WorldWideScience

Sample records for edf nuclear power

  1. Company of the month: French EDF opts for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Siw Linnea

    2006-01-01

    EDF is Europe's largest power company with 640 TWh produced in 2005 and 36,7 million customers in Europe. On a global scale the company has more than 40 million customers. EDF has significant positions in the four big energy markets in Europe: Germany, France, Great Britain and Italy. EDF has an ambitious investment program in the area of nuclear power, and holds that increased investments in this sector is the best and most beneficial way of keeping up with Europe's increasing energy demand (ml)

  2. Environmental survey around EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulquier, L.

    1992-01-01

    Description of various types of environmental test carried out under the responsibility of the Operator of nuclear power plants in France, with taking Fessenheim nuclear power plant as an example: permanent monitoring of radioactivity, periodic radioecological assessments, main results of measurements taken, showing that there are no detectable effects of the plant on the environment, policy of openness by publication of these results

  3. CO2: EDF's competitiveness is due to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    The CO 2 emissions of EDF group (EDF-France + EDF-energy (UK) + Hidrocantabrico (Spain) + EnBW (Germany)) soared by 53% in 2002 which is due to the purchase of british and spanish electricity sub-companies using fossil energies. Despite this sharp increase EDF remains one of the most competitive electricity companies in Europe concerning greenhouse gas emissions. EDF group is the first electricity company in Europe, it generates 22% of the electricity produced in E.U and contributes to CO 2 emissions with a rate of 101 Kg CO 2 /MWh which 3 times less than the average rate of 20 other European companies (358 Kg CO 2 /MWh). This result is due to the large part of nuclear power in the French energy mix. The best electricity companies as far as CO 2 emissions are concerned are Statkraft (Norway) with 0 Kg CO 2 /MWh (100% hydrology) and British-energy (U.K) with 75 Kg CO 2 /MWh (75% nuclear power). At the other end we have the DEI company (Greece) with 863 Kg CO 2 /MWh (100% lignite). (A.C.)

  4. Environmental monitoring around nuclear power plants of EDF in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chretien, V.; Hemidy, P.Y.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the regulatory environmental monitoring around its nuclear power plants, EDF carries out every year more than 40.000 measurements. In addition EDF performs more precise radioecological surveys on all its sites. This monitoring shows the minor incidence of EDF's nuclear power plants on the environment and a general decrease of gamma emitters radionuclides in the environment. These results confirm the efforts lead by EDF to minimise its impacts on the environment, linked to an efficient waste management and demonstrate the good operating standards of its plants. On a qualitative viewpoint, significant efforts on both metrology and organization have lead to improved measurements capabilities, in order to achieve NF EN ISO/CEI 17025 standard compliance. More recently, a similar approach has been implemented with sampling methods. While today the level achieved in the number and quality of measurement complies with the objectives of the monitoring of the impact of the nuclear power plants on the environment, the results of this monitoring should be presented to the public with more pedagogy to give an adequate answer to their expectations. The new questions that will undoubtedly be raised by the recent availability of this information on the Internet should reinforce this dialogue and should also be the opportunity to improve the quality of our communication. (author)

  5. EDF launching a new advertising campaign for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouilloux, Jean-Michel; Chaussade, Jean-Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Starting on November 12 [art, Electricite de France launched its sixth advertising campaign for nuclear power, running in newspapers, magazines and on television. Inserts were published in 10 national daily newspapers and 7 magazines spread over a week period. A 40 second TV commercial will also be broadcast on 15 different channels between November 17 and December 7,1997. In a setting of renewed opposition to nuclear power, the 1997 campaign is a deliberate voicing of opinion and a response designed to instill responsibility and clearly inform the public over the results of the French nuclear electricity programme. The campaign, costing 22 million francs 9 million for the publication of inserts and 13 million for the TV spots) dwells heavily on the programme's comparative benefits for France. The TV commercial, created by the ad agency Callegari Berville, conveys communication based on proof. The rationale is informative in tone, stating that nuclear power ensures a part, of France's independence for energy, and that this is an inexpensive form of power, the results of which are visible on every electricity bill. What is more, nuclear power is a clean and non-polluting energy form. Through scenes of daily life and other imaginary scenes, the spot highlights the advantages nuclear power gives our country. The press campaign is a continuity of the campaign run in November 1996, with EDF using information developed in advertisements to respond to the major questions being asked by the public: how does nuclear power make the cost of electricity competitive? Why does, nuclear power create more jobs in France than other forms of energy? What is the impact of nuclear power on global warming? What do we do with nuclear waste? Why does nuclear power help put our trade balance in the black? The campaign also helps meet a demand by using a reply coupon to propose a number of documents such as 'Focus on the French Nuclear Electricity Programme' or 'Nuclear Waste in

  6. Chemistry evaluation in French EDF Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The Nuclear Production Division of EDF is comprised of 19 power stations (58 PWR reactors) and 2 national engineering organisations. Nuclear Inspection (IN) is an internal assessment unit of the EDF Nuclear Production Directorate. At the request of the Directorate, it carries out periodic evaluations of all the units of the division. The evaluation of the nuclear sites (EGE: Overall Excellence Assessment) is carried out every 4 years, an intermediate evaluation is also carried out between each EGE. These evaluations are independent of the WANO and IAEA evaluations. Exchanges are carried out between Nuclear Inspection and the other international operators (for example, USA (INPO), England, China...) to share site evaluation methods. These evaluations are carried out by a team of 30 inspectors, reinforced during each evaluation by 10 peers who come from the various French nuclear sites. Nuclear Inspection produces a performance standards document for each FUNCTIONAL AREA, which is based on the requirements of the company. On the whole, 13 areas are evaluated during each inspection, in particular: Management, Operations, Maintenance, Engineering and Chemistry. The area of reactor plant chemistry has been evaluated since 2009. The Chemistry performance standards document is written from the EDF internal requirements and international references. During site evaluations, all the performance standards are assessed for compliance. The Chemistry performance standards document is comprised of 3 topics: Management of plant chemistry, The respect of the chemical and radiochemical specifications, The condition of the laboratories and the sampling lines, measuring equipment, and chemical products. The evaluations carried out make it possible to define strengths and weaknesses which the sites must address. After each evaluation, the assessment is presented to the site management and to the director of EDF Nuclear Production. For 4 years these evaluations have allowed progress to

  7. Organization of the operating quality in EDF nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolz, J.

    1976-01-01

    The organization of operating quality in EDF nuclear stations cover a number of planned and systematic actions of technical and management order carried on at station level and Nuclear Safety Department level. Priority is given to safety quality which has to remain the same during the whole life of the stations; the safety of a station depending from its designing, realization and starting up quality on one hand and from its operating methods on the other [fr

  8. Contribution to nuclear power stations to environment conservation (EDF experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astolfi, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    It is a world scale opinion now, that industrial activities, such as power generation, and energy use which still heavily rely on fossil fuels, are disproportionately instrumental in affecting our environment, and changing earth's physical conditions. For example, sulphur and nitrogen oxides, generated by coal and oil combustion, which can be harmful for our health, are also supposed to induce acid rains which damage our lakes and forests. Carbon dioxide emissions, which are unavoidable in most of combustion facilities, are acknowledged as instrumental in the open-quotes greenhouse effectclose quotes, which is supposed to bring about significant changes in the climate during forthcoming centuries. Facing such problems, severe regulations are now issued in most of industralized countries, mainly in the EEC, the aim of which is to reduce drastically pollutant discharge to the atmosphere. They obviously apply to power plants and as a consequence, utilities which operate fossil-fired units, will be prompted in the next future, to carry out sophisticated and expensive technical solutions to limitate pollutant emission to an acceptable level. In this respect, clean combustion technologies, such as fluidized beds, pollutant abatement systems such as flue gas desulphurization or denoxification, or even natural gas-fired plants like combined cycles, shall be designed and implemented, which will unavoidably increase the cost of power generation without totally solving the problem. In such a context, EDF opinion is that safe operation of nuclear power plants can make a substantial contribution in reducing pollution of the atmosphere, and this is highlighted by the example of the French nuclear program

  9. Seismic isolation of nuclear power plants - EDF's philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coladant, C.

    1989-01-01

    The elastomer bearing pads used since 1963 as supports for prestressed concrete pressure vessels (PCPVs) was quickly chosen by Electricite de France (ED) to improve the capability of nuclear power plants (NPPs) to withstand strong earthquakes and to reduce the seismic loads on structures and equipment. The standardized units for 900 and 1,300 MW(e) pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants have moderate seismic design loads of 0.2 and 0.15 g, respectively. These design loads were exceeded by the site dependent spectra of Cruas (France) and Koeberg (South Africa). To keep the plant design unchanged and to take the advantages of standardization, these units were put on laminated bearings with or without sliding plates. For the future French 1,500 MW(e) fast breeder reactors (FBRs), which are more sensitive to seismic loads, the base isolation is considered by EDF at the beginning of the design, even for low ground motions of 0.1 g. The buildings are placed on laminated bearings while the reactor block is supported by springs and dampers. The isolated plant has identical costs as a conventional design such as SPX1 at Creys-Malville

  10. Development of RCM methodology and tools for EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquot, J.P.; Bouchet, J.L.; Despujols, A.; Dewailly, J.; Martin-Mattei, C.

    1992-06-01

    This paper outlines the development of Reliability-Centered Maintenance procedures in the nuclear power industry. It presents the pilot study undertaken by EDF in the overall framework of its 'OMF' (RCM) project, as well as the potential for further improving and enriching analytical methods. Lastly, it gives the prospects for the future design of an 'OMF' workstation

  11. Twenty years of providing information on nuclear power. The experience of EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durr, M.; Ansel, P.; Chaussade, J.P.; Haller, P.; Hezard, L.; Hue, L.

    1995-01-01

    In France, the anti-nuclear protest movement became a real problem after 1968, as new sites were sought. Initially, information on nuclear power involved communication by the entities responsible for building the plants. Once Government officials and politicians overcame their initial hesitation, their support, which underscores the continuity of France's energy policy, came to play a major role in the public acceptance of nuclear power. Electricite de France (EDF) then had to master the art of informing and communicating with the public. The change in the parliamentary majority in 1981 did not call into question the nuclear programme, and new plants were commissioned with relative ease. The situation changed dramatically with the Chernobyl disaster. It therefore became vital to establish an efficient structure for crisis communications, and transparency became crucial. The focus shifted from launching new plants to operating existing facilities and restoring public confidence. While not neglecting the general public, the emphasis was on certain strategic segments of the population, notably teachers and health care professionals. Advertising campaigns are today aimed at certain segments of the public, whose opinion could well shift in favour of nuclear power. Lastly, EDF, as power plant operator, has to realize the importance of providing information on nuclear waste. Starting from a strategic policy of informing politicians and senior decision makers, in 1974 EDF began to focus on providing information that would 'educate' the public. This information was issued via technicians who had no specific training in communications techniques. In addition to the need to explain and justify its projects, EDF had to adopt a policy of transparency, and to dispense with the esoteric language of specialists and their preference for secrecy. After Chernobyl, EDF's managers made communications with the 'outside world' an integral part of their jobs. Nuclear information became a

  12. Low-level radioactive waste management in EDF nuclear power plants (FRANCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper shows some recent examples of Low-level radioactive waste management in EDF nuclear power plants: - Radioactive liquid wastes proceeding from steam generators leaching (NOGENT SUR SEINE-1 REACTOR) - Thermal insulation proceeding from heat exchanger and blower (CHINON-2 REACTOR) - Old iron from reactor dismantling (CHINON-3 REACTOR, MARCOULE G1 REACTOR, MARCOULE G2-G3 REACTORS) - fresh air filter and fire detector - CHINON-2 REACTOR breaker chambers

  13. EDF's approach to determine specifications for nuclear power plant bulk chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basile, Alix; Dijoux, Michel; Le-Calvar, Marc; Gressier, Frederic; Mole, Didier

    2012-09-01

    Chemical impurities in the primary, secondary and auxiliary nuclear power plants circuits generate risks of corrosion of the fuel cladding, steel and nickel based alloys. The PMUC (Products and Materials Used in plants) organization established by EDF intends to limit this risk by specifying maximum levels of impurities in products and materials used for the operation and maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Bulk chemicals specifications, applied on primary and secondary circuit chemicals and hydrogen and nitrogen gases, are particularly important to prevent chemical species to be involved in the corrosion of the NPPs materials. The application of EDF specifications should lead to reasonably exclude any risk of degradation of the first and second containment barriers and auxiliary circuits Important to Safety (IPS) by limiting the concentrations of chlorides, fluorides, sulfates... The risk of metal embrittlement by elements with low melting point (mercury, lead...) is also included. For the primary circuit, the specifications intend to exclude the risk of activation of impurities introduced by the bulk chemicals. For the first containment barrier, to reduce the risk of deposits like zeolites, PMUC products specifications set limit values for calcium, magnesium, aluminum and silica. EDF's approach for establishing specifications for bulk chemicals is taking also into account the capacity of industrial production, as well as costs, limitations of analytical control methods (detection limits) and environmental releases issues. This paper aims to explain EDF's approach relative to specifications of impurities in bulk chemicals. Also presented are the various parameters taken into account to determine the maximum pollution levels in the chemicals, the theoretical hypothesis to set the specifications and the calculation method used to verify that the specifications are suitable. (authors)

  14. Risk of containment sump plugging in EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    The fuel of PWR type reactors in usual functioning is cooled by water circulating in the primary circuit, kept at a 155 bars pressure. In the case of break in the circuit, the reactor is stopped automatically. But it is necessary to evacuate the power that continues to escape from the fuel, because of the radioactivity of products created during the reactor operating. In this aim a system called system of security injection allows to send water in the reactor core when the vapor that is releases by the primary circuit opening is condensed in the containment by the spraying system in the containment that sprays water under the containment dome. The two systems of security and spraying are supplied by a tank but when it is empty they are supplied by water recovered in the bottom of containment in sumps. The two systems operate in closed circuit and allow to evacuate the residual power. The purpose of this work is to study the risk of filters clogging that are in the sumps. (N.C.)

  15. The management of the radioactive waste generated by the EDF nuclear power plants in service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantes, B.; Beguin, St.

    2011-01-01

    From the very beginning of France's nuclear power programme, EDF has developed industrial-scale management of the waste it produces, which has constantly progressed in line with changes in the regulations and the available technology. This management process, improved thanks to feedback and experience, ensures that any risk of exposure, at every stage, from production to final disposal, is controlled. The guidelines adopted by EDF for sustainable management of its waste are as follows: -) reduce the quantity of waste, from the production stage and then through recycling and reprocessing; -) sort waste according to its nature and activity level, so that it can be processed and packaged appropriately and the appropriate long-term management solution implemented; -) package waste as soon as it is produced to prevent any risk of dispersion; -) store waste, pending decay or the availability of an appropriate disposal solution; -) transport and place waste in repositories, keeping it away from Man and the environment by means of engineered or natural barriers for as long as required for the radioactivity to decay to an acceptable level. Regarding short-lived waste produced during operating and maintenance activities at power plants in service, EDF currently implements fully-integrated industrial management solutions which are constantly being optimised in conjunction with its industrial partners. (authors)

  16. Maintenance of EDF nuclear power plants and servicing companies. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baize, Jean-Marc; Reveillon, Sylvie

    1997-01-01

    French Electricity Company (EDF - Electricite de France) and the associated servicing companies, engaged in maintenance partnership from 1991, reinforce and expand their policy by undersigning a progress charter, to cope with the safety and nuclear sector competition issues. This charter stipulates the mutual engagements in the following sectors: 1. Transparency in calling for servicing; 2. Development of the intervenors' professionalism; 3. Improvement in forecasting activity tasks; 4. Radioprotection; 5. Safety and working conditions. The 55 reactors of the EDF nuclear stock are stopped annually for around 6 weeks for refueling. On this occasion the essential maintenance works necessary to ensure the optimal safety of the installations are carried out. The maintenance requires the intervention of 30,000 employees, 10,000 EDF agents and 20,000 external intervenors and represents an amount of 14 million working hours. The full maintenance expenses amounts up to 11 billion FF in 1996, 6 billion of which are assigned to external companies

  17. The sanitary officer: first aid coordinator on EDF nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, A.

    2000-01-01

    The internal organisation for first aid to the injured in case of an accident on E.D.F. nuclear power plant calls for the immediate assistance of a first aid team, consisting of five workers, under the direction of a principal first aid officer; one of the first aid workers, the sanitary officer who instructs the first aid workers intervention awaiting the arrival of an external medical. When the 'Sanitary on-site Emergency Plan' was up' dated, twenty medical doctors and seventy members of staff from five different sites were questioned as to the function of the sanitary officer. The conclusions revealed a notable difference of training amongst the different sites, and concerning first aid organisation, difference of priority of actions, extent of their participation once the medical team arrives and their participation in case of decontamination treatment. The medical doctors and staff lay a particular stress on importance of defining on a national scale the limits of role and responsibilities of the sanitary officer and establish a more specific training in this field, consequently motivating commitment and professionalism involvement. There is a great difference between the training and coaching of the first aid assistance and fire protection teams. To conclude, we propose that the first aid officer be known as first aid coordinator and the qualification of 'Certificat de Formation aux Premiers Secours en Equipe' in compliance with the current legislation together with a specific nuclear module and they should undergo regular on-site drills. (author)

  18. On-site emergency preparedness and response PLAN for EDF Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOSSARD, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    Considering nuclear safety concepts applied to reactor design and preventive measures taken by EDF during operation, and although the probability of a nuclear accident, even minor, on a unit is very low, it still cannot be considered nil. Therefore, the operator must be prepared, if such an event should occur, by defining and implementing a 'crisis organisation' in cooperation with the Safety Authorities. The crisis organisation has been set up in order to master and control the accident, i.e. in order to prevent, in real time, the accident developing into a more serious situation and to limit the consequences regarding technical and radiological concerns. EDF crisis organisation is integrated into the current organisation at local level as well as at national level. In addition to the operation team in 'shifts', crisis organisation is based 'on-call' personnel available at home (local level) or within a restricted area (national level). This organisation includes Managers, Experts, Participants EDF (+FRAMATOME), each of the them working, in case of an emergency, in his field of skills

  19. The system of quality assurance of EDF for designing and developing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaujour, M.

    As the quality required for a power plant must fulfill at one and the same time, performance, safety and reliability criteria, the quality obtainment needs the establishment of a system of quality assurance: an internal system of arrangement of the organizations involved, measures creating the relations between said organizations, mechanisms of control of the quality organizing, and some statements. The respective roles of EDF and the constructors are defined together with the contractual obligations of the constructors [fr

  20. Programs of monitoring of the steam generators of EdF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This decision from the French authority of nuclear safety (ASN) modifies the decision DSIN/GRE-BCCN no 000632 from October 31, 2000 concerning the preventive maintenance programs of the steam generators of Electricite de France (EdF) reactors. The main themes of the previous decision are not changed, i.e. the improvement of circumferential crack detection means, the reinforcement of the external skin control of tubes and the correction of vibrational instabilities for a given family of tubes. The modification concerns only the paragraph 2.b relative to the internal crack control of the 600 MA alloy tubes in the rolling transition zone. This paragraph is abrogated. (J.S.)

  1. The cycle of the nuclear fuel used in EDF power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This document briefly indicates the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, from the purchase of natural uranium to waste storage. It also indicates the main responsibilities of EDF regarding this fuel cycle (to secure supplies, to organise material transportation, to process and store used fuels and associated wastes). It presents the different associated processes: uranium extraction, purification and concentration, conversion or fluoridation, enrichment. It briefly describes the fuel assembly fabrication, and indicates the main uranium producers in the world. Other addressed steps are: the transportation of fuel assembly, fuel loading, and spent fuel management, the processing of spent fuel and radioactive wastes

  2. The deconstruction of EDF nuclear power plants - Information note September 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Lionel

    2011-09-01

    As nine nuclear reactors are being deconstructed, this document outlines EDF commitment in this deconstruction, and the fact that this deconstruction is a long process which comprises several phases (stopping the reactor, partial and total dismantling). It presents the CIDEN (Deconstruction and Environment Engineering Centre), an expertise centre specialised in plant deconstruction. It briefly addresses the issue of deconstruction wastes: there are different types of wastes (conventional wastes and wastes with different levels of radioactivity), and different associated storage sites. The document highlights the importance of public, personnel and environment protection for these operations, and evokes the financial issue. Finally, the industrial project ICEDA (packaging and warehousing installation for activated wastes) is presented

  3. Development of RCM methodology and tools for EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquot, J.P.; Bouchet, J.L.; Despujols, A.; Dewailly, J.; Martin-Mattei, C.

    1995-01-01

    In 1990, EDF launched a Reliability-Centered Maintenance project for its nuclear plants. This 'OMF' project aims at developing methods and tools for analysis and in the first phase, applying these to one initial system (the pilot study). The results of the pilot study have confirmed the advantages of the 'OMF' analytical method: the prospects for the approach on an industrial scale are extremely promising. It should be noted that the precision of our 'OMF' analysis is not doubt superior to that common in other industrial domains (MSG/RCM analysis). The particular approach implies analysis of systems and components and, most importantly, integration of operation feedback, with a view to developing a rigorous maintenance program which can constantly be updated. In addition to the defining and implementing the method, the review of designing software aids has begun. The pilot study clearly pointed up the need for such aids in handling the necessary volume of information and assisting experts in their analysis. The EDF 'OMF' workstation (and its environment) will be used not only in preparing the 'initial' maintenance program but also in updating it during the 'living' program phase. (author)

  4. Development of RCM methodology and tools for EDF nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquot, J.P.; Bouchet, J.L.; Despujols, A.; Dewailly, J.; Martin-Mattei, C. [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou (France)

    1995-12-31

    In 1990, EDF launched a Reliability-Centered Maintenance project for its nuclear plants. This `OMF` project aims at developing methods and tools for analysis and in the first phase, applying these to one initial system (the pilot study). The results of the pilot study have confirmed the advantages of the `OMF` analytical method: the prospects for the approach on an industrial scale are extremely promising. It should be noted that the precision of our `OMF` analysis is not doubt superior to that common in other industrial domains (MSG/RCM analysis). The particular approach implies analysis of systems and components and, most importantly, integration of operation feedback, with a view to developing a rigorous maintenance program which can constantly be updated. In addition to the defining and implementing the method, the review of designing software aids has begun. The pilot study clearly pointed up the need for such aids in handling the necessary volume of information and assisting experts in their analysis. The EDF `OMF` workstation (and its environment) will be used not only in preparing the `initial` maintenance program but also in updating it during the `living` program phase. (author) 4 refs.

  5. Long Term Operation for EDF Nuclear Power Plants : Towards 60 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternon-Morin, Francoise; Degrave, Claude

    2012-01-01

    The lifetime extension of the French nuclear fleet, significantly beyond 40 years (initial design basis) is presently one of the major objectives for EDF, in order to smooth the commissioning flow for the new build program. A lifetime extension up to 60 years should be reasonably achieved, owing to the compliance with additional safety and environmental requirements, an adequate LTO strategy including an exceptional maintenance program periodically updated, and a LTO support program (R and D) consisting of aging knowledge improvement and decision-making tools and methods. The LTO program is illustrated with some examples of replaceable components and a focus is placed on the complementary analysis in progress for RPV and containment safety assessment. (author)

  6. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Darren; Gressier, Frederic; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Ranchoux, Gilles; Marteau, Herve; Labed, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  7. Environmental monitoring around nuclear power plants of EDF in France; La surveillance de l'environnement autour des centres nucleaires de production d'electricite d'EDF en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chretien, V.; Hemidy, P.Y. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2010-06-15

    As part of the regulatory environmental monitoring around its nuclear power plants, EDF carries out every year more than 40.000 measurements. In addition EDF performs more precise radioecological surveys on all its sites. This monitoring shows the minor incidence of EDF's nuclear power plants on the environment and a general decrease of gamma emitters radionuclides in the environment. These results confirm the efforts lead by EDF to minimise its impacts on the environment, linked to an efficient waste management and demonstrate the good operating standards of its plants. On a qualitative viewpoint, significant efforts on both metrology and organization have lead to improved measurements capabilities, in order to achieve NF EN ISO/CEI 17025 standard compliance. More recently, a similar approach has been implemented with sampling methods. While today the level achieved in the number and quality of measurement complies with the objectives of the monitoring of the impact of the nuclear power plants on the environment, the results of this monitoring should be presented to the public with more pedagogy to give an adequate answer to their expectations. The new questions that will undoubtedly be raised by the recent availability of this information on the Internet should reinforce this dialogue and should also be the opportunity to improve the quality of our communication. (author)

  8. Anticipation of maintenance of EDF nuclear power plants: the studying of the feasibility of big components repair or replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubreuil Chambardel, A.

    2001-01-01

    Maintaining the technical-economic performance of nuclear power stations is in the first place provided by standard preventive maintenance. These are operations of test, monitoring or maintenance performed periodically on the components, providing the guarantee of a level of safety and availability of the NPPs at the lowest possible cost. To this standard maintenance is added exceptional maintenance which covers important operations of maintenance to be performed (generally only once) on a large number of units, the achievement of which may have a strong impact in terms of resources and availability. As an example can be quoted replacement of steam generators. The second level of anticipation of maintenance consists of having a prospective vision of major degradations which could affect components, of identifying exceptional operations of maintenance which should ''probably'' be performed some day, and of making certain that measures are taken in order that, if needed, their implementation affects as little as possible the performance of the EDF nuclear power stations. EDF has developed these two levels of anticipation since the onset of running its NPPs. However it has turned out to be necessary to intensify the preceding actions in particular with regard to the possibilities to repair or replace components, by identifying as completely as possible the equipment which could create problems and by assessing the interest to implement solutions with a view of making the best use of allocated resources. (author)

  9. Anticipation of maintenance of EDF nuclear power plants: the studying of the feasibility of big components repair or replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubreuil Chambardel, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. Production Nucleaire, 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Maintaining the technical-economic performance of nuclear power stations is in the first place provided by standard preventive maintenance. These are operations of test, monitoring or maintenance performed periodically on the components, providing the guarantee of a level of safety and availability of the NPPs at the lowest possible cost. To this standard maintenance is added exceptional maintenance which covers important operations of maintenance to be performed (generally only once) on a large number of units, the achievement of which may have a strong impact in terms of resources and availability. As an example can be quoted replacement of steam generators. The second level of anticipation of maintenance consists of having a prospective vision of major degradations which could affect components, of identifying exceptional operations of maintenance which should ''probably'' be performed some day, and of making certain that measures are taken in order that, if needed, their implementation affects as little as possible the performance of the EDF nuclear power stations. EDF has developed these two levels of anticipation since the onset of running its NPPs. However it has turned out to be necessary to intensify the preceding actions in particular with regard to the possibilities to repair or replace components, by identifying as completely as possible the equipment which could create problems and by assessing the interest to implement solutions with a view of making the best use of allocated resources. (author)

  10. Personnel training at EDF's nuclear and fossil generation division and its application for the personnel of a nuclear power station abroad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabouhams, J.

    1991-01-01

    Safety in nuclear power stations relies so much upon human competence that the training of the personnel has to respond to the basic need of having personnel who are competent in their job permanently available. EDF has designed, organized and managed a large volume of training in order to provide its personnel involved in the operation of nuclear power station with initial training, training, retraining and improvement within the framework of quality organization. To deal with this training in the most efficient way EDF has developed various training aids ranging from booklets to fullscope simulator or fullscope mockups which are continually updated. All EDF experience has been used to train Daya Bay nuclear power plant personnel who have been monitored throughout the training programmes. Adequate safety conduct and attitudes including the socio-cultural background have been developed during the training. The principle teaching method was shadow training in other words the transfer in situ of knowledge, know how, and conduct from an experienced engineer. (author)

  11. A computer - aided system for the the E.D.F. 1400 MW. Nuclear power plants control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltranda, G.; Philipps, C.

    1988-01-01

    The future E.D.F. 1400 MW nuclear power plants (due to be commissioned in 1991 at CHOOZ) are provided with a control and instrumentation system including the following levels: - sensors and actuators (LEVEL 0): this is the interface of the elementary acquisition and control signals; - the programmable logical and numerical controllers (LEVEL 1) for the logical control sequences and analog adjustment sequences for the whole equipment of the facilities; - the control room (LEVEL 2) including the computer-aided operation system as well as the wall mimic diagram and the auxiliary panel directly connected to the controllers. This is the processing and control conversational level; - the maintenance and site computer-aided systems (LEVEL 3). This paper aims at describing the computer-aided operation system (called KIC N4), its main functions, its architecture and the solutions retained as regards its softwares and the high-quality of data required. The achievement of this system has been entrusted by EDF to the SEMA. METRA/CIMSA-SINTRA grouping, among which SEMA.METRA is the leading company

  12. A corporate ALARA engineering support for all EDF nuclear power plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiot, A.; Orjol, A. [Electricite de France (EDF/UTO), 93 - Noisy le Grand (France); Lafferriere, F.; Fraissinet, E. [Electricite de France (EDF-CNPE) du Blayais, 33 - Saint Ciers sur Gironde (France)

    2006-07-01

    Since 1991, EDF has established a national ALARA programme with a very effective result in terms of dose reduction. Of course, EDF management has decided to further improve occupational exposure management and dose reduction (both collective and individuals). Since 2002, one key element allowing reaching the new goals, is the set up of a national corporate engineering as a support for EDF sites for preparing maintenance interventions. Its objective is to reduce occupational exposure with the help of up to date tools and methods. That engineering support consists of a growing up team comprising at the moment about ten engineers, including CAD specialists and health physicists. It is in charge of using very efficient tools such as P.A.N.T.H.E.R. -R.P. to perform national modelling studies concerning the reactor and auxiliary buildings areas, which are the most costly in terms of doses. That tool has been developed initially for the first steam generator replacements by EDF S.E.P.T.E.N. engineering department. It uses friendly user 3D software to create a geometrical model of the concerned area with all existing materials (pipes, valves, concrete walls allowing visualizing on personal computers, each area from all perspectives. Other important inputs for P.A.N.T.H.E.R. R.P. are the quantities of radioisotopes present in each material. The code allows then estimating the dose rates at each location in the area, calculating the contribution of each equipment (i.e sources) in the area to the dose rate in each point; calculating also the contribution of each radio isotope to the dose rates. With the help of these models the engineering is then able to perform in depth generic work areas optimisation studies, taking into account the workload in each workstation. Up to recently these studies were performed only for huge operations such as steam generator replacements, they are now proposed to EDF sites for more usual interventions. The selection of these interventions takes

  13. A corporate ALARA engineering support for all EDF nuclear power plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiot, A.; Orjol, A.; Lafferriere, F.; Fraissinet, E.

    2006-01-01

    Since 1991, EDF has established a national ALARA programme with a very effective result in terms of dose reduction. Of course, EDF management has decided to further improve occupational exposure management and dose reduction (both collective and individuals). Since 2002, one key element allowing reaching the new goals, is the set up of a national corporate engineering as a support for EDF sites for preparing maintenance interventions. Its objective is to reduce occupational exposure with the help of up to date tools and methods. That engineering support consists of a growing up team comprising at the moment about ten engineers, including CAD specialists and health physicists. It is in charge of using very efficient tools such as P.A.N.T.H.E.R. -R.P. to perform national modelling studies concerning the reactor and auxiliary buildings areas, which are the most costly in terms of doses. That tool has been developed initially for the first steam generator replacements by EDF S.E.P.T.E.N. engineering department. It uses friendly user 3D software to create a geometrical model of the concerned area with all existing materials (pipes, valves, concrete walls allowing visualizing on personal computers, each area from all perspectives. Other important inputs for P.A.N.T.H.E.R. R.P. are the quantities of radioisotopes present in each material. The code allows then estimating the dose rates at each location in the area, calculating the contribution of each equipment (i.e sources) in the area to the dose rate in each point; calculating also the contribution of each radio isotope to the dose rates. With the help of these models the engineering is then able to perform in depth generic work areas optimisation studies, taking into account the workload in each workstation. Up to recently these studies were performed only for huge operations such as steam generator replacements, they are now proposed to EDF sites for more usual interventions. The selection of these interventions takes

  14. The nuclear cleanliness: a priority for EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Since autumn 1998 EDF implemented an action plan to improve the nuclear cleanliness on its sites. The first objective is to eliminate the contamination risk, by a better professional training and installation of new detection gantries. (A.L.B.)

  15. Neutron dosimetry in EDF experimental surveillance programme for VVER-440 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Erben, O.; Novosad, P.; Zerola, L.; Hogel, J.; Trollat, C.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen chains containing experimental surveillance material specimens of the VVER 440/213 nuclear power reactor pressure vessels were irradiated in the surveillance channels of the Nuclear Power Plant Dukovany in the Czech Republic. The irradiation periods were one, two or three cycles. The chains contained different number and types of containers, the omitted ones were replaced by chain elements. All of the containers were instrumented with wire neutron fluence detectors, some of the containers in the chain had spectrometric sets of neutron fluence monitors. For the absolute fluence values evaluation it was taken into account time history of the reactor power and local changes of the neutron flux along the reactor core height, correction factors due to the orientation of monitors with respect to the reactor core centre. Unfolding programs SAND-II or BASA-CF were used. The relative axial fluence distribution was obtained from the O-wire measurements. Neutron fluence values above 0.5 MeV energy and above 1.0 MeV energy in the container axis on the axial positions of the sample centres and fluence values in the geometric centre of the samples was calculated making use the exponential attenuation model of the incident neutron beam. Received fast neutron fluence values can be used as reference values to all VVER-440 type 213 nuclear power plant reactors. (author)

  16. Nuclear energy in France. Respective part of CEA, EDF, FRAMATOME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    In France, the three actors on the nuclear stage are CEA, EDF, and industry. The CEA, important organism of research and development, represents the public power, counsels the Government for safety and constitutes the State interference by the indirect mean of budget which is assigned to it. The industry, FRAMATOME, is commissioned to build plants. EDF has vocation to provide electricity at the lower costs [fr

  17. Decontamination experience using the EMMAC process in EDF nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, D.; Spychala, H. B.; Dupin, M.; Lantes, B.; Goulain, F.; Gregoire, J.; Jeandrot, S.

    1997-01-01

    The EMMA, EMMAC and EMMAC-PLUS decontamination processes, nondestructive tests and waste treatment are presented. The various applications of the new EMMAC soft decontamination process, used by EDF since 1995 have shown that it is a very effective tool and at the same time, is a very low corrosive process for the materials that have been treated . The improved efficiency, compared to the previous EMMA process allowed us to obtain good decontamination factors with only one cycle instead of two. At the same time, changes in chemical composition and waste treatment produced large reduction in the amount of radioactive wastes generated. Further improvements are still being sought. (authors)

  18. Current economic cost, the ARENH (Regulated Access to the Historic (EDF) Nuclear Energy Supplier) price, the differential rent and the scarcity rent of nuclear power: some observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percebois, J.

    2012-01-01

    This article sets out to explain the ARENH mechanism, the regulated price at which the EDF (France's historic monopoly supplier) must sell part of its production to its competitors in the framework of the Nome Act (New Organisation of the Electricity Market). This price by its nature is different from the Current Economic Cost (CEC) of nuclear power, as estimated by France's Government Accounting Office in its report submitted in January 2012. These two approaches revert to the problem of the determination of the scarcity rent of nuclear power in the context of the liberalised European market, in which nuclear power benefits from a 'cost' advantage relative to thermal electricity generated from fossil fuels. Furthermore, scarcity rent is not the same thing as differential rent. Selling a nuclear kWh at the price of a 'gas' kWh at certain times results in a differential rent enabling nuclear generated power to cover fixed costs. One can only speak of scarcity rent for nuclear power when the price at which the kWh is sold allows the recovery of more than is necessary to cover overall costs of nuclear power and it is this scarcity rent and its allocation that is the subject of debate. (author)

  19. EDF's Engineering Experience and Contribution to the Nuclear Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salha, Bernard; Fourest, Bernard; Arpino, Jean-Marc

    2002-01-01

    Electricite de France (EDF) is now operating 58 nuclear power units which produce 76% of the electricity generated in France. This EDF's industrial success is the result of its capacity to master and optimize its production tool, from design through operation. EDF's integrated engineering is in the heart of this process of technical expertise and economic optimization. It allows to be in interface between the needs of operators and industrials suppliers, while accumulating a significant feedback of operating experience. The will of achieving the process of frenchifying PWR technology and to implement new industrial innovations have ended up in the new NPP of 100 % french design, the N4 series and its significant innovations. EDF energy policy is to keep the nuclear option open for the future. This strategy results from the need to improve the availability and the life extension of the units in operation and to prepare the replacement of the operating reactors around 2015. This is the objective of the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR), a French-German joint project. EDF is also applying this industrial process in its international projects. For example China, which desires to implement a standardized nuclear program and to move forward the complete autonomy of its nuclear industry, has decided to adopt a similar approach to EDF's one. (authors)

  20. Revision of by-laws about effluents of EdF's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In France, in application of the clean water law from January 3, 1992 and since the decree 95-540 from May 4, 1995, each basic nuclear facility receives a single permission which covers both its water takes and its radioactive and non-radioactive effluents. This decree, initially dedicated to new facilities has been enlarged to all existing installations for which the prefectorial by-laws have reached their date-line. Thus, up to now, five inter-ministerial by-laws have renewed the permissions of water takes and effluents evacuation of the power plants of Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux (Loir-et-Cher), Flamanville (Manche), Paluel (Seine-Maritime), Belleville (Cher) and Saint-Alban (Isere). These by-laws foresee an important abatement of the effluents and concern more particularly the tritium, 14 C, the iodine isotopes and also some other non-radioactive chemical compounds. This document is a compilation of all revised by-laws about effluents and concerning the nuclear power plants listed above. (J.S.)

  1. Statistical analysis of the behaviour of the mechanical equipment of EDFs power plants - evaluation of the availability and safety of thermal and nuclear units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procaccia, H.; Brillon, A.; Cravero, M.; Lucenet, G.

    1975-01-01

    The investigation and research directorate of EDF has undertaken a statistical analysis of the behaviour of large mechanical equipment at conventional power stations during the ten years following the operating reports of these stations. It has thus been possible to determine the intrinsic reliability, the failure rate, the mean repair time, and the mean good operating time of feed water reheating points, power turbines, pumps and boilers of the various EDF plants (125 and 250 MW) leading to a consideration of the feasibility of an extrapolation to present and future plants. Based on these elementary investigation two methods of calculation have been developed. One is used to assess the overall availability of a thermal or nuclear power station based on the knowledge of the failure rates of the equipment, each piece of equipment being associated with an idea of its technical importance in the functioning of the equipment. A numerical application is given for 125 and 250 MW conventional plants. The purpose of the other method is to estimate the operational safety of the safety equipment of nuclear power stations, based on the development of tree diagrams for faults in basic equipment. A numerical example is given for the cooling systems for Phenix and for one of the Super Phenix versions. (author)

  2. Security of nuclear power in operation. Results from the first PWR 900 MWe stages of Electricity of France (EDF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capel, R; Chaubaron, J F [Electricite de France, 93 - Saint-Denis. Service de la Production Thermique

    1980-06-01

    The security and reliability objectives of the PWR 900 MWe stages are acquiring particular importance in the present energetic and nuclear context. This article presents the general framework wherein the superintendence and maintenance of plant equipment are situated. E.D.F. applies to all of its activities, the assurance of quality principles. The General Rules of Operating constitute the basic document. The Operating Technical Specifications specify the conditions for the correct operating and safety of the installations. The Organization of Quality handbook sets the rules to be obeyed in the management of all operations. Examples from Fessenhein and Bugey illustrate the subject and elucidate the practical dimension of security. Lastly, the lessons of experience are recalled.

  3. Advantages for EDF of using and updating PSAs for the probabilistic analysis of accident scenarios in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuillade, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    This paper shows the advantages for EDF of using and updating PSA models of PWR units for the probabilistic assessment of accident scenarios. These advantages may be classified in various categories: The construction of PSA models makes it possible to aggregate knowledge in a variety of fields: thermohydraulics, the behavior of equipment and systems, organization, plant operation, etc. The updating of PSA models makes it possible to monitor the state of progress of PWR unit safety levels and also allows a variety of applications to be used throughout the service life of the unit. The results obtained are directly applicable to the units as the 'reference PSA models' developed by EDF conform to the units in service. The use of PSA for the examination of incident or accident scenarios makes it possible to verify the adequacy of the resources both in terms of 'systems' and 'plant operation'. These two notions are to be taken in the broadest sense, as they cover the aspects of system design, reliability and availability of equipment, organization of plant operation, comprehensiveness of operating procedures, human redundancy, etc. The use of PSA models through the different applications (analyses of predominant sequences, analyses of main equipment failures, analyses main operator actions, analyses according to the power units, etc) is becoming an indispensable supplement to conventional deterministic analyses of the envisaged accident scenarios. Within the scope of accident prevention, it constitutes a tool to assist the decision-maker, especially when evaluating the pertinence of the General Operating Rules (operating procedures, operating technical specifications, periodic testing, etc). (S.Y.)

  4. The safety approach in the operation of EDF power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertron, L.; Mira, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    To get a view on what is involved in maintaining a high level of safety in the operation of EdF nuclear power plants, it may be recalled that in 1987, 76 % of the EdF production was nuclear. The nuclear plants include thirty-four standard PWR 900 plants, fourteen PWR 1300 plants, the 305 MW SENA PWR, the four 500 MW GCR: CHINON A3 plant, St-LAURENT A1 (390 MW), A2 (450 MW) and BUGEY 1 (540 MW), the 233 MW PHENIX fast breeder reactor and the CREYS-MALVILLE 1200 MW fast breeder reactor, now being prepared for a new startup after the 1987 incident. So the importance of a safe operation of this investment is considerable for EdF, which is the designer, owner, industrial architect and operator. According to the French regulations, EdF is responsible for the safe operation of its power plants. A considerable human component is also at stake, as the safe operation of plants implies all the personnel to varying degrees. There are 15,000 such employees, all of whom have to be trained, competent and motivated. The operation of this system for 340 reactor-years has to-date resulted in no incident of any significant impact on the environment. Right from the start, safety in operation has always been an essential and clearly stated priority. Among other lessons the Three-Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents have reinforced the conviction that the human factors, the man-machine interface, and the safety culture were determining elements. With forty-eigh PWR plants in service, the problem is to maintain safe operation of a system now running at cruising speed, but also including some units (particularly the GCRs) that must be prepared for decommissioning. In addition EDF has to demonstrate the safe operations of CREYS MALVILLE, fast breeder reactor

  5. EDF guide book for decontamination at power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glorennec, C.; Bemer, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant components or equipment often need to be more or less decontaminated before undergoing maintenance. In order to coordinate the activities of the different maintenance specialists belonging to the corporate or site organizations, the management of EDF/Nuclear and Fossil Division has created a decontamination task force. One of the objectives of this task force was to elaborate the present Guide Book for Decontamination at Power Plants. This paper provides assistance to nuclear plants operators in the very specific field of decontamination

  6. Optimization of the decontamination in EDF PWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosset, P.; Dupin, M.; Buisine, D.; Buet, J.F.; Brunel, V.

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation of decontamination in EDF PWR power plants is the result of a permanent collaborative work between the plant operators, the subcontractors, central services of nuclear power division of EDF. This collaborative work enables the saving of all the feedback experience. The main operations carried out on nuclear sites like mechanical decontamination of valves, use of the ''EMMAC'' process on big components (replacement of steam generator, hydraulic parts of the reactor coolant pumps), use of foam on pools walls and divers in highly contaminated pools have been discussed. This paper shows that the choice of decontamination processes is very dependant on the components, on the dose rate reduction to be aimed and on the possibility to treat the waste on site. (authors)

  7. The management of the flow assisted corrosion on the nuclear power plants of the fleet of EDF: a strategy of commitment for the control of the ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevin, S.; Moutrille, M.P.; Caylar, P.; Delacoux, D.; Gipon, E.; Mellin, N.; Qiu, G.; Alos Ramos, O.; Tarabay, J.; Mansour, C.

