WorldWideScience

Sample records for education clinical services

  1. Quality assessment of clinical education services in teaching hospitals located in Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi-Feyzabadi, Vahid; Gozashti, Mohammad Hossein; Komsari, Samane; Mohammadtaghizadeh, Sedigheh; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza

    2015-11-01

    Clinical education is one of the most important components of the resource generation function of health systems, and it has a very important role in graduates' competency with respect to effective, practical education. This study aimed to assess the quality of clinical services in Kerman's teaching hospitals located in southeastern Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2011 on 303 medical students at different levels of medical education at Kerman's teaching hospitals. A modified SERVQUAL instrument was used to collect the data after its validity and reliability were checked. The data were analyzed by SPSS 18.0 using the paired t-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and post hoc tests, when appropriate. In all five dimensions of quality, gaps were observed between students' perceptions and expectations as follows: Assurance (mean = -1.18), Responsiveness (-1.56), Empathy (-1.4), Reliability (-1.27), and Tangibles (-1.21). There was a significant difference between the quality perceptions and expectations of the medical students (p < 0.001). A significant difference was observed between three educational levels, including externships, internships, and assistantships regarding the dimensions of the quality gaps (p < 0.001). The clinical services provided by teaching hospitals in the study did not meet the students' expectations at any of the three educational levels. As we precisely assessed the dimensions and items that had the higher quality gaps, it was apparent that, for most part, clinical education officials could improve the quality by designing interventions, which would not be very difficult to do.

  2. Interprofessional education through service-learning: lessons from a student-led free clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlow, Janice L; Goodwin, Charles; Sevilla, Javier

    2015-05-01

    The academic community must replicate and strengthen existing models for interprofessional education (IPE) to meet widespread calls for team-based patient-centered care. One effective but under-explored possibility for IPE is through student-led clinics, which now exist in the majority of medical schools. This short report presents the Indiana University Student Outreach Clinic (IU-SOC), which involves seven different professional programs across three institutions, as a model for how IPE can be delivered formally through service learning. Lessons learned, such as nurturing an intentional interprofessional program, structured orientation and reflection, and resource and knowledge sharing between the clinic and academic institutions, can be applied to all student-led clinics, but also can inform other IPE initiatives in health professional curricula.

  3. An analysis of pre-service family planning teaching in clinical and nursing education in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muganyizi, Projestine S; Ishengoma, Joyce; Kanama, Joseph; Kikumbih, Nassoro; Mwanga, Feddy; Killian, Richard; McGinn, Erin

    2014-07-12

    Promoting family planning (FP) is a key strategy for health, economic and population growth. Sub-Saharan Africa, with one of the lowest contraceptive prevalence and highest fertility rates globally, contributes half of the global maternal deaths. Improving the quality of FP services, including enhancing pre-service FP teaching, has the potential to improve contraceptive prevalence. In efforts to improve the quality of FP services in Tanzania, including provider skills, this study sought to identify gaps in pre-service FP teaching and suggest opportunities for strengthening the training. Data were collected from all medical schools and a representative sample of pre-service nursing, Assistant Medical Officer (AMO), Clinical Officer (CO) and assistant CO schools in mainland Tanzania. Teachers responsible for FP teaching at the schools were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Observations on availability of teaching resources and other evidence of FP teaching and evaluation were documented. Relevant approved teaching documents were assessed for their suitability as competency-based FP teaching tools against predefined criteria. Quantitative data were analyzed using EPI Info 6 and qualitative data were manually analyzed using content analysis. A total of 35 pre-service schools were evaluated for FP teaching including 30 technical education and five degree offering schools. Of the assessed 11 pre-service curricula, only one met the criteria for suitability of FP teaching. FP teaching was typically theoretical with only 22.9% of all the schools having systems in place to produce graduates who could skillfully provide FP methods. Across schools, the target skills were the same level of competence and skewed toward short acting methods of contraception. Only 23.3% (n = 7) of schools had skills laboratories, 76% (n = 22) were either physically connected or linked to FP clinics. None of the degree providing schools practiced FP at its own teaching hospital

  4. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Continuing Education Programs on Providing Clinical Community Pharmacy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques dos Reis, Tiago; Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Girotto, Edmarlon; Guerra, Marisabelle Lima; de Oliveira Baldoni, André; Leira Pereira, Leonardo Régis

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize the effects of media methods used in continuing education (CE) programs on providing clinical community pharmacy services and the methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. Methods. A systematic review was performed using Medline, SciELO, and Scopus databases. The timeline of the search was 1990 to 2013. Searches were conducted in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. Results. Nineteen articles of 3990 were included. Fourteen studies used only one media method, and the live method (n=11) was the most frequent (alone or in combination). Only two studies found that the CE program was ineffective or partially effective; these studies used only the live method. Most studies used nonrobust, nonvalidated, and nonstandardized methods to measure effectiveness. The majority of studies focused on the effect of the CE program on modifying the knowledge and skills of the pharmacists. One study assessed the CE program’s benefits to patients or clients. Conclusion. No evidence was obtained regarding which media methods are the most effective. Robust and validated methods, as well as assessment standardization, are required to clearly determine whether a particular media method is effective. PMID:27402991

  5. CLOUD SERVICES IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.S. Seydametova

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the on-line services based on cloud computing, provided by Google to educational institutions. We describe the own experience of the implementing the Google Apps Education Edition in the educational process. We analyzed and compared the other universities experience of using cloud technologies.

  6. An analysis of pre-service family planning teaching in clinical and nursing education in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Muganyizi, Projestine S; Ishengoma, Joyce; Kanama, Joseph; Kikumbih, Nassoro; Mwanga, Feddy; Killian, Richard; McGinn, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Background Promoting family planning (FP) is a key strategy for health, economic and population growth. Sub-Saharan Africa, with one of the lowest contraceptive prevalence and highest fertility rates globally, contributes half of the global maternal deaths. Improving the quality of FP services, including enhancing pre-service FP teaching, has the potential to improve contraceptive prevalence. In efforts to improve the quality of FP services in Tanzania, including provider skills, this study s...

  7. Outsourcing Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Anne S.; Bishop, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lower Pioneer Valley Educational Collaborative, organized in 1974, consists of seven school districts legally bound in a governance structure. Although the member districts are located in Hampden County, Massachusetts, the collaborative provides educational programs and services to school districts and municipalities throughout western…

  8. Health Services: Clinical. Pharmacy Aide. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Julie; And Others

    This instructor's manual consists of materials for use in presenting a course in the occupational area of pharmacy aide. Included in the first part of the guide are a program master sequence; a master listing of instructional materials, equipment, and supplies; an overview of the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) system; and guidelines…

  9. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reena Aggarwal,1,2 Tim Swanwick2 1Women's Health, Whittington Health, London, UK; 2Health Education England, North Central and East London, London, UK Abstract: Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are improved. In the UK National Health Service, the traditional divide between doctors and managers is being bridged, as clinical leadership is now foregrounded as an important organizational priority. There are 60,000 doctors in postgraduate training (junior doctors in the UK who provide the majority of front-line patient care and form an "operating core" of most health care organizations. This group of doctors is therefore seen as an important resource in initiating, championing, and delivering improvement in the quality of patient care. This paper provides a brief overview of leadership theories and constructs that have been used to develop a raft of interventions to develop leadership capability among junior doctors. We explore some of the approaches used, including competency frameworks, talent management, shared learning, clinical fellowships, and quality improvement. A new paradigm is identified as necessary to make a difference at a local level, which moves learning and leadership away from developing "leaders", to a more inclusive model of developing relationships between individuals within organizations. This shifts the emphasis from the development of a "heroic" individual leader to a more distributed model, where organizations are "leader-ful" and not just "well led" and leadership is centered on a shared vision owned by whole teams working on the frontline. Keywords: National Health Service, junior doctors, quality improvement, management, health care

  10. Review of evolution of clinical, training and educational services and research program for autism spectrum disorders in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Virginia Chun-Nei; Fung, Cheuk-Wing; Lee, So-Lun; Wong, Polly Tsz Yan

    2015-10-01

    The evolution of a local fragmented model of services for children with autism in Hong Kong emerged gradually over the past three decades with lack of government funding or support. This had been due to increasing number of children with autism being detected and referred for earlier assessment. With increasing pressure from parents due to long waiting time for assessment and training services and the increasing polarization by mass media there had been a gradual increasing public awareness over the past five years. Though still highly fragmented in the availability of services, there is a growing "business model" available in the community due to increasing need and lack of public funding for support. There is a lack of strategic planning for medical diagnostic and management issues in Hong Kong. Our University of Hong Kong based Autism Research Program was pioneered in 1985 based on the increasing load of autism cases referred for assessment for other developmental problems and diagnosed as Autism in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital. As the first author has been the staff of the University of Hong Kong, this program flourished as a research based program. The benefits of early identification and intervention of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) had been increasingly recognized, and with the increased public awareness and increasing trend of earlier diagnosis, there has been a continuously high demand from parents for earlier assessment and training for children suspected to have ASD. This model had not received extra funding for this integrated program for research, teaching and training in autism. We had to apply for various donations and grants to support the development of this pioneer program. The research output and organization of forums for public education and awareness are reviewed. The latter part of the paper reports the summary of clinical profile of autism cases (N=1441) assessed from 1985 to 2010 June under the University of Hong Kong. As the

  11. Developing Partnerships in the Provision of Youth Mental Health Services and Clinical Education: A School-Based Cognitive Behavioral Intervention Targeting Anxiety Symptoms in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Allison M; Groth, Trisha A; Sanders, Mary; O'Brien, Rosanne; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    Clinical scientists are calling for strong partnerships in the provision of evidence-based treatments for child mental health problems in real-world contexts. In the present study, we describe the implementation of a cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBI) to address grade 5 children's anxiety symptoms. The CBI arose from a long-standing partnership between University and Education Department stakeholders. The partnership integrates school-based, evidence-informed treatment delivery with clinical education, and also supports a school-based psychology clinic to provide assessment and treatment services to children attending schools within the catchment area and clinical training for university graduate students. Children in the active condition (N=74) completed the CBI during regular class time, while children in the control condition (N=77) received the standard classroom curriculum. Children's anxiety and depressive symptoms, threat interpretation biases (perceived danger and coping ability), and perceptions of their social skills were assessed before and after condition. Children in the active condition reported significant improvements in self-reported anxiety symptoms, and perceptions of their social skills and coping ability, whereas no significant differences were observed for children in the control condition from pre- to post-assessment. For a subset of children assessed 12 months after the CBI (n=76), symptom improvement remained stable over time and estimates of danger and coping ability showed even greater improvement. Results demonstrate the value of strong stakeholder partnerships in innovative youth mental health services, positive child outcomes, and clinical education. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Hospital clinical pharmacy services in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Huong T L; Pham, Van T T; Ba, Hai L; Dong, Phuong T X; Cao, Thao T B; Nguyen, Hanh T H; Brien, Jo-Anne

    2018-04-07

    Background Clinical pharmacy is key to the quality use of medicines. While there are different approaches in different countries, international perspectives may inform health service development. The Vietnamese Ministry of Health introduced a legal regulation of clinical pharmacy services in December 2012. Objective To describe the services, and to explore reported barriers and facilitators in implementing clinical pharmacy activities in Vietnamese hospitals after the introduction of Vietnamese Ministry of Health legal regulation. Setting Thirty-nine hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam, including 22 provincial and 17 district hospitals. Method A mixed methods study was utilized. An online questionnaire was sent to the hospitals. In-depth interviews were conducted with pairs of nominated pharmacists at ten of these hospitals. The questionnaire focused on four areas: facilities, workforce, policies and clinical pharmacy activities. Main outcome measure Proportion of clinical pharmacy activities in hospitals. Themes in clinical pharmacy practice. Results 34/39 (87%) hospitals had established clinical pharmacy teams. Most activities were non-patient-specific (87%) while the preliminary patient-specific clinical pharmacy services were available in only 8/39 hospitals (21%). The most common non-patient-specific activities were providing medicines information (97%), reporting adverse drug reactions (97%), monitoring medication usage (97%). The patient specific activities varied widely between hospitals and were ad hoc. The main challenges reported were: lack of workforce and qualified clinical pharmacists. Conclusion While most hospitals had hospital-based pharmacy activities, the direct patient care was limited. Training, education and an expanded work forces are needed to improve clinical pharmacy services.

  14. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Reena; Swanwick, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are improved. In the UK National Health Service, the traditional divide between doctors and managers is being bridged, as clinical leadership is now foregrounded as an important organizational priority. There are 60,000 doctors in postgraduate training (junior doctors) in the UK who provide the majority of front-line patient care and form an "operating core" of most health care organizations. This group of doctors is therefore seen as an important resource in initiating, championing, and delivering improvement in the quality of patient care. This paper provides a brief overview of leadership theories and constructs that have been used to develop a raft of interventions to develop leadership capability among junior doctors. We explore some of the approaches used, including competency frameworks, talent management, shared learning, clinical fellowships, and quality improvement. A new paradigm is identified as necessary to make a difference at a local level, which moves learning and leadership away from developing "leaders", to a more inclusive model of developing relationships between individuals within organizations. This shifts the emphasis from the development of a "heroic" individual leader to a more distributed model, where organizations are "leader-ful" and not just "well led" and leadership is centered on a shared vision owned by whole teams working on the frontline.

  15. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Reena; Swanwick, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are improved. In the UK National Health Service, the traditional divide between doctors and managers is being bridged, as clinical leadership is now foregrounded as an important organizational priority. There are 60,000 doctors in postgraduate training (junior doctors) in the UK who provide the majority of front-line patient care and form an “operating core” of most health care organizations. This group of doctors is therefore seen as an important resource in initiating, championing, and delivering improvement in the quality of patient care. This paper provides a brief overview of leadership theories and constructs that have been used to develop a raft of interventions to develop leadership capability among junior doctors. We explore some of the approaches used, including competency frameworks, talent management, shared learning, clinical fellowships, and quality improvement. A new paradigm is identified as necessary to make a difference at a local level, which moves learning and leadership away from developing “leaders”, to a more inclusive model of developing relationships between individuals within organizations. This shifts the emphasis from the development of a “heroic” individual leader to a more distributed model, where organizations are “leader-ful” and not just “well led” and leadership is centered on a shared vision owned by whole teams working on the frontline. PMID:29355184

  16. Ghana - Community Services - Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The objectives in this ex-post performance evaluation target how the education sub-activity was implemented, if and how it has been sustained, and its perceived...

  17. Education services and the AEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasker, A.

    1990-01-01

    The services to education provided by the Atomic Energy Authority (AEA) in the United Kingdom are undertaken as part of a wider responsibility to provide information on all aspects of nuclear energy to the general public. The AEA education provision for schools is described. (author)

  18. Benchmarking clinical photography services in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Giles

    2015-01-01

    Benchmarking is used in services across the National Health Service (NHS) using various benchmarking programs. Clinical photography services do not have a program in place and services have to rely on ad hoc surveys of other services. A trial benchmarking exercise was undertaken with 13 services in NHS Trusts. This highlights valuable data and comparisons that can be used to benchmark and improve services throughout the profession.

  19. Service Quality in Postgraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Robert J.; Heffernan, Troy W.; Megicks, Phil

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring service quality in higher education is increasingly important for attracting and retaining tuition-based revenues. Nonetheless, whilst undergraduates have received substantial academic exposure, postgraduate-based research has been scant. Consequently, the objectives of this paper are threefold: first, to identify the service…

  20. The clinical educator and complexity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoo, Adrian; Kumar, Koshila

    2018-02-08

    Complexity science perspectives have helped in examining fundamental assumptions about learning and teaching in the health professions. The implications of complexity thinking for how we understand the role and development of the clinical educator is less well articulated. This review article outlines: the key principles of complexity science; a conceptual model that situates the clinical educator in a complex system; and the implications for the individual, organisation and the system. Our conceptual model situates the clinical educator at the centre of a complex and dynamic system spanning four domains and multiple levels. The four domains are: personal (encompassing personal/professional needs and expectations); health services (health agencies and their consumers); educational (educational institutions and their health students); and societal (local community/region and government). The system also comprises: micro or individual, meso or organisational, and macro or socio-political levels. Our model highlights that clinical educators are situated within a complex system comprising different agents and connections. It emphasises that individuals, teams and organisations need to recognise and be responsive to the unpredictability, interconnectedness and evolving nature of this system. Importantly, our article also calls for an epistemological shift from faculty development to capacity building in health professions education, aimed at developing individual, team, organisational and system capabilities to work with(in) complexity. Clinical educators are situated within a complex system comprising different agents and connections. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  1. Role Modeling for Clinical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ellen Richter

    1991-01-01

    To become better role models, higher educators in institutions of clinical education should be conscious of the behaviors they demonstrate and the broad range of activities and attitudes that students observe and emulate, including clinical competence, professional demeanor, doctor-patient interactions, ethical values, and social consciousness.…

  2. Support Services for Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Frieden

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and operation of a distance education support infrastructure requires the collaboration of virtually all administrative departments whose activities deal with students and faculty, and all participating academic departments. Implementation can build on where the institution is and design service-oriented strategies that strengthen institutional support and commitment. Issues to address include planning, faculty issues and concerns, policies and guidelines, approval processes, scheduling, training, publicity, information-line operations, informational materials, orientation and registration processes, class coordination and support, testing, evaluations, receive site management, partnerships, budgets, staffing, library and e-mail support, and different delivery modes (microwave, compressed video, radio, satellite, public television/cable, video tape and online. The process is ongoing and increasingly participative as various groups on campus begin to get involved with distance education activities. The distance education unit must continuously examine and revise its processes and procedures to maintain the academic integrity and service excellence of its programs. It’s a daunting prospect to revise the way things have been done for many years, but each department has an opportunity to respond to new ways of serving and reaching students.

  3. Defining Service and Education in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Debra; Gagne, Josh; Kesselheim, Jennifer C

    2017-11-01

    Program directors (PDs) and trainees are often queried regarding the balance of service and education during pediatric residency training. We aimed to use qualitative methods to learn how pediatric residents and PDs define service and education and to identify activities that exemplify these concepts. Focus groups of pediatric residents and PDs were performed and the data qualitatively analyzed. Thematic analysis revealed 4 themes from focus group data: (1) misalignment of the perceived definition of service; (2) agreement about the definition of education; (3) overlapping perceptions of the value of service to training; and (4) additional suggestions for improved integration of education and service. Pediatric residents hold positive definitions of service and believe that service adds value to their education. Importantly, the discovery of heterogeneous definitions of service between pediatric residents and PDs warrants further investigation and may have ramifications for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and those responsible for residency curricula.

  4. Service quality framework for clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramessur, Vinaysing; Hurreeram, Dinesh Kumar; Maistry, Kaylasson

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate a service quality framework that enhances service delivery in clinical laboratories by gauging medical practitioner satisfaction and by providing avenues for continuous improvement. The case study method has been used for conducting the exploratory study, with focus on the Mauritian public clinical laboratory. A structured questionnaire based on the SERVQUAL service quality model was used for data collection, analysis and for the development of the service quality framework. The study confirms the pertinence of the following service quality dimensions within the context of clinical laboratories: tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, turnaround time, technology, test reports, communication and laboratory staff attitude and behaviour. The service quality framework developed, termed LabSERV, is vital for clinical laboratories in the search for improving service delivery to medical practitioners. This is a pioneering work carried out in the clinical laboratory sector in Mauritius. Medical practitioner expectations and perceptions have been simultaneously considered to generate a novel service quality framework for clinical laboratories.

  5. Evaluating clinical librarian services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettle, Alison; Maden-Jenkins, Michelle; Anderson, Lucy; McNally, Rosalind; Pratchett, Tracey; Tancock, Jenny; Thornton, Debra; Webb, Anne

    2011-03-01

      Previous systematic reviews have indicated limited evidence and poor quality evaluations of clinical librarian (CL) services. Rigorous evaluations should demonstrate the value of CL services, but guidance is needed before this can be achieved.   To undertake a systematic review which examines models of CL services, quality, methods and perspectives of clinical librarian service evaluations.   Systematic review methodology and synthesis of evidence, undertaken collaboratively by a group of 8 librarians to develop research and critical appraisal skills.   There are four clear models of clinical library service provision. Clinical librarians are effective in saving health professionals time, providing relevant, useful information and high quality services. Clinical librarians have a positive effect on clinical decision making by contributing to better informed decisions, diagnosis and choice of drug or therapy. The quality of CL studies is improving, but more work is needed on reducing bias and providing evidence of specific impacts on patient care. The Critical Incident Technique as part of a mixed method approach appears to offer a useful approach to demonstrating impact.   This systematic review provides practical guidance regarding the evaluation of CL services. It also provides updated evidence regarding the effectiveness and impact of CL services. The approach used was successful in developing research and critical appraisal skills in a group of librarians. © 2010 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2010 Health Libraries Group.

  6. AN ENVIRONMENT FOR EDUCATIONAL SERVICE COMMUNITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Spillner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    In most global economies, there is a strong trend from agriculture and manufacturing towards service-orientation and tertiarisation: Services, products with value-added service solutions and, more recently, automated Internet service offerings seamlessly delivered through on-demand elastic cloud computing resources. In the affected societies, education is recognised as a key factor for maintaining the competitiveness. Specialised education about services is widely available, but tool support ...

  7. Clinical biochemistry education in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queraltó, J M

    1994-12-31

    Clinical biochemistry in Spain was first established in 1978 as an independent specialty. It is one of several clinical laboratory sciences specialties, together with haematology, microbiology, immunology and general laboratory (Clinical analysis, análisis clinicos). Graduates in Medicine, Pharmacy, Chemistry and Biological Sciences can enter post-graduate training in Clinical Chemistry after a nation-wide examination. Training in an accredited Clinical Chemistry department is 4 years. A national committee for medical and pharmacist specialties advises the government on the number of trainees, program and educational units accreditation criteria. Technical staff includes nurses and specifically trained technologists. Accreditation of laboratories is developed at different regional levels. The Spanish Society for Clinical Biochemistry and Molecular Pathology (SECQ), the national representative in the IFCC, has 1600 members, currently publishes a scientific journal (Química Clinica) and a newsletter. It organizes a continuous education program, a quality control program and an annual Congress.

  8. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great co...

  9. Work load issues in clinical nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, P; Fitzgerald, D C; McCarthy, P A; McDougal, D

    1997-01-01

    This survey of 22 baccalaureate (BSN) programs was undertaken to describe and analyze work load issues in BSN nursing education. Academic careers of nursing faculty may be at risk because clinical work load policies generally place less value on clinical teaching than on classroom teaching. Research question addressed teaching credit hours received for each clinical contact hour, remaining weekly hours available for clinical faculty to accomplish service and research activities, and student-to-faculty ratios in clinical settings. Seventy per cent of the programs surveyed allocated less than 1 teaching credit hour to 1 clinical contact hour. Nursing faculty who taught clinical courses with 5:1 to .25:1 work load credit for face-to-face contact hour ratios needed to work between 8 and 24 hours more in face-to-face teaching compared with colleagues teaching lecture courses, thus leaving less time for scholarship and service activities. Fifty per cent of the programs reported 10 or more students in some of the clinical courses. Faculty reported concerns about quality of learning experiences and supervisory difficulties as student numbers in clinical courses exceeded 8 students/faculty member.

  10. Combining Service and Learning in Higher Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, Maryann

    1999-01-01

    .... Hundreds of college and university presidents, most of the major higher education associations, and a number of highly influential scholars actively support the development of service-learning...

  11. Wheelchair service provision education in academia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen H. Fung

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The majority of the educational institutions teach wheelchair education; however, there is great variability in what and how it is taught and evaluated. The results demonstrate the need for more in-depth investigation regarding the integration process of wheelchair education in educational institutions, with the ultimate goal of improving wheelchair service provision worldwide.

  12. College clinic service quality and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshwal, Pankaj; Ranjan, Vini; Mittal, Geetika

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the service quality dimensions that play an important role in patient satisfaction in campus clinics in Delhi; assess student satisfaction with service; and suggests ways to improve areas of dissatisfaction. A questionnaire was distributed to students who had completed at least two consultations at the college clinic. Convenience sampling was used to approach respondents. The questionnaire uses modified SERVQUAL and other instruments, including original dimensions and those constructed through detailed discussions. Factor analyses, reliability tests and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy were conducted. The final sample had a total of 445 respondents. After factor analysis, the authors found that the dimensions affecting patient satisfaction are: staff professionalism; clinic staff reliability; clinic accessibility and basic facilities; tangibles; cleanliness; awareness of the clinic/diseases and how clinic staff deals with emergencies. Most students were satisfied with the professionalism of the clinic staff. More than 70 percent of the respondents reported that the clinic staff paid good attention to them. The campus clinic was deemed reliable by more than 50 percent of respondents. The students found the clinic's location convenient, with more than 50 percent supporting its location. However, there was dissatisfaction among the students regarding the tangibles of the clinic, with more than 50 percent favoring upgrading. There was satisfaction among the respondents regarding the availability of the doctor after clinic hours, but contact details for the clinic staff were not easily accessible on campus. More than 60 percent of respondents were satisfied with the cleanliness of the campus clinic. More than 50 percent felt that the campus clinic was not equipped to deal with emergencies efficiently. At the same time, 90 percent of respondents reported the availability of referral facilities in case of

  13. The RAFT Telemedicine Network: Lessons Learnt and Perspectives from a Decade of Educational and Clinical Services in Low- and Middle-Incomes Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediang, Georges; Perrin, Caroline; Ruiz de Castañeda, Rafael; Kamga, Yannick; Sawadogo, Alexandre; Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are to (i) provide an overview of the educational and clinical experiences of the Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine (RAFT) network, (ii) analyze key challenges and lessons learnt throughout a decade of activity, and (iii) draw a vision and perspectives of its sustainability. The study was carried out following three main stages: (i) a literature review, (ii) the analysis of key documents, and (iii) discussions with key collaborators of the RAFT. Réseau en Afrique Francophone pour la Télémédecine has been offering an important quantity of educational, clinical, and public health activities during the last decade. The educational activities include the weekly delivery of video-lectures for continuing and post-graduate medical education, the use of virtual patients for training in clinical decision making, research training activities using ICTs and other e-learning activities. The clinical and public health activities include tele-expertise to support health professionals in the management of difficult clinical cases, the implementation of clinical information systems in African hospitals, the deployment of mHealth projects, etc. Since 2010, the RAFT has been extended to the Altiplano in Bolivia and Nepal (in progress). Lessons Learnt and Perspectives: Important lessons have been learnt from the accumulated experiences throughout these years. These lessons concern: social and organization, human resources, technologies and data security, policy and legislation, and economy and financing. Also, given the increase of the activities and the integration of eHealth and telemedicine in the health system of most of the countries, the RAFT network faces many other challenges and perspectives such as learning throughout life, recognition, and valorization of teaching or learning activities, the impact evaluation of interventions, and the scaling up and transferability out of Africa of RAFT activities. Based on the RAFT

  14. Pursuing Improvement in Clinical Reasoning: The Integrated Clinical Education Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, Mary Ann

    2018-01-01

    The link between clinical education and development of clinical reasoning is not well supported by one theoretical perspective. Learning to reason during clinical education may be best achieved in a supportive sociocultural context of nursing practice that maximizes reasoning opportunities and facilitates discourse and meaningful feedback. Prelicensure clinical education seldom incorporates these critical components and thus may fail to directly promote clinical reasoning skill. Theoretical frameworks supporting the development of clinical reasoning during clinical education were evaluated. Analysis of strengths and gaps in each framework's support of clinical reasoning development was conducted. Commensurability of philosophical underpinnings was confirmed, and complex relationships among key concepts were elucidated. Six key concepts and three tenets comprise an explanatory predictive theory-the integrated clinical education theory (ICET). ICET provides critical theoretical support for inquiry and action to promote clinical education that improves development of clinical reasoning skill. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(1):7-13.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. A clinical governance framework for blood services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, L M; Benjamin, R J; Devine, D V; Katz, L M; Pink, J

    2015-05-01

    The elements of clinical governance, which ensure excellence in clinical care, can be applied to blood services. In this survey, their application in a range of blood providers was gauged, with the aim of identifying best practice and producing a generalizable framework. The Medical Directors of members of the Alliance of Blood Operators surveyed how different elements of clinical governance operated within their organizations and developed recommendations applicable in the blood service environment. The recommendations that emerged highlighted the importance of an organization's culture, with the delivery of optimal clinical governance being a corporate responsibility. Senior management must agree and promote a set of values to ensure that the system operates with the patient and donor at its heart. All staff should understand how their role fits into the 'journey to the patient', and a culture of openness promoted. Thus, reporting of errors and risks should be actively sought and praised, with penalties applied for concealment. Systems should exist to collect, analyse and escalate clinical outcomes, safety data, clinical risk assessments, incident reports and complaints to inform organizational learning. Clinical governance principles from general health care can be applied within blood services to complement good manufacturing practice. This requires leadership, accountability, an open culture and a drive for continuous improvement and excellence in clinical care. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. Service Learning and STEM Education Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichart Prasertsang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Community service allowed learners to meet their real Competency in leadership classroom. Thinking and doing by problem Solving togethers among learners, teacher, and Community seem to be STEM education. It aimed to create and innovate thing for supporting Community. STEM education as a final stage that meet service learning and community based knowledge.

  17. Australian clinical dosimetry service at ARPANSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Abel; Williams, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Earlier this year, the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council accepted the Federal Government's offer to fund the establishment and operation for 3 years of an Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS). The service will be located within the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency in Yallambie, Victoria and will commence operation at the beginning of 20II. The purpose of the ACDS is to make available independent checks and auditing services to all Australian radiotherapy services. These services will range form postal audits to site visits, and include treatment dose assessments using phantoms (Level III audits). There will be a Clinical Advisory Group to oversee the development of the service, so the ACPSEM and other professional groups will playa key role in developing the ACDS. In consultation with radiotherapy facilities, the ACDS will establish an Audit Panel which will be made up of local staff to assist with on site work and minimise travel costs. The results of all measurements made by the ACDS will be confi dential: only de-identified data would be publicly reported. The service will be free to participating facilities in the first 3 years. An independent review will be conducted in the third year to determine the ongoing arrangements for the service.

  18. Visual research in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezemer, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore what might be gained from collecting and analysing visual data, such as photographs, scans, drawings, video and screen recordings, in clinical educational research. Its focus is on visual research that looks at teaching and learning 'as it naturally occurs' in the work place, in simulation centres and other sites, and also involves the collection and analysis of visual learning materials circulating in these sites. With the ubiquity of digital recording devices, video data and visual learning materials are now relatively cheap to collect. Compared to other domains of education research visual materials are not widely used in clinical education research. The paper sets out to identify and reflect on the possibilities for visual research using examples from an ethnographic study on surgical and inter-professional learning in the operating theatres of a London hospital. The paper shows how visual research enables recognition, analysis and critical evaluation of (1) the hidden curriculum, such as the meanings implied by embodied, visible actions of clinicians; (2) the ways in which clinical teachers design multimodal learning environments using a range of modes of communication available to them, combining, for instance, gesture and speech; (3) the informal assessment of clinical skills, and the intricate relation between trainee performance and supervisor feedback; (4) the potentialities and limitations of different visual learning materials, such as textbooks and videos, for representing medical knowledge. The paper concludes with theoretical and methodological reflections on what can be made visible, and therefore available for analysis, explanation and evaluation if visual materials are used for clinical education research, and what remains unaccounted for if written language remains the dominant mode in the research cycle. Opportunities for quantitative analysis and ethical implications are also discussed. © 2016 John Wiley

  19. Application of cloud services in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kiryakova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Educational institutions in information society rely heavily on information and communication technologies. They allow them to follow innovative pedagogical paradigms and approaches and implement modern forms of training that are tailored to the needs and characteristics of the new generation of learners. More and more educational institutions are turning to the use of cloud services, because they are extremely effective alternative for providing the high quality resources and services to all participants in the learning process at an affordable price. The main objective of this study is to present the most popular cloud services – cloud-based office suites and cloud storage services, focusing on their use in education.

  20. 42 CFR 405.2452 - Services and supplies incident to clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... psychologist and clinical social worker services. 405.2452 Section 405.2452 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... clinical social worker services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a clinical psychologist's or clinical social worker's services are reimbursable under this subpart if the service or supply is— (1) Of a...

  1. The application of patient education in clinical interventional work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuqing; Lv Shukun; Ma Shuxian; Shi Liang

    2010-01-01

    By introducing patient education into the nursing care of interventional therapy, the medical workers can effectively help and encourage the patients to actively participate in and cooperate with the interventional therapy and related nursing care service. Besides, the relevant education and guidance can greatly help the patients to promote functional restoration and psychological recovery. This article systematically describes the approaches, the principles, the choice of the right moment for health education and the education contents in clinical interventional work. (authors)

  2. Establishing a clinical cardiac MRI service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Regan, D.P.; Schmitz, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    After several years of research development cardiovascular MRI has evolved into a widely accepted clinical tool. It offers important diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of clinical indications, which include ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathies, valvular dysfunction and congenital heart disorders. It is a safe non-invasive technique that employs a variety of imaging sequences optimized for temporal or spatial resolution, tissue-specific contrast, flow quantification or angiography. Cardiac MRI offers specific advantages over conventional imaging techniques for a significant number of patients. The demand for cardiac MRI studies from cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and other referrers is likely to continue to rise with pressure for more widespread local service provision. Setting up a cardiac MRI service requires careful consideration regarding funding issues and how it will be integrated with existing service provision. The purchase of cardiac phased array coils, monitoring equipment and software upgrades must also be considered, as well as the training needs of those involved. The choice of appropriate imaging protocols will be guided by operator experience, clinical indication and equipment capability, and is likely to evolve as the service develops. Post-processing and offline analysis form a significant part of the time taken to report studies and an efficient method of providing quantitative reports is an important requirement. Collaboration between radiologists and cardiologists is needed to develop a successful service and multi-disciplinary meetings are key component of this. This review will explore these issues from our perspective of a new clinical cardiac MRI service operating over its first year in a teaching hospital imaging department

  3. Current educational issues in the clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiens, R; Elleker, M G; Goldsand, G; Hugenholtz, H; Puddester, D; Toyota, B; Findlay, J M

    2001-11-01

    Canadian training in the clinical neurosciences, neurology and neurosurgery, faces significant challenges. New balances are being set by residents, their associations and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada between clinical service, education and personal time. The nature of hospital-provided medical service has changed significantly over the past decade, impacting importantly on resident training. Finally, future manpower needs are of concern, especially in the field of neurosurgery, where it appears that soon more specialists will be trained than can be absorbed into the Canadian health care system. A special symposium on current challenges in clinical neuroscience training was held at the Canadian Congress of Neurological Sciences in June 2000. Representatives from the Canadian Association of Interns and Residents, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and English and French neurology and neurosurgery training programs made presentations, which are summarized in this report. Residency training has become less service-oriented, and this trend will continue. In order to manage the increasingly sophisticated hospital services of neurology and neurosurgery, resident-alternatives in the form of physician "moonlighters" or more permanent hospital-based clinicians or "hospitalists" will be necessary in order to operate major neuroclinical units. Health authorities and hospitals will need to recognize and assume this responsibility. As clinical experience diminishes during residency training, inevitably so will the concept of the fully competent "generalist" at the end of specialty training. Additional subspecialty training is being increasingly sought by graduates, particularly in neurosurgery. Training in neurology and neurosurgery, as in all medical specialties, has changed significantly in recent years and continues to change. Programs and hospitals need to adapt to these changes in order to ensure the production of fully

  4. Veterans' Mental Health in Higher Education Settings: Services and Clinician Education Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niv, Noosha; Bennett, Lauren

    2017-06-01

    Utilization of the GI Bill and attendance at higher education institutions among student veterans have significantly increased since passage of the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Campus counseling centers should be prepared to meet the mental health needs of student veterans. This study identified the mental health resources and services that colleges provide student veterans and the education needs of clinical staff on how to serve student veterans. Directors of mental health services from 80 California colleges completed a semistructured phone interview. Few schools track the number, demographic characteristics, or presenting needs of student veterans who utilize campus mental health services or offer priority access or special mental health services for veterans. Directors wanted centers to receive education for an average of 5.8 veteran-related mental health topics and preferred workshops and lectures to handouts and online training. Significant training needs exist among clinical staff of campus mental health services to meet the needs of student veterans.

  5. Free Tax Services in Pediatric Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcil, Lucy E; Hole, Michael K; Wenren, Larissa M; Schuler, Megan S; Zuckerman, Barry S; Vinci, Robert J

    2018-05-18

    The earned income tax credit (EITC), refundable monies for America's working poor, is associated with improved child health. Yet, 20% of eligible families do not receive it. We provided free tax preparation services in clinics serving low-income families and assessed use, financial impact, and accuracy. Free tax preparation services ("StreetCred") were available at 4 clinics in Boston in 2016 and 2017. We surveyed a convenience sample of clients ( n = 244) about experiences with StreetCred and previous tax services and of nonparticipants ( n = 100; 69% response rate) and clinic staff ( n = 41; 48% response rate) about acceptability and feasibility. A total of 753 clients received $1 619 650 in federal tax refunds. StreetCred was associated with significant improvement in tax filing rates. Of surveyed clients, 21% were new filers, 47% were new users of free tax preparation, 14% reported new receipt of the EITC, and 21% reported new knowledge of the EITC. StreetCred had high client acceptability; 96% would use StreetCred again. Families with children were significantly more likely to report StreetCred made them feel more connected to their doctor ( P = .02). Clinic staff viewed the program favorably (97% approval). Free tax services in urban clinics are a promising, feasible financial intervention to increase tax filing and refunds, save fees, and link clients to the EITC. With future studies, we will assess scalability and measure impact on health. StreetCred offers an innovative approach to improving child health in primary care settings through a financial intervention. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Improving Educational Outcomes by Providing Educational Services through Mobile Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Computers, Networks, and Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and instructors with various online educational services. With the recent developments in M-learning and mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By providing the educational services using wireless and mobile technologies, the educational institutions can potentially bring great convenience to those off-campus students who do not always have time to find Internet enabled computers to get the important educational information from their academic institutions. With the mobile or M-educational services, both the students and the instructors can access the services anytime and anywhere they want. This paper discusses those M-educational services that can be moved to the mobile platform and then presents the system prototype and architecture that integrate these services into the mobile technology platform. The paper will conclude with a description of the formative evaluation of the system prototype.

  7. Status Configurations, Military Service and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Elder, Glen H., Jr.; Spence, Naomi J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Armed Forces offer educational and training benefits as incentives for service. This study investigates the influence of status configurations on military enlistment and their link to greater educational opportunity. Three statuses (socioeconomic status of origin, cognitive ability and academic performance) have particular relevance for…

  8. Using Social Media to Support Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer

    2017-12-01

    Social media has been used increasingly as part of nursing education. Nurse educators at a large, multisite teaching hospital used social media to support clinical teaching. A series of educational images was created by nurse educators and shared across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. This campaign coincided with in-unit clinical education. Nurse educators can consider using social media as an adjunct to clinical teaching, especially in large hospital settings. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(12):541-542. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. The educational dimension of pastoral youth service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Miriam Gallego

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The educational dimension of pastoral youth service is highlighted by the fact that it is about education on faith. Faith education means taking a young person towards a personal encounter with God. This fact is also known as an experience with God or religious experience. The religious experience favors cognitive and affective development, desire of the absolute, relationships development, commitments with justice, and the construction of a personal life and social history; in this regard, the religious experience turns into an educational one.The evangelist deed in the pastoral youth service, does not occur through isolated actions but through a process, that is, through a set of educational dynamisms that bring the young person to open up to his/her personal and social reality, to search for answers to his/her questions, be active in society, and build a life project. In pastoral ministries each gesture is, at the same time and with the same intensity, an educational event and a proposal of youth’s lives about God’s mysteries. The pastoral youth service brings educational means —objectives, contents, educational sites, processes, methodologies, people responsible for education, etc.— that can be no doubt evaluated.

  10. 76 FR 40713 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION..., authorized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Through this notice, we are adding a...

  11. 76 FR 40712 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION... published by the Department. Dated: July 6, 2011. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and...

  12. Understanding the value added to clinical care by educational activities. Value of Education Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, G S; Headrick, L A; Boex, J R

    1999-10-01

    In an era of competition in health care delivery, those who pay for care are interested in supporting primarily those activities that add value to the clinical enterprise. The authors report on their 1998 project to develop a conceptual model for assessing the value added to clinical care by educational activities. Through interviews, nine key stakeholders in patient care identified five ways in which education might add value to clinical care: education can foster higher-quality care, improve work satisfaction of clinicians, have trainees provide direct clinical services, improve recruitment and retention of clinicians, and contribute to the future of health care. With this as a base, an expert panel of 13 clinical educators and investigators defined six perspectives from which the value of education in clinical care might be studied: the perspectives of health-care-oriented organizations, clinician-teachers, patients, education organizations, learners, and the community. The panel adapted an existing model to create the "Education Compass" to portray education's effects on clinical care, and developed a new set of definitions and research questions for each of the four major aspects of the model (clinical, functional, satisfaction, and cost). Working groups next drafted proposals to address empirically those questions, which were critiqued at a national conference on the topic of education's value in clinical care. The next step is to use the methods developed in this project to empirically assess the value added by educational activities to clinical care.

