary to Higher Education in Flanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coertjens, Liesje; Donche, Vincent; De Maeyer, Sven; van Daal, Tine; Van Petegem, Peter

    2017-01-01

    As in many OECD countries, the first year in Flemish Higher Education is a major hurdle. Research on the experience of the transition period from secondary to higher education highlights the importance of the change in students' teaching/learning environment. Though this change is hypothesised to affect students' learning strategies, and hereby…

  10. The Use of Humor as a Teaching Strategy in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukehart, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to determine the use of humor as a teaching strategy among a sample of nurse educators employed by community colleges and universities in Northern and Central California nursing programs. The study also identified the types of humor used, how humor is used in the classroom, and nurse educators' perceptions of…

  11. Education Abroad, Human Capital Development, and National Competitiveness: China's Brain Gain Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Su-Yan

    2011-01-01

    This is a documentary study of education abroad policy in the People's Republic of China (PRC) between 1978 and 2009. By examining the dynamics underpinning the PRC state's efforts to shape the flow of Chinese students and scholars from and into China, this article reveals the major strategies that have enabled education abroad to become a source…

  12. Educational Strategies of Minority Youth and the Social Constructions of Ethnicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldenhawer, Bolette

    2014-01-01

    From observations of different minority groups in the nine countries participating in the EDUMIGROM research programme, this chapter explores minority students' views on their educational options and the role they attribute to schooling in their life. She distinguishes three types of educational ...... strategies of 'mobilization', 'instrumentation' and 'opposition' to schooling, which are unevenly distributed across the different countries and the different ethnic groups observed....

  13. Strategies of business education in job creation and self reliance for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the strategies in business education and its role in achieving self reliance, job creation and empowerment for sustainable development. Lecturers in the Business Education Department of Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki formed the study population. Data was collected using a suitable structured and ...

  14. Strategies for information management in education: Some international experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Bytheway

    2014-06-01

    Objectives: This article reports and analyses conversation with eight international educators in Europe, Canada, the United States, New Zealand and Australia. All are managing the impact of technology in different ways (reactive and pro-active, at different levels (pre-primary through to senior citizen, in different roles (teachers, administrators and senior managers and in different contexts (schools and universities. Method: Open-ended conversations with educators and educational administrators in developed countries were recorded, transcribed and analysed. The qualitative analysis of the content was done in the style of ‘open coding’ and ‘selective coding’ using a qualitative content analysis tool. Results: Whilst technology is still seen to drive much thinking, it is found that that success is not derived from the technology, but from a full and proper understanding of the needs and aspirations of those who are directly involved in educational processes, and by means of a managerial focus that properly recognises the context within which an institution exists. Conclusion: Whilst this result might be expected, the detailed analysis of the findings further reveals the need to manage investments in educational technologies at different levels and in different ways.

  15. Research on the Network Security Strategy for Digital Distance Education Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Minzhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance education has been an important development tendency and learning platform with the emphasis of lifelong learning of the society. Networked learning and teaching is a main characteristic of distance education, which inevitably needs to transmit large magnitude of private data among students, teachers and the education platform. To protect the security of data transmission and storage, a networked security strategy was proposed. The security strategy is based on the technologies of intrusion detection and digital signature. An intrusion detection model was established in accordance to the main tasks of distance education platform. The encryption process of digital signature was illustrated along with the information flow of the distance education platform. The paper offers an effective reference for solving security problems of distance education platforms.

  16. Executive summary: Education research in emergency medicine-opportunities, challenges, and strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMantia, Joseph; Deiorio, Nicole M; Yarris, Lalena M

    2012-12-01

    The 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Education Research In Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success" convened a diverse group of stakeholders in medical education to target gaps in emergency medicine (EM) education research and identify priorities for future study. A total of 175 registrants collaborated in preparatory and conference-day activities to explore subtopics in educational interventions, learner assessment, faculty development, and research funding and infrastructure. The conference was punctuated by didactic sessions led by key international medical education experts and ended with consensus formation in many domains. This issue of AEM presents the exciting results of this process. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Lacrosse in the Physical Education Setting: Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, Susan Y.; Cathey, R. Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article on the game of lacrosse focuses on offensive strategies used to help students become successful in game play. It describes lead-up activities students should know and perform, such as stick holding, cradling, scooping, catching, and the passing fundamentals of lacrosse. The progressions of tasks in this article were designed from…

  18. Japanese Language Educator's Strategies for and Attitudes toward Teaching Kanji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hideko; Green, Kathy E.

    2002-01-01

    Explored the attitudes of 251 second language teachers toward Kanji and their choices of instructional strategies for teaching Kanji. Principal component analysis resulted in the identification of six statistically reliable domains representing underlying attitudes toward teaching kanji. Descriptive statistics revealed that the mot positive…

  19. Undergraduate Climate Education: Motivations, Strategies, Successes, and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Karin B.; Gold, Anne U.; Ledley, Tamara Shapiro; Sullivan, Susan Buhr; Manduca, Cathryn A.; Mogk, David W.; Wiese, Katryn

    2014-01-01

    Climate literacy is an essential component of a strategy to comprehend and confront the grand challenge of global climate change. However, scientific complexity, societal implications, and political associations make climate change a difficult but important topic to teach. In this paper we report on the results of a survey of undergraduate faculty…

  20. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  1. ROSES: role of self-monitoring of blood glucose and intensive education in patients with Type 2 diabetes not receiving insulin. A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciosi, M; Lucisano, G; Pellegrini, F; Cantarello, A; Consoli, A; Cucco, L; Ghidelli, R; Sartore, G; Sciangula, L; Nicolucci, A

    2011-07-01

    To estimate the efficacy of a self-monitoring-based disease management strategy in patients with Type 2 diabetes treated with oral agent monotherapy. This was an open-label, randomized, pilot study, primarily led by diabetes nurses. Patients were randomly allocated to either a self-monitoring-based disease management strategy or usual care (ratio 3:1) and followed up for 6 months. Education was centred on how to modify lifestyle according self-monitoring readings. Self-monitoring of blood glucose results were discussed during monthly telephone contact. The primary endpoint was mean change in HbA(1c) levels, estimated with an ANOVA for repeated measures. All analyses were intention to treat. Three diabetic clinics recruited 62 patients, of whom five were lost to follow-up. At baseline, both groups had a mean HbA(1c) value of 7.9% ± 0.6% (63 ± 6 mmol/mol). After 6 months, mean HbA(1c) reduction was 1.2 ± 0.1% (-13 ± 1 mmol/mol) in the intervention group and 0.7 ± 0.2 (-8 ± 2 mmol/mol) in the control group, with an absolute mean difference between groups of -0.5% (95% CI -0.9 to -0.0%; P = 0.04) (-5 mmol/mol, 95% CI -10 to 0). At study end, 61.9% of patients in the intervention group and 20.0% in the control group reached the target level of HbA(1c) self-monitoring disease management strategy, primarily led by diabetes nurses and allowing a timely and efficient use of self-monitoring readings, is able to improve metabolic control, primarily through lifestyle modifications leading to weight loss. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  2. Study on Teaching Strategies in Mathematics Education based on CAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of information technology and the popularization of internet, mobile phone, new media represented is gradually influencing and changing people’s study and life, become the centre and social consensus of cultural information, according to the China Internet Network Information centre, the youth is the main use of CAI(Computer Assisted Instruction, which is the most active group of customers, fully understand the impact of the new media environment for students, higher mathematics education of college students in CAI. In this paper, the CAI is proposed for mathematics education of college students.

  3. Strategies for structuring interdisciplinary education in Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvijovic, Marija; Höfer, Thomas; Aćimović, Jure

    2016-01-01

    function by employing experimental data, mathematical models and computational simulations. As Systems Biology is inherently multidisciplinary, education within this field meets numerous hurdles including departmental barriers, availability of all required expertise locally, appropriate teaching material...... internationally. We believe that one of the overriding goals of any Systems Biology education should be a student’s ability to phrase and communicate research questions in such a manner that they can be solved by the integration of experiments and modelling, as well as to communicate and collaborate productively...

  4. Strategies toward the Inclusion of Environmental Education in Educator Preparation Programs: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crim, Courtney; Moseley, Christine; Desjean-Perrotta, Blanche

    2017-01-01

    A national study was conducted to investigate the inclusion of environmental education (EE) into educator preparation programs across the United States. Responses from teacher educators in institutions of higher education indicated that the infusion of EE into educator preparation programs is limited and varies greatly across the nation. Findings…

  5. Art-Based Learning Strategies in Art Therapy Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods research study examined the use of art-based teaching methods in master's level art therapy graduate education in North America. A survey of program directors yielded information regarding in which courses and how frequently art-based methods (individual in-class art making, dyad or group art making, student art projects as…

  6. Designing Pedagogic Strategies for Dialogic Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Alyson

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the pedagogic value of dialogue to strengthen pre-service teachers' reflective practices and improve their knowledge about the power of talk for learning. Dialogic learning was introduced to a unit of study taken by a final-year cohort of students in an initial teacher education degree at an urban university in Australia.…

  7. Getting Started in Education Organizing: Resources and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Education Organizing (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, community organizing has emerged as an effective force for school improvement. In the context of shrinking education funding, stubborn opportunity and achievement gaps between low-income and wealthy children and between children of color and White children, and polarizing debate on school reform, community organizing…

  8. Social Justice Praxis in Education: Towards Sustainable Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deventer, Idilette; van der Westhuizen, Philip C.; Potgieter, Ferdinand J.