    2015-01-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) is very effective for nuclear power plants. This generalized corrosion can lead to the rupture of pipes. EDF has developed during these 20 last years the software called BRT-CICERO for the surveillance of the secondary piping system of its Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). This software enables the operator to calculate the FAC wear rates taking into account all the influencing parameters such as: pipe isometrics, chromium content of the steel, chemical conditioning and operating parameters of the secondary circuit (temperature, pressure, etc.). This is a major tool for the operators to organize the maintenance and to plan the inspections. In the framework of the French pressure vessel law issued on March 15. 2000, the software BRT-CICERO has been recognized by the French authority for the FAC surveillance on the secondary pressure piping lines of the EDF 58 nuclear reactors. It takes advantage of the experience feedback of the French fleet and of the improvements. BRT-CICERO is frequently updated. A guideline is associated to BRT-CICERO to define the rules and the domain of use and to take advantage of all its functionalities. (authors)

  8. ASN takes position in the in-service follow-up programs of primary and secondary loops of EdF's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This decision from the French authority of nuclear safety (ASN) aims at fixing the conditions to be respected by Electricite de France (EdF) during its in-service follow-up programs for the monitoring and preventive maintenance of the primary and secondary cooling loops of EdF's PWR reactors. The components and the particular points to be controlled are listed in appendixes. (J.S.)

  9. Research helps EdF improve operating practices and control rooms [at nuclear power plants in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leckner, J.-M.

    1989-01-01

    In September 1982, EdF set up a team to analyse incidents occurring in nuclear plants in France and elsewhere. This team consists of two groups of analysts: one for studying technical factors and one for investigating human factors. Medium-term objectives for the team involve work on the principal causes of malfunction and the extent to which significant incidents recur. Experience feedback, training and multifactor events, are the group's prime concerns. Information is gathered from two sources: simulators provide an analysis of operator behaviour in incident and accident situations; and plants themselves provide in-service data. The malfunctions which are examined are significant incidents listed according to ten criteria, the main ones being scrams, safety injection, events relating to technical specifications, malicious acts, discharge of radioactive substances and exposure of staff to ionizing radiation. Every week, all incidents are examined and communicated to the relevant analysts. The analyst must then draw up a summary, to include: a description of the facts; an analysis of the causes; and ideas for preventive actions. Many of the recommendations have now been carried out, with the result that recent years have seen a decline in human errors at French plants. (author)

  10. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandonnet, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This report is destined for the President of EDF with the purpose of informing him of the judgement the Inspector General has about the nuclear safety and radiation protection within the EDF Group. It is also intended for all who, in any way, play a role at EDF in improving nuclear safety. It may also prove useful to those outside the company who work in the nuclear field or indeed any branch of industry where there are risks to be managed and who wish to participate in the debate. It also contributes to the pool of information shared with the other nuclear operators under the auspices of WANO. The continuous improvement of nuclear safety results is a fundamental commitment of the EDF Group. This is notably reflected in a policy of transparency, whether in France, Britain, America or China. This document constitutes an example of this, offering an independent view of the operational situation. It is based on facts and findings derived in EDF's contacts with field staff and meetings with the decision makers, managers, medical personnel and players on both sides of this industry as well as outside stakeholders, especially contractor companies. The resulting snapshot of the situation in the field is particularly instructive. This report therefore concentrates more on problems and weaknesses rather than strengths and progress, except as concerns happenings outside France, where the focus is more on good practices than difficulties. Contents: 1 - The view from the Inspector General of EDF about the nuclear safety in the EDF group; 2 - A panorama of 2011: The management, The state of the installations, Maintenance of the French nuclear power plants, Relations with the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), The EPR projects, The players in the fields of health and safety, Radiation protection, Fire prevention and fire fighting, Increasing nuclear power plant security, Decommissioning; 3 - Nuclear safety management; 4 - The Fukushima Daiichi accident; 5 - Training to

  11. EDF'S nuclear strategy: new markets and skilled players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machenaud, H.

    2000-01-01

    French nuclear power has a bright future ahead, as a major contributor to the limitation of CO 2 emissions in the European Union, and as a cheap way of balancing the electricity supply. Of course, this future could be called into question if public no longer trusted us. This means we need to be stringent on the issues of safety, radiological protection of workers and maintenance. EDF will follow the debate raised by the French government on nuclear energy, through an attitude of openness and constant exchange of view ports, in order to give an objectively elaborated and clear answers to the questions raised by our industrial activities, and their future. EDF wants to answer these questions not only in technical, economic and scientific terms, but also by taking into account people's specific concerns, their expectations and their opinions. Citizens and customers should see a consistency in high standards between our ecological, technological, and commercial activities. It is only on this condition that EDF, and nuclear energy can keep the confidence they have earned in France. (author)

  12. Digital technology strengthens EDF's nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes an overview of the development of the use of various and new digital technologies of information and communication by EDF to train its nuclear operators, field technicians who are maintaining nuclear power plants, personnel in charge of risk management, and so on. Trainees are using tablets with augmented reality software, serious games, virtual reality helmets, and also digital simulators to learn how to control a reactor. More practical training also exists: people are taught how to practically and correctly assemble tubes for example

  13. Report 2000 of EDF nuclear park '' Humans, architects of the progress; Bilan 2000 du parc nucleaire d'EDF ''les hommes, artisans du progres''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stricker, L.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of the EDF nuclear park, during 2000, in matter of safety, environment and competitiveness. In 2000, the EDF nuclear installations safety still improved. Hopeful the nuclear energy part in its power production, EDF avoids the carbon dioxide diffusion in the atmosphere. EDF also commits itself to reduce the liquid effluents, the gaseous emissions and the solid wastes. At the same time EDF remained competitive with a decrease of the kWh price of 7%. (A.L.B.)

  14. Phasing out nuclear: shock statements by the EDF's CEO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benezet, E.; Mouchon, F.; Lomazzi, M.; Jeanne, M.

    2011-01-01

    While costs associated with phasing out nuclear or cancelling of nuclear programs are briefly evoked for different European countries (Belgium, Germany, Italy), the EDF Chairman, Mr Proglio, comments the decisions of these countries, outlines the various risks associated with such a decision in France (job losses, greenhouse gas emissions), also outlines EDF involvement in nuclear safety and evokes the issues of Fessenheim and of the EPR. Some French political aspects on that matter are also evoked

  15. Cooperation between regional fire brigades and EDF's power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudin, B.; Pigeon, M.

    2000-01-01

    An emergency plan has been worked out at each nuclear power plant. This plan involves public authorities, regional fire brigades, hospitals, and EDF's own emergency means. This organization implies that in case of emergency both outside help and intern means have to cooperate efficiently on the site. In order to clarify roles and order hierarchy, common intervention protocols have been written and tested. Joint exercises involving outside help and intern means are regularly organized to test the emergency organization and train the staff. (A.C.)

  16. Allowing for the effect of external forces in the protection of nuclear power stations. Protecting EDF's nuclear power stations from earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betbeder-Matibet, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the method adopted to determine the seismic level to be allowed for on a given site. One goes on to summarise the general rules applied to protect nuclear power stations against earthquakes and traces the pattern of studies carried out to determine the stresses to which plants can be subjected. Finally, one examines the consequences which allowing for earthquakes have on the design of engineering work and equipment [fr

  17. History of large scale maintenance operations performed by EDF on the steam generators of its nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After a first part which describes the role of steam generators in nuclear reactors, highlights their importance for the reactor safety, and briefly presents their maintenance, this report describes the new types of degradation which have been observed, and their processing. Thus, it describes the clogging on cracked tubes, comments its impact on safety, describes the available control means, and discusses the use of chemical cleaning and the on-going work on this topic. It discusses the risk of fatigue cracking of tubes in abnormal support position. It comments the holding in position of stoppers used during maintenance. It describes and discusses the corrosion phenomena, and the performed and requested corrective actions

  18. Main prospects of EDF's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre Bacher, M.; Jean Pierrard, M.

    1994-01-01

    Today, EDF is at a half way point in its third major standardized series, the N4 1400 MW series. The main objective agreed upon for this N4 series, was to improve the insertion of man in the control loop. After the TMI accident in 1979, selective improvements had already been introduced in the 900 series ; the 1300 series, which was the underway, was also the object of more significant improvements (for instance a digital control system) ; but it still seemed desirable that all the lessons to be learned from the accident be reflected in the third series : the fully computerized instrumentation and control system developed for the N4 series ?comparable to the one developed for Airbus ?is today the first of its kind in the world. The demand increase for electric energy dramatically stopped in 1993. However, the prospect for the coming years is more optimistic. Electricity consumption is expected to increase slowly by an average 2% per year. In this context, EDF is preparing its energy program for the nest century and takes into account that hydraulic generation capacity will remain stable and that the French thermal units fueled with coal are rather old and will have to be replaced.

  19. Nuclear knowledge management overview at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballay, J.; Vannieuwenhuyse, J.; Nups, A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of knowledge management practices within the French nuclear generation park. The study was initially partnered by one of the 19 Nuclear Power-plants, located at Golfech near Toulouse, and then extended to a more general overview. Golfech is a 650 people unit, from which 25 of them were interviewed to carry out the study. This staff was made of managers, experts, seniors and juniors, all of them being working at Golfech in the different skills for nuclear generation needs: driving, engineering, maintenance, safety, environment, etc. They were questioned about their practices, tools and organisations concerning creating, sharing, transferring, and renewing knowledge. A general knowledge management model was derived from this study. It shows that the professional knowledge, in any industrial sector, is the result of four learning processes: an education-oriented process, a codified and normative learning process, a context-based collective learning process and an experience-based individual learning process. These learning processes inter-operate through any kind of activity, and they induce four knowledge structures: the basic knowledge, the technical knowledge, the know-how and the experiential knowledge. In conclusion, the model explains how the firm learns and, in the same time, how everybody as a single individual learns. It is a crucial point to understand how the knowledge-based economy runs, as a constant interconnection between two opposite but complementary forces: the collective and the individual ones. (author)

  20. Nuclear Energy: A Competitive and Safe Option, The EDF Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, F.

    1998-01-01

    Today, nuclear energy seems challenged by fossil energies, especially gas. However, the 1997's French government survey over energy options still places nuclear energy at the top of the list. The reasons why and how safe nuclear energy is still competitive are detailed in this paper. Most recent data from EDF's reactor will be discussed in terms of environmental and electricity production issues. The methods and management used to attain these results are explained for the different phases: design, construction, operation, and maintenance. The beneficial aspects over industrial development and local employment will be underlined. The influence of nuclear energy on EDF's financial results are shown, from past programme to today's operation. As most of french reactors are designed to adapt their output to the changes of load in the national grid, results are, as a conclusion, discussed in a small and medium electrical grid perspective. (author)

  1. EdF in the core of UK's nuclear industry... before expecting more

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moal, C.

    2008-01-01

    With the announcement at the end of September 2008 of EdF's friendly takeover bid on British Energy, the French group confirms its will of dominating the European nuclear industry before going back to the assault of the US market. Together, EdF and British Energy (owner of 8 NPPs (9.5 GW) and 1 coal-fired power plant (2 GW)) will make a turnover of 11.9 billion euro with 19800 employees and 85.6 TWh of production. Short paper. (J.S.)

  2. The training for nuclear fuel handling at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The handling of fuel assemblies in a nuclear power plant presents 3 types of work: the taking delivery of fresh fuel, the refueling and the disposal of spent fuel. These operations are realized by teams made up of 3 handling operators and a supervisor. The refueling is made by 3*8-hour teams. These handling operations are important for the nuclear safety, a mishandling can damage the fuel cladding which is the first containment barrier, so a training center (CETIC) has been created. This center was founded in 1986 by EDF and Framatome, the purpose was to validate maintenance procedures, to test handling equipment and to train the teams which work on site. Various training programmes have been set up and a system of qualification degrees has been organized. The CETIC is fitted up with equipment that are full-sized mockups of real installations. Fuel assemblies don't react in a similar way to the different mechanical and neutronic stresses they undergo while they are in the core, they get deformed and the handling operations become more delicate. The mockup fuel assemblies are quite deformed to train the teams and prepare them to face any real situation. (A.C.)

  3. Nuclear knowledge management overview at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballay, J.; Vannieuwenhuyse, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of knowledge management practices in the French nuclear generation park. The study was initially partnered by one of the 19 Nuclear Power-plants, located at Golfech near Toulouse, and then extended to a more general overview. Golfech is a 650 people unit, from which 25 of them were interviewed to carry out the study. These staffs were made of managers, experts, seniors and juniors, all of them being working at Golfech in the different skills for nuclear generation needs: driving, engineering, maintenance, safety, environment, etc. They were questioned about their practices, tools and organisations concerning creating, sharing, transferring, and renewing knowledge. The study shows that professional knowledge is fundamentally made of four levels, which are embedded, by specific leverages and experiences. The first level is made of the 'basic knowledge' which is required in every job, especially for juniors. It is delivered by the means of Human Resources and education systems: Recruitment, Learning and Training, Simulators, juniors mentoring, and Competencies management processes. These systems are thus the first category of KM processes. The second level of knowledge is the 'technical knowledge', that is codified in the procedures, norms, and all the technical specifications. This knowledge has grown up for 4 decades, by a special KM process called return on experience. This KM process is driven by a systematic way. Every technical problem is registered, analysed, and evaluated by experts and managers networks, and discussed with other stakeholders, so that recommendations can be held on at a national level. This return on experience process is a collective learning process, very efficient for safety and performance of the French nuclear park. By this process, the explicit knowledge of the last 3 decades is stored in a large knowledge base made of 10,000 documents a year. It is important to notice that, due to its explicit and collective

  4. CLI technical commission. Additional safety assessments within the EDF nuclear stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This slides presentation addresses additional safety assessments within the EDF nuclear stock. It describes the context and challenges of these assessments (institutional framework, European coherence, major objectives for EDF). It describes how EDF is organised to perform these assessments: a global project after Fukushima, assessments and tests which are beyond the existing safety referential, the three defence lines and their tests. It addresses the content of assessment reports for each topic (earthquake, flooding, loss of water, loss of electric supply, accident management). It indicates some improvements proposed after the first assessments. It describes the improvements concerning the Gravelines power plant. It recalls the assessment agenda, proposes a brief overview of events, comments the results of the third decennial visit of production unit no. 1 which comprised some proof test on the primary circuit, on the reactor vessel and on the reactor building

  5. EDF ageing management program of nuclear components: a safety and economical issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, C.

    2005-01-01

    Ageing management of Nuclear Power Plants is an essential issue for utilities, in term of safety and availability and corresponding economical consequences. Practically all nuclear countries have developed a systematic program to deal with ageing of components on their plants. This paper presents the ageing management program developed by EDF and that are compared with different other approaches in other countries (IAEA guidelines and GALL report). The paper presents a general overview of the programs, the major results, recommendations and conclusions. (author)

  6. Energy - EDF takes back the control of the nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    This article comments the statement made by an EDF official before the inquiry commission of the French National Assembly, about the works initiated by EDF and Areva to improve the EPR profitability. This would lead to the design of a safer, more efficient and less costly new reactor which would however require a certification. This project is based on an optimization of the Areva's EPR, and would propose different power levels, notably less powerful reactors for less connected grids (for example in Saudi Arabia), and less powerful reactors would mean less expensive reactors. The article also evokes the issue of the cost of the Finnish EPR, and the different existing and projected EPR reactors

  7. Ensuring the sustainability of EDF power plant operating capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, J.

    2009-01-01

    The life extension of the power plants is considered whereas EDF must face an acceleration of the retirement rates due to the fact that the first generations of the baby-boom are ageing 60 years, now. Between 2000 and 2006, EDF gradually set up a system of management of competencies. On the one hand, EDF moved from logic of relatively standardized training to a more individualized logic of acquisition of competencies. In addition, the objective of maintenance of internat competencies defined in 2000 was supplemented in 2003 by a prospective dimension intended to anticipate the departures in inactivity. Then in 2006 competencies of sub-contractors were taken into account. During this period I.R.S.N. has assessed 3 times this system of management. This article briefly presents the principal lessons driven from these evaluations. It accounts for the undeniable effort made by EDF to ensure the maintenance of its competencies. However, it stresses that a high level of vigilance is still needed because it is not stabilized already. (author)

  8. EDF crippled by nuclear. Study of EDF's nuclear activity perspectives in France - November 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Juan Camilo

    2016-11-01

    After a discussion of the general context in terms of evolution of the energy market (over-capacity related to the development of renewable energies, limited export perspectives, low prices), of difficult position for the nuclear sector in Europe (an inadequate business model, shutting down of always more plants), of perspectives for EDF (a difficult passage from a monopoly to a competitive market, and a constraining legal framework), this study reports an assessment of EDF's assets. In the next part, it addresses issues related to dismantling and to waste management for French nuclear reactors. It describes the context, outlines that dismantling charges have been under-provisioned, and that assessments made for waste management are not completely reliable, and also discusses consequences in terms of accounting. The cost of future investments is then discussed, with also their consequences in terms of accounting. Financial consequences are finally discussed

  9. Corrosion behaviour of zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding in EDF power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romary, H; Deydier, D [EDF, Direction de l` Equipment SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-02-01

    Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, a surveillance of fuel has been carried out in order to evaluate the fuel behaviour under irradiation. Until now, nuclear fuels provided by suppliers have met EDF requirements concerning fuel behaviour and reliability. But, the need to minimize the costs and to increase the flexibility of the power plants led EDF to the definition of new targets: optimization of the core management and fuel cycle economy. The fuel behaviour experience shows that some of these new requirements cannot be fully fulfilled by the present standard fuel due to some technological limits. Particularly, burnup enhancement is limited by the oxidation and the hydriding of the Zircaloy 4 fuel rod cladding. Also, fuel suppliers and EDF need to have a better knowledge of the Zy-4 cladding behaviour in order to define the existing margins and the limiting factors. For this reason, in-reactor fuel characterization programs have been set up by fuel suppliers and EDF for a few years. This paper presents the main results and conclusions of EDF experience on Zy-4 in-reactor corrosion behaviour. Data obtained from oxide layer or zirconia thickness measurements show that corrosion performance of Zy-4 fuel rod cladding, as irradiated until now in EDF reactors, is satisfactory but not sufficient to meet the future needs. The fuel suppliers propose in order to improve the corrosion resistance of fuel rod cladding, low tin Zy-4 cladding and then optimized Zy-4 cladding. Irradiation of these claddings are ongoing. The available corrosion data show the better in-reactor corrosion resistance of optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding compared to the standard Zy-4 cladding. The scheduled fuel surveillance program will confirm if the optimized Zy-4 fuel rod cladding will meet the requirements for the future high burnup and high flexibility fuel. (author). 10 refs, 19 figs, 4 tabs.

  10. Nuclear Safety: Our Overriding Priority. EDF Group Report 2015 in response to FTSE4Good Nuclear Criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillart, H.

    2015-01-01

    EDF is the world's leading nuclear operator with 74.8 GW of installed capacity in France, the United Kingdom and the United States, an EPR under construction in France, and 2 EPRs under construction in China through TNPJVC (EDF 30%), a joint venture with CGNPC. As such, EDF acts at all stages in the life of its power plants (design, construction, operation, decommissioning) to: - ensure rigorous operation of facilities; - prevent all incidents and accidents; - reduce the impact of any incidents or accidents that might nevertheless occur. The main safety measures were published in a single document in 2015 setting out the Group's nuclear safety policy. Each nuclear operating company inside the Group acts in compliance with the legal obligations and regulations specific to its host country. Each company works to ensure and continuously improve its safety performance with its own methods, skills and values. The EDF Group respects national differences. At the same time it frames common principles to deliver the highest level of incident prevention and protection of the public, workers and the environment. This policy applies to new projects (overall architecture, design and construction) and all existing plants (operation, maintenance, waste management, decommissioning and engineering). The Group works closely with its industrial partners to deliver these objectives. Each company is responsible for the proper operation of its nuclear activities, and delegates responsibilities appropriately to each level of management or operation. The Group guarantees the allocation of resources needed to ensure nuclear safety. An in-house independent nuclear safety function is in place at power plant level, company level and Group level. Each has a duty to alert senior management of inappropriate or inadequate line management response. Nuclear safety is the absolute priority for the EDF Group at every stage of the plant life-cycle. Each company is responsible for ensuring that its

  11. EDF's nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction-had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's 'with book' on nuclear safety. (author)

  12. EDF'S nuclear safety approach for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.; Kus, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The realization of the important French program fifty-four units equipped with pressurized water reactors in service, or under construction - had led to the progressive implementation of an original approach in the field of nuclear safety. From an initial core consisting of the deterministic approach to safety devised on the other side of the Atlantic, which has been entirely preserved and often specified, further extras have been added which overall increase the level of safety of the installations, without any particular complications. This paper aims at presenting succinctly the outcome of the deliberation, which constitutes now the approach adopted by Electricite de France for the safety of nuclear units equipped with pressurized water reactors. This approach is explained in more detail in EDF's white book on nuclear safety

  13. EDF decommissioning programme: A global commitment to safety, environment and cost efficiency of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatry, Jean-Paul

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, decommissioning of nuclear power plants has become a key issue for nuclear industry in Europe. The phasing out of nuclear energy in Germany, Belgium and Sweden, as well as the early closure of nuclear units in applicant countries in the frame of EU enlargement, has largely contributed to consider decommissioning as the next challenge to face. The situation is slightly different in France: nuclear energy is still considered as a safe, cost-effective and environment friendly energy source and EDF is still working on the development of a new generation of reactor to replace the existing one. Nevertheless, to achieve this objective, it will be necessary to get the support of political decision-makers and the acceptance of public opinion. The increasing mobilisation of EDF for the decommissioning of its already shutdown NPPs shows its willingness to demonstrate its capacity to control the nuclear life cycle from end to end. The successful implementation of its decommissioning programme will not mean the end of nuclear energy as an efficient way to generate electricity but it will constitute a prerequisite for the erection of new nuclear power plants in France

  14. EDF Energy Nuclear New Build: Lessons Learned in Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachar, M.; Borlodan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: EDF Energy Nuclear New Build (NNB) is building two EPR reactors at Hinkley Point C in Somerset in the United Kingdom that will provide reliable, low carbon electricity to meet approximately 7% of the UK’s electricity needs. The Hinkley Point C project is well advanced. It has achieved planning consent, design approval for the EPR reactor and a nuclear site license. There is a well-developed supply chain with identified preferred bidders who are already heavily involved in construction planning. Training for needed skills is underway and industrial agreements with trade unions are in place. NNB has the unique opportunity to set Knowledge Management behaviours, culture, and standards for the Hinkley Point C project from project inception instead of working to change them, such as on an operational site. (author

  15. EDF Group - Annual Report 2014. The people who power tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The EDF Group is the world's leading electricity company and very well established in Europe. Its business covers all electricity-related activities, from generation to networks and commerce. It is an important player in energy trading through EDF trading. This document is EDF Group's annual report for the year 2014. It contains information about Group profile, governance, business, development strategy, sales and marketing, positions in Europe and international activities. The document is made of several reports: the Activity and Sustainable Development Report, the 'EDF at a glance' report, and the EDF Group Performance sheet

  16. Nuclear non-proliferation and security culture within EDF nuclear fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debes, M.

    2013-01-01

    This document describes the nuclear non-proliferation strategy and the safety culture of EDF. The author lists all the mandatory rules and regulations at international and national levels EDF has to comply with. All these requirements are applied in EDF nuclear facilities through adequate procedures that assure a nuclear material accountancy, a follow-up of any item containing nuclear material in the facility, and internal controls. External independent controls are also performed. The EDF security policy goal is to protect human, material and knowledge assets, and to preserve operational capacity, competitiveness and public confidence, within national regulatory framework and regulation on 'vital importance facilities'. The treatment of events or incident (detection, analysis, lessons drawn, experience feedback) is a tool to progress, along with reporting, internal control process and audits. The security requirements cover the different related domains important to EDF industrial assets: security of employees against assaults; security of data according to their sensibility level; security of the information system and telecom; awareness and training of employees; relations with external suppliers or contractors; business premises; security of staff and projects abroad. For industrial facilities and grids (facilities of 'vital importance'...), the defense in depth principles are applied against the different threat scenarios. Security measures are studied at the design stage in a consistent way with nuclear safety measures, while taking into account the protective means deployed by public authorities. These risk analysis are periodically reassessed. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  17. Advanced CFD simulation for the assessment of nuclear safety issues at EDF. Some examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vare, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    EDF R and D has computer power that puts it amongst the top industrial research centers in the world. Its supercomputers and in-house codes as well as its experts represent important capabilities to support EDF activities (safety analyses, support to the design of new reactors, analysis of accidental situations non reproducible by experiments, better understanding of physics or complex system response, effects of uncertainties and identification of prominent parameters, qualification and optimization of processes and materials...). Advanced numerical simulation is a powerful tool allowing EDF to increase its competitiveness, improve its performance and the safety of its plants. On this issue, EDF made the choice to develop its own in-house codes, instead of using commercial software, in order to be able to capitalize its expertise and methodologies. This choice allowed as well easier technological transfer to the concerned business units or engineering divisions, fast adaptation of our simulation tools to emerging needs and the development of specific physics or functionalities not addressed by the commercial offer. During the last ten years, EDF has decided to open its in-house codes, through the Open Source way. This is the case for Code – Aster (structure analysis), Code – Saturne (computational fluid dynamics, CFD), TELEMAC (flow calculations in aquatic environment), SALOME (generic platform for Pre and Post-Processing) and SYRTHES (heat transfer in complex geometries), among others. The 3 open source software: Code – Aster, Code – Saturne and TELEMAC, are certified by the French Nuclear Regulatory Authority for many «Important to Safety» studies. Advanced simulation, which treats complex, multi-field and multi-physics problems, is of great importance for the assessment of nuclear safety issues. This paper will present 2 examples of advanced simulation using Code – Saturne for safety issues of nuclear power plants in the fields of R and D and

  18. The ALARA project of the EDF nuclear park exploitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potoczek, J.

    1998-01-01

    To bring the exploitation of the nuclear park of EDF at the level of the best exploiters in the world in matter of collective and individual dosimetry, the ALARA principle coordinates numerous actions: to associate the temporary societies, to define common language, methods and tools for the whole park to organize a level effect in this area, to optimize the maintenance that is expansive in radiation doses, to make the different levels of management responsible on dosimetric stakes, to reduce the singular sources of exposure, to assure the organisation and exploitation of the experience back in this field and adapt consequently the system of information. The results are cheerful and the objectives for 2000 are: less than 1.2 h.Sv by year and by reactor, no intervener whom annual radiation dose is upper than 20 mSv (out of exceptional case). (N.C.)

  19. Risk of containment sump plugging in EDF nuclear power plants; Risque de colmatage des puisards de l'enceinte de confinement des centrales nucleaires d'EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-10-01

    The fuel of PWR type reactors in usual functioning is cooled by water circulating in the primary circuit, kept at a 155 bars pressure. In the case of break in the circuit, the reactor is stopped automatically. But it is necessary to evacuate the power that continues to escape from the fuel, because of the radioactivity of products created during the reactor operating. In this aim a system called system of security injection allows to send water in the reactor core when the vapor that is releases by the primary circuit opening is condensed in the containment by the spraying system in the containment that sprays water under the containment dome. The two systems of security and spraying are supplied by a tank but when it is empty they are supplied by water recovered in the bottom of containment in sumps. The two systems operate in closed circuit and allow to evacuate the residual power. The purpose of this work is to study the risk of filters clogging that are in the sumps. (N.C.)

  20. EDF decommissioning programme: A global commitment to safety, environment and cost efficiency of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenouillet, J.-J.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays, decommissioning of nuclear power plants has become a key issue for the nuclear industry in Europe. The phasing out of nuclear energy in Germany, Belgium and Sweden, as well as the early closure of nuclear units in applicant countries in the frame of EU enlargement, has largely contributed to consider decommissioning as the next challenge to face. The situation is slightly different in France: Nuclear energy is still considered as a safe, cost-effective and environment friendly energy source and EDF is still working on the development of a new generation of reactors to replace the existing ones. Nevertheless, to achieve this objective, it will be necessary to get the support of political decision-makers and the acceptance of public opinion. (author)

  1. Revision of by-laws about effluents of EdF's nuclear power plants; Revision des arretes de rejets des centrales nucleaires d'EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In France, in application of the clean water law from January 3, 1992 and since the decree 95-540 from May 4, 1995, each basic nuclear facility receives a single permission which covers both its water takes and its radioactive and non-radioactive effluents. This decree, initially dedicated to new facilities has been enlarged to all existing installations for which the prefectorial by-laws have reached their date-line. Thus, up to now, five inter-ministerial by-laws have renewed the permissions of water takes and effluents evacuation of the power plants of Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux (Loir-et-Cher), Flamanville (Manche), Paluel (Seine-Maritime), Belleville (Cher) and Saint-Alban (Isere). These by-laws foresee an important abatement of the effluents and concern more particularly the tritium, {sup 14}C, the iodine isotopes and also some other non-radioactive chemical compounds. This document is a compilation of all revised by-laws about effluents and concerning the nuclear power plants listed above. (J.S.)

  2. Training within the French nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jusselin, F.

    1987-01-01

    Training dispensed by the EDF Nuclear and Fossil Generation Division has contributed significantly toward successful startup and operation of French nuclear power plants. In 1986, the time-based availability of 900 MW PWRs totaled 85 %. This is just one example of how EDF training programs have benefited from 150 reactor-years of operating experience and the ensuing opportunities for perfecting and testing of training tool effectiveness. These programs have been adopted by utilities in other countries where suitable local facilities are making advantageous use of EDF training experience and methods. EDF expertise is also transferred to these countries indirectly through the simulator manufacturer

  3. EDF FARN (fast action force in case of nuclear accident) - Focus on radiation protection of workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. As part of the operation of its nuclear power plants, EDF set up in the 80's an emergency response organisation together with the French public authorities aimed at managing the consequences, especially radiological of any events. This is based on the setting up of emergency plans involving both the operator and the public authorities, at local and national level, with both parties assessing the consequences of a radiological accident in the environment constantly enhanced as part of the continuous improvement process. As the Fukushima accident especially highlighted the relevance of having a response system available off site, this emergency response organisation has been strengthened both with equipment and human resources so as to be able to respond to major accidents further to external hazards. These resources have been designed to factor in a high level of radiological risk. The functions and responsibilities are clearly defined for any event occurring at a nuclear power plant. The operator shall be accountable for the actions to be taken on site concerning technical plant management, worker protection and rescue of casualties. The public authorities shall be accountable for all the measures to be taken off site, especially protection of the local population and environmental monitoring. The EDF emergency response organisation is based on enhanced equipment and human resources at site and corporate level supplemented with EDF corporate and non-EDF resources. The EDF emergency plan covers the situation where all the site units are affected. The decision to set up the nuclear rapid response taskforce was taken further to the Fukushima accident in 2011 and it has been operational since 2012. Integrated in the emergency response organisation, its main aim is to be capable of responding in less than 12 hours to reinstate water, electricity and air supply at the nuclear power plant where the accident has occurred. It is

  4. A resilient, robust and active managing of a nuclear crisis is essential for the EDF group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delamare, V.

    2016-01-01

    As a producer, a transmission and a dispatcher company of electricity, the EDF group has to face technological and industrial risks. The EDF group has set up a robust organisation for managing nuclear crisis. As soon as an incident appears in a nuclear power plant the PUI is triggered, this emergency plan allows the mobilization of humane and equipment means necessary to bring back the plant to a safe state. Between 60 and 80 people on duty have to join back their post in less than one hour. The crisis is also managed at a national scale by the activation of 4 crisis cells situated in Paris: the operational cell that will bring extra humane and equipment means to the damaged facility if necessary, the communication cell dedicated to the information of the media, the strategic cell that will supervise the consequences of the incident in terms of technological, legal, financial or societal impacts and the anticipation cell that will be able to analyse the response to the crisis in a critical way making suggestions for the future. (A.C.)

  5. Crisis communication and EDF's power grid paralysis from the 1970's to the 2000's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautreau, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    The power failure of 19 December 1978 and the storms of December 1999 were two critical moments in crisis communication for EDF. If the difficult situations or else the disasters were effectively anticipated, only these actual situations had allowed improving the Company's communication schemes and systems. Since the years 1950 and the program of hydraulic equipment, EDF had obviously developed a communication department that was enhanced with the launch of the nuclear program. Similarly, a 'crisis communication' was permanently ready, namely in the cases of storm or snowfall. The power failure of 19 December 1978 occurred whilst the company had an active scheme, but it is its sheer size that surprised. As it obliged to resort to the national media (radio) to inform the users without electricity. If the network had not been affected in 1978, things were quite different during the storms of 1999. And communication was then focused on mobilizing the Company's employees to restore electricity. In both cases, the feedback from experience has allowed to improve the communication schemes and systems

  6. Radioactive waste management at EDF plants: General overview and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debes, M.; Bordier, M.

    2001-01-01

    During the last fifteen years a significant decrease in solid radioactive waste generated by nuclear power plants of Electricite de France (EDF) has taken place. Technology used by EDF is described, with emphasis on innovative technologies. Experience and lessons learned are described showing how EDF has responded to meet increasingly stringent regulations for radioactive waste management. (author)

  7. SDIN a new information system for the EDF's fleet of French nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corre, Y.; Sasseigne, P.; Herodin, J.M.; Leclerq, J.

    2013-01-01

    The SDIN is the new information system that allows the management of operating and maintenance activities of EDF's fleet of nuclear power plants. This new system relies on 6 main softwares that allow: 1) the management of operations and maintenance, 2) the management of documentation, 3) the management of activities during unit outages, 4) the management of diagrams, schemes and designs, 5) the reporting of activities, and 6) a unified access to the SDIN. SDIN entered into operation in 2012 (6 years after its launching) in a testing phase in the Blayais power plant and in 2 engineering departments. SDIN is expected to improve the plant performance and its standard of safety as well as to prepare the way in terms of adequate technical conditions for operating life extension. (A.C.)

  8. Diagnosis of faults in EDF power plants: from monitoring to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joussellin, A.

    1994-06-01

    Electricite de France is constantly is search of means to improve safety and availability in its nuclear power plants. To this end, EDF has designed new monitoring systems for the major components of its units: for turbogenerator and inlet valves monitoring, for reactor coolant pumps monitoring, for internal structures monitoring and for loose parts detection. New techniques for signal acquisition and processing for diagnosis are used and all these monitoring systems are designed with the same general concept on monitoring. Simultaneously, a workstation for monitoring and aid in diagnosis (PSAD) is under development. It will integrate every monitoring system and will constitute an indispensable tool for plant personnel, enabling them to diagnose the condition of plant equipment, and providing them with high efficiency and user-friendly tools. The PSAD will have a flexible architecture, guaranteeing optimum distribution of computing power to make it available where it is needed. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs

  9. Diagnosis of faults in EDF power plants: From monitoring to diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joussellin, A.; Chevalier, R.

    1994-01-01

    Electricite de France is constantly in search of means to improve safety and availability in its nuclear power plants. To this end, EDF has designed new monitoring systems for the major components of its units: for turbogenerator and inlet valves monitoring, for reactor coolant pumps monitoring, for internal structures monitoring and for loose parts detection. New techniques for signal acquisition and processing for diagnosis are used and all these monitoring systems are designed with the same general concept on monitoring. Simultaneously, a workstation for monitoring and aid in diagnosis (PSAD) is under development. It will integrate every monitoring system and will constitute an indispensable tool for plant personnel, enabling them to diagnose the condition of plant equipment, and providing them with high efficiency and user-friendly tools. The PSAD will have a flexible architecture, guaranteeing optimum distribution of computing power to make it available where it is needed

  10. The de-construction programme for EDF'S first generation power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zask, G.; Corcuff, A.

    2003-01-01

    Before 2001 EDF had adopted a 'long wait' scenario for the de-construction of nuclear power plants, consisting of waiting for a period of 5 to 10 years for IAEA level 2 (partial release of the site), then postponing the total de-construction of the facility for 25 to 50 years, in order to benefit from the natural decay of the radioactivity and thereby reduce the dosimetry of the personnel and the costs. Today, as regards the 8 power plants of the first generation and Creys-Malville, EDF has decided to undertake the total de-construction over a period of 25 years of all its reactors that have ceased commercial operation. The forecast cost of this programme amounts to Euro 3 billion. It thus intends to demonstrate its capacity to control, within the scale of the human lifespan, the entire life cycle of its nuclear power plants, while minimising the impact on man and the environment. This choice of immediate dismantling for the power plants of the first generation does not prejudge what will be done, when the time comes, for the PWR plants currently in operation. The paper has the following contents: 1. General; 2.The facilities concerned; 3. Chronological sequence adopted for de-construction; 4. Milestones and critical paths; 4.1. Simplification of the administrative procedures; 4.2. The waste channels; 4.3. Industrial organisation; 4.3.1. Creation of Centre d'Ingenierie De-construction et Environnement (CIDEN); 4.3.2. Responsibilities, interfaces and co-ordination of the various departments concerned (Role of owner: Responsibility as nuclear operator; Overall co-ordination; Operational steering of projects); 4.3.3. Internal authorization process; 4.3.4. Obtaining and maintaining skills (Training; Environment; De-construction; Radiological protection, radiology, radioecology; Processing of waste and approval of the cycle); 4.3.5. Monitoring of works and surveillance of service providers; 4.3.6. Radiological protection, environment; 4.3.7. Control of conventional

  11. SIROCCO project: 15 advanced instructor desk and 4 simulated control room for 900MW and 1300MW EDF power plant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alphonse, J.; Roth, P.; Sicard, Y.; Rudelli, P.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes the fifteen advanced instructors station and four simulated control delivered to EDF in the frame of the SIROCCO project by the Consortium formed by ATOS Origin, CORYS Tess, for the Electricite de France (EDF). These instructor stations are installed on fifteen replica training simulators located on different sites throughout France for the purposes of improving the job-related training of the EDF PWR nuclear power plant operating teams. This covers all 900 MW and 1300MW nuclear power plant of EDF. The simulated control rooms are installed on maintenance platform located at EDF and the consortium facilities. The consortium uses it to maintain and upgrade the simulators. EDF uses it to validate the upgrade delivered by the consortium before on site installation and to perform engineering analysis. This presentation sets out successively: - The major advantages of the generic and configurable connected module concept for flexible and quick adaptation to different simulators; - The innovative functionalities of the advanced Instructor Desk (IS) which make the instructor's tasks of preparation, monitoring and postanalysis of a training session easier and more homogeneous; - The use of the Simulated Control Room (SCR) for training purposes but also for those of maintenance and design studies for upgrades of existing control rooms

  12. Improvement of communications in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depigny, C.; Ghertman, F.; Lestien, A.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1983, Electricite de France (EDF) has been engaged in a major project to improve nuclear power plant communications. This project was launched following a series of incidents in which inappropriate communications practices and equipment were shown to be an aggravating, or in some cases, the determining factor. This paper presents the program established by EDF to resolve communications problems in its nuclear power stations

  13. On-line acoustic monitoring of EDF nuclear plants in operation and loose-part diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.L.; Puyal, C.

    1991-05-01

    In order to detect incipient failures in nuclear power plant components, EDF has now put into operation more than 50 loose-part monitoring systems, on its 900 MW and 1 300 MW units. This paper first reviews the experience gained on the 900 MW reactors in recent years. It then focuses on the 1 300 MW loose part monitoring system (IDEAL) and to the tools developed for the diagnosis off site within a specific Expertise Laboratory at the Research and Development Division. New studies have been undertaken within the Monitoring and Aid to Diagnosis Station (PSAD) in order to extend the capabilities of loose part diagnosis on site. The new tools here presented integrate the recent progress in acquisition technology (SMART system) and in artificial intelligence (MIGRE expert system)

  14. EDF decommissioning and dismantling policy a global commitment to safety, environment and cost efficiency of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rondeau, J.

    2001-01-01

    Until recently, EDF's policy regarding the dismantling of its decommissioned nuclear power plants was to reach 'level 2' (release of non-nuclear facilities) and to postpone final dismantling for another 30-40 years. Today, some studies suggest that a full deconstruction program of the first generation NPPs (9 units) could be optimized over the period 2000 - 2025. EDF has acquired during the last ten years an unique experience, both as an operator and as an engineering company, in the frame of the decommissioning programme of its own NPPs. Many types of reactors, including graphite moderated one, PWR, are at varying stages of the dismantling process.Plant operation quality is at the core of a satisfactory control of releases. Over the last decade, as a result of the efforts of all operating sites associated with good in-house operating practice feedback, the overall release volume has been divided by two, and the release activity by one hundred. Another issue given increased attention is radiological cleanliness. EDF-DPN launched a 'radiological cleanliness' action plan revolving around two main themes: increased monitoring of nuclear-related transportations, site entrance and access to controlled areas, along with on-site radiological cleanliness, particularly during maintenance work tasks. Progress is already apparent in several points at issue and the overall objective of the action plan should be attained. (author)

  15. The nuclear power stations of the French atomic energy programme (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leduc, C.

    1960-01-01

    After recalling the entry of nuclear energy into energy production in France, the paper emphasizes the evolution of techniques applied in the designing of French nuclear power plants and describes the means employed for reducing costs per kWh of EDF2 and EDF3 compared with EDF1: the electric power per ton of uranium varies from 493 kW/t for EDF1 to 970 kW/t for EDF3. For this purpose the thermal power and electric power of units are changed respectively from 290 MWt for EDF1 to 1200 or 1600 MWt for EDF3 and from 28 to 250 MW. The results are obtained by an improvement in neutronic characteristics, developments in nuclear fuel technology, and simplification of the system of charging the reactor, whose means of maintenance are increased; the EDF2 heat-exchangers have been so designed as to increase the unit power of the elements, which will attain 9 MWt, as against 3 for EDF1. For EDF3 an advance project forecasts a thermodynamic layout with only one pressure stage. The paper ends with a description of the burst-slug detection systems, and an appendix gives a detailed comparative table of EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3 plant characteristics. (author) [fr

  16. Nuclear tourists: the challenge of EDF's production sites accessibility, 1974-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the evolution of accessibility of Electricite de France (EDF) production sites when the country chose energy independence in 1974. If the nuclear program seems to be at the origins of French industrial tourism, which process made these energy plants a touristic attraction?

  17. The nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serres, R.

    1999-01-01

    The French nuclear generating industry is highly competitive. The installations have an average age of fifteen years and are half way through their expected life. Nuclear power accounts for 70% of the profits of the French generating company, EDF. Nuclear generation has a minimal effect on the atmosphere and France has a level of CO 2 emissions, thought to be the main cause of the greenhouse effect, half that of Europe as a whole. The air in France is purer than in neighbouring countries, mainly because 75% of all electrical power is generated in nuclear plants and 15% in hydroelectric stations. The operations and maintenance of French nuclear power plants in the service and distribution companies out of a total of 100 000 employees in all, 90 % of whom are based in mainland France. (authors)

  18. EDF, a utility and its own needs in the field of transport of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouin, P.; Mignot, E.; Hoang, L.P.

    1989-01-01

    As one of the most important producers of nuclear electricity in the world, EDF is concerned by all the aspects of the transport of nuclear materials and more particularly by those related to the nuclear fuel cycle. EDF is not itself a specialist in this field and most of the transports along the nuclear fuel cycle is done for their own account by their usual partners such as COGEMA or TRANSNUCLEAIRE. Since the beginning of the French nuclear program, they have generally used for these transports casks that already exist on the market and which were well suited to their needs. Nevertheless, new and specific needs appeared during the progress of their nuclear program and have lead them to: study and build new casks or packages, use existing casks for new purposes, develop a device for the measurement of fuel assemblies burn up, develop a software to optimize the evacuation of irradiated fuel for reprocessing. The purpose of this paper is to describe these realization but as a preliminary, they will present briefly the importance of the transport of nuclear materials for EDF

  19. Experimental adoption of RCM in EDF substations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heroin, G.; Aupied, J.; Sanchis, G.