  13. CSRQ Center Report on Education Service Providers: Educator's Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Data-Driven Reform in Education (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Education service providers (ESPs), or education management organizations, are for-profit or non-profit organizations that contract with new or existing public, charter, or private schools to help them implement comprehensive reforms. Which of these ESPs have evidence that they help children in elementary and secondary school of positive effects…

  14. 42 CFR 405.2450 - Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker... § 405.2450 Clinical psychologist and clinical social worker services. (a) For clinical psychologist or clinical social worker professional services to be payable under this subpart, the services must be— (1...

  15. National survey of pain clinics in Croatia: Organization and services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Fidahić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze organization and therapeutic procedures administered in tertiary outpatient pain clinics in Croatia. Methods. Data about organization of pain clinics, its personnel, equipment, continuing medical education, therapeutic procedures, research activities and relations with pharmaceutical industry were collected using questionnaires. Results. Twenty-two Croatian pain clinics were included in the study. Most of the pain clinics employ exclusively anesthesiologists and nurses. The most frequently prescribed therapeutic procedures in pain clinics were pharmacotherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, acupuncture and trigger point injections. Almost all pain clinics provide educational material for patients. Most of the pain clinics have regular interactions with pharmaceutical companies. Prescribing decisions were based mostly on information from scientific meetings, research articles and consultations with colleagues. Information sources which are considered to be the gold standard – the systematic reviews of The Cochrane Collaboration – were used less frequently (n=12; 57% than advertising materials from pharmaceutical companies (n=16; 76%. Few physicians and other pain clinics staff had scientific degrees or academic titles or were involved in a research project. Conclusion. The national study about pain clinics in Croatia pointed out that there is room for improvement of their organization and services. Pain clinics should employ health-care professionals with diverse backgrounds. They should offer treatments backed by the highest-level of scientific evidence. Since pain is a major public health issue, pain clinic staff should engage more in research to contribute to the growing field of pain research, to enhance capacities for pain research in Croatia, to incorporate scientific evidence into their daily decision-making and to enable evidence-based practice.

  16. National survey of pain clinics in Croatia: Organization and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidahić, Mahir; Dogan, Katarina; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2015-01-01

    To analyze organization and therapeutic procedures administered in tertiary outpatient pain clinics in Croatia. Data about organization of pain clinics, its personnel, equipment, continuing medical education, therapeutic procedures, research activities and relations with pharmaceutical industry were collected using questionnaires. Twenty-two Croatian pain clinics were included in the study. Most of the pain clinics employ exclusively anesthesiologists and nurses. The most frequently prescribed therapeutic procedures in pain clinics were pharmacotherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, acupuncture and trigger point injections. Almost all pain clinics provide educational material for patients. Most of the pain clinics have regular interactions with pharmaceutical companies. Prescribing decisions were based mostly on information from scientific meetings, research articles and consultations with colleagues. Information sources which are considered to be the gold standard--the systematic reviews of The Cochrane Collaboration--were used less frequently (n=12; 57%) than advertising materials from pharmaceutical companies (n=16; 76%). Few physicians and other pain clinics staff had scientific degrees or academic titles or were involved in a research project. The national study about pain clinics in Croatia pointed out that there is room for improvement of their organization and services. Pain clinics should employ health-care professionals with diverse backgrounds. They should offer treatments backed by the highest-level of scientific evidence. Since pain is a major public health issue, pain clinic staff should engage more in research to contribute to the growing field of pain research, to enhance capacities for pain research in Croatia, to incorporate scientific evidence into their daily decision-making and to enable evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  17. Exploring E-marketing Opportunities for Exporting Education Services : Case HAAGA-HELIA Global Education Services

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez , Julio

    2013-01-01

    This Bachelor’s thesis examines online marketing opportunities for exporting education programs and education consulting services from Finland and internationally. The objective of the study is to determine how is the current B2B environment in e-marketing communications. The purpose of this research is to provide useful information on e-marketing strategies that would benefit HAAGA-HELIA Global Education Services (HAAGA-HELIA GES). This study consists of a theoretical section tha...

  18. The clinical nurse educator as leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman-Mullally, Theresa; Mulder, Cindy K; McCarter-Spalding, Deborah E; Hagler, Debra A; Gaberson, Kathleen B; Hanner, Mary Beth; Oermann, Marilyn H; Speakman, Elizabeth T; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Young, Patricia K

    2013-01-01

    The National League for Nursing recognizes leadership as an important aspect of the educator role. The purpose of this article is to describe leadership in the context of clinical nursing education and how clinical nurse educators enact leadership. The article identifies particular nursing practice skills and strengths that clinicians bring to nursing education that enhance leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities. After review of several leadership models, we identified five overarching themes that demonstrate how clinical nurse educators exemplify the various models including role modeling, providing vision, helping students to learn, challenging the system or status quo, and seeking relational integrity. We explicate the themes with examples affirming the leadership potential of clinical nurse educators, and suggest ways in which nursing faculty members and administrators might draw on the leadership capital of clinical nurse educators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing clinical education through understanding key principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Joanne; Wright, Caroline; Baird, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, a practicum facilitated the integration of on-campus learning and practical workplace training. Over the past 3 decades, an educative practicum has evolved that promotes clinical reasoning, including analytical and evaluative abilities, through reflective practice. Anecdotal evidence indicates that the delivery of clinical education within medical radiation science entry-level programs continues to vacillate between traditional practicums and the new reflective practicums. To review the literature about clinical education within the medical radiation sciences and identify key principles for practitioners seeking to reflect upon and improve their approach to teaching and supporting students in the clinical environment. A search of 3 major journal databases, Internet searches, and hand searches of reference lists were conducted to identify literature about clinical education in the medical radiation sciences from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2012. Twenty-two studies were included in this review. The 5 key elements associated with clinical education include the clinical support model and quality, overcoming the theory-practice gap, learning outcomes and reliable and valid assessment, preparing and supporting students, and accommodating differing teaching and learning needs. Many factors influence the quality of clinical education, including the culture of the clinical environment and clinical leadership roles. Several approaches can help students bridge the theory-practice gap, including simulators, role-playing activities, and reflective journals. In addition, clinical educators should use assessment strategies that objectively measure student progress, and they should be positive role models for their students. The successful clinical education of students in the medical radiation sciences depends upon the systems, structures, and people in the clinical environment. Clinical education is accomplished through the collaborative efforts of the

  20. 42 CFR 440.20 - Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.20 Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services. (a) Outpatient hospital... services that are not generally furnished by most hospitals in the State. (b) Rural health clinic services... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital services and rural health...

  1. Physiotherapy clinical education at a South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Chetty

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical education for physiotherapists forms a vital part of undergraduate programmes and equips students with competencies to practise autonomously as qualified health practitioners. However, disparities are evident in approaches to clinical education.Objective. To explore the perceptions of physiotherapy students, community-service physiotherapists and physiotherapy clinical supervisors regarding the clinical education framework at a tertiary institution in South Africa in order to understand preparedness of students for practice.Methods. A case study approach with two focus group discussions with students and interviews with community physiotherapists and clinical supervisors was employed. Data were analysed and categorised into key themes and sub-themes.Results. Five themes emerged from triangulation of data from the three groups: preparedness for professional practice, institutional barriers, curriculum disputes, personal factors and recommendations for physiotherapy clinical education. Students felt inadequately prepared owing to a perceived lack of exposure to certain aspects of physiotherapy, while community therapists believed that reflection on the undergraduate programme after qualifying contributed to their adequate preparation. Clinical supervisors supposed that students would benefit from actively engaging with teaching and learning opportunities, and clinical personnel collaboration was seen as key to facilitate a continuum in clinical education from classroom to healthcare setting.Conclusion. Participants reported that the existing curriculum structure may need to be revisited to address various issues, while holistic collaboration between students, supervisors and clinical personnel is imperative to create a cohesive learning environment.

  2. Towards Web Service-Based Educational Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G.

    2005-01-01

    The need for designing the next generation of web service-based educational systems with the ability of integrating components from different tools and platforms is now recognised as the major challenge in advanced learning technologies. In this paper, we discuss this issue and we present the conceptual design of such environment, referred to as…

  3. Disciplines in the Service of Educational Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that the 20th century has been the century of the application of disciplines - philosophy, psychology, history, sociology, statistics, cognitive science, and computer science - to educational thought on an unprecedented scale. The same disciplines, in the service of the study of women by women, have led to a whole new complex of thought…

  4. Physiotherapy clinical educators' perceptions and experiences of clinical prediction rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Grahame M; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Rivett, Darren A

    2015-12-01

    Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) are widely used in medicine, but their application to physiotherapy practice is more recent and less widespread, and their implementation in physiotherapy clinical education has not been investigated. This study aimed to determine the experiences and perceptions of physiotherapy clinical educators regarding CPRs, and whether they are teaching CPRs to students on clinical placement. Cross-sectional observational survey using a modified Dillman method. Clinical educators (n=211, response rate 81%) supervising physiotherapy students from 10 universities across 5 states and territories in Australia. Half (48%) of respondents had never heard of CPRs, and a further 25% had never used CPRs. Only 27% reported using CPRs, and of these half (51%) were rarely if ever teaching CPRs to students in the clinical setting. However most respondents (81%) believed CPRs assisted in the development of clinical reasoning skills and few (9%) were opposed to teaching CPRs to students. Users of CPRs were more likely to be male (pphysiotherapy (pStudents are unlikely to be learning about CPRs on clinical placement, as few clinical educators use them. Clinical educators will require training in CPRs and assistance in teaching them if students are to better learn about implementing CPRs in physiotherapy clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Developments in clinical neuropsychology: implications for school psychological services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michael J; Scott, Albert J

    2011-01-01

    According to the 2000 Report of the Surgeon General's Conference on Children's Mental Health, a significant percentage of children and adolescents have emotional or behavioral problems serious enough to merit a mental health diagnosis. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 reemphasized the schools' importance in supporting cognitive and behavioral development in students, particularly those identified with learning problems. In this article, we examine the growing specialty of clinical neuropsychology and provide suggestions for integrating this field into school-based psychological services. This article provides a review of the neuropsychological bases for many childhood learning disorders and addresses how school psychologists can work with clinical neuropsychologists to better address the needs of exceptional children through neuropsychological testing. There is substantial neurological evidence for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder as well as disorders of reading, language, and mathematics. Close collaborative partnerships between clinical neuropsychologists and school psychologists will help develop assessment protocols that are likely to result in more effective intervention services for students with neuropsychological conditions. Schools are being asked to support the physical, cognitive, and emotional development in students, particularly those identified with chronic physical and mental health challenges. Dissatisfaction with minimal screenings, the growing awareness of the neurology of learning disorders, and the passage of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 obliges all school-based mental health providers to consider how to fully integrate the tools of clinical neuropsychology into school-based psychological services. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  6. Status Configurations, Military Service and Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Elder, Glen H; Spence, Naomi J

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Armed Forces offer educational and training benefits as incentives for service. This study investigates the influence of status configurations on military enlistment and their link to greater educational opportunity. Three statuses (socioeconomic status of origin, cognitive ability and academic performance) have particular relevance for life course options. We hypothesize that young men with inconsistent statuses are more likely to enlist than men with consistent status profiles, and that military service improves access to college for certain configurations. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) show (1. that several status configurations markedly increased the likelihood of military enlistment and (2. within status configurations, recruits were generally more likely to enroll in higher education than nonveterans, with associate degrees being more likely.

  7. Status Configurations, Military Service and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Elder, Glen H.; Spence, Naomi J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Armed Forces offer educational and training benefits as incentives for service. This study investigates the influence of status configurations on military enlistment and their link to greater educational opportunity. Three statuses (socioeconomic status of origin, cognitive ability and academic performance) have particular relevance for life course options. We hypothesize that young men with inconsistent statuses are more likely to enlist than men with consistent status profiles, and that military service improves access to college for certain configurations. Analyses of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) show (1. that several status configurations markedly increased the likelihood of military enlistment and (2. within status configurations, recruits were generally more likely to enroll in higher education than nonveterans, with associate degrees being more likely. PMID:24511161

  8. Assuring Quality Control of Clinical Education in Multiple Clinical Affiliates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Judith A.

    A plan was developed to assure equivalency of clinical education among the medical laboratory technician (MLT) programs affiliated with Sandhills Community College. The plan was designed by faculty to monitor the quality of clinical courses offered by the clinical affiliates. The major strategies were to develop competencies, slide/tape modules, a…

  9. 42 CFR 410.73 - Clinical social worker services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clinical social worker services. 410.73 Section 410... Clinical social worker services. (a) Definition: clinical social worker. For purposes of this part, a clinical social worker is defined as an individual who— (1) Possesses a master's or doctor's degree in...

  10. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed asthma clinic in an Indian Health Service clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Ryan G; Nye, Shane

    2016-01-01

    To observe whether American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) patients at the Yakama Indian Health Service seen at the pharmacist-managed asthma clinic improved asthma outcomes. Retrospective chart review, single group, preintervention and postintervention. Pharmacist-managed asthma clinic at an Indian Health Service ambulatory care clinic. Sixty-one AI/AN patients who were seen at least once in the asthma clinic from 2010 to 2014. Pharmacist-provided asthma education and medication management. Asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department or urgent care (ED) visits. The total number of asthma-related hospitalizations and ED visits between the 12-month periods preceding and following the initial asthma clinic visit were 11 versus 2 hospitalizations (P = 0.02) and 43 versus 25 ED visits (P = 0.02), respectively. Over the same period, asthma-related oral corticosteroid use showed a nonsignificant decrease in the number of prescriptions filled (n = 59, P = 0.08). In contrast, inhaled corticosteroid prescription fills significantly increased (n = 42, P = 0.01). A reduction of asthma-related hospitalizations and ED visits were observed during the course of the intervention. Increased access to formal asthma education and appropriate asthma care benefit the Yakama AI/AN people. A controlled trial is needed to confirm that the intervention causes the intended effect. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Analysis of Family Clinical, vision of service nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Merisio Raimundi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to know the practice of the Family Clinic in Cuiaba and its relationship with the precepts of the expanded clinic, from the perspective of the service nurses. Method qualitative descriptive research, data collection with semi-structured interviews and results analyzed according to the method of thematic content analysis. Results for nurses working in the service, this assumes a differentiated and innovative proposal, which seeks to correlate with shared management in its three spheres. Although most do not know the Enlarged Clinic term in his speech cited its main principles and its tools. The greatest potential described were related to the Support Center for Health and popular participation, and as challenges, the lack of community health worker, the national health establishment registration and the difficulty of operation due to the profile of the professionals technical level arising from secondary care. Conclusions The clinic has positive aspects that can contribute to the advancement of the profession, to train health professionals and an innovative primary care model. Therefore, it emphasizes the need for implementation of continuing education in order to realize its proposal, and further studies on site.

  12. Improvement of Clinical Skills through Pharmaceutical Education and Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Professors and teaching staff in the field of pharmaceutical sciences should devote themselves to staying abreast of relevant education and research. Similarly those in clinical pharmacies should contribute to the advancement of pharmaceutical research and the development of next generation pharmacists and pharmaceuticals. It is thought that those who work in clinical pharmacies should improve their own skills and expertise in problem-finding and -solving, i.e., "clinical skills". They should be keen to learn new standard treatments based on the latest drug information, and should try to be in a position where collecting clinical information is readily possible. In the case of pharmacists in hospitals and pharmacies, they are able to aim at improving their clinical skills simply through performing their pharmaceutical duties. On the other hand, when a pharmaceutical educator aims to improve clinical skills at a level comparable to those of clinical pharmacists, it is necessary to devote or set aside considerable time for pharmacist duties, in addition to teaching, which may result in a shortage of time for hands-on clinical practice and/or in a decline in the quality of education and research. This could be a nightmare for teaching staff in clinical pharmacy who aim to take part in such activities. Nonetheless, I believe that teaching staff in the clinical pharmacy area could improve his/her clinical skills through actively engaging in education and research. In this review, I would like to introduce topics on such possibilities from my own experiences.

  13. Physiotherapy clinical educators' perceptions of student fitness to practise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kristin; Curtis, Heather; Keating, Jennifer L; Bearman, Margaret

    2017-01-17

    Health professional students are expected to maintain Fitness to Practise (FTP) including clinical competence, professional behaviour and freedom from impairment (physical/mental health). FTP potentially affects students, clinicians and clients, yet the impact of supervising students across the spectrum of FTP issues remains relatively under-reported. This study describes clinical educators' perceptions of supporting students with FTP issues. Between November 2012 and January 2013 an online survey was emailed to physiotherapy clinical educators from 34 sites across eight health services in Australia. The self-developed survey contained both closed and open ended questions. Demographic data and Likert scale responses were summarised using descriptive statistics. The hypotheses that years of clinical experience increased clinical educator confidence and comfort in supporting specific student FTP issues were explored with correlational analysis. Open text questions were analysed based on thematic analysis. Sixty-one percent of the 79 respondents reported supervising one or more students with FTP issues. Observed FTP concerns were clinical competence (76%), mental health (51%), professional behaviour (47%) and physical health (36%). Clinicians considered 52% (95% CI 38-66) of these issues avoidable through early disclosure, student and clinician education, maximising student competency prior to commencing placements, and human resources. Clinicians were confident and comfortable supporting clinical competence, professional behaviour and physical health issues but not mental health issues. Experience significantly increased confidence to support all FTP issues but not comfort. Student FTP issues affects the clinical educator role with 83% (95% CI 75-92) of clinicians reporting that work satisfaction was affected due to time pressures, emotional impact, lack of appreciation of educator time, quality of care conflict and a mismatch in role perception. Educators also

  14. Support for Offering Sexual Health Services through School-Based Health Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michele Johnson; Barr, Elissa; Wilson, Kristina; Griner, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies document support for sexuality education in the schools. However, there is a dearth of research assessing support for sexual health services offered through school-based health clinics (SBHCs). The purpose of this study was to assess voter support for offering 3 sexual health services (STI/HIV testing, STI/HIV…

  15. ANALYSIS OF PERCEIVED QUALITY OF EDUCATION SERVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murwatiningsih Murwatiningsih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the descriptive overview of the quality of education services consisting. The location of this research was at the Economics Faculty of Semarang State University, and the object of the study was student at semester VII of the Economics Faculty. The population of this study was 620 students in the academic year of 2014/2015. Proportional cluster ranom sampling technique was utilized to get 186 samples. The method of collecting data using questionnaires, whereas method of data analysis using non-parametric statistics (descriptive percentages.The result shows that the quality of education services, which can be seen from the dimensions of relevance, efficiency, effectiveness, accountability, responsiveness, creativity, productivity, academic abilities, empathy, and appearance, are perceived well by students. However, this result has not optimal yet, especially on the dimensions of relevance, efficiency and effectiveness.

  16. Wayfinding Services for Open Educational Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kalz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available To choose suitable resources for personalcompetence development in the vast amount of openeducational resources is a challenging task for a learner.Starting with a needs analysis of lifelong learners andlearning designers we introduce two wayfinding servicesthat are currently researched and developed in theframework of the Integrated Project TENCompetence.Then we discuss the role of these services to supportlearners in finding and selecting open educational resourcesand finally we give an outlook on future research.

  17. Online database for documenting clinical pathology resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Chou, David; Astion, Michael L

    2007-01-01

    Training of clinical pathologists is evolving and must now address the 6 core competencies described by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), which include patient care. A substantial portion of the patient care performed by the clinical pathology resident takes place while the resident is on call for the laboratory, a practice that provides the resident with clinical experience and assists the laboratory in providing quality service to clinicians in the hospital and surrounding community. Documenting the educational value of these on-call experiences and providing evidence of competence is difficult for residency directors. An online database of these calls, entered by residents and reviewed by faculty, would provide a mechanism for documenting and improving the education of clinical pathology residents. With Microsoft Access we developed an online database that uses active server pages and secure sockets layer encryption to document calls to the clinical pathology resident. Using the data collected, we evaluated the efficacy of 3 interventions aimed at improving resident education. The database facilitated the documentation of more than 4 700 calls in the first 21 months it was online, provided archived resident-generated data to assist in serving clients, and demonstrated that 2 interventions aimed at improving resident education were successful. We have developed a secure online database, accessible from any computer with Internet access, that can be used to easily document clinical pathology resident education and competency.

  18. Implementing a clinical pharmacy service in hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Tatiane Fernandes; Aguiar, Karina da Silva; Rotta, Inajara; Belletti, Klezia Morais da Silva; Carlotto, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    To implement a clinical pharmacy service focused on the comprehensive review of antineoplastic drugs used in therapy of hematological diseases. An interventional study was conducted in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital in two different periods, with and without a clinical pharmacy service, respectively. This service consisted of an antineoplastic prescription validation (analysis of patients' characteristics, laboratory tests, compliance with the therapeutic protocol and with pharmacotechnical parameters). When problems were detected, the pharmacist intervened with the physician or another health professional responsible for the patient. Inpatients and outpatients with hematological diseases were included. We found an increased detection of drug-related problem by 106.5% after implementing the service. Comparing the two periods, an increase in patients' age (26.7 years versus 17.6 years), a predominance of outpatients (54% versus 38%), and an increase in multiple myeloma (13% versus 4%) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (16% versus 3%) was noted. The most commonly found problems were related to dose (33% versus 25%) and cycle day (14% versus 30%). With regard to clinical impact, the majority had a significant impact (71% versus 58%), and in one patient from the second period could have been fatal. The main pharmaceutical interventions were dose adjustment (35% versus 25%) and drug withdrawal (33% versus 40%). The pharmacy service contributed to increase the detection and resolution of drug-related problems, and it was an effective method to promote the safe and rational use of antineoplastic drugs. Implementar um serviço farmacêutico clínico centrado na revisão completa dos antineoplásicos utilizados no tratamento de doenças hematológicas. Estudo intervencional conduzido em um hospital universitário terciário brasileiro em dois períodos distintos, com base na ausência e na presença do serviço farmacêutico clínico, respectivamente. O referido servi

  19. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  20. Service Quality in Higher Education Using an Enhanced SERVQUAL Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kay C.; Kek, Sei W.

    2004-01-01

    Customer service and quality are driving forces in the business community. As higher educational institutions tussle for competitive advantage and high service quality, the evaluation of educational service quality is essential to provide motivation for and to give feedback on the effectiveness of educational plans and implementation. This…

  1. Broadband Radio Service (BRS) and Educational Broadband Service (EBS) Transmitters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Broadband Radio Service (BRS), formerly known as the Multipoint Distribution Service (MDS)/Multichannel Multipoint Distribution Service (MMDS), is a commercial...

  2. How to implement live video recording in the clinical environment: A practical guide for clinical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Adam; Dewar, Alistair; Edgar, Simon; Caesar, Dave; Gowens, Paul; Clegg, Gareth

    2017-06-01

    The use of video in healthcare is becoming more common, particularly in simulation and educational settings. However, video recording live episodes of clinical care is far less routine. To provide a practical guide for clinical services to embed live video recording. Using Kotter's 8-step process for leading change, we provide a 'how to' guide to navigate the challenges required to implement a continuous video-audit system based on our experience of video recording in our emergency department resuscitation rooms. The most significant hurdles in installing continuous video audit in a busy clinical area involve change management rather than equipment. Clinicians are faced with considerable ethical, legal and data protection challenges which are the primary barriers for services that pursue video recording of patient care. Existing accounts of video use rarely acknowledge the organisational and cultural dimensions that are key to the success of establishing a video system. This article outlines core implementation issues that need to be addressed if video is to become part of routine care delivery. By focussing on issues such as staff acceptability, departmental culture and organisational readiness, we provide a roadmap that can be pragmatically adapted by all clinical environments, locally and internationally, that seek to utilise video recording as an approach to improving clinical care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Information-Seeking Habits of In-Service Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Todd; Bannon, Susan H.; Nunes-Bufford, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Research on information literacy and educators has focused on preservice educators and learning information literacy skills. Little research exists on in-service educators and their information literacy skills. Purposes of this study were to identify information sources that in-service educators used; to determine relationships between information…

  4. Beyond Accreditation: What Defines a Quality Funeral Service Education Program? An Investigation of the Relationship between Educational Correlates and Program Quality in Funeral Service Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritch, John Bradley

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine what defines a quality funeral service education program beyond accreditation. The study examined the opinions of funeral service education chairs (N = 45, representing 80% of the population) who are leaders of funeral service education programs accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education.…

  5. Extension and Higher Education Service-Learning: Toward a Community Development Service-Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Randy

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how on-the-ground Extension educators interface with higher education service-learning. Most service-learning in Extension has focused on precollege youth and 4-H. When we look at higher education service-learning and Extension in Wisconsin, we see that there is not as much connection as might be expected. County-based…

  6. A national survey of clinical pharmacy services in county hospitals in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dongning; Xi, Xiaoyu; Huang, Yuankai; Hu, Hao; Hu, Yuanjia; Wang, Yitao; Yao, Wenbing

    2017-01-01

    Clinical pharmacy is not only a medical science but also an elaborate public health care system firmly related to its subsystems of education, training, qualification authentication, scientific research, management, and human resources. China is a developing country with a tremendous need for improvements in the public health system, including the clinical pharmacy service system. The aim of this research was to evaluate the infrastructure and personnel qualities of clinical pharmacy services in China. Public county hospitals in China. A national survey of clinical pharmacists in county hospitals was conducted. It was sampled through a stratified sampling strategy. Responses were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The main outcome measures include the coverage of clinical pharmacy services, the overall staffing of clinical pharmacists, the software and hardware of clinical pharmacy services, the charge mode of clinical pharmacy services, and the educational background, professional training acquisition, practical experience, and entry path of clinical pharmacists. The overall coverage of clinical pharmacy services on both the department scale (median = 18.25%) and the patient scale (median = 15.38%) does not meet the 100% coverage that is required by the government. In 57.73% of the sample hospitals, the staffing does not meet the requirement, and the size of the clinical pharmacist group is smaller in larger hospitals. In addition, 23.4% of the sample hospitals do not have management rules for the clinical pharmacists, and 43.1% do not have rational drug use software, both of which are required by the government. In terms of fees, 89.9% of the sample hospitals do not charge for the services. With regard to education, 8.5% of respondents are with unqualified degree, and among respondents with qualified degree, 37.31% are unqualified in the major; 43% of respondents lack the clinical pharmacist training required by the government. Most

  7. Service quality and clinical outcomes: an example from mental health rehabilitation services in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killaspy, Helen; Marston, Louise; Omar, Rumana Z; Green, Nicholas; Harrison, Isobel; Lean, Melanie; Holloway, Frank; Craig, Tom; Leavey, Gerard; King, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Current health policy assumes better quality services lead to better outcomes. To investigate the relationship between quality of mental health rehabilitation services in England, local deprivation, service user characteristics and clinical outcomes. Standardised tools were used to assess the quality of mental health rehabilitation units and service users' autonomy, quality of life, experiences of care and ratings of the therapeutic milieu. Multiple level modelling investigated relationships between service quality, service user characteristics and outcomes. A total of 52/60 (87%) National Health Service trusts participated, comprising 133 units and 739 service users. All aspects of service quality were positively associated with service users' autonomy, experiences of care and therapeutic milieu, but there was no association with quality of life. Quality of care is linked to better clinical outcomes in people with complex and longer-term mental health problems. Thus, investing in quality is likely to show real clinical gains.

  8. Transforming RN education: clinical learning and clinical knowledge development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, P

    1993-04-01

    Transforming RN education has the potential for transforming clinical teaching and learning for all students. The returning RN student offers possibilities for clinical learning that the generic student does not have, but this should not cause us to limit the returning RN student to the generic level. Where possible innovative programs should be developed to move the RN student from baccalaureate level to the Master's level. As educators, we should take the opportunity to increase the numbers of nurses who are educationally prepared to move into advanced levels of practice. The returning RN student offers a rich human resource for the profession, and a rich resource for improving our clinical teaching as well as our practice.

  9. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HDR-Clinical Data Service (CDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — CDS is a SOAP/REST web service interface that supports Create, Retrieve, Update, and Delete (CRUD) operations against HDR data stores over secure Hypertext Transfer...

  11. 75 FR 23254 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Training and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... special education, early intervention services, transition services, and related services; (iii... Special Education Programs' (OSEP) technical assistance and dissemination centers ( http://www.ed.gov...

  12. Nursing students' clinical competencies: a survey on clinical education objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, C; Grugnetti, A M; Caruso, R; Gallotti, M L; Borrelli, P; Puci, M

    2017-01-01

    Developing clearly defined competencies and identifying strategies for their measurement remain unfortunately a critical aspect of nursing training. In the current international context, which continues to be characterised by deep economic crisis, universities have a fundamental role to play in redefining the educational goals to respond to the expectations of certain geographical areas of interest, as underscored in the Bologna Process (Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education Convened in Bologna 19 June 1999). The aim of this observational study was to examine the clinical learning context of nursing students using a tool developed by a team of teachers for the analysis of clinical learning. Redefinition of the clinical learning objectives with reference to the competencies set out in the questionnaire validated by Venturini et al. (2012) and the subsequent use of the tool created by the team of teachers for students in the first, second and third-year courses of the 2013/14 academic year, covering all the internships called for in those years. All nursing students enrolled in the first, second and third year of the nursing undergraduate degree program at the University of Pavia (no. 471) participated in this survey. A total of 1,758 clinical internships were carried out: 461 for the first year, 471 for the second year and 826 for the third year. Setting objectives, beginning with the educational offerings in the several clinical contexts, represents a strong point for this process. The results highlight a level of heterogeneity and complexity intrinsic to the University of Pavia educational system, characterized by clinical settings with different clinical levels (Research hospital and other traditional hospitals) that offering different levels of training. The use of the self-evaluation form for clinical learning made it possible to perform real-time observations of the training activities of the entire student body. An educational model

  13. Assessing Interprofessional Education Collaborative Competencies in Service-Learning Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Alexa M; Hale, Kenneth M; Brown, Nicole V; McAuley, James W

    2016-03-25

    Objective. To investigate the effect of an interprofessional service-learning course on health professions students' self-assessment of Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) competencies. Design. The semester-long elective course consisted of two components: a service component where students provided patient care in an interprofessional student-run free clinic and bi-weekly workshops in which students reflected on their experiences and discussed roles, team dynamics, communication skills, and challenges with underserved patient populations. Assessment. All fifteen students enrolled in the course completed a validated 42-question survey in a retrospective post-then-pre design. The survey instrument assessed IPEC competencies in four domains: Values and Ethics, Roles and Responsibilities, Interprofessional Communication, and Teams and Teamwork. Students' self-assessment of IPEC competencies significantly improved in all four domains after completion of the course. Conclusion. Completing an interprofessional service-learning course had a positive effect on students' self-assessment of interprofessional competencies, suggesting service-learning is an effective pedagogical platform for interprofessional education.

  14. Selecting physician leaders for clinical service lines: critical success factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Andrew L; Bard, Marc A

    2008-03-01

    Clinical service lines and interdisciplinary centers have emerged as important strategic programs within academic health centers (AHCs). Effective physician leadership is significant to their success, but how these leaders are chosen has not been well studied. The authors conducted a study to identify current models for selecting the physician leaders of clinical service lines, determine critical success factors, and learn how the search process affected service line performance. In 2003 and 2004, the authors interviewed clinical and executive personnel involved in 14 programs to establish, or consider establishing, heart or cancer service lines, at 13 AHCs. The responses were coded to identify and analyze trends and themes. The key findings of the survey were (1) the goals and expectations that AHCs set for their service line leaders vary greatly, depending on both the strategic purpose of the service line in the AHC and the service line's stage of development, (2) the matrix organizational structure employed by most AHCs limits the leader's authority over necessary resources, and calls forth a variety of compensating strategies if the service line is to succeed, (3) the AHCs studied used relatively informal processes to identify, evaluate, and select service line leaders, and (4) the leader's job is vitally shaped by the AHC's strategic, structural, and political context, and selection criteria should be determined accordingly. Institutions should be explicit about the strategic purpose and stage of development of their clinical service lines and be clear about their expectations and requirements in hiring service line leaders.

  15. The accountability of clinical education: its definition and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, E; Gruppen, L; Catton, P; Hays, R; Woolliscroft, J O

    2000-10-01

    Medical education is not exempt from increasing societal expectations of accountability. Competition for financial resources requires medical educators to demonstrate cost-effective educational practice; health care practitioners, the products of medical education programmes, must meet increasing standards of professionalism; the culture of evidence-based medicine demands an evaluation of the effect educational programmes have on health care and service delivery. Educators cannot demonstrate that graduates possess the required attributes, or that their programmes have the desired impact on health care without appropriate assessment tools and measures of outcome. To determine to what extent currently available assessment approaches can measure potentially relevant medical education outcomes addressing practitioner performance, health care delivery and population health, in order to highlight areas in need of research and development. Illustrative publications about desirable professional behaviour were synthesized to obtain examples of required competencies and health outcomes. A MEDLINE search for available assessment tools and measures of health outcome was performed. There are extensive tools for assessing clinical skills and knowledge. Some work has been done on the use of professional judgement for assessing professional behaviours; scholarship; and multiprofessional team working; but much more is needed. Very little literature exists on assessing group attributes of professionals, such as clinical governance, evidence-based practice and workforce allocation, and even less on examining individual patient or population health indices. The challenge facing medical educators is to develop new tools, many of which will rely on professional judgement, for assessing these broader competencies and outcomes.

  16. Comparing Alternative Instruments to Measure Service Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochado, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of five alternative measures of service quality in the high education sector--service quality (SERVQUAL), importance-weighted SERVQUAL, service performance (SERVPERF), importance-weighted SERVPERF, and higher education performance (HEdPERF). Design/methodology/approach: Data were…

  17. Pre-Service Secondary Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Shane; Boyle, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The attitudes held by pre-service teachers have been shown to affect their willingness and ability to implement an inclusive approach to education. A sample consisting of 193 pre-service secondary teachers enrolled in secondary education courses at an Australian university were surveyed to determine their attitudes towards inclusive education,…

  18. In-Service Teacher Education: Some Suggestions for Improvement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper therefore examines teacher education, especially in-service teacher education and how it has been practised elsewhere. It is hoped that education policy makers will take note of some of the issues raised in this paper as the one day workshop which has hitherto been the most used strategy of in-service teacher ...

  19. 75 FR 14582 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services-Special Demonstration Programs-Model...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services--Special... of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of proposed... for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services proposes a priority under the Special Demonstration...

  20. 75 FR 47798 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services-Special Demonstration Programs-Model...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services--Special... of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of final... for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services establishes a priority under the Special...

  1. Character education in perspective of chemistry pre-service teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdekawati, Krisna

    2017-12-01

    As one of the pre-service teacher education programs, Chemistry Education Department Islamic University of Indonesia (UII) is committed to providing quality education. It is an education that can produce competent and characteristic chemistry pre-service teacher. The focus of research is to describe the perception of students as a potential teacher of chemistry on character education and achievement of character education. The research instruments include questionnaires and observation sheets. Research data show that students have understood the importance of character education and committed to organizing character education later in schools. Students have understood the ways in which character education can be used. The students stated that Chemistry Education Department has tried to equip students with character education. The observation result shows that students generally have character as a pre-service teacher.

  2. TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION AS TOOL OF MARKETING POLICY OF THE BRITISH EDUCATION SYSTEM IN THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET OF EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ш В Тагирова

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth of academic mobility of students, professors, professionals, experts, as well as educational programs and institutions has led to the emergence of new forms of educational services in the global education market - transnational (cross-border education. International branch campuses, distance learning, joint educational programs, educational services of commercial providers are the most common types of transnational education and act as an effective tool of a national marketing strategy to promote a national education system in education global market

  3. Teaching and clinical educator competency: bringing two worlds together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Cathy P

    2009-01-01

    More sessional clinical educators are being employed in educational institutions today than ever before. Also identified in the literature are issues affecting sessional clinical educators' ability to develop and maintain educator competency. Using the definition of educator competency by the National League for Nursing (NLN 2005a), explored in this paper are ways of increasing sessional clinical educator competency, such as orientation and mentorship programs to support student learning in clinical environments. Approaches in the form of theoretical models designed to evaluate clinical educator competency are examined. A new Sessional Clinical Educator Competency (SCEC) Framework is offered to provide direction for implementing strategies to develop and evaluate sessional clinical educator competency. Suggested is that the SCEC framework could be useful for educational administrators and sessional clinical educators to assess clinical educator competency.

  4. Clinical education and clinical evaluation of respiratory therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Deborah L

    2005-09-01

    Different blends of knowledge, decision making, problem solving,professional behaviors, values, and technical skills are necessary in the changing health care environments in which respiratory therapists practice. Frequently, novice students are expected to perform quickly and efficiently,and it may be forgotten that students are still learning and mastering the foundation pieces of practice. Clinical educators take on the responsibility of student development in addition to overseeing patient care. Normally,these volunteer instructors are role models for respiratory therapy students. The characteristic of initiative when demonstrated by a beginning student is attractive to the clinical instructor, promotes sharing of experiences, and may evolve into a mentor-protege relationship. Some clinical instructors may be underprepared to teach and are uncomfortable with student evaluation. Respiratory therapy facilities in conjunction with academic institutions may consider sponsoring ongoing programs for clinical teachers. Teaching and learning in the clinical environment is more than demonstration of skills and knowledge. Furthermore, it can be debated whether the memorization of facts or of the steps of a skill is more valuable than competency in problem solving, clinical reasoning, or information retrieval. New knowledge is built within a context and is further integrated when grounded by experience. Development of "prediction in practice" or the anticipation of the next necessary actions may be worth integrating into the instructional toolbox. Intuition has been defined as an "understanding without a rationale". This definition separates intuition from rational decision making and presents intuition as a type of innate ability. Reflection when guided by clinical instructors can help deepen critical thinking, as will Socratic questioning on a regular basis. Most clinical staff can agree on the performance of an incompetent student, but discrimination of the levels of

  5. A Conceptual Framework for Clinical Education in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To develop a model for clinical education in athletic training education based on integration of various allied health professional clinical education models. Background: Clinical education is a critical component of allied health education programs. It allows for the transfer of knowledge and skills from classroom to practical…

  6. Ethnographic nexus analysis in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim(s): Internationally, student nurses' attrition after clinical practice is an increasing problem (Hamshire, Willgoss, & Wibberley, 2012; Pilegård Jensen, 2006). A better understanding of 'becoming a nurse' as situated practice in the hospital wards might help avoid pitfalls...... in the clinical practice. Thus a thorough insight into the field is necessary in order to change it. The purpose of this paper is to show and discuss how it is possible methodologically to do ethnographic research in clinical education and how the field of clinical nursing education in the hospital wards might...... be improved after insights obtained through ethnographic research. Methods: Using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004, 2007) as an ethnographic framework in four Danish hospital wards, a study of the development of a professional identity among student nurses in Denmark was conducted. Scollon and Scollon...

  7. Medical students, clinical preventive services, and shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Carole W; Thompson, Margaret E; Noel, Mary Margaret

    2002-11-01

    Improving access to preventive care requires addressing patient, provider, and systems barriers. Patients often lack knowledge or are skeptical about the importance of prevention. Physicians feel that they have too little time, are not trained to deliver preventive services, and are concerned about the effectiveness of prevention. We have implemented an educational module in the required family practice clerkship (1) to enhance medical student learning about common clinical preventive services and (2) to teach students how to inform and involve patients in shared decision making about those services. Students are asked to examine available evidence-based information for preventive screening services. They are encouraged to look at the recommendations of various organizations and use such resources as reports from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force to determine recommendations they want to be knowledgeable about in talking with their patients. For learning shared decision making, students are trained to use a model adapted from Braddock and colleagues(1) to discuss specific screening services and to engage patients in the process of making informed decisions about what is best for their own health. The shared decision making is presented and modeled by faculty, discussed in small groups, and students practice using Web-based cases and simulations. The students are evaluated using formative and summative performance-based assessments as they interact with simulated patients about (1) screening for high blood cholesterol and other lipid abnormalities, (2) screening for colorectal cancer, (3) screening for prostate cancer, and (4) screening for breast cancer. The final student evaluation is a ten-minute, videotaped discussion with a simulated patient about screening for colorectal cancer that is graded against a checklist that focuses primarily on the elements of shared decision making. Our medical students appear quite willing to accept shared decision making as

  8. Curricular Placement of Academic Service-Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Amy; Bolduc, Steven R.; Gallo, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The higher education service-learning literature is rich with case studies, guidelines for service-learning course and program development, and demonstrations of the impact of service-learning on students. Minimal discussion, however, focuses on the "strategic placement" of service-learning in disciplinary curricula, and how curricular…

  9. Service Quality in Distance Education using the Gronroos Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid, Fazelina Sahul; Yip, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Demand for distance education programs have been increasing rapidly over the years. As a result, assessment of the quality of distance education programs has become a strategic issue that is very pertinent for program survival. This study uses Gronroos Model for assessing the service quality of the Malaysian distance education institutions. This model is chosen because it takes into account of the service delivery process and also service outcome. Our study confirms the multidimensional natur...

  10. Service Learning for Improvement of Customer Service Education in LIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Aguirre, Mónica

    2017-01-01

    This work explores the ways in which academic librarians specializing in areas related to user services consider the courses they took as part of obtaining their library and information science (LIS) degree prepared them to deal with issues of customer service in their current work. Effective customer service is a central aspect of accomplishing…

  11. A case-mix in-service education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, R R

    1985-01-01

    The new case-mix in-service education program at the Presbyterian Hospital in the City of New York is a fine example of physicians and administration working together to achieve success under the new prospective pricing system. The hospital's office of Case-Mix Studies has developed an accurate computer-based information system with historical, clinical, and demographic data for patients discharged from the hospital over the past five years. Reports regarding the cases, diagnoses, finances, and characteristics are shared in meetings with the hospital administration and directors of sixteen clinical departments, their staff, attending physicians, and house officers in training. The informative case-mix reports provide revealing sociodemographic summaries and have proven to be an invaluable tool for planning, marketing, and program evaluation.