    2015-01-01

    Social justice, defined as an impetus towards a socially just educational world, is based on the assumption that all people, irrespective of belief or societal position, are entitled to be treated according to the values of human rights, human dignity and equality. Diverging from the classical positivist approach in social science research that…

  9. strategies on perceived motivational climate in physical education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Grounded in Achievement Goal Theory of Nicholls (1989), the aim of this study was to assess the development of four teaching interventions based on the TARGET areas of Ames (1992) and verify their effect on the perceived motivational climate at situational level in Physical Education (PE) classes. Participants were 580 ...

  10. Educators' perceptions on bullying prevention strategies | de Wet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I rep ort on an inve stigatio n into a group of Free State educators' recognition of bullying, their reaction s to incidences of b ullying, and the ir perceptions of the effectiveness of a number o f bul lying prevention s trategies. The research instrument was a synthesis of the Delaware Research Questionnaire and questions ...

  11. Mission, Vision, Strategy: Discernment in Catholic Business Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassl, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    By virtue of its divine vocation, Catholic business education must be mission driven. In reality, however, mission drift and failure to maintain distinctiveness are widespread among Catholic business schools (CBS). Many believe that a trade-off between academic quality and Catholicity is unavoidable, and opt for accommodating the expectations of…

  12. Canada's International Education Strategy: Focus on Scholarships. CBIE Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Based on a survey of approximately 40 professionals involved in various disciplines associated with international education across Canada, this study examines Canada's (federal, provincial, and territorial government) offering of scholarships to international students. Focused at the university level, the study elaborates on relevant international…

  13. LSD and the Student: Approaches to Educational Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Allan Y.

    There are three basic functions of the college relevant to the drug abuse problem: the therapeutic, the preventative, and the developmental. The first principle of psychedelic drug education may be termed the sympathetic attitude. It involves a thorough understanding of drugs on the part of the college administration, plus the ability to treat…

  14. China's Strategy for the Internationalization of Higher Education: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, the internationalization of higher education in China has had considerable achievements, and has contributed to the current transformation of the Chinese system into one of the largest and arguably most promising ones in the world. Setting the Chinese experience in an international context, this article assesses the latest…

  15. Evaluation Strategies in Financial Education: Evaluation with Imperfect Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lauren; Dudensing, Rebekka; Granovsky, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Program evaluation often suffers due to time constraints, imperfect instruments, incomplete data, and the need to report standardized metrics. This article about the evaluation process for the Wi$eUp financial education program showcases the difficulties inherent in evaluation and suggests best practices for assessing program effectiveness. We…

  16. Desktop Simulation: Towards a New Strategy for Arts Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsheim, Nina Sun

    2009-01-01

    For arts departments in many institutions, technology education entails prohibitive equipment costs, maintenance requirements and administrative demands. There are also inherent pedagogical challenges: for example, recording studio classes where, due to space and time constraints, only a few students in what might be a large class can properly…

  17. Corporate real estate alignment strategies in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, R.; van der Voordt, D.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the management approaches concerned with the process of aligning Corporate Real Estate (CRE) with organizational goals on a strategic level and regarding day-to-day operating activities in higher education institutes. Methodology/approach – The paper first

  18. Financing Education for the Public Good: A New Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Walter W.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is suggested that depends on and measures how spending on higher and basic education is really an investment in the future, not consumption spending. This is a vital distinction because investment in human capital contributes heavily to growth and development, but also to higher state tax revenue and lower Medicaid, child care,…

  19. Effective Education and Communication Strategies to Promote Environmental Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaval, Lisa; Cornwell, James F. M.

    2017-01-01

    Communicators of climate science seek ways to better educate and motivate individuals to personally commit to sustainable, energy-saving activities. However, critical psychological and social barriers to conservation make this task challenging. Behavioural scientists are well aware of the difficulties that individuals and groups have in responding…

  20. When negotiation fails. Private education as a disciplinary strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Regt, A.J; Weenink, D.

    2004-01-01

    The pressure on children to stay in education for an extended period of their lives is high. Such protracted school careers require a large amount of self-control and the ability to defer gratification. Students who lack the necessary discipline to do so may become school dropouts. For

  1. Higher Education Lecturing and Humor: From Perspectives to Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Fuzhan; Mafakheri, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the issues surrounding the use of humor as an informal teaching method in higher education lecturing. The impact and usefulness of humor, from both a teacher's and a student's perspective, will be investigated. The aim is to classify the challenges and limitations of using humor in classrooms and to investigate and…

  2. Interactive Education in Public Administration (2): Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jonathan; Alford, John

    2015-01-01

    The previous article ("Interactive education in public administration (1): The role of teaching 'objects'") described the benefits of "moving from behind the lectern" to engage in interactive teaching in public policy and administration, and the central role of "objects" in that process. But teaching…

  3. Enhancing Community Education Through Innovative Teaching Strategies in a Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Ann W; Johnson, Tanya L; Fox, Margot W; Wang, Chih-Hsuan

    2018-04-01

    Nurse educators are relentlessly in search of innovative measures that enhance student learning and offer opportunities that prepare them for clinical practice. Collaborative opportunities between schools of nursing and community settings are beneficial for students and the community. One strategy was developed by a southeastern baccalaureate nursing program through the assistance of the National Institutes of Health mini-grants program, related to their Safe Sleep campaign. Safe Sleep subject matter was integrated into the curriculum, where students learned content, developed teaching strategies, and taught community members components of Safe Sleep. The project provided faculty and baccalaureate nursing students with an opportunity to implement a community outreach education project addressing Safe Sleep. Students learned cultural assessment, teaching, and communication skills, and community members benefited from learned knowledge of health promotion programs. Future educational outreach projects are recommended to further examine program effectiveness and the value of teaching-learning strategies. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(4):240-244.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Human Rights Education: A Pedagogical and Didactic (Teaching Strategy Focused in a Controversial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Magendzo-Kolstrein

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article, which can be envision as an essay, is to present a pedagogical-didactic strategy for human rights education focusing on the controversy. Advancements and setbacks faced by human rights education in Latin America are exposed in order to support this strategy. Therefore, it indicates that education has denied the conflict and explains the need for its inclusion under the idea of ‘controversial issue’. Additionally, the existence of conflicts in the interpretation, violation and/or respect for human rights is pointed out. The principal tensions that cross human rights are displayed. Based on the above, the need to support the existence of a human rights education focusing on the conflict and central components of its teaching strategy are described, and it ends by referring to its didactic approach and the role which should be assumed by faculty when teaching human rights including the conflict.

  5. Pharmacy education in India: strategies for a better future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jishnu, V; Gilhotra, Rm; Mishra, Dn

    2011-10-01

    In this world of specialization and globalization the pharmacy education in India is suffering from serious backdrops and flaws. There is an urgent need to initiate an academic exercise aimed at attaining revamping of curriculum, keeping in pace with current and emerging trends in the field of pharmacy. Unfortunately all these years, enough emphasis was not laid on strengthening the components of Community Pharmacy, Hospital and Clinical pharmacy, while designing curriculum at diploma and degree levels of teaching. The curriculum followed by almost all universities in India are no were up to the world standards and students are still getting the 20-30 yrs older compounding practical exposure in labs during the graduation level. The article emphasises the concept of innovation ecosystems and quality management. Application of TQM to the educational system improves the present situation. The counseling system which serves to be the gateway of the students for entry into the profession should be brought under the scanner. Introducing specializations at the graduation level will result in professional expertise and excellence. Education is a customer focused industry and every student should be capable of evaluating themselves for continuously improving their quality and professionalism. Teacher focused mastery learning should give away to student focused smart learning. An educational institution should provide the student with a stress-free atmosphere for learning and developing his intellectual capabilities. Every college should have a counseling centre to address the problems of students in their academic and personal life. An emphasis on the concept of quality teacher is included. Revival of the pharmacy education in India is the need of the hour which in turn will pave the way for the up gradation of the pharmacy profession in the country.