    1995-12-01

    EDF, after testing Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) on systems used in nuclear power plants, has now successfully extended RCM to all of its nuclear power plants. In the light of this experience, EDF has committed itself to a pilot study on a line bay of a 400 kV substation in 1992. The RCM method as applied benefited from EDF's policy of maintenance, introduced five years ago on all substations, which has enhanced prospects of reliability. The original feature in the selection of maintenance tasks was that it brought into play two criteria for failure assessment: frequency and seriousness, and two criteria for maintenance task selection: efficiency and facility. (author)

  20. EDF's fiftieth anniversary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spann, L.

    1996-01-01

    During its half-century of existence, EdF (Electricite de France) has carried out an impressive productivity effort. The company, the manpower of which has remained practically the same from the beginning, produces today 22 times more kW per hour than in 1946. In 1995, the French production of electric power reached 442.2 TWh, which corresponds to a 3.9 % increase with respect to the previous year. This production corresponds to a 99000 MW installed capacity of nuclear (59 %), thermal (17 %) and hydraulic (24 %) origin, respectively. This example illustrates the success of EdF, which is considered as ''the result of a huge technical and industrial adventure'' said Franck Borotra, French Ministry of Industry, Post and Telecommunications. This paper comprises three parts. The first part describes some historical and political aspects of the creation and development of the company with the building of several hydro-electric dams up to 1957, the starting of the nuclear program in 1973-74 during the petroleum crisis, the new goals and the evolution of the company inside the European Community. The second part describes the political, ecological and financial controversy about the Saone-Rhine rivers connection project, in which EdF is involved, and which would allow a 15 times increase of the rivers transportation capacity. The last part is a comparative summary of EdF's 1994 and 1995 balance sheet of production, financing, expenditures, trade, contracts etc.. (J.S.). 2 photos

  1. ''PSAD'' on-line monitoring and aid to diagnosis workstation: a monitoring tool for EDF power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, J.; Mazalerat, J.M.; Monnier, B.; Cordier, R.

    1993-01-01

    Like other electricity utilities, Electricite de France seeks to enhance the safety and availability of its nuclear power plants. To this end, for over ten years EDF has been installing on each plant unit two monitoring systems of its own design, one to monitor the primary cooling system, and the other, the turbogenerator set. Since the beginning of this project, widespread progress has been made in techniques of signal acquisition and processing, and in diagnosis using artificial intelligence methods. EDF has decided to call on these advanced techniques in developing its new-generation monitoring equipment, and to integrate them in its development of a workstation for on-line monitoring and diagnosis-support (PSAD: Poste de Surveillance et d'Aide au Diagnostic). PSAD will be a tool for on-line monitoring of the main components in nuclear power plants (initially the main coolant pumps and turbogenerator sets, and soon thereafter, monitoring of internal structures, detection of loose parts in the primary cooling system, etc.). PSAD will provide plant personnel with indispensable support in their diagnosis of the condition of plant equipment. It will integrate user-friendly, high-performance systems that also free the operator from many day-to-day tasks. PSAD will have a flexible architecture, for optimum distribution of the computing power where it is most needed, thereby improving the quality of the data. This paper presents the project objectives and describes work currently under way to implement EDF's diagnosis-support strategy for the years to come. (authors). 5 figs., 6 refs

  2. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After a first chapter in which the Inspector General states his own vision of facts and results regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection for 2009, the relationship with the ASN (Nuclear safety authority), and also gives his own impression on the whole EDF nuclear system, the next chapters more particularly address the following topics: safety management, radiation protection of interveners, abilities and education for new challenges, the exploitation quality, the implementation of new regulatory arrangements, the extension of exploitation duration, the EPR project, the doctors as actors of safety management, service providing or subcontracting companies and fleet performance, prevention and struggle against fire, the activity of British Energy which is part of the EDF group, events which occurred within the EDF group (exposure of an intervener, incidents involving fuel components, biases in work monitoring, a fire on a turbo generator, an incident in Dungeness), lessons drawn from other industrial events (in a Russian hydroelectric station and in a refinery in Texas), and visits in China and in Japan

  3. Nuclear facilities of EdF's operational hot base of Tricastin. 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This annual report is established on account of article 21 of the 2006-686 French law from June 13, 2006, relative to the transparency and safety in the nuclear domain. It describes, first, the nuclear facilities of the EdF operational hot base of Tricastin, then, the measures taken to ensure their safety (personnel radioprotection, actions implemented for nuclear safety improvement, organisation in crisis situation, external and internal controls, technical assessment of the facilities), and finally the procedures of management of radioactive wastes. A glossary and the viewpoint of the Committee of Hygiene, safety and working conditions about the content of the document conclude the report. (J.S.)

  4. Ensuring the sustainability of EDF power plant operating capacity; Assurer la perennite des competences d'exploitation des centrales d'EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Service d' Etude des Facteurs Humains, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2009-07-15

    The life extension of the power plants is considered whereas EDF must face an acceleration of the retirement rates due to the fact that the first generations of the baby-boom are ageing 60 years, now. Between 2000 and 2006, EDF gradually set up a system of management of competencies. On the one hand, EDF moved from logic of relatively standardized training to a more individualized logic of acquisition of competencies. In addition, the objective of maintenance of internat competencies defined in 2000 was supplemented in 2003 by a prospective dimension intended to anticipate the departures in inactivity. Then in 2006 competencies of sub-contractors were taken into account. During this period I.R.S.N. has assessed 3 times this system of management. This article briefly presents the principal lessons driven from these evaluations. It accounts for the undeniable effort made by EDF to ensure the maintenance of its competencies. However, it stresses that a high level of vigilance is still needed because it is not stabilized already. (author)

  5. Computerized dosimetry management systems within EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubert, G.

    1996-01-01

    EDF, using the ALARA approach, has embarked an ambitious project of optimising the doses received in its power plants. In directing its choice of actions and the effectiveness of such actions, the French operator is using a computerized personal and collective dosimetry management system. This system provides for ongoing monitoring of dosimetry at personal, site and unit level or indeed for the entire population of EDF nuclear power plants. (author)

  6. The great refit of the EDF nuclear fleet and post-Fukushima actions. An ambition to extend to 50 or 60 years the exploitation of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnac, Alain de; Perves, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The great refit of the EDF nuclear fleet aims at extending the service lifetime of nuclear reactors. If the extension to 40 years is well undertaken, an extension to 50 or 60 years could only be approved after a return on experience of the Fukushima accident and possible additional requests made by the ASN in reference to facilities ageing. The authors first recall some elements related to the Fukushima accident and outline the fact that the possibility of such a strong tsunami had not been taken in to account by the operator (as it had been for a neighbouring nuclear power station, Onagawa). They also highlight the differences between Japan and France in terms of organisation of the nuclear industry. They also outline technical differences in the design of power stations. Thus, the first lessons learned from the accident seem to support French options. They discuss the evolutions which however are planned for the French nuclear stations after the Fukushima accident. Then, the authors present the great refit and the issue of the extension of the service lifetime of the EDF nuclear fleet. This project is presented as a major challenge for EDF, and implies a management of expenses. They outline the good level of French energy production with respect to greenhouse gas emissions, and briefly discuss the issue of competitiveness for renewable energies

  7. French lessons in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenti, M.

    1991-01-01

    In stark contrast to the American atomic power experience is that of the French. Even the disaster at Chernobyl in 1986, which chilled nuclear programs throughout Western Europe, did not slow the pace of the nuclear program of the state-owned Electricite de France (EDF), based in Paris. Another five units are under construction and are scheduled to be connected to the French national power grid before the end of 1993. In 1989, the EDF's 58 nuclear reactors supplied 73 percent of French electrical needs, a higher percentage than any other country. In the United States, for example, only about 18 percent of electrical power is derived from the atom. Underpinning the success of nuclear energy in France is its use of standardized plant design and technology. This has been an imperative for the French nuclear power industry since 1974, when an intensive program of nuclear power plant construction began. It was then, in the aftermath of the first oil embargo, that the French government decided to reduce its dependence on imported oil by substituting atomic power sources for hydrocarbons. Other pillars supporting French nuclear success include retrofitting older plants with technological or design advances, intensive training of personnel, using robotic and computer aids to reduce downtime, controlling the entire nuclear fuel cycle, and maintaining a comprehensive public information effort about the nuclear program

  8. EDF decommissioning programme a global commitment to safety, environment and cost efficiency of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenouillet, J.-J.

    2002-01-01

    EDF has 9 NPPs permanently shutdown and under decommissioning. EDF considers that if the nuclear option is to remain open, it is necessary to deal with increasing public concerns for environmental and waste management issues. Therefore EDF has decided to achieve total dismantling of all shutdown reactor in the next 25 years. The Decommissioning Program has been developed including 2 stages of activities. The first stage consists of: 1) Final dismantling of Brennilis in 2015; 2) A dismantling demonstration of a PWR reactor building (Chooz A) before starting replacing the population of PWRs currently in operation; 3) Final dismantling of reactor containment of a GCR (Bugey 1) as a first of its kind. The second stage includes: 1)Dismantling of following 5 GCR (Saint Laurent A1 and A2, Chinon A1, A2 and A3); 2) Final dismantling of Chooz A and Bugey 1 in 2025. The successful implementation relies on the simplification of the regulatory process; availability of treatment, conditioning and disposal facilities and effective nuclear industry. The main issue is availability of time and waste solutions such as opening of a Very Low Waste disposal in 2003 (130 000 tons); opening of a new disposal for graphite and radiferous wastes (17 000 tons) in 2010 and opening in 2007-2008 of a centralized interim storage (BANEDA) facility for long-lived Medium Level Wastes (500 tons including filters, control rods etc)Three investigations are to be carried out for high level radioactive waste before 2006

  9. Total and EDF invest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signoret, St.

    2008-01-01

    So as to prepare the future of their industrial sector,the Total company plans to invest (14 billion Euros in 2008) to increase its production capacities and strengthen in of other activities as the liquefied natural gas and the renewable energies; EDF plans to inject 35 billion Euros over three years to multiply the new projects of power plants (wind turbines, coal in Germany, gas in Great Britain and nuclear power in Flamanville). EDF wants to exploit its knowledge of leader to run more than ten E.P.R.(European pressurized water reactor) in the world before 2020, projects are in examination with China, Great Britain, South Africa and United States. (N.C.)

  10. Architecture and aesthetics of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreu, P.

    1977-01-01

    Having first analysed the main aesthetical and architectural problems related to the establishment of nuclear sites, the first results of the description is given of studies undertaken by a group of architects asked by E.D.F. to conceive the main buildings of a nuclear power plant and to imagine their insert in the site [fr

  11. Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas-Hamilton, J.; Home Robertson, J.; Beith, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this debate the Government's policy on nuclear power is discussed. Government policy is that nuclear power is the safest and cleanest way of generating electricity and is cheap. Other political parties who do not endorse a nuclear energy policy are considered not to be acting in the people's best interests. The debate ranged over the risks from nuclear power, the UK safety record, safety regulations, and the environmental effects of nuclear power. The Torness nuclear power plant was mentioned specifically. The energy policy of the opposition parties is strongly criticised. The debate lasted just over an hour and is reported verbatim. (UK)

  12. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2005-01-01

    This chapter discussed the following topics related to the nuclear power: nuclear reactions, nuclear reactors and its components - reactor fuel, fuel assembly, moderator, control system, coolants. The topics titled nuclear fuel cycle following subtopics are covered: , mining and milling, tailings, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactor operations, radioactive waste and fuel reprocessing. Special topic on types of nuclear reactor highlighted the reactors for research, training, production, material testing and quite detail on reactors for electricity generation. Other related topics are also discussed: sustainability of nuclear power, renewable nuclear fuel, human capital, environmental friendly, emission free, impacts on global warming and air pollution, conservation and preservation, and future prospect of nuclear power

  13. Fuel operation of EDF nuclear fleet presentation of the centralized organization for operational engineering at the nuclear generation division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    The main feature of EDF Nuclear Fleet is the standardization, with 'series' of homogeneous plants (same equipment, fuel and operation technical documents). For fuel operation, this standardization is related to the concept of 'fuel management scheme' (typical fuel reloads with fixed number and enrichment of fresh assemblies) for a whole series of plants. The context of the Nuclear Fleet lead to the choice of a centralized organization for fuel engineering at the Nuclear Generation Division (DPN), located at UNIPE (National Department for Fleet Operation Engineering) in Lyon. The main features of this organization are the following: - Centralization of the engineering activities for fuel operation support in the Fuel Branch of UNIPE, - Strong real-time link with the nuclear sites, - Relations with various EDF Departments in charge of design, nuclear fuel supply and electricity production optimization. The purposes of the organization are: - Standardization of operational engineering services and products, - Autonomy with independent methods and computing tools, - Reactivity with a technical assistance for sites (24 hours 'hot line'), - Identification of different levels (on site and off site) to solve core operation problems, - Collection, analysis and valorization of operation feedback, - Contribution to fuel competence global management inside EDF. This paper briefly describes the organization. The main figures of annual engineering production are provided. A selection of examples illustrates the contribution to the Nuclear Fleet performance. (authors)

  14. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  15. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    ''Nuclear Power'' describes how a reactor works and examines the different designs including Magnox, AGR, RBMK and PWR. It charts the growth of nuclear generation in the world and its contributions to world energy resources. (author)

  16. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  17. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  18. Hearing of Mr. Francois Roussely, President of EdF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussely, F.

    2005-01-01

    This document is the proceedings of the hearing of F. Roussely, President of Electricite de France (EdF), at the commission of economic affairs of the French house of commons, about the advisability of the construction of the EPR (European pressurized reactor) demonstration plant and about its possible financing by EdF. In a first part, F. Roussely recalls the European context of deregulation of energy markets and its impact of the French electric power industry (opening of the French market, industrial and social actions of EdF, need of a new generation of nuclear reactor, preservation of EdF's energy mix, warranty of public utility, un-bundling between energy trade and distribution, EdF's turnover and profitability, EdF's foreign daughter companies). In a second part, F. Roussely answers a series of questions asked by the different members of the commission concerning the different points presented in the first part. (J.S.)

  19. Developments in health physics at Electricite de France, implementation at Guangdong Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Maochun

    1993-01-01

    The Guangdong Nuclear Power Station intend to apply the same organization and the same principle in health physics as EDF (ELECTRICITE DE FRANCE). The permanent 'clean plant' objective has ensured that the internal exposure of nuclear plant workers has remained virtually zero. This, then, is the basis on which EDF is now continuing to develop health physics in its plants

  20. Impact studies and nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambolle, Thierry

    1981-01-01

    Impact studies form an essential part of environmental protection. The impact study discipline has enabled the EDF to have a better understanding of the effects of nuclear power stations on the environment and to remedy them at the project design stage [fr

  1. Energies and media nr 32. Conditions for the nuclear sector. Uranium and its enrichment for EDF. The role of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    After some comments on recent events in the nuclear sector in different countries (international conference, agreement between Rosatom and the IAEA, energy policy and projects in India, Turkey, Vietnam, France, Finland, UK, Sweden, USA, Germany), this publication discusses the uranium enrichment issue for EDF and the role of Russia. It refers to a report by the French High committee for transparency and information on nuclear safety (HCTISN) and to a hearing by the French Parliament. Different aspects are discussed: the national and international legal contexts and their relationship, the EDF reactor supply (enriched uranium of MOX, fixed elements in enrichment contracts, supply security), enrichment processes and installations (in France, natural uranium enrichment, use of reprocessed or recycle uranium, use of depleted uranium as a by-product of enrichment), how EDF and AREVA are working with Russia (enrichment of recycled uranium, use of depleted uranium)

  2. EDF national emergency organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverge, J.

    1992-01-01

    The scope of French nuclear power led Electricite de France (EDF) to design standard products, manufactured in series but adaptable to different sites. Standardization is based on the decision on a single technology: pressurized water reactors (PWR). Thirty-four 900 MW and seventeen 1300 MW units are in operation on seventeen sites. The specific nature of French organization for normal operation and accident management results from equipment standardization and single licensee. This specificity is based on emergency plan standardization and highly structured national organization. Figs

  3. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  4. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.

    1991-01-01

    Is a nuclear power renaissance likely to occur in the United States? This paper investigates the many driving forces that will determine the answer to that question. This analysis reveals some frequently overlooked truths about the current state of nuclear technology: An examination of the issues also produces some noteworthy insights concerning government regulations and related technologies. Public opinion will play a major role in the unfolding story of the nuclear power renaissance. Some observers are betting that psychological, sociological, and political considerations will hod sway over public attitudes. Others wager that economic and technical concerns will prevail. The implications for the nuclear power renaissance are striking

  5. EdF: high tension(s) metamorphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussely, F.; Arnoux, P.; Baritault, A.; Alto, P.; Castets, C.; Secondi, J.

    2003-01-01

    Electricite de France, the French electric utility, has to face a formidable mutation. The deregulation of the power market will lead to a social, commercial, judicial, financial and international 'big-bang'. The company has been weakened by disappointing results and by an embarrassing running into debts. This dossier analyzes the consequences of the deregulation of the French power market on the future evolution of EdF. It includes the analysis made by a French economist, E. Cohen, an interview and a portrait of F. Roussely, head of EdF, a presentation of Easenergy, a start-up of EdF which makes partnerships with US energy-related companies, the worries of EdF's employees and the redistribution of the syndicates power inside the company, the controversy around EdF's 2002 results and the points that remained in the shade, EdF's European competitors and the progressive opening of the French power market, EDF's production tool and its availability (58 nuclear reactors, 538 hydroelectric power plants and 26 thermal power plants), the costly foreign markets strategy of EdF and the under-capitalization of the company. (J.S.)

  6. Integrated CAD/CAE for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecoq, P.; Lachat, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The size of the French nuclear power program has led both EDF and Framatome to equip themselves progressively with management software, computer-assisted design (CAD) systems, and computer-assisted engineering (CAE) systems. The nature of the projects and of the respective activities of EDF and Framatome determined the essential specifications of these computerized systems. EDF and Framatome have pooled their CAD/CAE efforts in a joint venture (Groupement d'Interet Economique) called GIAO, set up in 1985 by EDF and Aquitaine Systeme (a subsidiary of Framatome and Elf Aquitaine). GIAO's ambition is to become a pole of French CAD/CAE efforts and to foster progress in integrated computer-assisted engineering, by enlarging the synergy of EDF and Framatome in this field to other enterprises that participate in design and construction of complex industrial plants

  7. Nuclear Internet: Back to a future (at nucleaire.edf.fr)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubouin, Pascal [Electricite de France, Site Cap Ampere, 1, place Pleyel, 93282 Saint Denis Cedex (France); Borel, Remi [Electricite de France, Site Cap Ampere, 1, place Pleyel, 93282 Saint Denis Cedex (France)

    2001-07-01

    The world is changing. Environment and Health are key issues, especially in western countries. People start to worry about the impact of the products they use or eat and about their legacy to their children, on a worldwide scale : 'We do not inherit the earth from our parents; we borrow it from our children' is one of the current new motto for the ''citizens of Earth''. In such a context, nuclear energy is less accepted than before. The recent debate over the ozone layer, global warming and climate change, GMOs, mad-cow disease and most recently uranium-based ammunitions, cannot but reinforce the deep mistrust felt by large components of the society. Opponents to nuclear energy have found a new audience, and some political decisions take this evolution into account. This mistrust is reinforced by the absence of a direct link between EDF and the general public. However: a new attitude is emerging, which might be an opportunity for us. Citizens demand the right to know, the right to shape their own point of view, using first-hand information. Internet is an obvious answer to this need for more personal, human contact. This presentation discusses how do you establish a link with people browsing the net, so they can shape their own opinion about nuclear energy? A climate of trust is key, based on the following ingredients: Transparency; Responsibility and trustworthiness; Openness and Empathy; Innovation; Interactivity. An overview on 8 months activity is displayed. The EDF web site has improved since its launch and is still improving today. It is not considered a finished product.

  8. Nuclear Internet: Back to a future (at nucleaire.edf.fr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubouin, Pascal; Borel, Remi

    2001-01-01

    The world is changing. Environment and Health are key issues, especially in western countries. People start to worry about the impact of the products they use or eat and about their legacy to their children, on a worldwide scale : 'We do not inherit the earth from our parents; we borrow it from our children' is one of the current new motto for the c itizens of Earth . In such a context, nuclear energy is less accepted than before. The recent debate over the ozone layer, global warming and climate change, GMOs, mad-cow disease and most recently uranium-based ammunitions, cannot but reinforce the deep mistrust felt by large components of the society. Opponents to nuclear energy have found a new audience, and some political decisions take this evolution into account. This mistrust is reinforced by the absence of a direct link between EDF and the general public. However: a new attitude is emerging, which might be an opportunity for us. Citizens demand the right to know, the right to shape their own point of view, using first-hand information. Internet is an obvious answer to this need for more personal, human contact. This presentation discusses how do you establish a link with people browsing the net, so they can shape their own opinion about nuclear energy? A climate of trust is key, based on the following ingredients: Transparency; Responsibility and trustworthiness; Openness and Empathy; Innovation; Interactivity. An overview on 8 months activity is displayed. The EDF web site has improved since its launch and is still improving today. It is not considered a finished product

  9. The photovoltaic ambitious of EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houot, G.

    2008-01-01

    Added to the wind energy, EDF develops the photovoltaic by its subsidiaries EDF Energies Nouvelles, for the big power plants and EDF Energies Nouvelles Reparties centralized on the market of small installations for roofs. The author analyzes the society management and project concerning the photovoltaic development. (A.L.B.)

  10. Extension of the nuclear power plant lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keramsi, Alain

    2011-01-01

    After a presentation of the French nuclear context (history of the reactor fleet, choice of reactor type, PWR operation principle, competitiveness, environmental performance), this Power Point presentation addresses the context and challenges of the operation lifetime (average fleet age in different countries, examples of extensions, case of the United States, what is at stake with lifetime extension, decennial visits, EDF strategy), discusses the EDF's safety objectives (definition of the three main safety functions, impact of the operation duration and of the coexistence of two generations for the safety functions), discusses how to manage the ageing phenomenon for replaceable and non-replaceable components

  11. EDF Group - Annual Report 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    EDF group is the world's leading electricity company and global leader for low-carbon energy production. Particularly well established in Europe, especially France, the United-Kingdom, Italy and Belgium, as well as North and South America, the Group covers all businesses spanning the electricity value chain - from generation to distribution and including energy transmission and trading activities - to continuously balance supply. A marked increase in the use of renewables is bringing change to its electricity generation operations, which are underpinned by a diversified and complementary energy mix founded on nuclear power capacity. EDF offers products and advice to help residential customers manage their electricity consumption, to support the energy and financial performance of its business customers, and to help local authorities find sustainable solutions. This document is EDF Group's annual report for the year 2016. It contains information about Group profile, governance, business, development strategy, sales and marketing, positions in Europe and international activities. The document comprises the Group's activities and performances Report and the 'EDF at a glance' 2017 report

  12. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the CNPE EDF nuclear facilities of Tricastin - 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This safety report was established under the article 21 of the French law no. 2006-686 of June 13, 2006 relative to nuclear safety and information transparency. It presents, first, the facilities of the Tricastin nuclear power plant (INB 87 and 88, Saint-Paul-Trois-Chateaux, Drome (FR)). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2011, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive (chemical, thermal) effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, The radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facilities are presented and sorted by type of waste, quantities and type of conditioning. Other environmental impacts (noise) are presented with their mitigation measures. Actions in favour of transparency and public information are presented as well. The document concludes with a glossary and a list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions. (J.S.)

  13. Forced transitions for EDF: the EDF ship facing head-winds; Dalkia, the renewable trump card to be valorized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaux, Aurelie

    2018-01-01

    Electricite de France (EDF), the state-owned and main power producer in France is, as the Titanic liner, lacking agility to navigate into the wild seas of the French energy transition policy. Besides, the era of engineers that construct energy cathedrals and of nuclear full supremacy is now well over, giving the way to innovative management policies with workers participation and digitalisation. EDF is preparing a new strategy addressing market opening and deregulation, renewable energy sources, and more freedom for EDF's numerous subsidiary companies. A second paper precisely concerns Dalkia, one of EDF's subsidiaries which is specialized in energy efficiency, heat and cold generation and networks that are more and more supplied by renewable energies. A third paper addresses EDF-SEI, whose specialty is energy autonomy in isolated areas (islands, etc.)

  14. VISIT - Virtual visits to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollaret, Jean-Christophe

    2001-01-01

    For more than twenty years, EDFs Communication Division has conducted a policy of opening its generation sites to the general public. Around 300,000 people visit a nuclear power plant every year. However, for the security of persons and the safety of facilities, those parts of the plant situated in controlled areas are not accessible to visitors. For the sake of transparency, EDF has taken an interest in the technologies offered by virtual reality to show the general public what a nuclear power plant is really like, so as to initiate dialogue on nuclear energy, particularly with young people. Visit has been developed with virtual reality technologies. It serves to show the invisible (voyage to the core of fission), the inaccessible and to immerse the visitors in environments which are usually closed to the general public (discovery of the controlled area of a nuclear power plant). Visit is used in Public Information Centres which receive visitors to EDF power plants and during international exhibitions and conferences. Visit allows a virtual tour of the following controlled areas: locker room hot area/cold area, a necessary passage before entering the controlled areas; reactor building; fuel building; waste auxiliary building (liquid, solid and gaseous effluents). It also includes a tour of the rooms or equipment usually accessible to the general public: control room, turbine hall, transformer, air cooling tower

  15. Nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, P.

    1985-01-01

    The question 'Do we really need nuclear power' is tackled within the context of Christian beliefs. First, an estimate is made of the energy requirements in the future and whether it can be got in conventional ways. The dangers of all the ways of supplying energy (eg coal mining, oil and gas production) are considered scientifically. Also the cost of each source and its environmental effects are debated. The consequences of developing a new energy source, as well as the consequences of not developing it, are considered. Decisions must also take into account a belief about the ultimate purpose of life, the relation of men to each other and to nature. Each issue is raised and questions for discussion are posed. On the whole the book comes down in favour of nuclear power.

  16. The yawning chasm of French nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This is an account of a paper appeared in Energy Economist, February 1988 and contains a severe critique of the French nuclear power policy, in particular the Electricite de France, Cogema and Framatome. It is argued that the blueprint of the original nuclear power program has not been achieved in many topics. Points of critique to the EdF are: the electricity price, overcapacities and financial indeptedness. The French industries are not flourishing due to ample supply of cheap energy, nor do French nuclear manufacturers sell the fast breeder technology throughout the world. (qui)

  17. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of EdF's Tricastin operational hot base nuclear facilities (BCOT) - 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    This safety report was established under the article 21 of the French law no. 2006-686 of June 13, 2006 relative to nuclear safety and information transparency. It presents, first, the Tricastin operational hot base facility (INB no. 157, Bollene, Vaucluse (FR)), a nuclear workshop for storage and maintenance and qualification operations on some EdF equipments. Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facility are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2010, if some, are reported as well as the effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, The radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility is presented and sorted by type of waste, quantities and type of conditioning. The document concludes with a glossary and a list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions. (J.S.)

  18. Public inquiry related to the request by EDF of a definitive stopping and complete dismantling of the hardware storage installation of the Monts d'Arree nuclear power plant (INB n.162). Opinion and conclusions of the inquiry commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    After a recall of the project of stopping and dismantling of the hardware storage installation (INB n.162) which had been created after the stopping and dismantling of the Monts d'Arree heavy water nuclear reactor (INB n.28), this report analyzes the results of the public inquiry, and highlights the arguments of those in favour of this project and those opposed to it. Then, it states the Inquiry Commission's opinion which addresses the request for a national public debate, the project justification, the inquiry file, the site radiological status, the site radiological control during works, the impacts of dismantling, the various risks (for the population and the workers, in terms of fire risks), the issue of radioactive wastes, economic aspects (costs, jobs, local economy, tourism and site image), and site reconversion

  19. EDF Group - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    EDF Group is the world's leading electricity company and it is particularly well established in Europe, especially France, the United Kingdom, Italy and Belgium. Its business covers all electricity-related activities, from generation to distribution and including energy transmission and trading activities to continuously balance supply with demand. A marked increase in the use of renewables is bringing change to its power generation operations, which are underpinned by a diversified low-carbon energy mix founded on nuclear power capacity. With activities across the entire electricity value chain, EDF is reinventing the products and services it offers to help residential customers manage their electricity consumption, to support the energy and financial performance of business customers and to support local authorities in finding sustainable solutions for the cities of the future. This document is EDF Group's annual report for the year 2015. It contains information about Group profile, governance, business, development strategy, sales and marketing, positions in Europe and international activities. The document is made of several reports: the 2016 Book, the '2016 at a glance' report, the Profile and Performance 2015 report, the 2015 Reference Document - Annual Financial Report

  20. Summary of replies to the public consultation on the virtual power plants (VPP) system implemented by EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    From 15 December 2005 to 13 January 2006, CRE organized a public consultation on the Virtual Power Plants (VPP) system implemented by EDF. The questions asked to the contributors concerned: their assessment of the effect of VPP on the French market during the period 2001-2005; their suggestions concerning the continuation or stopping of the current system, or concerning the setting up of a new system of energy or generation capacity release by EDF. Twenty three players in the French electricity market answered this consultation. The replies made by the various contributors to each question are very diversified. This document presents the summary of replies received, question by question. (A.L.B.)

  1. Summary of replies to the public consultation on the virtual power plants (VPP) system implemented by EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    From 15 December 2005 to 13 January 2006, CRE organized a public consultation on the Virtual Power Plants (VPP) system implemented by EDF. The questions asked to the contributors concerned: their assessment of the effect of VPP on the French market during the period 2001-2005; their suggestions concerning the continuation or stopping of the current system, or concerning the setting up of a new system of energy or generation capacity release by EDF. Twenty three players in the French electricity market answered this consultation. The replies made by the various contributors to each question are very diversified. This document presents the summary of replies received, question by question. (A.L.B.)

  2. The nuclear power stations of the French atomic energy programme (1960); Les centrales nucleaires de puissance du programme francais (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leduc, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Roux, J P [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1960-07-01

    After recalling the entry of nuclear energy into energy production in France, the paper emphasizes the evolution of techniques applied in the designing of French nuclear power plants and describes the means employed for reducing costs per kWh of EDF2 and EDF3 compared with EDF1: the electric power per ton of uranium varies from 493 kW/t for EDF1 to 970 kW/t for EDF3. For this purpose the thermal power and electric power of units are changed respectively from 290 MWt for EDF1 to 1200 or 1600 MWt for EDF3 and from 28 to 250 MW. The results are obtained by an improvement in neutronic characteristics, developments in nuclear fuel technology, and simplification of the system of charging the reactor, whose means of maintenance are increased; the EDF2 heat-exchangers have been so designed as to increase the unit power of the elements, which will attain 9 MWt, as against 3 for EDF1. For EDF3 an advance project forecasts a thermodynamic layout with only one pressure stage. The paper ends with a description of the burst-slug detection systems, and an appendix gives a detailed comparative table of EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3 plant characteristics. (author) [French] Apres avoir rappele l'integration de l'energie nucleaire parmi les moyens de production de l'energie en France, les auteurs se penchent surtout sur l'evolution des techniques appliquees dans l'equipement des centrales nucleaires francaises et decrivent les moyens mis en oeuvre pour reduire les prix de revient du kWh d'EDF2 et d'EDF3 par rapport a EDF1: la puissance electrique par tonne d'uranium varie de 493 kW/t pour EDF1 a 970 kW/t pour EDF3. C'est dans ce but que les puissances thermiques et la puissance unitaire des groupes turbo-alternateurs passent respectivement de 290 MWt pour EDF1 a 1200 ou 1600 MWt pour EDF3 et de 82 a 250 MW. Les resultats sont obtenus par une amelioration des caracteristiques neutroniques, des progres realises sur la technologie des elements combustibles, une simplification du systeme de

  3. EDF nuclear fuel cycle: report for the HCTISN meeting on the 20 of November 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The first part of this report describes the different steps of the EDF fuel cycle and the associated flows: overview, description of each step (natural uranium mines, enrichment, fabrication, production in reactors, processing, recycling). The second part deals with valuable materials and wastes (history of waste flows since 1994, MOX flows since 1994). It presents supply sources and flows (diversification to ensure supply safety, flows among different supply steps) and actions performed by EDF to promote information. Some propositions are given to improve information

  4. Nuclear power, society and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 12 short notes about sociological and environmental aspects of nuclear power in France and other countries: the epidemiological inquiry widened to all French nuclear sites; the sanitary and radioecological effects of nuclear activities in Northern Cotentin (France); the WONUC (World National Council of Nuclear Workers) anger with the French government about the shutdown of Superphenix reactor; the new more informative promotional campaign of Electricite de France (EdF) for nuclear power; the scientific and research prices attributed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) to its searchers; the creation of a committee of inquiry in the French senate for the careful examination of the economical, social and financial consequences of the shutdown of Superphenix; the 31.2% increase of CEA-Industrie benefits for 1997; the decrease of nuclear contestation in Germany; the French-German communication efficiency during the Fessenheim accident simulation in October 7, 1997; the 3.5% increase of CO 2 emissions in the USA; the decommissioning of 3 Russian reactors for military plutonium production; Greenpeace condemnation for abusive purposes against British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) and its activities at Sellafield (UK). (J.S.)

  5. Human Factor on Gravelines Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duboc, Gerard

    1998-01-01

    In a first part, the documents describes the commitments by EDF nuclear power plan operations to demands made by the Safety Authority regarding actions in the field of human factors (concerns expressed by the Authority, in-depth analysis, positions on different points raised by the Authority). In a second part, it presents the various actions undertaken in the Gravelines nuclear power station regarding human factors: creation of an 'operator club' (mission and objectives, methods and means, first meetings, tracking file), development of risk analysis strategy, setting up of a human factor engineering mission and example of action in case of a significant event

  6. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  7. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Data concerning the existing nuclear power plants in the world are presented. The data was retrieved from the SIEN (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: nuclear plants, its status and type; installed nuclear power plants by country; nuclear power plants under construction by country; planned nuclear power plants by country; cancelled nuclear power plants by country; shut-down nuclear power plants by country. (E.G.) [pt

  8. Nuclear architecture and landscape: the power plant creates the site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Claude; Bouvier, Yves

    2005-01-01

    The implementation, from 1974, of the French nuclear programme, was associated with an 'Architecture Plan' requested by Michel Hug, Equipment Manager at power utility EDF. The objective was to create an architecture language specific to nuclear power. Far from trying to hide the nuclear power stations, the nuclear architecture college conversely designed one set of ambitious and powerful shapes. Systematically associated to one landscape and to one colourist, the architect sought to use in the best possible way the potentialities available on one site. The power station should not blend in with the landscape, but on the contrary, participate in the creation of a fresh landscape

  9. Nuclear power, society and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    2 subjects are treated: the regular public opinion poll ordered by CEA, EdF, COGEMA and FRAMATOME and the denuclearization of one of the nuclear research center belonging to CEA. Every year in december the BVA polling institute leads a public opinion poll about how nuclear activities are perceived by people. This year about 1000 people have been questioned about the French nuclear power program, radioactivity, safety in nuclear facilities, nuclear wastes, information and public debates. The most meaningful result is that now fewer people think that nuclear energy will play a major role in 10 or 20 years. More people now think that radioactivity even at very low doses is dangerous. In 1946 the ZOE reactor was built on the site of the ancient stronghold of Chatillon which became the nuclear research center of Fontenay-aux-roses in april 1957. From 1958 to 1962 ZOE and a pilot unit of spent fuel reprocessing were dismantled. The test reactor Triton whose definitive shutdown took place in 1982, underwent a complete decontamination, as for Minerve reactor it was removed to Cadarache. The hot laboratories in which methods concerning the fabrication of plutonium fuels, the reprocessing and the handling of high activity wastes have been settled and tested, are due to be dismantled. 20 hot cells, 134 glove boxes and about 100 tanks of liquid effluents are involved. CEA has budgeted 910 millions of francs for the complete denuclearization of this site, it will be over in 2010. (A.C.)

  10. The French Electricity Company (EDF) and GEC ALSTHOM have signed the agreement for Chinese Laibin B electric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    EDF and GEC ALSTHOM together with the government of Chinese Province Guangxi have organized in Pekin on 3 september 1997 a ceremony for signing a BOOT (Build, Own, Operate, Transfer) contract for the Coal Power Plant (2 x 360 MW) at Laibin B. This is the first Chinese BOOT contract in the power domain entirely financed by foreign capital. The two western companies which were retained for this project, following an international call for offers, invest USD 150 million of its own founds in this USD 600 million project. They will hold 60% and 40% of the capital of the company created for this project, respectively. The construction power plant is planned to be completed at the end of 1999 - beginning of 2000. After 15 years of industrial operation the power plant will be transferred to the autonomous government of the Province Guangxi. The communique contains the following 8 files: 1. The Laibin B power plant; 2. Build, Own, Operate, Transfer; 3. The autonomous Guangxi Province; 4. An outline of EDF in China; 5. Profile/activities of GEC ALSTHOM in China; 6. The 'Credit Agricole Indosuez' in China; 7. BZW Barclays PLC; 8. HSBC Investment Banking in China

  11. The yawning chasm of French nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The financial problems of the nuclear power industry in France are explained. Cogema, the waste reprocessing company ventured into the French financial futures market and lost money. It is trying to sue its brokers over this disaster. Framatome, the State reactor manufacturer is trying to diversify into aeronautics, electronics and foodstuffs. The electric utility EdF is sliding into debt and, with no price rise allowed, this situation will get worse. Theoretically EdF should be delivering cheap electricity from nuclear power stations. However, French electricity prices are not significantly cheaper than those of Germany and the United Kingdom. The generating capacity will increase greatly over the next few years. The availability of existing plants is also improving. In spite of efforts to export its electricity (about 10% is exported) EdF seem unable to make its extra electricity cheaper and is heavily in debt. The fast breeder programme has also not lived up to expectations due to a sodium leak at Superphenix. (U.K.)

  12. Visit of the chinese Vice-President of the people's republic of China, Hu Jintao, at the Bugey nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    During the visit of the Vice-President of the people's republic of China at the Bugey nuclear power plant, EDF showed its will of cooperation with China in the energy domain. This document presents the main aspects of this cooperation: the chinese electric power system panorama, the EDF investments in China and the future development. (A.L.B.)

  13. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  14. EDF's experience with supercomputing and challenges ahead - towards multi-physics and multi-scale approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delbecq, J.M.; Banner, D.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are a major asset of the EDF company. To remain so, in particular in a context of deregulation, competitiveness, safety and public acceptance are three conditions. These stakes apply both to existing plants and to future reactors. The purpose of the presentation is to explain how supercomputing can help EDF to satisfy these requirements. Three examples are described in detail: ensuring optimal use of nuclear fuel under wholly safe conditions, understanding and simulating the material deterioration mechanisms and moving forward with numerical simulation for the performance of EDF's activities. In conclusion, a broader vision of EDF long term R and D in the field of numerical simulation is given and especially of five challenges taken up by EDF together with its industrial and scientific partners. (author)

  15. 'Nuclear safety: our absolute priority'. File 2014 of the EDF Group in response to the FTSE4Good criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillart, H.

    2014-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the EDF Group activity, this report presents its different nuclear assets which belong to EDF SA, EDF Energy, CENG or TNPJVC (these companies are also briefly presented). The next part addresses and describes the various aspects related to safety and to radiation protection: the safety policy and its implementation within the group, incidents and events, unplanned outages, assessments of nuclear safety, risk analysis, preparation to emergency situations, adaptation to climate change, lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, public and workers exposure to radiations, site protection. The fourth part addresses issues related to wastes: general presentation, legal and regulatory context, policy, management of radioactive wastes, management of used fuels, dismantling and wastes. The next part addresses issues related to training: overview of human resources and training policy, implementation. The last part presents reporting actions and results

  16. Nuclear power economic database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Xiaoming; Li Lin; Zhao Shiping

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power economic database (NPEDB), based on ORACLE V6.0, consists of three parts, i.e., economic data base of nuclear power station, economic data base of nuclear fuel cycle and economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment. Economic database of nuclear power station includes data of general economics, technique, capital cost and benefit, etc. Economic database of nuclear fuel cycle includes data of technique and nuclear fuel price. Economic database of nuclear power planning and nuclear environment includes data of energy history, forecast, energy balance, electric power and energy facilities

  17. The role of the operator of nuclear power plants in disposal of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Public opinion polls show that the French have largely understood the importance of our nuclear programme in maintaining French independence with regard to power supply and its security and that they have confidence in the technicians for the proper construction and operation of these power plants, but that they retain many questions concerning the disposal of nuclear waste. They have the impression that solutions remain to be found, and especially that the Electricite de France (EDF) devised the nuclear power programme without concern for the disposal of waste. This lack of information is fortunately far from reality, EDF, under the supervision of the security authorities, manages the waste produced in the nuclear power plants. Final stocking of waste is handled by a body that is independent of the waste producer, the ''Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs'' (Andra) (National Agency for the Management of Radioactive Waste). (author). 7 refs., 1 tab

  18. Nuclear power in Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, Ronald E.

    1998-08-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Nuclear Energy in the Asian context; Types of nuclear power reactors used in Asia; A survey of nuclear power by country; The economics of nuclear power; Fuels, fuel cycles and reprocessing; Environmental issues and waste disposal; The weapons issues and nuclear power; Conclusions. (Author)

  19. French nuclear power experience with public opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havlicek, R.

    1990-01-01

    Establishing information centres proved to be advantageous in France. In this way, about 300 000 people visit nuclear power plants annually. EdF staff members periodically supply information to media people. Emphasis is also laid on good contacts with Members of Parliament, physicians, clergymen, teachers and politicians. The strategy of indirect communication is recognized: the utilities should not speak for themselves, it is better for somebody else to say the thing. No debates are organized with Greenpeace, who are too militant, irrational and untrustworthy. Municipalities where nuclear power plants are sited receive tax money from the plants (as from any other industrial plant), so that if the power plant is shut down, the population often demands that a new nuclear power plant be built there. Absolute transparency, openness and immediate response are vital in contacts with the public. (M.D.). 1 fig

  20. 2002 annual report EDF group; 2002 rapport annuel groupe EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is the 2002 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) group, the French electric utility. Content: Introductory section (EDF at a glance, Chairman's message, 2002 Highlights); Corporate governance and Group strategy (Corporate governance, sustainable growth strategy, EDF branches); Financial performance (Reaching critical mass, Margins holding up well, Balance sheet); Human resources (Launching Group-wide synergies, Optimising human resources); Customers (Major customers, SMEs and professional customers, Local authorities, Residential customers, Ensuring quality access to electricity); Generation (A balanced energy mix, Nuclear generation, Fossil-fuelled generation, Renewable energies); Corporate social responsibility (Global and local partnerships, Promoting community development)

  1. 2002 annual report EDF group; 2002 rapport annuel groupe EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is the 2002 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) group, the French electric utility. Content: Introductory section (EDF at a glance, Chairman's message, 2002 Highlights); Corporate governance and Group strategy (Corporate governance, sustainable growth strategy, EDF branches); Financial performance (Reaching critical mass, Margins holding up well, Balance sheet); Human resources (Launching Group-wide synergies, Optimising human resources); Customers (Major customers, SMEs and professional customers, Local authorities, Residential customers, Ensuring quality access to electricity); Generation (A balanced energy mix, Nuclear generation, Fossil-fuelled generation, Renewable energies); Corporate social responsibility (Global and local partnerships, Promoting community development)

  2. EDF's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serviere, G.

    2009-01-01

    After a period when several types of power reactors were operated, the most part of the French nuclear power plants were built in a 10 years time on the basis of a PWR design. This very important effort allowed France to face the oil crisis and an increase of power demand. Today nuclear energy keeps all its relevance in the French energy mix but a larger contribution of renewable energies is expected progressively. Light water reactors will stay dominant in the 2, 3 decades to come because of their important feedback experience and their economical competitiveness. The emergence of the 4. generation is not sure, it will depend strongly on: -) the available resources of uranium, -) the extend of the use of nuclear energy in the world, and -) its competitiveness compared to the 3. generation. This series of slides is divided into 3 parts: 1) the nuclear power in the French energy mix, 2) 3. generation reactors versus 4. generation ones, and 3) The EPR at Flamanville and in the world (China, Usa and Great-Britain). (A.C.)