  12. Clinical Education: Stranger in an Elitist Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Norman

    1981-01-01

    As law schools shed their pervasive elitism, clinical training will grow in scope and importance. Lawyers who meet the demands of a broad-based clientele cannot function with the limited skills that traditional education has provided. Law schools will have to train people to operate independently. (MLW)

  13. Measuring service quality in a hospital colposcopy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Mik; Wisniewski, Hazel

    2005-01-01

    The issues surrounding the measurement and provision of service quality in a health care setting are becoming increasingly important to nursing. This research study aims to apply the SERVQUAL measurement instrument in a Scottish colposcopy clinic. The study involved adapting the SERVQUAL instrument to the colposcopy setting and asking a sample of patients to complete the questionnaire. Patient expectations of service were obtained on first attendance at the clinic. Patient perceptions of service received were obtained on completion of treatment. Perceptions and expectations are then compared to identify where the largest service gaps exist. Although patient satisfaction with the overall service provided was generally high, the instrument provided evidence of where specific service improvements were needed. The largest service quality gap was for the reliability of service. The research also revealed the need for improved premises. Although the study has a limited sample size, it does appear that the SERVQUAL instrument has a useful diagnostic role to play in assessing and monitoring service quality in nursing, enabling nursing staff to identify where improvements are needed from the patients' perspective. The study has raised a number of issues which would form the basis for useful further research. Service quality from the patients' perspective should be routinely monitored and assessed. The findings should be useful to nursing staff seeking to assess, and improve, service quality.

  14. Setting Up an ePathology Service at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi: Joint Collaboration With Cleveland Clinic, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahal, Ayoub; Batac, Crystal Mildred O; Slaw, Renee J; Bauer, Thomas W

    2018-04-24

    - The production of whole slide images is the most advanced form of digital pathology, in which a high-resolution digital scanner is used to rapidly scan glass microscope slides and produce a computer-generated whole slide image that can be saved, stored in a network-attached storage device, and accessed through slide management software within the hospital domain and remotely by authorized users. Digital transformation of glass slides has revolutionized the practice of anatomic pathology by facilitating and expediting consultative services, improving clinical workflow, and becoming an indispensable tool in education and research. - To highlight the institutional need of Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) and the cultural background for obtaining the United Arab Emirates' first comprehensive digital pathology program; to describe a multiphase road map for achieving full implementation of this platform; and to describe the system's clinical applications and its future potential growth. - At Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, we prioritized our efforts to initiate digital consultations (eConsultations) and digital immunohistochemistry services (eIHC) with Cleveland Clinic Laboratories (Cleveland, Ohio). After this, we established an internal archiving system together with a subspecialty-based, organ-specific digital library of pathologic diseases. - We describe the strategic adoption and implementation of digital pathology into the clinical workflow of the pathology and laboratory medicine institute of Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, and we highlight its impact on clinical operations, educational activities, and patient care.

  15. CLOUD SERVICES IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS OF TECHNOLOGICAL COLLEGES’ STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana M. Konovalenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article the prospects for "cloud services" use in the educational process in higher educational institutions I-II levels of accreditation are considered. There are analyzed the literature relating to the concept of "cloud services" and their use in the educational process, as well as some advantages and disadvantages of using cloud services at distant data processing. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud service Google Cloud Platform are presented. On the basis of the research it is proposed G Suite for Education service as a Google cloud environment to work with all applications. There are considered new features of Google Docs in cloud services G Suite for Education and showed by the example the solution to problems using new features of Google Docs in Excel application.

  16. Combining Service and Learning in Higher Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gray, Maryann

    1999-01-01

    The Policy Debate In the past decade, colleges and universities have made greater efforts to involve students in community service, particularly service-learning, a special form of community service...

  17. Pre-Service and In-Service Preschool Teachers' Views Regarding Creativity in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkus, Simge; Olgan, Refika

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the views of pre-service and in-service preschool teachers concerning the developing of children's creativity in early childhood education by determining the similarities and/or differences among their views. The data were gathered from 10 pre-service and 11 in-service teachers through focus group meetings, and then from…

  18. Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Bente Vigh; Mortensen, Lene S.; Scherpbier, Albert J J

    2010-01-01

    The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate...... in clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education....

  19. Clinical Education Environment Experiences of Operating Room Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh khazaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The objective of medical education is to train competent and qualified workforce in order to provide services in various health environments. One of the important objectives of Operating Room students is to train workforce who can involve in patient’s health and recovery. Training these students should cause clinical ability and independent decision making during surgery. Since students during internship face with many problems, this study has been conducted to explore and describe the challenges and experiences.Methods: This qualitative study is a phenomenology that was conducted based on 20 students in the last semester of Operating Room associate’s degree with purposive sampling. Deep and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data and data were analyzed by content analysis method.Results: The findings in 5 main themes: (1 Physical space and equipment in the operating room, (2 The student’s position in operating room, (3 Integrating knowledge and action, (4 Managing education environment and 5- Student’s viewpoint about operating room and working in it.Conclusions: Interviews with students revealed the educational environment challenges with which they are faced during their study. Teachers can provide solutions to overcome the challenges and create a positive atmosphere for students' learning using results of this study and students may continue their interest in education and improve the quality of their education.Keywords: CLINICAL EDUCATION, OPERATING ROOM STUDENTS, CHALLENGE

  20. Price Determination for Educational Services Based on the Investments in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaga Radu Lucian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at highlighting the link between educational marketing (product/service and price determination for educational services and investment in education, using empirical models and customization of classic approaches (interpolation method addressed to individual educational investment.

  1. Opportunities for Pharmacists and Student Pharmacists to Provide Clinical Preventive Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A. DiPietro Mager

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacists and student pharmacists can play an important role in providing clinical preventive services as specified by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF. The USPSTF guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations about clinical preventive services for the general population. The purpose of this paper is to provide information to pharmacists and student pharmacists developing and implementing preventive health care services. Examples of successful pharmacy-based programs are also provided. Pharmacists and student pharmacists can provide preventive health care interventions by conducting screenings, providing education, and making referrals. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties   Type: Idea Paper

  2. Effect of clinic experience on pre-service professionals perceptions of applied special needs services. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n2p145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Carpenter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available With the understanding that the attitudes and expectations a teacher carries into the classroom directly affect student achievement, this study was administered to evaluate the cognitive affect that clinical experience incorporating individuals with disabilities had on pre-service exercise science professionals. University Students with and without experience in an adapted clinical environment were given surveys covering attitudes and perceptions towards classroom atmosphere, teachers’ instructional techniques, inclusion, and self-efficacy. Data were analyzed and used to determine pedagogical implications. Findings suggest that pre-service educators tend to feel unprepared and ill-equipped to work in an inclusive educational environment. Therefore, pre-service teacher programs should ideally include coursework in adaptive education and experiential components such as practicum, field experience, and clinical experience. In addition, a school-university collaborative relationship can facilitate beneficial outcomes to future educators as well as special needs populations.

  3. Effect of clinic experience on pre-service professionals perceptions of applied special needs services. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n2p145

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Carpenter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available With the understanding that the attitudes and expectations a teacher carries into the classroom directly affect student achievement, this study was administered to evaluate the cognitive affect that clinical experience incorporating individuals with disabilities had on pre-service exercise science professionals. University Students with and without experience in an adapted clinical environment were given surveys covering attitudes and perceptions towards classroom atmosphere, teachers’ instructional techniques, inclusion, and self-efficacy. Data were analyzed and used to determine pedagogical implications. Findings suggest that pre-service educators tend to feel unprepared and ill-equipped to work in an inclusive educational environment. Therefore, pre-service teacher programs should ideally include coursework in adaptive education and experiential components such as practicum, field experience, and clinical experience. In addition, a school-university collaborative relationship can facilitate beneficial outcomes to future educators as well as special needs populations.

  4. 75 FR 9193 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may... for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum project period through a...

  5. 75 FR 77624 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview... months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-31191...

  6. Social Filters in Assessing Higher Education Services Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurkin, Anatoly; Lutsenko, Ekaterina; Bazhenova, Natalia; Bazhenov, Ruslan; Bogachenko, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to reveal social filters in the system of assessing the higher education services market. On the basis of the institutional interpretation of market relations, mechanisms and features of asymmetries formation in the educational services market are investigated. The role of the institutional environment ensuring…

  7. Education Technology Services at Indiana University: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichelmeyer, B. A.; Hara, Noriko; Yi, Jessi; Dennen, Vanessa; Avers, Dale; Tzeng, Jeng-Yi

    1998-01-01

    This paper, based on a qualitative research study, describes the technology resources available in the Indiana University School of Education, explains the range of services provided by Education Technology Services (ETS), documents the organizational structure of ETS, and describes the key processes and culture of ETS. (Author/AEF)

  8. Institutional Roles for In-Service Education of School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Patrick D., Ed.; Blackstone, Peggy L., Ed.

    This document is a compilation of papers read at a 4-day conference attended by 60 participants from throughout the United States. Chapters include (1) "In-Service Education of School Administrators: Background, Present Status, and Problems," by Robert B. Howsam; (2) "Notes on Institutional Relationships in the In-Service Education of the…

  9. Service learning in teacher education: an institutional model for an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in service learning is growing at a time of curriculum change in teacher education and institutional change in higher education in South Africa. This raises the question ";What models are available to guide institutions to develop service learning?"; This article outlines Pollack's typology of institutional responses to ...

  10. Clinical educators' self-reported personal and professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The target group was inter-professional clinical educators that are involved in student education on the clinical platform. Although the course participants were professionals and specialists in their own fields, the majority of clinical educators have very little or no knowledge of adult education. The Supervision Course aims to ...

  11. Integration of outpatient infectious diseases clinic pharmacy services and specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Elise M; Gerzenshtein, Lana

    2016-06-01

    The integration of specialty pharmacy services and existing outpatient clinical pharmacy services within an infectious diseases (ID) clinic to optimize the care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is described. The management of HIV-infected patients is a highly specialized area of practice, often requiring use of complex medication regimens for reduction of HIV-associated morbidity and mortality prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections, and prevention of HIV transmission. To maximize the effectiveness and safety of treatment with antiretroviral agents and associated pharmacotherapies, an interdisciplinary team is often involved in patient care. At Chicago-based Northwestern Medicine (NM), the outpatient ID clinic has long worked with an interdisciplinary care team including physicians, clinical pharmacists, nurses, and social workers to care for patients with HIV infection. In April 2014, specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection were added to the NM ID clinic's care model to help maintain continuity of care and enhance patient follow-up. The care model includes well-defined roles for clinical pharmacists, pharmacy residents and students on rotation, and licensed pharmacy technicians. Specialty pharmacy services, including medication education, prescription fulfillment, assistance with medication access (e.g., navigation of financial assistance programs, completion of prior-authorization requests), and treatment monitoring, allow for closed-loop medication management of the HIV-infected patient population. Integration of specialty pharmacy services with the interdisciplinary care provided in the outpatient NM ID clinic has enhanced continuity of care for patients with HIV infection in terms of prescription filling, medication counseling, and adherence monitoring. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nursing students’ experiences of clinical education setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahnama M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Appropriate clinical environment has an important role in preparing students to use learned knowledge in practice through providing learning opportunities. Since the students’ experiences in the clinical setting affect on quality of their learning, the current study aimed to explain the experiences of nursing students concerning clinical education setting. Materials and Method: The current study was conducted based on conventional content analysis. Sampling was done purposively and the participants were 13 last year nursing students in Zabol Nursing and Midwifery School in 2013-2014. Data collection was done through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was conducted through qualitative content analysis approach. Results: Based on the results, five major categories including threats, vision, dual forces, mindset and students’ action to clinical education and also10 subcategorie were identified. Conclusion: Since the formation of students’ experiences in these environments is one of the predictive factors in achieving their learning and in facilitating the professionalization process, thus the attention of managers in clinical settings is very important for decreasing the threats and concerns for students. In this way, the marred prospects of profession can be recovered through the meeting students’ expectations, attractiveness of the profession can be increased and the positive belief, actions and feelings can be created in students.

  13. Strategies for service-learning assessment in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee

    2013-10-01

    A large body of literature exists on the instructional pedagogy known as service-learning. Service-learning is a teaching and learning approach characterized by the dental hygiene student's practical application of academic studies and occurs within a community setting, to the benefit of both the student and community. Dental hygiene educators use service-learning to enhance student knowledge and application of oral health curriculum. This manuscript reports on the importance of service-learning assessment to the National Dental Hygiene Research Agenda as well as the future of the profession of dental hygiene and the successful strategies in service-learning evaluation available for utilization by dental hygiene educators.

  14. Service Learning in Medical Education: Project Description and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Nicole J.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Although medical education has long recognized the importance of community service, most medical schools have not formally nor fully incorporated service learning into their curricula. To address this problem, we describe the initial design, development, implementation, and evaluation of a service-learning project within a first-year medical…

  15. 34 CFR 200.45 - Supplemental educational services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... day; (2) Specifically designed to— (i) Increase the academic achievement of eligible students as... supplemental educational services from a State-approved provider selected by the student's parents. (2) Except... services to each student whose parents request these services, the LEA must give priority to the lowest...

  16. Educating nursing students in clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailey, Sarah; Lamb, Karen; Friese, Tanya; Christopher, Beth-Anne

    2015-02-01

    One of the goals of nursing education is to develop caring and responsible nurses with clinical reasoning skills who are capable of improving outcomes in complex healthcare systems. Using the Model of Situated Learning in Nursing Leadership, generalist entry graduate nursing students at Rush University in Chicago, part of a large academic medical centre with Magnet recognition for excellence in nursing practice, are educated using a curriculum based on the clinical nurse leader (CNL) competencies. This article presents a case study that demonstrates how the model is used to provide experiences for learning the CNL role. The students learn leadership in practice through their involvement in ongoing efforts at the medical centre to improve the care of patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The case study provides lessons in teaching CNL leadership competencies through efforts to improve the quality of care for an at-risk group of patients.

  17. 75 FR 13111 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview... AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice... 15, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative...

  18. 75 FR 13109 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of... California Special Education Fiscal Support Alliance J. Sarge Kennedy, regarding the excess costs, supplement... consent for special education and related services. Topic Addressed: Individualized Education Programs...

  19. Clinical and financial impact of pharmacy services in the intensive care unit: pharmacist and prescriber perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, Robert; Brett McQueen, R; Campbell, Jon

    2013-04-01

    To compare pharmacist and prescriber perceptions of the clinical and financial outcomes of pharmacy services in the intensive care unit (ICU). ICU pharmacists were invited to participate in the survey and were asked to invite two ICU prescriber colleagues to complete questionnaires. ICUs with clinical pharmacy services. The questionnaires were designed to solicit frequency, efficiency, and perceptions about the clinical and financial impact (on a 10-point scale) of pharmacy services including patient care (eight functions), education (three functions), administration (three functions), and scholarship (four functions). Basic services were defined as fundamental, and higher-level services were categorized as desirable or optimal. Respondents were asked to suggest possible sources of funding and reimbursement for ICU pharmacy services. Eighty packets containing one 26-item pharmacy questionnaire and two 16-item prescriber questionnaires were distributed to ICU pharmacists. Forty-one pharmacists (51%) and 46 prescribers (29%) returned questionnaires. Pharmacists had worked in the ICU for 8.3 ± 6.4 years and devoted 50.3 ± 18.7% of their efforts to clinical practice. Prescribers generally rated the impact of pharmacy services more favorably than pharmacists. Fundamental services were provided more frequently and were rated more positively than desirable or optimal services across both groups. The percent efficiencies of providing services without the pharmacist ranged between 40% and 65%. Both groups indicated that salary support for the pharmacist should come from hospital departments of pharmacy or critical care or colleges of pharmacy. Prescribers were more likely to consider other sources of funding for pharmacist salaries. Both groups supported reimbursement of clinical pharmacy services. Critical care pharmacy activities were associated with perceptions of beneficial clinical and financial outcomes. Prescribers valued most services more than pharmacists

  20. International Trade in Educational Services: Good or Bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kurt; Vincent-Lancrin, Stephan

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the challenges and opportunities that international trade in educational services represents for higher education systems in industrialized and developing countries and shows the importance of international quality assurance in education. Makes the case that the lifelong learning sector is most likely to be affected by developments…

  1. Pre-Service Educators' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdikana, Andile; Ntshangase, Sibusiso; Mayekiso, Tokozile

    2007-01-01

    The inclusion of learners with special educational needs in general education is becoming more prevalent. As a result various special education researchers have begun to examine the success of inclusion, as well as the attitudes and beliefs of general educators towards the inclusion of learners with disabilities in the general education classroom.…

  2. 75 FR 55786 - Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education; Notice of Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver for the... Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC). Currently, the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP...

  3. 75 FR 55785 - Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education; Notice of Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver for the... this award, the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) funds NCEO to address national, State, and...

  4. Expanding harm reduction services through a wound and abscess clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Lauretta E; Arevalo, Silvia; Catchpool, Christopher; Heimer, Robert

    2002-12-01

    A wound and abscess clinic, held concurrently with a syringe exchange, provided economical treatment and aftercare for injection-associated soft tissue infections. During 20 two-hour clinic sessions, 173 treatment episodes were logged, and the visit cost was estimated at $5 per patient. Increased patient-clinician interactions provided opportunities beyond those afforded by the syringe exchange for patients to obtain resources and referrals to services such as HIV counseling and testing, medical care, and drug treatment. Distribution of cards advertising the clinic was substantially less effective than word of mouth in increasing community awareness of the clinic.

  5. Defining the Perception and Experiences of Educational Service Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Ahmady

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The office of educational services at universities is a very important division and it is necessary for employees to strive towards providing suitable services to students. The quality of educational services has always been a major concern for higher education managers. Interviewing stakeholders and experts increases our understanding of different aspects of the subject in order to create a native model with high performance capability based on existing conditions and the cultural and political infrastructure of our country. Therefore, we aimed to define the perception and experiences of educational service stakeholders.Methods: In this qualitative thematic content analysis that adapted a deductive approach using Graneheim and Lundman’s method. Initially, purposeful sampling was done to identify and select the students (as first level stakeholders studying paramedical majors at one of the medical science universities of the country during the educational year 2015-2016. Altogether, 20 people were interviewed consisting of 6 students, 4 faculty members, 2 student affairs employees, 1 counselor, 2 education officers, and 2 education office managers.Data were analyzed and coded using MAXQDA software.Results: Of the 400 initial codes extracted through data analysis, 336 abstract codes, 48 sub-categories, 20 categories, and 7 themes were obtained. The level of abstraction was different in the categories. The extracted themes were as follows: information gap before and after entering university, the difference between expected and perceived services and factors contributing to expectations, the university’s approach in enhancing service quality, the student and management of educational problems, the system-student interaction in educational planning, and the professors’ responsibilities and performance in enhancing quality, and the role on the university management system in enhancing the quality of services

  6. Educational technology infrastructure and services in North American medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, Carol; Souza, Kevin H; Heestand, Diane; Moses, Anna; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    To describe the current educational technology infrastructure and services provided by North American allopathic medical schools that are members of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), to present information needed for institutional benchmarking. A Web-based survey instrument was developed and administered in the fall of 2004 by the authors, sent to representatives of 137 medical schools and completed by representatives of 88, a response rate of 64%. Schools were given scores for infrastructure and services provided. Data were analyzed with one-way analyses of variance, chi-square, and correlation coefficients. There was no difference in the number of infrastructure features or services offered based on region of the country, public versus private schools, or size of graduating class. Schools implemented 3.0 (SD = 1.5) of 6 infrastructure items and offered 11.6 (SD = 4.1) of 22 services. Over 90% of schools had wireless access (97%), used online course materials for undergraduate medical education (97%), course management system for graduate medical education (95%) and online teaching evaluations (90%). Use of services differed across the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education continuum. Outside of e-portfolios for undergraduates, the least-offered services were for services to graduate and continuing medical education. The results of this survey provide a benchmark for the level of services and infrastructure currently supporting educational technology by AAMC-member allopathic medical schools.

  7. Marketing services of higher education: theoretical aspect

    OpenAIRE

    Evgenyi Polonskyi

    2014-01-01

    The article is devoted to theoretical aspects of the use of marketing activities in institutions of higher education. The author analyzes of education from the standpoint of the marketing mix. The main factors of the external and internal environments affecting the educational institution.

  8. Healthcare facility commissioning – the transition of clinical services

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Watt, R

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available structure of bricks and mortar into a functional facility with staff, equipment, medication, supplies, etc. ready to eventually receive patients who need care and cure. Beyond these tangible elements, there are also many intangibles which are required, e... in order for the new facility to deliver the intended clinical services. These include links to the emergency services which brings patients in need of emergency care to the facility, links to other healthcare facilities for more specialized care...

  9. Effective interventions on service quality improvement in a physiotherapy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi, Farid; Tabrizi, JafarSadegh; Eteraf Oskouei, MirAli; AsghariJafarabadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Service quality is considered as a main domain of quality associ-ated with non-clinical aspect of healthcare. This study aimed to survey and im-proves service quality of delivered care in the Physiotherapy Clinic affiliated with the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. A quasi experimental interventional study was conducted in the Physiotherapy Clinic, 2010-2011. Data were collected using a validated and reli-able researcher made questionnaire with participation of 324 patients and their coadjutors. The study questionnaire consisted of 7 questions about demographic factors and 38 questions for eleven aspects of service quality. Data were then analyzed using paired samples t-test by SPSS16. In the pre intervention phase, six aspects of service quality including choice of provider, safety, prevention and early detection, dignity, autonomy and availability achieved non-acceptable scores. Following interventions, all aspects of the service quality improved and also total service quality score improved from 8.58 to 9.83 (PService quality can be improved by problem implementation of appropriate interventions. The acquired results can be used in health system fields to create respectful environments for healthcare customers.

  10. Development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John D; Williams, Jonathan P; Barnes, Julie F; Greenlee, Katie M; Cardiology, Bcps-Aq; Leonard, Mandy C

    2017-07-15

    The development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services is described. In an effort to align with the initiatives proposed within the ASHP Practice Advancement Initiative, the department of pharmacy at Cleveland Clinic, a 1,400-bed academic, tertiary acute care medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, established a goal to provide decentralized clinical pharmacy services for 100% of patient care units within the hospital. Patient care units that previously had no decentralized pharmacy services were evaluated to identify opportunities for expansion. Metrics analyzed included number of medication orders verified per hour, number of pharmacy dosing consultations, and number of patient discharge counseling sessions. A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of this service and potential resident learning opportunities. A learning experience description was drafted, and feedback was solicited regarding the development of educational components utilized throughout the rotation. Pharmacists who were providing services to similar patient populations were identified to serve as preceptors. Staff pharmacists were deployed to previously uncovered patient care units, with pharmacy residents providing decentralized services on previously covered areas. A rotating preceptor schedule was developed based on geographic proximity and clinical expertise. An initial postimplementation assessment of this resident-driven service revealed that pharmacy residents provided a comparable level of pharmacy services to that of staff pharmacists. Feedback collected from nurses, physicians, and pharmacy staff also supported residents' ability to operate sufficiently in this role to optimize patient care. A learning experience developed for pharmacy residents in a large medical center enabled the expansion of decentralized clinical services without requiring additional pharmacist full-time equivalents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  11. APPLICATIONS OF CLOUD COMPUTING SERVICES IN EDUCATION – CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Cieplak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Cloud Computing in enterprises are very wide-ranging. In opposition, educational applications of Cloud Computing in Poland are someway limited. On the other hand, young people use services of Cloud Computing frequently. Utilization of Facebook, Google or other services in Poland by young people is almost the same as in Western Europe or in the USA. Taking into account those considerations, few years ago authors have started process of popularization and usage of Cloud Computing educational services in their professional work. This article briefly summarizes authors’ experience with selected and most popular Cloud Computing services.

  12. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Kate S; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay; Emmerton, Lynne; Burton, Deborah L; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service (interventions) they choose to deliver. To explore the scope and frequency of asthma-related clinical interventions provided by pharmacists to patients in an evidence-based complex asthma service. Pharmacists from 4 states/territories of Australia were trained in asthma management. People with asthma had 3 or 4 visits to the pharmacy. Guided by a structured patient file, the pharmacist assessed the patient's asthma and management and provided interventions where and when considered appropriate, based on their clinical decision making skills. The interventions were recorded in a checklist in the patient file. They were then analysed descriptively and thematically. Pharmacists provided 22,909 clinical pharmacy interventions over the service to 570 patients (398 of whom completed the service). The most frequently delivered interventions were in the themes 'Education on asthma', 'Addressing trigger factors', 'Medications - safe and effective use' and 'Explore patient perspectives'. The patients had a high and ongoing need for interventions. Pharmacists selected interventions based on their assessment of perceived need then revisited and reinforced these interventions. Pharmacists identified a number of areas in which patients required interventions to assist with their asthma management. Many of these were perceived to require continuing reinforcement over the duration of the service. Pharmacists were able to use their clinical judgement to assess patients and provide clinical pharmacy

  13. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Kate S.; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay; Emmerton, Lynne; Burton, Deborah L.; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service (interventions) they choose to deliver. Objective: To explore the scope and frequency of asthma-related clinical interventions provided by pharmacists to patients in an evidence-based complex asthma service. Methods: Pharmacists from 4 states/territories of Australia were trained in asthma management. People with asthma had 3 or 4 visits to the pharmacy. Guided by a structured patient file, the pharmacist assessed the patient’s asthma and management and provided interventions where and when considered appropriate, based on their clinical decision making skills. The interventions were recorded in a checklist in the patient file. They were then analysed descriptively and thematically. Results: Pharmacists provided 22,909 clinical pharmacy interventions over the service to 570 patients (398 of whom completed the service). The most frequently delivered interventions were in the themes ’Education on asthma’, ’Addressing trigger factors’, ’Medications - safe and effective use’ and ’Explore patient perspectives’. The patients had a high and ongoing need for interventions. Pharmacists selected interventions based on their assessment of perceived need then revisited and reinforced these interventions. Conclusion: Pharmacists identified a number of areas in which patients required interventions to assist with their asthma management. Many of these were perceived to require continuing reinforcement over the duration of the service. Pharmacists were able to use their

  14. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeMay KS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service (interventions they choose to deliver. Objective: To explore the scope and frequency of asthma-related clinical interventions provided by pharmacists to patients in an evidence-based complex asthma service. Methods: Pharmacists from 4 states/territories of Australia were trained in asthma management. People with asthma had 3 or 4 visits to the pharmacy. Guided by a structured patient file, the pharmacist assessed the patient’s asthma and management and provided interventions where and when considered appropriate, based on their clinical decision making skills. The interventions were recorded in a checklist in the patient file. They were then analysed descriptively and thematically. Results: Pharmacists provided 22,909 clinical pharmacy interventions over the service to 570 patients (398 of whom completed the service. The most frequently delivered interventions were in the themes ‘Education on asthma’, ‘Addressing trigger factors’, ‘Medications – safe and effective use’ and ‘Explore patient perspectives’. The patients had a high and ongoing need for interventions. Pharmacists selected interventions based on their assessment of perceived need then revisited and reinforced these interventions. Conclusion: Pharmacists identified a number of areas in which patients required interventions to assist with their asthma management. Many of these were perceived to require continuing reinforcement over the duration of the service. Pharmacists were

  15. Learning through service: student perceptions on volunteering at interprofessional hepatitis B student-run clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Leslie C; Zheng, Patricia; Coelho, Anabelle D; Lin, Lisa D; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; O'Brien, Bridget C; Yu, Albert Y; Lai, Cindy J

    2011-06-01

    Student-run clinics (SRCs) are widespread, but studies on their educational impact are limited. We surveyed preclinical medical, nursing, and pharmacy students about their experiences in a hepatitis B elective which provided opportunities to they could volunteer at hepatitis B screening and vaccination SRCs. Student responses revealed positive perceptions of the volunteer experience. Benefits included interacting with patients, developing clinical skills, providing service to disadvantaged populations, and collaborating with health professional peers. Students who participated in clinic reported enhanced skills compared to those who did not attend. SRCs play a valuable role in instilling positive attitudes and improving skills.

  16. System aspects of management technology for scientific and educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zatsarinnyy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research purpose: to develop the technology of operational-technical management of scientific and educational services. Methods: methods of patent research and analysis of critical technologies of information and control systems; methods of system approach to organize and manage IT services to meet business needs. Topicality. The state policy in the sphere of national security and socio-economic development of the Russian Federation, carried out in the face of new threats requires correcting structural imbalances in the economy. National interests should be implemented by means of strategic priorities in the various sectors of the economy, in the financial sphere - the timely implementation of government programs. In the Message of the President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin to the Federal Assembly on December 1, 2016 one of the priorities defined the creation of a national research infrastructure, representing the information and technology platform for the integration of the intellectual resources in the field of science, education and production with the aim of creating the conditions for qualitative changes in the field of science and technology. In this connection, scientific-methodical and systematic technical issues to systematize services of scientific and educational institutions of the country and creation of the united informational and analytical system of the management of such services seem to be topical. Within the framework of the whole complex of problems to design such a system, the development issues of technologies for the effective operational-technical management of scientific and educational services are of great interest. Results. The technology of operational-technical management of scientific and educational services was developed, which is a complex of technical solutions to provide information support for the activities of organizational systems – consumers and suppliers of scientific and educational

  17. Running a postmortem service - a business case and clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Marta C.; Whitby, Elspeth; Fink, Michelle A.; Collett, Jacquelene M.; Offiah, Amaka C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the postmortem examination is to offer answers to explain the cause and manner of death. In the case of perinatal, infant and paediatric postmortem examinations, the goal is to identify unsuspected associated features, to describe pathogenic mechanisms and new conditions, and to evaluate the clinical management and diagnosis. Additionally, the postmortem examination is useful to counsel families regarding the probability of recurrence in future pregnancies and to inform family planning. Worldwide the rate of paediatric autopsy examinations has significantly declined during the last few decades. Religious objections to postmortem dissection and organ retention scandals in the United Kingdom provided some of the impetus for a search for non-invasive alternatives to the traditional autopsy; however, until recently, imaging studies remained an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, the traditional autopsy. In 2012, Sheffield Children's Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust set up the service provision of minimally invasive fetal, perinatal and neonatal autopsy, while a postmortem imaging service has been running in Melbourne, Australia, since 2008. Here we summarise the essentials of a business case and practical British and Australian experiences in terms of the pathological and radiologic aspects of setting up a minimally invasive clinical service in the United Kingdom and of developing a clinical postmortem imaging service as a complementary tool to the traditional autopsy in Australia. (orig.)

  18. Linking audit and clinical effectiveness in the lung tumour service

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sharon

    2009-05-28

    Clinical Audit plays an important role in the evaluation of care and clinical outcomes for all patients. In conjunction with the respiratory nurse specialist a retrospective chart audit of the regional lung cancer service was undertaken at the Midlands Regional Hospital Mullingar (MRHM). The lung cancer service has been established for four years and has set its standards in line with NICE guidelines and Irish guidelines for the clinical management of lung cancer. An audit tool was developed by the audit facilitator in conjunction with the respiratory nurse specialist and key department personnel. The tool aimed to measure length of time taken for key steps in the patients care pathway. A pilot audit was carried out and the tool was evaluated. The audit tool provided accurate recording of information at key points in the patient’s care which allows for a thorough service evaluation. The data collected and analysed gives vital information on the quality of service, and showed where there are deficits in service provision that need to be addressed.

  19. Running a postmortem service - a business case and clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Marta C.; Whitby, Elspeth; Fink, Michelle A.; Collett, Jacquelene M.; Offiah, Amaka C. [Western Bank, Academic Unit of Child Health, Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the postmortem examination is to offer answers to explain the cause and manner of death. In the case of perinatal, infant and paediatric postmortem examinations, the goal is to identify unsuspected associated features, to describe pathogenic mechanisms and new conditions, and to evaluate the clinical management and diagnosis. Additionally, the postmortem examination is useful to counsel families regarding the probability of recurrence in future pregnancies and to inform family planning. Worldwide the rate of paediatric autopsy examinations has significantly declined during the last few decades. Religious objections to postmortem dissection and organ retention scandals in the United Kingdom provided some of the impetus for a search for non-invasive alternatives to the traditional autopsy; however, until recently, imaging studies remained an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, the traditional autopsy. In 2012, Sheffield Children's Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust set up the service provision of minimally invasive fetal, perinatal and neonatal autopsy, while a postmortem imaging service has been running in Melbourne, Australia, since 2008. Here we summarise the essentials of a business case and practical British and Australian experiences in terms of the pathological and radiologic aspects of setting up a minimally invasive clinical service in the United Kingdom and of developing a clinical postmortem imaging service as a complementary tool to the traditional autopsy in Australia. (orig.)

  20. Clinical Education Partnership: A Model for School District and College of Nursing Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreulen, Grace J.; Bednarz, Patricia K.; Wehrwein, Teresa; Davis, James

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration between school districts and universities has potential to increase the level of health services available in schools while providing quality public health clinical nursing placements for universities. This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Clinical Education Partnership Model (CEPM), a dynamic…

  1. Centralization of a Regional Clinical Microbiology Service: The Calgary Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre L Church

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic laboratory services in Alberta have been dramatically restructured over the past five years. In 1994, Alberta Health embarked on an aggressive laboratory restructuring that cut back approximately 30% of the overall monies previously paid to the laboratory service sector in Calgary. A unique service delivery model consolidated all institutional and community-based diagnostic testing in a company called Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS in late 1996. CLS was formed by a public/private partnership between the Calgary Regional Health Care Authority (CRHA and MDS-Kasper Laboratories. By virtue of its customer service base and scope of testing, CLS provides comprehensive regional laboratory services to the entire populace. Regional microbiology services within CLS have been successfully consolidated over the past three years into a centralized high volume laboratory (HVL. Because the HVL is not located in a hospital, rapid response laboratories (RRLs are operated at each acute care site. Although the initial principle behind the proposed test menus for the RRLs was that only procedures requiring a clinical turnaround time of more than 2 h stay on-site, many other principles had to be used to develop and implement an efficient and clinically relevant RRL model for microbiology. From these guiding principles, a detailed assessment of the needs of each institution and extensive networking with user groups, the functions of the microbiology RRLs were established and a detailed implementation plan drawn up. The experience at CLS with regards to restructuring a regional microbiology service is described herein. A post-hoc analysis provides the pros and cons of directing and operating a regionalized microbiology service.

  2. Critical Challenges of Pre and Post Service Extension Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical Challenges of Pre and Post Service Extension Education and ... poor policy decision and implementation, rapid development in science and ... problems associated with information/communication echnologies access and utilization.

  3. Application of Service Quality Model in Education Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ding Hooi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ideas on service quality stem from the West. The massive developments in research in the West are undeniable of their importance. This leads to the generation and development of new ideas. These ideas were subsequently channeled to developing countries. Ideas obtained were then formulated and used by these developing countries in order to obtain better approach in channeling service quality. There are ample to be learnt from the service quality model, SERVQUAL which attain high acceptance in the West. Service quality in the education system is important to guarantee the effectiveness and quality of education. Effective and quality education will be able to offer quality graduates, which will contribute to the development of the nation. This paper will discuss the application of the SERVQUAL model into the education environment.

  4. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... generation was used to develop a holistic healthcare model for a higher education campus' health service. It became ... innovative. Health plays a .... conducted will set the tone for the interactive process of holistic healthcare.

  5. A decade of experience with a clinical pharmacokinetics service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, P J; Smith, W E; Palarea, E R

    1988-09-01

    The development, operation, and functions of the pharmacokinetics service at Memorial Medical Center of Long Beach (MMCLB) are described, and the data used to determine the quality and cost-effectiveness of the service are presented. Current functions of the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB include making brief written comments about the interpretations of serum drug concentrations (SDCs) and oral recommendations to physicians on dosage adjustment; provision of written consultations with dosage recommendations; provision of drug information, education, and research; and development of drug dosing guidelines for the pharmacy and medical staff. During the 10-year existence of this service, costs have been justified on the basis of not only revenue generated by the service (in the form of "drug concentration scheduling" and "drug concentration evaluation" fees charged to patients) but also by cost savings resulting from the prevention of inappropriate, misleading, and potentially dangerous SDCs. An audit conducted in 1986 showed that the policy of having pharmacists schedule the sampling times for SDCs saves about $500,000 annually. Quality assurance has been documented by auditing compliance with and therapeutic effectiveness of dosing guidelines and by working with laboratory personnel to identify and prevent spurious SDC results and assay errors. The methods used by the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB to document the benefits of the service have been vital in proving both its cost-effectiveness and its positive effect on patient care.

  6. Clinical Predictive Modeling Development and Deployment through FHIR Web Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilia, Mohammed; Choi, Myung; Henderson, Amelia; Iyengar, Sneha; Braunstein, Mark; Sun, Jimeng

    2015-01-01

    Clinical predictive modeling involves two challenging tasks: model development and model deployment. In this paper we demonstrate a software architecture for developing and deploying clinical predictive models using web services via the Health Level 7 (HL7) Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) standard. The services enable model development using electronic health records (EHRs) stored in OMOP CDM databases and model deployment for scoring individual patients through FHIR resources. The MIMIC2 ICU dataset and a synthetic outpatient dataset were transformed into OMOP CDM databases for predictive model development. The resulting predictive models are deployed as FHIR resources, which receive requests of patient information, perform prediction against the deployed predictive model and respond with prediction scores. To assess the practicality of this approach we evaluated the response and prediction time of the FHIR modeling web services. We found the system to be reasonably fast with one second total response time per patient prediction.

  7. Congenital Heart Defects and Receipt of Special Education Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Autry, Andrew; Razzaghi, Hilda; Boyle, Coleen A; Mahle, William T; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the prevalence of receipt of special education services among children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) compared with children without birth defects. Children born from 1982 to 2004 in metropolitan Atlanta with CHDs (n = 3744) were identified from a population-based birth defect surveillance program; children without birth defects (n = 860 715) were identified from birth certificates. Cohorts were linked to special education files for the 1992-2012 school years to identify special education services. Children with noncardiac defects or genetic syndromes were excluded; children with CHDs were classified by presence or absence of critical CHDs (ie, CHDs requiring intervention by age one year). We evaluated the prevalence of receipt of special education services and prevalence rate ratios using children without birth defects as a reference. Compared with children without birth defects, children with CHDs were 50% more likely to receive special education services overall (adjusted prevalence rate ratio [aPRR] = 1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-1.7). Specifically, they had higher prevalence of several special education categories including: intellectual disability (aPRR = 3.8; 95% CI: 2.8-5.1), sensory impairment (aPRR = 3.0; 95% CI: 1.8-5.0), other health impairment (aPRR = 2.8; 95% CI: 2.2-3.5), significant developmental delay (aPRR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.8), and specific learning disability (aPRR = 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1-1.7). For most special education services, the excess prevalence did not vary by presence of critical CHDs. Children with CHDs received special education services more often than children without birth defects. These findings highlight the need for special education services and the importance of developmental screening for all children with CHDs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Inclusion Reconceptualized: Pre-Service Teacher Education and Disability Studies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Christopher M.; Tompkins, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    In this article, two teacher educators describe and explain how they are reconceptualizing a pre-service teacher education course on inclusion using disability studies in education (DSE) scholarship. The DSE approach better connects the oft-separated field of diversity and inclusion, and builds on the program's overall focus on equity education.…

  9. Architecture Design of Healthcare Software-as-a-Service Platform for Cloud-Based Clinical Decision Support Service

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Sungyoung; Cha, Jieun; Ji, Myungkyu; Kang, Hyekyung; Kim, Seok; Heo, Eunyoung; Han, Jong Soo; Kang, Hyunggoo; Chae, Hoseok; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To design a cloud computing-based Healthcare Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Platform (HSP) for delivering healthcare information services with low cost, high clinical value, and high usability. Methods We analyzed the architecture requirements of an HSP, including the interface, business services, cloud SaaS, quality attributes, privacy and security, and multi-lingual capacity. For cloud-based SaaS services, we focused on Clinical Decision Service (CDS) content services, basic functi...

  10. [Services portfolio of a department of endocrinology and clinical nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente Delgado, Almudena; Gómez Enterría, Pilar; Tinahones Madueño, Francisco

    2011-03-01

    Endocrinology and Clinical Nutrition are branches of Medicine that deal with the study of physiology of body glands and hormones and their disorders, intermediate metabolism of nutrients, enteral and parenteral nutrition, promotion of health by prevention of diet-related diseases, and appropriate use of the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive tools related to these disciplines. Development of Endocrinology and Clinical Nutrition support services requires accurate definition and management of a number of complex resources, both human and material, as well as adequate planning of the care provided. It is therefore essential to know the services portfolio of an ideal Department of Endocrinology and Clinical Nutrition because this is a useful, valid and necessary tool to optimize the available resources, to increase efficiency, and to improve the quality of care. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  12. 75 FR 9189 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum project period through a...

  13. 75 FR 21606 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-9626... education and training for rehabilitation personnel; (3) Disseminate, in a cost-effective manner...

  14. Internationalization of Tertiary Education Services in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Mun-Heng Toh

    2012-01-01

    This paper traces the development of the education sector from its nascent stage of serving economic development needs to the internationalization stage of fulfilling Singapore’s aspiration to be a global education hub. The state plays an important role in guiding and fostering development of the education sector in the creation and production of human capital for domestic production as well as cross-border trading to generate income and employment, and attract talent to the economy. Reg...