  6. Strategies to Improve Students’ Educational Achievement Motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Taheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the fact that motivation is linked directly to the learning process and educational achievement, this study endeavored to identify strategies to improve students’ educational achievement motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 368 students from Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected using simple random sampling from 2013-2014. All of the Guilan University of Medical Sciences’ students met the general eligibility criteria except guest students. The questionnaire included five domains of economic, socio-cultural, educational, geo-regional, and personality factors in educational achievement motivation. Through using descriptive and inferential statistics (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, the compiled data were analyzed at the significance level of 0.05. Results: Data analysis revealed that socio-cultural factors have the maximum score (64.14 ± 9.92 and geo-regional factors have the minimum score (19.01±3.63 on the participants’ educational achievement motivation. What is more, a significant difference was revealed between educational field and educational effective factors as well as educational level and educational effective factors (p<0.011, p<0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Given that the socio-cultural factors had the maximum score on the students’ educational achievement motivation, it is recommended that university officials take these factors into account, and attempt to plan to provide appropriate strategies to enhance their students’ motivation, specifically their educational achievement motivation.

  7. Evaluation of Two CEDA Weatherization Pilot Implementations of an Exterior Insulation and Over-Clad Retrofit Strategy for Residential Masonry Buildings in Chicago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhauser, K.

    2013-08-01

    This project examines the implementation of an exterior insulation and over-clad strategy for brick masonry buildings in Chicago. The strategy was implemented at a free-standing two story two-family dwelling and a larger free-standing multifamily building. The test homes selected for this research represent predominant housing types for the Chicago area. High heating energy use typical in these buildings threaten housing affordability. Uninsulated mass masonry wall assemblies also have a strongly detrimental impact on comfort. Significant changes to the performance of masonry wall assemblies is generally beyond the reach of typical weatherization (Wx) program resources. The Community and Economic Development Association of Cook County, Inc. (CEDA) has secured a Sustainable Energy Resources for Consumers (SERC) innovation grant sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). This grant provides CEDA the opportunity to pursue a pilot implementation of innovative approaches to retrofit in masonry wall enclosures. The exterior insulation and over-clad strategy implemented through this project was designed to allow implementation by contractors active in CEDA weatherization programs and using materials and methods familiar to these contractors. The retrofit measures are evaluated in terms of feasibility, cost and performance. Through observations of the strategies implemented, the research described in this report identifies measures critical to performance as well as conditions for wider adoption. The research also identifies common factors that must be considered in determining whether the exterior insulation and over-clad strategy is appropriate for the building.

  8. Learning outcomes with visual thinking strategies in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Margaret; Hensel, Desiree; Decker, Kim A; Busby, Katie

    2017-04-01

    There is a need to develop innovative strategies that cultivate broad cognitive, intrapersonal, and interpersonal skills in nursing curricula. The purpose of this project was to explore transferable skills students gained from Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS). This qualitative descriptive study was conducted with 55 baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in an entry level healthy population course. The students participated in a 1h VTS session led by a trained facilitator. Data came from the group's written responses to a question about how they would use skills learned from VTS in caring for patients and in their nursing practice. Content analysis showed students perceived gaining observational, cognitive, interpersonal, and intrapersonal skills from the VTS session. VTS is a unique teaching strategy that holds the potential to help nursing students develop a broad range of skills. Studies are needed on optimal exposure needed to develop observational, communication, collaboration, and critical thinking skills. Research is also needed on how skills gained in VTS translate to practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A review of educational strategies to improve nurses' roles in recognizing and responding to deteriorating patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, S Y; Scherpbier, A; Klainin-Yobas, P; Rethans, J-J

    2011-09-01

    Physiological instability leading to clinical deterioration often precedes cardiopulmonary arrest. Nurses, who have the most frequent patient contact and responsibility for ongoing monitoring of patients, play a crucial role in recognizing and responding to clinical deterioration. The importance of education in supporting such a role has been addressed in numerous studies. This study aimed to identify nurses' educational needs and explore educational strategies to enhance their ability in recognizing and managing wards with deteriorating patients. A literature search from databases (2000-2010) was undertaken to include papers that identified the educational needs of ward nurses and existing educational programmes related to the care of deteriorating patients. Twenty-six papers were included in this review. Findings identified the educational need to empower nurses with the appropriate knowledge and skills in recognizing, reporting and responding to patient deterioration. The review of existing educational programmes and their outcomes identified valuable teaching information and strategies, and areas that could be improved in meeting nurses' educational needs. The review has highlighted important aspects of patient safety in clinical deterioration that could be further addressed by educational strategies targeting the role of ward nurses. These strategies include: utilizing clinical decision-making models to develop nurses' decision making skills; developing a standardized tool for systematic nursing assessment and management of clinical deterioration; incorporating training in clinical deterioration as a core competence of pre-registered nursing education; providing vital signs training to nursing assistants; and conducting more rigorous studies to evaluate the effectiveness of the educational programmes. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  10. International service learning in the Dominican Republic: An asynchronous pilot in interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer; Pullen, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Despite the logistical barriers of asynchronous academic calendars, university students in nursing and physical therapy in one academic health centre piloted an international, interprofessional, service learning project in the Dominican Republic. Although the nursing students and physical therapy students were not able to be in-country at the same time, they provided care to a common caseload of traumatic injury patients and those with chronic, debilitating conditions. Interprofessional communication occurred with the development of SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation) reports from the Team Training curriculum of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Students learned the depth of physical therapy and the breadth of nursing. The pilot led to a more refined design to pair nursing and PT students, requiring them to communicate via mobile phone regarding results of examinations, and suggestions for follow-up by the nursing students, to ensure continuity of care and a more comprehensive approach to services.

  11. Art as a scaffolding teaching strategy in baccalaureate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydo, Sharon K; Marcyjanik, Diane L; Zorn, CeCelia R; Hooper, Nicole M

    2007-01-01

    Although the use of art in nursing education is well highlighted, most of the literature is anecdotal or focuses on development of a reflective nursing practice with clients. In this study, art was used as a scaffold to infuse liberal nursing education by helping baccalaureate nursing students (n = 91) create a personal expression of nursing and move toward greater self-awareness. Scaffolding is a metaphor for supporting learners as they develop higher levels of thinking. Using naturalistic inquiry to analyze students' written responses in a course activity, four themes emerged from the data: art and creativity, teamwork, boundaries and horizons within self, and boundaries and horizons in the profession. Student's individual expressions of art served as the "calling forth" of processes that opened the door to each student's personal expression.

  12. [Strategy for educating senior dermatological residents in mycology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sei, Yoshihiro; Hiruma, Masataro; Watanabe, Shinichi; Makimura, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    To improve the ability of dermatologists to diagnose cutaneous mycoses, we have proposed a list of the minimum mycological knowledge and skills required by senior residents of dermatology. The list includes ability to select the most appropriate sampling method, knowledge of the basic method of potassium hydroxide (KOH) examination and skill in performing fungal cultures and identifying the most prevalent fungal species isolated from skin lesions. It is not possible for the Japanese Society of Medical Mycology to train every senior resident directly, and it is difficult for them to acquire sufficient expertise independently. Consequently, training and advice given by instructors in residents' home institutes is essential. A project of an advanced course for instructors, who are in charge of educating senior residents in their own institute, may be possible. Therefore, we have proposed here a list for instructors of the knowledge and skills required to educate senior residents. Employing this list should realize improved skill in dermatologists.

  13. Networking strategy for entrepreneurship education in the IES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Holguín Montoya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to strengthen the processes of entrepreneurship developed in different institutions of higher education and improving the entrepreneurial model of the city of Medellín, institutions like the Mayor’s Office and COMFAMA (Family Benefit Institution, unite to add economic efforts and management in order to lead the program called City E. The overall objective of the program is to establish measures aimed at improving skills and abilities in the different actors of entrepreneurship in higher education institutions of the IES city. Unify criteria and that the capacity on issues related to entrepreneurship and the creation of productive and competitive enterprises. To this end, the Bolivarian Pontifical University makes tracing models of entrepreneurship in HEIs nationally and internationally and designed and implemented from the results of research conducted by the UPB a curriculum model and comprehensive support for the creation companies. 