  3. 2002 annual report EDF group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is the 2002 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) group, the French electric utility. Content: Introductory section (EDF at a glance, Chairman's message, 2002 Highlights); Corporate governance and Group strategy (Corporate governance, sustainable growth strategy, EDF branches); Financial performance (Reaching critical mass, Margins holding up well, Balance sheet); Human resources (Launching Group-wide synergies, Optimising human resources); Customers (Major customers, SMEs and professional customers, Local authorities, Residential customers, Ensuring quality access to electricity); Generation (A balanced energy mix, Nuclear generation, Fossil-fuelled generation, Renewable energies); Corporate social responsibility (Global and local partnerships, Promoting community development)

  4. Operation problems as viewed by EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheimanoff, Andre; Gaborit, Jean; Thom, Roger

    1983-01-01

    The installation of a plant such as Eurodif, whose power will reach, when fully operational, a maximum of 3,200 MW, and of a nuclear power plant of 4x900 MW, such as the one located in the Tricastin area, has considerable effects on the structure and operation of the EDF's network, both at the national and regional levels. The paper presents the situation regarding the Tricastin-Eurodif complex in the context of the EDF's network, the main operation problems that are encountered and the organization that had to be created to tackle these problems. Finally, it affords the opportunity to give an appreciation of the situation about the operation of the complex in 1982 [fr

  5. EDF Group - Annual Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The EDF Group is a leading player in the energy industry, active in all areas of the electricity value chain, from generation to trading and network management, with expanding operations in the natural gas chain. It has a sound business model, evenly balanced between regulated and deregulated activities. The EDF Group is the leader in the French and British electricity markets and has solid positions in Germany and Italy and numerous other European countries, as well as industrial operations in Asia and the United States. Everywhere it operates, the EDF Group is a model of quality public service for the energy sector. With fi rst-rate human resources, R and D capability and generation expertise in nuclear, fossil-fired and renewable energies, particularly hydro, together with energy eco-efficiency offers, the EDF Group delivers competitive solutions that help ensure sustainable economic development and climate protection. This document is EDF Group's annual report for the year 2009. It contains information about Group profile, governance, business, development strategy, sales and marketing, positions in Europe and international activities. The document is made of several reports: the Activity and Sustainable Development Report, the Financial Report, the Management Report, the Report by the Chairman of EDF Board of Directors on corporate governance and internal control procedures, the Milestones report, the 'EDF at a glance' report, and the Sustainable Development Indicators

  6. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Single Channel Trip System for the Dungeness B AGRs in the United Kingdom has enabled Nuclear Electric to enhance the performance of each of the twin reactors progressively towards the design figure of 660MW. The unique self-testing dynamic nature of the microprocessor-based ISAT system was one of the key factors in satisfying the UK Regulator that the system met the demanding requirements of the Dungeness B application, and current operational and maintenance experience is very encouraging. Systems based on the ISAT principle have application in reactor protection systems throughout the world. (Author)

  7. ALARA organization in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollo, R.

    1997-01-01

    EDF's nuclear power stations were built with provisions being made, as from the design stage, to limit radiation sources and the results observed over the first ten years (annual collective dose and dose per unit of less than 2 man.Sv) were considered to be very good. However, these results began to deteriorate from 1988 onwards. At the same time, considerable progress was being made by other generators of electricity, who were achieving results which were better than those achieved by our later units. Furthermore, radiological protection standards are being revised and personal dose limits will soon be lowered. (authors)

  8. The French Electricity Company (EDF) and GEC ALSTHOM have signed the agreement for Chinese Laibin B electric power plant; Electricite de France (EDF) et GEC ALSTHOM signent l'accord de la centrale electrique de Laibin B en Chine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-03

    EDF and GEC ALSTHOM together with the government of Chinese Province Guangxi have organized in Pekin on 3 september 1997 a ceremony for signing a BOOT (Build, Own, Operate, Transfer) contract for the Coal Power Plant (2 x 360 MW) at Laibin B. This is the first Chinese BOOT contract in the power domain entirely financed by foreign capital. The two western companies which were retained for this project, following an international call for offers, invest USD 150 million of its own founds in this USD 600 million project. They will hold 60% and 40% of the capital of the company created for this project, respectively. The construction power plant is planned to be completed at the end of 1999 - beginning of 2000. After 15 years of industrial operation the power plant will be transferred to the autonomous government of the Province Guangxi. The communique contains the following 8 files: 1. The Laibin B power plant; 2. Build, Own, Operate, Transfer; 3. The autonomous Guangxi Province; 4. An outline of EDF in China; 5. Profile/activities of GEC ALSTHOM in China; 6. The 'Credit Agricole Indosuez' in China; 7. BZW Barclays PLC; 8. HSBC Investment Banking in China.

  9. EDF group - Reference Document 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The EDF group is an integrated energy company with a presence in a wide range of electricity-related businesses: generation, transmission, distribution, supply and energy trading. It is France's leading electricity operator and has a strong position in the three other main European markets (Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy), making it one of Europe's leading electrical players as well as a recognized player in the gas industry. With worldwide installed power capacity totaling 136.3 GW as of December 31, 2009 (134.0 GW in Europe) and global energy generation of 618.5 TWh, it has the largest generating capacity of all the major European energy corporations with the lowest level of CO 2 emissions due to the significant proportion of nuclear and hydroelectric power in its generation mix. The EDF group supplies gas, electricity, and associated services to more than 37.9 million customer accounts worldwide (including approximately 27.7 million in France). The EDF group's businesses reflect its adoption of a model aimed at finding the best balance between French and international activities, competitive and regulated operations and based on an upstream-downstream integration. In 2009, the Group's consolidated revenues were euros 66.3 billion, the net income (Group share) was euros 3.9 billion, and earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization was euros 17.5 billion. This document is EDF Group's Reference Document and Annual Financial Report for the year 2009. It contains information about: the Group activities, risk factors, Business, Organizational structure, Property plant and equipment, Operating and financial review, Capital resources and cash flows, Research and Development, Patents and Licenses, Information on trends, Financial outlook, Administrative, management, and supervisory bodies and senior management, Compensation and benefits, Functioning of the administration and management bodies, Employees/Human resources

  10. Nuclear power plants: 2004 atw compact statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    In late 2004, nuclear power plants were available for power supply or were under construction in 32 countries worldwide. A total of 441 nuclear power plants, i.e. two plants more than in late 2003, were in operation with an aggregate gross power of approx. 386 GWe and an aggregate net power, respectively, of 362 GWe, in 31 countries. The available capacity of nuclear power plants increased by approx. 5 GWe as a result of the additions by the six units newly commissioned: Hamaoka 5 (Japan), Ulchin 6 (Korea), Kalinin 3 (Russia), Khmelnitski 2 (Ukraine), Qinshan II-2 (People's Republic of China), and Rowno 4 (Ukraine). In addition, unit 3 of the Bruce A nuclear power plant in Canada with a power of 825 MWe was restarted after an outage of many years. Contrary to earlier plans, a recommissioning program was initiated for the Bruce A-1 and A-2 units, which are also down at present. Five plants were decommissioned for good in 2004; Chapelcross 1 to 4 with 50 MWe each in the United Kingdom, and Ignalina 1 with 1 300 MWe in Lithuania. 22 nuclear generating units with an aggregate gross power of 19 GWe in nine countries were under construction in late 2004. In India, construction work was started on a new project, the 500 MWe PFBR prototype fast breeder reactor. In France, the EDF utility announced its intention to build an EPR on the Flamanville site beginning in 2007. (orig.)

  11. Nuclear power in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Association believes that the CANDU nuclear power generation system can play a major role in achieving energy self-sufficiency in Canada. The benefits of nuclear power, factors affecting projections of electric power demand, risks and benefits relative to other conventional and non-conventional energy sources, power economics, and uranium supply are discussed from a Canadian perspective. (LL)

  12. Perspective of nuclear power policy change and trend of nuclear industry activities from energy policy of European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoko; Matsuo, Yuji; Nagatomi, Yu

    2009-01-01

    European countries of nuclear power phase-out have changed to commit to the future of nuclear energy due to the intended low-carbon power, the energy security concerns and the need of replacement reactors as current reactors approach the end of operating lives, as Italian government has passed legislation to build new nuclear power plants. This article described the perspective of nuclear power policy changes in UK, Italy an Sweden and the business trend and the SWOT analysis of related electric utilities (EDF, Enel and Vattenfall) and nuclear industries (Areva NP, Sheffield Forgemasters, ENSA and Studsvik). Policy implications obtained from this analysis were commented for Japanese nuclear industry activities. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Power program and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernilin, Yu.F.

    1990-01-01

    Main points of the USSR power program and the role of nuclear power in fuel and power complex of the country are considered. Data on dynamics of economic indices of electric power generation at nuclear power plants during 1980-1988 and forecasts till 2000 are presented. It is shown that real cost of 1 kW/h of electric power is equal to 1.3-1.8 cop., and total reduced cost is equal to 1.8-2.4 cop

  14. EDF's experience with supercomputing and challenges ahead - towards multi-physics and multi-scale approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delbecq, J.M.; Banner, D. [Electricite de France (EDF)- R and D Division, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2003-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are a major asset of the EDF company. To remain so, in particular in a context of deregulation, competitiveness, safety and public acceptance are three conditions. These stakes apply both to existing plants and to future reactors. The purpose of the presentation is to explain how supercomputing can help EDF to satisfy these requirements. Three examples are described in detail: ensuring optimal use of nuclear fuel under wholly safe conditions, understanding and simulating the material deterioration mechanisms and moving forward with numerical simulation for the performance of EDF's activities. In conclusion, a broader vision of EDF long term R and D in the field of numerical simulation is given and especially of five challenges taken up by EDF together with its industrial and scientific partners. (author)

  15. Nuclear power of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun Bee-Ho

    2011-01-01

    National nuclear is presented. Nuclear energy safety after Fukushima, international cooperation in nuclear energy is discussed. Nuclear projects with the United Arab Emirates have been developed to build 4 nuclear power plants in the UAE - APR 1400. At the Korea-Bulgaria Industrial Committee Meeting in Sofia (March 2011) Korean side proposed Nuclear Safety Training Program in Korea for Bulgarian government officials and experts transfer of know-how and profound expertise on world-class nuclear technology and nuclear safety

  16. China and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouquoire-Brillet, E.

    1999-01-01

    This book presents the history of nuclear power development in China from the first research works started in the 1950's for the manufacturing of nuclear weapons to the recent development of nuclear power plants. This study tries to answer the main questions raised by the attitude of China with respect to the civil and military nuclear programs. (J.S.)

  17. Nuclear power revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grear, B.

    2008-01-01

    Modern development of nuclear power technology and the established framework of international agreements and conventions are responding to the major political, economic and environmental issues - high capital costs, the risks posed by nuclear wastes and accidents, and the proliferation of nuclear weaponry - that until recently hindered the expansion of nuclear power.

  18. Precursor incident program at EDF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourest, B.; Maliverney, B.; Rozenholc, M.; Piovesan, C.

    1998-01-01

    The precursor program was started by EDF in 1994, after an investigation of the US NRC's Accident Sequence Precursor Program. Since then, reported operational events identified as Safety Outstanding Events have been analyzed whenever possible using probabilistic methods based on PSAs. Analysis provides an estimate of the remaining protection against core damage at the time the incident occurred. Measuring the incidents' severity enables to detect incidents important regarding safety. Moreover, the most efficient feedback actions can be derived from the main accident sequences identified through the analysis. Therefore, incident probabilistic analysis provides a way to assess priorities in terms of treatment and resource allocation, and so, to implement countermeasures preventing further occurrence and development of the most significant incidents. As some incidents cannot be analyzed using this method, probabilistic analysis can only be one among the methods used to assess the nuclear power plants' safety level. Nevertheless, it provides an interesting complement to classical methods of deterministic studies. (author)

  19. Complementary assessment of the safety of French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarcat, N.; Pouget-Abadie, X.

    2011-01-01

    As an immediate consequence of the Fukushima accident the French nuclear safety Authority (ASN) asked EDF to perform a complementary safety assessment for each nuclear power plant dealing with 3 points: 1) the consequences of exceptional natural disasters, 2) the consequences of total loss of electrical power, and 3) the management of emergency situations. The safety margin has to be assessed considering 3 main points: first a review of the conformity to the initial safety requirements, secondly the resistance to events overdoing what the facility was designed to stand for, and the feasibility of any modification susceptible to improve the safety of the facility. This article details the specifications of such assessment, the methodology followed by EDF, the task organization and the time schedule. (A.C.)

  20. Nuclear power in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addinall, E.; Ellington, H.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters: (the nature of nuclear power) the atomic nucleus - a potential source of energy; how nuclear reactors work; the nuclear fuel cycle; radioactivity - its nature and biological effects; (why we need nuclear power) use of energy in the non-communist world -the changing pattern since 1950; use of energy - possible future scenarios; how our future energy needs might be met; (a possible long term nuclear strategy) the history of nuclear power; a possible nuclear power strategy for the Western World; (social and environmental considerations) the hazards to workers in the nuclear power industry; the hazards to the general public (nuclear power industry; reactor operation; transport of radioactive materials; fuel reprocessing; radioactive waste disposal; genetic hazards); the threat to democratic freedom and world peace. (U.K.)

  1. The renaissance of Italian nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Cassuto, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the fifties Italy was an advanced country in terms of nuclear electricity but as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident Italy changed drastically its energy policy and closed definitely all its nuclear plants. Now in order to be less dependent on energy imports and to reduce its CO 2 emission, Italy has changed its mind and welcomes nuclear power in its future energy mix. The aim is to reach the following contributions for the production of electricity in 2030: 50% from fossil fuels, 25% from renewable energies and 25% from nuclear energy (13.000 MWe) and with a first reactor operating in 2020. The main actors of the renaissance of nuclear power in Italy are: -) ENEL (the second electricity producer in Europe), -) SOGIN, a company that is mainly in charge of the dismantling of nuclear plants, -) ENEA a state agency for the development of new technologies, energy and sustainable development, and -) companies working in the nuclear industry like ANSALDO. Various collaboration agreements have been signed between ENEL and EDF or between ENEA and CEA concerning staff training, nuclear safety or radioactive waste management. The main difficulties of this renaissance of the nuclear energy are to get the agreement of the national and local populations as well as that of the political class that is strongly marked by a division in 2 wings. (A.C.)

  2. EDF - The Inspector General's report on Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After a first chapter in which the Inspector General states his own vision of facts and results regarding nuclear safety and radiation protection for 2012, the next chapters address the following topics: the contrasted results of nuclear operating safety, the need to remain vigilant in nuclear safety management, the challenge of occupational safety, the need of new ambitious goals for radiation protection, an updated training which must be better led by line management, maintenance as a strategic issue, the long road ahead for nuclear technical information system (SDIN), the need of better attention to chemistry in operations, the new impetus of EPRs, plant life extension conditioned by nuclear safety, the mobilization of nuclear operators after Fukushima, and noteworthy operating events

  3. The economic impact of giving up nuclear power in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnot, N.; Gallon, St.

    2001-01-01

    French nuclear plants will have to be shut down in the 2020's. Electricite de France (EDF) could replace them by either nuclear or gas-fired plants. Choosing the latter would lead to an increase in Green House Gases (GHG) emissions and to a rise of EDF's generation costs. In 2020, the price of electricity in Europe will be determined by a competitive market. Therefore, a rise of EDF's generation costs will mainly depress its operating profit (and slightly increase the market's price). Giving up nuclear power in 2020 would consequently lead to a fall of EDF's value and would penalize its shareholders, the State. On a macro-economic scale, the shock on the production cost of electricity would lead to a 0,5 to 1,0 percentage point drop of GDP (depending on the hypotheses). Structural unemployment would rise by 0,3 to 0,6 percentage point. The model used to find these results does not take into account the risk of nuclear accidents nor the uncertainty on the costs of nuclear waste disposal. On the other hand, gas-price is assumed to be low, and the costs of gas-fired generation do not integrate the risk premium due to gas-price volatility. In conclusion, the best choice on both micro and macro scales, consists in extending the life of current nuclear plants (if such an extension is authorised by safety regulators). These plants would be financially-amortized, produce electricity at a very competitive cost and emit no GHG. Furthermore, extending the life of current nuclear plants will defer any irreversible commitment on their replacement. The necessary decision could therefore be taken later on, with more information on the cost of alternative generation technologies and their efficiency. (author)

  4. Nuclear power prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-09-15

    A survey of the nuclear power needs of the less-developed countries and a study of the technology and economics of small and medium scale power reactors are envisioned by the General Conference. Agency makes its services available to Member States to assist them for their future nuclear power plans, and in particular in studying the technical and economic aspects of their power programs. The Agency also undertakes general studies on the economics of nuclear power, including the collection and analysis of cost data, in order to assist Member States in comparing and forecasting nuclear power costs in relation to their specific situations

  5. Dictionary of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    2012-06-01

    The actualized version (June 2012) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, nuclear physics, reactor physics, isotope production, biological radiation effects, and radiation protection.

  6. New EdF's three challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepetit, V.

    2005-01-01

    The opening of 15% of Electricite de France (EdF) capital to the private sector will allow the first world electric utility to raise 7 billions of euros of cash flow. EdF will have also to face the new European situation: a strained market, several consolidations to come and many competitors to deal with. EdF has to re-launch its production tool and to reinforce its interconnection capacities if it wants to stay the number one of power exports in Europe. The integration of Edison company (Italy) by EdF gives access to new gas capacities but other resources have to be found if EdF wants to enlarge its gas offer. A new concentration era is foreseen in Europe and EdF will have to seize the economic growth opportunities in particular in Europe and China. (J.S.)

  7. Nuclear energy: the impossible debate? Interview with Francois Roussely

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    In an interview, the EDF CEO describes how EDF considers the future of nuclear energy, how EDF may restore the confidence of public opinion in nuclear energy, what EDF can do against the negative influence of the application of the precautionary principle. He also discusses the fact that French ecologists call for ending nuclear power as neighbouring countries phase out nuclear. He outlines the role of political decision makers regarding choices to be made to struggle against the greenhouse effect, and shows how EDF has been for a long time committed in a sustainable development

  8. Dictionary of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    2012-04-01

    The actualized version (April 2012) of the dictionary on nuclear power includes all actualizations and new inputs since the last version of 2001. The original publication dates from 1980. The dictionary includes definitions, terms, measuring units and helpful information on the actual knowledge concerning nuclear power, nuclear facilities, and radiation protection.

  9. Nuclear power status 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document gives statistical information on nuclear power plants status in the world in 1999, including the number of reactors in operation or under construction, the electricity supplied by nuclear power reactors and the respective percentage of electricity produced by nuclear energy in 1999, and the total operating experience to 31 December 1999, by country

  10. Nuclear power publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This booklet lists 69 publications on nuclear energy available free from some of the main organisations concerned with its development and operation in the UK. Headings are: general information; the need for nuclear energy; the nuclear industry; nuclear power stations; fuel cycle; safety; waste management. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine factors and prospects for a resumption in growth of nuclear power in the United States over the next decade. The focus of analysis on the likelihood that current efforts in the United States to develop improved and safer nuclear power reactors will provide a sound technical basis for improved acceptance of nuclear power, and contribute to a social/political climate more conducive to a resumption of nuclear power growth. The acceptability of nuclear power and advanced reactors to five social/political sectors in the U.S. is examined. Three sectors highly relevant to the prospects for a restart of nuclear power plant construction are the financial sector involved in financing nuclear power plant construction, the federal nuclear regulatory sector, and the national political sector. For this analysis, the general public are divided into two groups: those who are knowledgeable about and involved in nuclear power issues, the involved public, and the much larger body of the general public that is relatively uninvolved in the controversy over nuclear power

  12. Measures taken to improve nuclear safety on EdF PWRs in operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kus, J.-P.; Norvez, G.

    1993-01-01

    In parallel with its major nuclear programme (56 PWR units in service or under construction), France has developed an original philosophy in the field of Nuclear Safety. This comprehensive philosophy ensures a fine balance and coordination between design and operation, it provides a methodology to design, construct and operate a safe nuclear plant. Actual experience is then continuously compared to the initial expectation and the methodology refined whenever necessary. This methodology is fully applied to the new 1400 MWe plant series presently under construction. The essential elements are also backfitted into all previous units, thereby giving them an equivalent level of safety. The French PWR park can therefore be considered as very homogeneous with regard to its safety level, regarding both its design and operation. (author)

  13. Nuclear power flies high

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, S.T.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear power in aircraft, rockets and satellites is discussed. No nuclear-powered rockets or aircraft have ever flown, but ground tests were successful. Nuclear reactors are used in the Soviet Cosmos serles of satellites, but only one American satellite, the SNAP-10A, contained a reactor. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators, many of which use plutonium 238, have powered more than 20 satellites launched into deep space by the U.S.A

  14. Worldwide nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Worldwide nuclear power (WNP) is a companion volume to UPDATE. Our objective in the publication of WNP is to provide factual information on nuclear power programs and policies in foreign countries to U.S. policymakers in the Federal Government who are instrumental in defining the direction of nuclear power in the U.S. WNP is prepared by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy from reports obtained from foreign Embassies in Washington, U.S. Embassies overseas, foreign and domestic publications, participation in international studies, and personal communications. Domestic nuclear data is included only where its presence is needed to provide easy and immediate comparisons with foreign data

  15. Nuclear power controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arthur W. Murphy in the introductory chapter cites the issues, pro and con, concerning nuclear power. In assessing the present stance, he first looks back to the last American Assembly on nuclear power, held October 1957 and notes its accomplishments. He summarizes the six papers of this book, which focus on nuclear power to the end of this century. Chapter I, Safety Aspects of Nuclear Energy, by David Bodansky and Fred Schmidt, deals with the technical aspects of reactor safety as well as waste storage and plutonium diversion. Chapter 2, The Economics of Electric Power Generation--1975-2000, by R. Michael Murray, Jr., focuses specifically on coal-fired and nuclear plants. Chapter 3, How Can We Get the Nuclear Job Done, by Fritz Heimann, identifies actions that must take place to develop nuclear power in the U.S. and who should build the reprocessing plants. Chapter 4, by Arthur Murphy, Nuclear Power Plant Regulation, discusses the USNRC operation and the Price-Anderson Act specifically. Chapter 5, Nuclear Exports and Nonproliferation Strategy, by John G. Palfrey, treats the international aspects of the problem with primary emphasis upon the situation of the U.S. as an exporter of technology. Chapter 6, by George Kistiakowsky, Nuclear Power: How Much Is Too Much, expresses doubt about the nuclear effort, at least in the short run

  16. Nuclear power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea

  17. Role of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1982-01-01

    A survey of world nuclear installations, the operating experiences of power reactors, and estimates of future nuclear growth leads to the conclusion that nuclear power's share of world electric power supply will grow slowly, but steadily during this decade. This growth will lead advanced countries to use the commercial breeder by the end of the century. Nuclear power is economically viable for most industrialized and many developing countries if public acceptance problems can be resolved. A restructuring of operational safety and regulations must occur first, as well as a resolution of the safeguards and technology transfer issue. 7 figures, 7 tables

  18. Nuclear power in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Australian Uranium Association reports that Asia is the only region in the world where electricity generating capacity and specifically nuclear power is growing significantly. In East and South Asia, there are over 109 nuclear power reactors in operation, 18 under construction and plans to build about a further 100. The greatest growth in nuclear generation is expected in China, Japan, South Korea and India. As a member of the SE Asian community, Australia cannot afford to ignore the existence and growth of nuclear power generation on its door step, even if it has not, up to now, needed to utilise this power source

  19. Nuclear power in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rim, C S [Radioactive Waste Management Centre, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon, Choong-Nam (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-01

    Before addressing the issue of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in Korea, let me briefly explain the Korean nuclear power program and development plan for a passively safe nuclear power plant in Korea. At present, there are eight PWRs and one CANDU in operation; two PWRs are under construction, and contract negotiations are underway for one more CANDU and two more PWRs, which are scheduled to be completed by 1997,1998 and 1999, respectively. According to a recent forecast for electricity demand in Korea, about fifty additional nuclear power plants with a generating capacity of 1000MWe are required by the year 2030. Until around 2006, Korean standardized nuclear power plants with evolutionary features such as those in the ALWR program are to be built, and a new type of nuclear power plant with passive safety features is expected to be constructed after 2006. The Korean government is making a serious effort to increase public understanding of the safety of nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage and disposal. In addition, the Korean government has recently introduced a program of benefits for residents near nuclear power plants. By this program, common facilities such as community centers and new roads are constructed, and scholarships are given to the local students. Nuclear power is accepted positively by the utility and reasonably well by the public in Korea.

  20. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    The discussion on the development of nuclear power took place on 28 September 1960 in Vienna. In his opening remarks, Director General Cole referred to the widespread opinion that 'the prospect of cheap electricity derived from nuclear energy offers the most exciting prospect for improving the lot of mankind of all of the opportunities for uses of atomic energy'. He then introduced the four speakers and the moderator of the discussion, Mr. H. de Laboulaye, IAEA Deputy Director General for Technical Operations. n the first part of the discussion the experts addressed themselves in turn to four topics put forward by the moderator. These were: the present technical status of nuclear power, the present costs of nuclear power, prospects for future reductions in the cost of nuclear power, and applications of nuclear power in less-developed areas

  1. Wythenshawe boiler rig. Thirty years of support to the UK nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudge, Andy; Woolsey, Ian S.; Moore, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The Wythenshawe Boiler Rig in Manchester, UK, recently celebrated thirty years of operation in support of the UK nuclear power industry. The Boiler Rig, owned by EDF Energy and operated on EDF Energy's behalf by Serco plc, is a full scale once-through boiler test facility for the investigation of chemistry and corrosion related topics. This paper presents an overview of the design and operation of the Boiler Rig together with some of the technical highlights from its thirty years of operation, many of which have relevance to power plant operations beyond those plants for which the work was performed. (orig.)

  2. Labour inspection in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, J.; Polge, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    The French nuclear safety authority is in charge of labour inspection in nuclear power plants due to historical reasons. Thus, fifteen agents of ASN are acting simultaneously as nuclear inspectors and labour inspectors: they fulfill in the fifty eight reactor operated by EDF. ASN labour inspectors have the same rights ant duties than labour inspectors who fulfill in other French administrations. The regulatory domain is exactly the same. The work of ASN labour inspectors is divided in two main parts checking, on the one hand health and safety regulation requirements and on the other hand, social laws requirements. ASN labour inspectors assume, on their own, most of the decision they have to bring out. Nevertheless, ASN labour inspectors meet each other four times a year in order to share experiences. ASN labour inspectors and nuclear safety inspectors work together in the nuclear power plant. Its the principal benefit of this organisation. A high nu-clear safety level can not be reach without a good work conditions and social dialogue with labour unions. (author)

  3. Nuclear power debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunwick, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A recent resurgence of interest in Australia in the nuclear power option has been largely attributed to growing concerns over climate change. But what are the real pros and cons of nuclear power? Have advances in technology solved the sector's key challenges? Do the economics stack up for Australia where there is so much coal, gas and renewable resources? Is the greenhouse footprint' of nuclear power low enough to justify its use? During May and June, the AIE hosted a series of Branch events on nuclear power across Sydney, Adelaide and Perth. In the interest of balance, and at risk of being a little bit repetitive, here we draw together four items that resulted from these events and that reflect the opposing views on nuclear power in Australia. Nuclear Power for Australia: Irrelevant or Inevitable? - a summary of the presentations to the symposium held by Sydney Branch on 8 June 2005. Nuclear Reactors Waste the Planet - text from the flyer distributed by The Greens at their protest gathering outside the symposium venue on 8 June 2005. The Case For Nuclear Power - an edited transcript of Ian Hore-Lacy's presentation to Adelaide Branch on 19 May 2005 and to Perth Branch on 28 June 2005. The Case Against Nuclear Power - an article submitted to Energy News by Robin Chappie subsequent to Mr Hore-Lacy's presentation to Perth Branch

  4. The nuclear power decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear power has now become highly controversial and there is violent disagreement about how far this technology can and should contribute to the Western energy economy. More so than any other energy resource, nuclear power has the capacity to provide much of our energy needs but the risk is now seen to be very large indeed. This book discusses the major British decisions in the civil nuclear field, and the way they were made, between 1953 and 1978. That is, it spans the period between the decision to construct Calder Hall - claimed as the world's first nuclear power station - and the Windscale Inquiry - claimed as the world's most thorough study of a nuclear project. For the period up to 1974 this involves a study of the internal processes of British central government - what the author terms 'private' politics to distinguish them from the very 'public' or open politics which have characterised the period since 1974. The private issues include the technical selection of nuclear reactors, the economic arguments about nuclear power and the political clashes between institutions and individuals. The public issues concern nuclear safety and the environment and the rights and opportunities for individuals and groups to protest about nuclear development. The book demonstrates that British civil nuclear power decision making has had many shortcomings and concludes that it was hampered by outdated political and administrative attitudes and machinery and that some of the central issues in the nuclear debate were misunderstood by the decision makers themselves. (author)

  5. Financing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheriffah Noor Khamseah Al-Idid Syed Ahmad Idid

    2009-01-01

    Global energy security and climate change concerns sparked by escalating oil prices, high population growth and the rapid pace of industrialization are fueling the current interest and investments in nuclear power. Globally, a significant number policy makers and energy industry leaders have identified nuclear power as a favorable alternative energy option, and are presently evaluating either a new or an expanded role for nuclear power. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reported that as of October 2008, 14 countries have plans to construct 38 new nuclear reactors and about 100 more nuclear power plants have been written into the development plans of governments for the next three decades. Hence as new build is expected to escalate, issues of financing will become increasingly significant. Energy supply, including nuclear power, considered as a premium by government from the socio-economic and strategic perspective has traditionally been a sector financed and owned by the government. In the case for nuclear power, the conventional methods of financing include financing by the government or energy entity (utility or oil company) providing part of the funds from its own resources with support from the government. As national financing is, as in many cases, insufficient to fully finance the nuclear power plants, additional financing is sourced from international sources of financing including, amongst others, Export Credit Agencies (ECAs) and Multilateral Development Institutions. However, arising from the changing dynamics of economics, financing and business model as well as increasing concerns regarding environmental degradation , transformations in methods of financing this energy sector has been observed. This paper aims to briefly present on financing aspects of nuclear power as well as offer some examples of the changing dynamics of financing nuclear power which is reflected by the evolution of ownership and management of nuclear power plants

  6. Nuclear power status 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document gives general statistical information (by country) about electricity produced by nuclear power plants in the world in 1998, and in a table the number of nuclear reactors in operation, under construction, nuclear electricity supplied in 1998, and total operating experience as of 31 December 1998

  7. Nuclear Power Plants. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell, Walter, III

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: Why Use Nuclear Power?; From Atoms to Electricity; Reactor Types; Typical Plant Design Features; The Cost of Nuclear Power; Plants in the United States; Developments in Foreign…

  8. Balakovo nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A key means of improving the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants is through effective training of plant personnel. The goal of this paper is to show the progress of the training at the Balakovo Nuclear Power Plant, and the important role that international cooperation programs have played in that progress

  9. Nuclear power economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moynet, G.

    1987-01-01

    The economical comparison of nuclear power plants with coal-fired plants in some countries or areas are analyzed. It is not difficult to show that nuclear power will have a significant and expanding role to play in providing economic electricity in the coming decades. (Liu)

  10. Nuclear power: Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Wyk, A.

    1985-01-01

    The use of nuclear power in warfare is viewed from the point of use usefullness, essentiality and demolition. The effects of a H-bomb explosion are discussed as well as the use of nuclear power in warfare, with a Christian ethical background

  11. Consideration of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, I.

    1982-01-01

    Mr. Smart notes that the optimistic promise of nuclear energy for developing countries has not been met, but feels that nuclear power can still provide a growing share of energy during the transition from oil dependence. He observes that cost-benefit analyses vary for each country, but good planning and management can give nuclear power a positive future for those developing countries which can establish a need for it; have access to the economic, technological, and human resources necessary to develop and operate it; and can make nuclear power compatible with the social, economic, and cultural structure. 11 references

  12. Nuclear power in crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blowers, Andrew.; Pepper, David.

    1987-01-01

    Six themes run through this book: nuclear decision making and democratic accountability, nuclear bias and a narrow-based energy policy, scientific discredit and popular expertise, fusing science with social values, managerial competence and the geography of nuclear power. These are covered in thirteen chapters (all indexed separately) grouped into four parts -the political and planning context, nuclear waste, risk and impact - the social dimension and the future of nuclear power. It considers aspects in France, the United States and the United Kingdom with particular references to the Sizewell-B inquiry and the Sellafield reprocessing plant. (UK)

  13. Nuclear power plant outages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) controls nuclear power plant safety in Finland. In addition to controlling the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants, STUK also controls refuelling and repair outages at the plants. According to section 9 of the Nuclear Energy Act (990/87), it shall be the licence-holder's obligation to ensure the safety of the use of nuclear energy. Requirements applicable to the licence-holder as regards the assurance of outage safety are presented in this guide. STUK's regulatory control activities pertaining to outages are also described

  14. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulova, T.Ch.

    1976-01-01

    The textbook focuses on the technology and the operating characteristics of nuclear power plants equiped with pressurized water or boiling water reactors, which are in operation all over the world at present. The following topics are dealt with in relation to the complete plant and to economics: distribution and consumption of electric and thermal energy, types and equipment of nuclear power plants, chemical processes and material balance, economical characteristics concerning heat and energy, regenerative preheating of feed water, degassing and condenser systems, water supply, evaporators, district heating systems, steam generating systems and turbines, coolant loops and pipes, plant siting, ventilation and decontamination systems, reactor operation and management, heat transfer including its calculation, design of reactor buildings, and nuclear power plants with gas or sodium cooled reactors. Numerous technical data of modern Soviet nuclear power plants are included. The book is of interest to graduate and post-graduate students in the field of nuclear engineering as well as to nuclear engineers

  15. Nuclear power in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, J.

    2000-01-01

    Currently nuclear power accounts for more than 25% of total electricity production in Europe (including Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) However, significant new construction is planned in Central and Eastern Europe only, apart from some in France and, possibly in Finland. Many countries in Western Europe have put nuclear construction plans on hold and several have cancelled their nuclear programs. This report looks at the history of nuclear power and its current status in both Eastern and Western Europe. It provides an outline of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, from uranium procurement to final waste disposal. Economic and environmental issues are discussed, as well as the prospect of increased East-West trade and cooperation in the new poso-cold war world. Detailed profiles are provided of all the countries in Western Europe with significant nuclear power programs, as well as profiles of major energy and nuclear companies

  16. Mobile nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.

    1988-11-01

    This report is meant to present a general survey of the mobile nuclear power systems and not a detailed review of their technical accomplishments. It is based in published material mainly up to 1987. Mobile nuclear power systems are of two fundamentally different kinds: nuclear reactors and isotopic generators. In the reactors the energy comes from nuclear fission and in the isotopic generators from the radioactive decay of suitable isotopes. The reactors are primarily used as power sourves on board nuclear submarines and other warships but have also been used in the space and in remote places. Their thermal power has ranged from 30 kWth (in a satellite) to 175 MWth (on board an aircraft carrier). Isotopic generators are suitable only for small power demands and have been used on board satellites and spaceprobes, automatic weatherstations, lighthouses and marine installations for navigation and observation. (author)

  17. Nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povolny, M.

    1980-01-01

    The development and uses of nuclear power in Czechoslovakia and other countries are briefly outlined. In the first stage, the Czechoslovak nuclear programme was oriented to the WWER 440 type reactor while the second stage of the nuclear power plant construction is oriented to the WWER 10O0 type reactor. It is envisaged that 12 WWER 440 type reactors and four to five WWER 1000 type reactors will be commissioned till 1990. (J.P.)

  18. The nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plettner, B.

    1987-04-01

    The processes taking place in a nuclear power plant and the dangers arising from a nuclear power station are described. The means and methods of controlling, monitoring, and protecting the plant and things that can go wrong are presented. There is also a short discourse on the research carried out in the USA and Germany, aimed at assessing the risks of utilising nuclear energy by means of the incident tree analysis and probability calculations. (DG) [de

  19. Nuclear power in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    the plans of the Spanish Government to reduce their dependence on oil over the next ten years by a considerable increase in nuclear generating capacity are outlined. Data on the type, generating power, location and commissioning data of a number of nuclear power stations in Spain are tabulated. The use of foreign companies for the design and construction of the nuclear stations and the national organisations responsible for different aspects of the programme are considered. (UK)

  20. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftergood, S.; Hafemeister, D.W.; Prilutsky, O.F.; Rodionov, S.N.; Primack, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have provided energy for satellites-with nearly disastrous results. Now the US government is proposing to build nuclear-powered boosters to launch Star Wars defenses. These authors represent scientific groups that are opposed to the use of nuclear power in near space. The authors feel that the best course for space-borne reactors is to ban them from Earth orbit and use them in deep space

  1. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daglish, J.

    1982-01-01

    A report is given of a recent international conference convened by the IAEA to consider the technical and economic experience acquired by the nuclear industry during the past 30 years. Quotations are given from a number of contributors. Most authors shared the opinion that nuclear power should play a major role in meeting future energy needs and it was considered that the conference had contributed to make nuclear power more viable. (U.K.)

  2. Governance of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.; Carnesale, A.; Zigman, P.; DeRosa, F.

    1981-01-01

    Utility decisions on whether to invest in nuclear power plants are complicated by uncertainties over future power demand, regulatory changes, public perceptions of nuclear power, and capital costs. A review of the issues and obstacles confronting nuclear power also covers the factors affecting national policies, focusing on three institutional questions: regulating the industry, regulating the regulators, and regulatory procedures. The specific recommendations made to improve safety, cost, and public acceptance will still not eliminate uncertainties unless the suggested fundamental changes are made. 29 references

  3. Nuclear power under strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    The German citizen faces the complex problem of nuclear power industry with slight feeling of uncertainty. The topics in question can only be briefly dealt with in this context, e.g.: 1. Only nuclear energy can compensate the energy shortage. 2. Coal and nuclear energy. 3. Keeping the risk small. 4. Safety test series. 5. Status and tendencies of nuclear energy planning in the East and West. (GL) [de

  4. Application of artificial intelligence for nuclear power plant surveillance and diagnosis problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnier, B.; Ricard, B.; Doutre, J.L.; Martin-Mattei, C.; Fernandes, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents three expert systems in the field of surveillance and diagnosis of nuclear power plants. Each application is described from the point of view of knowledge modeling. Then, a general knowledge model is proposed for a class of diagnosis problems. At the end, the paper shows the future frame of the surveillance of the nuclear power plant main components at EDF in which the greatest part of those expert systems will run

  5. Worldwide nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Worldwide Nuclear Power (WNP) is a companion volume to Update. Our objective in the publication of WNP is to provide factual information on nuclear power programs and policies in foreign countries to U.S. policymakers in the Federal Government. Facts about the status of nuclear activities abroad should be available to those who are instrumental in defining the direction of nuclear power in the U.S. WNP is prepared by the Office of Nuclear Energy from reports obtained from foreign embassies in Washington, U.S. Embassies overseas, foreign and domestic publications, participation in international studies, and personal communications. It consists of two types of information, tabular and narrative. Domestic nuclear data is included only where its presence is needed to provide easy and immediate comparisons with foreign data. In general, complete U.S. information will be found in Update

  6. Forecasting winds over nuclear power plants statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marais, Ch.

    1997-01-01

    In the event of an accident at nuclear power plant, it is essential to forecast the wind velocity at the level where the efflux occurs (about 100 m). At present meteorologists refine the wind forecast from the coarse grid of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. The purpose of this study is to improve the forecasts by developing a statistical adaptation method which corrects the NWP forecasts by using statistical comparisons between wind forecasts and observations. The Multiple Linear Regression method is used here to forecast the 100 m wind at 12 and 24 hours range for three Electricite de France (EDF) sites. It turns out that this approach gives better forecasts than the NWP model alone and is worthy of operational use. (author)

  7. Nuclear power statistics 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelgaard, P.L.

    1986-06-01

    In this report an attempt is made to collect literature data on nuclear power production and to present it on graphical form. Data is given not only for 1985, but for a number of years so that the trends in the development of nuclear power can be seen. The global capacity of nuclear power plants in operation and those in operation, under construction, or on order is considered. Further the average capacity factor for nuclear plants of a specific type and for various geographical areas is given. The contribution of nuclear power to the total electricity production is considered for a number of countries and areas. Finally, the accumulated years of commercial operation for the various reactor types up to the end of 1985 is presented. (author)

  8. Nuclear power: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 206 power reactors with a gross power of 181,941 MWe and a net power of 172,699 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2004, one nuclear power plant was commissioned in Russia (Kalinin 3), two (Kmelnitzki 2 and Rowno 4) in Ukraine. Five nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2004. As announced in 2000, the Chapelcross 1 to Chapelcross 4 plants in Britain were shut down for economic reasons. In Lithuania, the Ignalina 1 unit was disconnected from the power grid, as had been demanded by the EU Commission within the framework of the negotiations about the country's accession to the EU. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.5 GW. In late 2004, four nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (2). 150 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25), which is sixteen more than the year before as a consequence of the accession of new countries. They had an aggregate gross power of 137,943 MWe and a net power of 131,267 MWe, generating approx. 983 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2003, thus again contributing some 32% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in Lithuania (80%), followed by 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 56% in Belgium, and 46% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as

  9. The nuclear power cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Fifty years after the first nuclear reactor come on-line, nuclear power is fourth among the world's primary energy sources, after oil, coal and gas. In 2002, there were 441 reactors in operation worldwide. The United States led the world with 104 reactors and an installed capacity of 100,000 MWe, or more than one fourth of global capacity. Electricity from nuclear energy represents 78% of the production in France, 57% in Belgium, 46% in Sweden, 40% in Switzerland, 39% in South Korea, 34% in Japan, 30% in Germany, 30% in Finland, 26% in Spain, 22% in Great Britain, 20% in the United States and 16% in Russia. Worldwide, 32 reactors are under construction, including 21 in Asia. This information document presents the Areva activities in the nuclear power cycle: the nuclear fuel, the nuclear reactors, the spent fuel reprocessing and recycling and nuclear cleanup and dismantling. (A.L.B.)

  10. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs

  11. Nuclear power in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    India has now nine years of experience with her in nuclear power generation. The system has been acclaimed on various grounds by the authority concerned with its organization in the country. The present paper intends to examine critically the claim for economic superiority of the nuclear power over the thermal power which is asserted often by the spokesmen for the former. Information about the cost of nuclear power that is available to researchers in India is very meagre. Whatever appears in official publications is hardly adequate for working out reasonable estimates for scrutiny. One is therefore left to depend on the public statements made by dignitaries from time to time to form an idea about the economics of nuclear power. Due to gaps in information we are constrained to rely on the foreign literature and make careful guesses about possible costs applicable to India

  12. LDC nuclear power: Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, V.

    1982-01-01

    Brazil has been expanding its nuclear power since 1975, following the Bonn-Brasilia sales agreement and the 1974 denial of US enriched uranium, in an effort to develop an energy mix that will reduce dependence and vulnerability to a single energy source or supplier. An overview of the nuclear program goes on to describe domestic non-nuclear alternatives, none of which has an adequate base. The country's need for transfers of capital, technology, and raw materials raises questions about the advisability of an aggressive nuclear program in pursuit of great power status. 33 references

  13. Nuclear power - the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hann, J.

    1991-01-01

    It is asserted by the author that nuclear power is the only available resource - indeed the only solution to an ever-increasing demand for energy in the United Kingdom over the next 50-100 years. It must be the cornerstone of a practical integrated energy policy, covering that sort of time-scale. In fact, it is going to be a strategic necessity. In this paper the background to establishing a policy is sketched. An explanation is given of what the nuclear industry is doing so as to ensure that the nuclear option is very definitely retained as a result of the 1994 Review of nuclear power in the UK. (author)

  14. EDF Energies Nouvelles - 2010 Registration Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    EDF Energies Nouvelles is a world leader in renewable energy electricity. The company develops, builds and operates clean energy power plants both for its own account and for third parties. Historically, EDF Energies Nouvelles primarily developed its business in two geographical areas, Europe and North America (U.S., Canada and Mexico). EDF Energies Nouvelles is a subsidiary of EDF, helping the Group to achieve its renewable energy goals. The EDF Group generates low-carbon electricity around the world and actively participates in the energy transition. EDF Energies Nouvelles prioritizes development of wind and photovoltaic solar capacity. As an integrated operator with global reach, EDF Energies Nouvelles covers the entire renewable energy chain, from development to operation and maintenance, and manages all project phases in-house. This document is EDF Energies Nouvelles' registration document for the year 2010. It contains information about Group profile, governance, business, investments, property, plant and equipment, management, financial position, employees, shareholders, etc. The document includes the half-year and full year financial reports

  15. EDF - 2015 full-year results: all targets reached, Strong operating performance in adverse market conditions, 2018 ambition reiterated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    A key player in energy transition, the EDF Group is an integrated electricity company, active in all areas of the business: generation, transmission, distribution, energy supply and trading, energy services. A global leader in low-carbon energies, the Group has developed a diversified generation mix based on nuclear power, hydropower, new renewable energies and thermal energy. The Group is involved in supplying energy and services to approximately 37.6 million customers, of which 27.8 million in France. The Group generated consolidated sales of Euro 75 billion in 2015, of which 47.2% outside of France. EDF is listed on the Paris Stock exchange. EDF achieved all its targets in 2015. The year was marked by strong operational performance, reflecting the significant efforts the teams made. With the end of the regulated Yellow and Green Tariffs, most clients turned to EDF. Nuclear output reached its highest level, since 2011 in France, and since 2005 in the United Kingdom. EDF is also continuing its significant development in renewable energy, with an additional 1 GW of net installed capacity. The transformation of EDF Group is essential in the unfavourable market conditions. EDF has embarked on this transformation, and is accelerating innovation to serve the energy transition

  16. The distribution of iodine in the vicinity of nuclear power plants: the impossibility of ''banalizing'' nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchene, F.; Ferrand, V.