  15. Pre-Employment Laboratory Education. Food Service Guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    This guidebook is designed for use in teaching students enrolled in preemployment laboratory education (PELE) food service programs. The first of two major sections includes an overview for teachers on planning, conducting, and evaluating a PELE food service program. Specific topics discussed in section 1 include (1) facilities and equipment, (2)…

  16. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... This work ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare service .... The procedure refers to how the activity takes place. The ... Avant (1995:37) state that concepts are mental constructions .... received from the registered nurse he or she can return to the.

  17. Perceptions of Human Services Students about Social Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Judith T.

    2010-01-01

    Human services educators and scholars maintain that they are teaching social change theory and skills that will allow students to engage in large-scale social change. A review of the literature, from a critical theory perspective, offered little evidence that social change is being taught in human services programs. In this collective case study,…

  18. Independent Living Services and the Educational Motivation of Foster Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriamiatoe, Osarumen Rachel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the components of independent living training and services to determine their effectiveness in preparing foster youth in Tennessee for adulthood, and whether the youth's perceived effectiveness of these services affected their educational motivation. Support factors (i.e., family, financial,…

  19. Leadership of Education Psychological Services: Fit for Purpose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Roger

    2013-01-01

    At a time of great change for educational psychology services in England, this paper reviews current theories of leadership and proposes how an integration of key aspects of these can be applied to support a self review of leadership practice, both by individual leaders and by services. The message from current theory is that in the midst of…

  20. Current Commitments under the GATS in Educational Services. Background Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    The GATS is a multilateral, legally enforceable agreement among members of the World Trade Organization (WTO) that regulates international trade services. Rules regulating internationally traded educational services, which include various types of exchange programs, are part of the agreement. Among the 42 member countries that have made…

  1. Inclusion in Early Childhood Education: Pre-Service Teachers Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majoko, Tawanda

    2016-01-01

    This study examined pre-service teachers' understanding, attitudes, preparation and concerns regarding inclusion in early childhood education (ECE) in Zimbabwe. Entrenched within inclusive pedagogy, this descriptive study draws on a sample of 24 pre-service teachers purposively selected from the largest teachers' college with the oldest…

  2. Pre-Professional Arts Based Service-Learning in Music Education and Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feen-Calligan, Holly; Matthews, Wendy K.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study of art therapy and music education students at a Midwestern university in the United States, who participated in single-semester service-learning assignments prior to their clinical internship or student teaching experience. Undergraduate music teacher-candidates taught music to homeschool students; art therapy…

  3. [The Marketing of Healthcare Services in ENT-Clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschner, M; Lenarz, T

    2016-07-01

    The provision of healthcare services in Germany is based on fundamental principles of solidarity and is highly regulated. The question arises which conditions exist for marketing for healthcare services in ENT-clinics in Germany. The marketing options will be elicited using environmentally analytical considerations. The objectives can be achieved using measures derived from external instruments (service policy, pricing policy, distribution policy or communications policy) or from an internal instrument (human resources policy). The policy environment is particularly influenced by the regulatory framework, which particularly restricts the scope for both the pricing and communications policies. All measures must, however, reflect ethical frameworks, which are regarded as the fundamental premise underlying healthcare services and may be at odds with economic factors. Scope for flexibility in pricing exists only within the secondary healthcare market, and even there only to a limited extent. The significance of price in the marketing of healthcare services is thus very low. If marketing activities are to succeed, a market analysis must be carried out exploring the relevant factors for each individual provider. However, the essential precondition for the marketing of healthcare services is trust. The marketing of healthcare services differs from that of business management-oriented enterprises in other branches of economy. In the future the importance of marketing activities will increase. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The History of Disability Services in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, Brinckerhoff, McGuire, and Shaw observed that the field of postsecondary education and disability services had "moved through its adolescence and was embarking on adulthood" (xiii). Indeed, the field had undergone rapid expansion nationwide in the prior 30 years and grew into a full-fledged profession within higher education (Jarrow…

  5. Public Radio Stations' Educational Services, 1982-83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joan H.; Wood, Denise E.

    Highlights are presented from a third survey of educational services provided by public radio stations to elementary, secondary, and postsecondary educational institutions throughout the United States for the 2-year period from September 1, 1981 to August 30, 1983. Findings presented are based on the responses of 49 stations out of the 132…

  6. Post-Mao China: Educational Services for Exceptional Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Yang, Ling-Yan; Xiao, Fei; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    When William Moore, a Scottish Presbyterian pastor, established the first special school in China in 1874, the country began her long and circuitous journey toward establishing formal educational services for individuals with special needs. Special education in China developed slowly on the infertile soil of continual wars, political instability,…

  7. Advertising Services. A Suggested Curriculum Guide. Marketing and Distributive Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Univ., Normal. Dept. of Business Education.

    This publication is a curriculum guide designed to assist local educators in planning and implementing instructional programs for Office of Education Code 04.01, Advertising Services, a subcluster within the marketing and distribution cluster. The curricular guide is divided into two major sections. The first section contains information for the…

  8. Identifying role of perceived quality and satisfaction on the utilization status of the community clinic services; Bangladesh context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Rizwanul M; Abdullah, Mamun S; Rahman, Anisur M; Alam, Ashraful M

    2016-06-24

    Bangladesh is one among the few countries of the world that provides free medical services at the community level through various public health facilities. It is now evident that, clients' perceived quality of services and their expectations of service standards affect health service utilization to a great extent. The aim of the study was to develop and validate the measures for perception and satisfaction of primary health care quality in Bangladesh context and to identify their aspects on the utilization status of the Community Clinic services. This mixed method cross sectional survey was conducted from January to June 2012, in the catchment area of 12 community clinics. Since most of the outcome indicators focus mainly on women and children, women having children less than 2 years of age were randomly assigned and interviewed for the study purpose. Data were collected through FGD, Key informants interview and a pretested semi- structured questionnaire. About 95 % of the respondents were Muslims and 5 % were Hindus. The average age of the respondents was 23.38 (SD 4.15) and almost all of them are home makers. The average monthly expenditure of their family was 95US $ (SD 32US$). At the beginning of the study, two psychometric research instruments; 24 items perceived quality of primary care services PQPCS scale (chronbach's α = .89) and 22 items community clinic service satisfaction CCSS scale (chronbach's α = .97), were constructed and validated. This study showed less educated, poor, landless mothers utilized the community clinic services more than their educated and wealthier counterpart. Women who lived in their own residence used the community clinic services more frequently than those who lived in a rental house. Perceptions concerning skill and competence of the health care provider and satisfaction indicating interpersonal communication and attitude of the care provider were important predictors for community clinic service utilization

  9. OT - Education for the health services of the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bodil Winther; Sørensen, Annette; Hove, Anne

    OT - Education for the health services of the future This presentation offers knowledge about which qualifications the health services and OT practice in general demand from Occupational Therapists. The study was developed in a wider context of the constant reflection within higher education...... as a result of the rapid pace of change in society. The Faculty of Occupational Therapy in Copenhagen wanted to enable the graduates in the best possible way to meet the employers’ demands as to qualifications. Furthermore, the aim was to develop and guarantee the quality of the educations offered...... by University College Oeresund. To express the level of education to be achieved in terms of competences and learning outcome, the study was inspired by the tuning process of educational structures in Europe, which is part of the Bologna process to integrate higher education area in Europe. The study is based...

  10. Setting up recovery clinics and promoting service user involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Thomas

    2017-06-22

    Service user involvement in mental health has gained considerable momentum. Evidence from the literature suggests that it remains largely theoretical rather than being put into practice. The current nature of acute inpatient mental health units creates various challenges for nurses to put this concept into practice. Recovery clinics were introduced to bridge this gap and to promote service user involvement practice within the current care delivery model at Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust. It has shaped new ways of working for nurses with a person-centred approach as its philosophy. Service users and nurses were involved in implementing a needs-led and bottom-up initiative using Kotter's change model. Initial results suggest that it has been successful in meeting its objectives evidenced through increased meaningful interactions and involvement in care by service users and carers. The clinics have gained wide recognition and have highlighted a need for further research into care delivery models to promote service user involvement in these units.

  11. The Students' Viewpoint on Quality of Educational Services in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Rostami, Farideh; Ghara, Aliasghar Nadi; Abedi, Ghassem

    2017-03-01

    Recently, focusing on higher education quality has got increasingly critical. The novel managerial attitudes have defined the customer-demanded quality. Based on this, recognizing the receivers' perception of the quality of the services offered and evaluating the quality of the service is considered of the basic measures taken in order to develop quality promotion programs. Therefore, this is a qualitative research conducted for students' viewpoint on quality of educational services. This qualitative study has been performed by the phenomenological method. The samples have been selected based on goal-oriented approach. In this qualitative research, the required data have been collected in two phases (90 individual interviews and 30 focus group discussions) at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences during which the participants have conveyed their experiences and expectations encountering the educational quality topic. All the interviews have been recorded and implemented. The interviews analysis has been carried out simultaneously with the implementation and using theme analysis by Smith method. According to the findings regarding the definition of quality, the students have emphasized two important aspects including "educational services standards by the teacher "and "the students' satisfaction". Thus the final education quality resulted from the students' experiences and perception is this way: "Presenting the students educational services in class and out of class compatible with the educational services standards so that it results in the students' satisfaction". When a person views her/him-self rightful as a customer, whatever seems necessary to them appears like a requirement. Then regarding paying attention and reflecting on the customers' perceived needs, it is possible to determine their expectations limit to some extent. Therefore, designing educational quality standards in order to evaluate the teachers' function without taking the stakeholders

  12. Strengthening citizenship education in secondary school: a service- learning proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángela María Figueroa Iberico

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To form people that develop in an active and compromised way their citizenship to solve community and country problems is the objective of our present education. However some specialists observe mistakes in our civic education noticing that it needs an integral and structural change. School is the perfect place to constantly practice citizenship through the practice of values, capacities and abilities that allow students interact among them, with their authorities and with society members. In this article, it presents a service-learning proposal which links learning and solidarity service in order to apply the acquired knowledge in the classroom for community service developing competences in daily contexts.

  13. Embracing service user involvement in radiotherapy education: A discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Gareth; Thompson, Gillian; Willis, Susan; Hodgson, Denyse

    2014-01-01

    Aim: There is currently a drive within cancer services to incorporate user involvement in delivery and education, as such the aim of this article is to investigate the potential role of service users in pre-registration education and how this could impact on radiotherapy programmes. Method: Key databases were searched for terms: patient participation, service user involvement, health care education, student assessment, patient involvement, pre-registration education and training. Suitable literature was reviewed and references within all articles and documents were investigated to ensure as broad and an inclusive search possible. Results: There is little published literature indicating user involvement in radiotherapy education but many studies in nursing, medicine and other allied health professions indicate a rationale for user involvement. Discussion: There are benefits of involving service users, i.e. gaining insight from patients and carers perspectives, challenges stereotypes and assumptions. Disadvantages include the quality of the feedback from users in assessment, resources required, and the ethical considerations. Conclusion: Inclusion of service users in radiotherapy education is recommended in line with cancer care policy, they provide a unique perspective to learning and involvement should be encouraged

  14. Evaluation Apprehension and Impression Management in Clinical Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C

    2018-05-01

    Historically, clinical medical education has relied on subjective evaluations of students and residents to judge their clinical competence. The uncertainty associated with these subjective clinical evaluations has produced evaluation apprehension among learners and attempts to manage one's professional persona (impression management) among peers and supervisors. Such behavior has been documented from antiquity through the Middle Ages to the present, including in two new qualitative studies in this issue of Academic Medicine on the social psychology of clinical medical education. New approaches to medical education, including competency-based education, mastery learning, and assessment methods that unite evaluation and education, are slowly changing the culture of clinical medical education. The author of this Invited Commentary argues that this shift will bring greater transparency and accountability to clinical medical education and gradually reduce evaluation apprehension and the impression management motives it produces.

  15. Innovation in pediatric clinical education: application of the essential competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Birkmeier, Marisa; Anderson, Deborah K; Martin, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    At the Section on Pediatrics Education Summit in July 2012, consensus was achieved on 5 essential core competencies (ECCs) that represent a knowledge base essential to all graduates of professional physical therapist education programs. This article offers suggestions for how clinical instructors (CIs) might use the ECCs to identify student needs and guide student learning during a pediatric clinical education experience. Pediatric CIs potentially might choose to use the ECCs as a reference tool in clinical education to help (1) organize and develop general, clinic-specific clinical education objectives, (2) develop and plan individualized student learning experiences, (3) identify student needs, and (4) show progression of student learning from beginner to intermediate to entry level. The ECCs may offer CIs insights into the role of pediatric clinical education in professional physical therapist education.

  16. Banking Services, Business Education: 7713.15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffee, Alice

    This course in banking intends to give students an insight into the personal and business services that banks provide. It includes instruction on savings and checking accounts, loans, trusts, and safety deposit facilities. Also included are the performance objectives, five pages of an outline on course content, suggested teaching and learning…

  17. WTO Members' Commitments in Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of World Trade Organization is in line with the conclusion reached at the end of the Uruguay Round in April 1994 by the bulk of the world's trading nations. WTO is in charge of managing multilateral trading system. WTO's "General Agreement on Trade in Services" (GATS) requires member nations to comply with the following…

  18. The students’ viewpoint on the quality gap in educational services

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAHIM KHANLI, MARZIYEH; DANESHMANDI, HADI; CHOOBINEH, ALIREZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Students and university community are social and human resources of the country. The students’ viewpoints about the quality of educational services can be considered as a basis for planning quality promotion and improving organizational performance. This study was conducted to determine the quality gap in educational services by the students of Health and Nutrition School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 140 students participated voluntarily (age range=19 to 40 years). The service quality (SERVQUAL) questionnaire was used for data collection. This questionnaire measured the quality gap in 5 dimensions of educational service including assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability, and tangibility. The students’ perception about the current conditions and their expectations as to optimal conditions can be determined, using this questionnaire. The score of the gap in quality of educational services is calculated from difference between perception and expectation scores. Due to non-normality of data, non-parametric tests were used. To this end, data were analyzed by statistical tests including Wilcoxon, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whiteny tests in SPSS 14. Results: The results showed that there was quality gap in all 5 dimensions of educational services. The largest and the smallest gaps were observed in "responsiveness" with a mean±SD of -0.94±0.74 and in "reliability" with a mean±SD of -0.76±0.69, respectively. There was a significant difference in quality gap between the 5 dimensions (p<0.001). Conclusion: According to the results, the students’ expectations were higher than their perceptions of current conditions; also, in all aspects of the services their expectations were not met. It is recommended that workshops on customer services, communication skills and personnel’s technical skills development should be planned and held. Also, allocating more resources for improving

  19. The students' viewpoint on the quality gap in educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARZIYEH RAHIM-KHANLI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Students and university community are social and human resources of the country. The students’ viewpoints about the quality of educational services can be considered as a basis for planning quality promotion and improving organizational performance. This study was conducted to determine the quality gap in educational services by the students of Health and Nutrition School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 140 students participated voluntarily (age range=19 to 40 years. The service quality (SERVQUAL questionnaire was used for data collection. This questionnaire measured the quality gap in 5 dimensions of educational service including assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability, and tangibility. The students’ perception about the current conditions and their expectations as to optimal conditions can be determined, using this questionnaire. The score of the gap in quality of educational services is calculated from difference between perception and expectation scores. Due to non-normality of data, non-parametric tests were used. To this end, data were analyzed by statistical tests including Wilcoxon, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whiteny tests in SPSS 14. Results: The results showed that there was quality gap in all 5 dimensions of educational services. The largest and the smallest gaps were observed in "responsiveness" with a mean±SD of -0.94±0.74 and in "reliability" with a mean±SD of -0.76±0.69, respectively. There was a significant difference in quality gap between the 5 dimensions (p<0.001. Conclusion: According to the results, the students’ expectations were higher than their perceptions of current conditions; also, in all aspects of the services their expectations were not met. It is recommended that workshops on customer services, communication skills and personnel’s technical skills development should be planned and held. Also, allocating more resources for

  20. Service-Learning Initiatives in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Eileen; Planas, Jessica; Quan, Melissa; Greiner, Lydia; Kazer, Meredith; Babington, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    In response to the changing demands of the U.S. healthcare system and the needs of the nursing profession, the Institute of Medicine, in collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, spearheaded a two-year initiative to develop recommendations for the future of nursing. Discussions of these recommendations within nursing education led to…

  1. Project reconversion Service Hospital Radiation Oncology Clinics-Medical School

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarneti, A.; Levaggi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The Health Sector operates within the framework of Social Policy and it is therefore one of the ways of distribution of public benefit, like Housing, Education and Social Security. While public spending on health has grown in recent years, its distribution has been uneven and the sector faces funding and management problems. The Service Hospital Radiation Oncology has reduced its health care liavility , lack technological development and unsufficient human resources and training. Aim: developing an inclusive reform bill Service Hospital Radiation Oncology .Material and Methods: This project tends to form a network institutional, introducing concepts of evidence-based medicine, risk models, cost analysis, coding systems, system implementation of quality management (ISO-9000 Standards). Proposes redefining radiotherapy centers and their potential participation in training resource development goals humanos.Promueve scientific research of national interest. Separate strictly administrative function, management and teaching. The project takes into account the characteristics of demand, the need to order it and organize around her, institutional network system and within the Hospital das Clinicas own related services related to Service Hospital Radiation Oncology , Encourages freedom of choice, and confers greater equity in care. The project would managed by the Hospital Clínicas. Conclusions: We believe this proposal identifies problems and opportunities, Service Hospital Radiation Oncology proposes the development of institutional network under one management model

  2. Points to consider for prioritizing clinical genetic testing services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Franziska; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    Given the cost constraints of the European health-care systems, criteria are needed to decide which genetic services to fund from the public budgets, if not all can be covered. To ensure that high-priority services are available equitably within and across the European countries, a shared set...... testing services available in the next decade. Ethically and economically reflected prioritization criteria are needed. Prioritization should be based on considerations of medical benefit, health need and costs. Medical benefit includes evidence of benefit in terms of clinical benefit, benefit......, following the principles of accountability for reasonableness. We provide points to consider to stimulate this debate across the EU and to serve as a reference for improving patient management.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 24 September 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.190....

  3. Permanent education that approaches radiation protection in hemodynamic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flor, Rita de Cassia; Anjos, Djeniffer Valdirene dos

    2011-01-01

    In the hemodynamic services that apply ionizing radiation yet exist the necessity of capacitation of workers for actuation in those areas. So, this qualitative study performed in a hemodynamic service at Sao Jose, Santa Catarina, Brazil, had the objective to analyse how are developed the permanent education programs and the real necessity of workers. The results have shown that the workers are longing for their qualification and formation, as generally they are admitted with not any qualification for those services. So, the workers that realize the on duty hemodynamic service praxis must do it in a conscious manner and the E P is a way for to adopt good practice in radiological protection

  4. Leadership of education psychological services: fit for purpose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Roger

    2013-01-01

    At a time of great change for educational psychology services in England, this paper reviews current theories of leadership and proposes how an integration of key aspects of these can be applied to support a self review of leadership practice, both by individual leaders and by services. The message from current theory is that in the midst of complexity and rapid change, a primary focus on the head of service is outdated; there should instead be a focus to develop the leadership capacity of the service as a whole. Key constructs considered are systems thinking, social identity, authenticity, and leadership as social construction. PMID:26157196

  5. Leadership of education psychological services: fit for purpose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Roger

    2013-06-01

    At a time of great change for educational psychology services in England, this paper reviews current theories of leadership and proposes how an integration of key aspects of these can be applied to support a self review of leadership practice, both by individual leaders and by services. The message from current theory is that in the midst of complexity and rapid change, a primary focus on the head of service is outdated; there should instead be a focus to develop the leadership capacity of the service as a whole. Key constructs considered are systems thinking, social identity, authenticity, and leadership as social construction.

  6. Educator or Counselor? Navigating Uncertain Boundaries in the Clinical Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Annette M; Corcoran, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Nurse educators in the clinical environment experience great rewards and challenges in their work with undergraduate students. However, closely working with students can lead to the challenge of intervening with those who are emotionally distressed. How do nurse educators navigate the precarious and subtle territory between educating and counseling? This article briefly reviews how boundaries are explored in nursing. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate how nurse educators can determine when their support and education begins to move into the counseling role. Finally, future directions for nurse educators are suggested. Little research exists that examines how nurse educators navigate the boundaries between educator and counselor roles with students in clinical settings. Navigating between the educator and counselor roles with students experiencing emotional distress in clinical settings can be challenging for nurse educators. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Empowering education: A new model for in-service training of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMUD CHAGHARI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through Walker and Avant’s strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. Results: In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Conclusion: Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  8. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaghari, Mahmud; Saffari, Mohsen; Ebadi, Abbas; Ameryoun, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through 'Walker and Avants strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  9. Redefining Scientist-Educator Partnerships: Science in Service at Stanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Stanford Solar Observatories Group and Haas Center for Public Service have created an innovative model for scientist-educator partnerships in which science students are trained and mentored by public service education professionals to create outreach events for local communities. The program, Science in Service, is part of the EPO plan for the Solar Group's participation in NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission. Based on the principles of service learning, the Science in Service Program mentors college science students in best practices for communicating science and engages these students in public service projects that center on teaching solar science. The program goals are to - Enhance and expand the learning experiences that pre-college students, from underserved and underrepresented groups in particular, have in science and technology. - Promote leadership in community service in the area of science and engineering among the next generation of scientists and engineers, today's undergraduate students. - Encourage science and engineering faculty to think creatively about their outreach requirements and to create a community of faculty committed to quality outreach programs. This talk will describe the unique advantages and challenges of a research-public service partnership, explain the structure of Stanford's Science in Service Program, and present the experiences of the undergraduates and the outreach communities that have been involved in the program.

  10. Promoting resilience among nursing students in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lisa Jean; Asselin, Marilyn

    2018-01-01

    Resilience is the ability to overcome adversity and grow stronger from the experience. Increased resilience has been shown to positively impact nurses in practice. With this knowledge, recommendations to incorporate resilience training into nursing education have been made. Research, integrative reviews and a theoretical model of resilience in nursing students are explored in this paper. The authors posit that facilitating resilience is important in the setting of clinical education. Through incorporating resilience training in the clinical setting, educators can better prepare students for challenges in their educational environment and ultimately for nursing practice. Specific strategies for clinical educators to incorporate resilience training are suggested. Strategies are organized into three categories, support, education and reflection. The position of facilitating resilience in clinical education may open a discussion for future educational practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mental Health Services, Free Appropriate Public Education, and Students with Disabilities: Legal Considerations in Identifying, Evaluating, and Providing Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell; Smith, Carl; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Losinski, Mickey

    2018-01-01

    In the past few years, the provision of mental health services in public schools has received considerable attention. When students with disabilities are eligible for special education and related services under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), mental health services are required if such services are needed to provide…

  12. Individual Education Plan Goals and Services for Adolescents with Autism: Impact of Age and Educational Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Jennifer; Mastergeorge, Ann M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the educational programs for adolescents with autism (age 12-16 years) in inclusion and noninclusion settings as reflected in their Individual Education Plan (IEP) goals, services, and curricular adaptations. Students who were included in general education math and language arts instruction had fewer…

  13. Using Service-Learning to Educate Students about Stakeholder Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Walter Honadle

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Using Lee’s definition of service-learning as “an instructional method in which students learn course content by actively participating in thoughtfully organized service experiences related to that content”, this article offers a case of action-oriented service- learning. It shows one way to combine traditional teaching methods with an action-oriented approach to service-learning that benefits both the community and imparts critical know-how into the education of planning students. Through service-learning students acquire valuable skills and also increase their competence as practitioners and increase their confidence in their field in a way that nurtures their abilities and provides minimal risk to the clientele because the students are working under the guidance of faculty. As previous research from diverse fields have shown, service-learning benefits the students and the groups they encounter through their projects. KEYWORDSservice-learning, civic engagement, community development

  14. Enhanced clinical pharmacy service targeting tools: risk-predictive algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajji, Feras W D; Scullin, Claire; Scott, Michael G; McElnay, James C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of using a mix of clinical pharmacy data and routine hospital admission spell data in the development of predictive algorithms. Exploration of risk factors in hospitalized patients, together with the targeting strategies devised, will enable the prioritization of clinical pharmacy services to optimize patient outcomes. Predictive algorithms were developed using a number of detailed steps using a 75% sample of integrated medicines management (IMM) patients, and validated using the remaining 25%. IMM patients receive targeted clinical pharmacy input throughout their hospital stay. The algorithms were applied to the validation sample, and predicted risk probability was generated for each patient from the coefficients. Risk threshold for the algorithms were determined by identifying the cut-off points of risk scores at which the algorithm would have the highest discriminative performance. Clinical pharmacy staffing levels were obtained from the pharmacy department staffing database. Numbers of previous emergency admissions and admission medicines together with age-adjusted co-morbidity and diuretic receipt formed a 12-month post-discharge and/or readmission risk algorithm. Age-adjusted co-morbidity proved to be the best index to predict mortality. Increased numbers of clinical pharmacy staff at ward level was correlated with a reduction in risk-adjusted mortality index (RAMI). Algorithms created were valid in predicting risk of in-hospital and post-discharge mortality and risk of hospital readmission 3, 6 and 12 months post-discharge. The provision of ward-based clinical pharmacy services is a key component to reducing RAMI and enabling the full benefits of pharmacy input to patient care to be realized. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. 76 FR 13371 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Personnel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... personnel--in special education, related services, early intervention, and regular education--to work with... early intervention, special education, or related services. In a 2004 survey of coordinators for the...

  16. Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malling, Bente; Mortensen, Lene S; Scherpbier, Albert J J; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2010-09-21

    The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate in clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education. The study was a trans-sectional correlation study. The educational climate was investigated by a survey among all doctors (specialists and trainees) in the departments. Leadership skills of the consultants responsible for education were measured by multi-source feedback scores from heads of departments, peer consultants, and trainees. Doctors from 42 clinical departments representing 21 specialties participated. The response rate of the educational climate investigation was moderate 52% (420/811), Response rate was high in the multisource-feedback process 84.3% (420/498). The educational climate was scored quite high mean 3.9 (SD 0.3) on a five-point Likert scale. Likewise the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for education were considered good, mean 5.4 (SD 0.6) on a seven-point Likert scale. There was no significant correlation between the scores concerning the educational climate and the scores on leadership skills, r = 0.17 (p = 0.29). This study found no relation between the educational climate and the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education in clinical departments with the instruments used. Our results indicate that consultants responsible for education are in a weak position to influence the educational climate in the clinical department. Further studies are needed to explore, how heads of departments and other factors related to the clinical organisation could influence the educational climate.

  17. Improving patient experience in a pediatric ambulatory clinic: a mixed method appraisal of service delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soeteman M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Marijn Soeteman,1 Vera Peters,2 Jamiu O Busari1,3 1Department of Pediatrics, Atrium Medical Center, Heerlen, 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, 3Department of Educational Development and Research, Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands Objective: In 2013, customer satisfaction surveys showed that patients were unhappy with the services provided at our ambulatory clinic. In response, we performed an appraisal of our services, which resulted in the development of a strategy to reduce waiting time and improve quality of service. Infrastructural changes to our clinic’s waiting room, consultation rooms, and back offices were performed, and schedules were redesigned to reduce wait time to 10 minutes and increase consultation time to 20 minutes. Our objective was to identify if this would improve 1 accessibility to caregivers and 2 quality of service and available amenities. Design: We conducted a multi-method survey using 1 a patient flow analysis to analyze the flow of service and understand the impact of our interventions on patient flow and 2 specially designed questionnaires to investigate patients’ perceptions of our wait time and how to improve our services. Results: The results showed that 79% of our respondents were called in to see a doctor within 20 minutes upon arrival. More patients (55% felt that 10–20 minutes was an acceptable wait time. We also observed a perceived increase in satisfaction with wait time (94%. Finally, a large number of patients (97% were satisfied with the quality of service and with the accessibility to caregivers (94%. Conclusion: The majority of our patients were satisfied with the accessibility to our ambulatory clinics and with the quality of services provided. The appraisal of our operational processes using a patient flow analysis also demonstrated how this strategy could effectively be applied to investigate and improve quality of

  18. Factors shaping how clinical educators use their educational knowledge and skills in the clinical workplace: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Koshila; Greenhill, Jennene

    2016-02-18

    In order to consolidate their educational knowledge and skills and develop their educational role, many clinicians undertake professional development in clinical education and supervision. It is well established that these educationally-focussed professional development activities have a positive impact. However, it is less clear what factors within the clinical workplace can shape how health professionals may use and apply their educational knowledge and skills and undertake their educational role. Looking through the lens of workplace affordances, this paper draws attention to the contextual, personal and interactional factors that impact on how clinical educators integrate their educational knowledge and skills into the practice setting, and undertake their educational role. Data were gathered via a survey of 387 clinical educators and semi-structured interviews with 12 clinical educators and 6 workplace managers. In this paper, we focus on analysing and reporting the qualitative data gathered in this study. This qualitative data were subject to a thematic analysis and guided by theoretical constructs related to workplace affordances. Three key themes were identified including contextual, personal and interactional factors. Contextual elements referred to organisational structures and systems that impact on participants' educational role, how participants' clinical education role was articulated and configured within the organisation, and how the organisation shaped the educational opportunities available to clinicians. Personal factors encompassed clinicians' personal motivations and goals to teach and be involved in education, develop their own educational skills and function as a role model for students. Interactional factors referred to the professional interactions and networks through which clinicians shared their educational knowledge and skills and further consolidated their profile as educational advocates in their workplace. There are a number of

  19. Evaluating service user pedagogy in UK higher education: Validating the Huddersfield Service User Pedagogy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobbell, Jane; Boduszek, Daniel; Kola-Palmer, Susanna; Vaughan, Joanne; Hargreaves, Janet

    2018-04-01

    There is global recognition that the inclusion of service users in the education of health and social care students in higher education can lead to more compassionate professional identities which will enable better decision making. However, to date there is no systematic tool to explore learning and service user involvement in the curriculum. To generate and validate a psychometric instrument which will allow educators to evaluate service user pedagogy. Construction and validation of a new scale. 365 undergraduate students from health and social care departments in two universities. A two correlated factor scale. Factor 1 - perceived presence of service users in the taught curriculum and factor 2 - professionals and service users working together (correlation between factor 1 and factor 2 - r = 0.32). The Huddersfield Service User Pedagogy Scale provides a valid instrument for educators to evaluate student learning. In addition, the tool can contribute to student reflections on their shifting professional identities as they progress through their studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 75 FR 47801 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Special...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Special Demonstration Programs--Model Demonstration Projects To Improve Outcomes for Individuals.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-19585...

  1. Modern advertising of educational services in the education system.

    OpenAIRE

    Zotov, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Before the educational organizations are constantly arising questions: "Where can I find willing to learn and ability to pay students? What to teach? How to teach? How to take the money? What kind of advertising do? "Find the answers to these questions can be found in this article.

  2. Analyzing Clinical Presentation, Service Utilization, and Clinical Outcome of Female Sexual Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Heather C.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers examining clinically-relevant trends for sexual minority women have found evidence of psychological distress and greater utilization of mental health services compared to heterosexually-identified women. However, the results of many research studies with this population have methodological limitations surrounding recruitment of…

  3. Advancing the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kathleen; White, Kathryn; Roydhouse, Jessica K

    2013-04-01

    Clinical trials nurses play a pivotal role in the conduct of clinical research, but the educational and career pathway for these nurses remains unclear. This article reports findings from a survey of nurses working in cancer clinical trials research in Australia. Most participants held postgraduate qualifications (42 of 61); however, clinical trials education was primarily attained through short professional development courses. Interest in pursuing trial-specific postgraduate education was high, but barriers were identified, including cost, time, and unclear benefit for career advancement. Job titles varied substantially, which is indicative of an unclear employment pathway. These findings suggest that initiatives to improve the educational and career pathway for clinical trials nurses are needed and should include the following: formal educational preparation, greater consistency in employment status, and clearer career progression. These strategies should be underpinned by broad professional recognition of the clinical trials nurse as a specialized nursing role. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. The students' viewpoint on the quality gap in educational services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim Khanli, Marziyeh; Daneshmandi, Hadi; Choobineh, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Students and university community are social and human resources of the country. The students' viewpoints about the quality of educational services can be considered as a basis for planning quality promotion and improving organizational performance. This study was conducted to determine the quality gap in educational services by the students of Health and Nutrition School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, 140 students participated voluntarily (age range=19 to 40 years). The service quality (SERVQUAL) questionnaire was used for data collection. This questionnaire measured the quality gap in 5 dimensions of educational service including assurance, responsiveness, empathy, reliability, and tangibility. The students' perception about the current conditions and their expectations as to optimal conditions can be determined, using this questionnaire. The score of the gap in quality of educational services is calculated from difference between perception and expectation scores. Due to non-normality of data, non-parametric tests were used. To this end, data were analyzed by statistical tests including Wilcoxon, Friedman, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whiteny tests in SPSS 14. The results showed that there was quality gap in all 5 dimensions of educational services. The largest and the smallest gaps were observed in "responsiveness" with a mean±SD of -0.94±0.74 and in "reliability" with a mean±SD of -0.76±0.69, respectively. There was a significant difference in quality gap between the 5 dimensions (peducational facilities and physical environment is recommended.

  5. Multimedia educational services in stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazioglou, M.; Theodorou, K.; Kappas, C.

    1999-01-01

    The computer-based learning methods in medicine have been well established as stand-alone learning systems. Recently, these systems were enriched with the use of telematics technology to provide distance learning capabilities. Stereotactic radiotherapy is more of the most representative advanced radiotherapy techniques. Due to the multidisciplinary character of the technique and the rapid evolution of technology implemented, the demands in training have increased. The potential of interactive multimedia and Internet technologies for the achievement of distance learning capabilities in this domain are investigated. The realization of a computer-based educational program in stereotactic radiotherapy in a multimedia format is a new application in the computer-aided distance learning field. The system is built according to a client and server architecture, based on the Internet infrastructure, and composed of server nodes. The impact of the system may be described in terms of: time and transportation costs saving, flexibility in training (scheduling, rate and subject selection), online communication and interaction with experts, cost effective access to material (delivery or access by a large number of users and revision of the material by avoiding and database development. (authors)

  6. Changes in information behavior in clinical teams after introduction of a clinical librarian service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Christine; Turner, Janet; Durbin, Jane; Ryan, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The eighteen-month evaluation of a clinical librarian project (October 2003–March 2005) conducted in North Wales, United Kingdom (UK) assessed the benefits of clinical librarian support to clinical teams, the impact of mediated searching services, and the effectiveness of information skills training, including journal club support. Methods: The evaluation assessed changes in teams' information-seeking behavior and their willingness to delegate searching to a clinical librarian. Baseline (n = 69 responses, 73% response rate) and final questionnaire (n = 57, 77% response rate) surveys were complemented by telephone and face-to-face interviews (n = 33) among 3 sites served. Those attending information skills training sessions (n = 130) completed evaluations at the session and were surveyed 1 month after training (n = 24 questionnaire responses, n = 12 interviews). Results: Health professionals in clinical teams reported that they were more willing to undertake their own searching, but also more willing to delegate some literature searching, than at the start of the project. The extent of change depended on the team and the type of information required. Information skills training was particularly effective when organized around journal clubs. Conclusions: Collaboration with a clinical librarian increased clinician willingness to seek information. Clinical librarian services should leverage structured training opportunities such as journal clubs. PMID:17252062

  7. Main trends of the international market of educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Chinaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The world education system everything will more be transformed to the multi-billion industry, one of the profitable directions of which is training of foreign students. Creation and development of successfully functioning system of the international education, attraction of a significant amount of foreign students are not only to increase the budget of higher education institution and to lift its prestige, but also and a method of promotion of policy, culture, economy, a conduct of life of the host country home. With respect there to research and practical interest has studying and the analysis of the main directions of development of the international market of educational services. This article in which changes of the main indicators reflecting the main vectors of export of education in the leading countries - exporters and in our country are considered is also devoted to these questions.The purpose of work is the analysis of development of the international market of educational services in recent years. The analysis of analytical and statistical information on the processes happening in this area, both at the international level, and in Russia is the basis.In the course of the research the methods of the analytical and logical analysis on the basis of statistical data promoting more detailed studying of dynamic and structural changes of the social and economic phenomena and processes were used.In general for the last 30 years the extent of the international student’s mobility increased more than by 6 times. The international educational market constantly develops, increasing the turnover. However flows of the international students periodically change the orientation, both on countries of source, and over the countries of training. At the same time it is possible to note that changes in structure of the largest countries recipients happen more slowly, than as a part of the countries delivering foreign students. The largest world sources of

  8. Equitable service provision for inclusive education and effective early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, K M

    1998-01-01

    This paper illustrates one model of providing an integrated paediatric speech and language therapy service which attempts to meet the demands of both inclusive education and effective early intervention. A move has been made from location-oriented therapy provision to offering children and their families equal opportunities to have appropriate intervention according to need. The model incorporates the philosophy of inclusive education and supports the development of current specialist educational establishments into resource bases of expertise for children with special needs in mainstream schools.

  9. Evaluating the service quality of undergraduate nursing education in Taiwan--using quality function deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2004-05-01

    This study applies quality function deployment (QFD) techniques to evaluate the quality of service of undergraduate nursing education in Taiwan from the perspective of nursing students. Survey data from 560 undergraduate nursing students at four Taiwanese universities were subjected to QFD analysis in order to identify the quality characteristics most highly valued by students, the elements of educational service they consider most important and least important, and relationships/discrepancies between student quality requirements and institutional service elements. Results show that students value traditional elements of nursing education - clinical practice and lectures - more highly than recent additions such as computer-aided instruction and multimedia teaching. Results also show that students are looking for quality primarily in the area of faculty characteristics. The implication is that institutions which provide nursing education should not neglect the importance of investing in faculty when they are seeking to upgrade the quality of their programs. Further QFD studies are recommended to evaluate the quality of nursing education from the perspective of preceptors and nurses who help to train students in clinical settings.

  10. Managing risk: clinical decision-making in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Gerace, Adam; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Debra; Barkway, Patricia; Curren, David; Oster, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment and management is a major component of contemporary mental health practice. Risk assessment in health care exists within contemporary perspectives of management and risk aversive practices in health care. This has led to much discussion about the best approach to assessing possible risks posed by people with mental health problems. In addition, researchers and commentators have expressed concern that clinical practice is being dominated by managerial models of risk management at the expense of meeting the patient's health and social care needs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the risk assessment practices of a multidisciplinary mental health service. Findings indicate that mental health professionals draw on both managerial and therapeutic approaches to risk management, integrating these approaches into their clinical practice. Rather than being dominated by managerial concerns regarding risk, the participants demonstrate professional autonomy and concern for the needs of their clients.

  11. The Integrated Complex of Marketing of Higher Education Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhehus Olena V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article, on the basis of generalization of scientific views of foreign and domestic scientists, substantiates the integrated model of marketing of higher education products and services with consideration of their specificities. The obtained result is the «5Р + S» model, which includes the newly introduced poli-element «proposition», combining the interrelated and indivisible elements of «product», «people» and «process», as well as the traditional elements of the service marketing complex: «price», «place», «promotion», «physical evidence». The «social-marketing» element has been added to the integrated model on the basis of the high societal importance of educational services. Altogether, the proposed integrated model of the complex of marketing of higher education products and services is a symbiosis of commercial and non-commercial marketing, which will enhance social and economic efficiency of functioning of higher educational institution.

  12. Interoperable adaptive educational hypermedia : a web service definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meccawy, M.; Celik, I.; Cristea, A.I.; Stewart, C.; Ashman, H.; Kinshuk, xx; Koper, R.; Kommers, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to resolve the problem of authoring and interchanging educational material, based on web services. Here we describe the ultimate goal, of reusing and interchanging freely adaptive elearning material, shortly sketch previous solutions, showing their benefits but also

  13. Student-Life Stress in Education and Health Service Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascavage, Victoria; Winterman, Kathleen G.; Buot, Max; Wies, Jennifer R.; Lyzinski, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the effects of student-life stress on Education and Health Service majors (n = 195) at a private, religious, Midwestern university in the USA, we assessed student perception of overall stress level and physical stress level using the Student-life Stress Inventory. The targeted sample consisted of students with…

  14. Consumer Attitude Towards Service Failure and Recovery in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Hardeep; Devi, Pinkey

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore consumer attitude towards service failure and recovery in the higher education in general and with respect to teaching, examination, library, computer lab, administration and infrastructure in particular. Design/Methodology/Approach: The data are collected from 120 students of three undergraduate colleges of…

  15. Engaged Service Learning--Implications for Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Tony; Burgin, Shelley

    2009-01-01

    Dwindling resources for tertiary education, has resulted in reduced emphasis on intensive, small group, staff-student collaborative project-based service learning. However, training scientists to manage significant issues, such as sustainable water use, requires an ability to engage both industry and community stakeholders. This paper describes…

  16. Journeys across Difference: Pre-Service Teacher Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding and managing diverse classrooms is an important competency for teachers in South Africa today. Critics of the dominant approach to teaching on and with difference in pre-service teacher education argue that it mostly promotes de-contextualised celebrations of diverse cultures without addressing critical ...