  14. A strategy for global environmental education at the university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.T.; Hayes, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Earth's environment is a dynamic system that is affected both by natural phenomena and by human activity. The changes occurring in the global environment are bound to have serious consequences for all its inhabitants. Therefore, the world is rapidly becoming interdependent. Multidisciplinary scientific efforts must be directed toward understanding these global environmental changes. These efforts will require sufficient funds to attract scientists into global environmental research and to disseminate new knowledge to future scholars and to the general public alike. The federal government has a definite role to play in this effort and should allocate sufficient funds to initiate and sustain these programs. Unfortunately, such funds are not currently budgeted. The academic department, as the basic structural and functional unit of the American university system, is most appropriate to ensure environmental educational goals. The authors propose the establishment of a novel Department of Global Environment at every university. That department must be multidisciplinary in nature and must accumulate a critical mass of scholars from all relevant traditional disciplines in the arts and sciences to generate knowledge, to educate students, and to provide advisory services to policy makers. The study product of this department should receive a broad-based education and should emerge as an informed individual who possesses sufficient skills to achieve sustainable communities. That student should also be equipped to assume leadership and to formulate policy about global environmental issues. The investment in education may well be the only way to secure a future for humanity and for the natural world as we now know it

  15. Moodle: Teaching Strategies in Distance Education in Oral Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    de Castro Junior, Rubens Cardozo; Medeiros, Tuana Caruso; Honório, Heitor Marques; Sant’Ana, Eduardo; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sérgio

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The current model of education has been suffering changes, undergoing renovations, and seeking using and enjoying increasingly technological resources, as, for example, the Learning Management System (LMS). One of the most used LMS platforms is the Modular Object Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment (Moodle). This article proposes to demonstrate how Moodle platform was introduced in the subject of Stomatology through a clear and objective methodology. Study Design. In six months, ...

  16. Improving Nursing Knowledge of Alcohol Withdrawal: Second Generation Education Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Kimberly; Collins, Michelle L; Melson, Jo; Mooney, Ruth; Muffley, Cheryl; Wright-Glover, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Christiana Care Health System implemented a Care Management Guideline for Alcohol Withdrawal Symptom Management, which provided direction for inpatient screening for alcohol withdrawal risk, assessment, and treatment. Nurses educated on its use expressed confusion with the use of the assessment tools, pharmacokinetics, and pathophysiology of alcohol withdrawal and delirium tremens. Reeducation was provided by nursing professional development specialists. Pre- and postsurveys revealed that nurses were more confident in caring for patients with alcohol withdrawal.

  17. An Education Strategy to Respond to Medicine Inequality in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrn, Stephen R; Ekeocha, Zita; Clase, Kari L

    2017-07-01

    People living in Africa face a heavy and wide-ranging burden of disease that takes an incalculable toll on social and economic development as well as shortening life expectancy (life expectancy in Tanzania is about 60 vs. about 80 in the United States and Europe. Further, the pharmaceutical market in developing countries is immature and may not support quality medicines. In many cases, a tender system is used, and medicines are bought by the government at the lowest price. In addition to access to medicines, a number of pharmaceutical sciences problems are apparent. The availability of infrastructure and especially standard instruments such as HPLC and X-ray diffraction is minimal. Additionally, there is an important need to increase access to advanced education for men and women in Africa, especially access to state-of-the-art scientific education. Utilizing the mandate of Nelson Mandela, Purdue's conceptual approach has been to utilize education to combat these problems. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. From STEM to STEAM: Strategies for Enhancing Engineering & Technology Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy M. Connor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to challenge the common pedagogies found in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education with a particular focus on engineering. The dominant engineering pedagogy remains “chalk and talk”; despite research evidence that demonstrates its ineffectiveness. Such pedagogical approaches do not embrace the possibilities provided by more student-centric approaches and more active learning. The paper argues that there is a potential confusion in engineering education around the role of active learning approaches, and that the adoption of these approaches may be limited as a result of this confusion, combined with a degree of disciplinary egocentrism. The paper presents examples of design, engineering and technology projects that demonstrate the effectiveness of adopting pedagogies and delivery methods more usually attributed to the liberal arts such as studio based learning. The paper concludes with some suggestions about how best to create a fertile environment from which inquiry based learning can emerge as well as a reflection on whether the only real limitation on cultivating such approaches is the disciplinary egocentrism of traditional engineering educators.

  19. Building Visual Artists’ Resilience Capabilities: Current Educator Strategies and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Maree Siddins

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Enrolments in higher education programs in the creative and performing arts are increasing in many countries. Yet graduates of these degrees, who enter the broad sector known as the creative industries, face particular challenges in terms of securing long-term and sustainable employment. In addition, creative and performing artists face a range of mental challenges, caused by such factors as: the solitary nature of much creative practice, critical feedback by audiences and gatekeepers, or the general pressures associated with maintaining artistic relevance or integrity. The concepts of resilience and professional wellbeing are therefore highly relevant to those who pursue a career in creative industries, and while there has been an emerging body of work in this area, to date it has focussed on the performing arts area (e.g. music, theatre. Hence, in order to expand knowledge relevant to resilience and artists, this paper sets out to explore the extent to which current educators in the Australian context specifically address these issues within higher visual arts curricula; specifically the areas of illustration, design, film and photography. This was achieved via interviews with seventeen current academics working in these areas. The findings propose that higher education providers of programs in the visual arts consider placing a stronger emphasis on the embedded development of resilience and professional wellbeing capacities.

  20. Preparing for disasters: education and management strategies explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfred, Danita; Chilton, Jenifer; Connor, Della; Deal, Belinda; Fountain, Rebecca; Hensarling, Janice; Klotz, Linda

    2015-01-01

    During the last half of the 20th century, the focus of nursing changed from home and field to high-tech clinics and hospitals. Nursing in the absence of technology due to man-made or natural disasters almost disappeared from the curriculum of many nursing schools. Numerous disaster events and threats in the early 21st century caused educators and practitioners to increase the emphasis on disaster nursing and those principles that guide the nurse's practice in response to disasters. This article chronicles tools used by nurse educators to integrate disaster nursing into the didactic and clinical experiences of baccalaureate nursing students. We represent two nursing schools about 90 miles apart that collaborated to provide students with practical application of disaster nursing concepts. Part 1: An educational journey toward disaster nursing competencies: A curriculum in action provides an overview of the curricular tools used to insure adequate coverage of disaster nursing concepts across the curriculum. Part 2: Collaborative learning in Community Health Nursing for emergency preparedness relates the steps taken to plan, implement, and evaluate two different collaborative disaster simulation events. In this manuscript we have attempted transparency so that others can learn from our successes and our failures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pedagogic Strategies Perceived to Enhance Student Learning in Athletic Training Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensch, James M; Ennis, Catherine D

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate students' and instructors' educational experiences in Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)-accredited athletic training education programs and specifically to determine to what extent pedagogic strategies were reflected in students' perceptions of their learning experiences, instructors' perceptions of their teaching, and athletic training course syllabi. DESIGN AND SETTING: Students and instructors currently enrolled in or teaching in 5 university athletic training programs accredited by CAAHEP provided in-depth interviews pertaining to students' educational experiences. Students' educational experiences in CAAHEP-accredited athletic training programs were also examined through current athletic training education course syllabi. SUBJECTS: Twenty-one students (9 males, 12 females) and 12 instructors (7 males, 5 females) were interviewed to examine their perceptions of teaching and learning experiences within their program. MEASUREMENTS: Students' and instructors' perceptions of their educational experiences in CAAHEP-accredited athletic training education programs were analyzed qualitatively using the data-analysis software program NUD*IST. Data from all 3 sources (students' interviews, instructors' interviews, course syllabi) were coded into categories within the NUD*IST program and then triangulated to ensure the authenticity of the findings. RESULTS: Based on the analysis of students' and instructors' interviews and course syllabi, 3 pedagogic strategies were identified that appeared to facilitate athletic training education in CAAHEP-accredited programs: use of scenarios and case studies, authentic experiences, and a positive educational environment. CONCLUSIONS: Students and instructors in CAAHEP-accredited athletic training education programs recognize and value specific pedagogic theories of teaching and learning and achievement motivation in students' educational experiences. Specific educational

  2. A Simplified Semiquantitative Meal Bolus Strategy Combined with Single- and Dual-Hormone Closed-Loop Delivery in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Véronique; Haidar, Ahmad; Messier, Virginie; Legault, Laurent; Ladouceur, Martin; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2016-08-01

    Single- and dual-hormone closed-loop systems can improve glycemic control and have the potential to reduce carbohydrate-counting burden for patients with type 1 diabetes; however, simplification of meal insulin calculation should not compromise glycemic control. We compared in a randomized outpatient pilot trial: (1) a single-hormone closed-loop system accompanied with carbohydrate-content matched boluses versus accompanied with a simplified meal bolus strategy, and (2) a dual-hormone closed-loop system accompanied with carbohydrate-content matched boluses versus accompanied with a simplified meal bolus strategy. Carbohydrate-matched boluses were based on the participant's carbohydrate meal content estimation whereas the simplified strategy involved the selection, by participants, of a semi-quantitative meal carbohydrate-content size: snack, regular, large, or very large meal. Each participant also underwent sensor-augmented pump therapy. Basal insulin delivery was more aggressive with the simplified bolus. The primary outcome was mean sensor glucose level over a 15-h daytime period. Twelve participants were recruited (48.2 ± 16.0 years old; HbA1c 7.4% ± 0.9%) to compare the two bolus strategies during single- and dual-hormone closed-loop delivery. A similar mean sensor glucose level (15 h) was achieved with the carbohydrate-matched boluses and simplified strategy using single-hormone (median [interquartile]: 7.6 [7.2-8.1] vs. 8.0 [7.0-8.6] mmol/L; P = 0.90) and dual-hormone closed-loop systems (7.6 [6.7-9.1] vs. 7.0 [6.4-8.2] mmol/L; P = 0.08). Exploratory analyses showed that, as compared with sensor-augmented pump therapy, there was an increased time spent in hypoglycemia with the simplified strategy but not with the carbohydrate-matched boluses. Though the algorithm employed in this pilot study may lead to an increased risk for hypoglycemia, this strategy has the potential to reduce the carbohydrate-counting burden in patients with type