    1998-01-01

    Despite the controversial dimension of civilian nuclear facilities, the recent distribution of iodine in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France brought little response from the populations concerned. Could it be that nuclear power plants today are looked upon as ordinary factories by those who live near them? Could it be that the risks they incur have become 'banal'? A qualitative survey conducted in the area around the Bugey nuclear power plant, near Lyons, has provided food for further thought on the matter. The building of the plant in 1965 brought about profound changes in the host territory which has gone from a rural way of life to the era of industry and peri-urbanization. Yet the isolation in which employees of the facility were long seen to live, or the considerable amounts of tax it provides, particularly to the village which hosted it, have meant that the nuclear site has always kept its own particular status, despite the creation of chemicals industries in the surrounding area. The Chernobyl accident was a blow to the reassuring discourse thus for exuded by the EDF The testimony of the local people reveals the construction of different forms of 'symbolic protection', which were themselves to be shattered by the iodine distribution operation. By 'backing' focused communication rather than information, EDF merely sustained the confusion surrounding an industrial facility that remains somewhat out of the ordinary. (authors)

  17. Nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Katumi; Sato, Akira; Kaimori, Kimihiro; Kumano, Tetsuji

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power generation for commercial use in Japan has passed 35 years since beginning of operation in the Tokai Nuclear Power Station in 1966, and has 51 machines of reactor and about 44.92 MW of total output of equipment scale in the 21st century. However, an environment around nuclear energy becomes severer at present, and then so many subjects to be overcome are remained such as increased unreliability of the public on nuclear energy at a chance of critical accident of the JCO uranium processing facility, delay of pull-thermal plan, requirement for power generation cost down against liberalization of electric power, highly aging countermeasure of power plant begun its operation as its Genesis, and so on. Under such conditions, in order that nuclear power generation in Japan survives as one of basic electric source in future, it is necessary not only to pursue safety and reliability of the plant reliable to the public, but also to intend to upgrade its operation and maintenance by positively adopting good examples on operational management method on abroad and to endeavor further upgrading of application ratio of equipments and reduction of generation cost. Here were outlined on operation conditions of nuclear power stations in Japan, and introduced on upgrading of their operational management and maintenance management. (G.K.)

  18. Development of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  19. Development of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-01-15

    An extensive discussion of problems concerning the development of nuclear power took place at the fifth regular session of the IAEA General Conference in September-October 1961. Not only were there many references in plenary meetings to the nuclear power plans of Member States, but there was also a more specific and detailed debate on the subject, especially on nuclear power costs, in the Program, Technical and Budget Committee of the Conference. The Conference had before it a report from the Board of Governors on the studies made by the Agency on the economics of nuclear power. In addition, it had been presented with two detailed documents, one containing a review of present-day costs of nuclear power and the other containing technical and economic information on several small and medium-sized power reactors in the United States. The Conference was also informed of the report on methods of estimating nuclear power costs, prepared with the assistance of a panel of experts convened by the Agency, which was reviewed in the July 1961 issue of this Bulletin

  20. 600 MW nuclear power database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ruiding; Chen Guorong; Chen Xianfeng; Zhang Yishu

    1996-01-01

    600 MW Nuclear power database, based on ORACLE 6.0, consists of three parts, i.e. nuclear power plant database, nuclear power position database and nuclear power equipment database. In the database, there are a great deal of technique data and picture of nuclear power, provided by engineering designing units and individual. The database can give help to the designers of nuclear power

  1. Nuclear power experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The International Conference on Nuclear Power Experience, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held at the Hofburg Conference Center, Vienna, Austria, from 13 to 17 September 1982. Almost 1200 participants and observers from 63 countries and 20 organizations attended the conference. The 239 papers presented were grouped under the following seven main topics: planning and development of nuclear power programmes; technical and economic experience of nuclear power production; the nuclear fuel cycle; nuclear safety experience; advanced systems; international safeguards; international co-operation. The proceedings are published in six volumes. The sixth volume contains a complete Contents of Volume 1 to 5, a List of Participants, Authors and Transliteration Indexes, a Subject Index and an Index of Papers by Number

  2. Canada's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, W.

    1976-01-01

    Although Canada has developed the CANDU type reactor, and has an ambitious programme of nuclear power plant construction, there has been virtually no nuclear controversy. This progress was seen as a means to bring Canada out of the 'resource cow' era, and onto a more equal footing with technologically elite nations. However the Indian nuclear explosion test, waste storage problems, contamination problems arising from use of uranium ore processing waste as land fill and subsidised sale of nuclear power plants to Argentina and South Korea have initiated public and parliamentary interest. Some economists have also maintained that Canada is approaching over-supply of nuclear power and over-investment in plant. Canada has no official overall energy production plan and alternative sources have not been evaluated. (JIW)

  3. Without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The arguments put forward by the SPD point to the following: Backing out of nuclear power is a must, because of the awful quality of the hazards involved; because there can be no real separation guaranteed between civil and military utilisation of nuclear energy; for reasons of international responsibility; because we must not pass the buck on to the next generation; because social compatibility must be achieved; because the story of the 'cheap' nuclear generation of electricity is a fairy tale; because nuclear power pushes back coal as an energy source; because current ecological conditions call for abandonment of nuclear power, and economic arguments do not really contradict them. A reform of our energy system has to fulfill four requirements: Conserve energy; reduce and avoid environmental pollution; use renewable energy sources as the main sources; leave to the next generation the chance of choosing their own way of life. (HSCH) [de

  4. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.; Tasker, A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides about a fifth of both Britain's and the world's electricity. It is the largest single source of electricity in Western Europe; in France three quarters of electricity is generated by nuclear power stations. This booklet is about the safety of those plants. It approaches the subject by outlining the basic principles and approaches behind nuclear safety, describing the protective barriers and safety systems that are designed to prevent the escape of radioactive material, and summarising the regulations that govern the construction and operation of nuclear power stations. The aim is to provide a general understanding of the subject by explaining the general principles of the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor and setting out the UKAEA strategy for nuclear safety, the objective being always to minimize risk. (author)

  5. Nuclear Power in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Duk-Sang

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Korea's nuclear power program has been promoted by step-by-step approach; the first stage was 1970's when it depended on the foreign contractors' technology and the second was 1980's when it accumulated lots of technology and experience by jointly implementing the project. Lastly in the third stage in 1990's, Korea successfully achieved the nuclear power technological self-reliance and developed its standard nuclear power plant, so-called Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR 1000). Following the development of OPR 1000, Korea has continued to upgrade the design, known as the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) and APR+. Korea is one of the countries which continuously developed the nuclear power plant projects during the last 30 years while the other advanced countries ceased the project, and therefore, significant reduction of project cost and construction schedule were possible which benefits from the repetition of construction project. And now, its nuclear industry infrastructure possesses the strong competitiveness in this field.The electricity produced from the nuclear power is 150,958 MWh in 2008, which covers approximately 36% of the total electricity demand in Korea, while the installed capacity of nuclear power is 17,716 MW which is 24% of the total installed capacity. We are currently operating 20 units of nuclear power plants in Korea, and also are constructing 8 additional units (9,600 MW). Korea's nuclear power plants have displayed their excellent operating performance; the average plant capacity factor was 93.4% in 2008, which are about 15% higher than the world average of 77.8%. Moreover, the number of unplanned trips per unit was only 0.35 in 2008, which is the world top class performance. Also currently we are operating four CANDU nuclear units in Korea which are the same reactor type and capacity as the Cernavoda Units. They have been showing the excellent operating performance, of which capacity in 2008 is 92.8%. All the Korean

  6. The future of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeile, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    Present conditions and future prospects for the nuclear power industry in the United States are discussed. The presentation includes a review of trends in electrical production, the safety of coal as compared to nuclear generating plants, the dangers of radiation, the economics of nuclear power, the high cost of nuclear power in the United States, and the public fear of nuclear power. 20 refs

  7. Nuclear power industry, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The intent of this publication is to provide a single volume of resource material that offers a timely, comprehensive view of the nuclear option. Chapter 1 discusses the development of commercial nuclear power from a historical perspective, reviewing the factors and events that have and will influence its progress. Chapters 2 through 5 discuss in detail the nuclear powerplant and its supporting fuel cycle, including various aspects of each element from fuel supply to waste management. Additional dimension is brought to the discussion by Chapters 6 and 7, which cover the Federal regulation of nuclear power and the nuclear export industry. This vast body of thoroughly documented information offers the reader a useful tool in evaluating the record and potential of nuclear energy in the United States

  8. Safety and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, John; Gunning, Angela.

    1988-01-01

    Representatives of the supporters and opponents of civil nuclear power put forward the arguments they feel the public should consider when making up their mind about the nuclear industry. The main argument in favour of nuclear power is about the low risk in comparison with other risks and the amount of radiation received on average by the population in the United Kingdom from different sources. The aim is to show that the nuclear industry is fully committed to the cause of safety and this has resulted in a healthy workforce and a safe environment for the public. The arguments against are that the nuclear industry is deceitful, secretive and politically motivated and thus its arguments about safety, risks, etc, cannot be trusted. The question of safety is considered further - in particular the perceptions, definitions and responsibility. The economic case for nuclear electricity is not accepted. (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear power training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The training of technical manpower for nuclear power projects in developing countries is now a significant part of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme. Two basic courses are the cornerstones of the Agency's training programme for nuclear power: a course in planning and implementation, and a course in construction and operation management. These two courses are independent of each other. They are designed to train personnel for two distinct phases of project implementation. The nuclear power project training programme has proven to be successful. A considerable number of highly qualified professionals from developing countries have been given the opportunity to learn through direct contact with experts who have had first-hand experience. It is recognized that the courses are not a substitute for on-the-job training, but their purpose is achieved if they have resulted in the transfer of practical, reliable information and have helped developing countries to prepare themselves for the planning, construction and operation management of nuclear power stations

  10. Nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Moreira, Y.M. de.

    1979-01-01

    The legal aspects of nuclear power plant construction in Brazil, derived from governamental political guidelines, are presented. Their evolution, as a consequence of tecnology development is related. (A.L.S.L.) [pt

  11. Nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkiewicz, M.; Navratil, J.

    The construction of a nuclear power plant is conditioned on territorial requirements and is accompanied by the disturbance of the environment, land occupation, population migration, the emission of radioactive wastes, thermal pollution, etc. On the other hand, a nuclear power plant makes possible the introduction of district heating and increases the economic and civilization activity of the population. Due to the construction of a nuclear power plant the set limits of negative impacts must not be exceeded. The locality should be selected such as to reduce the unfavourable effects of the plant and to fully use its benefits. The decision on the siting of the nuclear power plant is preceded by the processing of a number of surveys and a wide range of documentation to which the given criteria are strictly applied. (B.H.)

  12. Nuclear power in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, Z.H.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2005-01-01

    Pakistan started its nuclear power program by installing a 137 M We Canadian Deuterium Reactor (Candu) at Karachi in 1971 which became operational in 1972. The post-contract technical support for the Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (KANUPP) was withdrawn by Canada in 196 as a consequence of Indian nuclear device test in 1974. In spite of various difficulties PAEC resolved to continue to operate KANUPP and started a process for the indigenous fabrication of spare parts and nuclear fuel. The first fuel bundle fabricated in Pakistan was loaded in the core in 1980. Since then KANUPP has been operating on the indigenously fabricated fuel. The plant computer systems and the most critical instrumentation and Control system were also replaced with up-to date technology. In 2002 KANUPP completed its original design life of 30 year. A program for the life extension of the plant had already been started. The second nuclear power plant of 300 M We pressurized water reactor purchased from China was installed in Chashma in 1997, which started commercial operations in 2001. Another unit of 300 M We will be installed at Chashma in near future. These nuclear power plants have been operating under IAEA safeguards agreements. PAEC through the long-term performance of the two power plants has demonstrated its competence to safely and successfully operate and maintain nuclear power plants. Pakistan foresees an increasingly important and significant share of nuclear power in the energy sector. The Government has recently allocated a share of 8000 MWe for nuclear energy in the total energy scenario of Pakistan by the year 2025. (author)

  13. The Korean nuclear power program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Tong

    1996-01-01

    Although the world nuclear power industry may appear to be in decline, continued nuclear power demand in Korea indicates future opportunities for growth and prosperity in this country. Korea has one of the world's most vigorous nuclear power programs. Korea has been an active promoter of nuclear power generation since 1978, when the country introduced nuclear power as a source of electricity. Korea now takes pride in the outstanding performance of its nuclear power plants, and has established a grand nuclear power scheme. This paper is aimed at introducing the nuclear power program of Korea, including technological development, international cooperation, and CANDU status in Korea. (author). 2 tabs

  14. Electricite de France nuclear power plant information activities in the education system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollier, Pierre M [Electricite de France, Engineering and Construction Division, Sites-Environnment-Information Branch, Information and Communication Section, 22-30, avenue de Wagram, 75008, Paris (France)

    1989-07-01

    Since the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, public opinion in France has changed considerably. Four national surveys carried out over the last two-and-a-half years have shown significant decreases in public approval of nuclear energy (43 percent in October 1988). However, there is no current structured opposition to nuclear power plants. The French public takes nuclear power for granted, but prefers solar energy. It is aware that nuclear power will play an important role in energy supply and that EDF did not build more plants than necessary. It has confidence in the French technique (75 percent), in EDF ability to operate nuclear power plants without serious incidents (55 percent), and in the ability of EDF engineers to deal with a serious accident (50 percent) even though they believe a serious accident could occur (75 percent). However, the situation created by the Chernobyl accident resulted in changes to the EDF information policy. EDF undertook extensive information programs on nuclear power and energy matters during the first years of the program 1975 to 1983), and followed them by a period of less extensive information focussed on electricity. Relations around the nuclear power plant sites between EDF and the public, elected representatives and the media, which had always been close, were reinforced. Information packages were prepared and distributed. Contacts with Textbook Publishers have enabled fruitful exchanges of information, especially during visits to nuclear facilities (power plants, fuel enrichment plants, operating simulators). Remarkable results have been seen in the textbooks concerned. Films, usually videocassettes, are loaned out free of charge. Lectures are a channel of information frequently used by schools since they are free, fit well into the program of some grades, and do not take up too much of the students' time. Visits are considered to be an Excellent Source of Information. Many local initiatives have been taken by plants and schools

  15. Electricite de France nuclear power plant information activities in the education system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollier, Pierre M.

    1989-01-01

    Since the Chernobyl accident in April 1986, public opinion in France has changed considerably. Four national surveys carried out over the last two-and-a-half years have shown significant decreases in public approval of nuclear energy (43 percent in October 1988). However, there is no current structured opposition to nuclear power plants. The French public takes nuclear power for granted, but prefers solar energy. It is aware that nuclear power will play an important role in energy supply and that EDF did not build more plants than necessary. It has confidence in the French technique (75 percent), in EDF ability to operate nuclear power plants without serious incidents (55 percent), and in the ability of EDF engineers to deal with a serious accident (50 percent) even though they believe a serious accident could occur (75 percent). However, the situation created by the Chernobyl accident resulted in changes to the EDF information policy. EDF undertook extensive information programs on nuclear power and energy matters during the first years of the program 1975 to 1983), and followed them by a period of less extensive information focussed on electricity. Relations around the nuclear power plant sites between EDF and the public, elected representatives and the media, which had always been close, were reinforced. Information packages were prepared and distributed. Contacts with Textbook Publishers have enabled fruitful exchanges of information, especially during visits to nuclear facilities (power plants, fuel enrichment plants, operating simulators). Remarkable results have been seen in the textbooks concerned. Films, usually videocassettes, are loaned out free of charge. Lectures are a channel of information frequently used by schools since they are free, fit well into the program of some grades, and do not take up too much of the students' time. Visits are considered to be an Excellent Source of Information. Many local initiatives have been taken by plants and schools

  16. Commercial nuclear power 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. 39 tabs

  17. [Nuclear News -- Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The topics discussed in this section are: (1) NU(Northeast Utilities) receives largest court fine levied for false records. (2) ComEd nuclear fleet has best-ever performance. (3) Perry and Beaver Valley now run by First Energy Nuclear. (4) Slight reactor power increases may save dollars; (5) Nuclear plants shares to change hands. (6) Y2K nonsafety-related work scheduled for completion. (7) New NRC plan for reviewing plant license transfers with foreign ownership.

  18. Nuclear power and acceptation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speelman, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    In 1989 a workshop was held organized by the IAEA and the Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose was to investigate under which circumstances a large-scale extension of nuclear power can be accepted. Besides the important technical information, the care for the environment determined the atmosphere during the workshop. The opinion dominated that nuclear power can contribute in tackling the environment problems, but that the social and political climate this almost makes impossible. (author). 7 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  19. Discounting and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the practice of discounting and its applicability to nuclear power, and the choice of discount rates. Opportunity cost of capital; risk; social time preference; intergenerational equity; non-monetary aspects; and discounting and nuclear energy; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  20. Nuclear power and leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimston, M.

    1991-03-01

    This booklet describes the nature of leukaemia, disease incidence in the UK and the possible causes. Epidemiological studies observing rates of leukaemia near nuclear power stations in the UK and other parts of the world are discussed. Possible causes of leukaemia excesses near nuclear establishments include radioactive discharges into the environment, paternal radiation exposure and viral causes. (UK)

  1. No to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Kim Beazley has again stated a Labor Government would not pursue nuclear power because the economics 'simply don't stack up'. 'We have significant gas, coal and renewable energy reserves and do not have a solution for the disposal of low-level nuclear waste, let alone waste from nuclear power stations.' The Opposition Leader said developing nuclear power now would have ramifications for Australia's security. 'Such a move could result in our regional neighbours fearing we will use it militarily.' Instead, Labor would focus on the practical measures that 'deliver economic and environmental stability while protecting our national security'. Mr Beazley's comments on nuclear power came in the same week as Prime Minister John Howard declined the request of Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh for uranium exports, although seemingly not ruling out a policy change at some stage. The Prime Ministers held talks in New Delhi over whether Australia would sell uranium to India without it signing the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. An agreement reached during a visit by US President George W. Bush gives India access to long-denied nuclear technology and guaranteed fuel in exchange for allowing international inspection of some civilian nuclear facilities. Copyright (2006) Crown Content Pty Ltd

  2. Nuclear Power Plant Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, George A.

    1975-01-01

    The author recognizes a body of basic knowledge in nuclear power plant technoogy that can be taught in school programs, and lists the various courses, aiming to fill the anticipated need for nuclear-trained manpower--persons holding an associate degree in engineering technology. (Author/BP)

  3. Nuclear power for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croall, S.; Sempler, K.

    1978-01-01

    A 'comic strip' account of nuclear power, covering weapons and weapons proliferation, reactor accidents involving human errors, radiation hazards, radioactive waste management and the fuel cycle, fast breeder reactors and plutonium, security, public relations and sociological aspects, energy consumption patterns, energy conservation and alternative energy sources, environmental aspects and anti-nuclear activities. (U.K.)

  4. Progress by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creamer, A.

    1980-01-01

    United States scientist Petr Beckmann predicts that there will eventually be nuclear power stations in the Transvaal in South Africa. This will take place for two reasons: to decrease pollution problems and to ensure economic advancement. He also refers to the the toxicity of nuclear wastes and coal wastes

  5. World status - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.

    1984-01-01

    The problems of nuclear power are not so much anti-nuclear public opinion, but more the decrease of electricity consumption growth rate and the high cost of building reactors. Because of these factors, forecasts of world nuclear capacity have had to be reduced considerably over the last three years. The performance of reactors is considered. The CANDU reactor remains the world's best performer and overall tends to out-perform larger reactors. The nuclear plant due to come on line in 1984 are listed by country; this shows that nuclear capacity will increase substantially over a short period. At a time of stagnant demand this will make nuclear energy an important factor in the world energy balance. Nuclear power stations in operation and under construction in 1983 are listed and major developments in commercial nuclear power in 1983 are taken country by country. In most, the report is the same; national reactor ordering cut back because the expected increase in energy demand has not happened. Also the cost-benefit of nuclear over other forms of energy is no longer as favourable. The export opportunities have also declined as many of the less developed countries are unable to afford reactors. (U.K.)

  6. Nuclear power costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    A report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat and presented to the seventh session of the Agency's General Conference says that information on nuclear power costs is now rapidly moving from the domain of uncertain estimates to that of tested factual data. As more and more nuclear power stations are being built and put into operation, more information on the actual costs incurred is becoming available. This is the fourth report on nuclear power costs to be submitted to the IAEA General Conference. The report last year gave cost information on 38 nuclear power projects, 17 of which have already gone into operation. Certain significant changes in the data given last year are included-in the present report; besides, information is given on seven new plants. The report is divided into two parts, the first on recent developments and current trends in nuclear power costs and the second on the use of the cost data for economic comparisons. Both stress the fact that the margin of uncertainty in the basic data has lately been drastically reduced. At the same time, it is pointed out, some degree of uncertainty is inherent in the assumptions made in arriving at over-all generating cost figures, especially when - as is usually the case - a nuclear plant is part of an integrated power system

  7. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.

    2007-01-01

    The development of space nuclear power and propulsion in the United States started in 1955 with the initiation of the ROVER project. The first step in the ROVER program was the KIWI project that included the development and testing of 8 non-flyable ultrahigh temperature nuclear test reactors during 1955-1964. The KIWI project was precursor to the PHOEBUS carbon-based fuel reactor project that resulted in ground testing of three high power reactors during 1965-1968 with the last reactor operated at 4,100 MW. During the same time period a parallel program was pursued to develop a nuclear thermal rocket based on cermet fuel technology. The third component of the ROVER program was the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) that was initiated in 1961 with the primary goal of designing the first generation of nuclear rocket engine based on the KIWI project experience. The fourth component of the ROVER program was the Reactor In-Flight Test (RIFT) project that was intended to design, fabricate, and flight test a NERVA powered upper stage engine for the Saturn-class lunch vehicle. During the ROVER program era, the Unites States ventured in a comprehensive space nuclear program that included design and testing of several compact reactors and space suitable power conversion systems, and the development of a few light weight heat rejection systems. Contrary to its sister ROVER program, the space nuclear power program resulted in the first ever deployment and in-space operation of the nuclear powered SNAP-10A in 1965. The USSR space nuclear program started in early 70's and resulted in deployment of two 6 kWe TOPAZ reactors into space and ground testing of the prototype of a relatively small nuclear rocket engine in 1984. The US ambition for the development and deployment of space nuclear powered systems was resurrected in mid 1980's and intermittently continued to date with the initiation of several research programs that included the SP-100, Space Exploration

  8. Nuclear power for beginners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croall, S.; Sempler, K.

    1979-01-01

    Witty, critically, and with expert knowledge, 'Atomic power for beginners' describes the development of nuclear power for military purposes and its 'peaceful uses' against the will of the population. Atomic power, the civil baby of the bomb is not only a danger to our lives - it is enemy to all life as all hard technologies are on which economic systems preoccupied with growth put their hopes. Therefore, 'Atomic power for beginners' does not stop at nuclear engineering but proceeds to investigate its consequences, nationally and with a view to the Third World. And since the consequences are so fatal and it is not enough to say no to nuclear power, it gives some thoughts to a better future - with soft technology and alternative production. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  9. At the heart of EDF's education plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, C.

    2010-01-01

    Facing a high and growing number of retirements and the present revival of nuclear energy, Electricite de France (EDF), the French state-owned electric utility, is struggling to find the competencies it needs, especially in domains such as reactor operators, mechanic technicians and engineers in the fields of fittings, boiler fabrication, maintenance, automation, etc. EDF is thus engaged in an important education and training program. The author reports from Bugey (France), where is located one of the main EDF production-engineering training center, and describes the variety of learning activities available in the center. An important effort is devoted to the training of foreign operators in order for EDF to better compete on the nuclear energy international market

  10. Nuclear power for tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.; Konstantinov, L.V.; Dastidar, P.

    1989-09-01

    The evolution of nuclear power has established this energy source as a viable mature technology, producing at comparative costs more than 16% of the electricity generated world-wide. After outlining the current status of nuclear power, extreme future scenarios are presented, corresponding respectively to maximum penetration limited by technical-economic characteristics, and nuclear phase-out at medium term. The situation is complex and country specific. The relative perception of the importance of different factors and the compensation of advantages vs. disadvantages, or risk vs. benefits, has predominant influence. In order to proceed with an objective and realistic estimate of the future role of nuclear power worldwide, the fundamental factors indicated below pro nuclear power and against are assessed, including expected trends regarding their evolution: Nuclear safety risk; reduction to levels of high improbability but not zero risk. Reliable source of energy; improvements towards uniform standards of excellence. Economic competitiveness vs. alternatives; stabilization and possible reduction of costs. Financing needs and constraints; availability according to requirements. Environmental effects; comparative analysis with alternatives. Public and political acceptance; emphasis on reason and facts over emotions. Conservation of fossil energy resources; gradual deterioration but no dramatic crisis. Energy supply assurance; continuing concerns. Infrastructure requirements and availability; improvements in many countries due to overall development. Non-proliferation in military uses; separation of issues from nuclear power. IAEA forecasts to the year 2005 are based on current projects, national plans and policies and on prevailing trends. Nuclear electricity generation is expected to reach about 18% of total worldwide electricity generation, with 500 to 580 GW(e) installed capacity. On a longer term, to 2030, a stabilized role and place among available viable

  11. Country nuclear power profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA`s programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA`s programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ``profiles``, to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future. Refs, figs, tabs.

  12. Country nuclear power profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The preparation of Country Nuclear Power Profiles was initiated within the framework of the IAEA's programme for nuclear power plant performance assessment and feedback. It responded to a need for a database and a technical document containing a description of the energy and economic situation and the primary organizations involved in nuclear power in IAEA Member States. The task was included in the IAEA's programmes for 1993/1994 and 1995/1996. In March 1993, the IAEA organized a Technical Committee meeting to discuss the establishment of country data ''profiles'', to define the information to be included in the profiles and to review the information already available in the IAEA. Two expert meetings were convened in November 1994 to provide guidance to the IAEA on the establishment of the country nuclear profiles, on the structure and content of the profiles, and on the preparation of the publication and the electronic database. In June 1995, an Advisory Group meeting provided the IAEA with comprehensive guidance on the establishment and dissemination of an information package on industrial and organizational aspects of nuclear power to be included in the profiles. The group of experts recommended that the profiles focus on the overall economic, energy and electricity situation in the country and on its nuclear power industrial structure and organizational framework. In its first release, the compilation would cover all countries with operating power plants by the end of 1995. It was also recommended to further promote information exchange on the lessons learned from the countries engaged in nuclear programmes. For the preparation of this publication, the IAEA received contributions from the 29 countries operating nuclear power plants and Italy. A database has been implemented and the profiles are supporting programmatic needs within the IAEA; it is expected that the database will be publicly accessible in the future

  13. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bupp, I.C.; Derian, J.C.; Donsimoni, M.P.; Treitel, R.

    1975-01-01

    Present trends in nuclear reactor costs are interpreted as the economic result of a fundamental debate regarding the social acceptability of nuclear power. Rising capital costs for nuclear power plants are evaluated through statistical analysis of time-related factors, characteristics of licensing and construction costs, physical characteristics of reactors, and geographic and site-related factors. Conclusions are drawn regarding the impact of social acceptability on reactor costs, engineering estimates of future costs, and the possibility of increased potential relative competitiveness for coal-fueled plants. 7 references. (U.S.)

  14. The reality of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, D.

    1979-01-01

    The following matters are discussed in relation to the nuclear power programmes in USA and elsewhere: siting of nuclear power plants in relation to a major geological fault; public attitudes to nuclear power; plutonium, radioactive wastes and transfrontier contamination; radiation and other hazards; economics of nuclear power; uranium supply; fast breeder reactors; insurance of nuclear facilities; diversion of nuclear materials and weapons proliferation; possibility of manufacture of nuclear weapons by developing countries; possibility of accidents on nuclear power plants in developing countries; radiation hazards from use of uranium ore tailings; sociological alternative to use of nuclear power. (U.K.)

  15. NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

    1963-05-14

    A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

  16. Nuclear power prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, K.

    1994-01-01

    The technical, economic and political prospects of nuclear power are described with regard to ecological aspects. The consensus talks, which failed in spite of the fact that they were stripped of emotional elements and in spite of major concessions on the part of the power industry, are discussed with a view to the political and social conditions. (orig.) [de

  17. The nuclear power alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1989-04-01

    The Director General of the IAEA stressed the need for energy policies and other measures which would help to slow and eventually halt the present build-up of carbon dioxide, methane and other so-called greenhouse gases, which are held to cause global warming. He urged that nuclear power and various other sources of energy, none of which contribute to global warming, should not be seen as alternatives, but should all be used to counteract the greenhouse effect. He pointed out that the commercially used renewable energies, apart from hydropower, currently represent only 0.3% of the world's energy consumption and, by contrast, the 5% of the world's energy consumption coming from nuclear power is not insignificant. Dr. Blix noted that opposition for nuclear power stems from fear of accidents and concern about the nuclear wastes. But no generation of electricity, whether by coal, hydro, gas or nuclear power, is without some risk. He emphasized that safety can never be a static concept, and that many new measures are being taken by governments and by the IAEA to further strengthen the safety of nuclear power

  18. Future nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, D.S.; Nasreddine, M.

    2006-01-01

    The book includes an introduction then it speaks about the options to secure sources of energy, nuclear power option, nuclear plants to generate energy including light-water reactors (LWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGR), fast breeder reactors (FBR), development in the manufacture of reactors, fuel, uranium in the world, current status of nuclear power generation, economics of nuclear power, nuclear power and the environment and nuclear power in the Arab world. A conclusion at the end of the book suggests the increasing demand for energy in the industrialized countries and in a number of countries that enjoy special and economic growth such as China and India pushes the world to search for different energy sources to insure the urgent need for current and anticipated demand in the near and long-term future in light of pessimistic and optimistic outlook for energy in the future. This means that states do a scientific and objective analysis of the currently available data for the springboard to future plans to secure the energy required to support economy and welfare insurance.

  19. Physics and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, N E

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power owes its origin to physicists. Fission was demonstrated by physicists and chemists and the first nuclear reactor project was led by physicists. However as nuclear power was harnessed to produce electricity the role of the engineer became stronger. Modern nuclear power reactors bring together the skills of physicists, chemists, chemical engineers, electrical engineers, mechanical engineers and civil engineers. The paper illustrates this by considering the Sizewell B project and the role played by physicists in this. This covers not only the roles in design and analysis but in problem solving during the commissioning of first of a kind plant. Looking forward to the challenges to provide sustainable and environmentally acceptable energy sources for the future illustrates the need for a continuing synergy between physics and engineering. This will be discussed in the context of the challenges posed by Generation IV reactors

  20. Nuclear power in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringwood, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear power debate hinges upon three major issues: radioactive waste disposal, reactor safety and proliferation. An alternative strategy for waste disposal is advocated which involves disposing of the radwaste (immobilized in SYNROC, a titanate ceramic waste form) in deep (4 km) drill-holes widely dispersed throughout the entire country. It is demonstrated that this strategy possesses major technical (safety) advantages over centralized, mined repositories. The comparative risks associated with coal-fired power generation and with the nuclear fuel cycle have been evaluated by many scientists, who conclude that nuclear power is far less hazardous. Considerable improvements in reactor design and safety are readily attainable. The nuclear industry should be obliged to meet these higher standards. The most hopeful means of limiting proliferation lies in international agreements, possibly combined with international monitoring and control of key segments of the fuel cycle, such as reprocessing

  1. LDC nuclear power: Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selim, M.E.S.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reviews the evolution of Egypt's nuclear program, the major factors that influenced the successive series of nuclear decisions, and the public debate over the far-reaching program attempted by the late President Anwar El-Sadat. Egypt's program is important, not only because it was the first Arab country to enter the nuclear age, but because it is an ambitious program that includes the installation of eight reactors at a time when many countries are reducing their commitment to nuclear power. Major obstacles remain in terms of human, organizational, and natural resource constraints. 68 references, 1 table

  2. Nuclear power economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  3. Nuclear power economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  4. Nuclear power in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishida, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations

  5. Nuclear power in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishida, J [Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1990-07-01

    The Japanese movement against nuclear energy reached a climax in its upsurge in 1988 two years after the Chernobyl accident. At the outset of that year, this trend was triggered by the government acknowledgement that the Tokyo market was open to foods contaminated by the fallout from Chernobyl. Anti-nuclear activists played an agitating role and many housewives were persuaded to join them. Among many public opinion surveys conducted at that time by newspapers and broadcasting networks, I would like to give you some figures of results from the poll carried out by NHK: Sixty percent of respondents said that nuclear power 'should be promoted', either 'vigorously' 7 or 'carefully' 53%). Sixty-six percent doubted the 'safety of nuclear power', describing it as either 'very dangerous' 20%) or 'rather dangerous' (46%). Only 27% said it was 'safe'. In other words, those who acknowledged the need for nuclear power were almost equal in number with those who found it dangerous. What should these figures be taken to mean? I would take note of the fact that nearly two-thirds of valid responses were in favor of nuclear power even at the time when public opinion reacted most strongly to the impact of the Chernobyl accident. This apparently indicates that the majority of the Japanese people are of the opinion that they would 'promote nuclear power though it is dangerous' or that they would 'promote it, but with the understanding that it is dangerous'. But the anti-nuclear movement is continuing. It remains a headache for both the government and the electric utilities. But we can regard the anti-nuclear movement in Japan as not so serious as that faced by other industrial nations.

  6. New purchase conditions by EDF, of the electrical power produced by the energy valorization installations of domestic wastes and assimilated; Nouvelles conditions d'achat par EDF de l'electricite produite par les installations de valorisation energetique des dechets managers et assimiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    The State Secretary for the Industry, C. Pierret, approved the new purchase conditions by EDF, concerning the electric power, produced by the installations of domestic wastes energy valorization. This action is in agreement with the energy policy. The purchase conditions are presented and commented. (A.L.B.)

  7. Steps to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The recent increase in oil prices will undoubtedly cause the pace at which nuclear power is introduced in developing countries to quicken in the next decade, with many new countries beginning to plan nuclear power programmes. The guidebook is intended for senior government officials, policy makers, economic and power planners, educationalists and economists. It assumes that the reader has relatively little knowledge of nuclear power systems or of nuclear physics but does have a general technical or management background. Nuclear power is described functionally from the point of view of an alternative energy source in power system expansion. The guidebook is based on an idealized approach. Variations on it are naturally possible and will doubtless be necessary in view of the different organizational structures that already exist in different countries. In particular, some countries may prefer an approach with a stronger involvement of their Atomic Energy Commission or Authority, for which this guidebook has foreseen mainly a regulatory and licensing role. It is intended to update this booklet as more experience becomes available. Supplementary guidebooks will be prepared on certain major topics, such as contracting for fuel supply and fuel cycle requirements, which the present book does not go into very deeply

  8. Nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.R.; Kati, S.L.; Raman, R.; Nanjundeswaran, K.; Nadkarny, G.V.; Verma, R.S.; Mahadeva Rao, K.V.

    1983-01-01

    Indian experience pertaining to investment and generation costs of nuclear power stations is reviewed. The causes of investment cost increases are analysed and the increases are apportioned to escalation, design improvements and safety related adders. The paper brings out the fact that PHWR investment costs in India compare favourably with those experienced in developed countries in spite of the fact that the programme and the unit size are relatively much smaller in India. It brings out that in India at current prices a nuclear power station located over 800 km from coal reserves and operating at 75% capacity factor is competitive with thermal power at 60% capacity factor. (author)

  9. EDF Skills Management for Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poizat, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Training Standards: EDF Nuclear Generation Training Strategy & Fundamentals for Managing Competencies - Adaptation of INPO ACAD02-001: 1 – Management of Competencies; 2 – Training Management for Performance Improvement; 3 – Management of Training Processes & Resources; 4 – Initial Training; 5 – Continuing Training; 6 – Training Implementation & Trainee Evaluation; 7 – Training Effectiveness Evaluation; 8 – Engagement of NPP’s Personnel in Competencies

  10. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. EDF group - Reference Document 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The EDF Group is an integrated energy supplier operating in a wide range of electricity-related businesses: generation, transmission, distribution, sale and trading of energy. It is the main operator in the French electricity market and holds strong positions in the other three principal European markets (Germany, the United Kingdom, Italy) making it one of the leading electricity groups in Europe, and a recognized actor in the gas market. With an installed capacity of 123.7 GW in Europe (128.2 GW worldwide) it holds, among the major European energy specialists, the largest production fleet and the one emitting the least CO 2 , owing to the share of nuclear technology and hydropower in its generation mix. The EDF group supplies electricity, gas and associated services to more than 37.8 million customers throughout the world and in Europe (more than 28 million of whom are in France). The EDF Group has built a business model balanced between France and the international markets, and between deregulated and regulated operations. In 2006, the Group recorded consolidated sales of euros 58,932 million, net income (Group share) of euros 5,605 million, and it achieved earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization of euros 13,930 million. From July 1, 2007, the EDF group will carry out its trading activities in a European energy market fully open to competition. This document is EDF Group's Reference Document for the year 2006. It contains information about: the Group activities, risk factors, Business overview, Organizational structure, Property, plants and equipment, Operating and financial review, Capital resources and cash flows, Research and Development, Patents and Licenses, Trend information, Financial forecasts or estimates, Administrative, management and supervisory bodies and senior management, Remuneration and benefits, Board practices, Employees/Human resources, Major shareholders, Related party transactions, Financial information

  12. On-site tests on the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morilhat, P.; Favennec, J.M.; Neau, P.; Preudhomme, E.

    1996-01-01

    On-site tests and experiments are performed by EDF Research and Development Division on the nuclear power plants to assess the behaviour of major components submitted to thermal and vibratory solicitations. On-going studies deal with the qualification of new nuclear power plant standard and with the feedback of plants under operation. The tests, particularly the investigation tests, correspond to large investments and entail an important data volume which must ensure the continuity over a long period of the order of magnitude of the in-service plant life (around 40 years). This paper addresses the on-site experimental activities, describes the means to be used, and gives an example: the qualification of SG of new 1450 MW nuclear power plants. (author)

  13. Nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This press dossier presented in Shanghai (China) in April 1999, describes first the activities of the Framatome group in the people's republic of China with a short presentation of the Daya Bay power plant and of the future Ling Ao project, and with a description of the technological cooperation with China in the nuclear domain (technology transfers, nuclear fuels) and in other industrial domains (mechanics, oil and gas, connectors, food and agriculture, paper industry etc..). The general activities of the Framatome group in the domain of energy (nuclear realizations in France, EPR project, export activities, nuclear services, nuclear fuels, nuclear equipments, industrial equipments) and of connectors engineering are presented in a second and third part with the 1998 performances. (J.S.)

  14. Abuse of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, J [UKAEA

    1976-09-01

    This paper reproduces an address by Sir John Hill, Chairman of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, at a conference in London organised by the Financial Times in July 1976. Actions that, in the author's view, could be regarded as constituting abuse of nuclear power are first summarised, and the various aspects of the use and abuse of nuclear power are discussed. The author considers that achieving the maximum degree of acceptance of the Non-Proliferation Treaty is the most important political objective in nuclear power, but considers that nuclear terrorism would be abortive and that, so far as the UK is concerned, the present precautions are adequate and will remain so. It is considered that much abuse of nuclear power arises from the prevalence of its critics, particularly with reference to Pu hazards, the health of nuclear employees, and possible damage to the health of the public. The Pu problem is considered to be far more emotive than rational. The possibility of lung cancer and leukaemia is discussed. It is concluded that atomic energy is one of the best of industries in which to work, both from the health and interest points of view.