  17. Immigrants to the United States and Adult Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrotta, Clarena

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes documented and undocumented immigrant populations in the United States. It discusses salient factors influencing their status as immigrants as well as adult education services available to them through publicly funded programs, social units, and community centers, especially churches and libraries.

  18. Service Strategies for Higher Educational Institutions Based on Student Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amit K.; Javalgi, Rajshekhar; Whipple, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, higher education institutions in the U.S. have faced increased competition and expenditures coupled with declines in financial support. Furthermore, they often have been forced to cater to the needs of an increasingly diverse group of students and must design service strategies based on the unique needs of each group. This…

  19. 76 FR 70667 - Small Business Size Standards: Educational Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... business assistance, SBA establishes small business size definitions (referred to as size standards) for... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG29 Small Business Size Standards: Educational Services AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The U.S...

  20. Public Service Motivation and Socialization in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the extent to which the characteristics of public administration degree programs are related to public service motivation (PSM) using a higher education socialization framework. Using a sample of approximately 500 students enrolled in 26 Master's degree programs across the country, this study confirms that…

  1. Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Attitudes towards Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varcoe, Linda; Boyle, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that an important factor in the success of inclusive education is dependent upon teachers' attitudes. Based on this evidence, the present study investigated the impact of a range of teacher variables in association with training on primary pre-service teachers' attitudes by examining total inclusion scores, positive…

  2. Service learning: Connecting higher education and civil society ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The decline in civic participation, dwindling support for social services and deficits in state budgets, has created a climate in which higher education, supported by several policies, has to make a commitment to contribute to the reconstruction and development of society by linking academic programmes to community-based ...

  3. The Deming Method: Systems Theory for Educational Technology Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, Mark L.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses quality management principles as taught by W. Edwards Deming and describes their applications to educational technology services. Traditional organizational charts are explained; and benefits of using flow charts in Deming's systems are described, including better communications between departments, building teamwork, and opportunities…

  4. Considerations for Sexuality Education and Services for LGB Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Julie; Bernert, Donna J.

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education and health services for elderly individuals who reside in care settings (e.g., assisted living facilities, nursing homes, retirement communities) have received limited attention in the professional literature. However, the lack of sexual health promotion practices in elder care facilities can be detrimental to older…

  5. Nurse Educators' Preceptions of Preparedness to Guide Clinical Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins-Cameron, Stella L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine nurse educators' (NEs) perceptions of their level of preparedness to guide learning in clinical rotations of associate degree pre-licensure nursing programs of a South Atlantic state. The study also sought to determine the relationship between clinical experience, formal education, and teaching experience to…

  6. Cultural politics and clinical competence in Australian health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderson, Lenore; Allotey, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Medical competence is demonstrated in multiple ways in clinical settings, and includes technical competence, both in terms of diagnosis and management, and cultural competence, as demonstrated in communication between providers and clients. In cross-cultural contexts, such communication is complicated by interpersonal communication and the social and cultural context. To illustrate this, we present four case studies that illustrate the themes from interviews with immigrant women and refugees from Middle Eastern and Sahel African backgrounds, conducted as part of a study of their reproductive health. In our analysis, we highlight the limitations of conventional models of communication. We illustrate the need for health providers to appreciate the possible barriers of education, ethnicity, religion and gender that can impede communication, and the need to be mindful of broader structural, institutional and inter-cultural factors that affect the quality of the clinical encounter.

  7. Stem cell tourism--a web-based analysis of clinical services available to international travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Ruairi; O'Brien, Timothy; Flaherty, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are advertised through online resources which describe a range of treatments with diverse clinical indications. Stem cell tourists may not be aware of the information they should seek when consulting these clinics, or of the potential risks involved. The aim of this study was to characterise the therapies offered by online stem cell clinics. A web based search utilising five search terms was employed. The first twenty pages of each search result were screened against 340 variables. 224 out of 1091 websites advertised stem cell clinics. 68 eligible sites covering 21 countries were evaluated. The top five clinical indications for stem cell therapy were multiple sclerosis, anti-ageing, Parkinson's disease, stroke and spinal cord injury. Adult, autologous stem cells were the most commonly utilised stem cell, and these were frequently sourced from bone marrow and adipose tissue and administered intravenously. Thirty-four per cent of sites mentioned the number of patients treated while one quarter of clinics provided outcome data. Twenty-nine per cent of clinics had an internationally recognised accreditation. Fifteen per cent of clinics stated that their therapies posed no risk. Eighty-eight per cent of clinics claimed treatment effectiveness, with 16% describing their curative potential. Over 40% of sites did not specify the number or duration of treatments. Fifty-three per cent of clinics requested access to patients' medical records, and 12% recommended patients discuss the proposed therapy with their doctor. No clinic recommended that travellers consult a travel medicine specialist or receive vaccinations prior to their intended travel. One quarter of sites discussed contraindications to treatment, with 41% of sites detailing follow up patient care. There is potential for stem cell tourists to receive misleading or deficient information from online stem cell clinics. Both the stem cell tourist and travel medicine practitioner should be educated

  8. Clinical polymorphism and variability in education of autistic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov S.A.Morozova T.I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders are considered a highly heterogeneous group by clinical signs, which makes it impossible to develop a common method of correctional and educational development for them. In this article, results of an analysis of clinical, psychological and pedagogic polymorphism in autism spectrum disorders are shown, emphasized are its main components and basic consequences necessary for organizing education. Results are viewed in the context of the principle of variability in education. A dual structure of variability in education of autistic children has been discovered. Shortly reviewed are some topical problems of correctional education process for autism spectrum disorders

  9. Medical simulation-based education improves medicos' clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; Liu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Hai

    2013-03-01

    Clinical skill is an essential part of clinical medicine and plays quite an important role in bridging medicos and physicians. Due to the realities in China, traditional medical education is facing many challenges. There are few opportunities for students to practice their clinical skills and their dexterities are generally at a low level. Medical simulation-based education is a new teaching modality and helps to improve medicos' clinical skills to a large degree. Medical simulation-based education has many significant advantages and will be further developed and applied.

  10. Usefulness of problem-based learning in clinical nursing education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem based learning (PBL) in clinical nursing is described as an effective learning strategy that can encourage students to become self-directed learners and to master clinical skills that can be transferable to service users. This study explores the usefulness of PBL in a nursing clinical setting from the nursing students' ...

  11. Author: MA du Plessis CLINICAL LEGAL EDUCATION MODELS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    21892687

    various aspects of legal practice and engage in community service learning ... components, namely clinical duty, classroom teaching and clinician/student tutorial ..... Vawda YA "Learning from Experience: The Art and Science of Clinical Law" ... Lennertz M Date Unknown Developing Legal Clinics in Brazil: Remarks on the.

  12. Metaphor Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers towards Mathematics and Mathematics Education in Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Oguz; Tas, Isil; Aslan, Durmus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the thoughts of pre-service teachers, who play an important role in the early preschool experience of children in mathematics, towards the concepts of mathematics and education of mathematics with the help of metaphors. The study group of the research consists of a total of 227 pre-service teachers at the…

  13. 77 FR 75670 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services,Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Registration; Fisher Clinical Services,Inc. By Notice dated September 20, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on October 2, 2012, 77 FR 60143, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown... that the registration of Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., to import the basic class of controlled...

  14. 78 FR 23958 - Importer of Controlled Substances: Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. By Notice dated November 27, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on December 5, 2012, 77 FR 72409, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown... the registration of Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., to import the basic class of controlled substance...

  15. 78 FR 5497 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... Registration; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. By Notice dated November 1, 2012, and published in the Federal Register on November 9, 2012, 77 FR 67396, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown... the registration of Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., to import the basic class of controlled substance...

  16. 78 FR 46371 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Almac Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Register on April 19, 2013, 78 FR 23594, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton... registration of Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) to import the basic classes of controlled substances is..., conventions, or protocols in effect on May 1, 1971. DEA has investigated Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI...

  17. 42 CFR 405.515 - Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed by physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services... Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.515 Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed... limitation on reimbursement for markups on clinical laboratory services billed by physicians. If a physician...

  18. 75 FR 81253 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum project period through a...

  19. 75 FR 5299 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in... conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services between 1...

  20. 75 FR 55788 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of... high cognition who also require special education and related services under the IDEA. Topic Addressed... of the special education and related services provided to the child. [cir] Letter dated January 7...

  1. 76 FR 344 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services establishes a priority for the funding of a National SCI... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in...

  2. 75 FR 21617 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview.... The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum..., Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-9635 Filed 4-23-10; 8...

  3. 75 FR 21270 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may... call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services between 1:00 p.m...

  4. 75 FR 3454 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of... permissible and when an evaluation for special education and related services is required. Part C--Infants and.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-1082...

  5. 75 FR 77629 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum project period through a...

  6. 75 FR 25845 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS); Overview Information; Centers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS); Overview... from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. The pre-application meeting will be.... Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-11007...

  7. 75 FR 75666 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum project period through a...

  8. Integrating HIV & AIDS education in pre-service mathematics education for social justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda van Laren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1999, many South African education policy documents have mandated integration of HIV & AIDS education in learning areas/disciplines. Policy document research has shown that although South African politicians and managers have produced volumes of eloquent and compelling legislation regarding provision for HIV & AIDS education, little of this is translated into action. The impact of HIV & AIDS permeates the social, economic and political arenas in South Africa. Integration of HIV & AIDS education across disciplines can serve as a strategy to further the ideals of social justice. This paper focuses on how integration in the teaching and learning of Mathematics Education provides opportunities to take action for social justice. The inquiry explores the following question: How can the myth that there is 'nothing we can do' about HIV & AIDS, which is linked to social justice issues, be addressed through integration of HIV & AIDS education in Mathematics pre-service teacher education? Drawing on self-study, the work of a Mathematics teacher educator who worked with pre-service teachers to integrate HIV & AIDS education at a higher education institution is described. By considering integration of HIV & AIDS education in Mathematics Education and taking action it is possible to develop strategies which directly relate to social justice.

  9. New Educational Services Development: Framework for Technology Entrepreneurship Education at Universities in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Warda, Sherein Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The overall objective of the current study is to explore how universities can better developing new educational services. The purpose of this paper is to develop framework for technology entrepreneurship education (TEPE) within universities. Design/Methodology/Approach: Qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed. This…

  10. Students' Assessment and Self-assessment of Nursing Clinical Faculty Competencies: Important Feedback in Clinical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Zec, Davor; Pušeljić, Silvija; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    The students' assessment of clinical faculty competencies and the faculty members' self-assessment can provide important information about nursing clinical education. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the students' assessment of the clinical faculty member's competencies and the faculty member's self-assessment. These differences can reveal interesting insights relevant for improving clinical practice.

  11. Educational clusters as a tool ofpublic policy on the market of educational services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Vorona

    2016-08-01

    Due to this, the innovative educational cluster has been determined as a voluntary association of geographically close interacting entities, educational institutions, government, banking and private sector, innovative enterprises/organizations infrastructure. Such interaction is characterized by the production of competitive educational, cultural, social services, the availability of the agreed development strategy aimed at the interests of each participant and the region being a territory of cluster’s localization.

  12. Key components of a service model providing early childhood support for women attending opioid treatment clinics: an Australian state health service review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Susan R; Schmied, Virginia; Nicholls, Daniel; Dahlen, Hannah

    2012-09-01

    To report the findings of a service review--specifically the strategy to provide early childhood services 'on site' at opioid treatment clinics to address access difficulties. Child and family health nurses are skilled in the assessment and support of families during early childhood. However, women with a history of substance abuse are often cautious when engaging with universal and other health services, with the result that the infant may miss recommended developmental screening and early referral to improve health outcomes. In 2006, an internal review was undertaken of the integration of early childhood and parenting services at opioid treatment clinics in a large Area Health Service of New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative study design, using semi-structured interview questions was used. Data were collected via six focus groups (4-15 participants in each group) and individual interview of child and family health nurses, nurse unit managers and clinical staff (n=58). Three key components of a model for providing early childhood support in collaboration with opioid treatment services were identified. First, the importance of building a trusting relationship between the woman and the child and family health nurses, second, maintaining continuity of care and a multidisciplinary/multiagency approach, and finally the importance of staff education, support and professional development. The provision of early childhood and parenting services on site, as part of a multidisciplinary 'one stop shop' approach to service delivery was a clear recommendation of the review. Reduction of access difficulties to specialised early childhood support is of benefit to clients, community health services attempting to provide a service to this difficult to reach population and to drug and alcohol services seeking to provide a high level of holistic care for clients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Awareness and utilization of community clinic services among women in rural areas in Bangladesh: A cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanni Yaya

    Full Text Available In recent years, Bangladesh government has accomplished the ambitious project of establishing hospitals 18,000 Community Health Clinics in sub-districts across the country. Operating under the affiliation of the government hospitals, these community health clinics aim to provide free healthcare services and to increase health-awareness among the extreme poor communities in the rural areas. However, a great proportion of the people are still not well aware of the services offered by the community health clinics. Thus, it is imperative to identify the factors of awareness regarding the community clinics. Research-based evidence is necessary to improve the efficacy and service coverage of community clinics among key population.Cross-sectional data of size 11,673 women aged 15 to 49 years living in rural settings across seven divisions were extracted from the latest Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2014. The main outcome measures of our study were awareness and utilization of Community Clinic Services (CCs. Descriptive statistics were used to present the baseline socio-demographic and economic characteristics; Chi-square test and logistic regression were performed to identify the factors associated with awareness of community clinics.About one-third (36.7% of the women were aware of community clinics. Geographical location, level of education, household wealth status and frequency of reading newspaper were found to be significantly associated with awareness about community clinic services. Services reported to be obtained in the community clinics include family planning, immunization, tetanus, antenatal care, vitamin A, and health care for children and child growth monitoring. In the multivariate logistic regression, the odds of awareness among participants with primary education [p<0.001, AOR = 1.255, 95%CI = 1.107-1.357], secondary qualification [p<0.001, AOR = 1.370, 95%CI = 1.242-1.510] and tertiary [p<0.001, AOR = 1.526, 95%CI = 1

  14. The teaching of Education Policy and Administration in pre-service teacher education courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranilce Guimarães-Iosif

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the teaching of education policy and administration in pre-service teacher education courses from a theoretical-critical and non-linear perspective of education policy study. The data was collected during a semester in two mixed classes totaling 65 students from the Physical Education, Literature, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics and Physics undergraduate courses. As part of the integration project of the graduate program in education with the undergraduate program, the professor of the policy line of the program in education began using methodologies focused on research activities in their undergraduate classes, aiming to broaden learning and to familiarize students with themes related to education policies. The research results indicate that the learning process in the area goes from the initial rejection to the construction of a critical position on political and governance issues surrounding Brazilian education.

  15. Clinical education and student satisfaction: An integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen F. Phillips, EdD, MSN, IBCLC, ICCE

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The clinical component of undergraduate clinical education is a critical area in nursing programs. Faculty shortages have made recruitment of clinical faculty and clinical teaching more challenging. As such, alternate models of clinical faculty assignments are being explored to address faculty shortages. This article contains an extensive literature review conducted to survey models of clinical education and student satisfaction with the clinical environment. The purpose of this paper is to examine student satisfaction in the clinical learning environment using articles employing the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI along with examining the use of alternate clinical staffing models in differing levels of undergraduate nursing students. A literature search focusing on studies published between 2002 and 2015 was conducted from 5 electronic databases. Thirty-five articles were reviewed and 22 were selected for this literature review. The studies reviewed concluded that students favored a more positive and favorable clinical environment than they perceived as being actually present. A supportive clinical learning environment is of paramount importance in securing positive teaching learning outcomes. Nurse educators can apply the results of this review in order to develop and maintain quality clinical teaching and to promote a positive, student-centric, clinical learning environment.

  16. Outsiders in nursing education: cultural sensitivity in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrew, Jacqueline Kayler; Lewallen, Lynne Porter; Chun, Edna

    2014-01-01

    Cultural competence is a stated value of nursing and nursing education. However, some institutional and traditional practices in nursing education can unintentionally impede nurses from achieving cultural competence. Both the literature and interviews with nurse educators show that despite educators' intentions to treat all students the same, nontraditional students may feel singled out and may in fact be singled out for closer scrutiny because of their difference from the demographic norms of nursing students. To ensure that the nursing profession reflects the composition of the patient population it serves, nurse educators must first acknowledge the Eurocentric culture of nursing education and, then, work to change the environment in which students are recruited, learn, and take on the role of beginning practicing nurses. © 2014.

  17. Reflections of a Peace Educator: The Power and Challenges of Peace Education with Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sharon Anne

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective essay examines one long-standing peace and global education initiative for pre-service teacher candidates. The article probes the meanings of peace education and of global education embedded in the program, as well as the program's apparent consequences: What understandings of peace education did the pre-service candidates…

  18. Quality of educational services in the field of Project management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Barilović

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth and development of any business system depends on effectively and successfully implemented projects. Considering that the number of projects worldwide has been constantly increasing, developing project skills in individuals which will be involved in a project is of crucial importance. In the Republic of Croatia, the number of institutions offering education programmes in project management has been steadily growing. Each of these institutions will have to build its competitiveness on the marketing concept. Lately, the quality of educational services has been recognized as an increasingly important element of marketing. One of the education programmes in the field of project management in Croatia is the Specialist Graduate Professional Study Programme in Project Management offered at the Baltazar Adam Krčelić College of Business and Management in Zaprešić. In this paper the authors examine the competitiveness of the above education programme through a survey on the quality of educational service conducted in 2012 with a sample of 202 students with the aim of further defining the guidelines for improvement of its market competitiveness

  19. The influence of staff training and education on prosthetic and orthotic service quality: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghany, Saeed; Sadeghi-Demneh, Ebrahim; Trinler, Ursula; Onmanee, Pornsuree; Dillon, Michael P; Baker, Richard

    2018-06-01

    Education and training in prosthetics and orthotics typically comply with International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics standards based on three categories of prosthetic and orthotic professionals. This scoping study sought to describe the evidence base available to answer the question, How are prosthetic and orthotic services influenced by the training of staff providing them? Scoping review. A structured search of the peer-reviewed literature catalogued in major electronic databases yielded 3039 papers. Following review of title and abstract, 93 articles were considered relevant. Full-text review reduced this number to 25. Only two articles were identified as providing direct evidence of the effects of training and education on service provision. While both suggested that there was an impact, it is difficult to see how the more specific conclusions of either could be generalised. The other 23 articles provide a useful background to a range of issues including the specification of competencies that training programmes should deliver (3 articles), descriptions of a range of training programmes and the effects of training and education on student knowledge and skills. Although it is considered axiomatic, the service quality is dependent on practitioner education and training. There is insufficient evidence to establish whether levels of training and education in prosthetics and orthotics have an effect on the quality of prosthetic and orthotic services. Clinical relevance There is very little evidence about the effects of training and education of prosthetists and orthotists on service quality. While this is a somewhat negative finding, we feel that it is important to bring this to the attention of the prosthetics and orthotics community.

  20. Student-generated e-learning for clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Alex N; Nisly, Sarah; Walton, Alison

    2017-04-01

    Within clinical education, e-learning facilitates a standardised learning experience to augment the clinical experience while enabling learner and teacher flexibility. With the shift of students from consumers to creators, student-generated content is expanding within higher education; however, there is sparse literature evaluating the impact of student-developed e-learning within clinical education. The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate a student-developed e-learning clinical module series within ambulatory care clinical pharmacy experiences. Three clinical e-learning modules were developed by students for use prior to clinical experiences. E-learning modules were created by fourth-year professional pharmacy students and reviewed by pharmacy faculty members. A pre-/post-assessment was performed to evaluate knowledge comprehension before and after participating in the e-learning modules. Additionally, a survey on student perceptions of this educational tool was performed at the end of the clinical experience. There is sparse literature evaluating the impact of student-developed e-learning within clinical education RESULTS: Of the 31 students eligible for study inclusion, 94 per cent participated in both the pre- and post-assessments. The combined post-assessment score was significantly improved after participating in the student-developed e-learning modules (p = 0.008). The student perception survey demonstrated positive perceptions of e-learning within clinical education. Student-generated e-learning was able to enhance knowledge and was positively perceived by learners. As e-learning continues to expand within health sciences education, students can be incorporated into the development and execution of this educational tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Association of British Clinical Diabetologists (ABCD): survey of specialist diabetes care services in the UK, 2000. 3. Podiatry services and related foot care issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winocour, P H; Morgan, J; Ainsworth, A; Williams, D R R

    2002-07-01

    To examine the provision of, and variations in, podiatry and other services for diabetic foot care in the UK. A postal survey of secondary care providers of diabetes services in the UK in 2000. Following two reminders a 77% response rate was achieved. The responses indicated that 97% had a state-registered podiatrist attached to the service, providing three (median) sessions each week for diabetes care, although only 44% had availability at all diabetic clinics, and only 3% had availability at paediatric diabetic services. Podiatry access at all diabetic clinics increased the likelihood of associated preventative as opposed to reactive ('trouble shooting') care (P podiatry input to patient education was common (84%), only 6% had received formal training in education. Guidelines and strategies for management of active foot problems were available in 50-74% of cases. Orthotic input was highly variable, and absent in 15% of responses. Podiatrist fitting and application of foot protective apparatus was only recorded in 22-61% of responses. Access to isotopic and/or MR foot imaging and peripheral angiography and angioplasty was recorded in 75-83% of responses. Separate specialist foot clinics were available in 49%, and where this was the case the use of newer foot ulcer healing applications was higher (P podiatry support to diabetes care over the last 10 years, the level of access and the nature of the services provided is much less than recommended in many advisory documents. The strategy of a co-ordinated 'team' approach to foot care still takes place in less than 50% of centres. There are clear regional differences in diabetes foot care services. Both providers and purchasers of diabetes services may not have given sufficient attention to this area, given the relatively small number of documented bids for service improvements in this area, and the very low success rate of such bids.

  2. Placing wireless tablets in clinical settings for patient education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribling, Judy C; Richardson, Joshua E

    2016-04-01

    The authors explored the feasibility and possible benefit of tablet-based educational materials for patients in clinic waiting areas. We distributed eight tablets preloaded with diagnosis-relevant information in two clinic waiting areas. Patients were surveyed about satisfaction, usability, and effects on learning. Technical issues were resolved. Thirty-seven of forty patients completed the survey. On average, the patients were satisfied in all categories. Placing tablet-based educational materials in clinic waiting areas is relatively easy to implement. Patients using tablets reported satisfaction across three domains: usability, education, and satisfaction.

  3. Placing wireless tablets in clinical settings for patient education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy C. Stribling, MA, MLS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The authors explored the feasibility and possible benefit of tablet-based educational materials for patients in clinic waiting areas. Methods: We distributed eight tablets preloaded with diagnosis-relevant information in two clinic waiting areas. Patients were surveyed about satisfaction, usability, and effects on learning. Technical issues were resolved. Results: Thirty-seven of forty patients completed the survey. On average, the patients were satisfied in all categories. Conclusions: Placing tablet-based educational materials in clinic waiting areas is relatively easy to implement. Patients using tablets reported satisfaction across three domains: usability, education, and satisfaction.

  4. Cost-effective clinical pharmacy services in a veterans administration drop-in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivens, J J; Magalian, P; Crozier, G A

    1983-11-01

    Services provided by a clinical pharmacist in a Veterans Administration outpatient clinic are described. Patients who come to the drop-in clinic for prescription refill authorization or medication-related problems are seen by a pharmacist rather than by a physician. The pharmacist interviews the patient, reviews the medical records and prescription and nonprescription drug profile, assesses appropriateness of current drug use, and records findings in the progress notes. The pharmacist may recommend presciption refill, change of medication or dosage, discontinuation, referral to a physician or nurse practitioner, follow-up appointments, or laboratory tests. The physician must countersign the pharmacist's prescriptions, referrals, and requests for laboratory tests. The clinical pharmacist's services reduced demand for physicians' time, allowed patients direct access to the health-care provider suited to deal with medication-related problems, and provided improved continuity of care. Potential benefits are cost savings from discontinuation of inappropriate drug therapy and from use of a pharmacist instead of a physician. The number of hospital admissions related to adverse drug reactions also may be reduced.

  5. Qualifying in-service education of Science Teachers (QUEST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Keld; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions for effe......The Danish QUEST-project is a large-scale (450 teachers), long-term (4 years) professional development project for science teachers. The project aims at closing the gap between the present inconsequential practice in in-service education and recent research results documenting conditions...... and peer involvement in collaborative practices in the school science teacher group is specifically addressed and targeted throughout the project. A special way of working (the QUEST-Rhythm) has been developed to increase the degree of teacher collaboration and networking over the 4 years. The accompanying...

  6. The effect of clinical academic service contracts on surgeon satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Joanne; Bradley, Christine; Cadeliña, Rachel; Hsiang, York

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the satisfaction of members of an academic department who are funded by a Clinical Academic Service Contract (CASC), compared with those who are not. We mailed a satisfaction questionnaire designed to examine surgeons' perceived effect of CASCs on their participation in their division or department and on professional activities (research, teaching, clinical) to members of the surgery department who perform operative interventions. We analyzed responses from CASC and non-CASC members, using t tests for continuous variables and chi-square tests for categorical variables. Four of 9 operative divisions (cardiac, thoracic, neurosurgery, pediatric surgery) are CASC-funded, and 5 are not (general, plastic, otolaryngology, urology, vascular). The response rate after 3 mailings was 59%. CASC responders agreed on the need for the following: improved focus and resolution of issues (p academic and administrative activities (p leisure time (p < 0.004). Responders disagreed that morale was low (p < 0.001). They were satisfied with the following: professional activities (p < 0.019), increased research activities (p < 0.001), quality of research (p < 0.001), more presentations (p < 0.025), increased teaching time (p < 0.004) and ability to care for their patients (p < 0.001). CASC responders were significantly more satisfied with their professional activities and more optimistic in their divisional roles than were non-CASC responders. Based on these results, all departmental members who perform operative interventions should consider being on a CASC.

  7. Architecture Design of Healthcare Software-as-a-Service Platform for Cloud-Based Clinical Decision Support Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sungyoung; Cha, Jieun; Ji, Myungkyu; Kang, Hyekyung; Kim, Seok; Heo, Eunyoung; Han, Jong Soo; Kang, Hyunggoo; Chae, Hoseok; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2015-04-01

    To design a cloud computing-based Healthcare Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Platform (HSP) for delivering healthcare information services with low cost, high clinical value, and high usability. We analyzed the architecture requirements of an HSP, including the interface, business services, cloud SaaS, quality attributes, privacy and security, and multi-lingual capacity. For cloud-based SaaS services, we focused on Clinical Decision Service (CDS) content services, basic functional services, and mobile services. Microsoft's Azure cloud computing for Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) was used. The functional and software views of an HSP were designed in a layered architecture. External systems can be interfaced with the HSP using SOAP and REST/JSON. The multi-tenancy model of the HSP was designed as a shared database, with a separate schema for each tenant through a single application, although healthcare data can be physically located on a cloud or in a hospital, depending on regulations. The CDS services were categorized into rule-based services for medications, alert registration services, and knowledge services. We expect that cloud-based HSPs will allow small and mid-sized hospitals, in addition to large-sized hospitals, to adopt information infrastructures and health information technology with low system operation and maintenance costs.

  8. Architecture Design of Healthcare Software-as-a-Service Platform for Cloud-Based Clinical Decision Support Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sungyoung; Cha, Jieun; Ji, Myungkyu; Kang, Hyekyung; Kim, Seok; Heo, Eunyoung; Han, Jong Soo; Kang, Hyunggoo; Chae, Hoseok; Hwang, Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To design a cloud computing-based Healthcare Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) Platform (HSP) for delivering healthcare information services with low cost, high clinical value, and high usability. Methods We analyzed the architecture requirements of an HSP, including the interface, business services, cloud SaaS, quality attributes, privacy and security, and multi-lingual capacity. For cloud-based SaaS services, we focused on Clinical Decision Service (CDS) content services, basic functional services, and mobile services. Microsoft's Azure cloud computing for Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) and Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) was used. Results The functional and software views of an HSP were designed in a layered architecture. External systems can be interfaced with the HSP using SOAP and REST/JSON. The multi-tenancy model of the HSP was designed as a shared database, with a separate schema for each tenant through a single application, although healthcare data can be physically located on a cloud or in a hospital, depending on regulations. The CDS services were categorized into rule-based services for medications, alert registration services, and knowledge services. Conclusions We expect that cloud-based HSPs will allow small and mid-sized hospitals, in addition to large-sized hospitals, to adopt information infrastructures and health information technology with low system operation and maintenance costs. PMID:25995962

  9. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Education and Training Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Peters, Jane S.; Albers, Nathaniel; Stuart, Elizabeth; Fuller, Merrian C.

    2010-03-19

    This report provides a baseline assessment of the current state of energy efficiency-related education and training programs and analyzes training and education needs to support expected growth in the energy efficiency services workforce. In the last year, there has been a significant increase in funding for 'green job' training and workforce development (including energy efficiency), through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Key segments of the energy efficiency services sector (EESS) have experienced significant growth during the past several years, and this growth is projected to continue and accelerate over the next decade. In a companion study (Goldman et al. 2009), our research team estimated that the EESS will increase two- to four-fold by 2020, to 220,000 person-years of employment (PYE) (low-growth scenario) or up to 380,000 PYE (high-growth scenario), which may represent as many as 1.3 million individuals. In assessing energy efficiency workforce education and training needs, we focus on energy-efficiency services-related jobs that are required to improve the efficiency of residential and nonresidential buildings. Figure ES-1 shows the market value chain for the EESS, sub-sectors included in this study, as well as the types of market players and specific occupations. Our assessment does not include the manufacturing, wholesale, and retail distribution subsectors, or energy efficiency-focused operations and maintenance performed by facility managers.

  10. Characteristics of student preparedness for clinical learning: clinical educator perspectives using the Delphi approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chipchase Lucinda S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During clinical placements, clinical educators facilitate student learning. Previous research has defined the skills, attitudes and practices that pertain to an ideal clinical educator. However, less attention has been paid to the role of student readiness in terms of foundational knowledge and attitudes at the commencement of practice education. Therefore, the aim of this study was to ascertain clinical educators’ views on the characteristics that they perceive demonstrate that a student is well prepared for clinical learning. Methods A two round on-line Delphi study was conducted. The first questionnaire was emailed to a total of 636 expert clinical educators from the disciplines of occupational therapy, physiotherapy and speech pathology. Expert clinical educators were asked to describe the key characteristics that indicate a student is prepared for a clinical placement and ready to learn. Open-ended responses received from the first round were subject to a thematic analysis and resulted in six themes with 62 characteristics. In the second round, participants were asked to rate each characteristic on a 7 point Likert Scale. Results A total of 258 (40.56% responded to the first round of the Delphi survey while 161 clinical educators completed the second (62.40% retention rate. Consensus was reached on 57 characteristics (six themes using a cut off of greater than 70% positive respondents and an interquartile deviation IQD of equal or less than 1. Conclusions This study identified 57 characteristics (six themes perceived by clinical educators as indicators of a student who is prepared and ready for clinical learning. A list of characteristics relating to behaviours has been compiled and could be provided to students to aid their preparation for clinical learning and to universities to incorporate within curricula. In addition, the list provides a platform for discussions by professional bodies about the role of placement

  11. Productivity and time use during occupational therapy and nutrition/dietetics clinical education: a cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Rodger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently in the Australian higher education sector higher productivity from allied health clinical education placements is a contested issue. This paper will report results of a study that investigated output changes associated with occupational therapy and nutrition/dietetics clinical education placements in Queensland, Australia. Supervisors' and students' time use during placements and how this changes for supervisors compared to when students are not present in the workplace is also presented. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cohort design was used with students from four Queensland universities, and their supervisors employed by Queensland Health. There was an increasing trend in the number of occasions of service delivered when the students were present, and a statistically significant increase in the daily mean length of occasions of service delivered during the placement compared to pre-placement levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A novel method for estimating productivity and time use changes during clinical education programs for allied health disciplines has been applied. During clinical education placements there was a net increase in outputs, suggesting supervisors engage in longer consultations with patients for the purpose of training students, while maintaining patient numbers. Other activities were reduced. This paper is the first time these data have been shown in Australia and form a sound basis for future assessments of the economic impact of student placements for allied health disciplines.

  12. Service user engagement in healthcare education as a mechanism for value based recruitment: An evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaslip, Vanessa; Scammell, Janet; Mills, Anne; Spriggs, Ashley; Addis, Andrea; Bond, Mandy; Latchford, Carolyn; Warren, Angela; Borwell, Juliet; Tee, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Within the United Kingdom (UK) there is an increasing focus on Values Based Recruitment (VBR) of staff working in the National Health Service (NHS) in response to public inquiries criticising the lack of person-centred care. All NHS employees are recruited on the basis of a prescribed set of values. This is extended to the recruitment of student healthcare professionals, yet there is little research of how to implement this. Involving Service Users in healthcare educational practice is gaining momentum internationally, yet involvement of service users in VBR of 'would be' healthcare professionals remains at an embryonic phase. Adult nurses represent the largest healthcare workforce in the UK, yet involvement of service users in their recruitment has received scant attention. This paper is an evaluation of the inclusion of service users in a VBR of 640 adult student nurses. This study used a participatory mixed methods approach, with service users as co-researchers in the study. The study consisted of mixed methods design. Quantitative data via an online questionnaire to ascertain candidates' perspectives (n=269 response rate of 42%), and academic/clinical nurses (n=35 response rate 34.65%). Qualitative data were gathered using focus groups and one to one interviews with service users (n=9). Data analysis included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. 4 overarching themes were identified; increasing sense of humanness, substantiating care values; impact of involvement; working together and making it work, a work in progress. The findings from the study highlight that involving service users in VBR of student healthcare professionals has benefits to candidates, service users and local health services. Appreciating the perceptions of healthcare professionals is fundamental in the UK and internationally to implementing service users' engagement in service enhancement and delivery. Findings from this study identify there may be a dissonance between the policy

  13. Author: MA du Plessis CLINICAL LEGAL EDUCATION MODELS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    21892687

    http://www.nuigalway.ie/business-public-policy-law/school-of-law/students/cle/. .... ...clinical legal education of final year LLB students, with the focus on analytical ..... Spot tests and minute papers can be applied successfully during student ...

  14. Optimizing education on the inpatient dermatology consultative service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    A consultative dermatology service plays an important role in patient care and education in the hospital setting. Optimizing education in balance with high-quality dermatology consultative services is both a challenge and an opportunity for dermatology consultation teams. There is an emergence of new information about how dermatology can best be taught in the hospital, much of which relies on principles of workplace learning as well as the science of how learning and teaching best happen in work settings. These best practices are summarized in this narrative review with integrated discussion of concepts from outpatient dermatology education and lessons learned from other inpatient teaching models. In addition, consultative dermatology curricula should utilize a blended curriculum model comprised of patient care and active learning and self-study modalities. Specific educational methods will discuss 2 strategies: (1) direct patient-care activities (ie, bedside teaching rounds) and (2) nonpatient care activities (ie, case presentations, didactic sessions, online modules, and reading lists). ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  15. The Union Health Center: a working model of clinical care linked to preventive occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, R; Plattus, B; Kellogg, L; Luo, J; Marcus, M; Mascolo, A; Landrigan, P J

    1997-03-01

    As health care provision in the United States shifts to primary care settings, it is vital that new models of occupational health services be developed that link clinical care to prevention. The model program described in this paper was developed at the Union Health Center (UHC), a comprehensive health care center supported by the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (now the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees) serving a population of approximately 50,000 primarily minority, female garment workers in New York City. The objective of this paper is to describe a model occupational medicine program in a union-based comprehensive health center linking accessible clinical care with primary and secondary disease prevention efforts. To assess the presence of symptoms suggestive of occupational disease, a health status questionnaire was administered to female workers attending the UHC for routine health maintenance. Based on the results of this survey, an occupational medicine clinic was developed that integrated direct clinical care with worker and employer education and workplace hazard abatement. To assess the success of this new approach, selected cases of sentinel health events were tracked and a chart review was conducted after 3 years of clinic operation. Prior to initiation of the occupational medicine clinic, 64% (648) of the workers surveyed reported symptoms indicative of occupational illnesses. However, only 42 (4%) reported having been told by a physician that they had an occupational illness and only 4 (.4%) reported having field a workers' compensation claim for an occupational disease. In the occupational medicine clinic established at the UHC, a health and safety specialist acts as a case manager, coordinating worker and employer education as well as workplace hazard abatement focused on disease prevention, ensuring that every case of occupational disease is treated as a potential sentinel health event. As examples of the success

  16. Clinical risk and depression (continuing education credit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, S

    1997-01-22

    This article provides information and guidance to nurses on clinical risks in mental health, particularly that of depression. It relates to UKCC professional development category: Reducing risk and Care enhancement.

  17. Perspectives on Clinical Education: How physiotherapy students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oyeyemia

    presumed that clinical teaching can effectively be done by any competent and experienced practitioner. This ... Becoming a competent physical therapist involves receiving .... Only an environment that reduces stress and opens the lines of ...

  18. The twinning of Scottish general practices and Malawian clinics: the provision of email and internet services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Neville

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many patients and health care professionals in the developed world are uncomfortable about doing nothing in the face of the glaring inequities in health care between their own environment and that of Africa. In an effort to 'think global, act local' a Scottish GP practice used personal contacts to build a twinning link with a clinic serving a township in Malawi. This article describes the experience of establishing e-mail and internet services for Malawian health care staff to afford them the same level of access as developed world staff enjoy in accessing educational materials and professional supports. Using our twin link as an exemplar we are now matching other Scottish General Practices to Malawian Clinics around a common theme of modern communication media.

  19. Clinical leadership development and education for nurses: prospects and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ML

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available M Lindell Joseph, Diane L Huber College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, elevated roles for nurses of care coordinator, clinical nurse leader, and advanced practice registered nurse have come to the forefront. Because change occurs so fast, matching development and education to job requirements is a challenging forecasting endeavor. The purpose of this article is to envision clinical leadership development and education opportunities for three emerging roles. The adoption of a common framework for intentional leadership development is proposed for clinical leadership development across the continuum of care. Solutions of innovation and interdependency are framed as core concepts that serve as an opportunity to better inform clinical leadership development and education. Additionally, strategies are proposed to advance knowledge, skills, and abilities for crucial implementation of improvements and new solutions at the point of care. Keywords: clinical leadership, nursing leadership, CNL, care coordination, innovation, interdependency

  20. 42 CFR 414.510 - Laboratory date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and pathology specimens. 414.510 Section 414.510 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens. The date of service for either a clinical laboratory test or the technical component of physician pathology service is as follows: (a...

  1. Clinical Reasoning in Athletic Training Education: Modeling Expert Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Paul R.; Lazenby, Todd W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To address the need for a more definitive approach to critical thinking during athletic training educational experiences by introducing the clinical reasoning model for critical thinking. Background: Educators are aware of the need to teach students how to think critically. The multiple domains of athletic training are comprehensive and…

  2. Student Perceptions on Service Quality of Higher Education: an Empirical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rahayu, Fatik; Murtanto, Murtanto; Ekasari, Ayu

    2007-01-01

    Educational literatures suggest that there is mounting pressure from customers of higher education to close the gap between their expectation of institutional performance and the actual performance (Widrick et al., 2002; Pariseau and Mc Daniel, 1997; Shank et al., 1995). Therefore, it is imperative that higher educations actively monitor the quality of their service. This study deals with measuring the service quality in higher education. The service quality of higher education in this resear...

  3. Fracture liaison service in a non-regional orthopaedic clinic--a cost-effective service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmed, M

    2012-01-01

    Fracture liaison services (FLS) aim to provide cost-effective targeting of secondary fracture prevention. It is proposed that a dedicated FLS be available in any hospital to which a patient presents with a fracture. An existing orthopaedic clinic nurse was retrained to deliver a FLS. Proformas were used so that different nurses could assume the fracture liaison nurse (FLN) role, as required. Screening consisted of fracture risk estimation, phlebotomy and DXA scanning. 124 (11%) of all patients attending the orthopaedic fracture clinic were reviewed in the FLS. Upper limb fractures accounted for the majority of fragility fractures screened n=69 (55.6%). Two-thirds of patients (n=69) had reduced bone mineral density (BMD). An evidence based approach to both non-pharmacological and pharmacotherapy was used and most patients (76.6%) receiving pharmacotherapy received an oral bisphosphonate (n=46). The FLS has proven to be an effective way of delivering secondary prevention for osteoporotic fracture in a non-regional fracture clinic, without increasing staff costs.

  4. 77 FR 27263 - Computer Matching Between the Selective Service System and the Department of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM Computer Matching Between the Selective Service System and the Department of Education AGENCY: Selective Service System. Action: Notice. In accordance with the Privacy Act of... of Participating Agencies The Selective Service System (SSS) and the Department of Education (ED). 2...