  3. Strategies for Improving Learner Metacognition in Health Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Melissa S; Castleberry, Ashley N; Persky, Adam M

    2017-05-01

    Metacognition is an essential skill in critical thinking and self-regulated, lifelong learning. It is important for learners to have skills in metacognition because they are used to monitor and regulate reasoning, comprehension, and problem-solving, which are fundamental components/outcomes of pharmacy curricula. Instructors can help learners develop metacognitive skills within the classroom and experiential setting by carefully designing learning activities within courses and the curriculum. These skills are developed through intentional questioning, modeling techniques, and reflection. This article discusses key background literature on metacognition and identifies specific methods and strategies to develop learners' metacognitive skills in both the classroom and experiential settings.

  4. Administrative Strategies of School Management Effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanintipparat Prommaraj

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were 1 to study the current and the expected Conditions of school management effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4 and 2 to construct administrative strategies of such schools. Eighty of directors, board chairpersons, teachers and parents were sampled. The instruments for data collection were 5-level rating scale questionnaires with the IOC value between 0.60–1.00 and the reliability value of 0.88 and in-depth interview forms. Quantitative data were analyzed by computer and qualitative data were inductively analyzed. The findings were as follows: 1. The current conditions school management effectiveness, Buriram Office of Primary Educational Service Area 4 was moderate while the expected conditions was high. By means of expected condition can be listed from high to low were atmosphere and environment management, administration, learning management and participation. 2. Strategies for effective management of schools under the Office of Educational Service Area 4 consists of four elementary Bachelor’s strategy is the first strategic development, management efficiency. 2 learners develop strategies to meet educational standards. Strategy 3: create an atmosphere and environment conducive to development. Strategy 4 and the joint cooperation of network.

  5. Web-Based Evidence Based Practice Educational Intervention to Improve EBP Competence among BSN-Prepared Pediatric Bedside Nurses: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laibhen-Parkes, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    For pediatric nurses, their competence in EBP is critical for providing high-quality care and maximizing patient outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess and refine a Web-based EBP educational intervention focused on improving EBP beliefs and competence in BSN-prepared pediatric bedside nurses, and to examine the feasibility,…

  6. Action methods in the classroom: creative strategies for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorcas E; Freed, Patricia E; Tadych, Rita A

    2006-01-01

    Nursing education recognizes the need for a framework of experiential learning that supports the development of professional roles. Action methods, originated by Jacob L. Moreno (1953), can be readily adapted to any nursing classroom to create the conditions under which students learn and practice professional nursing roles. While nurse faculty can learn to use action methods, they may not fully comprehend their theoretical underpinnings or may believe they are only used in therapy. This article explores Moreno's ideas related to psychodrama and sociodrama applied in classroom settings, and presents many examples and tips for classroom teachers who wish to incorporate action methods into their classes.

  7. Strategies of day care center educators in dealing crying babies

    OpenAIRE

    Lígia Ebner Melchiori; Zélia Maria Mendes Biasoli Alves

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the views of day care center educators on how they act when babies cry, if they are able to identify the causes of crying and what are the subjection reasons that make them take action or not. Twenty-one caretakers were interviewed about each of the ninety babies, aged 4 to 24 months, under their care, using a semi-structured guide. The results show that overall the proportion of babies that do not cry significantly increases with age. However, crying f...

  8. Evaluating Teaching Strategies in Higher Education from Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani K Alghamdi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate students’ perception of learning experiences at one of the largest government universities in the eastern province of Saudi Arabia. The sample consisted of male and female students and their instructors enrolled in four main colleges (Arts, Education, Preparatory year, and Science. Data were collected through a survey and focus group interviews during the fall semester of 2014-2015 academic year. The results provide feedback to faculty members about the quality of content, format, and structure of their courses, and can contribute to teaching and learning processes by facilitating faculty growth, development, and self-improvement.

  9. UK higher education institutions’ technology-enhanced learning strategies from the perspective of disruptive innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The publication of institutional strategies for learning, teaching and assessment in UK higher education is practically ubiquitous. Strategies for technology-enhanced learning are also widespread. This article examines 44 publically available UK university strategies for technology-enhanced learning, aiming to assess the extent to which institutional strategies engage with and accommodate innovation in technology-enhanced learning. The article uses qualitative content analysis as its method, and uses the categories of disruptive innovation, sustaining innovation and efficiency innovation to evaluate individual institutional strategies. The article argues that sustaining innovation and efficiency innovation are more commonplace in the strategies than disruptive innovation, a position which is misaligned with the technology practices of students and lecturers.

  10. Education and dissemination strategies of photoactuation as a novel phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, E. M.; Wenn, D.; Ramos, I.; Esteve, J.; Mamojka, B.; Terentjev, E. M.

    2011-10-01

    In the current information age, scientists and educators are urged to disseminate scientific findings in a prompt manner for increased public acceptance, later on, in the market place. Customer acceptance of highly novel technologies is an education-driven effort that requires attention early-on during the stage of technology development. Prompt attention is particularly needed in technologies where nanoparticles are employed, such as those being developed within the Nano- Optical Mechanical Systems (NOMS) project. Another driving force to disseminate photoactuation is to generate interest and curiosity amongst the K-12 population that could eventually lead to increased enrollment of students in the physical sciences. In this paper, we present a work plan for the dissemination of photoactuation to society at large; from K-12 to the general public. The work plan will be designed in accordance with the logic model, following indications of the National Academy of Sciences, and will include a proposal for evaluating translational research following a process marker model.

  11. A Cross-Cultural Study on Environmental Risk Perception and Educational Strategies: Implications for Environmental Education in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongxia; Fortner, Rosanne

    2010-01-01

    This cross-cultural study examined college students' environmental risk perception and their preference in terms of risk communication and educational strategies in China and the United States. The results indicated that the Chinese respondents were more concerned about environmental risk, and they perceived the environmental issues to be more…

  12. Views from the Field: Conservation Educators' and Practitioners' Perceptions of Education as a Strategy for Achieving Conservation Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardoin, Nicole M.; Heimlich, Joe E.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents data from a mixed-methods study that collected data through surveys (n = 656), interviews (n = 15), and discussion groups (n = 75) to explore the use of social strategies such as education and outreach by non-governmental organizations and government agencies to reach outcomes related to biodiversity conservation and resource…

  13. Integrating simulated teaching/learning strategies in undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Barbara; Ferguson, Karen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the results of a mixed-methods study integrating the use of simulations in a nursing theory course in order to assess students' perceptions of self-efficacy for nursing practice are presented. Nursing students in an intervention group were exposed to a combination of lecture and simulation, and then asked to rate their perceptions of self-efficacy, satisfaction and effectiveness of this combined teaching and learning strategy. Based on Bandura's (1977, 1986) theory of self-efficacy, this study provides data to suggest that students' self-confidence for nursing practice may be increased through the use of simulation as a method of teaching and learning. Students also reported higher levels of satisfaction, effectiveness and consistency with their learning style when exposed to the combination of lecture and simulation than the control group, who were exposed to lecture as the only method of teaching and learning.

  14. Higher Education for Refugees: Lessons from a 4-Year Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Thomas M.; McFarland, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Refugees experience limited access to adequate education at all levels, but opportunities for higher education are especially lacking. Yet, evidence suggests that education plays an important protective role in helping refugee individuals and communities cope with their daily existence during protracted waiting periods, and the United Nations…

  15. Transitioning from Maori-Medium to English-Medium Education: Emerging Findings of a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Maori-bilingual education in New Zealand has come a long way towards injecting life into the Maori language. However, only a small number of families commit to bilingual education for the long term. This paper discusses why Maori parents either turn away from Maori-bilingual education or prematurely transition to English-medium schools. It then…

  16. Childhood obesity study: a pilot study of the effect of the nutrition education program Color My Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jean Burley; Pawloski, Lisa Renee; Goldberg, Patricia; Kyeung, Mi Oh; Stoehr, Ana; Baghi, Heibatollah

    2009-06-01

    The need for successful nutrition interventions is critical as the prevalence of childhood obesity increases. Thus, this pilot project examines the effect of a nutrition education program, Color My Pyramid, on children's nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, activity levels, and nutrition status. Using a pretest-posttest, quasiexperimental design, 126 fourth- and fifth-grade students from experimental and control schools are compared. The intervention program incorporates an online component www.MyPyramid.gov, Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory, and consists of six classes taught over a 3-month period. Results indicated that the program increased nutrition knowledge in the control group. Furthermore, it increased activity time from pretest to posttest and decreased systolic blood pressure for children in both groups; however, there were no significant differences in BMI percentiles. The findings indicate that Color My Pyramid can be successfully employed in school settings and thus support school nursing practice.