  15. Nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otway, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    Action at the international level will assume greater importance as the number of nuclear power plants increases, especially in the more densely populated parts of the world. Predictions of growth made prior to October 1973 [9] indicated that, by 1980, 14% of the electricity would be supplied by nuclear plants and by the year 2000 this figure would be about 50%. This will make the topic of international co-operation and standards of even greater importance. The IAEA has long been active in providing assistance to Member States in the siting design and operation of nuclear reactors. These activities have been pursued through advisory missions, the publication of codes of practice, guide books, technical reports and in arranging meetings to promote information exchange. During the early development of nuclear power, there was no well-established body of experience which would allow formulation of internationally acceptable safety criteria, except in a few special cases. Hence, nuclear power plant safety and reliability matters often received an ad hoc approach which necessarily entailed a lack of consistency in the criteria used and in the levels of safety required. It is clear that the continuation of an ad hoc approach to safety will prove inadequate in the context of a world-wide nuclear power industry, and the international trade which this implies. As in several other fields, the establishment of internationally acceptable safety standards and appropriate guides for use by regulatory bodies, utilities, designers and constructors, is becoming a necessity. The IAEA is presently planning the development of a comprehensive set of basic requirements for nuclear power plant safety, and the associated reliability requirements, which would be internationally acceptable, and could serve as a standard frame of reference for nuclear plant safety and reliability analyses

  16. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckurts, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    On the occasion of the retirement of the Editor-in-chief of 'atomwirtschaft', the author gave a keynote speech on the development of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany at the headquarters of the Handelsblatt Verlag in Duesseldorf on October 30, 1984. He subdivided the period under discussion into five phases, the first of which comprises the 'founding years' of 1955 to 1960. This was the time when activities in nuclear research and nuclear technology in Germany, which were permitted again in mid-1955, began with the establishment of the national research centers, the first Atomic Power Program, the promulgation of the Atomic Energy Act, the foundation of government organizations, including the Federal Ministry for Atomic Energy, etc. In the second phase, between 1960 and 1970, a solid foundation was laid for the industrial peaceful uses of nuclear power in the construction of the first LWR experimental nuclear power stations, the first successful export contracts, the beginnings of the first nuclear fuel cycle plants, such as the WAK reprocessing plant, the Asse experimental repository, the Almelo agreement on centrifuge enrichment. The third phase, between 1970 and 1975, was a period of euphoria, full of programs and forecasts of a tremendous boom in nuclear generating capacities, which were further enhanced by the 1973 oil squeeze. In 1973 and 1974, construction permits for ten nuclear power plants were applied for. The fourth phase, between 1975 and 1980, became a period of crisis. The fifth phase, the eighties, give rise to hope for a return to reason. (orig./UA) [de

  17. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports that since the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident in 1986, over 70 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's 112 member states have adopted two conventions to enhance international cooperation by providing timely notification of an accident and emergency assistance. The Agency and other international organizations also developed programs to improve nuclear power plant safety and minimize dangers from radioactive contamination. Despite meaningful improvements, some of the measures have limitations, and serious nuclear safety problems remain in the design and operation of the older, Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. The Agency's ability to select reactors under its operational safety review program is limited. Also, information on the extent and seriousness of safety-related incidents at reactors in foreign countries is not publicly available. No agreements exist among nuclear power countries to make compliance with an nuclear safety standards or principles mandatory. Currently, adherence to international safety standards or principles is voluntary and nonbinding. Some states support the concept of mandatory compliance, but others, including the United States, believe that mandatory compliance infringes on national sovereignty and that the responsibility for nuclear reactor safety remains with each nation

  18. Nuclear power's burdened future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavin, C.

    1987-01-01

    Although governments of the world's leading nations are reiterating their faith in nuclear power, Chernobyl has brought into focus the public's overwhelming feeling that the current generation of nuclear technology is simple not working. Despite the drastic slowdown, however, the global nuclear enterprise is large. As of mid-1986, the world had 366 nuclear power plants in operation, with a generating capacity of 255,670 MW. These facilities generate about 15% of the world's electricity, ranging from 65% in France to 31% in West Germany, 23% in Japan, 16% in the United States, 10% in the Soviet Union, and non in most developing nations. Nuclear development is clearly dominated by the most economically powerful and technologically advanced nations. The United States, France, the Soviet Union, Japan, and West Germany has 72% of the world's generating capacity and set the international nuclear pace. The reasons for scaling back nuclear programs are almost as diverse as the countries themselves. High costs, slowing electricity demand growth, technical problems, mismanagement, and political opposition have all had an effect. Yet these various factors actually form a complex web of inter-related problems. For example, rising costs usually represent some combination of technical problems and mismanagement, and political opposition often occurs because of safety concerns or rising costs. 13 references

  19. Nuclear power: Europa report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Last year, 2003, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union (EU-15) nuclear power plants have been operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries (incl. Turkey) nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 208 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 031 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 180 263 MWe were in operation at the end of 2003. No unit reached first criticality in 2003 or was connected to the grid. The unit Calder Hall 1 to Calder Hall 4 have been permanently shut down in Great Britain due to economical reasons and an earlier decision. In Germany the NPP Stade was closed. The utility E.ON has decided to shut down the plant due to the efforts of the liberalisation of the electricity markets. Last year, 8 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (3), Slovakia (2 - suspended), and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. The Finnish parliament approved plans for the construction of the country's fifth nuclear power reactor by a majority of 107 votes to 92. The consortium led by Framatome ANP was awarded the contract to build the new nuclear power plant (EPR, 1 600 MW) in Olkiluoto. In eight countries of the European Union 136 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 127 708 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 121 709 MWe. Net electricity production in 2003 in the EU amounts to approx. 905 TWh gross, which means a share of about 33 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 80% in Lithuania, 78% in France, 57% in the Slovak Republic, 57% in Belgium, and 46% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear power. Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    Last year, 2001, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In 8 of the 15 member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. In 7 of the 13 EU Candidate Countries nuclear energy was used for power production. A total of 216 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 171 802 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 181 212 MWe were in operation. One unit, i.e. Volgodonsk-1 in Russia went critical for the first time and started test operation after having been connected to the grid. Volgodonsk-1 adds about 1 000 MWe (gross) nd 953 MWe (net) to the electricity production capacity. The operator of the Muehlheim-Kaerlich NPP field an application to decommission and dismantle the plant; this plant was only 13 months in operation and has been shut down since 1988 for legal reasons. Last year, 10 plants were under construction in Romania (1), Russia (4), Slovakia (2), the Czech Republic (1) and the Ukraine (2), that is only in East European Countries. In eight countries of the European Union 143 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 128 758 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 122 601 MWe. Net electricity production in 2001 in the EU amounts to approx. 880.3 TWh gross, which means a share of 33,1 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. The reach 75.6% in France, 74.2% in Lithuania, 58.2% in Belgium, 53.2% in the Slovak Republic, and 47.4% in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal, and Austria. On May 24th, 2002 the Finnish Parliament voted for the decision in principle to build a fifth nuclear power plant in the country. This launches the next stage in the nuclear power plant project. The electric output of the plant unit will be 1000-1600 MW

  1. France without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B.; Charmant, A.; Devezeaux, J.G.; Ladoux, N.; Vielle, M.

    1995-01-01

    As environmental issues (particularly questions associated with the greenhouse effect) become a matter of increasing current concern, the French nuclear power programme can, in retrospect, be seen to have had a highly positive impact upon emissions of atmospheric pollutants. The most spectacular effect of this programme was the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from 530 million tonnes per annum in 1973 to 387 million tonnes per annum today. Obviously, this result cannot be considered in isolation from the economic consequences of the nuclear power programme, which have been highly significant.The most obvious consequence of nuclear power has been the production of cheap electricity, while a further consequence has been the stability of electricity prices resulting from the increasing self-sufficiency of France in energy supplies (from 22% in 1973 to 49.% in 1992). Moreover, French nuclear industry exports. In 1993, 61.7 TW·h from nuclear production were exported, which contributed F.Fr. 14.2 billion to the credit side of the balance of payment. For the same year, Framatome exports are assessed at about F.Fr. 2 billion, corresponding to manufacturing and erection of heavy components, and maintenance services. Cogema, the French nuclear fuel operator, sold nuclear materials and services for F.Fr. 9.3 billion. Thus, nuclear activities contributed more than F.Fr. 25 billion to the balance of payment. Therefore, a numerical assessment of the macroeconomic impact of the nuclear power programme is essential for any accurate evaluation of the environmental consequences of that programme. For this assessment, which is presented in the paper, the Micro-Melodie macroeconomic and energy supply model developed by the Commissariat a l'energie atomique has been used. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  2. Nuclear Power after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigot, B.

    2011-01-01

    On 11 March 2011 Japan suffered an earthquake of very high magnitude, followed by a tsunami that left thousands dead in the Sendai region, the main consequence of which was a major nuclear disaster at the Fukushima power station. The accident ranked at the highest level of severity on the international scale of nuclear events, making it the biggest since Chernobyl in 1986. It is still impossible to gauge the precise scope of the consequences of the disaster, but it has clearly given rise to the most intense renewed debates on the nuclear issue. Futuribles echoes this in the 'Forum' feature of this summer issue which is entirely devoted to energy questions. Bernard Bigot, chief executive officer of the technological research organization CEA, looks back on the Fukushima disaster and what it changes (or does not change) so far as the use of nuclear power is concerned, particularly in France. After recalling the lessons of earlier nuclear disasters, which led to the development of the third generation of power stations, he reminds us of the currently uncontested need to free ourselves from dependence on fossil fuels, which admittedly involves increased use of renewables, but can scarcely be envisaged without nuclear power. Lastly, where the Fukushima disaster is concerned, Bernard Bigot shows how it was, in his view, predominantly the product of a management error, from which lessons must be drawn to improve the safety conditions of existing or projected power stations and enable the staff responsible to deliver the right response as quickly as possible when an accident occurs. In this context and given France's high level of dependence on nuclear power, the level of use of this energy source ought not to be reduced on account of the events of March 2011. (author)

  3. France without nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charmant, A.; Devezeaux, J.G.; Ladoux, N.; Vielle, M.

    1991-01-01

    As coal production declined and France found herself in a condition of energy dependency, the country decided to turn to nuclear power and a major construction program was undertaken in 1970. The consequences of this step are examined in this article, by imagining where France would be without its nuclear power. At the end of the sixties, fuel-oil incontestably offered the cheapest way of producing electricity; but the first petroleum crisis was to upset the order of economic performance, and coal then became the more attractive fuel. The first part of this article therefore presents coal as an alternative to nuclear power, describing the coal scenario first and then comparing the relative costs of nuclear and coal investment strategies and operating costs (the item that differs most is the price of the fuel). The second part of the article analyzes the consequences this would have on the electrical power market, from the supply and demand point of view, and in terms of prices. The third part of the article discusses the macro-economic consequences of such a step: the drop in the level of energy dependency, increased costs and the disappearance of electricity exports. The article ends with an analysis of the environmental consequences, which are of greater and greater concern today. The advantage here falls very much in favor of nuclear power, if we judge by the lesser emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and especially carbon dioxide. 22 refs.; 13 figs.; 10 tabs

  4. Reviewing nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Colin

    1990-01-01

    The UK government has proposed a review of the prospects for nuclear power as the Sizewell B pressurized water reactor project nears completion in 1994. However, a delay in the completion of Sizewell B or a change of government could put off the review for some years beyond the mid 1990s. Anticipating, though, that such a review will eventually take place, issues which it should consider are addressed. Three broad categories of possible benefit claimed for nuclear power are examined. These are that nuclear power contributes to the security of energy supply, that it provides protection against long run fossil fuel price increases and that it is a means of mitigating the greenhouse effect. Arguments are presented which cost doubt over the reality of these benefits. Even if these benefits could be demonstrated, they would have to be set against the financial, health and accident costs attendant on nuclear power. It is concluded that the case may be made that nuclear power imposes net costs on society that are not justified by the net benefits conferred. Some comments are made on how a government review, if and when it takes place, should be conducted. (UK)

  5. EDF group - Reference Document 2008. Leading the energy change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The EDF group is an integrated energy company with a presence in a wide range of electricity-related businesses: generation, transmission, distribution, supply and energy trading. It is France's leading electricity operator and has a strong position in the three other main European markets (Germany, the United Kingdom and Italy), making it one of Europe's leading electrical players as well as a recognized player in the gas industry. With worldwide installed power capacity totaling 127.1 GW (124.8 GW in Europe) and global energy generation of 609.9 TWh, it has the largest generating capacity of all the major European energy corporations with the lowest level of CO 2 emissions due to the significant proportion of nuclear and hydroelectric power in its generation mix. The EDF group supplies gas, electricity, and associated services to more than 38 million customer accounts worldwide (including approximately 28 million in France). The EDF group's businesses reflect its adoption of a model aimed at finding the best balance between French and international activities, and between competitive and regulated operations. In 2008, the Group's consolidated revenues were euros 64.3 billion, the net income (Group share) was euros 3.4 billion, and earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization was euros 14.2 billion. Since July 1, 2007, the EDF group conducts its business in a European market that is completely open to competition. Since January 1, 2008, ERDF, a wholly owned subsidiary of EDF, has assumed responsibility for all distribution in France, while RTE-EDF Transport is responsible for all transmission activities. This document is EDF Group's Reference Document for the year 2008. It contains information about: the Group activities, risk factors, Business overview, Organizational structure, Property plant and equipment, Operating and financial review, Capital resources and cash flows, Research and development, patents and licenses

  6. The politics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.

    1978-01-01

    The contents of the book are: introduction; (part 1, the economy of nuclear power) nuclear power and the growth of state corporatism, ownership and control - the power of the multi-nationals, economic and political goals - profit or control, trade union policy and nuclear power; (part 2, nuclear power and employment) nuclear power and workers' health and safety, employment and trade union rights, jobs, energy and industrial strategy, the alternative energy option; (part 3, political strategies) the anti-nuclear movement, trade unions and nuclear power; further reading; UK organisations. (U.K.)

  7. Operators' arrangement for handling nuclear accidents at power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertron, L.; Meclot, B.

    1986-01-01

    Given the preventive measures adopted by Electricite de France (EDF), the probability of a nuclear accident occurring in a power plant is extremely low but cannot, even so, be considered to be zero. The operator must therefore be prepared for this possibility. Apart from dealing with the consequences of the accident, the organization he sets up must fulfil the double objective of preventing any worsening of the accident and ensuring that the social, political and economic effects remain in proportion to the seriousness of the accident. The paper describes the organization set up by EDF in co-operation with the public authorities, indicating the concepts on which it is based and the logistical resources brought into play, in particular for telecommunications. Reports on the TMI incident showed that public telecommunications services can well be saturated in the event of an emergency. EDF, relying on the combined advantages of all transmission systems which the French Postal and Telecommunications Office can place at its disposal, as well as private networks with a concession from the Government, has taken the necessary precautions to deal with this problem. The organization is also designed to respond to the requirements of the media and the population at large for correct information. These systems are naturally all tested during training exercises which ensure that the organization as a whole can cope, in terms both of manpower and equipment, with a very improbable event. (author)

  8. Nuclear power and other energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doederlein, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A comparison is made between nuclear power plants, gas-fuelled thermal power plants and oil-fired thermal power plants with respect to health factors, economy, environment and resource exploitation, with special reference to the choice of power source to supplement Norwegian hydroelectric power. Resource considerations point clearly to nuclear power, but, while nuclear power has an overall economic advantage, the present economic situation makes its heavy capital investment a disadvantage. It is maintained that nuclear power represents a smaller environmental threat than oil or gas power. Finally, statistics are given showing that nuclear power involves smaller fatality risks for the population than many other hazards accepted without question. (JIW)

  9. Nuclear power production costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erramuspe, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The economic competitiveness of nuclear power in different highly developed countries is shown, by reviewing various international studies made on the subject. Generation costs (historical values) of Atucha I and Embalse Nuclear Power Plants, which are of the type used in those countries, are also included. The results of an international study on the economic aspects of the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle are also reviewed. This study shows its relatively low incidence in the generation costs. The conclusion is that if in Argentina the same principles of economic racionality were followed, nuclear energy would be economically competitive in the future, as it is today. This is of great importance in view of its almost unavoidable character of alternative source of energy, and specially since we have to expect an important growth in the consumption of electricity, due to its low share in the total consumption of energy, and the low energy consumption per capita in Argentina. (Author) [es

  10. Environment and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Aimed at the general public this leaflet, one of a series prepared by AEA Technology, on behalf of the British Nuclear Industry Forum, seeks to put the case for generating electricity to meet United Kingdom and world demand using nuclear power. It examines the environmental problems linked to the use of fossil-fuels in power stations and other uses, such as the Greenhouse Effect. Problems associated with excess carbon dioxide emissions are also discussed, such as acid rain, the effects of deforestation and lead in petrol. The role of renewable energy sources is mentioned briefly. The leaflet also seeks to reassure on issues such as nuclear waste managements and the likelihood and effects of nuclear accidents. (UK)

  11. Thai Nuclear Power Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namwong, Ratanachai

    2011-01-01

    The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT), the main power producer in Thailand, was first interested in nuclear power as an electricity option in 1967 when the electricity demand increased considerably for the first time as a result of the economic and industrial growth. Its viability had been assessed several times during the early seventies in relation to the changing factors. Finally in the late 1970s, the proceeding with nuclear option was suspended for a variety of reasons, for instance, public opposition, economic repercussion and the uncovering of the indigenous petroleum resources. Nonetheless, EGAT continued to maintain a core of nuclear expertise. During 1980s, faced with dwindling indigenous fossil fuel resources and restrictions on the use of further hydro as an energy source, EGAT had essentially reconsidered introducing nuclear power plants to provide a significant fraction to the long term future electricity demand. The studies on feasibility, siting and environmental impacts were conducted. However, the project was never implemented due to economics crisis in 1999 and strong opposition by environmentalists and activists groups. The 1986 Chernobyl disaster was an important cause. After a long dormant period, the nuclear power is now reviewed as one part of the solution for future energy supply in the country. Thailand currently relies on natural gas for 70 percent of its electricity, with the rest coming from oil, coal and hydro-power. One-third of the natural gas consumed in Thailand is imported, mainly from neighbouring Myanmar. According to Power Development Plan (PDP) 2007 rev.2, the total installed electricity capacity will increase from 28,530.3 MW in 2007 to 44,281 MW by the end of plan in 2021. Significantly increasing energy demand, concerns over climate change and dependence on overseas supplies of fossil fuels, all turn out in a favor of nuclear power. Under the current PDP (as revised in 2009), two 1,000- megawatt nuclear

  12. Computer-assisted training experiment used in the field of thermal energy production (EDF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felgines, R.

    1982-01-01

    In 1981, the EDF carried out an experiment with computer-assisted training (EAO). This new approach, which continued until June 1982, involved about 700 employees all of whom operated nuclear power stations. The different stages of this experiment and the lessons which can be drawn from it are given the lessons were of a positive nature and make it possible to envisage complete coverage of all nuclear power stations by computer-assisted training within a very short space of time [fr

  13. Nuclear Power Plants (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyerly, Ray L.; Mitchell III, Walter [Southern Nuclear Engineering, Inc.

    1973-01-01

    Projected energy requirements for the future suggest that we must employ atomic energy to generate electric power or face depletion of our fossil-fuel resources—coal, oil, and gas. In short, both conservation and economic considerations will require us to use nuclear energy to generate the electricity that supports our civilization. Until we reach the time when nuclear power plants are as common as fossil-fueled or hydroelectric plants, many people will wonder how the nuclear plants work, how much they cost, where they are located, and what kinds of reactors they use. The purpose of this booklet is to answer these questions. In doing so, it will consider only central station plants, which are those that provide electric power for established utility systems.

  14. The market of nuclear plant dismantling. The new EDF's strategy, process standardisation, robotization: which perspectives for the market by 2030?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    Dismantling appears as the most promising activity in the nuclear sector due to ageing plants, to ambitious objectives of reduction of the nuclear share in the energy mix, or to high expertise of French companies in robotic and digital solutions for deconstruction in radioactive environments. However, the development of the dismantling market depends on EDF decisions: the extension of nuclear reactor lifetime postpones the development of this market. In this context, this study aims at giving an anticipated view of the plant dismantling market by 2030, at deciphering growth levers for the sector actors, and at understanding the sector operation and the business model of operators. Thus, the report presents the main components of the market (key figures, dismantling types, dismantling steps, sector ecosystem, barriers to enter the market, costs, contractual relationships), proposes an analysis of the market and of its perspectives (situation in France, and at the world level, predictive scenario for 2030), and discusses the development axes and demand evolutions (robotization and digitalisation, elaboration of standardised processes, management of wastes produced by nuclear dismantling, internationalisation of French actors). It also proposes an overview of actors in France, and identity sheets for commissioners (EDF, New Areva), contractors (Onet, Vinci, Engie), and other actors (Veolia, Assystem, Ortec, Cybernetix, Oreka Group). The last part proposes synthetic sheets for more than 110 companies of the sector (general information, management and financial performance data under the form of tables and figures) and comparative tables according to 5 key indicators. Data are presented for a period ranging from 2010 to 2016

  15. Pulsed nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear power plant. This power plant consists of: 1.) a cavity; 2.) a detonatable nuclear device in a central region of the cavity; 3.) a working fluid inside of the cavity; 4.) a method to denote a nuclear device inside of the cavity; 5.) a mechanical projection from an interior wall of the cavity for recoiling to absorb a shock wave produced by the detonation of the nuclear device and thereby protecting the cavity from damage. A plurality of segments defines a shell within the cavity and a plurality of shock absorbers, each connecting a corresponding segment to a corresponding location on the wall of the cavity. Each of these shock absorbers regulate the recoil action of the segments; and 6.) means for permitting controlled extraction of a quantity of hot gases from the cavity produced by the vaporization of the working fluid upon detonation of the nuclear device. A method of generating power is also described. This method consists of: 1.) introducing a quantity of water in an underground cavity; 2.) heating the water in the cavity to form saturated steam; 3.) detonating a nuclear device at a central location inside the cavity; 4.) recoiling plate-like elements inside the cavity away from the central location in a mechanically regulated and controlled manner to absorb a shock wave produced by the nuclear device detonation and thereby protect the underground cavity against damage; 5.) extracting a quantity of superheated steam produced by the detonation of the nuclear device; and 6.) Converting the energy in the extracted superheated steam into electrical power

  16. Misunderstanding nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tombs, F.

    1981-01-01

    The inaugural lecture of Sir Francis Tombs as newly installed President of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, on the reasons for the widely differing perceptions of opposing factions in the nuclear debate, is reviewed with extensive quotations. The lecturer pointed out that development of nuclear power as an energy source requires the consent of the majority and the uncommitted must be persuaded to spend the time necessary to understand the issues and to evaluate the arguments in an objective way. (U.K.)

  17. Nuclear power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1990-01-01

    I want to give some ideas on the situation of public and utility acceptance of nuclear power in the Federal Republic of Germany and perhaps a little bit on Europe. Let me start with public perception. I think in Germany we have a general trend in the public perception of technology during the last decade that has been investigated in a systematic manner in a recent study. It is clear that the general acceptance of technology decreased substantially during the last twenty years. We can also observe during this time that aspects of the benefits of technology are much less reported in the media, that most reporting by the media now is related to the consequences of technologies, such as negative environmental consequences. hat development has led to a general opposition against new technological projects, in particular unusual and large. That trend is related not only to nuclear power, we see it also for new airports, trains, coal-fired plants. here is almost no new technological project in Germany where there is not very strong opposition against it, at least locally. What is the current public opinion concerning nuclear power? Nuclear power certainly received a big shock after Chernobyl, but actually, about two thirds of the German population wants to keep the operating plants running. Some people want to phase the plants out as they reach the end-of-life, some want to substitute newer nuclear technology, and a smaller part want to increase the use of nuclear power. But only a minority of the German public would really like to abandon nuclear energy

  18. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Last year, 1999, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In eight of the fifteen member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. A total of 218 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 181,120 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 171,802 MWe were in operation. Two units, i.e. Civaux 2 in France and Mochovce-2 in Slovakia went critical for the first time and started commercial operation after having been connected to the grid. Three further units in France, Chooz 1 and 2 and Civaux 1, started commercial operation in 1999 after the completion of technical measures in the primary circuit. Last year, 13 plants were under construction in Romania, Russia, Slovakia and the Czech Republic, that is only in East European countries. In eight countries of the European Union 146 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 129.772 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 123.668 MWe. Net electricity production in 1999 in the EU amounts to approx. 840.2 TWh, which means a share of 35 per cent of the total production. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 75 per cent in France, 73 per cent in Lithuania, 58 per cent in Belgium and 47 per cent in Bulgaria, Sweden and Slovakia. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal and Austria. (orig.) [de

  19. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    Last year, 2000, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In eight of the fifteen member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. A total of 218 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 172 259 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 181 642 MWe were in operation (31.12.2000; 215 plants, 180 067 MWe (gross), 172 259 MWe (net)). One unit, i.e. Temelin in the Czech Republic went critical for the first time and started test operation after having been connected to the grid. Temelin adds about 981 MWe (gross) and 912 MWe (net) to the electricity production capacity. Three units, Hinkley Point A1 and A2 in United Kingdom, and Chernobyl 3 in the Ukraine have been shut down during the year 2000. This means a loss of 1534 MWe gross capacity and 1420 MWe net capacity. Last year, 12 plants (31.12.2000: 11 plants) were under construction in Romania, Russia, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and the Ukraine, that is only in east european countries. In eight countries of the European Union 146 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 129 188 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 123 061 MWe (31.12.2000: 144 plants, 128 613 MWe (gross), 122 627 MWe (net)). Net electricity production in 2000 in the EU amounts to approx. 818.8 TWh, which means a share of 35 per cent of the total production in the whole EU. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. The reach 76 per cent in France, 74 per cent in Lithuania, 57 per cent in Belgium and 47 per cent in the Ukraine. Nuclear power also provides an noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e. g. Italy, Portugal and Austria. (orig.) [de

  20. How nuclear power began

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowing, M.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the features of the story of nuclear power, both in nuclear weapons and nuclear power stations, derive from their timing. Usually, in the history of science the precise timing of discovery does not make much difference, but in the case of nuclear fission there was the coincidence that crucial discoveries were made and openly published in the same year, 1939, as the outbreak of the Second World War. It is these events of the 1930s and the early post-war era that are mainly discussed. However, the story began a lot earlier and even in the early 1900s the potential power within the atom had been foreseen by Soddy and Rutherford. In the 1930s Enrico Fermi and his team saw the technological importance of their discoveries and took out a patent on their process to produce artificial radioactivity from slow neutron beams. The need for secrecy because of the war, and the personal trusts and mistrusts run through the story of nuclear power. (UK)

  1. Nuclear power safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency, the organization concerned with worldwide nuclear safety has produced two international conventions to provide (1) prompt notification of nuclear accidents and (2) procedures to facilitate mutual assistance during an emergency. IAEA has also expanded operational safety review team missions, enhanced information exchange on operational safety events at nuclear power plants, and planned a review of its nuclear safety standards to ensure that they include the lessons learned from the Chernobyl nuclear plant accident. However, there appears to be a nearly unanimous belief among IAEA members that may attempt to impose international safety standards verified by an international inspection program would infringe on national sovereignty. Although several Western European countries have proposed establishing binding safety standards and inspections, no specific plant have been made; IAEA's member states are unlikely to adopt such standards and an inspection program

  2. Nuclear power and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mi

    2006-01-01

    During the 30s and 40s of the last century atomic physicists discovered the fission of uranium nuclei bombarded by neutrons and realized the first self-sustaining controlled fission chain reaction, which ushered in the atomic age. After 50 years of electricity production, in 2003 nuclear power plants were generating 16% of the total electricity in the world. Of these, thermal neutron reactors make up over 99%. For the large scale production of nuclear power, say up to hundreds of GWe, it is very important to speed up the development and deployment of fast breeder reactors to avoid the future lack of uranium resources. (authors)

  3. Nuclear power plants maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power plants maintenance now appears as an important factor contributing to the competitivity of nuclea energy. The articles published in this issue describe the way maintenance has been organized in France and how it led to an actual industrial activity developing and providing products and services. An information note about Georges Besse uranium enrichment plant (Eurodif) recalls that maintenance has become a main data not only for power plants but for all nuclear industry installations. (The second part of this dossier will be published in the next issue: vol. 1 January-February 1989) [fr

  4. Nuclear power safety economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legasov, V.A.; Demin, V.F.; Shevelev, Ya.V.

    1984-01-01

    The existing conceptual and methodical basis for the decision-making process insuring safety of the nuclear power and other (industrial and non-industrial) human activities is critically analyzed. Necessity of development a generalized economic safety analysis method (GESAM) is shown. Its purpose is justifying safety measures. Problems of GESAM development are considered including the problem of costing human risk. A number of suggestions on solving them are given. Using the discounting procedure in the assessment of risk or detriment caused by harmful impact on human health is substantiated. Examples of analyzing some safety systems in the nuclear power and other spheres of human activity are given

  5. Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is located in Zarechny, approximately 60 km east of Ekaterinberg along the Trans-Siberian Highway. Zarechny, a small city of approximately 30,000 residents, was built to support BNPP operations. It is a closed city to unescorted visitors. Residents must show identification for entry. BNPP is one of the first and oldest commercial nuclear power plants in Russia and began operations in 1964. As for most nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation, BNPP is operated by Rosenergoatom, which is subordinated to the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (Minatom). BNPP is the site of three nuclear reactors, Units 1, 2, and 3. Units 1 and 2, which have been shut-down and defueled, were graphite moderated reactors. The units were shut-down in 1981 and 1989. Unit 3, a BN-600 reactor, is a 600 MW(electric) sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Unit 3 went on-line in April 1980 and produces electric power which is fed into a distribution grid and thermal power which provides heat to Zarechny. The paper also discusses the SF NIKIET, the Sverdiovsk Branch of NIKIET, Moscow, which is the research and development branch of the parent NIKEIT and is primarily a design institute responsible for reactor design. Central to its operations is a 15 megawatt IVV research reactor. The paper discusses general security and fissile material control and accountability at these two facilities

  6. Nuclear power plant decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaziz Yunus

    1986-01-01

    A number of issues have to be taken into account before the introduction of any nuclear power plant in any country. These issues include reactor safety (site and operational), waste disposal and, lastly, the decommissioning of the reactor inself. Because of the radioactive nature of the components, nuclear power plants require a different approach to decommission compared to other plants. Until recently, issues on reactor safety and waste disposal were the main topics discussed. As for reactor decommissioning, the debates have been academic until now. Although reactors have operated for 25 years, decommissioning of retired reactors has simply not been fully planned. But the Shippingport Atomic Power Plant in Pennysylvania, the first large scale power reactor to be retired, is now being decommissioned. The work has rekindled the debate in the light of reality. Outside the United States, decommissioning is also being confronted on a new plane. (author)

  7. EDF group - Reference Document 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The EDF Group is a leading player in the European energy industry, active in all areas of the electricity value chain, from generation to trading and network management. The leader in the French electricity market, the Group also has solid positions in the United Kingdom, Germany and Italy, with a portfolio of 38.5 million European customers and a generation fleet which is unique in the world. It intends to play a major role in the global revival of nuclear and is increasingly active in the gas chain. The Group has a sound business model, evenly balanced between regulated and deregulated activities. Given its R and D capability, its track record and expertise in nuclear, fossil-fired and hydro generation and in renewable energies, together with its energy eco-efficiency offers, EDF is well placed to deliver competitive solutions to reconcile sustainable economic growth and climate preservation. This document is EDF Group's Reference Document and Annual Financial Report for the year 2007. It contains information about Group profile, governance, business, investments, property, plant and equipment, management, financial position, human resources, shareholders, etc. The document includes the 2008 half-year financial report and consolidated financial statements, and the report drafted by the Statutory Auditors

  8. Nuclear power and modern society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, A.

    1999-01-01

    A treatise consisting of the following sections: Development of modern society (Origin of modern society; Industrial society; The year 1968; Post-industrial society; Worldwide civic society); Historic breaks in the development of the stationary power sector (Stationary thermal power; Historic breaks in the development of nuclear power); Czech nuclear power engineering in the globalization era (Major causes of success of Czech nuclear power engineering; Future of Czech nuclear power engineering). (P.A.)

  9. Power generation by nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear power plays an important role in the world, European (33%) and French (75%) power generation. This article aims at presenting in a synthetic way the main reactor types with their respective advantages with respect to the objectives foreseen (power generation, resources valorization, waste management). It makes a fast review of 50 years of nuclear development, thanks to which the nuclear industry has become one of the safest and less environmentally harmful industry which allows to produce low cost electricity: 1 - simplified description of a nuclear power generation plant: nuclear reactor, heat transfer system, power generation system, interface with the power distribution grid; 2 - first historical developments of nuclear power; 3 - industrial development and experience feedback (1965-1995): water reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu), RBMK, fast neutron reactors, high temperature demonstration reactors, costs of industrial reactors; 4 - service life of nuclear power plants and replacement: technical, regulatory and economical lifetime, problems linked with the replacement; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  10. LDC nuclear power: Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweedale, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Argentina's 31-year-old nuclear research and power program makes it a Third World leader and the preeminent Latin American country. Easily accessible uranium fuels the heavy water reactor, Atucha I, which provides 10% of the country's electric power. Atucha II and III are under construction. Several domestic and international factors combined to make Argentina's program succeed, but achieving fuel-cycle independence and the capacity to divert fissionable material to military uses is a cause for some concern. 60 references

  11. Nuclear power: Pt. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janse van Rensburg, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the annual growthrate of 2,5% in the need for energy and the present coal, oil, gas and uranium reserves, it is expected that there will be an energy deficiency early in the twentieth century. Coal-fired power stations have the disadvantage of pollution and a high water consumption. The use of nuclear power in South Africa is backed-up by its uranium reserves

  12. The Cattenom nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Lorraine region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Cattenom comprises 4 production units of 1300 MW each (5200 MW as a whole). The facility generated 34 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. 8% of the French national power generation. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  13. The Penly nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Haute Normandie region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Penly comprises 2 production units of 1300 MW each (2600 MW as a whole). The facility generated 18.5 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. 3.57% of the French national power generation and 80% of the energy consumed in the Haute-Normandie region. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  14. The Blayais nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Aquitaine region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Blayais comprises 4 production units of 900 MW each (3600 MW as a whole). The facility generated 21.3 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. 5.5% of the French national power generation and 1.2 times the energy consumed in the Aquitaine region. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  15. The Chinon nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Centre region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Chinon comprises 4 production units of 900 MW each (3600 MW as a whole). The facility generated 19.03 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. 4.8% of the French national power generation. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  16. The Paluel nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Haute Normandie region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Paluel comprises 4 production units of 1300 MW each (5200 MW as a whole). The facility generated 29.5 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. about 7% of the French national power generation and 35% of the energy produced in the Normandie region. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  17. The Bugey nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Rhone-Alpes region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Bugey comprises 4 production units of 900 MW each (3600 MW as a whole). The facility generated 20.87 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. 5% of the French national power generation and 40% of the energy consumed in the Rhone-Alpes region. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  18. The Golfech nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Midi-Pyrenees region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Golfech comprises two production units of 1300 MW each (2600 MW as a whole). The facility generated 19.7 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. more than 5% of the French national power generation and 100% of the energy consumed in the Midi-Pyrenees region. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  19. The abuse of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.

    1977-01-01

    Different aspects of possible abuse of nuclear power by countries or individuals are discussed. Special attention is paid to the advantage of nuclear power, despite the risk of weapon proliferation or terrorism. The concepts of some nuclear power critics, concerning health risks in the nuclear sector are rejected as untrue and abusive

  20. Nuclear power plant analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stritar, A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of Nuclear Power Plant Analyzers in USA is described. There are two different types of Analyzers under development in USA, the forst in Idaho and Los Alamos national Lab, the second in brookhaven National lab. That one is described in detail. The computer hardware and the mathematical models of the reactor vessel thermalhydraulics are described. (author)

  1. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  2. Nuclear power and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    1992-01-01

    Some aspects of safety of nuclear power with special reference to Indian nuclear power programme are discussed. India must develop technology to protect herself from the adverse economic impact arising out of the restrictive regime which is being created through globalization of safety and environmental issues. Though the studies done and experience gained so far have shown that the PHWR system adopted by India has a number of superior safety features, research work is needed in the field of operation and maintenance of reactors and also in the field of reactor life extension through delaying of ageing effects. Public relations work must be pursued to convince the public at large of the safety of nuclear power programme. The new reactor designs in the second stage of evolution are based on either further improvement of existing well-proven designs or adoptions of more innovative ideas based on physical principles to ensure a higher level of safety. The development of Indian nuclear power programme is characterised by a balanced approach in the matter of assuring safety. Safety enforcement is not just looked upon as a pure administrative matter, but experts with independent minds are also involved in safety related matters. (M.G.B.)

  3. Nuclear Power in Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Research has shown that nuclear radioisotope power generators can supply compact, reliable, and efficient sources of energy for a broad range of space missions. These missions range from televising views of planetary surfaces to communicating scientific data to Earth. This publication presents many applications of the advancing technology and…

  4. Captivated by nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaageson, P.; Kjellstroem, B.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish decision to discontinue nuclear power production is discussed. The basis of the referendum is presented. A number of cases where the decision to stop production in the year 2010 is counteracted, are described. The political and technical steps to facilitate the settlement are presented. (GB)

  5. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  6. Aspect of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighi Oskoei, R.; Raeis Hosseiny, N.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next 50 years, unless patterns change dramatically, energy production and use will contribute to global warming through large-scale greenhouse gas emissions-hundreds of billions of tonnes of carbon in the form of carbon dioxide. Nuclear power would be one option for reducing carbon emissions. At present, however, this is unlikely: nuclear power faces stagnation and decline. We decided to study the future of nuclear power because we believe this technology , despite the changes it faces, is an important option for the world to meet future energy needs without emitting carbon dioxide and other atmospheric pollutants. Other options include increased efficiency, renewable and sequestration. We believe that all options should be preserved as nations develop strategies at provide energy while meeting important environmental challenges. The nuclear power option will only be exercised, however if the technology demonstrates better economics, improved safety, successful waste management, and low proliferation risk, and if public policies place a significant value on electricity production that does not produce carbon dioxide

  7. Safe nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cady, K.B.

    1992-01-01

    Nearly 22 percent of the electricity generated in the United States already comes from nuclear power plants, but no new plants have been ordered since 1978. This paper reports that the problems that stand in the way of further development have to do with complexity and perceived risk. Licensing, construction management, and waste disposal are complex matters, and the possibility of accident has alienated a significant portion of the public. But a national poll conducted by Bruskin/Goldring at the beginning of February shows that opposition to nuclear energy is softening. Sixty percent of the American people support (strongly or moderately) the use of nuclear power, and 18 percent moderately oppose it. Only 15 percent remain obstinately opposed. Perhaps they are not aware of recent advances in reactor technology

  8. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2007-04-01

    The report is the fourth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2006 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  9. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The report is the second report in a new series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2004 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  10. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampman, D.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Nystrup, P.E.

    2006-03-01

    The report is the third report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe National Laboratory and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2005 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development and development of emergency management systems, safety related events of nuclear power and international relations and conflicts. (ln)

  11. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.

    2009-06-01

    The report is the fifth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2008 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events of nuclear power, and international relations and conflicts. (LN)

  12. Psychological empowerment in French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillol, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Since the eighties, nuclear safety has been discussed in organizational studies and constitutes nowadays a specific stream with several standpoints. Regarding the reliability of nuclear plants, the nuclear safety literature has emphasized on the crucial role of individuals and human factors. Especially, some researchers have noticed rule breaking behavior and the impact of individual self-confidence on the behavior; but without deepening their analyses. As high self-esteem and confidence, i.e. psychological empowerment, naturally lead to innovation and rule breaking, the behavior can be analyzed, in such a regulated industry, as opposite to safety. Thus, this article aims at explaining the roots and discernable features of the observed psychological empowerment. Methods include an in-depth qualitative study in 4 nuclear power plants owned by Electricite de France (EDF), the French national nuclear power operator. Focused on the leading team of the plant, the set of data is composed of 35 interviews, 6 weeks of non-participant observation and internal documents. The content analysis has revealed two main pillars of psychological empowerment. On the first hand, the strong professional identity developed at the opening of the plants is based on initiative and risk-taking. In some ways, this professional identify fostered by commitment to a demanding job and the team, influences behavior more than do professional rules. On the second hand, the management discourse is perceived as ambiguous towards the strict application of the rules and tacitly legitimizes rule breaking behavior. This article details and exemplifies these phenomena and discusses the implications. (author)

  13. Nuclear power. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Lay language brings an understanding of nuclear technology and nuclear politics to the non-specialist reader. The author notes that there has been little change in the technology during the four decades of the nuclear age, but mankind has still to learn how to live with it. Part One explains how reactors work, identifies different reactor types, and describes the fuel cycle. Part two follows research developments during the pre-Manhatten Project days, the war effort, and the decision to pursue commercial nuclear power. He traces the development of policies to secure fission materials and international efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons grade material and the safe handling of radioactive wastes on a global as well as national scale. There are four appendices, including an annotated reference to other publications. 9 figures.

  14. Nuclear-powered submarines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curren, T.

    1989-01-01

    The proposed acquisition of nuclear-powered submarines by the Canadian Armed Forces raises a number of legitimate concerns, including that of their potential impact on the environment. The use of nuclear reactors as the propulsion units in these submarines merits special consideration. Radioactivity, as an environmental pollutant, has unique qualities and engenders particular fears among the general population. The effects of nuclear submarines on the environment fall into two distinct categories: those deriving from normal operations of the submarine (the chief concern of this paper), and those deriving from a reactor accident. An enormous body of data must exist to support the safe operation of nuclear submarines; however, little information on this aspect of the proposed submarine program has been made available to the Canadian public. (5 refs.)

  15. Can nuclear power compete?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The competitiveness of electricity generation from new nuclear plant with that from fossil-fired plant depends on a number of factors, the most important of which are the future costs of fossil fuels and the required rate of return on capital. Nuclear power is generally expected to remain competitive for baseload generation in OECD countries except in regions with direct access to cheap fossil fuels, based on the economic criteria and price expectations prevailing in the different countries. The situation in the United Kingdom will be clearer later in 1993 when comparisons prepared for the Government's Nuclear Review are published, but on the basis of the information available new nuclear plants should be competitive with the other technical options available for deployment around the year 2000. (author)

  16. LDC nuclear power: Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherr, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    The US created the need for nuclear power in the Phillipines and then provided the means to fill it, but the 20-year nuclear program was reversed in 1976 because of public opposition to heavy-handed government policies. The situation illustrates the overriding importance of foreign influence and political judgment. Despite substantial investments in the training of Filipino nuclear scientists and technicians, nuclear energy continues to be viewed as an alien technology by the people. Even the protracted debate over the first reactor has been dominated by US experts and advisers because the traditional transnational cooperation was extended beyond government to nongovernmental citizen organizations when Filipno protestors sought help from US groups. 120 references

  17. Experience of load following in French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miossec, C.

    1989-01-01

    The relative importance of the French nuclear programme has reached such a scale that nuclear power stations can no longer be operated in the base load mode: their capacity exceeded the network demands for 1200 hours in 1983 and it is estimated that this figure will move to 5200 hours in 1990; their power should be able to vary flexibly. These figures illustrate the policy of substituting nuclear power plants for fossil-fired plants and explain the need for nuclear units to provide a quality of service at least equal to that of their ''elders'', which, for several years, have regularly participated in load following. Electricite de France (EDF) therefore had to perform the studies and work necessary to provide nuclear units with the required modulation capacity. There are several grid requirements and three types of flexibility are to be distinguished. The first, load follow, is fundamental when adapting to demand. The second type of flexibility, frequency adjustment, is another important factor in the quality of the product delivered to the consumer. The third type of flexibility is participation in the spinning reserve. When automatic operations are inadequate, available power reserves must be used to support the gird. Load following operations are performed. The operating mode with load modulation is subject to authorisations issued by the governmental organisations responsible for nuclear safety. EDF and the manufacturers have had to prove that such operations remain compatible with safety under normal operating conditions and, in the event of incidents, modulation should be capable of considerably modifying the initial conditions. (5 figures). (Author)

  18. Safety experience on EDF's PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, P.

    1986-01-01

    The french nuclear programme has been widely publicized. In 1985, the total nuclear electricity generated was around 216 GWh, i. e. 70% of the electricity produced by electricity de France (EDF). If we consider only pressurized water reactors, at the end of 1985, 37 units were in operation (32 900 MWe and 5 1300 MWe) and 18 were under construction. I intend to review our experience with the safety of PWR's, but I will first present briefly some aspects related to the safety organization in France and the standardization policy. (author) [pt

  19. Facts about nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muench, E.

    1980-01-01

    The argument concerning the introduction and the further expansion of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany has been existing for several years in differing intensities and most different forms. The arguments and theses of the discussion deal with the various aspects of the reciprocity between nuclear energy and environment. This is the key-note for the scientists to treat the relevant problems and questions in the discussion about nuclear energy. The controversy in which often emotional theses are stated instead of reasonably deliberating the pros and contras includes civil initiatives, societies, and environment protection organisations on the one hand and authorities, producers, and operators of nuclear-technical plants on the other. And the scale of the different opinions reaches from real agreement to deep condemnation of a technology which represents an option to meet the energy need in the future. In this situation, this book is an attempt to de-emotionalize the whole discussion. Most of the authors of the articles come from research centres and have been working on the problems they deal with for years. The spectrum of the topics includes the energy-political coherences of nuclear energy, the technical fundaments of the individual reactor types, safety and security of nuclear-technical plants the fuel cycle, especially the waste management in nuclear power plants, environmental aspects of energy generation in general and nuclear energy in special, the question of Plutonium and the presentation of alternative energy sources including nuclear fusion. The arrangement of these topics is meant to help to clarify the complex coherences of nuclear energy and to help those interested in problems of energy policy to make their own personal decisions. (orig./RW) [de

  20. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, B.F.

    1977-01-01

    The economics of electricity supply and production in the FRG is to see on the background of the unique European interconnected grid system which makes very significant contributions to the availability of standby energy and peak load power. On this basis and the existing high voltage grid system, we can build large nuclear generating units and realise the favorable cost aspects per installed KW and reduced standby power. An example of calculating the overall electricity generating costs based on the present worth method is explained. From the figures shown, the sensitivity of the generating costs with respect to the different cost components can be derived. It is apparent from the example used, that the major advantage of nuclear power stations compared with fossil fired stations lies in the relatively small percentage fraction contributed by the fuel costs to the electricity generating costs. (orig.) [de

  1. Nuclear power and weapons proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, T.; Rathjens, C.W.; Ruina, J.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear weapons development and nuclear electric power is examined. A brief description of nuclear weapons design is first given. This is then followed by a discussion of various aspects of nuclear power technology and of how they affect a nuclear weapon programme. These include fuel cycles, chemical reprocessing of spent fuel, uranium enrichment, and the control of dissemination of nuclear technology. In conclusion there is a discussion of possible political and institutional controls for limiting nuclear proliferation. (U.K.)