  5. Physician medical direction and clinical performance at an established emergency medical services system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Marc-David; White, Shaun D; Perry, Malcolm L; Platt, Thomas E; Hardan, Mohammed S; Stoy, Walt A

    2009-01-01

    Few developed emergency medical services (EMS) systems operate without dedicated medical direction. We describe the experience of Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) EMS, which in 2007 first engaged an EMS medical director to develop and implement medical direction and quality assurance programs. We report subsequent changes to system performance over time. Over one year, changes to the service's clinical infrastructure were made: Policies were revised, paramedic scopes of practice were adjusted, evidence-based clinical protocols were developed, and skills maintenance and education programs were implemented. Credentialing, physician chart auditing, clinical remediation, and online medical command/hospital notification systems were introduced. Following these interventions, we report associated improvements to key indicators: Chart reviews revealed significant improvements in clinical quality. A comparison of pre- and post-intervention audited charts reveals a decrease in cases requiring remediation (11% to 5%, odds ratio [OR] 0.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20-0.85], p = 0.01). The proportion of charts rated as clinically acceptable rose from 48% to 84% (OR 6 [95% CI 3.9-9.1], p < 0.001). The proportion of misplaced endotracheal tubes fell (3.8% baseline to 0.6%, OR 0.16 [95% CI 0.004-1.06], (exact) p = 0.05), corresponding to improved adherence to an airway placement policy mandating use of airway confirmation devices and securing devices (0.7% compliance to 98%, OR 714 [95% CI 64-29,334], (exact) p < 0.001). Intravenous catheter insertion in unstable cases increased from 67% of cases to 92% (OR 1.31 [95% CI 1.09-1.71], p = 0.004). EMS administration of aspirin to patients with suspected ischemic chest pain improved from 2% to 77% (OR 178 [95% CI 35-1,604], p < 0.001). We suggest that implementation of a physician medical direction is associated with improved clinical indicators and overall quality of care at an established EMS system.

  6. The Quality of Educational Services- Institutional Case Study From the Romanian Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa NICOLESCU

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the topic of the quality of educational services, emphasizing on higher education, as a field of services of large public interest that has high influences at individual, group and society level. The paper starts by looking at the influencing factors for the quality of higher education from the perspective of the regulations and practices at both European and national level. In this context, the internal evaluation of quality at institutional level is a new requirement for higher education institutions in Romania. Part of the evaluation process is represented by the requirement to develop informational data bases. The paper exemplifies the results that can be obtained by monitoring quality and collecting information, and concludes with a set of recommendations for managing quality at institutional level.

  7. Capacity building of skilled birth attendants: a review of pre-service education curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Adetoro A; Mani, Safiyanu; Abubakar, Aisha; van den Broek, Nynke

    2013-07-01

    to assess the level, type and content of pre-service education curricula of health workers providing maternity services against the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice. We reviewed the quality and relevance of pre-service education curricula of four cadres of health-care providers of maternity care in Northern Nigeria. we adapted and used the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice to design a framework of criteria against which we assessed curricula for pre-service training. We reviewed the pre-service curricula for Nurses, Midwives, Community Health Extension Workers (CHEW) and Junior Community Health Extension Workers (JCHEW) in three states. Criteria against which the curricula were evaluated include: minimum entry requirement, the length of the programme, theory: practice ratio, curriculum model, minimum number of births conducted during training, clinical experience, competencies, maximum number of students allowable and proportion of Maternal, Newborn and Child Health components (MNCH) as part of the total curriculum. four pre-service education programmes were reviewed; the 3 year basic midwifery, 3 year basic nursing, 3 year Community Health Extension Worker (CHEW) and 2 year Junior Community Health Extension Worker (JCHEW) programme. Findings showed that, none of these four training curricula met all the standards. The basic midwifery curriculum most closely met the standards and competencies set out. The nursing curriculum showed a strong focus on foundations of nursing practice, theories of nursing, public health and maternal newborn and child health. This includes well-defined modules on family health which are undertaken from the first year to the third year of the programme. The CHEW and JCHEW curricula are currently inadequate with regard to training health-care workers to be skilled birth attendants. although the midwifery curriculum

  8. 77 FR 31072 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... Development Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  9. 76 FR 19189 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  10. 78 FR 70102 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies; Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... notice under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and... Development Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the...

  11. 75 FR 79446 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative... Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  12. 76 FR 65781 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and feasibility of proposed projects and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  13. 77 FR 72438 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and... through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and...

  14. 78 FR 53015 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and... Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and feasibility of proposed projects and...

  15. 76 FR 73781 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative... Officer through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  16. 75 FR 28686 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service; Cooperative... through the Director of the Clinical Science Research and Development Service on the relevance and... notice under Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Clinical Science...

  17. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  18. 75 FR 39431 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  19. 75 FR 32435 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services establishes a priority for grants to support States... to serve a single State, OA, or FAS. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative...

  20. 75 FR 33277 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  1. 75 FR 27737 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  2. 75 FR 22760 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  3. 75 FR 27318 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-11607 Filed 5-13-10; 8:45 am...) The Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR parts 74, 75, 77, 79, 80...

  4. 75 FR 13106 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; Migrant and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview..., Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-5976 Filed 3-17-10; 8...). Program Authority: 29 U.S.C. 774. Applicable Regulations: (a) The Education Department General...

  5. 75 FR 34251 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Centers for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-14405 Filed 6-15-10; 8:45 am... Reinvestment Act of 2009, Pub. L. 111-5 (ARRA). Applicable Regulations: (a) The Education Department General...

  6. 75 FR 21614 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... $200,000 for a single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and... 21, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc...

  7. 75 FR 39782 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... exceeding $650,000 for a single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education... staff from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services between 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m...

  8. 75 FR 36239 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  9. 76 FR 339 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services establishes a priority for the funding of a... exceeding $625,000 for a single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education...

  10. 75 FR 59699 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... provisions, the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) awarded two 18-month grants to support States... Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice...

  11. 75 FR 66743 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of..., 2010 to National Association of State Directors of Special Education Executive Director Bill East, reiterating that the calculation of State financial support for special education and related services for...

  12. 75 FR 30005 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; List of... Addressed: Maintenance of State Financial Support [cir] Office of Special Education Programs Memorandum 10-5... special education and related services. Topic Addressed: Children in Private Schools [cir] Letter dated...

  13. 75 FR 33274 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  14. 76 FR 780 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview... of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  15. 75 FR 5291 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview..., Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. [FR Doc. 2010-2182 Filed 2-1-10; 8:45... the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)). Absolute Priority: For FY 2010 and any...

  16. Achieving clinical nurse specialist competencies and outcomes through interdisciplinary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, Beth; Wolf, Sherry

    2006-01-01

    Without formal education, many healthcare professionals fail to develop interdisciplinary team skills; however, when students are socialized to interdisciplinary practice through academic clinical learning experiences, effective collaboration skills can be developed. Increasingly, educational environments are challenged to include clinical experiences for students that teach and model interdisciplinary collaboration. The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to create an interdisciplinary educational experience for clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students and postgraduate physicians. The interdisciplinary learning experience, supported by an educational grant, provided an interdisciplinary cohort of learners an opportunity to engage in a clinically focused learning experience. The interdisciplinary cohort consisted of CNS students and physicians in various stages of postgraduate training. The clinical experience selected was a quality improvement initiative in which the students were introduced to the concepts and tools of quality improvement. During this 1-month clinical experience, students applied the new skills by implementing a quality improvement project focusing on medication reconciliation in the outpatient setting. The CNS core competencies and outcomes were used to shape the experience for the CNS students. The CNS students exhibited 5 of the 7 essential characteristics of the CNS (leadership, collaboration, consultation skills, ethical conduct, and professional attributes) while demonstrating competencies and fulfilling performance expectations. During this learning experience, the CNS students focused on competencies and outcomes in the organizational sphere of influence. Multiple facilitating factors and barriers were identified. This interdisciplinary clinical experience in a quality improvement initiative provided valuable opportunities for CNS students to develop essential CNS characteristics and to explore practice competencies in the

  17. Feedback in clinical education: untying the Gordian knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Debra F

    2015-05-01

    Feedback is essential to clinical education, especially in the era of competencies, milestones, and entrustable professional activities. It is, however, an area where medical educators often fall short. Although educational leaders and faculty supervisors provide feedback in a variety of clinical settings, surveys show important gaps in medical student and resident satisfaction with the feedback received, suggesting lost opportunities to identify performance problems as well as to help each learner reach his or her greatest potential.In this issue of Academic Medicine, Telio and colleagues extend the empirically validated concept of a "therapeutic alliance" to propose the "educational alliance" as a framework for enhancing feedback in medical education. They highlight the importance of source credibility, which depends on the teacher-learner relationship and alignment of values, the teacher's understanding of the learner's role and goals, the teacher's direct observation of the learner, and the learner's perception of the teacher's good intentions. The author of this Commentary suggests that the educational alliance framework should prompt medical educators to reconsider feedback and explore opportunities for optimizing it. Most medical schools and graduate medical education programs are not designed in a way that supports the education alliance model, but the Commentary author offers suggestions for cultivating educational alliances, including rethinking supervisor selection criteria. Such interventions should be combined with ongoing faculty development and efforts to improve coaching and mentoring for students, residents, and fellows. Untying the Gordian knot of effective feedback will require innovative approaches, exchange of successful strategies, and continued research.

  18. The Reasons and Motivation for Pre-Service Teachers Choosing to Specialise in Primary Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spittle, Sharna; Spittle, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the reasons for pre-service teachers choosing to specialise in primary physical education and how these choices related to their motivation. Pre-service teachers who then elected to specialise in primary physical education (n = 248) completed the Attractors and Facilitators for Physical Education (AFPE) questionnaire and the…

  19. Clinical audit in the final year of undergraduate medical education: towards better care of future generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Donna B; Miflin, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In Australia, in an environment undergoing rapidly changing requirements for health services, there is an urgent need for future practitioners to be knowledgeable, skilful and self-motivated in ensuring the quality and safety of their practice. Postgraduate medical education and vocational programs have responded by incorporating training in quality improvement into continuing professional development requirements, but undergraduate medical education has been slower to respond. This article describes the clinical audit programme undertaken by all students in the final year of the medical course at the University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, Australia, and examines the educational worth of this approach. Data were obtained from curricular documents, including the clinical audit handbook, and from evaluation questionnaires administered to students and supervisors. The clinical audit programme is based on sound educational principles, including situated and participatory learning and reflective practice. It has demonstrated multi-dimensional benefits for students in terms of learning the complexities of conducting an effective audit in professional practice, and for health services in terms of facilitating quality improvement. Although this programme was developed in a medical course, the concept is readily transferable to a variety of other health professional curricula in which students undertake clinical placements.

  20. The clinical learning environment in nursing education: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flott, Elizabeth A; Linden, Lois

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to report an analysis of the clinical learning environment concept. Nursing students are evaluated in clinical learning environments where skills and knowledge are applied to patient care. These environments affect achievement of learning outcomes, and have an impact on preparation for practice and student satisfaction with the nursing profession. Providing clarity of this concept for nursing education will assist in identifying antecedents, attributes and consequences affecting student transition to practice. The clinical learning environment was investigated using Walker and Avant's concept analysis method. A literature search was conducted using WorldCat, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases using the keywords clinical learning environment, clinical environment and clinical education. Articles reviewed were written in English and published in peer-reviewed journals between 1995-2014. All data were analysed for recurring themes and terms to determine possible antecedents, attributes and consequences of this concept. The clinical learning environment contains four attribute characteristics affecting student learning experiences. These include: (1) the physical space; (2) psychosocial and interaction factors; (3) the organizational culture and (4) teaching and learning components. These attributes often determine achievement of learning outcomes and student self-confidence. With better understanding of attributes comprising the clinical learning environment, nursing education programmes and healthcare agencies can collaborate to create meaningful clinical experiences and enhance student preparation for the professional nurse role. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. [Scientific, practical and educational aspects of clinical epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briko, N I

    2012-01-01

    This article defines clinical epidemiology and describes its goal and objectives. The author claims that clinical epidemiology is a section of epidemiology which underlies the development of evidence-based standards for diagnostics, treatment and prevention and helps to select the appropriate algorithm for each clinical case. The study provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Epidemiological research is shown to be methodological basis of clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine with randomized controlled trials being the "gold standard" for obtaining reliable data. The key stages in the history of clinical epidemiology are discussed and further development of clinical epidemiology and the integration of courses on clinical epidemiology in education is outlined for progress in medical research and health care practice.

  2. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Pre-Service Physical Educators' Perceptions of Their Professional Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Geoffrey Martin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to capture the essence of the perceptions of 11 pre-service physical educators in the final field placement and clinical practices of their undergraduate degree program at the University of Redbank, the University of Peters, and Ina University where they prepared to become professional…

  3. School Nursing in New Mexico: Partners in Education. Annual School Health Services Summary Report 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Public Education Department, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The school nurse serves in an essential role to provide expertise and oversight for the provision of school health services and promotion of health Education. Using clinical knowledge and judgement, the school nurse plans and provides health care to students, performs health screenings and coordinates referrals to the medical home or private…

  4. Clinical education in private practice: an interdisciplinary project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubt, Lorna; Paterson, Margo; O'Riordan, Anne

    2004-01-01

    Education of rehabilitation professionals traditionally has occurred in acute care hospitals, rehabilitation centres, and other publicly funded institutions, but increasing numbers of rehabilitation professionals are now working in the community in private agencies and clinics. These privately owned clinics and community agencies represent underutilized resources for the clinical training of students. Historically, private practitioners have been less likely to participate in clinical education because of concerns over patient satisfaction and quality of care, workload, costs, and liability. Through a program funded by the Ministry of Health of Ontario, we conducted a series of interviews and focus groups with private practitioners, which identified that several incentives could potentially increase the numbers of clinical placements in private practices, including participation in the development of student learning objectives related to private practice, professional recognition, and improved relationships with the university departments. Placement in private practices can afford students skills in administration, business management, marketing and promotion, resource development, research, consulting, networking, and medical-legal assessments and processes. This paper presents a discussion of clinical education issues from the perspective of private practitioners, based on the findings of a clinical education project undertaken at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, and previous literature.

  5. Strengthening nurses' political identity through service learning partnerships in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsan, Tobie H; Forbes, Rebecca A; MacWilliams, Gail; Norwood, Wade S; Reifsteck, Mary A; Trosin, Brenda; Weber, Margaret M

    The extent to which nursing students are educationally prepared to lead health policy initiatives is inextricably linked to their political identity. Knowing and showing oneself to be a politic person in interactions with others is a dynamic social process that the authors propose can be facilitated by innovative, community-based service learning partnerships. A partnership between an elected city councilman and Registered Nurses in a baccalaureate-level professional issues course demonstrates how service learning can create a context for students' political socialization. In a pilot study, systematic qualitative research techniques were used to analyze the partners' reflections about their relationship. Findings suggest that students' political identities were developed through involvement in the community. Working on issues of mutual interest also raised policy makers' and nurses' consciousness of the value both groups contribute to addressing problems in urban communities.

  6. Quality of breast cancer early detection services conducted by well woman clinics in the district of Gampaha, Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithana, Palatiyana Vithanage Sajeewanie Chiranthika; Ariyaratne, May; Jayawardana, Pl

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in females in Sri Lanka and early detection can lead to reduction in morbidity and mortality. To evaluate selected aspects of breast cancer early detection services implemented through well woman clinics (WWCs) in the Gampaha District. The study consisted of two components. A retrospective descriptive arm assessed clinical breast examination (CBE) coverage of target age group women (TGW) of 35-59 years in all the WWCs in Gampaha district over 2003- 2007. A cross sectional descriptive study additionally assessed quality of breast cancer early detection services. The Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) technique was used to decide on the lot size and threshold values, which were computed as twenty and six clinics. Checklists were employed in assessing coverage, physical facilities and clinic activities. Client satisfaction on WWC services was assessed among 200 TGW attending 20 WWCs using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. CBE coverage in the Gampaha district increased only from 1.1-2.2% over 2003-2007. With regard to physical facilities, the number of clinics that were rated substandard varied between 7-18 (35- 90%). The items that were lacking included dust bins, notice boards, stationary, furniture and linen, and cleanliness of outside premises and toilets. With regard to clinic activities, punctuality of staff, late commencement of clinics, provision of health education, supervision, CBE and breast self-examination (BSE) were substandard in 7- 20 clinics (35-100%). Client satisfaction for WWC services was 45.2% (IQR: 38.7-54.8%) and only 11% had a score of ≥70%, the cut off set for satisfaction. Breast cancer early detection service coverage in the Gampaha district remained low (2.2%) in 2007, 11 years after commencing WWCs. All 20 clinics were substandard for overall CBE and BSE.

  7. Tertiary Students’ Entrepreneurial Ability of Entrepreneurship-Embedded Internship Program in Education Service Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Mei Chou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to explore tertiary students’ entrepreneurial ability of entrepreneurship-embedded internship program in education service industry. To achieve this goal, the study uses interviews, and panel discussions to confirm entrepreneurial ability. In addition, the study utilizes transformation of knowledge and ability to select representative knowledge items and to confirm the entrepreneurial ability structure of entrepreneurship-embedded internship program in education service industry through panel discussions. Entrepreneurs in education service industry should have these ten categories, total 42 items, such as essential professional knowledge item; that is, entrepreneurial skills, education ability, marketing ability, computer ability, service ability, and management ability, in order to cultivate entrepreneurs’ abilities of education service industry effectively. Core entrepreneurial ability of education service industry entrepreneurs should include 13 items in total, including entrepreneurial skills, education ability, marketing ability and service ability and so on.

  8. Analysis of a STEM Education Professional Development Conference for Pre-Service Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardrict-Ewing, Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines are attracting increased attention in education. The iSTEM 2017 conference was a professional development program designed to acquaint pre-service teachers with interdisciplinary, research-based STEM instructional strategies that can transform traditional classroom instruction…

  9. SERVQUAL Application and Adaptation for Educational Service Quality Assessments in Russian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeeva, Railya B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to demonstrate an adaptation of the SERVQUAL survey method for measuring the quality of higher educational services in a Russian university context. We use a new analysis and a graphical technique for presentation of results. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology of this research follows the classic…

  10. Community College Developmental Education Services: Perspectives of Spanish-Speaking Latino Early Childhood Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, John E.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this single-case study was to understand the perceptions of Latino Spanish-speaking English learners on the efficacy of developmental education services at a Western U.S. community college. The primary data collection method was in-depth individual interviews of a purposeful sample of nine successful students. Findings indicated…

  11. Development of Mobile Educational Services Application to Improve Educational Outcomes using Android Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam Farouk El-Sofany

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices have become instruments that allow new ways of interacting with institutional services. This paper describes the development of the Mobile Educational Services Application (MES app for the Android platform. This app allows access to mediated and self-access services, as well as databases, announcements, registration, events, book consultations, schedules, etc. The project provides Mobile and Web-based application tools (apps that allow online access for different users - students, instructors, and administrators. The app provides students with a user friendly, generic, web-based GUI to request educational services, to send text message inquiries, to add, drop, or defer courses, etc.. The app allows instructors to send or receive text messages to and from students using the mobile or web-based interface of the app. In addition to system monitoring, the app provides administrators an online tool to manage, add, update, and delete system information. This tool seeks to be one of the more useful economic apps that use Android technology for applications, using Tablets and mobile devices, for the use of students, instructors and administrators in accessing services in an educational institution.

  12. Institutions and organisations in Russian higher education: the example of Rostov region education services market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volchik Vyacheslav, V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the process of transformation in institutional and organizational structures of Russian Higher Education (Rostov Region is taken as an example. Adaptive economic behavior of key actors on the Russian education services market has been studied in the context of constantly changing institutional and organizational environments. Original institutional approach in the tradition of J. Commons and J. Hodgson has been applied to analyze interconnections between institutions and organizations. The evolution of institutional and organizational structures in Russian Higher education has been divided into three stages. We distinguish between those stages taking into account the dynamics of quantitative indicators and the change in norms and standards that regulate actors’ behavior in the field. The period of 1990-2002 can be characterized by weakening of government regulation and, simultaneously, lack of financial support of Higher Education. Meanwhile, private Higher Education and paid university programmes developed rapidly during that period. These changes resulted in quantitative growth in the field on the one hand, and devaluation of Higher Education, on the other hand. It is assumed that the “bubble” in Russian Higher Education, which arose in 2002-2008, occurred to a great extent because of the expansion in extramural and lowquality full-time education aimed only at getting graduate diplomas. During the period of bubble formation and latter decline in demand on the Russian education services market, the Government strengthened norms and standards referring to regulation of Higher Education. Recent “optimization processes” of 2009-2015 resulted in reducing the number of students and lecturers, universities and their branches.

  13. Collaborative learning of clinical skills in health professions education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G.; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M.; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study is designed to provide an overview of why, how, when and for whom collaborative learning of clinical skills may work in health professions education. Why: Collaborative learning of clinical skills may influence learning positively according to the non-medical literature...... suggests that learning is dependent on cognitive co-construction, shared knowledge and reduced cognitive load. When and for whom: The literature on the collaborative learning of clinical skills in health science education is reviewed to support or contradict the hypotheses provided by the theories outlined...... above. Collaborative learning of clinical skills leads to improvements in self-efficacy, confidence and performance when task processing is observable or communicable. However, the effects of collaborative learning of clinical skills may decrease over time as benefits in terms of shared cognition...

  14. The importance of dialogue in student nurses' clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Grethe; Sørensen, Ann-Hallfrid; Hanssen, Ingrid

    2012-05-01

    Develop in-hospital tutorials where the hospital unit's nurse preceptor, the college teacher and student nurses discuss clinical experiences and together acquire knowledge. Literary research combined with examples from a clinical tutorial/discussion group project with B.A. student nurses, clinical nurses and college teacher. Clinical reflection groups may be an important step towards accomplishing stability in a collaborative effort between hospital and college to help students become knowledgeable, perceptive, reflecting, caring and effective nurses. The teacher's role in clinical practice is changing. The learning method described in this text, however resource-demanding, furthers close collaboration between hospital and college, and success depends on the educator's and clinician's collective competency. Our experience is that all parties concerned found that they gained a more holistic view of nurse education through participating in a forum focused on students' experiences through patient histories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of clinical residents' needs for ten educational subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Razavi

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Fulfilling the learners' "real needs" will improve medical education. There are subjects that are necessary for any clinical residents not considering their field of specialty. Among the subjects ten seems to be the most important: research methodology and data analysis, computer-based programs, medical recording, cardiopulmonary and cerebral resuscitation, clinical teaching programs, communication skills, clinical ethics, laboratory examinations, reporting special diseases and death certification, and prescription. Purpose This cross-sectional study assessed educational needs of clinical residents for ten educational subjects. Methods A questionnaire prepared by board faculty members consisted of 10 close-ended questions, and one open­ ended question was distributed among 1307 residents from 22 clinical disciplines, who registered for preboard or promotion exam in June 2000. Results Among the subjects three were the most needed: computer-based programs 149 (60%, data collecting system 606 (49%, and clinical ethics 643 (46%. The prescription standard was the least required 177(13%. Conclusion Complementary training courses on these subjects can be an answer to the clinical residents needs. Keywords : research methodology, computer in medicine, cpr, clinical teaching methods, communication in medicine, medical ethics, laboratory ordering, disease coding system, death certificate, prescription writing

  16. An overview of cloud services adoption challenges in higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Alharthi, Abdulrahman; Yahya, Fara; Walters, Robert John; Wills, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) plays an important role in enabling education services be delivered to users. Most education online services in universities have been run on the cloud to provide services to support students, lecturers, researchers and administration staff. These are enabled with the emergence of cloud computing in the world of IT. Cloud computing offers on demand Internet-based computing services. This paper presents an overview of cloud computing adoption in higher education, ma...

  17. Current status of educational services in higher agricultural education in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cobets’

    2016-07-01

    of passing students into the production, which is an absolute necessity in terms of training of qualified specialists. It is necessary to realize the concept of continuous and multi­level agricultural education focused on the holistic development of the individual, increasing social adaptation in today’s mobile world. It is important to ensure cooperation between higher education institutions from producers, services employment. Key terms of agricultural education European level is to create research universities and development of such scientific and educational centers. This is the way to competitive scientific developments, Bank of innovation, promotion of scientific and research work of local scientists in the international market of high technology products. Ukrainian experts are to be competitive in internal and world market.

  18. Breastfeeding education and support services offered to pediatric residents in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osband, Yardaena B; Altman, Robin L; Patrick, Patricia A; Edwards, Karen S

    2011-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) encourages pediatricians to support the practice of breastfeeding and residency educators to develop formal curricula in breastfeeding education. Few studies, however, describe breastfeeding education or support services currently provided to pediatric residents in the United States. The goals of this study were to investigate breastfeeding training offered during 3-year pediatric residency programs and to describe residency programs' policies and services for residents who breastfeed. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a Web-based survey of pediatric program directors regarding breastfeeding education and support services for residents. Seventy percent of program directors (132 of 189) completed the survey, with 77.3% of respondents (n = 102) estimating the amount of breastfeeding education offered to their pediatric residents. Residents are provided with a median total of 9.0 hours of breastfeeding training over 3 years, primarily in continuity clinic and in lectures and rounds with attendings. At the programs' primary teaching hospitals, breastfeeding residents are provided breastfeeding rooms (67.0%), breast pumps (75.3%), and breast milk storage facilities (87.6%). Only 10 programs reported having an official policy to accommodate breastfeeding residents. Pediatric residents receive approximately 3 hours of breastfeeding training per year. In addition, there is less than universal implementation by residency programs of AAP recommendations for supporting breastfeeding in the workplace. Pediatric residency programs should find ways to improve and assess the quality of breastfeeding education and workplace support to better role model this advocacy standard. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Experience with the Implementation of Clinical Pharmacy Services and Processes in a University Hospital in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Annemie; Claus, Barbara; Vandewoude, Koen; Petrovic, Mirko

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes the experience with the development of clinical pharmacy services in the Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. Implementation of clinical pharmacy services in Belgian hospitals has not been evident because these activities were initially not structurally financed. The aim is to describe the strengths and weaknesses of the clinical pharmacy development process, and the milestones that enhanced the progress. Furthermore, the organisation of clinical pharmacy in the Ghent University Hospital is explained, including back- and front-office activities, seamless pharmaceutical care and medication safety improvement. Some working methods, procedures and tools are explained for different clinical pharmacy services. In particular, the clinical pharmacy projects for geriatric patients as well as the preparation of clinical pharmacy services for the accreditation process are explained. We also reflect on the organisation model and the future development of clinical pharmacy, taking into consideration facilitators and potential barriers.

  20. Capacity building of skilled birth attendants: A review of pre-service education curricula.

    OpenAIRE

    Adegoke, Adetoro; Mani, Safiyanu; Abubakar, Aisha; Van Den Broek, Nynke

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the level, type and content of pre-service education curricula of health workers providing maternity services against the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential competencies for midwifery practice. We reviewed the quality and relevance of pre-service education curricula of four cadres of health-care providers of maternity care in Northern Nigeria.\\ud DESIGN AND SETTING: we adapted and used the ICM global standards for Midwifery Education and Essential ...

  1. The Pedagogical Reflection Model - an educational perspective on clinical decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voergaard Poulsen, Bettina; Vibholm Persson, Stine; Skriver, Mette

    Clinical decision-making is important in patient-centred nursing, which is known in nursing education and research (1) The Pedagogical Reflection Model (PRM) can provide a framework that supports students’ decision-making in patient-specific situations. PRM is based on the assumption that clinical......) The aims of this study were to explore how nurse students and clinical supervisors use PRM as method to reflect before, during and after PRM guidance in relation to clinical decisions in the first year of clinical practice...... decision-making needs to take into account; 1) clinical experiences, 2) the perspective of the patient, 3) clinical observations and investigations, 4) knowledge about patients experiences of being a patient and ill, 5) medical knowledge about diseases, and 6) the organizational framework (2,3,4)(Figure 1...

  2. METHODS FOR DESCRIPTION OF EDUCATION AND SCIENTIFIC SERVICES IN INFORMATION AND EDUCATION ON THE BASIS OF INTEROPERABILITY STACK EIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina V. Pavlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with methodology for description of scientifi c and educational services in education and information on the basis of interoperability stack EIF (European Interoperability Framework. The passage describes operation factors to depict services on every level of the methodology, tools used to describe the services and the content. We also provide the link between methodology of description with the life span of the service. The article presents an example of service description according to the methodology considering the current education and professional standards, ITIL recommendations, ontology on the OWL basis and WSDL-description. 

  3. Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriner, H.; Davies, B.; Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.; Allen, J.; Shepard, C.

    1998-05-01

    Research and development in the design and manufacture of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is growing at an enormous rate. Advances in MEMS design tools and fabrication processes at Sandia National Laboratories` Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) have broadened the scope of MEMS applications that can be designed and manufactured for both military and commercial use. As improvements in micromachining fabrication technologies continue to be made, MEMS designs can become more complex, thus opening the door to an even broader set of MEMS applications. In an effort to further research and development in MEMS design, fabrication, and application, Sandia National Laboratories has launched the Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program or SAMPLES program. The SAMPLES program offers potential partners interested in MEMS the opportunity to prototype an idea and produce hardware that can be used to sell a concept. The SAMPLES program provides education and training on Sandia`s design tools, analysis tools and fabrication process. New designers can participate in the SAMPLES program and design MEMS devices using Sandia`s design and analysis tools. As part of the SAMPLES program, participants` designs are fabricated using Sandia`s 4 level polycrystalline silicon surface micromachine technology fabrication process known as SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology). Furthermore, SAMPLES participants can also opt to obtain state of the art, post-fabrication services provided at Sandia such as release, packaging, reliability characterization, and failure analysis. This paper discusses the components of the SAMPLES program.

  4. Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE in pharmacy education - a trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirwaikar A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacy education has undergone a radical change as it evolves towards becoming a more patient oriented profession. With a greater emphasis on problem based teaching and competency, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE, supported by its reliability and validity became the gold standard for the evaluation of clinical skills of undergraduate students of medicine and pharmacy worldwide. Core competency evaluation has become a mandatory and critical norm for accountability of educational objectives as the traditional testing tools cannot evaluate clinical competence. Interpersonal and communication skills, professional judgment, skills of resolution etc., may be best assessed through a well- structured OSCE in comparison to oral examinations, multiple choice tests and other methods of assessment. Though OSCEs as an objective method of evaluation offer several advantages to both students and teachers, it also has disadvantages and pitfalls in implementation. This article reviews the OSCE as a trend in pharmacy education.

  5. [Basic considerations during outsourcing of clinical data management services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tong; Liu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    With worldwide improvements in the regulations of international and domestic clinical trial conductions, the quality of clinical trials and trial data management are receiving a great deal of attention. To ensure the quality of clinical trials, maintain business flexibilities and effectively utilize internal and external resources, the outsourcing model is used in the management of clinical data in operation of pharmaceutical companies. The essential criteria of a successful outsourcing mode in clinical trial are selection of qualified contract research organizations (CRO); establishment of appropriate outsourcing model, and generation of effective quality control systems to ensure the authenticity, integrity and accuracy of the clinical trial data.

  6. 75 FR 26945 - International Education Programs Service-Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    .... Schools and/or departments of education have a role to play in creating greater exposure since they are... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION International Education Programs Service--Fulbright-Hays Group Projects... Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of proposed priorities. SUMMARY: The Assistant...

  7. 75 FR 29327 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; State Personnel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... special education teachers. In order to meet this priority an applicant must demonstrate that the project... support to both special education and regular education teachers of children with disabilities and...

  8. Service quality and perceived value of technology-based service encounters: evaluation of clinical staff satisfaction in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Jye; Chang, Hsin Hsin; Eng, Cheng Joo; Wong, Kit Hong

    Previous research has evaluated technology-based service encounters (TBSEs) in the delivery of health care by assessing patient satisfaction. This study examined service quality and perceived value of TBSEs used in health organisations from the perspective of clinical staff, with staff technology readiness as a moderator. A quantitative survey was conducted in Taiwan, across private and public healthcare organisations. Results showed that TBSEs had a direct effect on service quality and perceived value, which in turn had a direct effect on staff satisfaction in using TBSEs. However, service quality had no effect on perceived value when moderated by technology readiness. Theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. The Strategy for Development of Educational Services and Educational Programs at the University of Warsaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnicki Maksym W.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The successful experience of the main educational and scientific institution of Poland – the University of Warsaw in formation and implementation of own strategy of development of educational services and educational programs under conditions of Polish membership in the European Union was researched. The model of the development system of the University of Warsaw has been built, based on its eleven main elements, reflecting the main strategic directions of development, which provide the basis for development of the University in the strategic perspective. The most important directions are described, which are pivotal and development-inclusive: concept of Open University; expansion of existing and creation of new training programs of an interdisciplinary nature; selection and education of scientific and pedagogical staff; training and practice of students; postgraduate education; launching of training programs in foreign languages, internationalization of education; paid tuition; scholarship programs of the University; promotion of outstanding didactic activities through the Foundation for didactic innovation; organizing the recruitment of candidates for training; quality of education. The scientific and practical results of this research will be useful for the top-level managers engaged in the development and implementation of strategies for higher education institutions and research universities in Ukraine.

  10. Use of Smartphones for Clinical and Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Jazmine; Godby, Tyler; Paul, David P; Smith, Harlan; Coustasse, Alberto

    Smartphone use in clinical settings and in medical education has been on the rise, benefiting both health care and health care providers. Studies have shown, however, that some health care facilities and providers are reluctant to switch to smartphones due to the threat of mixing personal apps with clinical care applications and the possibility that distraction created by smartphone use could lead to medication errors and errors linked to procedures, treatments, or tests. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of smartphones in a clinical setting and for medical education, to determine their overall impact. The methodology for this qualitative study was a literature review, conducted over five electronic databases. The search was limited to articles published in English, between 2010 and 2016. Forty-one sources that focused on the implementation of and the barriers to use of smartphones in clinical and medical education environments were referenced. These studies revealed that smartphones have more positive than negative effects on the ability to enhance patient care and medical education. Smartphone use is clearly an effective and efficient method of enhancing patient care and medical education in the health care industry. Access to health care as well is enhanced by the use of this tool.

  11. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education.

  12. American Elementary Education Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Biotechnology Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalengula, Vivien Mweene; Mumba, Frackson; Chitiyo, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This study examined elementary education pre-service teachers' attitudes towards biotechnology processes. A sample comprised 88 elementary education pre-service teachers at a mid-sized university in the Midwest of the USA. Sixty and 28 of these pre-service teachers were enrolled in Introductory Science Methods course and Advance Science Methods…

  13. Questions Often Asked about Special Education Services = Preguntas sobre los servicios de educacion especial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Lisa, Ed.

    This guide, available in both English and Spanish, answers questions often asked by parents about special education services. Questions and answers address the following topics: where to begin if a parent believes a child needs special education services, services available to very young children, the evaluation process, the Individualized…

  14. On International Trade in Educational Services: An Interpretation of the Regulations and China's WTO Commitments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xi-bin

    2006-01-01

    The "General Agreement on Trade in Services" (GATS) of the World Trade Organization (WTO) covers educational trade services. Hence, all the regulations of the GATS have to be followed in the international trade of educational services. Having acceded to the WTO, China is starting to fulfill the rights and obligations as a member by…

  15. Meeting the needs of tomorrow's public service: Guidelines for professional education in public administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R. L.; Cleaveland, F. N.

    1973-01-01

    The educational programs for public administration were studied to develop guidelines for meeting the requirements of public service in the 1980's. The current state of education for public service is discussed along with a prospective view of the service over the next decade. Criteria for evaluating graduate programs are presented.

  16. Online directed journaling in dental hygiene clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwozdek, Anne E; Klausner, Christine P; Kerschbaum, Wendy E

    2009-01-01

    Reflecting upon and sharing of clinical experiences in dental hygiene education is a strategy used to support the application of didactic material to patient care. The promotion of interactive, clinically focused discussions creates opportunities for students to foster critical thinking and socialization skills in dental hygiene practice. Twenty-eight dental hygiene students in their first semester of patient care utilized online directed journaling via blogging software, as a reflection and sharing strategy. Journal entries found critical thinking and socialization themes including connection of didactic material to clinical experience, student-patient interaction, student-student collaboration, and a vision of the professional role of the dental hygienist. A 7 item evaluation instrument provided data that the online journaling strategy was perceived as effective and valuable by the students. Online directed journaling is a strategy that has the potential to enhance critical thinking and socialization skills in dental hygiene clinical education.

  17. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  18. Surgeon Involvement in Pre-Clinical Medical Education: Attitudes of Directors of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Turner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application rates to surgical residencies have shown a downward trend recently. Introducing students to surgeons early in medical school can increase interest in surgery as a career and enhance the instruction of important surgical topics. Directors of undergraduate medical education have unique insight and influence regarding the participation of surgeons in pre-clinical education. Methods: To understand the attitudes of these educators towards surgeons as teachers in pre-clinical programs, a survey was administered to the directors of undergraduate medical education at each of the English-language medical schools in Canada. Results: Educators estimate the participation of surgeons in all categories of pre-clinical education to be low, despite being valuable, and think that it should be increased. The most significant barrier to participation identified was a lack of surgeons’ time. Conclusions: Despite the value of surgeons participating in pre-clinical education, their rate of participation is low. Steps should be taken to facilitate the involvement of surgeons in this phase of education, which may lead to improved education for students and increased student interest in surgery residencies.

  19. An E-mail Service in a Military Adolescent Medicine Clinic: will teens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study was to determine utilization patterns of an Adolescent Medicine Clinic e-mail service. An e-mail service was offered to 6134 patients presenting for care to a military Adolescent Medicine Clinic in San Antonio, Texas over a 6-month period. Families had to complete an authorization form acknowledging ...

  20. 77 FR 67396 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on August 20, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, [[Page 67397...

  1. 77 FR 60143 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on July 18, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  2. 77 FR 72409 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on October 16, 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  3. 78 FR 59064 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc. Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on June 21, 2013, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown...

  4. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) Pursuant to 21 U.S.C. 958(i), the Attorney General shall... on March 5, 2012, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton, Pennsylvania 18964...

  5. 77 FR 50162 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Almac Clinical Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Register on April 26, 2012, 77 FR 24985, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton... that the registration of Almac Clinical Services, Inc. (ACSI) to import the basic classes of controlled..., Inc. (ACSI) to ensure that the company's registration is consistent with the public interest. The...

  6. 78 FR 23594 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI) Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34(a), this is notice that on March 5, 2013, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton...

  7. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in

  8. Eportfolio and learning styles in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Pedersen, Birthe D.; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the use of electronic portfolio in clinical nursing education. The study is part of a larger study investigating learning mediated by ePortfolio. The method takes a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. The setting was a ten-week clinical course in basic nursing. The participa...... only in one way, lack of supervision about how to learn. The study showed some but not unambiguous connection between preferred learning styles and ePortfolio use....

  9. Physiotherapy clinical educators? perceptions of student fitness to practise

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Kristin; Curtis, Heather; Keating, Jennifer L.; Bearman, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    Background Health professional students are expected to maintain Fitness to Practise (FTP) including clinical competence, professional behaviour and freedom from impairment (physical/mental health). FTP potentially affects students, clinicians and clients, yet the impact of supervising students across the spectrum of FTP issues remains relatively under-reported. This study describes clinical educators? perceptions of supporting students with FTP issues. Methods Between November 2012 and Janua...

  10. The IEP Meeting: Perceptions of Parents of Students Who Receive Special Education Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Wade W.

    2008-01-01

    The author investigated parental perceptions of the individualized education program (IEP) meeting among 51 parents of students who were receiving special education services from 1 family support service agency. Survey questions pertained to the following areas: (a) IEP meeting experiences, (b) knowledge level of special education law, (c)…

  11. 76 FR 24914 - Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Digital River Education Services acquired Journey Education Marketing (JEM) in August 2010. Some workers... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,975] Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI...

  12. Republication of "A Propensity Score Matching Analysis of the Effects of Special Education Services"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul L.; Frisco, Michelle L.; Farkas, George; Hibel, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Since the landmark enactment of Education of the Handicapped Act in 1975, special education supports and services have been provided to children with disabilities. Although costly, the intentionality of these specialized services has been to advance the educational and societal opportunities of children with disabilities as they progress to…

  13. Costs and benefits of nursing clinical education for hospital institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivério Ribeiro

    2014-11-01

    Conclusion: The inferences show that the presence of students in Clinical Teachings in the hospitals leads to a positive balance of 21.57 € per day and service, with a positive reinforcement associated to the resulting citizens satisfaction facing student rendered cares.

  14. 75 FR 13550 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services: National HIV Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... services, reducing stigma, and making testing routine. This open competition seeks to expand fiscal... physical and mental health of the American people. Dated: March 12, 2010. Yvette Roubideaux, Director... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Office of Clinical and Preventive...

  15. Reaching youth through franchise clinics: assessment of Kenyan private sector involvement in youth services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Martha; Montagu, Dominic

    2007-03-01

    This paper evaluates the ability of social franchise programs, which use private providers to offer reproductive health services, to provide services to youth in western Kenya. Although franchise clinics have rarely targeted youth, they appear to offer a viable alternative for providing reproductive health services to this age group.

  16. Analysis of a STEM Education Professional Development Conference for Pre-Service Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardrict-Ewing, Gloria

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines are attracting increased attention in education. The iSTEM 2017 conference was a professional development program designed to acquaint pre-service teachers with interdisciplinary, research-based STEM instructional strategies that can transform traditional classroom instruction into dynamic learning environments. The STEM Education Scholars (STEMES) is a Learning Community of Practice, housed in the College of Education, at a mid-sized mid-western public research university. The program of study focused on designing a professional development program for future Pre-K12 teachers. The iSTEM 2017 conference presented by the STEMES Community of Practice sought to inform pre-service teachers of STEM pedagogy, and focused on innovative classroom resources, hands-on learning and increasing content confidence when incorporating STEM into classroom instruction. iSTEM 2017 was held in February, 2017, and offered twenty refereed presentations and workshop sessions, a keynote address, and a closing session to over 200 pre-service teachers. Conference participants chose sessions, participated in game-like experiences and shared their learning with each other as well as with conference organizers. Results from participant self-reported surveys were analyzed to measure the impact of the conference on improving participants' confidence in teaching STEM topics, and their attitudes about the instructional methods. These results were added to the conference proceedings, which also contain documentation of each iSTEM 2017 session. Findings suggest that the iSTEM 2017 conference had an overall positive impact on participants' familiarity with STEM education, their belief in the importance of STEM education, and their confidence to integrate STEM education into future instructional practices.