  17. Effects of coaching on educators' vocabulary-teaching strategies during shared reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Ashwini M; Hipfner-Boucher, Kathy; Milburn, Trelani; Weitzman, Elaine; Greenberg, Janice; Pelletier, Janette; Girolametto, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether an emergent literacy professional development program enhanced educators' use of vocabulary-teaching strategies during shared reading with small groups of pre-schoolers. Thirty-two pre-school educators and small groups of pre-schoolers from their classrooms were randomly assigned to experimental or comparison groups. The 15 educators in the experimental group received four in-service workshops as well as five individualized classroom coaching sessions. The comparison group received only the workshops. Each educator was video-recorded reading a storybook to a small group of pre-schoolers at pre-test and post-test. The videos were transcribed and coded to yield measures of the vocabulary-teaching strategies and children's vocabulary-related talk. The findings revealed that the children in the experimental group engaged in significantly more vocabulary-related talk relative to the comparison group. A non-significant trend in the data indicated that educators in the experimental group used more vocabulary-teaching strategies at post-test. The educators' familiarity with children's authors and book titles at pre-test was a significant predictor of their outcomes. These findings suggest that an emergent literacy professional development program that includes coaching can enhance children's participation in vocabulary-related conversations with their educators.

  18. Promoting Clinical Reasoning in Undergraduate Physical Therapy Education: A Review of Strategies and Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, Anders Falk

    2015-01-01

    in this area. This has resulted in diverse methods and strategies to transfer reasoning skills effectively to students. Awareness about recommended pedagogical techniques to enhance clinical reasoning skills can significantly influence the educator’s choice of methods within and beyond the classroom teaching......-deduction and the pattern recognition skills in physical therapy students, focused teaching methods and strategies need to be emphasized and adopted by academicians, clinical educators and of course students. It is also of utmost importance that evaluation systems of physical therapy programs are introspected for inclusion......Title: Promoting Clinical Reasoning in Undergraduate Physical Therapy Education: A Review of Strategies and Approaches Juneja H1, Brekke A F2 1,2 Physical Therapy Education, University College Zealand, Denmark Background: Clinical reasoning (CR) also referred to as “critical thinking” or “decision...

  19. Regular education teacher’s perception about resources and strategies for teaching disabled students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walquíria Gonçalves Reganhan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The resources and strategies adapted for disabled students are an important activity so that the special education needs in the inclusion environment are reached. Thus, the goal of this study was to identify how regular education teacher that have disabled student in theirs classrooms acknowledge the resources and strategies for these students. Five teachers were interviewed. The results indicated that the interviewees: 1 defined the resources the same way the literature of the area does; 2 performed adaptations in the pedagogic resources to reach the needs of the students but they all claimed the need for external aid from other professionals; and 3 expressed difficulty to acknowledge and to describe the strategies of the teaching used. The conclusion indicated that a more solid theoretical ground in the education of these teachers is necessary so that they explain their pedagogic actions.

  20. Kinship--king's social harmonisation project. Pilot phase of a social network for use in higher education (HE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, B A

    2013-05-08

    Students entering Higher Education are increasingly information and communications technology literate. Many students (graduates and undergraduates) arrive as "digital residents", who are adept with social media and technologically fluent. The informal use of social media for learning is becoming increasingly evident, along with the potentially detrimental effects of a poor digital profile on employment prospects. This paper describes the creation of Kinship (King's Social Harmonisation Project), a university hosted, members only social network, which is currently being piloted in the Medical School at King's College London. Along with a number of other teaching and learning resources, it is intended to use Kinship to establish an informal code of conduct by modelling and moderating appropriate professional online behaviour. Kinship was developed using an open source Elgg platform, thanks to funding of £20,000 from the College Teaching Fund under the mentorship of Brighton University (1). This educational research project, led by Medicine, was proposed to select, customise and evaluate a social networking platform in order to provide functionality that would enhance new and existing e-learning resources, support group interaction, participation and sharing and meet the diverse needs of three academic schools: Medicine, the Dental Institute and two separate Departments, the Modern Languages Centre and the Department of English from Arts & Humanities, as a pilot for wider College deployment. Student involvement is central to the project, from conducting the evaluation to moulding and customising the functionality and look of Kinship, in order to ensure that the site is authentic and evolves in response to their wishes and requirements. Formal evaluation of Kinship commences summer 2012.

  1. Strategies for selecting effective patient nutrition education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Laura H

    2010-10-01

    Nutrition and diet therapy are at the center of health promotion activities and self-management of chronic diseases. To assist an individual in making informed decisions regarding his or her diet and increase adherence to dietary recommendations or treatments, healthcare professionals must select health information that is appropriate to the client's level of understanding. A systematic approach in the evaluation of patient education material, whether in print or on the World Wide Web, must focus on the information's content, literacy level, graphical displays, layout and typography, motivating principles, cultural relevance, and feasibility. Additional criteria should be evaluated when accessing Web sites and include source, site credibility, conflict of interest, disclaimer, disclosure, navigation, and interactivity information.

  2. Academic coordination at university: Strategies for high quality education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Mar Durán Bellonch

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Most lecturers and professors involved in teaching School Management and Education Management courses have been engaged in developing some innovative actions to improve the training quality that we offer to students in the Pedagogy degree at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. These actions are aimed at increasing co-ordination among the teaching staff when designing and implementing the course curricula. Co-ordination meetings, exchanges of teaching experiences, discussions about what, how and when to teach the different contents, in which courses and at what level, methodological issues pointed out through technical description cards or the elaboration of study cases to be solved have become the basis of relevant actions during the last academic years. This paper explains each one of them, and provides useful information about the theoretical background, the process carried out, some of the results obtained, the output and the tools created.

  3. Education in primary school as a strategy to control dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeira Newton G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of Aedes aegypti, a species of mosquito that is the vector of the dengue pathogen, is being augmented by the population's lack of care in allowing the formation of larval habitats. One form of controlling dengue is the distribution of information on the mosquito to improve awareness and to provide the means necessary for the elimination of its reproductive habitats. To evaluate a teaching method concerning the vector and dengue, students from the 5th and 6th years of primary education were compared before and after didactic intervention with a group of control students. The students who received intervention were more successful in identifying the stages of the cycle, biological and morphological characteristics of the adult insect and the importance of the mosquito in health issues. The didactic intervention was successful in developing knowledge leading to increased awareness of the importance of preventative measures that should be taken against the vector and the disease.

  4. Handbook for Educating on Adolescent Reproductive and Sexual Health. Book One, Understanding the Adolescents and Their Reproductive and Sexual Health: Guide to Better Educational Strategies [and] Book Two, Strategies and Materials on Adolescent Reproductive and Sexual Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Clearing House on Population Education and Communication.

    This two-part handbook presents information on educating adolescents about reproductive and sexual health issues. "Book One, Understanding the Adolescents and Their Reproductive and Sexual Health: Guide to Better Educational Strategies" focuses on the demographic profile of adolescents as well as their fertility, sexual behavior, incidence of…

  5. Pilot Study of Educational Gaming to Improve Adherence to an End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Monitoring Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Taylore D; Stutzman, Sonja; Yu, Christine; Parry, David; Olson, DaiWai M

    2018-02-01

    End-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) monitoring is an important part of patient care. Understanding and interpreting ETCO2 wavelengths can be a challenge. This pilot study explored the efficacy of a novel approach to educating clinicians on ETCO2 monitoring via game theory. A video game application for ETCO2 monitoring was developed. Clinicians were encouraged to play the game over a 3-month period. Compliance with the ETCO2 protocol was compared in a random selection of patients admitted before, during, and after the intervention. Thirty-eight clinicians completed the preand posttest, with a significant difference in test scores (p = .03). The intervention was associated with higher adherence to the ETCO2 protocol before and after the intervention (p < .05). The availability of new technologies has created opportunities to develop new approaches to educate clinicians. This study showed that the use of a game improved adherence to the ETCO2 protocol. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(2):79-83. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Use of multimedia as an educational tool to improve human papillomavirus vaccine acceptability--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Eloise; Venkat, Pavithra; Ko, Emily; Orezzoli, Jorge P; Del Carmen, Marcela; Garner, Elizabeth I O