  2. Is nuclear power competitive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandfon, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The first phase of a two-phase study of the competitiveness of electricity from new coal and nuclear plants with oil and natural gas in common markets concludes that, with few exceptions throughout the country, overall levelized nuclear generating cost could be lower than coal generating costs by more than 40%. The study shows a wider margin of economic superiority for nuclear than has been seen in other recent studies. Capital and fuel costs are the major determinants of relative nuclear and coal economics. The only substantial difference in the input assumptions has related to a shorter lead time for both coal and nuclear units, which reduces capital costs. The study gives substance to the charge that delaying tactics by intervenors and an unstable licensing environment drove up lifetime costs of both coal and nuclear plants. This caused an increase in electric rates and affected the entire economy. The study shows that nuclear power is competitive when large baseload capacity is required. 14 figures

  3. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, L.F.C.

    1977-01-01

    Mr. Reichle feels that the economic advantages of pursuing nuclear power should prompt Congress and the administration to seek ways of eliminating undue delays and enabling industry to proceed with the design, construction, and management of nuclear plants and facilities. Abundant, low-cost energy, which can only be supplied by coal and nuclear, is vital to growth in our gross national product, he states. While conservation efforts are commendable, we must have more energy if we are to maintain our standard of living. Current energy resources projections into the next century indicate an energy gap of 42 quads with a 3 percent growth and 72 quads with a 4 percent growth. Comparisons of fuel prices, plant capital investment, and electric generation costs are developed for both coal and nuclear energy; these show that nuclear energy has a clear advantage economically as long as light water reactors are supplemented by breeder reactor development and the nuclear industry can demonstrate that these reactors are safe, reliable, and compatible with the environment. Mr. Reichle says excessive regulation and legal challenges combined with public apathy toward developing nuclear energy are delaying decisions and actions that should be taken now

  4. The problem of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimbrecht, J.; Kade, G.; Krusewitz, K.; Moldenhauer, B.; Steinhaus, K.; Weish, P.

    1977-01-01

    The battle over the problems of nuclear power has gone on in the Federal Republic for several years. The Buergerinitiativen, which used to be small and largely unpolitical, have become a major social force during this time. Subjects: 1) Dangers of nuclear power - can the risk be justified; 2)The necessity of nuclear power; 3) The enforcement of nuclear power - political and economic background; 4) Limits of power generation - limits of growth or limits of the system. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Nuclear Power Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintra do Prado, L.

    1966-01-01

    The present trend is to construct larger plants: the average power of the plants under construction at present, including prototypes, is 300 MW(e), i.e. three times higher than in the case of plants already in operation. Examples of new large-scale plants ares (a) Wylfa, Anglesey, United Kingdom - scheduled power of 1180 MW(e) (800 MW to be installed by 1967), to be completed in 1968; (b) ''Dungeness B'', United Kingdom - scheduled power of 1200 MW(e); (c) second unit for United States Dresden power plant - scheduled power of 715 MW(e) minimum to almost 800 MW(e). Nuclear plants on the whole serve the same purpose as conventional thermal plants

  6. The nuclear power debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerndl, B.

    1992-01-01

    This material-intensive analysis of the public dispute about nuclear power plants uses the fundamental thoughts of the conflict theory approach by Georg Simmel, linking them to results of recent value change research. Through the medium of a qualitative content analysis of arguments in favour of and against nuclear energy it is shown how values are expressed and move, how they differentiate and get modified, in conflicting argumentation patterns. The first part reconstructs the history of the nuclear power conflict under the aspect of its subject priorities changing from time to time. The second part shows, based on three debate priorities, how social value patterns recognized for the moment changed in and by the conflict: the argumentation is that the nuclear power controversy has led to a relativization of its scientific claim for recognition; it has created a problem awareness with regard to purely quantitatively oriented growth objectives and developed criteria of an ecologically controlled satisfaction of needs; the debate has paved the way, in the area of political regulation models, for the advancement of basic democratic elements within a representative democracy. (orig./HP) [de

  7. The Fessenheim nuclear power plant, at the service of a safe, competitive and CO2-free power generation in the heart of the Alsace region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In less than 20 years, Electricite de France (EDF) has built up a competitive park of 58 nuclear power plants, with no equivalent elsewhere, which represents an installed power of 63.1 GW (85% of EDF's power generation). Inside this nuclear park, the national power generation centre of Fessenheim comprises two production units of 900 MW each (1800 MW as a whole). The facility generated 8.7 billion kWh in 2009, i.e. 70% of the energy consumed in the Alsace region. This brochure presents the life of the power plant under various aspects: power generation, safety priority and culture, maintenance investments, respect of the environment, long-term fuel and wastes management, local economical involvement, transparency and public information, key figures and dates. (J.S.)

  8. Nuclear power for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Siddhanth; Lanjekar, Sanket; Jagdale, Bhushan; Srivastava, V.K.

    2015-01-01

    Water is one of the most important assets to mankind and without which the human race would cease to exist. Water is required by us right from domestic to industrial levels. As notified by the 'American Nuclear Society' and 'World Nuclear Association' about 1/5 th of the world population does not access to portable water especially in the Asian and African subcontinent. The situation is becoming adverse day by day due to rise in population and industrialization. The need of alternative water resource is thus becoming vital. About 97.5% of Earth is covered by oceans. Desalination of saline water to generate potable water is thus an important topic of research. Currently about 12,500 desalination plants are operating worldwide with a capacity of about 35 million m 3 /day using mainly fossil fuels for generation of large amount of energy required for processing water. These thermal power station release large amount of carbon dioxide and other green house gases. Nuclear reactors are capable of delivering energy to the high energy-intensive processes without any environmental concerns for climate change etc., giving a vision to sustainable growth of desalination process. These projects are currently employed in Kazakhstan, India, Japan, and Pakistan and are coupled to the nuclear reactor for generating electricity and potable water as well. The current climatic scenario favors the need for expanding dual purpose nuclear power plants producing energy and water at the same location. (author)

  9. Economics of nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, I.H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear power development in Taiwan was initiated in 1956. Now Taipower has five nuclear units in smooth operation, one unit under construction, two units under planning. The relatively short construction period, low construction costs and twin unit approach had led to the significant economical advantage of our nuclear power generation. Moreover betterment programmes have further improved the availability and reliability factors of our nuclear power plants. In Taipower, the generation cost of nuclear power was even less than half of that of oil-fired thermal power in the past years ever since the nuclear power was commissioned. This made Taipower have more earnings and power rates was even dropped down in March 1983. As Taiwan is short of energy sources and nuclear power is so well-demonstrated nuclear power will be logically the best choice for Taipower future projects

  10. Prospects for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes how the nuclear power industry is improving plant operation and safety procedures and is reducing maintenance costs as it hopes for a brighter political climate. Points out that most of the efforts focus on key areas, such as improvements in control rooms and operator training and studies of physical processes within the reactor and associated systems. Discusses the increasing complexity of nuclear plants, the use of computers to process data in BWR plants, the decommissioning of old plants, and plant safety research activities worldwide. Offers an annotated bibliography

  11. Economics of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwah, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    There can be no precise economic measures, in the abstract, of the costs of nuclear power production in the less-developed countries (LDCs). The conditions that affect the calculations have to be evaluated specifically for each country and individually for each nuclear-related project in that country. These conditions are a combination of internal and external factors, and their mix for one project can change during the course of construction. The author lists 21 factors that may vary according to individual national costs. 6 references, 4 tables

  12. EDF group. Annual report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-01

    This document is the English version of the 2001 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) Group, the French electric utility. It comprises 4 parts: introduction (statement of the chairman and chief executive officer, corporate governance, group key figures, sustainable growth indicators - parent company, energy for a sustainable future, EdF group worldwide); dynamics and balanced growth (financial results, EdF's strategy in building a competitive global group: consolidating the European network, moving forward in energy-related services, responding to increasing energy demand in emerging countries); sustainable solutions for all (empowering the customer: competitive solutions for industrial customers, anticipating the needs of residential customers and SMEs, environmental solutions to enhance urban life, upgrading the network and providing access to energy; a sound, sustainable and secure energy mix: a highly competitive nuclear fleet, the vital resource of fossil-fuelled plants, a proactive approach to renewable energies); a global commitment to corporate social responsibility (human resources and partnerships). (J.S.)

  13. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, C.J.; Silver, J.M.

    1985-09-01

    The report provides data and assessments of the status and prospects of nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle. The report discusses the economic competitiveness of nuclear electricity generation, the extent of world uranium resources, production and requirements, uranium conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel treatment and radioactive waste management. A review is given of the status of nuclear fusion research

  14. Making nuclear power sustainable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, B

    2003-01-01

    According to the present data, we must double our energy production while dividing by a factor of two the greenhouse gases emissions, knowing that today, 80% of our energy comes from the combustion of coal, gas and oil, all of which produce CO, released in the atmosphere. This is the toughest challenge facing us in the next few decades, and I include the water challenge, since producing drinking water will also increase our energy needs. This formidable challenge will not be easily met. No magic bullet is in sight, not even a nuclear bullet. To have any chance of success, we must actually implement all the available measures, and invent some more. In fact, we shall certainly need a three-pronged approach: Increase energy efficiency to limit energy consumption in our developed countries; Diversify our energy mix to reduce the share supplied by fossil fuels and that translates into increasing nuclear and renewable energy source; Trap and sequester CO 2 wherever and whenever economically possible. This article focuses on the nuclear issue. According to International Energy Agency (lEA) statistics, nuclear energy accounts today for 6.8% of the world energy supply. Is it realistic to expect this share to grow, when many forecasts (including lEA's own) predict a slow reduction? The future is not engraved in marble, it is ours to make; the future role of nuclear power will depend on the results of our present efforts to expand or overcome its limitations. It is quite possible that, within four decades, 40% of the electric power generated in all OECD countries, plus Russia, China, India and Brazil, comes from nuclear reactors. It is not far-fetched, when you consider that it took only two decades for France to increase its nuclear share of electricity from 8% to 80%. More ambitious, let's assume that in the same time frame and within the same countries 15% of the fuels for transportation come from nuclear produced hydrogen and that 10% of the space heating is supplied by

  15. Nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yampolsky, J.S.; Cavallaro, L.; Paulovich, K.F.; Schleicher, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an inherently safe modular nuclear power system for producing electrical power at acceptable efficiency levels using working fluids at relatively low temperatures and pressures. The system comprising: a reactor module for heating a first fluid; a heat exchanger module for transferring heat from the first fluid to a second fluid; a first piping system effecting flow of the first fluid in a first fluid circuit successively through the reactor module and the heat exchanger module; a power conversion module comprising a turbogenerator driven by the second fluid, and means for cooling the second fluid upon emergence thereof from the turbogenerator; a second piping system comprising means for effecting flow of the second fluid in a second fluid circuit successively through the heat exchanger module and the power conversion module; and a plurality of pits for receiving the modules

  16. Preparedness against nuclear power accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This booklet contains information about the organization against nuclear power accidents, which exist in the four Swedish counties with nuclear power plants. It is aimed at classes 7-9 of the Swedish schools. (L.E.)

  17. Nuclear power: pros and cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, H.

    1977-01-01

    The author deals with the nuclear power controversy in science and indicates the main points of the nuclear power debate by the population. The different scientific and ideological positions shown by the results of the campaign are explained. (HP) [de

  18. Ethical aspects of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streithofen, H.B.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear controversy comprises many ethical aspects, e.g. the waste disposal problem. Nuclear opponents should not neglect the environmental protection aspect; for example, the use of nuclear power alone brought about an 8% reduction of the CO 2 burden in 1987. Our responsibility towards nature and humans in the Third World leaves us no alternative to nuclear power. On the other hand, the nuclear power debate should not become a matter of religious beliefs. (DG) [de

  19. GAO report and EDF cost revisions reignite debate on Hinkley Point C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, The Independent Global Nuclear News Agency, Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-10-15

    The announcement by French state-controlled utility EDF that it has added pound 1.5 bn (Euro 1.7 bn, $ 1.9 bn) to its estimated costs for two new reactors at Hinkley Point C, has led to questions about whether the government should rethink the project, with some politicians calling for it to be abandoned. EDF's announcement came less than two weeks after a report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said the government's deal for the two EPR units, now estimated to be costing pound 19.6 bn (Euro 22.3 bn, $ 25.5 bn), has locked consumers into a risky and expensive project with uncertain strategic and economic benefits. The UK's Energy Technologies Institute (ETI), in a report prepared before the EDF announcement, had already said the requirement to improve the predictability and affordability of new nuclear power plants has never been stronger.

  20. GAO report and EDF cost revisions reignite debate on Hinkley Point C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, David

    2017-01-01

    The announcement by French state-controlled utility EDF that it has added pound 1.5 bn (Euro 1.7 bn, $ 1.9 bn) to its estimated costs for two new reactors at Hinkley Point C, has led to questions about whether the government should rethink the project, with some politicians calling for it to be abandoned. EDF's announcement came less than two weeks after a report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) said the government's deal for the two EPR units, now estimated to be costing pound 19.6 bn (Euro 22.3 bn, $ 25.5 bn), has locked consumers into a risky and expensive project with uncertain strategic and economic benefits. The UK's Energy Technologies Institute (ETI), in a report prepared before the EDF announcement, had already said the requirement to improve the predictability and affordability of new nuclear power plants has never been stronger.

  1. US nuclear power programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGolf, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    In the United States, coal provided 56 percent of the electricity generated in 1992. Nuclear energy was the next largest contributor, supplying 22 percent. Natural gas provided 9 percent, while hydro-electric and renewables together supplied another 9 percent. Currently, the 109 nuclear power plants in the U.S. have an overall generating capacity of 99,000 MWe. To improve efficiency, safety, and performance, the lessons of 30 years of experience with nuclear powerplants are being incorporated into design criteria for the next generation of U.S. plants. The new Advanced Light Water Reactor plants will feature simpler designs, which will enable more cost-effective construction and maintenance. To enhance safety, design margins are being increased, and human factors are being considered and incorporated into the designs

  2. Lessons of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingridge, D.

    1984-01-01

    In an earlier article the author has argued that the turbulent history of nuclear power in Britain and the USA stems from the technology itself, and has little to do with the very different institutional arrangements made for the new technology in the two countries. Nuclear plant has various features which make its planning extraordinarily difficult. Its long lead time, large unit size, capital intensity and dependence on complex infrastructure combine to ensure that mistakes are likely to be made in planning the technology and that what mistakes do occur are expensive. This article aims to expand on the earlier one in two ways; by looking at the apparent success of the French nuclear programme which seems to run counter to the thesis of the earlier article, and by trying to draw lessons from the earlier analysis for the breeder reactor. (author)

  3. Insurance and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whipple, C.

    1985-01-01

    The Price-Anderson Act is discussed, which establishes procedures for insuring nuclear facilities (including nuclear power plants). The act was enacted with the dual purpose of protecting the public and encouraging the development of a private nuclear energy industry. Criticisms that can generally be grouped into four categories regarding the Act are presented, the most controversial aspect being that should an accident occur, the aggregate liability of the reactor operator, the NRC, or any others who might be at fault is limited to $560 million. Lawsuits for amounts in excess of $560 million are prohibited. The 1975 renewal of the Price-Anderson Act does provide that damages in excess of the $560 million prompt Congress to review the particular incident and take action to protect the public from the consequences of a disaster of such magnitude

  4. US nuclear power programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGolf, D J

    1994-12-31

    In the United States, coal provided 56 percent of the electricity generated in 1992. Nuclear energy was the next largest contributor, supplying 22 percent. Natural gas provided 9 percent, while hydro-electric and renewables together supplied another 9 percent. Currently, the 109 nuclear power plants in the U.S. have an overall generating capacity of 99,000 MWe. To improve efficiency, safety, and performance, the lessons of 30 years of experience with nuclear powerplants are being incorporated into design criteria for the next generation of U.S. plants. The new Advanced Light Water Reactor plants will feature simpler designs, which will enable more cost-effective construction and maintenance. To enhance safety, design margins are being increased, and human factors are being considered and incorporated into the designs.

  5. Ardennes nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-12-01

    The SENA nuclear power plant continued to operate, as before, at authorized rated power, namely 905MWth during the first half year and 950MWth during the second half year. Net energy production:2028GWh; hours phased to the line: 7534H; availability factor: 84%; utilization factor: 84%; total shutdowns:19; number of scrams:10; cost per KWh: 4,35 French centimes. Overall, the plant is performing very satisfactory. Over the last three years net production has been 5900GWh, corresponding to in average utilization factor of 83%

  6. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Rineisky, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The invention is aimed at designing a nuclear power plant with a heat transfer system which permits an accelerated fuel regeneration maintaining relatively high initial steam values and efficiency of the steam power circuit. In case of a plant with three circuits the secondary cooling circuit includes a steam generator with preheater, evaporator, steam superheater and intermediate steam superheater. At the heat supply side the latter is connected with its inlet to the outlet of the evaporator and with its outlet to the low-temperature side of the secondary circuit

  7. Siting nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellin, J.; Joskow, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The first edition of this journal is devoted to the policies and problems of siting nuclear power plants and the question of how far commercial reactors should be placed from urban areas. The article is divided into four major siting issues: policies, risk evaluation, accident consequences, and economic and physical constraints. One concern is how to treat currently operating reactors and those under construction that were established under less-stringent criteria if siting is to be used as a way to limit the consequences of accidents. Mehanical cost-benefit analyses are not as appropriate as the systematic use of empirical observations in assessing the values involved. Stricter siting rules are justified because (1) opposition because of safety is growing: (2) remote siting will make the industry more stable; (3) the conflict is eliminated between regulatory policies and the probability basis for nuclear insurance; and (4) joint ownership of utilities and power-pooling are increasing. 227 references, 7 tables

  8. Nuclear power and ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwery, H.

    1998-01-01

    The author can see no sense in demanding an ethical regime to be applied exclusively to nuclear power but rather calls for an approach that discusses nuclear power as one constituent of the complex energy issue in a way spanning all dimensions involved, as e.g. the technological, economic, cultural, humanitarian, and humanistic aspects. An ethical approach does not question scientific research, or science or technology, but examines their relation to man and the future of humanity, so that an ethical approach will first of all demand that society will bring forward conscientious experts as reliable partners in the process of discussing the ethical implications of progress and development in a higly industrialised civilisation. (orig./CB) [de

  9. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisaka, Tatsuyoshi; Kamahara, Hisato; Yanagisawa, Ko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent corrosion stress cracks in structural materials in a BWR type nuclear power plant by decreasing the oxygen concentration in the reactor coolants. Constitution: A hydrogen injector is connected between the condensator and a condensate clean up system of a nuclear power plant. The injector is incorporated with hydrogenated compounds formed from metal hydrides, for example, of alloys such as lanthanum-nickel alloy, iron titanium alloy, vanadium, palladium, magnesium-copper alloy, magnesium-nickel alloy and the like. Even if the pressure of hydrogen obtained from a hydrogen bomb or by way of water electrolysis is changed, the hydrogen can always be injected into a reactor coolant at a pressure equal to the equilibrium dissociation pressure for metal hydride by introducing the hydrogen into the hydrogen injector. (Seki, T.)

  10. Integrating availability and maintenance objectives in plant design. EDF approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrave, Claude; Martin-Onraet, Michel

    1995-01-01

    Energy self sufficiency is a major strategic necessity for France. Regarding the fossil fuels power, competitiveness of nuclear energy is a key goal for Electricite de France. Accordingly, for future nuclear power plants to remain competitive, it is necessary to maintain the kWh production costs of the future units at a level close to those of the latest units under construction (N4 series), while raising the safety level. EDF therefore decided to implement an analytical and systematic process for study of the new projects to optimize the design by integration of the maintenance (durations, costs), availability and radiation exposure goals from the related operating experience. This approach, CIDEM (French acronym for Design Integrating Availability, operating Experience and Maintenance) aims at a single goal: to minimize the kWh production cost incorporating investment, operation and fuel costs, allowing for the operating experience from French and foreign units. The implementation of the CIDEM process constitutes for EDF a new approach to the study of the new Nuclear Power Plant projects. The competitivity of nuclear energy greatly depends on the success of such an approach. The studies conducted in the availability field have already highlighted a number of critical points and have made it possible to define the corresponding goal allocations and to establish a first series of structuring specifications for the project. (J.P.N.)

  11. Nuclear power: Year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This paper offers a contrary view on the future of nuclear power in the U.S. Contrarian, in that it argues that it is quite possible that the installed U.S. nuclear capacity in the year 2000 will be in the range of 250GWe. This projection is based on the longer view - a 20-30 year picture - of the price trends of the fuels commercially available to make electricity. And on the belief that other projections of nuclear capacity for the year 2000, while generally acknowledging the need to add significant amounts of new electricity capacity, are essentially discounting nuclear power. And thus, are ignoring fundamental economics. The logic for the projected 250 GWe follows: The demand for electricity is continuing to grow, albeit at a slower rate than that experienced prior to 1973; The excess generating capacity in the construction pipeline, which developed during the 1970s as economic growth rates came in at half the projections made in 1973, has been worked off; in fact, the pendulum has swung past the mid-point; U.S. utilities need to order an additional 200-350 GWe of capacity for service between 1992 and 2000; The real capital costs of plants, particularly nuclear plants, ordered in the 1980s will be less than that being completed today, as this new plant will be completed on a more expedient basis for reliability reasons, and built in an improved financial climate for utilities; Owing primarily to more favorable economics, but also to environmental considerations, at least half of new generating capacity will be nuclear

  12. Nuclear power in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarossa, G.

    1990-01-01

    As is known to most of this audience in November of 1987 a referendum determined a rejection of nuclear power in Italy. The referendum may be taken into consideration here as a large scale experiment which offers points of interest to this conference and problems to be aware of, in approaching a severe confrontation with the public. To give a synopsis of the Italian perspective I will examine: first the public acceptance in the situation before Chernobyl, then the most disturbing and sensitive factors of Chernobyl's consequences; how the opposition to nuclear energy worked with the support of most media and the strong pressures of an anti-nuclear political party, the syllogism of the opponents and the arguments used, the causes of major weakness of the defenders and how a new perception of nuclear risk was generated in the public. I will come to the topic of utility acceptance by mentioning that ENEL, as the National Utility, in its role is bound to a policy of compliance with Government decisions. It is oriented today to performance of feasibility studies and development of requirements for the next generation of reactors in order to maintain an updated proposal for a future recovery of the nuclear option. I will then try to identify in general terms the factors determining the future acceptance of nuclear power. They will be determined in the interdisciplinary area of politics, media and public interactions with the utilities the uses of the technology are forced to follow, by political constraints, two main directives: working only in new projects to achieve, if possible, new safety goals

  13. Nuclear power in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarossa, G [ENEA, Rome (Italy)

    1990-07-01

    As is known to most of this audience in November of 1987 a referendum determined a rejection of nuclear power in Italy. The referendum may be taken into consideration here as a large scale experiment which offers points of interest to this conference and problems to be aware of, in approaching a severe confrontation with the public. To give a synopsis of the Italian perspective I will examine: first the public acceptance in the situation before Chernobyl, then the most disturbing and sensitive factors of Chernobyl's consequences; how the opposition to nuclear energy worked with the support of most media and the strong pressures of an anti-nuclear political party, the syllogism of the opponents and the arguments used, the causes of major weakness of the defenders and how a new perception of nuclear risk was generated in the public. I will come to the topic of utility acceptance by mentioning that ENEL, as the National Utility, in its role is bound to a policy of compliance with Government decisions. It is oriented today to performance of feasibility studies and development of requirements for the next generation of reactors in order to maintain an updated proposal for a future recovery of the nuclear option. I will then try to identify in general terms the factors determining the future acceptance of nuclear power. They will be determined in the interdisciplinary area of politics, media and public interactions with the utilities the uses of the technology are forced to follow, by political constraints, two main directives: working only in new projects to achieve, if possible, new safety goals.

  14. AAEC nuclear power projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoe, G.; Fredsall, J.; Scurr, I.; Plotnikoff, W.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear power capacity projections developed in the May-June period of 1981 by the AAEC are presented. There have been downward revisions for nearly all countries with centrally planned economies. Projections for the year 2000 for the Western World have decreased in aggregate by 4.7% (27Gw) compared to those of 1980. However, this reduction is less than the previous estimate reduction and there appears to have been a stabilisation in the projection

  15. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Laurer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a quick-acting valve on the main-steam pipe of a nuclear power plant. The engineering design of the valve is to be improved. To the main valve disc, a piston-operated auxiliary valve disc is to be assigned closing a section of the area of the main valve disc. This way it is avoided that the drive of the main valve disc has to carry out different movements. 15 sub-claims. (UWI) [de

  16. Nuclear power in British politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the subject of nuclear power in British politics in 1986. The policies of the major political parties towards nuclear power are briefly outlined, along with public attitudes to nuclear energy, Chernobyl, and the rise of the anti-nuclear campaigners. (UK)

  17. Submarine nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enohara, Masami; Araragi, Fujio.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a ballast tank, and nuclear power facilities within the containment shell of a pressure resistance structure and a maintenance operator's entrance and a transmission cable cut-off device at the outer part of the containment shell, whereby after the construction, the shell is towed, and installed by self-submerging, and it can be refloated for repairs by its own strength. Constitution: Within a containment shell having a ballast tank and a pressure resisting structure, there are provided nuclear power facilities including a nuclear power generating chamber, a maintenance operator's living room and the like. Furthermore, a maintenance operator's entrance and exit device and a transmission cable cut-off device are provided within the shell, whereby when it is towed to a predetermined a area after the construction, it submerges by its own strength and when any repair inspection is necessary, it can float up by its own strength, and can be towed to a repair dock or the like. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. The safety of nuclear power plants during the year 2000 transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The French nuclear power plants had to face two main type of problems during the year 2000 transition: a generalized power grid incident and a dysfunction of computer-based or automated systems in nuclear installations. This dossier analyzes both possible incidents and describes the evaluation made by the French Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety (IPSN) of the different incident scenarios elaborated by Electricite de France (EdF) for its installations in anticipation of the transition. The problem of the year 2000 transition in other countries is briefly evoked. (J.S.)

  19. First steps of Poland in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidez, J.

    2010-01-01

    Poland appears as a new-comer in the domain of nuclear power but in fact previous projects of nuclear power plants existed but were abruptly stopped in the afterwards of Chernobyl. Today almost 90% of the electricity produced in Poland comes from the combustion of coal and lignite. In january 2009 the Polish government decided to include nuclear power in the energy mix with an aim of a 15% share of the electricity production in 2030 and with the first nuclear plant operating in 2020. The path toward this aim is marked out as following. 2009-2010: drawing up of the legal frame, creation of the nuclear safety authority, drawing up of the list of potential sites, and launching of the public debate. 2011-2013: selection of the first site, of the pool of investors, of the reactor technology and the signature of the contract for the first plant. 2014-2015: obtention of the administrative agreements, elaboration of the technical project. 2016-2020: construction of the plant. The polish public opinion favours nuclear energy and there is a kind of competition between different regions to home nuclear power plants. In 2010 Poland signed various collaboration agreements with the Usa, France and South-Korea. Polish authorities are studying the pros and cons of the EPR (EDF - Areva), ABWR (GE/Hitachi) and AP1000 (Westinghouse) reactors. (A.C.)

  20. Mechanical seals qualification procedure of the main pumps of nuclear power plants in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchdahl, D.; Martin, R.; Girault, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    Many important pumps in the nuclear power plants are equipped with mechanical seals. The good behaviour and reliability of mechanical seals depend specially on the quality and the stability of an interface of several microns. Peripheral speed reaches 50 m/s and pressure 5 MPa, shaft diameter may be 200 mm. Any failure of the mechanical seals may stop the production of electricity or may compromise nuclear safety. As far back as 1970, EDF has conducted qualification actions for the most important mechanical seals in terms of availability and safety. A qualification of mechanical seals needs three steps: - constructor test (tuning) at normal conditions, -qualification test on test rig at EDF/DER (semi-industrial) at normal, exceptional and incidental conditions lasting about 1500 h, - industrial qualification test in nuclear power station over one year. Several supplying sources are absolutely necessary. Any pump may receive mechanical seals from at least two different suppliers. A compromise had to be found to restrict the suppliers' number down to three. This choice concerned three high technology suppliers. A consistent modification procedure had been developed (references file procedure). For each power plant series, about ten types of mechanical seals are concerned. The selection criteria are the higher loads factors P, Vg or the safety related importance. This expensive approach is useful for EDF, many functional failures have been detected before the serial mechanical seals installation in the power plants. (authors). 1 annexe

  1. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The percentage of electricity generated by nuclear energy in each of the 26 countries that operated nuclear power plants in 1987 is given. The current policy and programs of some of these countries is described. News concerning uranium mining, enrichment, reprocessing and waste management is also included. Data in the form of a generalized status summary for all power reactors (> 30 MWEN) prepared from the nuclear power reactor data files of ANSTO is shown

  2. Nuclear power: the turning tide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, P.J.; Warren, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    During 1980 and 1981, opposition to the expansion of the nuclear power generation programme grew from about 45% of the population to approximately 53%. Women, young people and labour voters are the most strongly opposed to nuclear power but among no section of the population is there a clear majority in favour of building more nuclear power stations. (author)

  3. Nuclear power in the EC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrault, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power accounts for some 35% of electricity production in the European Community (EC). Using a mathematical analysis, based on different scenarios, i.e. low/high electricity demand and nuclear moratorium/revival, various demand forecasts are made. A pragmatic approach, considering conventional power generation pollution problems, forecasts a revival of nuclear power

  4. Overview paper on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiewak, I.; Cope, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    This paper was prepared as an input to ORNL's Strategic Planning Activity, ORNL National Energy Perspective (ONEP). It is intended to provide historical background on nuclear power, an analysis of the mission of nuclear power, a discussion of the issues, the technology choices, and the suggestion of a strategy for encouraging further growth of nuclear power

  5. Nuclear power proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear industry is experiencing a multiple crisis in which economic, technical and ethical aspects are blended inextricably. Nuclear hardware costs have everywhere soared far beyond inflation in the last five years, largely as a result of delays in programme completion arising from problems of reactor and fuel cycle. Meanwhile, partly as a result of this cost escalation, there is widespread and growing doubt as to whether capital will be available to finance the electricity generating levels projected by the industry and by governments for the 1990s. The nuclear industry is now in trouble at every stage of the fuel cycle. The industry's difficulties have also revealed a lack of overall - but particularly nuclear - energy strategy at either national or international levels, and a lack of will to create regulations and institutional machinery at either of these levels which might reassure both concerned publics and the energy industries themselves. This paper appraises some of the present limitations of international institutions in achieving control and management of nuclear power. (author)

  6. Nuclear power plants and the environment. Water samplings and releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Philippe; Bordet, Francois; Chevalier, Christian; Colin, Jean-Luc; Khalanski, Michel

    2013-01-01

    This voluminous and illustrated guide aims at giving detailed information on the nature of waters used by nuclear power plants and of releases, on how these samplings and controls are performed, on the associated risks for the environment and public health, and on how public is informed. After a general overview of these issues, a chapter addresses the protection of nature and biodiversity and the actions performed by EDF in this respect. The next chapter deals with public information. The next chapters discuss the water needs of a nuclear power plant, effluent releases and their impacts. Two chapters are dedicated to the monitoring and control of the environment, and to the various techniques of environmental metrology. Legal and regulatory aspects are then presented

  7. Protection against fire hazards in French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapus, J.

    2000-01-01

    The prevention of fire in French nuclear power plants has followed the evolution of safety regulations. Today fire hazards are no longer considered as classical industrial risks but as specific risks that deserve to be studied thoroughly and in a more formalized form. In the beginning of the eighties EDF was committed to the redaction of a technical referential against fire gathering all the directives applicable to the N4-type plant (1450 MW). In 1994 this technical referential was reconsidered and enlarged in order to involve 900 MW and 1300 MW units. In each nuclear power plant a PAI (plan against fire) has been elaborated so that the installation can be progressively upgraded according to the last standard defined by the technical referential. (A.C.)

  8. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small folder presents a digest of some useful information concerning the nuclear power plants worldwide and the situation of nuclear industry at the end of 1997: power production of nuclear origin, distribution of reactor types, number of installed units, evolution and prediction of reactor orders, connections to the grid and decommissioning, worldwide development of nuclear power, evolution of power production of nuclear origin, the installed power per reactor type, market shares and exports of the main nuclear engineering companies, power plants constructions and orders situation, evolution of reactors performances during the last 10 years, know-how and development of nuclear safety, the remarkable facts of 1997, the future of nuclear power and the energy policy trends. (J.S.)

  9. Thoughts on nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouze, Michel

    1996-01-01

    In this article published before the Chernobyl accident (and the greenhouse effect issue), the author comments the evolution of the perception people have on nuclear energy: it was supposed to be the beginning of a golden age, and is finally perceived as a source of thermal and radioactive pollution and a major industrial risk. He outlines and criticizes the various and more or less violent reactions and debates about the fact that choosing nuclear energy means choosing a certain type of society. He considers that this point of view refuses reality. He states that the emerging new and renewable energies cannot be the solution. He comments the emergence of an energy crisis after the first oil crisis, and the associated questions about a possible reduction of consumption, the replacement of oil, the potential of renewable energies. He criticizes the excessive fear about nuclear materials and energy, discusses the actual risks associated with electronuclear production, and discusses the energy issue in the international context to outline the importance of nuclear energy. He finally addresses issues related to the definition and implementation of an energy policy, with EDF as a major actor

  10. Evaluation tests on controbloc, a programmable automaton for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pralus, B.; Bourassin, J.L.; Varaldi, G.

    1983-01-01

    Controbloc is the programmable automaton used by Electricite de France (EDF) to equip its 1300 MW range of power plants. EDF and the designer CGEE Alsthom have conducted a large number of tests on prototype series equipment to determine whether it matches its specifications. These tests were performed in various laboratories in the Paris area and were concerned with: (1) verifying performance (acquisition, processing and retrieval cycle times - multiplexed exchange performance); (2) the robustness of equipment and its behaviour in industrial conditions (climatic tests in line with IEC regulations - earthquake resistance in particularly severe conditions - resistance to industrial interference); (3) behaviour when internal faults occur, an aspect of particular importance in view of the role played by Controbloc in nuclear power plants; in the event of a failure, safety (incorrect commands must not be given) and availability (resumption of operation) must be guaranteed. A large number of checks have been carried out both by the designer and EDF, the latter having put into operation an original method which is described in the paper. Controbloc has been thoroughly tested and its modular construction has facilitated the performance of these tests. Some shortcomings have been revealed which the designer or EDF has remedied. (author)

  11. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Zbinden, M.; Taponat, M.C.; Robertson, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is part of a series of papers aiming to present the friction and wear results of a collaborative study on nuclear power plant components tested in pressurized high temperature water. The high temperature test facilities and the methodology in presenting the kinetics and wear results are described in detail. The results of the same material combinations obtained from two very different high temperature test facilities (NRCC and EDF) are presented and discussed. (K.A.)

  12. Banning nuclear power at sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handler, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article argues that now that the East-West conflict is over, nuclear-powered vessels should be retired. Nuclear-powered ships and submarines lack military missions, are expensive to build and operate, generate large amounts of long-lived deadly nuclear waste from their normal operations and when they are decommissioned, and are subject to accidents or deliberate attack which can result in the sinking of nuclear reactors and the release of radiation. With the costs of nuclear-powered vessels mounting, the time has come to ban nuclear power at sea. (author)

  13. The need for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    This leaflet examines our energy future and concludes that nuclear power is an essential part of it. The leaflet also discusses relative costs, but it does not deal with social and environmental implications of nuclear power in any detail, since these are covered by other British Nuclear Forum publications. Headings are: present consumption; how will this change in future; primary energy resources (fossil fuels; renewable resources; nuclear); energy savings; availability of fossil fuels; availability of renewable energy resources; the contribution of thermal nuclear power; electricity; costs for nuclear power. (U.K.)

  14. Nuclear power renaissance or demise?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossani, Umair

    2010-09-15

    Nuclear power is going through a renaissance or demise is widely debated around the world keeping in mind the facts that there are risks related to nuclear technology and at the same time that is it environmentally friendly. My part of the argument is that there is no better alternative than Nuclear power. Firstly Nuclear Power in comparison to all other alternative fuels is environmentally sustainable. Second Nuclear power at present is at the dawn of a new era with new designs and technologies. Third part of the debate is renovation in the nuclear fuel production, reprocessing and disposal.

  15. Health effects of low dose exposures to external ionizing radiation in the French cohort of nuclear workers CEA-AREVA-EDF - 5287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuraud, K.; Fournier, L.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Laurier, D.; Laroche, P.; Le Guen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of nuclear workers are particularly relevant to study health effects of low dose and low dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation. In France, a cohort of nuclear workers employed by CEA, AREVA NC, or EDF, and badge-monitored for radiation exposure, has been followed-up. Annual exposure to penetrating photons was reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios were calculated using national mortality rates as the reference. Estimates of radiation dose-mortality associations were obtained using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) model. A total of 59,004 workers were followed-up between 1968 and 2004, for an average of 25 years. The mean cumulative photons dose was 16.1 mSv. At the end of the follow-up, workers were 56 years old and 6,310 workers had died. A strong healthy worker effect was observed. Positive but imprecise estimates of ERR/Sv were observed for all solid cancers and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A significant ERR/Sv was found for myeloid leukemia. This cohort study is the most informative ever conducted in France among nuclear workers. Results confirmed a healthy worker effect due to selection at hiring and health monitoring from occupational medicine. Observed dose-risk relationships were consistent with risks estimated in other studies, even if they remained associated to a large uncertainty. (authors)

  16. EDF at a glance 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This document presents the organization and key data of Electricite de France (EdF) group for 2003: business, priorities, values, different branches of the group (continental Europe, western Europe, Mediterranean branch, Africa, Asia-Pacific, Americas, Dalkia energy services, development branch), management, board of directors, market opening in France, human resource strategy, R and D, customers (residential, commercial, business and industrial, local authorities), industrial tool (fossil-fired generation, network management, renewable energy sources), reliability, financial flexibility, sustainable development (role of renewables in generation, CO 2 emissions, radiation protection, nuclear waste, environment, handling fuel poverty, landscape conservation), contacts and affiliates outside France. (J.S.)

  17. Torness: proposed nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The need for and desirability of nuclear power, and in particular the proposed nuclear power station at Torness in Scotland, are questioned. Questions are asked, and answered, on the following topics: position, appearance and cost of the proposed Torness plant, and whether necessary; present availability of electricity, and forecast of future needs, in Scotland; energy conservation and alternative energy sources; radiation hazards from nuclear power stations (outside, inside, and in case of an accident); transport of spent fuel from Torness to Windscale; radioactive waste management; possibility of terrorists making a bomb with radioactive fuel from a nuclear power station; cost of electricity from nuclear power; how to stop Torness. (U.K.)

  18. Nuclear Power Plant 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Again this year, our magazine presents the details of the conference on Spanish nuclear power plant operation held in February and that was devoted to 1996 operating results. The Protocol for Establishment of a New Electrical Sector Regulation that was signed last December will undoubtedly represent a new challenge for the nuclear industry. By clearing stating that current standards of quality and safety should be maintained or even increased if possible, the Protocol will force the Sector to improve its productivity, which is already high as demonstrated by the results of the last few years described during this conference and by recent sectorial economic studies. Generation of a nuclear kWh that can compete with other types of power plants is the new challenge for the Sector's professionals, who do not fear the new liberalization policies and approaching competition. Lower inflation and the resulting lower interest rates, apart from being representative indices of our economy's marked improvement, will be very helpful in facing this challenge. (Author)

  19. Nuclear power regional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parera, María Delia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a regional analysis of the Argentine electricity market was carried out considering the effects of regional cooperation, national and international interconnections; additionally, the possibilities of insertion of new nuclear power plants in different regions were evaluated, indicating the most suitable areas for these facilities to increase the penetration of nuclear energy in national energy matrix. The interconnection of electricity markets and natural gas due to the linkage between both energy forms was also studied. With this purpose, MESSAGE program was used (Model for Energy Supply Strategy Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts), promoted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This model performs a country-level economic optimization, resulting in the minimum cost for the modelling system. Regionalization executed by the Wholesale Electricity Market Management Company (CAMMESA, by its Spanish acronym) that divides the country into eight regions. The characteristics and the needs of each region, their respective demands and supplies of electricity and natural gas, as well as existing and planned interconnections, consisting of power lines and pipelines were taken into account. According to the results obtained through the model, nuclear is a competitive option. (author) [es

  20. Nuclear power for developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschmann, H.; Vennemann, J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the energy policy quandary of developing countries and explains why nuclear power plants of a suitable size - the KKW 200 MW BWR nuclear power plant for electric power and/or process steam generation is briefly presented here - have an economic advantage over fossil-fuelled power plants. (HP) [de

  1. Nuclear power in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikdahl, C.E.

    1999-01-01

    Sweden uses 16,000 kWh of electricity per person, by far the highest consumption in EU. The reason is a well-developed electricity intensive industry and a cold climate with high share of electric heating. The annual power consumption has for several years been about 140 TWh and a normal year almost 50 per cent is produced by hydro and 50 percent by nuclear. A new legislation, giving the Government the right to ordering the closure nuclear power plants of political reasons without any reference to safety, has been accepted by the Parliament. The new act, in force since January 1, 1998, is a specially tailored expropriation act. Certain rules for the economical compensation to the owner of a plant to be closed are defined in the new act. The common view in the Swedish industry is that the energy conservation methods proposed by the Government are unrealistic. During the first period of about five years the import from coal fired plants in Denmark and Germany is the only realistic alternative. Later natural gas combi units and new bioenergy plants for co-production of heat and power (CHP) might be available. (orig.) [de

  2. Bradwell Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    When built, the Magnox reactors were expected to have operating lifetimes of 20-25 years. In order to satisfy the licensing authorities of their continued safety, long term safety reviews (LTSRs) are being carried out as the reactors reach 20 years of operation. This is the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate's (NII) summary report on Bradwell nuclear power station. The objectives of the LTSR are stated. A description of the plant is followed by an explanation of the statutory position on licensing. The responsibilities of the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) and the NII are defined. From the examination of the CEGB's LTSR it is concluded that this generally confirms the validity of the existing safety case for present operation. However, some recommendations are made as to work required for reactor operation up to 1992. A summary of the NII findings is presented. This includes the reactor pressure circuit integrity, effects of ageing and in-service wear and radiation doses. (U.K.)

  3. Perspectives of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, Gy.

    2001-01-01

    In several countries the construction of nuclear power plants has been stopped, and in some counties several plants have been decommissioned or are planned to. Therefore, the question arises: have nuclear power plants any future? According to the author, the question should be reformulated: can mankind survive without nuclear power? To examine this challenge, the global power demand and its trends are analyzed. According to the results, traditional energy sources cannot be adequate to supply power. Therefore, a reconsideration of nuclear power should be imminent. The economic, environmental attractions are discussed as opposite to the lack of social support. (R.P.)

  4. Nuclear Power Today and Tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, with 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 68 new reactors under construction, nuclear power's global generating capacity reached 372.5 GW(e) at the end of 2012. Despite public scepticism, and in some cases fear, which arose following the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, two years later the demand for nuclear power continues to grow steadily, albeit at a slower pace. A significant number of countries are pressing ahead with plans to implement or expand their nuclear power programmes because the drivers toward nuclear power that were present before Fukushima have not changed. These drivers include climate change, limited fossil fuel supply, and concerns about energy security. Globally, nuclear power looks set to continue to grow steadily, although more slowly than was expected before the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The IAEA's latest projections show a steady rise in the number of nuclear power plants in the world in the next 20 years. They project a growth in nuclear power capacity by 23% by 2030 in the low projection and by 100% in the high projection. Most new nuclear power reactors planned or under construction are in Asia. In 2012 construction began on seven nuclear power plants: Fuqing 4, Shidaowan 1, Tianwan 3 and Yangjiang 4 in China; Shin Ulchin 1 in Korea; Baltiisk 1 in Russia; and Barakah 1 in the United Arab Emirates. This increase from the previous year's figures indicates an on-going interest and commitment to nuclear power and demonstrates that nuclear power is resilient. Countries are demanding new, innovative reactor designs from vendors to meet strict requirements for safety, national grid capacity, size and construction time, which is a sign that nuclear power is set to keep growing over the next few decades.