  17. Learner-oriented distance education supporting service system model and applied research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liyong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance education is a product of social progress and an emerging way of life-long learning as well. This paper describes the construction of the distance education supporting service system and establishes the distance education supporting service system from the perspective of distance education learners. Under the premise of considering to provide six influencing factors--learning facilities, learning coaching and counseling, learning resources, education and teaching information, assessment of student learning situation and organization of practical teaching activities, this paper assesses the distance education supporting service system of Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen by using AHP.

  18. Impact of clinical pharmacist-based parenteral nutrition service for bone marrow transplantation patients: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Maryam; Hayatshahi, Alireza; Sarayani, Amir; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Javadi, Mohammadreza; Torkamandi, Hassan; Gholami, Kheirollah; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a well-documented supportive care which maintains the nutritional status of patients. Clinical pharmacists are often involved in providing PN services; however, few studies have investigated the effect of a clinical pharmacy-based PN service in resource-limited settings. We designed a randomized clinical trial to compare the clinical pharmacist-based PN service (intervention group) with the conventional method (control group) for adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran (2011-2012). In the intervention group, the clinical pharmacists implemented standard guidelines of nutrition support. The conventional method was a routine nutrition support protocol which was pursued for all patients in the bone marrow transplantation wards. Main study outcomes included nutritional status (weight, albumin, total protein, pre-albumin, and nitrogen balance), length of hospital stay, time to engraftment, rate of graft versus host disease, and mortality rate. Patients were followed for 3 months. Fifty-nine patients were randomly allocated to a study group. The overall intake (oral and parenteral) in the control group was significantly lower than standard daily needed calories (P nutritional outcomes were either preserved or improved in the intervention group while the nutritional status in the control group was deteriorated (P values nutrition support service significantly improved nutritional status and clinical outcomes in comparison with the suboptimal conventional method. Future studies should assess the cost effectiveness of clinical pharmacists' PN services.

  19. Description of Sanitation Clinic Implementation in Primary Health Care Services in Bukittinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vini Jamarin

    2016-01-01

    descriptive study used total sampling, in which all seven PHCS in Bukittinggi are included. This research was done from September to October 2013. Based on quedionaire result, all sanitarians are well-educated, but only two of them had sanitation clinic training. Only one PHCS has a special room, six has posters and leaflets, two allocates special budget for sanitation clinic, and six has all kind of manual books. Based on secondary data, the accumulation of environment-based disease’s cases in all PHCS is variative and fluctuative and the accumulation of clients come to sanitation clinic is still below the expectation. House-visitting activity has not met the expectation yet, while trans-program activity has been running well, trans-sector activity has been running well in almost all PHCS, and evaluation has been running in a variative frequency. All sanitation clinic graded good in implementing sanitation clinic, within the range of 50-100%.Keywords: sanitation clinic, primary health care service

  20. The rare and undiagnosed diseases diagnostic service - application of massively parallel sequencing in a state-wide clinical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynam, Gareth; Pachter, Nicholas; McKenzie, Fiona; Townshend, Sharon; Slee, Jennie; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Vasudevan, Anand; Hawkins, Anne; Broley, Stephanie; Schofield, Lyn; Verhoef, Hedwig; Walker, Caroline E; Molster, Caron; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Jamieson, Sarra; Tang, Dave; Lassmann, Timo; Mina, Kym; Beilby, John; Davis, Mark; Laing, Nigel; Murphy, Lesley; Weeramanthri, Tarun; Dawkins, Hugh; Goldblatt, Jack

    2016-06-11

    The Rare and Undiagnosed Diseases Diagnostic Service (RUDDS) refers to a genomic diagnostic platform operating within the Western Australian Government clinical services delivered through Genetic Services of Western Australia (GSWA). GSWA has provided a state-wide service for clinical genetic care for 28 years and it serves a population of 2.5 million people across a geographical area of 2.5milion Km(2). Within this context, GSWA has established a clinically integrated genomic diagnostic platform in partnership with other public health system managers and service providers, including but not limited to the Office of Population Health Genomics, Diagnostic Genomics (PathWest Laboratories) and with executive level support from the Department of Health. Herein we describe report presents the components of this service that are most relevant to the heterogeneity of paediatric clinical genetic care. Briefly the platform : i) offers multiple options including non-genetic testing; monogenic and genomic (targeted in silico filtered and whole exome) analysis; and matchmaking; ii) is delivered in a patient-centric manner that is resonant with the patient journey, it has multiple points for entry, exit and re-entry to allow people access to information they can use, when they want to receive it; iii) is synchronous with precision phenotyping methods; iv) captures new knowledge, including multiple expert review; v) is integrated with current translational genomic research activities and best practice; and vi) is designed for flexibility for interactive generation of, and integration with, clinical research for diagnostics, community engagement, policy and models of care. The RUDDS has been established as part of routine clinical genetic services and is thus sustainable, equitably managed and seeks to translate new knowledge into efficient diagnostics and improved health for the whole community.

  1. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service

    OpenAIRE

    Lemay, Kate S.; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay; Emmerton, Lynne; Burton, Deborah L.; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service...

  2. Teaching clinical reasoning by making thinking visible: an action research project with allied health clinical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delany, Clare; Golding, Clinton

    2014-01-30

    Clinical reasoning is fundamental to all forms of professional health practice, however it is also difficult to teach and learn because it is complex, tacit, and effectively invisible for students. In this paper we present an approach for teaching clinical reasoning based on making expert thinking visible and accessible to students. Twenty-one experienced allied health clinical educators from three tertiary Australian hospitals attended up to seven action research discussion sessions, where they developed a tentative heuristic of their own clinical reasoning, trialled it with students, evaluated if it helped their students to reason clinically, and then refined it so the heuristic was targeted to developing each student's reasoning skills. Data included participants' written descriptions of the thinking routines they developed and trialed with their students and the transcribed action research discussion sessions. Content analysis was used to summarise this data and categorise themes about teaching and learning clinical reasoning. Two overriding themes emerged from participants' reports about using the 'making thinking visible approach'. The first was a specific focus by participating educators on students' understanding of the reasoning process and the second was heightened awareness of personal teaching styles and approaches to teaching clinical reasoning. We suggest that the making thinking visible approach has potential to assist educators to become more reflective about their clinical reasoning teaching and acts as a scaffold to assist them to articulate their own expert reasoning and for students to access and use.

  3. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS).

  4. Evaluation of clinical pharmacy services offered for palliative care patients in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Kyle John; Mohamad, Alaa Adil; AlYafei, Sumaya AlSaadi

    2014-09-01

    Palliative care is an emerging concept in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council, a political and economic union of Arab states bordering the Persian Gulf, namely Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates. Clinical pharmacy services have not yet been evaluated in this region. The objectives of this study were to create a baseline inventory of clinical pharmacy interventions in palliative care and to assess the perceived importance of interventions made. This was a prospective, single-center characterization study. Interventions were documented from September 30 to December 1, 2013. They were characterized into predetermined categories and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Physician acceptance rate and intervention rate per patient were calculated. Classification categories were sent to 10 practicing pharmacists in each of Qatar and Canada, who ranked the categories on the basis of perceived importance. A total of 96 interventions were documented, giving 3 interventions per patient and an acceptance rate of 81%. Discontinuing therapy (29%), initiating therapy (25%), and provision of education/counseling (13.5%) were most common. No differences were found between rankings from pharmacists in Qatar or Canada. Clinical pharmacy interventions are frequent, and those relating to alterations in drug therapy are most common. Interventions align with the perceived importance from pharmacists in both Qatar and Canada.

  5. Identifying mental health services in clinical genetic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, M; Esplen, M J; Wilson, B J; Dorval, M; Bottorff, J L; Ly, M; Carroll, J C; Allanson, J; Humphreys, E; Rayson, D

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mental health needs of individuals at risk for adult onset hereditary disorder (AOHD) from the perspective of their genetic service providers, as it is unknown to what extent psychosocial services are required and being met. A mail-out survey was sent to 281 providers on the membership lists of the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors and the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists. The survey assessed psychosocial issues that were most commonly observed by geneticists, genetic counsellors (GCs), and nurses as well as availability and types of psychosocial services offered. Of the 129 respondents, half of genetic service providers reported observing signs of depression and anxiety, while 44% noted patients' concerns regarding relationships with family and friends. In terms of providing counselling to patients, as the level of psychological risk increased, confidence in dealing with these issues decreased. In addition, significantly more GCs reported that further training in psychosocial issues would be most beneficial to them if resources were available. As a feature of patient care, it is recommended that gene-based predictive testing include an integrative model of psychosocial services as well as training for genetic service providers in specific areas of AOHD mental health.

  6. Service impact of a national clinical leadership development programme: findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fealy, Gerard M; McNamara, Martin S; Casey, Mary; O'Connor, Tom; Patton, Declan; Doyle, Louise; Quinlan, Christina

    2015-04-01

    The study reported here was part of a larger study, which evaluated a national clinical leadership development programme with reference to resources, participant experiences, participant outcomes and service impact. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the programme's service impact. Clinical leadership development develops competencies that are expressed in context. The outcomes of clinical leadership development occur at individual, departmental and organisational levels. The methods used to evaluate the service impact were focus groups, group interviews and individual interviews. Seventy participants provided data in 18 separate qualitative data collection events. The data contained numerous accounts of service development activities, initiated by programme participants, which improved service and/or improved the culture of the work setting. Clinical leadership development programmes that incorporate a deliberate service impact element can result in identifiable positive service outcomes. The nuanced relationship between leader development and service development warrants further investigation. This study demonstrates that clinical leadership development can impact on service in distinct and identifiable ways. Clinical leadership development programmes should focus on the setting in which the leadership competencies will be demonstrated. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. In-Service Physical Educators' Experiences of Online Adapted Physical Education Endorsement Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Haegele, Justin A; Foot, Rachel

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in-service physical education (PE) teachers' experiences during online adapted physical education (APE) graduate courses. Based on andragogy theory (adult learning theory) we employed a descriptive qualitative methodology using an explanatory case study design. The participants (6 female and 3 male) were in-service PE teachers enrolled in an online graduate APE endorsement program. Data collection included journal reflection reports and face-to-face interviews. A constant comparative method was used to interpret the data. Three interrelated themes emerged from the participants' narratives. The first theme, instructor communication, exposes the advantages and disadvantages the participants perceived regarding communication while enrolled in the online APE graduate courses. The second theme, bulletin board discussion experiences, described participants' perceptions of the use of the bulletin board discussion forum. Lastly, the final theme, assessment experiences, described how the participants learned knowledge and skills through online courses related to assessment and evaluation.

  8. Travelling educational workshops for clinical teachers: are they worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peter; Pullon, Sue

    2011-03-01

    The support of doctors who teach medical students in clinical settings is considered very important. In order to function as effectively as possible in their role as clinical teachers, these clinicians require educational support from faculty members. The most usual form that support takes is university staff offering face-to-face teaching on educational topics. It is estimated that in the course of 1 year, and across the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Otago, there could be up to 600 clinicians actively involved in the direct support of medical students. Many of these clinicians work in locations some considerable distance from the university campus. In 2009 the Medical Education Unit based at the Wellington Campus introduced a series of peripatetic face-to-face workshops for clinical teachers in several different geographical locations. Educational support of this nature is challenging to organise and potentially expensive, which begs the question: are travelling workshops worthwhile? Whereas the subject matter of the workshops was of interest to those who attended, of equal importance was the opportunity the workshops created to interact with colleagues in a relaxed atmosphere. In addition, the workshops were the catalyst for some clinicians to formally pursue their particular educational interests. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  9. Concept-Based Learning in Clinical Experiences: Bringing Theory to Clinical Education for Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ann

    2016-07-01

    Concept-based learning is used increasingly in nursing education to support the organization, transfer, and retention of knowledge. Concept-based learning activities (CBLAs) have been used in clinical education to explore key aspects of the patient situation and principles of nursing care, without responsibility for total patient care. The nature of best practices in teaching and the resultant learning are not well understood. The purpose of this multiple-case study research was to explore and describe concept-based learning in the context of clinical education in inpatient settings. Four clinical groups (each a case) were observed while they used CBLAs in the clinical setting. Major findings include that concept-based learning fosters deep learning, connection of theory with practice, and clinical judgment. Strategies used to support learning, major teaching-learning foci, and preconditions for concept-based teaching and learning will be described. Concept-based learning is promising to support integration of theory with practice and clinical judgment through application experiences with patients. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(7):365-371.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Impact of an educational intervention and clinical performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reduced (p=0.002 and p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion. This study demonstrates that adopting a relatively simple educational tool, making use of a clinical performance dashboard indicator and benchmarking practice can significantly reduce the level of neonatal sepsis while also reducing contaminated blood cultures.

  11. Peer Assisted Learning in Clinical Education: Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Jolene M.; Weidner, Thomas G.; Marty, Melissa C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the occurrence, benefits, and preferences for peer assisted learning (PAL) in medical and allied health clinical education, and to identify areas in athletic training which need further research. Data Sources: Using relevant terms, five databases were searched for the period 1980-2006 regarding literature on the use of PAL in…

  12. Informed Consent: Ethical Issues and Future Challenges in Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angaran, David M.

    1989-01-01

    A look at pharmaceutical care needs in the future is the basis for discussion of the educational needs of clinical pharmacists. Issues discussed include the appropriate degree (bachelor's vs. doctoral), costs of instruction, faculty/student ratios, the pharmacy practice faculty as role models, and computer-assisted instruction. (MSE)

  13. Clinical Correlations as a Tool in Basic Science Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda J. Klement

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical correlations are tools to assist students in associating basic science concepts with a medical application or disease. There are many forms of clinical correlations and many ways to use them in the classroom. Five types of clinical correlations that may be embedded within basic science courses have been identified and described. (1 Correlated examples consist of superficial clinical information or stories accompanying basic science concepts to make the information more interesting and relevant. (2 Interactive learning and demonstrations provide hands-on experiences or the demonstration of a clinical topic. (3 Specialized workshops have an application-based focus, are more specialized than typical laboratory sessions, and range in complexity from basic to advanced. (4 Small-group activities require groups of students, guided by faculty, to solve simple problems that relate basic science information to clinical topics. (5 Course-centered problem solving is a more advanced correlation activity than the others and focuses on recognition and treatment of clinical problems to promote clinical reasoning skills. Diverse teaching activities are used in basic science medical education, and those that include clinical relevance promote interest, communication, and collaboration, enhance knowledge retention, and help develop clinical reasoning skills.

  14. Clinical pharmacy cardiac risk service for managing patients with coronary artery disease in a health maintenance organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhoff, Brian G; Nies, Leslie K; Olson, Kari L; Nash, James D; Rasmussen, Jon R; Merenich, John A

    2007-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy service for managing the treatment of coronary artery disease in a health maintenance organization is described. Despite the proven benefits of aggressive risk factor modification for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), there remains a treatment gap between consensus- and evidence-based recommendations and their application in patient care. In 1998, Kaiser Permanente of Colorado developed the Clinical Pharmacy Cardiac Risk Service (CPCRS) to focus on the long-term management of patients with CAD to improve clinical outcomes. The primary goals of the CPCRS are to increase the number of CAD patients on lipid-lowering therapy, manage medications shown to decrease the risk of future CAD-related events, assist in the monitoring and control of other diseases that increase cardiovascular risk, provide patient education and recommendations for nonpharmacologic therapy, and act as a CAD information resource for physicians and other health care providers. Using an electronic medical record and tracking database, the service works in close collaboration with primary care physicians, cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitation nurses, and other health care providers to reduce cardiac risk in the CAD population. Particular attention is given to dyslipidemia, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco cessation. Treatment with evidence-based regimens is initiated and adjusted as necessary. Over 11,000 patients are currently being followed by the CPCRS. A clinical pharmacy service in a large health maintenance organization provides cardiac risk reduction for patients with CAD and helps close treatment gaps that may exist for these patients.

  15. 34 CFR 300.534 - Protections for children not determined eligible for special education and related services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... special education and related services. 300.534 Section 300.534 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES... children not determined eligible for special education and related services. (a) General. A child who has...

  16. Service Recovery in Marketing Education: It's What We Do that Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajesh; Muncy, James A.

    2008-01-01

    One thing that higher education has in common with other service providers is that service failures occur. There are times when students are negatively impacted by mistakes made in the classroom. An extensive body of literature has developed in the area of services marketing about what to do when such service failures occur. The current study…

  17. Job analysis and student assessment tool: perfusion education clinical preceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Jeffrey B

    2007-09-01

    The perfusion education system centers on the cardiac surgery operating room and the perfusionist teacher who serves as a preceptor for the perfusion student. One method to improve the quality of perfusion education is to create a valid method for perfusion students to give feedback to clinical teachers. The preceptor job analysis consisted of a literature review and interviews with preceptors to list their critical tasks, critical incidents, and cognitive and behavioral competencies. Behaviorally anchored rating traits associated with the preceptors' tasks were identified. Students voted to validate the instrument items. The perfusion instructor rating instrument with a 0-4, "very weak" to "very strong" Likert rating scale was used. The five preceptor traits for student evaluation of clinical instruction (SECI) are as follows: The clinical instructor (1) encourages self-learning, (2) encourages clinical reasoning, (3) meets student's learning needs, (4) gives continuous feedback, and (5) represents a good role model. Scores from 430 student-preceptor relationships for 28 students rotating at 24 affiliate institutions with 134 clinical instructors were evaluated. The mean overall good preceptor average (GPA) was 3.45 +/- 0.76 and was skewed to the left, ranging from 0.0 to 4.0 (median = 3.8). Only 21 of the SECI relationships earned a GPA SECI are methods to provide valid information to improve the quality of a perfusion education program.

  18. Impact of bandwidth for various services in heterogeneous network and quality of service via communication technologies in Malaysian higher educational

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazri ISMAIL

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on heterogeneous services and communication technologies for retrieving and sending information between students and lecturers in Malaysian higher educational institutes. It intends to investigate pattern and significant level of various services implementation, convergence of communication technologies and bandwidth capacity for last mile users (students and lecturers. It is designed to determine which communication technologies, services, bandwidth capacity and QoS will achieve the highest level acceptance in Malaysian higher educational institutes. Heterogeneous environment can also generate mobility approaches. A survey method is used to collect data from respondents (System Network Administrator in Malaysian higher educational institutes. Statistical Analysis using t-test shows that implementation of high speed bandwidth for Internet (WAN achieved significant level. Frequency test are used to analyze the various services implementation via convergence of communication technologies in heterogeneous environment for retrieving information. The most apparent finding of this study is that various services implementation in higher educational institutes can affect convergence of communication technologies usage in accessing information over heterogeneous network environment between students and lecturers. The study or analysis confirms that Malaysia higher educational institutes have not achieved a maximum level of various services implementation via convergence of communication technologies between students and lecturers in heterogeneous network environment. Therefore, low convergence of communication technologies can produce a low mobility and ubiquitous interaction between students and lectures in Malaysian higher educational institutes.

  19. Educational service specialist: reality reflection of a municipality paulista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Grasiela Gomes Liduenha Gonçalves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to analyze the Specialized Educational Care (AEE, in Portuguese in Brazil, southeast region, state of São Paulo, specifically in a paulista municipality. Therefore, was used the laws that guide the pedagogical work within this space, official social indicators and empirical data, which was created during visits to the city, when was realized the observation in the resource room and an interview with the responsible teacher. The results indicate: increase in the number of classes that offer the AEE in Brazilian schools, in the southeast region and in the state of São Paulo; with respect to the municipality analyzed, was found that teaching the AEE is isolated from the school context and the service is directed to students with learning disabilities, although there is presence of students with other disabilities in school, in addition, the service is limited to an autonomous life activities , especially in the development of mental processes. The results showed that still there are difficulties in implementing the AEE in school that need more policies and actions based on local realities.

  20. Area health education centers and health science library services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R T; Howard, F H

    1977-07-01

    A study to determine the impact that the Area Health Education Center type of programs may have on health science libraries was conducted by the Extramural Programs, National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with a contract awarded by the Bureau of Health Manpower, Health Resources Administration, to develop an inventory of the AHEC type of projects in the United States. Specific study tasks included a review of these programs as they relate to library and information activities, on-site surveys on the programs to define their needs for library services and information, and a categorization of library activities. A major finding was that health science libraries and information services are generally not included in AHEC program planning and development, although information and information exchange is a fundamental part of the AHEC type of programs. This study suggests that library inadequacies are basically the result of this planning failure and of a lack of financial resources; however, many other factors may be contributory. The design and value of library activities for these programs needs explication.

  1. USE OF SOCIAL INTERNET SERVICES IN EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITY OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Shlianchak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the key opportunities of using services of web 2. 0 technologies to the educational process. It is shown of Social Software tools: Wiki technology, system of creating blogs, systems of storing and sharing web resources. The basic lines of Wiki-technology, possibility, and methods of the use of it are described in pedagogical practice. The described pedagogical potential of Wiki-technology to organize project activities of students. It should be stressed that Wiki is a piece of server software that allows users to freely create and edit web page content using any web browser. The author focusing on teaching and methodical opportunities of the Internet blogs and systems of storing and sharing web resources (for joint hypertext materials creation, placement of presentations, text documents, photos, video resources, etc. in professional preparation of the future primary school teachers. It is shown efficiency using of web 2. 0 technologies in the educational work future teachers (by the example of their own resources of Kirovograd State Pedagogical University named after Volodymyr Vynnychenko.

  2. Novice-Service Language Teacher Development: Bridging the Gap between Preservice and In-Service Education and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2012-01-01

    One reason for teacher attrition is that a gap exists between pre-service teacher preparation and in-service teacher development, in that most novice teachers suddenly have no further contact with their teacher educators, and from the very first day on the job, must face the same challenges as their more experienced colleagues, often without much…

  3. Postsecondary Students With Psychiatric Disabilities Identify Core Services and Key Ingredients to Supporting Education Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebel, Kathleen; Mizrahi, Raphael; Ringeisen, Heather

    2017-10-26

    Accessing and successfully completing postsecondary educational opportunities may be challenging for those living with psychiatric disabilities. This exploratory study highlights the experiences of individuals with psychiatric disabilities participating in postsecondary educational support initiatives. Investigators conducted case studies with 3 education support initiatives across the United States. Focus groups revealed what concrete supported education services were helpful and key ingredients in delivering education supports. Access to specialists, mindfulness techniques, help with time management and procrastination, and facilitating classroom accommodations were identified as critical. Developing authentic relationships with supported education staff, flexibility in service delivery and access to student peers living with psychiatric disabilities were noted as key ingredients in service delivery. Incorporating the voice of students with psychiatric disabilities into supported education services can increase access, involvement, and retention, therein providing more supports to students with psychiatric disabilities achieving their postsecondary education goals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Provision of educationally related services for children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, J Daniel

    2007-06-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabling conditions often need educationally related services. As medical home providers, physicians and other health care professionals can assist children, adolescents, and their families with the complex federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and systems associated with these services. Expanded roles for physicians and other health care professionals in individualized family service plan, individualized education plan, and Section 504 plan development and implementation are recommended. Recent updates to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act will also affect these services. Funding for these services by private and nonprivate sources also continue to affect the availability of these educationally related services. The complex range of federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and systems for special education and related services for children and adolescents in public schools is beyond the scope of this statement. Readers are referred to the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement "The Pediatrician's Role in Development and Implementation of an Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or an Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP)" for additional background materials. The focus of this statement is the role that health care professionals have in determining and managing educationally related services in the school setting. This policy statement is a revision of a previous statement, "Provision of Educationally Related Services for Children and Adolescents With Chronic Diseases and Disabling Conditions," published in February 2000 by the Committee on Children With Disabilities (http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics;105/2/448).

  5. In-service education and teachers’ perception about key competences development with Sport Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Calderón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to analyze the perception of physical education teachers on job opportunities of key competences of a particular teaching model. To this end, 12 teachers, Secondary and Primary, conducted an in-service education course on the model, and once completed, implemented a teaching unit in their respective schools. It was then through a questionnaire, they were asked about their perception of the development of key competences. To check whether there were differences in the perception of teachers on the development of each of the core competencies, it was calculated means and standard deviations of all variables recorded, and used the Mann-Whitney U test for independent samples. Teachers see great potential to work competence through Sport Education Model primarily on social and civic competence, lifelong learning, and autonomy and personal initiative.

  6. Education in the clinical context: establishing a strategic framework to ensure relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Fox, Robyn; Armit, Lyn

    2008-01-01

    Quality contemporary practice relies on nurses to provide health care within an embedded nexus of clinical, professional and organisational learning that leads them through a career trajectory that encourages lifelong development. Within complex health service environments this is fraught with difficulties. Enhancing practice is multifaceted requiring not just education for the acquisition of skills and abilities but time and space for reflection on experience within the clinical context. This ultimately leads to professional knowledge development. Queensland Health has developed a Nursing and Midwifery Staff Development Framework to assist nurses in structuring their experiences in the practice setting to enable their professional goals. Learning is guided within this framework through its collective modus operandi, that is, the development of teams that overlap to identify and progress the educational agenda; resources to develop consistent relevant learning material that incorporates evidence obtained through practices and the literature; and educator and clinician networks across health services throughout the state, and furthermore, links with the tertiary sector to assist in marketing, applicability and synergy with further education.

  7. Receipt of special education services following elementary school grade retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Michael; Guppy, Nicole; Young, Robin; Augustyn, Marilyn

    2009-06-01

    To estimate the proportion of children who receive an Individualized Education Program (IEP) following grade retention in elementary school. Longitudinal cohort study. Children retained in kindergarten or first (K/1) grade and third grade, presumably for academic reasons, were followed up through fifth grade. Presence or absence of an IEP. A total of 300 children retained in K/1 and 80 retained in third grade were included in the study. Of the K/1 retainees, 68.9% never received an IEP during the subsequent 4 to 5 years; of the third-grade retainees, 72.3% never received an IEP. Kindergarten/first-grade retainees in the highest quintile for socioeconomic status and those with suburban residence were less likely to receive an IEP than retained children in all other socioeconomic status quintiles (adjusted odds ratio, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.62) and in rural communities (0.16; 0.06-0.44). Among K/1 retainees with persistently low academic achievement in math and reading, as assessed by standardized testing, 38.2% and 29.7%, respectively, never received an IEP. Most children retained in K/1 or third grade for academic reasons, including many of those who demonstrated sustained academic difficulties, never received an IEP during elementary school. Further studies are important to elucidate whether retained elementary schoolchildren are being denied their rights to special education services. In the meantime, early-grade retention may provide an opportunity for pediatricians to help families advocate for appropriate special education evaluations for children experiencing school difficulties.

  8. "The Strawberry Generation… They Are Too Pampered": Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers' Perspectives on Outdoor Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atencio, Matthew; Tan, Yuen Sze Michelle; Ho, Susanna; Ching, Chew Ting

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores pre-service PE teachers' conceptions of outdoor education (OE) in Singapore. Survey questionnaires were administered to 120 pre-service teachers; 14 teachers participated in follow-up semi-structured interviews. The findings indicate that OE is predominantly situated within the outdoor camp environment. Pre-service teachers…

  9. Impact of bandwidth for various services in heterogeneous network and quality of service via communication technologies in Malaysian higher educational

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Nazri ISMAIL; Abdullah Mohd ZIN

    2007-01-01

    This study focuses on heterogeneous services and communication technologies for retrieving and sending information between students and lecturers in Malaysian higher educational institutes. It intends to investigate pattern and significant level of various services implementation, convergence of communication technologies and bandwidth capacity for last mile users (students and lecturers). It is designed to determine which communication technologies, services, bandwidth capacity and QoS will ...

  10. Feedback in Clinical Education, Part I: Characteristics of Feedback Provided by Approved Clinical Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, Sara; Henning, Jolene

    2014-01-01

    Context Providing students with feedback is an important component of athletic training clinical education; however, little information is known about the feedback that Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs; now known as preceptors) currently provide to athletic training students (ATSs). Objective To characterize the feedback provided by ACIs to ATSs during clinical education experiences. Design Qualitative study. Setting One National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletic training facility and 1 outpatient rehabilitation clinic that were clinical sites for 1 entry-level master's degree program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Patients or Other Participants A total of 4 ACIs with various experience levels and 4 second-year ATSs. Data Collection and Analysis Extensive field observations were audio recorded, transcribed, and integrated with field notes for analysis. The constant comparative approach of open, axial, and selective coding was used to inductively analyze data and develop codes and categories. Member checking, triangulation, and peer debriefing were used to promote trustworthiness of the study. Results The ACIs gave 88 feedback statements in 45 hours and 10 minutes of observation. Characteristics of feedback categories included purpose, timing, specificity, content, form, and privacy. Conclusions Feedback that ACIs provided included several components that made each feedback exchange unique. The ACIs in our study provided feedback that is supported by the literature, suggesting that ACIs are using current recommendations for providing feedback. Feedback needs to be investigated across multiple athletic training education programs to gain more understanding of certain areas of feedback, including frequency, privacy, and form. PMID:24143902

  11. 78 FR 41198 - Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative Studies Scientific Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Clinical Science Research and Development Service Cooperative... under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Clinical Science Research and.... The Committee advises the Chief Research and Development Officer through the Director of the Clinical...

  12. Stakeholder Perception of Service Quality in Qatar Higher Education Institutions: An Application to Qatar University

    OpenAIRE

    Shurair, Amal S.

    2017-01-01

    Managing quality of services offered by institutions of higher education is important in any country due to the inherent aim of producing quality graduates from programs offered in the university. Qatar has made substantial investments in higher education. Qatar University, being the national university of the country, the perception of stakeholders on the service quality in education becomes an important factor for developing a quality education system. Therefore, the main goal of this thesi...

  13. Comparison of blood services and clinical transfusion practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction Tracking blood safety status of member states by World Health Organisation is now a routine activity through Global Database for Blood Safety. To understand further the differences between high income and low-income countries a detailed review may be warranted. In this review, the blood services of ...

  14. 77 FR 34942 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Annual State Application Under Part B of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act SUMMARY: In accordance with Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (20 U.S.C...

  15. 75 FR 34990 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services Overview... exceeding $850,000 for a single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  16. 75 FR 38510 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Personnel Development to Improve...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Personnel... word ``scholar'' in the Special Education Preservice Program Improvement Grants (84.325T) priority in....html . Dated: June 25, 2010. Alexa Posny, Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative...

  17. 75 FR 48957 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Technology and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... Special Education Programs (OSEP) provides competitive grant funds to support the video description of... exceeding $1,000,000 for a single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education...

  18. 75 FR 39216 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... exceeding $1,000,000 for a single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education... this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  19. 75 FR 39426 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; National Institute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview... exceeding $850,000 for a single budget period of 12 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education... participate in this meeting by conference call with NIDRR staff from the Office of Special Education and...

  20. "Sexuality Isn't Just about Sex": Pre-Service Teachers' Shifting Constructs of Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkinson, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a three-year study into pre-service (student) teachers' experiences of and beliefs about sexuality education in New Zealand schools. It reports on participants' own memories of school sexuality education programmes, and examines changes in their constructs of sexuality education during their teacher education in…

  1. In-service and pre-service teacher education in IBSE: The ESTABLISH approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ješková, Zuzana; Kireš, Marián; McLoughlin, Eilish; Finlayson, Odilla; Ottander, Christina; Ekborg, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    One of the main goals of the ESTABLISH 7fp project (available on line at http://www.establish-fp7.eu/) was the development and implementation of the professional development teacher education programmes (TEP) to support teachers in adopting inquiry-based strategies in their teaching. Within the project there was a model for in-service and pre-service teacher training in IBSE designed and implemented across 12 participating countries. The programme is based on 4 core elements and 4 additional elements that are built around the IBSE teaching units developed within the project. As accepted by ESTABLISH partners, all teacher training programmes include the minimum of the four elements, i.e. introduction to IBSE, industrial content knowledge, teacher as implementer and teacher as developer of IBSE teaching materials. There are also four additional elements designed in detail, i.e. ICT for IBSE, argumentation in the classroom, research and design projects for students, assessment of IBSE. These can be added to the programme optionally with regard to the level of teachers’ IBSE skills and current situation in education and teachers’ professional development within the country. This ESTABLISH model of TEP was followed in participating countries in order to change teachers’ attitudes from traditional ways of teaching towards adopting inquiry strategies and their successful implementation in the classroom. Within the face-to-face workshops teachers experienced and developed their inquiry based teaching strategies using specifically developed materials. In addition, the e-platform has been developed to provide on-line support. This platform provides educators and teachers with all the necessary materials for the training and IBSE teaching units and other teaching materials for teachers’ ongoing help. The teacher training programme was successfully implemented in Slovakia. There were two runs of teacher training workshops on IBSE already carried out. Moreover, the

  2. Moving Into Communities: Developing Cultural Competence with Pre-service Educators through Community Service-Learning Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Coffey

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research in teacher education suggests that field experiences in community settings can offer pre-service teachers a context for understanding the link between theory and practice. This paper documents the experiences of pre-service educators who participated in service-learning partnerships for thirty hours in multiple community settings in the southeast United States. Pre-service teachers not only volunteered in the community, but they also engaged in critically reflective journal writing and participated in evaluative class discussions. Students praised the benefits of a service experience in both school and community placements and discussed how interactions with the community agencies gave them the insight into how community organizations often play a significant role in the lives of the underserved students they will eventually teach. The author argues that the inclusion of a service-learning component in early pre-service teacher education field experiences has the potential to facilitate the examination of the relationships between community organizations and schools and encourage development of cultural competence among pre-service teachers. KEYWORDSservice-learning, pre-service teacher preparation, community partnerships

  3. Developing education tailored to clinical roles: genetics education for haemophilia nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sarah; Barker, Colin; Marshall, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Genetics is an important component of the clinical work of haemophilia nurses, but little was known about the genetic education needs of haemophilia nurses. To develop, deliver and evaluate genetic education for haemophilia nurses, based on clinical roles. Perceived relevance of genetics to haemophilia nursing practice was explored using electronic voting (response rate 75%, 58/77). A follow-on questionnaire to a volunteer sample of participants explored educational preferences (response rate 41%, 17/41). Results informed development of a two-hour genetics workshop session, evaluated by questionnaire (response rate 67%, 47/70). Genetic competences were considered relevant to the clinical practice of haemophilia nurses, and learning needs were identified. Preference was expressed for education focused on practical skills. During the subsequent workshop, participant confidence ratings significantly increased in the four areas addressed. Planned changes to clinical care and training were reported. Within new areas of advanced nursing practice, learning needs can be addressed by: identifying relevant clinical activities and associated learning needs; creating a strategy and resources using preferred forms of delivery; implementing the strategy; and evaluating its effect. This will enable development of education that addresses the real needs of practising nurses, grounded in their daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Emotional climate and internal communication in a clinical management unit compared with two traditional hospital services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, E; Rubio, A; March, J C; Danet, A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the emotional climate, quality of communication and performance indicators in a clinical management unit and two traditional hospital services. Quantitative study. questionnaire of 94 questions. 83 health professionals (63 responders) from the clinical management unit of breast pathology and the hospital services of medical oncology and radiation oncology. descriptive statistics, comparison of means, correlation and linear regression models. The clinical management unit reaches higher values compared with the hospital services about: performance indicators, emotional climate, internal communication and evaluation of the leadership. An important gap between existing and desired sources, channels, media and subjects of communication appear, in both clinical management unit and traditional services. The clinical management organization promotes better internal communication and interpersonal relations, leading to improved performance indicators. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Recruiting to cohort studies in specialist healthcare services: Lessons learned from clinical research nurses in UK cleft services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Fabio; Rumsey, Nichola; Humphries, Kerry; Bennett, Rhiannon; Davies, Amy; Sandy, Jonathan; Stock, Nicola Marie

    2018-03-01

    To explore the experiences of clinical research nurses recruiting patients in a large specialist care-based cohort study. Longitudinal studies are vital to better understand the aetiology and moderators of health conditions. This need is especially salient for congenital conditions, such as cleft lip and/or palate, where establishing large, comprehensive data sets from birth is vital to improve understanding and to inform interventions. Various barriers exist in recruiting patients to large cohort studies. The role of clinical research nurses embedded within health settings has grown over past decades to facilitate data collection, yet challenges remain. Qualitative descriptive study. Individual semi-structured interviews with 12 clinical research nurses based in 10 National Health Service cleft services across the UK, recruiting to the Cleft Collective Birth Cohort Study. Of seven emergent themes, three highlighted challenges to recruiting patients, another three described facilitative factors, and one theme overlapped challenges and facilitators. Challenges included the life circumstances of potential participants; language barriers; and limited clinical research nurse time for study. Facilitative factors included integrating research into clinical practice; patient information shared with clinical research nurses; and support from the university-based research study team. The theme "Method of data collection" related to both challenges and facilitators. The qualitative data from clinical research nurses recruiting to a large birth cohort study provide helpful practical detail for specialist healthcare teams, specialist nurses, clinical research nurses and researchers looking to optimise recruitment and data collection in longitudinal studies. The findings suggest the importance of specialist clinical services and research study teams cooperating to embed research into everyday clinical practice, without compromising care. This should facilitate patients

  6. Trade in Educational Services: An Overview of GATS and Policy Implications for Higher Agricultural Education in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soam, S. K.; Sastry, R. Kalpana; Rashmi, H. B.

    2007-01-01

    Higher education is a service that contributes to national development, integration and regional cohesion. Agricultural education in particular has been viewed in many developing countries as a significant contributor to sustainable development and poverty alleviation. In view of its public mandate, higher education in most countries is regulated…

  7. Education Websites and Their Benefits to Potential International Students: A Case Study of Higher Education Service Providers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Teik Chooi; Ho, Henry Wai Leong; Amri, Siti

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at criteria on how education service providers' websites could benefit their potential students from overseas. Effective design of education website is important as web users are typically fastidious and want information fast--this serves as the background of this study. The study focuses on three selected education institutions'…

  8. Current status, challenges and the way forward for clinical pharmacy service in Ethiopian public hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Arebu Issa; Tilahun, Zelalem; Gebretekle, Gebremedhin Beedemariam; Ayalneh, Belete; Hailemeskel, Bisrat; Engidawork, Ephrem

    2017-05-19

    Clinical pharmacy service has evolved steadily over the past few decades and is now contributing to the 'patient care journey' at all stages. It is improving the safety and effectiveness of medicines and has made a significant contribution to the avoidance of medication errors. In Ethiopia, clinical pharmacy service is in its initial phase, being started in July 2013. This study therefore aimed at assessing the status, challenges and way forward of clinical pharmacy service in the country. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in six regional states and one city- administration in September 2014. A total of 51 hospitals were included in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were employed for data collection. A total of 160 pharmacy graduates, and 51 pharmacy heads participated in the study. Internal Medicine and Pediatric wards were the major wards where the graduates provide clinical pharmacy service. Almost 94% of the new graduates were found to be involved in clinical pharmacy service, but 47% of them rated their service as poor. The overall satisfaction of the graduates was close to 36%. Thirteen hospitals discontinued and two hospitals not even initiated the service largely due to shortage of pharmacists and lack of management support. About 44% of the surveyed hospitals documented the clinical pharmacy service provided using either developed or adopted formats. Lack of awareness by the medical fraternity, high attrition rate, lack of support from the management as well as from the health care team, readiness of the graduates to deliver the service, and shortage of pharmacists were identified by the key informants as the major stumbling block to deliver clinical pharmacy service. Clinical pharmacy service is initiated in most of the surveyed hospitals and a large proportion of the graduates were involved in the service. Although there is a great enthusiasm to promote clinical pharmacy service in the surveyed hospitals, efforts made to

  9. Designing a placebo device: involving service users in clinical trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Jinks, Clare; Bouças, Sofia Barbosa; Hislop, Kelly; Dziedzic, Krysia S; Rhodes, Carol; Burston, Amanda; Adams, Jo

    2013-12-01

    Service users are increasingly involved in the design of clinical trials and in product and device development. Service user involvement in placebo development is crucial to a credible and acceptable placebo for clinical trials, but such involvement has not yet been reported. To enhance the design of a future clinical trial of hand splints for thumb-base osteoarthritis (OA), service users were involved in splint selection and design of a placebo splint. This article describes and reflects on this process. Two fora of service users were convened in 2011. Service users who had been prescribed a thumb splint for thumb-base OA were approached about involvement by Occupational Therapy (OT) practitioners. A total of eight service users took part in the fora. Service users discussed their experience of OA and their own splints and then tried a variety of alternative splints. Through this they identified the active features of splints alongside acceptable and unacceptable design features. Service users focused on wearability and support with or without immobilization. Fora discussed whether a placebo group ('arm') was an acceptable feature of a future trial, and service users developed a potential design for a placebo splint. This is the first project that to involve service users in placebo design. Service users are increasingly involved in product and device design and are ideally placed to identify features to make a placebo credible yet lacking key active ingredients. The future trial will include research into its acceptability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Developments in Clinical Neuropsychology: Implications for School Psychological Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michael J.; Scott, Albert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: According to the 2000 Report of the Surgeon General's Conference on Children's Mental Health, a significant percentage of children and adolescents have emotional or behavioral problems serious enough to merit a mental health diagnosis. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act…

  11. Key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Young; Noh, Wonjung

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we identified key components of financial-analysis education for clinical nurses. We used a literature review, focus group discussions, and a content validity index survey to develop key components of financial-analysis education. First, a wide range of references were reviewed, and 55 financial-analysis education components were gathered. Second, two focus group discussions were performed; the participants were 11 nurses who had worked for more than 3 years in a hospital, and nine components were agreed upon. Third, 12 professionals, including professors, nurse executive, nurse managers, and an accountant, participated in the content validity index. Finally, six key components of financial-analysis education were selected. These key components were as follows: understanding the need for financial analysis, introduction to financial analysis, reading and implementing balance sheets, reading and implementing income statements, understanding the concepts of financial ratios, and interpretation and practice of financial ratio analysis. The results of this study will be used to develop an education program to increase financial-management competency among clinical nurses. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Family socio-economic profile and private spending on educational goods and services in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rokicka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to theory, educational goods and services have an important impact on a child’s human capital. Although the majority of educational services in Poland are delivered within a public education system, various educational costs are borne by parents. This paper looks at the socio-economic determinants of private spending on education, including fees, private tutoring and courses, educational goods and materials, and the internet. The analysis was performed using the Polish Household Budget Survey for 2009 and 2010. Results from a logit regression suggest that disposable household income per capita and parental level of education, especially mother’s level of education have the greatest impact on spending on educational goods and services. This was true for all analysed categories of expenditure. Regional disparities and community size were an important factor especially with regards to spending on private tutoring and additional courses.