    2010-08-01

    To determine, through a pilot study, whether use of a video-based educational tool can influence overall human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability, views on vaccine mandates, school vaccination, and acceptable age for vaccination. Written surveys addressing HPV knowledge and vaccine acceptability were administered to study participants from January to March 2007. An initial 32-question survey was completed, followed by an 8-minute educational video, and a post-video assessment. Out of 256 subjects, 73.0% watched the video and completed all surveys. Eighty percent of the subjects had heard of HPV, while 65.0% knew, prior to viewing the video, that the vaccine was available. Individual vaccine acceptability increased from 66.7% to 78.0% after the video (p=.0014). Prior to the video, 54.8% of subjects supported mandatory HPV vaccination, with 51.1% supporting school vaccination, and 66.7% accepting vaccination if it were free. After the video, these percentages increased to 72.6% (pSecondary analysis revealed Hispanics, African Americans, and lower income families were more likely to accept HPV vaccination after the video. A perception that vaccination promotes sex, and whether or not participants talk to their children about sex, did not affect acceptability. Using an educational video significantly increased overall HPV vaccine acceptability and acceptance in younger age groups. This may be an effective means of increasing awareness and acceptability of HPV vaccination. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Do generic strategies impact performance in higher educational institutions? A SEM-based investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlam Mohammad Alzoubi; Okechukwu Lawrence Emeagwali

    2016-01-01

    This study set out to initiate an investigation into the linkage between generic strategy and performance in higher educational institutions and the moderating effect of institution-type. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), it examined the responses of a stratified sample of academics and administrative staff (n= 333) randomly selected from eight universities in northern Cyprus. Findings suggest that while there is a weak effect of differentiation strategy on performance, a strong effec...

  8. School-based strategies for oral health education of adolescents- a cluster randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleem Abdul

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral health education (OHE in schools has largely been imparted by dental professionals. Considering the substantial cost of this expert-led approach, the strategies relying on teachers, peer-leaders and learners themselves have also been utilized. However the evidence for comparative effectiveness of these strategies is lacking in the dental literature. The present study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of dentist-led, teacher-led, peer-led and self-learning strategies of oral health education. Methods A two-year cluster randomized controlled trial following a parallel design was conducted. It involved five groups of adolescents aged 10-11 years at the start of the study. The trial involved process as well as four outcome evaluations. The present paper discusses the findings of the study pertaining to the baseline and final outcome evaluation, both comprising of a self-administered questionnaire, a structured interview and clinical oral examination. The data were analyzed using Generalized Estimating Equations. Results All the three educator-led strategies of OHE had statistically higher mean oral health knowledge (OHK, oral health behavior (OHB, oral hygiene status (OHS and combined knowledge, behavior and oral hygiene status (KBS scores than the self-learning and control groups (p Conclusions The dentist-led, teacher-led and peer-led strategies of oral health education are equally effective in improving the oral health knowledge and oral hygiene status of adolescents. The peer-led strategy, however, is almost as effective as the dentist-led strategy and comparatively more effective than the teacher-led and self-learning strategies in improving their oral health behavior. Trail registration SRCTN39391017

  9. The California Alliance for Sustainability: A Collaborative Pilot Project to Build Regional Advocacy and Leadership for Sustainability Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, E. P.; Smith, G.; Cordero, E. C.; Santone, S.

    2012-12-01

    For Education for Sustainability (Efs) to have the presence in the K-12 curriculum that it arguably should, considerable obstacles must be overcome. Barriers include the role of high-stakes testing in marginalizing science and social studies and the lack of environmental and sustainability content in teacher education programs. The California Alliance for Sustainability (CASE), a collaborative 18-month project funded by the Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation, unites San José State University (SJSU) and Creative Change Educational Solutions (CCES) (http://www.creativechange.net/) to investigate and address potential barriers to Efs in San Francisco Bay area schools and regional teacher education programs and to document best practices for integrating sustainability into teachers' existing standards-based teaching. The overarching goal of the CASE project is to create a regional infrastructure of K-12 teachers and pre-service teacher educators who use EfS as a context for educational innovation and transformation, thus supplying a focused first step for investigating how Efs can be more broadly implemented in California's classrooms. This presentation will showcase the efforts of a pilot group of classroom teachers and teacher educators to bring EfS to their teaching. In summer 2012, the CASE Project provided 16 in-service teachers and 5 pre-service teacher education faculty from SJSU and California State University East Bay with a three-day professional development workshop. Practicing teachers and teacher educators experienced joint instruction in the content and pedagogy of sustainability though investigation of topics (e.g., Sustainable Communities, Ecological Footprint Analysis, Climate Change, Resource Use, Food Systems and Life Cycle Analysis) that offer broad connections to California standards in science and other disciplines. Sustainability concepts were also discussed as an engaging context for addressing the emerging Common Core and Next Generation

  10. How gaming is used as an innovative strategy for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royse, Mary A; Newton, Sarah E

    2007-01-01

    Gaming is an innovative teaching strategy that research has shown to be effective for improving nursing student learning outcomes. Specifically, gaming enhances retention of knowledge, promotes problem-based learning, and motivates nursing students to become more engaged in their learning. The literature also indicates that the use of gaming during nursing education promotes active learning, encourages critical thinking, makes learning more exciting, and can replicate real-life scenarios. However, empirical support for these advantages is lacking. This manuscript discusses the literature related to gaming, describes its use as a teaching strategy, and addresses implications for nursing education.

  11. Collaborative testing as a learning strategy in nursing education: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandahl, Sheryl S

    2009-01-01

    Nurses are important members of a patient's interprofessional health care team. A primary goal of nursing education is to prepare nursing professionals who can work collaboratively with other team members for the benefit of the patient. Collaborative learning strategies provide students with opportunities to learn and practice collaboration. Collaborative testing is a collaborative learning strategy used to foster knowledge development, critical thinking in decision-making, and group processing skills. This article reviews the theoretical basis for collaborative learning and research on collaborative testing in nursing education.

  12. Early education and counselling of patients with acute coronary syndrome. A pilot study for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Lukas; Massarotto, Paola; Hediger, Hannele; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy

    2016-06-01

    At time of discharge, patients with acute coronary syndrome often have a knowledge deficit regarding their disease, further treatment and necessary behavioural changes. It is well known that self-efficacy as a prerequisite for behavioural changes can be influenced by patient education. This study investigated whether an individualized education programme starting early in the cardiac care unit enhanced self-efficacy and rehabilitation programme attendance, and was feasible and satisfying for patients. In a pilot randomized controlled trial, 40 patients with acute coronary syndrome were enrolled. The intervention group received in addition to standard care an early individual needs-oriented educational session in the cardiac care unit and subsequently one on the ward addressing risk factors, medication and self-management as well as referral to a rehabilitation programme by a nurse. Self-efficacy was assessed twice, at attendance in a rehabilitation programme six weeks after discharge. The participants' satisfaction with the intervention was assessed qualitatively. When controlling for anxiety and depression, the intervention group showed significant better self-efficacy scores on the ability to control the symptoms (p=0.034). When controlling additionally for age, no significant differences could be detected. The attendance of a rehabilitation programme was higher in the intervention group. The participants in the intervention group reported high satisfaction with the early education. Early education seems to benefit patients with acute coronary syndrome. In light of increased confidence to control one's symptoms and the higher attendance in rehabilitation programmes, as well as a high satisfaction with the intervention, a full powered study will be pursued. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  13. Does the Kids Café Program's Nutrition Education Improve Children's Dietary Intake? A Pilot Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jayna M; Liu, Yan; Chen, Tzu-An; Thompson, Deborah I; Cullen, Karen W

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the Kids Café Program (KCP) nutrition education and assess its impact on children's diet quality and body mass index (BMI) percentile. An experimental design consisting of pretest-posttest comparison groups using mixed methods to evaluate a 6-session nutrition education intervention. Four Boys and Girls Club sites PARTICIPANTS: A total of 120 9- to 12-year-old children in the KCP (60 intervention and 60 comparison); 89% completed posttest evaluations. Trained KCP site staff taught the nutrition education curriculum at intervention sites. Healthy Eating Index-2010 using 24-hour dietary recall data (primary) and BMI percentile (secondary) ANALYSIS: Repeated-measures mixed-effects modeling RESULTS: Mean age of children was 10.2 years; mean BMI percentile was about 79; 95% were from food-insecure households. The total Healthy Eating Index-2010 score for both groups at baseline and posttest ranged from 50 to 60. At posttest, compared with baseline scores, children from both groups scored significantly lower for total vegetables, and greens and beans; the intervention group children had significantly higher sodium scores. Process evaluation indicated that 60-minute lecture-based sessions were too long after children were in school all day. This pilot study suggests that the KCP nutrition education curriculum needs improvement. Further research based on behavioral constructs is needed to refine the curriculum to encourage healthier food choices among children and using the MyPlate and the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  14. [Education in health: perspectives of the Family Health Strategy team under Paulo Freire's view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria Clara Porto; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative study whose research subjects were the members of a Health Family Strategy. and has as purpose to know their perspectives about health education and presents them through the dialogical conception of Paulo Freire. In the circles of culture, four themes emerged: family health team, health education, health education practice in team work and how to improve the stock of existing health education, were encode, decode and critically unveiled its concepts, challenges, opportunities and expectations of their educational practices. The field research was the development of a Primary Care Unit of Health of Cachoeira do Campo, Minas Gerais. The results showed that health education is recognized by the subjects as a liability, but its practice is facing cultural barriers, and receives little emphasis in the daily work.