  5. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  6. Nuclear power plant disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of a nuclear power plant disaster is small but not excluded: in its event, assistance to the affected population mainly depends on local practitioners. Already existing diseases have to be diagnosed and treated; moreover, these physicians are responsible for the early detection of those individuals exposed to radiation doses high enough to induce acute illness. Here we present the pathogenesis, clinical development and possible diagnostic and therapeutical problems related to acute radiation-induced diseases. The differentiation of persons according to therapy need and prognosis is done on the sole base of the clinical evidence and the peripheral blood count. (orig.) [de

  7. Nuclear power plant diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollo, E.; Siklossy, P.

    1982-01-01

    The cooling circuit vibration diagnostic system of the Block 1 of the Paks nuclear power station is described. The automatic online vibration monitoring system consisting presently of 42 acceleration sensors and 9 pressure fluctuation sensors, which could be extended, performs both global and local inspection of the primary cooling circuit and its components. The offline data processing system evaluates the data for failure mode analysis. The software under development will be appropriate for partial preliminary identification of failure reasons during their initial phases. The installation experiences and the preliminary results during the hot operational testing of Block 1 are presented. (Sz.J.)

  8. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scurr, I.F.; Silver, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization maintains an ongoing assessment of the world's nuclear technology developments, as a core activity of its Strategic Plan. This publication reviews the current status of the nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia and around the world. Main issues discussed include: performances and economics of various types of nuclear reactors, uranium resources and requirements, fuel fabrication and technology, radioactive waste management. A brief account of the large international effort to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power is also given. 11 tabs., ills

  9. Nuclear power generation modern power station practice

    CERN Document Server

    1971-01-01

    Nuclear Power Generation focuses on the use of nuclear reactors as heat sources for electricity generation. This volume explains how nuclear energy can be harnessed to produce power by discussing the fundamental physical facts and the properties of matter underlying the operation of a reactor. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with an overview of nuclear physics, first by considering the structure of matter and basic physical concepts such as atomic structure and nuclear reactions. The second chapter deals with the requirements of a reactor as a heat source, along with the diff

  10. On nuclear power plant uprating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, S. Allen; Bailey, James V.; Maginnis, Stephen T.

    2004-01-01

    Power uprating for commercial nuclear power plants has become increasingly attractive because of pragmatic reasons. It provides quick return on investment and competitive financial benefits, while involving low risks regarding plant safety and public objection. This paper briefly discussed nuclear plant uprating guidelines, scope for design basis analysis and engineering evaluation, and presented the Salem nuclear power plant uprating study for illustration purposes. A cost and benefit evaluation of the Salem power uprating was also included. (author)

  11. Nuclear Security for Floating Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiba, James M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Scherer, Carolynn P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-13

    Recently there has been a lot of interest in small modular reactors. A specific type of these small modular reactors (SMR,) are marine based power plants called floating nuclear power plants (FNPP). These FNPPs are typically built by countries with extensive knowledge of nuclear energy, such as Russia, France, China and the US. These FNPPs are built in one country and then sent to countries in need of power and/or seawater desalination. Fifteen countries have expressed interest in acquiring such power stations. Some designs for such power stations are briefly summarized. Several different avenues for cooperation in FNPP technology are proposed, including IAEA nuclear security (i.e. safeguards), multilateral or bilateral agreements, and working with Russian design that incorporates nuclear safeguards for IAEA inspections in non-nuclear weapons states

  12. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Aage, H.K.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thomsen, J.

    2012-07-01

    The report is the ninth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2011 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the Fukushima accident. (LN)

  13. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thorlaksen, B.

    2010-05-01

    The report is the seventh report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is written in collaboration between Risoe DTU and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2009 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations, conflicts and the European safety directive. (LN)

  14. Nuclear power and nuclear safety 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E.; Israelson, C.; Kampmann, D.; Nystrup, P.E.; Thomsen, J.

    2013-11-01

    The report is the tenth report in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power production, with special emphasis on safety issues and nuclear emergency preparedness. The report is prepared in collaboration between DTU Nutech and the Danish Emergency Management Agency. The report for 2012 covers the following topics: status of nuclear power production, regional trends, reactor development, safety related events, international relations and conflicts, and the results of the EU stress test. (LN)

  15. Nuclear power. Volume 1. Nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 1 contains the following chapters; (1) nuclear reactor theory; (2) nuclear reactor design; (3) types of nuclear power plants; (4) licensing requirements; (5) shielding and personnel exposure; (6) containment and structural design; (7) main steam and turbine cycles; (8) plant electrical system; (9) plant instrumentation and control systems; (10) radioactive waste disposal (waste management) and (11) conclusion

  16. International nuclear power status 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2002-04-01

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  17. International nuclear power status 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2003-03-01

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  18. Competitiveness of nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Yoshihiko

    1998-01-01

    In view of the various merits of nuclear power generation, Japanese electric utilities will continue to promote nuclear power generation. At the same time, however, it is essential to further enhance cost performance. Japanese electric utilities plan to reduce the cost of nuclear power generation, such as increasing the capacity factor, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing construction costs. In Asia, nuclear power will also play an important role as a stable source of energy in the future. For those countries planning to newly introduce nuclear power, safety is the highest priority, and cost competitiveness is important. Moreover, financing will be an essential issue to be resolved. Japan is willing to support the establishment of nuclear power generation in Asia, through its experience and achievements. In doing this, support should not only be bilateral, but should include all nuclear nations around the Pacific rim in a multilateral support network. (author)

  19. Ecological problems of nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babaev, N S; Demin, V F; Kuz' min, I I; Stepanchikov, V I [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii

    1978-10-01

    Modern power sources including nuclear one are characterized. Basic information on radiation protection of man and biosphere is presented. Problems of radiation effect of nuclear fuel cycle enterprises on population and environment are discussed. Comparative evaluation of nuclear and thermal power effect on biosphere is made. It is shown that nuclear power is the safest power source at the present development state. The conclusion is drawn that the use of nuclear energy controlled and limited by scientifically founded norms does not present radiation hazard for population and environment.

  20. Nuclear power in western society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, N.L.

    1977-01-01

    The degree to which problems of public acceptance have contributed to the slowdown in progress of nuclear power in Western European countries and the USA is discussed. Some of the effects on the nuclear power industry, i.e. the electrical utilities, the power station suppliers, and the fuel cycle contractors are described. The problem of the lack of public acceptance is examined by consideration of four areas: the position of the employee working in nuclear installations, opposition from the local community, the question of terrorism and its impact on nuclear policy, and finally, what is felt to constitute the greatest anxiety concerning nuclear power, that of proliferation. (U.K.)

  1. EDF at a glance. EDF group 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document presents the organization and key data of the Electricite de France (EdF) group for 2002: business (generation and trading, transmission, distribution, supply, energy services), corporate governance (board of directors, executive committee), different branches of the group (continental Europe, western Europe, Middle-East and Africa, Asia-Pacific, Americas), main affiliates, international contacts and addresses, financial performance (consolidated sales, Ebitda), customers (residential, commercial, business and industrial, local authorities), generation (balanced energy mix), human resources, corporate social responsibility, sustainable development indicators. (J.S.)

  2. Is nuclear power and alternative?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejon, E.

    1996-01-01

    In this chapter of the book author deals with the historical background for the nuclear energy power. Some statistical data about nuclear power stations as well as on radioactive wastes are given. The Chernobyl catastrophe is described. Author thinks that nuclear energy is not safe and it has no perspective in future

  3. The 40 year deadline for the French nuclear stock. Decision process, strengthening option and costs associated with a possible lifetime extension beyond 40 years of EDF reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marignac, Yves

    2014-01-01

    This report first proposes an overview of the lifetime extension problematic (PLEX) for nuclear plants in a general context (strategy of lifetime extension, and uncertainty and lack of return on experience), and in the case of France (emergence of a strategy of lifetime extension, economic challenges of an extension, uncertainty on investments required by an extension, risk of imposed implicit decisions). It gives a rather detailed overview of the French nuclear reactor fleet, of the status of EDF-operated reactors (construction stages, main lifetime events, regulatory situation of currently exploited reactors) and of their characteristics (common operation principle, main components, main safety functions, main considered severe accidents). It addresses safety issues related to ageing and to the post-Fukushima re-assessment (problematic, robustness increase, limits and weaknesses of additional safety assessments). It presents the currently performed improvements (safety referential, applicable strengthening requirements like safety re-examinations and requirements introduced after Fukushima, applied strengthening prescriptions drawn from additional safety assessments or from the third decennial inspection, with their limitations and perspectives). It proposes strengthening scenarios along with their challenges (in terms of requirement level, procedure and agenda). Three scenarios are proposed (degraded safety, preserved safety, strengthened safety) and analysed in terms of protection against aggressions, diffuse robustness, prevention and management of reactor accident, prevention and management of pool accidents, ultimate control and assistance means. Scenarios are finally compared in terms of costs

  4. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1976-07-01

    The IAEA is organizing a major conference on nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle, which is to be held from 2 to 13 May 1977 in Salzburg, Austria. The programme for the conference was published in the preceding issue of the IAEA Bulletin (Vol.18, No. 3/4). Topics to be covered at the conference include: world energy supply and demand, supply of nuclear fuel and fuel cycle services, radioactivity management (including transport), nuclear safety, public acceptance of nuclear power, safeguarding of nuclear materials, and nuclear power prospects in developing countries. The articles in the section that follows are intended to serve as an introduction to the topics to be discussed at the Salzburg Conference. They deal with the demand for uranium and nuclear fuel cycle services, uranium supplies, a computer simulation of regional fuel cycle centres, nuclear safety codes, management of radioactive wastes, and a pioneering research project on factors that determine public attitudes toward nuclear power. It is planned to present additional background articles, including a review of the world nuclear fuel reprocessing situation and developments in the uranium enrichment industry, in future issues of the Bulletin. (author)

  5. Nuclear Power Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981-85 research program planned by the Nuclear Power Division of EPRI places major emphasis on the assurance of safety and realiability of light water reactors (LWRs). Of high priority is a better knowledge of LWR-system behavior undeer abnormal conditions and the behavior of structural materials used for pressure vessels, piping, and large nuclear-plant components. Strong emphasis is also placed on achieving the most-effective performance and utilization of nuclear fuels and improving the corrosion resistance of pressurized-water-reactor steam generators. Efforts are underway to reduce radiation exposure and outage duration and to investigate the human factors involved in plant operation and maintenance. Substantial emphasis is placed on short-range goals designed to achieve useful results in the next two to seven years. The Division's mid- and long-range goal is to improve the use of fissionable and fertile materials and aid in the realization of other reactor systems. A series of general goals, categorized into three time frames and planned expenditures shows the trend of work to be undertaken. 53 figures

  6. Nuclear power in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koryakin, Yu.I.

    1977-01-01

    The present states of nuclear power in Spain is shortly surveyed. Data are provided on NPPs currently in operation, under construction, designed and planned. In line with the 10-year ''National programme of electricity supply'' a major and all increasing part of the electricity generation growth is to be ensured by NPPs and to account for more than 50% by the end of the period (1987). Out of the 7 units of NPPs now under construction, 6 units utilize PWR reactors and only 1 unit- a BWR reactor. The roles of private and public sectors are noted. Main characteristics of the ''ENSA'' plant now under construction are provided where components of NPPs with PWR and BWR reactors will be fabricated. Major developments in the fields of mining, milling and extraction of U from lignites, U enrichment, fuel fabrication and spent fuel reprocessing are considered. Measures now taken to improve the licensing procedure, surveillance of NPPs and personnel training are to advance the nuclear power development programme in the country

  7. To EDF: PHOEBUS, computer-assisted engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecocq, P.; Goudal, J.C.; Barache, J.M.; Feingold, D.; Cornon, P.

    1986-01-01

    EDF has built a modular integrated computer-assisted nuclear engineering (CAE) system called POEBUS. Since 1975, the Organization has been interested in CAE which places computer methods and technology at the disposal of the engineering department. This paper describes the changes and their effect on the techniques in use, working methods and the personnel called on to put them into operation [fr

  8. Nuclear power: how and why

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The subject is discussed, with special reference to the United Kingdom, under the headings: the need for nuclear power; Britain's experience (nuclear reactors); the nuclear process; how fuel is made; recycling fuel; wastes and their treatment; decommissioning; fast reactors; nuclear fusion; safety and radiation. (U.K.)

  9. Nuclear power plant emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The guide sets forth detailed requirements on how the licensee of a nuclear power plant shall plan, implement and maintain emergency response arrangements. The guide is also applied to nuclear material and nuclear waste transport in situations referred to in guide YVL 6.5. Requirements on physical protection are presented in a separate guide of Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK)

  10. Nuclear power without nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, K.; Klein, F.J.

    1982-01-01

    In this study leading experts summarize the work of a working group meeting during several years, and they represent the state of the art of the international discussion about the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. The technical basis of proliferation, the relations between energy policy and nuclear energy, as well as the development of the non-proliferation system up to the present are thoroughly studied. Special attention is paid to the further development of the instruments of the non-proliferation policy, and approaches and ways to improving the control of the fuel cycle, e.g. by means of multinational methods or by improving the control requirements are analyzed. Also the field of positive inducements and negative sanctions to prevent the proliferation as well as the question of ensured supply are elucidated in detail. A further section then analyzes the functions of the international organizations active in this field and the nuclear policy of the most important western industrial nations, the RGW-states and the threshold countries of the Third World. This volume pays special attention to the nuclear policy of the Federal Republic of Germany and to the possibilities and necessities of a further development of the non-proliferation policy. (orig.) [de

  11. Canada's steps towards nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1958-09-01

    This paper describes the policy development of nuclear power in Canada. Canada has a natural abundance of coal, oil, natural gas, water power and uranium. It was recognized that the demand for nuclear power would only materialize if it met an economically competitive range.

  12. Fields of nuclear power application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper deals with nuclear power application in fields different from electricity generation, i.e. district heating, sea water desalination, coal gasification and nuclear splitting of water. (RW) [de

  13. Nuclear power: a British view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, G.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: importance of nuclear power; the problems; fuel availability (uranium purchasing policy; uranium market; longer-term demand; enrichment market; fast reactor); non-proliferation and nuclear export policy; public acceptability. (U.K.)

  14. Services for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fremann, M.; Ryckelynck

    1987-01-01

    This article gives an information as complete as possible about the activities of the french nuclear industry on the export-market. It describes the equipment and services available in the field of services for nuclear power stations [fr

  15. The benefits of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    This article briefly outlines the benefits of nuclear power. Nuclear electricity generation is compared with fossil-fuel generated electricity in terms of environmental pollution and accidents and disease hazards

  16. Nuclear power in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, S. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). Science Policy Research Unit)

    1991-01-01

    The main aim of this article is that of illustrating the experience of the use of nuclear power in Eastern Europe in order to estimate the degree of adequacy or inadequacy of COMECON's nuclear technology. The author examines four areas of interest concerning: the feasibility of new orders for nuclear plants in Eastern Europe; the pros and cons of completing half-built nuclear power plants; current policy towards existing nuclear power plants; and a review of the available evidence on the operating performance of plants in Eastern Europe. The common belief that the nuclear power experience had by old COMECON countries is uniformly bad does not seem to be fully supported by the limited evidence available. In the author's opinion, the prospects for a successful nuclear power industry in these countries depends on a series on interdependent factors among which, human skills hold a prominent position.

  17. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushijima, Susumu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to prevent the degradation in the quality of condensated water in a case where sea water leakage should occur in a steam condenser of a BWR type nuclear power plant. Constitution: Increase in the ion concentration in condensated water is detected by an ion concentration detector and the leaking factor of sea water is calculated in a leaking factor calculator. If the sea water leaking factor exceeds a predetermined value, a leak generation signal is sent from a judging device to a reactor power control device to reduce the reactor power. At ehe same tiem, the leak generation signal is also sent to a steam condenser selection and isolation device to interrupt the sea water pump of a specified steam condenser based on the signal from the ion concentration detector, as well as close the inlet and outlet valves while open vent and drain valves to thereby forcively discharge the sea water in the cooling water pipes. This can keep the condensate desalting device from ion breaking and prevent the degradation in the quality of the reactor water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. Nuclear power. Volume 2. Nuclear power project management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT DESIGN is intended to be used as a working reference book for management, engineers and designers, and as a graduate-level text for engineering students. The book is designed to combine theory with practical nuclear power engineering and design experience, and to give the reader an up-to-date view of the status of nuclear power and a basic understanding of how nuclear power plants function. Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) review of nuclear power plants; (2) licensing procedures; (3) safety analysis; (4) project professional services; (5) quality assurance and project organization; (6) construction, scheduling, and operation; (7) nuclear fuel handling and fuel management; (8) plant cost management; and (9) conclusion

  19. Problems of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panasenkov, A.

    1982-01-01

    The answers are reported given by the head of the department for peaceful uses of nuclear energy of the secretariat of the Council of Mutual Economic Assistance, Mr. A. Pasenkov to questions given him in an interview for APN. The questions were related to the current state and development of world nuclear power, nuclear safety and the attitude of the general public to nuclear power in the West and in the CMEA countries. (B.S.)

  20. Nuclear power in East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelson, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    This editorial discusses the shifting dominance in the nuclear reactor technology from the USA to new leadership in East Asia. With the expanding economies and electricity demand, Design, construction and operation of a large number of nuclear power plants in east Asia will support nuclear engineers, technologist, manufacturing facilities, and potential weapons experts. In contrast, the cessation of construction of power reactors in the US is leading to deminished nuclear capabilities

  1. Nuclear power 2005: European report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, nuclear power plants were operated and/or built in eighteen European countries. Thirteen of these countries are members of EU-25. Five of the ten countries joining the European Union on May 1, 2004 operate nuclear power stations. A total of 204 power reactors with a gross power of 181,030 MWe and a net power of 171,8479 MWe were in operation at the end of the year. In 2005, no nuclear power plant was commissioned. Two nuclear power plants were decommissioned in Europe in the course of 2005. In Germany the Obrigheim NPP and in Sweden the Barsebaeck 2 NPP have been permanently shut down due to political decisions. As a result of ongoing technical optimization in some plants, involving increases in reactor power or generator power as well as commissioning of plants of higher capacity, nuclear generating capacity increased by approx. 1.6 GW. In late 2005, five nuclear generating units were under construction in Finland (1), Romania (1), and Russia (3). 148 nuclear power plants were operated in thirteen states of the European Union (EU-25). They had an aggregate gross power of 137,023 MWe and a net power of 130,415 MWe, generating approx. 970 billion gross kWh of electricity in 2005, thus again contributing some 31% to the public electricity supply in the EU-25. In largest share of nuclear power in electricity generation is found in France (80%), followed by 72% in Lithuania, 55% in the Slovak Republic, 55% in Belgium, and 51% in Ukraine. In several countries not operating nuclear power plants of their own, such as Italy, Portugal, and Austria, nuclear power makes considerable contributions to public electricity supply as a result of electricity imports. (All statistical data in the country report apply to 2004 unless indicated otherwise. This is the year for which sound preliminary data are currently available for the states listed.) (orig.)

  2. Discharges from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    HM Inspectorate of Pollution commissioned, with authorising responsibilities in England and Wales, a study into the discharges of radioactive effluents from Nuclear Power Stations. The study considered arisings from nuclear power stations in Europe and the USA and the technologies to treat and control the radioactive discharges. This report contains details of the technologies used at many nuclear power stations to treat and control radioactive discharges and gives, where information was available, details of discharges and authorised discharge limits. (author)

  3. Energy situation and nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, M R [Reactor and Neutron physics Department Nuclear Research Center A.E., Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    A brief general review is given concerning the requirements of power throughout history with an indication to the world capital reserves of energy. The energy released from the conversion of mass in chemical and nuclear processes is also discussed with comparative analysis between conventional fuel fired plant and nuclear power plant having the same energy output. The advantages and disadvantages arising from having a nuclear power programme are also discussed. 1 fig.

  4. Nuclear power news no 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The following matters are treated: What happened at the Chernobyl accident? - The Russian graphite reactor - a comparison with light water reactors. - The Soviet program for nuclear power. - Serious organizational unsatisfactory state of things at the nuclear power plants of Soviet. - Graphite reactors of the nuclear power program of the world. - The radioactive fallout in Sweden after Chernobyl. - The risks involved in radioactive radiation - an experts conception

  5. Manpower development for nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This Guidebook provides policy-makers and managers of nuclear power programmes with information and guidance on the role, requirements, planning and implementation of manpower development programmes. It presents and discusses the manpower requirements associated with the activities of a nuclear power programme, the technical qualifications of this manpower and the manpower development corresponding to these requirements and qualifications. The Guidebook also discusses the purpose and conditions of national participation in the activities of a nuclear power programme

  6. Nuclear power - facts, trends, problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickermann, W.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt has been made to describe the state-of-the-art of nuclear power utilization, particularly for energy production. On the basis of information obtained from study tours through the USSR a rather comprehensive review of nuclear power plants and research establishments in the Soviet Union, of desalination reactors, ship propulsion reactors and fast breeder reactors is given, including nuclear facilities of other countries, e.g. France, USA, GDR. Heat generation, radiation-induced chemical processes and aspects associated with nuclear energy uses, such as risks, environmental protection or radioactive wastes, are also considered. Moreover, the author attempts to outline the social relevance of nuclear power

  7. Design, manufacturing and commissioning of mobile unit for EDF (Dow Chemical process)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cangini, D.; Cordier, J.P.; PEC Engineering, Osny, France)

    1985-01-01

    To process their spent ion exchange resins and the liquid wastes, EDF has ordered from PEC a mobile unit using the DOW CHEMICAL binder. This paper presents the EDF's design requirements as well as the new French regulation for waste embedding. The mobile unit was started in January 1983 and commissioned successfully in January 1985 in the TRICASTIN EDF's power plant

  8. Wuergassen nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    The decision of the Federal Court of Administration concerns an application for immediate decommissioning of a nuclear power plant (Wuergassen reactor): The repeal of the permit granted. The decision dismisses the appeal for non-admission lodged by the plaintiffs against the ruling of the Higher Court of Administration (OVG) of North-Rhine Westphalia of December 19th 1988 (File no. 21 AK 8/88). As to the matter in dispute, the Federal Court of Administration confirms the opinion of the Higher Court of Administration. As to the headnotes, reference can be made to that decision. Federal Court of Administration, decision of April 5th 1989 - 7 B 47.89. Lower instance: OVG NW, Az.: 21 AK 8/88. (orig./RST) [de

  9. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    In the first embodiment of the present invention, elements less activated by neutrons are used as reactor core structural materials placed under high neutron irradiation. In the second embodiment of the present invention, materials less activated by neutrons when corrosive materials intrude to a reactor core are used as structural materials constituting portions where corrosion products are generated. In the third embodiment, chemical species comprising elements less activated by neutrons are used as chemical species to be added to reactor water with an aim of controlling water quality. A nuclear power plant causing less radioactivity can be provided by using structural materials comprising a group of specific elements hardly forming radioactivity by activation of neutrons or by controlling isotope ratios. (N.H.)

  10. Nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear power plant is described which includes a steam generator supplied via an input inlet with feedwater heated by reactor coolant to generate steam, the steam being conducted to a steam engine having a high pressure stage to which the steam is supplied, and which exhausts the steam through a reheater to a low pressure stage. The reheater is a heat exchanger requiring a supply of hot fluid. To avoid the extra load that would be placed on the steam generator by using a portion of its steam output as such heating fluid, a portion of the water in the steam generator is removed and passed through the reheater, this water having received at least adequate heating in the steam generator to make the reheater effective, but not at the time of its removal being in a boiling condition

  11. Nuclear power ecology: comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.; Lips'ka, A.Yi.; Pisanko, Zh.Yi.

    2005-01-01

    Ecological effects of different energy sources are compared. Main actions for further nuclear power development - safety increase and waste management, are noted. Reasons of restrained public position to nuclear power and role of social and political factors in it are analyzed. An attempt is undertaken to separate real difficulties of nuclear power from imaginary ones that appear in some mass media. International actions of environment protection are noted. Risk factors at different energy source using are compared. The results of analysis indicate that ecological influence and risk for nuclear power are of minimum

  12. Nuclear power reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjon, Robert

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to explain the physical working conditions of nuclear reactors for the benefit of non-specialized engineers and engineering students. One of the leading ideas of this course is to distinguish between two fundamentally different concepts: - a science which could be called neutrodynamics (as distinct from neutron physics which covers the knowledge of the neutron considered as an elementary particle and the study of its interactions with nuclei); the aim of this science is to study the interaction of the neutron gas with real material media; the introduction will however be restricted to its simplified expression, the theory and equation of diffusion; - a special application: reactor physics, which is introduced when the diffusing and absorbing material medium is also multiplying. For this reason the chapter on fission is used to introduce this section. In practice the section on reactor physics is much longer than that devoted to neutrodynamics and it is developed in what seemed to be the most relevant direction: nuclear power reactors. Every effort was made to meet the following three requirements: to define the physical bases of neutron interaction with different materials, to give a correct mathematical treatment within the limit of necessary simplifying hypotheses clearly explained; to propose, whenever possible, numerical applications in order to fix orders of magnitude [fr

  13. Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyokawa, Teruyuki; Soman, Yoshindo.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To constitute a heat exchanger as one unit by integrating primary and secondary coolant circuits with secondary coolant circuit and steam circuit into a single primary circuit and steam circuit. Constitution: A nuclear power plant comprises a nuclear reactor vessel, primary coolant pipeways and a leakage detection system, in which a dual-pipe type heat exchanger is connected to the primary circuit pipeway. The heat conduction tube of the heat exchanger has a dual pipe structure, in which the inside of the inner tube is connected to the primary circuit pipeway, the outside of the outer tube is connected to steam circuit pipeway and a fluid channel is disposed between the inner and outer tubes and the fluid channel is connected to the inside of an expansion tank for intermediate heat medium. The leak detection system is disposed to the intermediate heat medium expansion tank. Sodium as the intermediate heat medium is introduced from the intermediate portion (between the inner and outer tubes) by way of inermediate heat medium pipeways to the intermediate heat medium expansion tank and, further, to the intermediate portion for recycling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Nuclear power in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The increase in electronuclear production is the result of an investment policy which was started twenty years ago and actively pursued, notably by France where the programme was speeded up during the last decade. Over the whole of Europe taken in the widest sense, that is to say over the 10 million sq kms which stretch from the Atlantic to the Eastern borders of the Soviet Union with its population of nearly 664 million inhabitants (a sixth of the world population), the number of reactors continues to grow. In Eastern Europe a major investment programme is in progress and the Soviets have already reached the 1,500 MWe level. In the West, after a period of uncertainty marked by a systematic opposition to nuclear, public opinion is now much more favourable to this form of energy. The next referendum due to be held in Switzerland is likely to confirm this trend. There is still some uncertainty over the size of programmes as in Spain and Italy but it is true that the economic crisis had lead to a cut-back in energy demand. Consumption increases however turn up increasingly often. The following study examines 17 European countries which have already built nuclear power plants or are just about to do so [fr

  15. Broader utilization of programmable automation equipment in French nuclear power plants: Reflections on the choices made by Electricite de France and French designers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudry, Y.; Varaldi, G.

    1983-01-01

    More than 1000 microprocessors and more than 10,000 data memories in each of the twenty or so 1300 MW units in the French nuclear programme: that was the decision taken by Electricite de France (EDF) in conjunction with the designers in 1974, with the intention of introducing programmable automata on a wide scale in French nuclear power plants. This programme was carried out with the assistance of advanced research services such as the universities, the Commissariat a l'energie atomique (CEA), EDF's design and research service and the designers, most of whom were already EDF suppliers for the 900 MW range. Having used computers for linking sequences (themselves carried out with electromagnetic technology) for its latest natural-uranium gas-cooled graphite-moderated power plants, EDF decided to call a temporary halt, in the case of its 900 MW light-water range, to the use of digital techniques for the control and automation of power plants although it continued to employ such techniques widely in data processing. Thus, the widespread introduction of programmable automata, which was decided upon in 1974/75 at a time when no equivalent existed at the international level, led EDF and French designers to undertake a major development effort in order to meet the requirements - particularly safety and reliability requirements - for such automata to be incorporated into the nuclear field. How does this choice fit in with the logical evolution of the digitalization of French nuclear power plants. What problems has it caused for EDF and French industry. How have these problems been tackled. How have they been overcome. These are the questions dealt with in this paper. (author)

  16. Audit of EDF generation and transmission division suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leconte, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the process for acceptance by EDF/production and transmission group of suppliers, industrial equipment manufacturers and providers of repair activities or services for the maintenance of nuclear plants. 1 tab

  17. Nuclear power perspective in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinrong; Xu Changhua

    2003-01-01

    China started developing nuclear technology for power generation in the 1970s. A substantial step toward building nuclear power plants was taken as the beginning of 1980 s. The successful constructions and operations of Qinshan - 1 NPP, which was an indigenous PWR design with the capacity of 300 MWe, and Daya Bay NPP, which was an imported twin-unit PWR plant from France with the capacity of 900 MWe each, give impetus to further Chinese nuclear power development. Now there are 8 units with the total capacity of 6100 MWe in operation and 3 units with the total capacity of 2600 MWe under construction. For the sake of meeting the increasing demand for electricity for the sustainable economic development, changing the energy mix and mitigating the environment pollution impact caused by fossil fuel power plant, a near and middle term electrical power development program will be established soon. It is preliminarily predicted that the total power installation capacity will be 750-800GWe by the year 2020. The nuclear share will account for at least 4.0-4.5 percent of the total. This situation leaves the Chinese nuclear power industry with a good opportunity but also a great challenge. A practical nuclear power program and a consistent policy and strategy for future nuclear power development will be carefully prepared and implemented so as to maintain the nuclear power industry to be healthfully developed. (author)

  18. Nuclear power plant operator licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide applies to the nuclear power plant operator licensing procedure referred to the section 128 of the Finnish Nuclear Energy Degree. The licensing procedure applies to shift supervisors and those operators of the shift teams of nuclear power plant units who manipulate the controls of nuclear power plants systems in the main control room. The qualification requirements presented in the guide also apply to nuclear safety engineers who work in the main control room and provide support to the shift supervisors, operation engineers who are the immediate superiors of shift supervisors, heads of the operational planning units and simulator instructors. The operator licensing procedure for other nuclear facilities are decided case by case. The requirements for the basic education, work experience and the initial, refresher and complementary training of nuclear power plant operating personnel are presented in the YVL guide 1.7. (2 refs.)

  19. Nuclear Power Plant Module, NPP-1: Nuclear Power Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, Robert L.

    The purpose of the Nuclear Power Plant Modules, NPP-1, is to determine the total cost of electricity from a nuclear power plant in terms of all the components contributing to cost. The plan of analysis is in five parts: (1) general formulation of the cost equation; (2) capital cost and fixed charges thereon; (3) operational cost for labor,…

  20. Nuclear power falling to pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moberg, Aa.

    1985-01-01

    The international development during the 80s is reviewed. It is stated that the construction of plants has come to a standstill. The forecasting of nuclear power as a simple and cheap source of energy has been erroneous because of cracks and leakage, unsolved waste problems and incidents. Nuclear power companies go into liquidation and reactors are for sale. Sweden has become the country with most nuclear power per capita mainly due to its controlled decommissioning. The civilian nuclear power makes the proliferation of nuclear weapons possible. With 324 reactors all over the world, a conventional war may cause disasters like Hiroshima. It is stated that the nuclear power is a dangerous and expensive source of energy and impossible to manage. (G.B.)

  1. Nuclear power - the Hydra's head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunyard, P

    1986-01-01

    Following the accident at Chernobyl, the nuclear policies of many governments have been reconsidered and restated. Those in favour of nuclear power are those with highly centralised state bureaucracies, such as France and the USSR, where public opinion is disregarded. In more democratic countries, where referenda are held, such as Austria and Sweden, the people have chosen to do away with nuclear power. Indeed, the author states that nuclear power represents the State against the people, the State against democracy. Reference is made to the IAEA Reactor Safety Conference held in September, 1986, in Vienna, and the declaration sent to it by AntiAtom International. This called for the United Nations to promote the phasing out of nuclear power facilities throughout the world. It also called on the IAEA to support the phasing out of nuclear power and promote benign energy forms instead.

  2. Nuclear power - the Hydra's head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyard, Peter.

    1986-01-01

    Following the accident at Chernobyl, the nuclear policies of many governments have been reconsidered and restated. Those in favour of nuclear power are those with highly centralised state bureaucracies, such as France and the USSR, where public opinion is disregarded. In more democratic countries, where referenda are held, such as Austria and Sweden, the people have chosen to do away with nuclear power. Indeed, the author states that nuclear power represents the State against the people, the State against democracy. Reference is made to the IAEA Reactor Safety Conference held in September, 1986, in Vienna, and the declaration sent to it by AntiAtom International. This called for the United Nations to promote the phasing out of nuclear power facilities throughout the world. It also called on the IAEA to support the phasing out of nuclear power and promote benign energy forms instead. (UK)

  3. Nuclear power and the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, St.

    2009-01-01

    This series of slides describes the policy of the UK government concerning nuclear power. In January 2008 the UK Government published the White Paper on the Future of Nuclear Power. The White Paper concluded that new nuclear power stations should have a role to play in this country's future energy mix. The role of the Government is neither to build nuclear power plants nor to finance them. The White Paper set out the facilitative actions the Government planned to take to reduce regulatory and planning risks associated with investing in new nuclear power stations. The White Paper followed a lengthy period of consultation where the UK Government sought a wide variety of views from stakeholders and the public across the country on the future of nuclear power. In total energy companies will need to invest in around 30-35 GW of new electricity generating capacity over the next two decades. This is equivalent to about one-third of our existing capacity. The first plants are expected to enter into service by 2018 or sooner. The Office for Nuclear Development (OND) has been created to facilitate new nuclear investment in the UK while the Nuclear Development Forum (NDF) has been established to lock in momentum to secure the long-term future of nuclear power generation in the UK. (A.C.)

  4. Nuclear power in human medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The public widely associate nuclear power with the megawatt dimensions of nuclear power plants in which nuclear power is released and used for electricity production. While this use of nuclear power for electricity generation is rejected by part of the population adopting the polemic attitude of ''opting out of nuclear,'' the application of nuclear power in medicine is generally accepted. The appreciative, positive term used in this case is nuclear medicine. Both areas, nuclear medicine and environmentally friendly nuclear electricity production, can be traced back to one common origin, i.e. the ''Atoms for Peace'' speech by U.S. President Eisenhower to the U.N. Plenary Assembly on December 8, 1953. The methods of examination and treatment in nuclear medicine are illustrated in a few examples from the perspective of a nuclear engineer. Nuclear medicine is a medical discipline dealing with the use of radionuclides in humans for medical purposes. This is based on 2 principles, namely that the human organism is unable to distinguish among different isotopes in metabolic processes, and the radioactive substances are employed in amounts so small that metabolic processes will not be influenced. As in classical medicine, the application of these principles serves two complementary purposes: diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear power in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, V A

    1981-04-01

    This article examines the role of nuclear power in the USSR. Since the beginning of development of power reactors in the Soviet Union in the 1950s, their contribution had grown to 6% of all electric power by 1980. Reactor development has proceeded rapidly, with a number of reactor designs in use. Fast-breeder reactors and designs for specialized applications are under development. It is anticipated that the contribution of nuclear power will continue to grow. The status of nuclear power stations at 20 locations is summarized in a table.

  6. Nuclear power in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    This Article examines the role of nuclear power in the USSR. Since the beginning of development of power reactors in the Soviet Union in the 1950s, their contribution had grown to 6% of all electric power by 1980. Reactor development has proceeded rapidly, with a number of reactor designs in use. Fast breeder reactors and designs for specialized applications are under development. It is anticipated that the contribution of nuclear power will continue to grow. (author)

  7. Power peaking nuclear reliability factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.A.; Pegram, J.W.; Mays, C.W.; Romano, J.J.; Woods, J.J.; Warren, H.D.

    1977-11-01

    The Calculational Nuclear Reliability Factor (CNRF) assigned to the limiting power density calculated in reactor design has been determined. The CNRF is presented as a function of the relative power density of the fuel assembly and its radial local. In addition, the Measurement Nuclear Reliability Factor (MNRF) for the measured peak hot pellet power in the core has been evaluated. This MNRF is also presented as a function of the relative power density and radial local within the fuel assembly

  8. Nuclear power in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, V A [AN SSSR, Moscow. Akusticheskij Inst.

    1982-04-01

    This Article examines the role of nuclear power in the USSR. Since the beginning of development of power reactors in the Soviet Union in the 1950s, their contribution had grown to 6% of all electric power by 1980. Reactor development has proceeded rapidly, with a number of reactor designs in use. Fast breeder reactors and designs for specialized applications are under development. It is anticipated that the contribution of nuclear power will continue to grow.

  9. Nuclear power in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, V A [State Committee for Science and Technology, Moscow, USSR

    1981-04-01

    This article examines the role of nuclear power in the USSR. Since the beginning of development of power reactors in the Soviet Union in the 1950's, their contribution had grown to six per cent of all electric power by 1980. Reactor development has proceeded rapidly, with a number of reactor designs in use. Fast breeder reactors and designs for specialized applications are under development. It is anticipated that the contribution of nuclear power will continue to grow.

  10. Nuclear power and other thermal power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakke, J.

    1978-01-01

    Some philosophical aspects of mortality statistics are first briefly mentioued, then the environmental problems of, first, nuclear power plants, then fossil fuelled power plants are summarised. The effects of releases of carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are briefly discussed. The possible health effects of radiation from nuclear power plants and those of gaseous and particulate effluents from fossil fuel plants are also discussed. It is pointed out that in choosing between alternative evils the worst course is to make no choice at all, that is, failure to install thermal power plants will lead to isolated domestic burning of fossil fuels which is clearly the worst situation regarding pollution. (JIW)

  11. Power generation costs. Coal - nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This supplement volume contains 17 separate chapters investigating the parameters which determine power generation costs on the basis of coal and nuclear power and a comparison of these. A detailed calculation model is given. The complex nature of this type of cost comparison is shown by a review of selected parameter constellation for coal-fired and nuclear power plants. The most favourable method of power generation can only be determined if all parameters are viewed together. One quite important parameter is the load factor, or rather the hours of operation. (UA) 891 UA/UA 892 AMO [de

  12. New approaches to nuclear power

    KAUST Repository

    Dewan, Leslie

    2018-01-21

    The world needs a cheap, carbon-free alternative to fossil fuels to feed its growing electricity demand. Nuclear power can be a good solution to the problem, but is hindered by issues of safety, waste, proliferation, and cost. But what if we could try a new approach to nuclear power, one that solves these problems? In this lecture, the CEO of Transatomic Power will talk about how their company is advancing the design of a compact molten salt reactor to support the future of carbon-free energy production. Can the designs of new reactor push the boundaries of nuclear technology to allow for a safe, clean, and affordable answer to humanityメs energy needs? Nuclear power involves capturing the energy produced in nuclear fission reactions, which emerges as heat. This heat is most frequently used to boil water into steam, which then drives a turbine to produce electricity in a nuclear power plant. Worldwide, there is a renaissance of new nuclear technology development -- a new generation of young engineers are racing to develop more advanced nuclear reactors for a better form of power generation. Transatomic Power, specifically, is advancing the design of an easily contained and controlled, atmospheric pressure, high power density molten salt reactor that can be built at low cost. The road to commercialization is long, and poses many challenges, but the benefits are enormous. These new reactors push the boundaries of technology to allow for better, safer ways to power the world.

  13. Images of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Katsuhisa; Misumi, Jyuji; Yamada, Akira; Sakurai, Yukihiro; Seki, Fumiyasu; Shinohara, Hirofumi; Misumi, Emiko; Kinjou, Akira; Kubo, Tomonori.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to check and see, using Hayashi's quantification method III, whether or not the respondents differed in their images of a nuclear power plant, depending on their demographic variables particularly occupations. In our simple tabulation, we compared subject groups of nuclear power plant employees with general citizens, nurses and students in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. The results were that while the nuclear power plant employees were high in their evaluations of facts about a nuclear power plant and in their positive images of a nuclear power plant, general citizens, nurses and students were overwhelmingly high in their negative images of a nuclear power plant. In our analysis on category score by means of the quantification method III, the first correlation axis was the dimension of 'safety'-'danger' and the second correlation axis was the dimension of 'subjectivity'-'objectivity', and that the first quadrant was the area of 'safety-subjectivity', the second quadrant was the area of 'danger-subjectivity', the third quadrant as the area of 'danger-objectivity', and the forth quadrant was the area of 'safety-objectivity'. In our analysis of sample score, 16 occupation groups was compared. As a result, it was found that the 16 occupation groups' images of a nuclear power plant were, in the order of favorableness, (1) section chiefs in charge, maintenance subsection chiefs, maintenance foremen, (2) field leaders from subcontractors, (3) maintenance section members, operation section members, (4) employees of those subcontractors, (5) general citizens, nurses and students. On the 'safety-danger' dimension, nuclear power plant workers on the one hand and general citizens, nurses and students on the other were clearly divided in terms of their images of a nuclear power plant. Nuclear power plant workers were concentrated in the area of 'safety' and general citizens, nurses and students in the area of 'danger'. (J.P.N.)

  14. The EDF group and the sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document deals with the management policy of the EDF Group, concerning the sustainable development. The program is presented showing the Group will to contribute to an environmental quality: a control of the activities impact on the environment, the development of the renewable energies, the solidarity and the electric power access development in developing countries. (A.L.B.)

  15. EDF group. Annual report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-01

    This document is the English version of the 2001 annual report of Electricite de France (EdF) Group, the French electric utility. It comprises 4 parts: introduction (statement of the chairman and chief executive officer, corporate governance, group key figures, sustainable growth indicators - parent company, energy for a sustainable future, EdF group worldwide); dynamics and balanced growth (financial results, EdF's strategy in building a competitive global group: consolidating the European network, moving forward in energy-related services, responding to increasing energy demand in emerging countries); sustainable solutions for all (empowering the customer: competitive solutions for industrial customers, anticipating the needs of residential customers and SMEs, environmental solutions to enhance urban life, upgrading the network and providing access to energy; a sound, sustainable and secure energy mix: a highly competitive nuclear fleet, the vital resource of fossil-fuelled plants, a proactive approach to renewable energies); a global commitment to corporate social responsibility (human resources and partnerships). (J.S.)

  16. Electricite de France Strategy for its nuclear power plants' decommissioning programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knockaert, J.M.; Gatineau, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Although final shutdown of the first large PWR Power Stations should not occur before 2015, Electricity of France is nevertheless directly concerned by the decommissioning of its nuclear plants. The shutdown programme of the gas-graphite units is in progress and the medium-power PWR plant (300 MWe) installed at Chooz in the Ardennes will be finally shutdown at the end of 1991. This solution requires EDF to have a policy available which enables it to simultaneously run the double operation 'Plant shutdown-decommissioning' and 'New constructions-increasing available power' from both the technical and financial viewpoints. (author)

  17. Saving more to consume more. EDF's communication ambiguities during the energy saving era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouvier, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Since 1974, EDF is placed between a communication scheme imposed for energy savings and an industrial strategy of massive investment in nuclear power. In ten years, the company managed to increase households electricity consumption without advertising, due in particular to electric heating. But strong tensions were generated by this situation and led the company to develop an institutional communication to the employees and to the general public

  18. US nuclear power industry overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    The electric utilities in the United States are facing a number of challenges as deregulation proceeds. Cost control is one of these challenges that impacts directly the operators of nuclear power plants. This presentation reviews recent data on the performance of nuclear power plants and discusses technical developments to reduce operating costs, with particular reference to low-level radioactive waste issues

  19. Islands for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, E.F.F.W.; Fraser, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    The safety principles, design criteria and types of artificial island for an offshore nuclear power station are discussed with particular reference to siting adjacent to an industrial island. The paper concludes that the engineering problems are soluble and that offshore nuclear power stations will eventually be built but that much fundamental work is still required. (author)

  20. Nuclear power - the moral question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searby, P.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power has raised moral and ethical as well as technological issues and the British Council of churches, recognising this, has participated in the UK nuclear power debate. In this short article, Mr Philip Searby, Secretary of the UKAEA, considers some of the views adopted by the Council. (author)