  13. Integration of Ambulatory Clinical Pharmacy Services in a Gastroenterology Clinic for Management of Hepatitis C Infection: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Bower

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe implementation of comprehensive medication management (CMM services in a gastroenterology (GI clinic for HCV patients on direct acting antivirals (DAAs, and to evaluate services in terms of identification of medication related problems (MRPs, patient satisfaction, and provider satisfaction. Methods: Six months of visit data was retrospectively collected to determine demographic data and to analyze pharmacist’s identification of MRPs. Patient satisfaction surveys were collected using a thirteen question validated pharmacist-satisfaction survey. After pilot completion, a twelve-question survey was sent to all GI clinic staff members to evaluate overall staff satisfaction with services. Results: Ninety-four CMM visits were completed. A total of 246 MRPs were identified with an average of 2.6 MRPs per visit. Seventy-eight MRPs were related to appropriate indication, 27 to efficacy, 30 to safety, and 109 to adherence. Forty MRPs were related to drug-drug interactions. Patient satisfaction surveys revealed that 86% of respondents rated the quality of care and services from the clinical pharmacist as "Excellent". Patients better understood and felt confident with therapy. All staff satisfaction survey respondents strongly agreed or agreed that the pharmacist made valuable contributions to the clinic and patient care. All also strongly agreed that pharmacy’s CMM services were an essential component to the management of HCV. Conclusion: Data supports continued involvement of clinical pharmacists within the clinic to promote safety and efficacy of DAAs. Patient and staff satisfaction survey results further illustrate the importance and value that CMM provided by clinical pharmacists can provide. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including

  14. Evaluation of the implementation of a clinical pharmacy service on an acute internal medicine ward in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Nicola; Wei, Li; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Pasut, Enrico; Leschiutta, Silvia; Rossi, Paolo; Troncon, Maria Grazia

    2018-04-10

    interventions/ per month) of major clinical significance. The most frequent interventions were to educate a healthcare professional (20.4%) and change dose (16.1%). To our knowledge this is the first study evaluating the effect of a structured communication strategy on acceptance rate of pharmacist interventions. Pharmaceutical care delivered by the clinical pharmacist is likely to have had beneficial outcomes. Clinical pharmacy services like the one described should be implemented widely to increase patient safety.

  15. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, pNeurology (r=.231, p=.017), however was not significantly correlated with any component of the Objective Structured Clinical Examination. Volume of cases correlated with higher performance on measures of specialty knowledge and clinical skill. Fewer relationships emerged correlating breadth of cases and performance on the same measures. This study provides guidance to educators who must decide how much emphasis to place on volume versus breadth of cases in outpatient clinic learning experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Clinical reasoning in undergraduate nursing education: a scoping review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Sáskia Sampaio Cipriano de; Corrêa, Consuelo Garcia; Silva, Rita de Cássia Gengo E; Cruz, Diná de Almeida Monteiro Lopes da

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the current state of knowledge on clinical reasoning in undergraduate nursing education. A systematic scoping review through a search strategy applied to the MEDLINE database, and an analysis of the material recovered by extracting data done by two independent reviewers. The extracted data were analyzed and synthesized in a narrative manner. From the 1380 citations retrieved in the search, 23 were kept for review and their contents were summarized into five categories: 1) the experience of developing critical thinking/clinical reasoning/decision-making process; 2) teaching strategies related to the development of critical thinking/clinical reasoning/decision-making process; 3) measurement of variables related to the critical thinking/clinical reasoning/decision-making process; 4) relationship of variables involved in the critical thinking/clinical reasoning/decision-making process; and 5) theoretical development models of critical thinking/clinical reasoning/decision-making process for students. The biggest challenge for developing knowledge on teaching clinical reasoning seems to be finding consistency between theoretical perspectives on the development of clinical reasoning and methodologies, methods, and procedures in research initiatives in this field.

  17. Effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on service delivery and clinical outcomes in adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Caroline; White, Sarahlouise; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Ear, nose and throat complaints are very common and can cause significant disruption to patients' lives. Many conditions are of a chronic nature and are not currently managed in a timely manner by general practitioners in the community. This may be due to a lack of specialized knowledge, necessary diagnostic equipment or time for lengthy patient education on management of their condition. A nurse-led model of care may be an effective alternative. To examine the effectiveness of nurse-led clinics on adults with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints. Adult patients, aged 18 years and older, attending ear, nose and throat clinics, regardless of the complaint. Nurse-led care in general practice and acute care in which the nurse was identified as taking a lead role in the care of the patients with chronic ear, nose and throat complaints. General practitioner-led care, or ear, nose and throat consultant-led care, sometimes described as "standard care". Service delivery outcomes, clinical and health outcomes and financial outcomes. Any relevant quantitative studies published in English between 1980 and 2013 were considered. A standardized three-step search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. Databases searched include PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library (CENTRAL), Scopus, Embase, MedNar and ProQuest Theses and Dissertations. Methodological validity was assessed independently by two reviewers using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Due to methodological heterogeneity of the included studies, no statistical pooling was possible and all results are presented narratively. The search identified 13,536 titles, of which 20 potentially relevant articles were retrieved. Of these 20, 17 were excluded following full-text review leaving three studies that were assessed for methodological quality and included in the review. Service delivery outcome findings were that patient satisfaction was equal or higher and

  18. A Leadership Education and Development Program for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Modic, Mary Beth; Van Dyk, Jennifer; Hancock, K Kelly

    2016-11-01

    The Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) Program was designed to transform care at the bedside by empowering clinical nurses as leaders. The heart of LEAD was enhancing communication skills of clinical nurses with clinical colleagues and, most importantly, patients and families. Key concepts of leadership/management were included: personal awareness, personal leadership skills/abilities, leading change, leading others individually and in teams, enhancing the patient/provider experience, and the leadership role in outcomes management. A quantitative, longitudinal, survey design was used with 2 cohorts. The program consisted of six 4-hour sessions for 3 to 6 months. Leadership practices were measured before program implementation, at the end of the program, and 3 months after program completion. There were significant increases in leadership practices sustained 3 months after program completion. A range of other outcome measures was included. There is a need for additional leadership development programs for clinical nurses.

  19. Service, training, mentorship: first report of an innovative education-support program to revitalize primary care social service in Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Van Wieren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Mexican mandatory year of social service following medical school, or pasantía, is designed to provide a safety net for the underserved. However, social service physicians (pasantes are typically unpracticed, unsupervised, and unsupported. Significant demotivation, absenteeism, and underperformance typically plague the social service year. Objective: Compañeros en Salud (CES aimed to create an education-support package to turn the pasantía into a transformative learning experience. Design: CES recruited pasantes to complete their pasantía in CES-supported Ministry of Health clinics in rural Chiapas. The program aims to: 1 train pasantes to more effectively deliver primary care, 2 expose pasantes to central concepts of global health and social medicine, and 3 foster career development of pasantes. Program components include supportive supervision, on-site mentorship, clinical information resources, monthly interactive seminars, and improved clinic function. We report quantitative and qualitative pasante survey data collected from February 2012 to August 2013 to discuss strengths and weaknesses of this program and its implications for the pasante workforce in Mexico. Results: Pasantes reported that their medical knowledge, and clinical and leadership skills all improved during the CES education-support program. Most pasantes felt the program had an overall positive effect on their career goals and plans, although their self-report of preparedness for the Mexican residency entrance exam (ENARM decreased during the social service year. One hundred percent reported they were satisfied with the CES-supported pasantía experience and wished to help the poor and underserved in their careers. Conclusions: Education-support programs similar to the CES program may encourage graduating medical students to complete their social service in underserved areas, improve the quality of care provided by pasantes, and address many of the known

  20. Service, training, mentorship: first report of an innovative education-support program to revitalize primary care social service in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wieren, Andrew; Palazuelos, Lindsay; Elliott, Patrick F; Arrieta, Jafet; Flores, Hugo; Palazuelos, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican mandatory year of social service following medical school, or pasantía, is designed to provide a safety net for the underserved. However, social service physicians (pasantes) are typically unpracticed, unsupervised, and unsupported. Significant demotivation, absenteeism, and underperformance typically plague the social service year. Compañeros en Salud (CES) aimed to create an education-support package to turn the pasantía into a transformative learning experience. CES recruited pasantes to complete their pasantía in CES-supported Ministry of Health clinics in rural Chiapas. The program aims to: 1) train pasantes to more effectively deliver primary care, 2) expose pasantes to central concepts of global health and social medicine, and 3) foster career development of pasantes. Program components include supportive supervision, on-site mentorship, clinical information resources, monthly interactive seminars, and improved clinic function. We report quantitative and qualitative pasante survey data collected from February 2012 to August 2013 to discuss strengths and weaknesses of this program and its implications for the pasante workforce in Mexico. Pasantes reported that their medical knowledge, and clinical and leadership skills all improved during the CES education-support program. Most pasantes felt the program had an overall positive effect on their career goals and plans, although their self-report of preparedness for the Mexican residency entrance exam (ENARM) decreased during the social service year. One hundred percent reported they were satisfied with the CES-supported pasantía experience and wished to help the poor and underserved in their careers. Education-support programs similar to the CES program may encourage graduating medical students to complete their social service in underserved areas, improve the quality of care provided by pasantes, and address many of the known shortcomings of the pasantía. Additional efforts should focus on

  1. Exploring the Role and Skill Set of Physiotherapy Clinical Educators in Work-Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Susan; Connaughton, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Clinical educators are under increasing pressures in the workplace to provide quality education of healthcare students within varying supervision frameworks. Along with facilitating the teaching of clinical skills, clinical educators play a support role for students and so require more than expert clinical abilities in their vital position linking…

  2. Telehealth for diabetes self-management education and support in an underserved, free clinic population: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threatt, Tiffaney B; Ward, Eileen D

    Primary study objectives were to (1) describe mean change in A1c from baseline of a free clinic population enrolled in telehealth diabetes self-management education and support (DSME/S) services and (2) to compare change in A1C and other clinical outcomes measures with free clinic patients enrolled in a traditional face-to-face DSME/S program. An exploratory study design and comparative evaluation of telehealth DSME/S services in a free clinic population was used. Baseline clinical measures were collected upon referral. Diabetes educators met with patients individually over 2-3 months. Clinical outcomes measures were collected within 6 months of program completion. Data from the telehealth group was assessed individually and compared to a free clinic traditional DSME/S program population. Twelve patients completed a telehealth free clinic DSME/S pilot program with a mean ± SD change in A1C from baseline of -1.03 ± 1.53% (P = 0.050). Mean ± SD change in A1C from baseline in the free clinic population participating in traditional face-to-face DSME/S services was -1.42 ± 1.80% (P = 0.001). No significant differences in secondary outcomes measures, including body mass index and blood pressure, were revealed among the study populations. Expanding access to care in populations faced with challenges of socioeconomics, limited education, and lower health literacy is a step toward reducing health disparities and positively affecting care. Mean A1C can be improved with telehealth DSME/S services in an underserved, free clinic population. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing the public health role of a front line clinical service: integrating stop smoking advice into routine podiatry services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jackie; Eden, Gary; Williams, Maria

    2007-06-01

    Although smoking is a major public health problem, many clinicians do not routinely provide evidence-based health improvement advice to smokers to help them to quit. Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) cycle methodology was used to design and implement a service development so that health improvement advice for smokers featured in all podiatry consultations provided by a Primary Care Trust in North East England. IT systems were developed to record the number and proportion of patients for whom smoking status was assessed, and the number and proportion of smokers who were given advice to quit and referred for specialist support. A questionnaire to staff explored their perceptions of the development on their clinics and consultations. During a 6-month period, smoking status was recorded for all 8831 (100%) patients attending podiatry clinics; 83% of smokers were given brief advice to quit; 7% of smokers were given help to access specialist stop smoking support services. Improvements were introduced within existing budgets and did not prolong clinics. It is straightforward and inexpensive to develop clinical services so that public health guidance is routinely implemented. More widespread implementation of similar service developments could lead to national improvements in public health.

  4. Clinical nurse specialist education: actualizing the systems leadership competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cathy J; Nelson-Marten, Paula

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to show how sequenced educational strategies aid in the acquisition of systems leadership and change agent skills, as well as other essential skills for professional clinical nurse specialist (CNS) practice. Clinical nurse specialist education offers the graduate student both didactic and clinical experiences to help the student transition into the CNS role. Clinical nurse specialist faculty have a responsibility to prepare students for the realities of advanced practice. Systems leadership is an integral competency of CNS practice. The contemporary CNS is to be a leader in the translation of evidence into practice. To assist students to acquire this competency, all CNS students are expected to use research and other sources of evidence to identify, design, implement, and evaluate a specific practice change. Anecdotal comments from students completing the projects are offered. Student projects have been focused in acute and critical care, palliative care, and adult/gerontologic health clinical settings; community outreach has been the focus of a few change projects. Examples of student projects related to the systems leadership competency and correlated to the spheres of influence impacted are presented.

  5. An integrative review and evidence-based conceptual model of the essential components of pre-service education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Peter; Fogarty, Linda; Fullerton, Judith; Bluestone, Julia; Drake, Mary

    2013-08-28

    With decreasing global resources, a pervasive critical shortage of skilled health workers, and a growing disease burden in many countries, the need to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of pre-service education in low-and middle-income countries has never been greater. We performed an integrative review of the literature to analyse factors contributing to quality pre-service education and created a conceptual model that shows the links between essential elements of quality pre-service education and desired outcomes. The literature contains a rich discussion of factors that contribute to quality pre-service education, including the following: (1) targeted recruitment of qualified students from rural and low-resource settings appears to be a particularly effective strategy for retaining students in vulnerable communities after graduation; (2) evidence supports a competency-based curriculum, but there is no clear evidence supporting specific curricular models such as problem-based learning; (3) the health workforce must be well prepared to address national health priorities; (4) the role of the preceptor and preceptors' skills in clinical teaching, identifying student learning needs, assessing student learning, and prioritizing and time management are particularly important; (5) modern, Internet-enabled medical libraries, skills and simulation laboratories, and computer laboratories to support computer-aided instruction are elements of infrastructure meriting strong consideration; and (6) all students must receive sufficient clinical practice opportunities in high-quality clinical learning environments in order to graduate with the competencies required for effective practice. Few studies make a link between PSE and impact on the health system. Nevertheless, it is logical that the production of a trained and competent staff through high-quality pre-service education and continuing professional development activities is the foundation required to achieve the

  6. Clinical psychologists' views of intensive interaction as an intervention in learning disability services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ruth; Firth, Graham; Leeming, Catherine; Sharma, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Intensive Interaction was initially developed in the 1980s as an educational approach for developing social communication and engagement with people with severe or profound intellectual disabilities and/or autism. Intensive Interaction has subsequently been adopted by a range of practitioners and professionals working in learning disability services and has a broad multi-disciplinary acceptance, being recommended in a number of UK governmental guidance documents. Despite this, there has been limited work on developing a deeper psychological understanding of the approach. This study utilises a qualitative description/thematic analysis approach to explore how clinical psychologists conceptualise the approach with regard to currently accepted psychological theories, as well as looking at other factors that influence their adoption and advocacy. The sample deliberately consisted of eight NHS (National Health Service) clinical psychologists known to be using or advocating the use of Intensive Interaction with people with a learning disability. The results of this study indicate that although the participants referred to some theories that might explain the beneficial outcomes of Intensive Interaction, these theories were rarely explicitly or clearly referenced, resulting in the authors having to attribute specific theoretical positions on the basis of inductive analysis of the participants' responses. Moreover, the participants provided varying views on how Intensive Interaction might be conceptualised, highlighting the lack of a generally accepted, psychologically framed definition of the approach. In conclusion, it was felt that further research is required to develop a specifically psychological understanding of Intensive Interaction alongside the formation of a Special Interest Group, which might have this task as one of its aims. There appeared to be a limited recognition amongst the participants of the specific psychological theories that can be seen to explain

  7. Use of health, education, and social services by individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Marni D; de B Hanlon Dearman, Ana C; Macwilliam, Leonard R; Chudley, Albert E; Roos, Noralou P; Yallop, Lauren P; A Longstaffe, Sally E

    2013-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is the leading cause of intellectual disability in western society, presenting a significant burden on health, education and social services. Quantifying the burden of FASD is important for service planning and policy and program development. To describe the health, education and social service use of individuals with FASD to provide an indication of the burden of service use of the disorder. Using a matched-cohort design health, education and social service data were linked with clinical records on individuals 6+ years diagnosed with FASD between 1999/2000-2009/10 (N=717). Matching was 2:1 with a general population (gPop) and asthma group by age, sex and area-level income. Adjusted rates and relative risks were calculated using Generalized Linear Models. Hospitalizations were higher in the FASD compared to gPop (adjusted relative risk=3.44 (95% confidence interval=2.29, 5.17)) and asthma (2.87 (1.94, 4.25)) groups, whereas for physician visits and overall prescriptions, the FASD group differed from only the gPop group (1.58 (1.34, 1.84); 1.44 (1.22, 1.72), respectively). Antibiotics, pain killers and anti-psychotics were similar across groups whereas antidepressants and psychostimulants were higher in the FASD group (antidepressants: FASD vs. gPop 8.76 (2.82, 27.21); FASD vs. asthma 2.10 (1.15, 3.83); psychostimulants: FASD vs. gPop 5.78 (2.89, 11.57); FASD vs. asthma 2.47 (1.37, 4.47)). Attention-deficit\\hyperactivity disorder was higher in the FASD than the gPop and asthma groups (6.41 (3.29, 12.49); 3.12 (1.97, 4.93), respectively). Education and social service use was higher for the FASD than either of the other groups for all measures (FASD vs. gPop and FASD vs. asthma, respectively for: grade repetition 3.06 (1.58, 5.94); 3.48 (1.79, 6.78); receipt of any special education funding 9.22 (6.23, 13.64); 6.10 (4.14, 8.99); family receipt of income assistance 1.74 (1.33, 2.27); 1.89 (1.45, 2.47); child in care 13.19 (5

  8. Personalised mobile services supporting the implementation of clinical guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Gay, Valerie; Leijdekkers, Peter; Rienks, Rienk; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Grasso, F; Paris, C

    2009-01-01

    Telemonitoring is emerging as a compelling application of Body Area Networks (BANs). We describe two health BAN systems developed respectively by a European team and an Australian team and discuss some issues encountered relating to formalization of clinical knowledge to support real-time analysis

  9. Benefits of a clinical pharmacokinetic service in optimising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    before the termination of the study (test period). Patients kept a seizure diary throughout the study. The MichaelisMenten model was used to calculate doses and predict steady-state serum concentrations. Setting. ine epilepsy clinics. Subjects. One hundred and ninety-five (113 black and 82 coloured) compliant people with ...

  10. Integration and timing of basic and clinical sciences education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandiera, Glen; Boucher, Andree; Neville, Alan; Kuper, Ayelet; Hodges, Brian

    2013-05-01

    Medical education has traditionally been compartmentalized into basic and clinical sciences, with the latter being viewed as the skillful application of the former. Over time, the relevance of basic sciences has become defined by their role in supporting clinical problem solving rather than being, of themselves, a defining knowledge base of physicians. As part of the national Future of Medical Education in Canada (FMEC MD) project, a comprehensive empirical environmental scan identified the timing and integration of basic sciences as a key pressing issue for medical education. Using the literature review, key informant interviews, stakeholder meetings, and subsequent consultation forums from the FMEC project, this paper details the empirical basis for focusing on the role of basic science, the evidentiary foundations for current practices, and the implications for medical education. Despite a dearth of definitive relevant studies, opinions about how best to integrate the sciences remain strong. Resource allocation, political power, educational philosophy, and the shift from a knowledge-based to a problem-solving profession all influence the debate. There was little disagreement that both sciences are important, that many traditional models emphasized deep understanding of limited basic science disciplines at the expense of other relevant content such as social sciences, or that teaching the sciences contemporaneously rather than sequentially has theoretical and practical merit. Innovations in integrated curriculum design have occurred internationally. Less clear are the appropriate balance of the sciences, the best integration model, and solutions to the political and practical challenges of integrated curricula. New curricula tend to emphasize integration, development of more diverse physician competencies, and preparation of physicians to adapt to evolving technology and patients' expectations. Refocusing the basic/clinical dichotomy to a foundational

  11. An educational video program to increase aging services technology awareness among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Joyce W; Van Son, Catherine; Dyck, Dennis; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2017-08-01

    Aging services technologies (ASTs), health technology that meets the needs of seniors, are being underutilized due to a lack of awareness. This study evaluated a video-based educational program to increase AST awareness. Two hundred and thirty-one older adults completed AST measures pre- and post-program. Participants endorsed significantly improved AST knowledge and attitude and a lower level of perceived stigma post-program. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that a greater reduction in stigma post-program and a higher number of physical/cognitive needs supported by ASTs at baseline were significant predictors of a greater increase in expressed intention to use ASTs following the video program. Furthermore, individuals living in their own homes, with a lower level of education, fewer physical and/or cognitive needs supported by ASTs at baseline, and greater functional limitations were found to be more likely to report a significant reduction in perceived stigma post-program. Four-week follow-up data from 75 individuals showed stable program gains. Program feedback was positive. The current findings provide support for the utility of the AST videos. The educational materials used in this study can be used clinically or for public health education to increase awareness and adoption of ASTs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical reasoning in undergraduate nursing education: a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Menezes,Sáskia Sampaio Cipriano de; Corrêa,Consuelo Garcia; Silva,Rita de Cássia Gengo e; Cruz,Diná de Almeida Monteiro Lopes da

    2015-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE This study aimed at analyzing the current state of knowledge on clinical reasoning in undergraduate nursing education. METHODS A systematic scoping review through a search strategy applied to the MEDLINE database, and an analysis of the material recovered by extracting data done by two independent reviewers. The extracted data were analyzed and synthesized in a narrative manner. RESULTS From the 1380 citations retrieved in the search, 23 were kept for review and their co...

  13. The new education frontier: clinical teaching at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Joshua T; Pierce, Read G; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet

    2014-02-01

    Regulations that restrict resident work hours and call for increased resident supervision have increased attending physician presence in the hospital during the nighttime. The resulting increased interactions between attendings and trainees provide an important opportunity and obligation to enhance the quality of learning that takes place in the hospital between 6 PM and 8 AM. Nighttime education should be transformed in a way that maintains clinical productivity for both attending and resident physicians, integrates high-quality teaching and curricula, and achieves a balance between patient safety and resident autonomy. Direct observation of trainees, instruction in communication, and modeling of cost-efficient medical practice may be more feasible during the night than during daytime hours. To realize the potential of this educational opportunity, training programs should develop skilled nighttime educators and establish metrics to define success.

  14. The educational and professional status of clinical embryology and clinical embryologists in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačič, B; Plas, C; Woodward, B J; Verheyen, G; Prados, F J; Hreinsson, J; De los Santos, M J; Magli, M C; Lundin, K; Plancha, C E

    2015-08-01

    What is the recognition of clinical embryology and the current status of clinical embryologists in European countries, regarding educational levels, responsibilities and workload, and need for a formal education in assisted reproductive technology (ART)? It is striking that the profession of clinical embryology, almost 40 years after the introduction of IVF, is still not officially recognized in most European countries. Reproductive medicine has developed into a sophisticated multidisciplinary medical branch since the birth of Louise Brown 37 years ago. The European Board & College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG) has recognized reproductive medicine as a subspeciality and has developed a subspeciality training for gynaecologists in collaboration with the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). However, nothing similar exists for the field of clinical embryology or for clinical embryologists. A questionnaire about the situation in clinical embryology in the period of 2012-2013 in the respective European country was sent to ESHRE National representatives (basic scientists only) in December 2013. At this time, 28 European countries had at least one basic scientist in the ESHRE Committee of National Representatives. The survey consisted of 46 numeric, dichotomous (yes/no) or descriptive questions. Answers were obtained from 27 out of 28 countries and the data were tabulated. Data about the numbers of 'ESHRE Certified Embryologists' were taken from the ESHRE Steering Committee for Embryologist Certification. In 2012, more than 7000 laboratory staff from 1349 IVF clinics in 27 European countries performed over 700 000 fresh and frozen ART cycles. Despite this, clinical embryology is only recognized as an official profession in 3 out of 27 national health systems. In most countries clinical embryologists need to be registered under another profession, and have limited possibilities for organized education in clinical embryology. Mostly they

  15. Mental Health Services in Special Education: An Analysis of Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Kataoka, Sheryl H.; Forness, Steven R.; Miranda, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a collaborative study conducted in a large urban school district, in which the authors surveyed 55 clinicians within the special education system, with a focus on the mental health services provided to students who were receiving related-services counseling as a mandated component of their individualized education plan.…

  16. Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs towards Educational Technologies Integration in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Christina; Mtebe, Joel S.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines pre-service teachers' (N = 386) self-efficacy beliefs towards educational technologies integration in the classroom at the two colleges in Tanzania that prepare secondary education teachers. Using regression analysis, the study found out that the determinants of self-efficacy beliefs among pre-service teachers towards…

  17. A Statistical Analysis of Education Service Quality Dimensions on Business School Students' Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok; Ling, Tan Pei

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate student satisfaction on quality education services provided by institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. Their level of satisfaction based primarily on the data collected through five dimensions of education service quality. A random sample of 250 students studying in an institution of higher learning was selected…

  18. Enhancing Pre-Service Special Educator Preparation through Combined Use of Virtual Simulation and Instructional Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Ahmad, Maria

    2018-01-01

    To meet the ever-increasing teaching standards, pre-service special educators need extensive and advanced opportunities for pedagogical preparation prior to entering the classroom. Providing opportunities for pre-service special educators to practice such strategies within a virtual simulation environment offers teacher preparation programs a way…

  19. The Effect of Teaching Experience on Service-Learning Beliefs of Dental Hygiene Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Sharlee Shirley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental causal-comparative study was to determine if service-learning teaching experience affects dental hygiene faculty perceptions of service-learning benefits and barriers in the United States. Dental hygiene educators from entry-level dental hygiene education programs in the United States completed the Web-based…

  20. Service Quality in Higher Education--A Case Study of Universiti Brunei Darussalam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alani, Farooq; Yaqoub, Yasir; Hamdan, Mahani

    2015-01-01

    No one doubts the value and importance of quality education, and quality assurance is one major driving force to achieve this. Measuring the performance of service quality of education services of Universiti Brunei Darussalam (UBD), as part of the quality assessment, was assessed based on Parasuraman's five Servqual dimensions. The assessment was…

  1. Pre-Service Special Education Teachers' Professionalism and Preparation in Terms of Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zboon, Eman; Ahmad, Jamal

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at examining Jordanian pre-service special education teachers' professionalism and preparation on the topic of child sexual abuse (CSA). Qualitative research data from interviews with 20 pre-service special education teachers were analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that these participants generally hold avoiding…

  2. A Study of Public Radio Stations' Educational Services, 1978-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    This second national survey of public radio stations' involvement in educational services to schools, colleges, and universities was conducted by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) for use by individual public radio stations, educational agencies, and other organizations interested and involved in planning public radio's services to…

  3. Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions on Tpack Development after Designing Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancar Tokmak, Hatice

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study aimed to investigate Early Childhood Education (ECE) pre-service teachers' perception of development in their technological, pedagogical, content knowledge (TPACK) after designing educational computer games for young children. Participants included 21 ECE pre-service teachers enrolled in the course Instructional…

  4. Maximizing the Potential of Mentoring: A Framework for Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Angelina; Knight, Bruce Allen; Dekkers, John

    2014-01-01

    Within the professional placement component of pre-service teacher education, mentoring has become a strategy that is used during the practical application of learning to teach. In this paper, we examine mentoring in the pre-service teacher education context by proposing a theoretically based framework for mentoring in this context. Firstly, the…

  5. Effects on in-service education on improving science teaching in Swaziland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stronkhorst, Robert; van den Akker, Jan

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of an evaluative and interpretive study into the potential of in-service education to improve science education in Swaziland. Short-term and long-term effects of an in-service intervention are evaluated in terms of changes in classroom processes. The teaching

  6. Can Pre-Service Physical Education Majors Identify Learning Standards during Authentic Teaching Episodes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffin, Mike; Foley, John; MacDonald, Lynn Couturier; Howarth, Kath

    2014-01-01

    Only a handful of research studies have been conducted to determine whether or not physical educators or pre-service physical education teachers are utilizing learning standards in their teaching. While pre-service teachers are typically required to align lesson objectives and content, their extent of their understanding of how learning standards…

  7. Teacher Preparation for Movement Education: Increasing Pre-Service Teachers' Competence for Working with Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevimli-Celik, Serap; Johnson, James E.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores pre-service teachers' perceptions of movement education, the benefits they perceive from participating in a 12-week movement education module in a course on play, and the module's effects on their confidence and competence in regard to incorporating movement into a curriculum. Findings suggest that the pre-service teachers…

  8. Elective Drama Course in Mathematics Education: An Assessment of Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagirli, Meryem Özturan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a newly introduced elective course "Drama in Mathematics Education" into mathematics education curriculum from the viewpoints of pre-service mathematics teachers. A case study was employed in the study. The study group consisted of 37 pre-service mathematics teachers who were enrolled in a Turkish state…

  9. How Pre-Service Teachers Learn Educational Technology with the Situated Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucuk, Sevda

    2018-01-01

    This research investigated pre-service teachers' motivation, learning strategies, and engagement in a situated learning based educational technology course. In this study, correlational research design was used. The sample of this study was 65 second year science education pre-service teachers. The data were collected through two questionnaires.…

  10. Investigation of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Sustainable Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Özgül

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to investigate pre-service science teachers' sustainable environmental education attitudes and the factors affecting them in terms of some variables (gender and grade level). The study group of the current research is comprised of 154 pre-service teachers attending the Department of Science Education in the…

  11. The Relationship between Turkish Pre-Service ICT Teachers' Educational Philosophies and Occupational Anxieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryakulu, Deniz; Atal-Köysüren, Deniz

    2018-01-01

    This study examines Turkish pre-service Information and Communication Technologies teachers' educational philosophies and occupational anxieties. A total of 800 pre-service teachers participated in the study. Results showed that the predominant educational philosophies among the participants were the existentialism, progressivism,…

  12. Emergency Contraception Education for Health and Human Service Professionals: An Evaluation of Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarossi, Lisa; Billowitz, Marissa; Breitbart, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care providers, health educators, and social service providers before and after a training session on emergency contraceptive pills. Design: A survey study using pre-post training measurements. Setting: Two hundred and twenty-three medical, social service, and health education providers in…

  13. CDC Kerala 1: Organization of clinical child development services (1987-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M K C; George, Babu; Nair, G S Harikumaran; Bhaskaran, Deepa; Leena, M L; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of establishing the Child Development Centre (CDC), Kerala for piloting comprehensive child adolescent development program in India, has been to understand the conceptualization, design and scaling up of a pro-active positive child development initiative, easily replicable all over India. The process of establishing the Child Development Centre (CDC) Kerala for research, clinical services, training and community extension services over the last 25 y, has been as follows; Step 1: Conceptualization--The life cycle approach to child development; Step 2: Research basis--CDC model early stimulation is effective; Step 3: Development and validation of seven simple developmental screening tools; Step 4: CDC Diagnostic services--Ultrasonology and genetic, and metabolic laboratory; Step 5: Developing seven intervention packages; Step 6: Training--Post graduate diploma in clinical child development; Step 7: CDC Clinic Services--seven major ones; Step 8: CDC Community Services--Child development referral units; Step 9: Community service delivery models--Childhood disability and for adolescent care counselling projects; Step 10: National capacity building--Four child development related courses. CDC Kerala follow-up and clinic services are offered till 18 y of age and premarital counselling till 24 y of age as shown in "CDC Kerala Clinic Services Flow Chart" and 74,291 children have availed CDC clinic services in the last 10 y. CDC Kerala is the first model for comprehensive child adolescent development services using a lifecycle approach in the Government sector and hence declared as the collaborative centre for Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram (RBSK), in Kerala.

  14. Identifying factors which enhance capacity to engage in clinical education among podiatry practitioners: an action research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abey, Sally; Lea, Susan; Callaghan, Lynne; Shaw, Steve; Cotton, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Health profession students develop practical skills whilst integrating theory with practice in a real world environment as an important component of their training. Research in the area of practice placements has identified challenges and barriers to the delivery of effective placement learning. However, there has been little research in podiatry and the question of which factors impact upon clinical educators' capacity to engage with the role remains an under-researched area. This paper presents the second phase of an action research project designed to determine the factors that impact upon clinical educators' capacity to engage with the mentorship role. An online survey was developed and podiatry clinical educators recruited through National Health Service (NHS) Trusts. The survey included socio-demographic items, and questions relating to the factors identified as possible variables influencing clinical educator capacity; the latter was assessed using the 'Clinical Educator Capacity to Engage' scale (CECE). Descriptive statistics were used to explore demographic data whilst the relationship between the CECE and socio-demographic factors were examined using inferential statistics in relation to academic profile, career profile and organisation of the placement. The survey response rate was 42 % (n = 66). Multiple linear regression identified four independent variables which explain a significant proportion of the variability of the dependent variable, 'capacity to engage with clinical education', with an adjusted R2 of 0.428. The four variables were: protected mentorship time, clinical educator relationship with university, sign-off responsibility, and volunteer status. The identification of factors that impact upon clinical educators' capacity to engage in mentoring of students has relevance for strategic planning and policy-making with the emphasis upon capacity-building at an individual level, so that the key attitudes and characteristics that are linked

  15. Innovation in Rehabilitation Services and Clinical Programs for Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Dadkhah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation program is a critical piece of clinical care strategy in order to accelerate healing and improve quality of life to the fullest extent possible. An innovated program should have 3 inspiring concepts: Seek inspire and Advance. Seeking and evaluating is a breakthrough technology, innovative methodology and emerging trend in the healthcare industry. The program should inspire clinicians to critically evaluate and implement the highest standards of care. Also an innovated program should advance clinical program development to maximize opportunities for first to market positioning and community partnerships. The scope of program can be from psycho-rehabilitation to predictor in addiction (1-3, Cognitive and motor rehabilitation researchers are quite concerned about system wide biases that may impair development of innovative rehabilitation techniques. In this issue ....

  16. Development and Implementation of a Pharmacist-Managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Kristine R.; Cross, Shane J.; McCormick, John N.; Baker, Donald K.; Molinelli, Alejandro R.; Mullins, Richard; Relling, Mary V.; Hoffman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The development and implementation of a pharmacist-managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics service is described. Summary Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a well-accepted role of the pharmacist. Pharmacogenetics, the study of genetic factors that influence the variability in drug response among patients, is a rapidly evolving discipline that integrates knowledge of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics with modern advances in genetic testing. There is growing evidence for the clinical utility of pharmacogenetics, and pharmacists can play an essential role in the thoughtful application of pharmacogenetics to patient care. A pharmacist-managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics service was designed and implemented. The goal of the service is to provide clinical pharmacogenetic testing for gene products important to the pharmacodynamics of medications used in our patients. The service is modeled after and integrated with an already established Clinical Pharmacokinetics service. All clinical pharmacogenetic test results are first reported to one of the pharmacists, who reviews the result and provides a written consult. The consult includes an interpretation of the result and recommendations for any indicated changes to therapy. In 2009, 136 clinical pharmacogenetic tests were performed, consisting of 66 TPMT tests, 65 CYP2D6 tests, and 5 UGT1A1 tests. Our service has been met with positive clinician feedback. Conclusion Our experience demonstrates the feasibility of the design and function of a pharmacist-managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics service at an academic specialty hospital. The successful implementation of this service highlights the leadership role that pharmacists can take in moving pharmacogenetics from research to patient care, thereby potentially improving patient outcomes. PMID:21200062

  17. The experience of clinical supervision for nurses and healthcare assistants in a secure adolescent service: Affecting service improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, R H; Eade, J; Delmage, E

    2018-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Regular and effective clinical supervision for mental health nurses and healthcare assistants (HCAs) is an important tool in helping to reduce stress and burnout, and in ensuring safe, effective and high-quality mental health care. Previous studies of clinical supervision within secure mental health environments have found both a low availability of clinical supervision, and a low level of staff acceptance of its value, particularly for HCAs. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In previous studies, the understanding shown by HCAs and nurses around the benefits of clinical supervision may have been limited by the methods used. This study was specifically designed to help them best express their views. In contrast to previous studies, both nurses and HCAs showed a good understanding of the function and value of clinical supervision. Significant improvements in the experience of, and access to, clinical supervision for nurses and HCAs working in secure mental health services may be achieved by raising staff awareness, demonstrating organizational support and increasing monitoring of clinical supervision. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Organizations should consider reviewing their approach to supervision to include raising staff awareness, multidisciplinary supervision, group supervision, and recording and tracking of supervision rates. Organizations should be mindful of the need to provide effective clinical supervision to HCAs as well as nurses. Introduction Studies have found a low availability and appreciation of clinical supervision, especially for healthcare assistants (HCAs). Qualitative research is needed to further understand this. Aims Increase understanding of nurses' and HCAs' experiences of, and access to, clinical supervision. Identify nurses' and HCAs' perceptions of the value and function of clinical supervision. Assess how interventions affect staff's experiences of clinical supervision. Methods In

  18. Service user integration into social work education: lessons learned from nordic participatory action projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Service users have lacked substantial influence, access, and participation in social work education in Norway and Sweden. In this article the author presents comparative analyses of two participatory projects that have developed and implemented practices that integrate service users into academic social work education and empower service users. The Norwegian HUSK project and the Social Work as Mobilization and Entrepreneurship course, also known as the "Mobilization course," at Lund University in Sweden demonstrate collaboration between research, social work education, and service users. The conclusions focus on the importance of the empowering processes by including recognition and dialogue, co-learning in practice, and the use of neutral venues to ensure effective user participation. The inclusion of service users in social work education can improve both practice and education.

  19. Vocational Study and Public Service Motivation: Disentangling the Socializing Effects of Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Anne Mette

    2012-01-01

    Most studies of Public Service Motivation investigate differences in motivation between public and private sector employees, but how these differences emerge and evolve in a pre-entry setting is still puzzling. Based on cross-sectional survey data with 3,521 Danish students enrolled in different...... vocational studies and at different stages (years) of their educational programs, this article investigates the socializing effects of higher education into different levels of public service motivation. The analysis demonstrates that students’ levels of public service motivation at different stages...... of their educational programs depends on the field of study: The level of public service motivation among students in vocational studies aimed at jobs with core public service delivery stays the same during education, whereas the level of public service motivation among students in other fields increases substantively...

  20. Perceptions of Eye Health and Eye Health Services among Adults Attending Outreach Eye Care Clinics in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Anthea; Yu, Mitasha; Paudel, Prakash; Naduvilath, Thomas; Fricke, Tim R; Hani, Yvonne; Garap, Jambi

    2015-01-01

    To determine how people attending outreach eye care clinics in Papua New Guinea (PNG) perceive eye health and eye health services. An interview-based questionnaire was administrated to a convenience sample of 614 adult participants across four provinces and perceptions of eye health and eye health services were recorded. Presenting and near visual acuity were measured and cause of visual impairment (VI) determined. In this sample, 113/614 participants (18.4%) presented with distance VI, 16 (2.6%) with distance blindness, and 221 (47.6%) with near VI. Older participants and those with near VI were more likely to indicate that it is hard to have an eye examination due to travel time, lack of transport and transport costs. Female participants and those from underserved areas were more likely to report shame and fear of jealousy from others when asked about their attitudes towards spectacles. Participants reporting that they were willing to pay higher amounts for testing and spectacles/treatment also reported higher education levels, higher household incomes and were more likely to be male. A quarter of participants (25.9%) indicated that they did not like having an eye examination because their reading and writing was poor. People attending outreach eye care clinics in PNG reported finding it difficult to attend eye health services due to transport difficulties and anticipated high costs. Negative attitudes towards spectacles were also prevalent, and negative perceptions appeared more frequently among older participants and those with less education.