  15. Geoconservation and scientific rock sampling: Call for geoethical education strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druguet, Elena; Passchier, Cees W.; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Carreras, Jordi

    2013-04-01

    Some geological outcrops have a special scientific or educational value, represent a geological type locality and/or have a considerable aesthetical/photographic value. Such important outcrops require appropriate management to safeguard them from potentially damaging and destructive activities. Damage done to such rock exposures can include drill sampling by geologist undertaken in the name of scientific advancement. In order to illustrate the serious damage scientific sampling can do, we give some examples of outcrops from Western Europe, North America and South Africa, important to structural geology and petrology, where sampling was undertaken by means of drilling methods without any protective measures. After the rock coring, the aesthetic and photographic value of these delicate outcrops has decreased considerably. Unfortunately, regulation and protection mechanisms and codes of conduct can be ineffective. The many resources of geological information available to the geoscientist community (e.g. via Internet, such as outcrops stored in websites like "Outcropedia") promote access to sites of geological interest, but can also have a negative effect on their conservation. Geoethical education on rock sampling is therefore critical for conservation of the geological heritage. Geoethical principles and educational actions are aimed to be promoted at different levels to improve geological sciences development and to enhance conservation of important geological sites. Ethical protocols and codes of conduct should include geoconservation issues, being explicit about responsible sampling. Guided and inspired by the UK Geologists's Association "Code of Conduct for Rock Coring" (MacFadyen, 2010), we present a tentative outline requesting responsible behaviour: » Drill sampling is particularly threatening because it has a negative visual impact, whilst it is often unnecessary. Before sampling, geologists should think about the question "is drill sampling necessary for

  16. Need Assessment for Sex Education amongst the University Students –A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep Kumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The morbidity associated with sexual ignorance, poor decision making and inadequate sexuality education is rising in India day by day. The possibility of sex related public health problems like sexual abuse, teenage pregnancies, abortions, unmarried motherhood, STD/HIV infections etc. are always remains high in university students. In this background to assess the student’s knowledge & perceived need for sex education this study was conducted. Objective Of Study: To assess the need of sex education in students To explore the views of students on content, source & preferred grade levels of education for sex education. Methods: It was a crosssectional study conducted among students of Panjab University, Chandigarh. Sample size was 86 (Boys=45, Girls=41. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect information from the respondents. The results were calculated in percentage. Results: 95% of students were in favors of mainstreaming of sex education. 76.74% students choose the teacher as the best source to provide sex education. Students preferred grade levels to start sex education was matriculation with curriculum containing the information on sexual body changes during growth, contraceptives and sexually transmitted diseases. Conclusions: Majority of students has received sex information from informal sources and they are not satisfied with their knowledge on sex education. Majority of them supports the implementation of sex education in educational institutes. The government needs to make sex education mandatory as well as plan the educational material in a way that incites not libidinous behavior but instills mature decision making skills in the students

  17. Need Assessment for Sex Education amongst the University Students –A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The morbidity associated with sexual ignorance, poor decision making and inadequate sexuality education is rising in India day by day. The possibility of sex related public health problems like sexual abuse, teenage pregnancies, abortions, unmarried motherhood, STD/HIV infections etc. are always remains high in university students. In this background to assess the student’s knowledge & perceived need for sex education this study was conducted. Objective Of Study: To assess the need of sex education in students To explore the views of students on content, source & preferred grade levels of education for sex education. Methods: It was a cross- sectional study conducted among students of Panjab University, Chandigarh. Sample size was 86 (Boys=45, Girls=41. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect information from the respondents. The results were calculated in percentage. Results: 95% of students were in favors of mainstreaming of sex education. 76.74% students choose the teacher as the best source to provide sex education. Students preferred grade levels to start sex education was matriculation with curriculum containing the information on sexual body changes during growth, contraceptives and sexually transmitted diseases. Conclusions: Majority of students has received sex information from informal sources and they are not satisfied with their knowledge on sex education. Majority of them supports the implementation of sex education in educational institutes. The government needs to make sex education mandatory as well as plan the educational material in a way that incites not libidinous behavior but instills mature decision making skills in the students

  18. Are Anti-Stigma Films a Useful Strategy for Reducing Weight Bias Among Trainee Healthcare Professionals? Results of a Pilot Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Anne Swift

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Weight bias is an important clinical issue that the educators of tomorrow's healthcare professionals cannot afford to ignore. This study, therefore, aimed to pilot a randomized controlled trial of the effects of educational films designed to reduce weight stigmatization toward obese patients on trainee dietitians' and doctors' attitudes. Methods: A pre-post experimental design with a 6-week follow-up, which consisted of an intervention group (n = 22 and a control group (n = 21, was conducted to assess the efficacy of brief anti-stigma films in reducing weight bias, and to test whether future, larger-scale studies among trainee healthcare professionals are feasible. Results: Participants at baseline demonstrated weight bias, on both implicit and explicit attitude measures, as well as strong beliefs that obesity is under a person's control. The intervention films significantly improved explicit attitudes and beliefs toward obese people, and participant evaluation was very positive. The intervention did not significantly improve implicit anti-fat bias. Conclusion: The current study suggests both that it is possible to conduct a substantive trial of the effects of educational films designed to reduce weight stigma on a larger cohort of trainee healthcare professionals, and that brief educational interventions may be effective in reducing stigmatizing attitudes in this population.

  19. Gender as a factor in differentiating strategies of coping with stress used by physical education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Guszkowska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Students are exposed to numerous stressors associated with their integration into their university education, their relationships with friends, and anxiety about the future. Given that stress may be related to university students’ academic performance, understanding the coping strategies used by students may be important in facilitating a positive transition to a university setting. The aim of this study was to determine the gender-based variation of strategies for coping with stress used by students, as well as to determine the correlation between these strategies and the students’ academic achievements. Participants and procedure The study design was cross sectional and included 376 first-year undergraduate students (227 men and 149 women enrolled in the physical education and sport programme at the University of Physical Education in Warsaw. The Polish adaptation of Carver, Scheier and Weintraub’s Multidimensional Inventory for Measuring Stress Coping – COPE and the mean grade from all first-year university courses (the indicator of academic achievements were used. Results Men definitely preferred task-oriented strategies, while women preferred to look for support (instrumental and emotional and placed higher importance on the focusing on and venting of emotions. Academic achievement correlated positively with task-oriented strategies and negatively with avoidance-oriented strategies. These relationships were partly confirmed by regression analyses. Conclusions The results of the study provide support for sex differences in the most frequently applied coping strategies. The results also suggest that avoidance-oriented strategies do not facilitate academic achievement, while active coping strategies correlate with greater success in studies.

  20. The "resident's dilemma"? Values and strategies of medical residents for education interactions: a cellular automata simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckerling, P S; Gerber, B S; Weiner, S J

    2006-01-01

    Medical residents engage in formal and informal education interactions with fellow residents during the working day, and can choose whether to spend time and effort on such interactions. Time and effort spent on such interactions can bring learning and personal satisfaction to residents, but may also delay completion of clinical work. Using hypothetical cases, we assessed the values and strategies of internal medicine residents at one hospital for both cooperative and non-cooperative education interactions with fellow residents. We then used these data and cellular automata models of two-person games to simulate repeated interactions between residents, and to determine which strategies resulted in greatest accrued value. We conducted sensitivity analyses on several model parameters, to test the robustness of dominant strategies to model assumptions. Twenty-nine of the 57 residents (50.9%) valued cooperation more than non-cooperation no matter what the other resident did during the current interaction. Similarly, thirty-six residents (63.2%) endorsed an unconditional always-cooperate strategy no matter what the other resident had done during their previous interaction. In simulations, an always-cooperate strategy accrued more value (776.42 value units) than an aggregate of strategies containing non-cooperation components (675.0 value units, p = 0.052). Only when the probability of strategy errors reached 50%, or when values were re-ordered to match those of a Prisoner's Dilemma, did non-cooperation-based strategies accrue the most value. Cooperation-based values and strategies were most frequent among our residents, and dominated in simulations of repeated education interactions between them.