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Sample records for echo-planar imaging diffusion-weighted

  1. Cholesteatoma imaging using modified echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Flook, E; Izzat, S; Ismail, A

    2011-01-01

    Imaging of cholesteatomas can be useful especially in cases of recurrent disease. Computed tomography scans have been recommended before primary surgery, but cholesteatoma tissue looks similar to inflammatory tissue. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is both sensitive and specific in detecting cholesteatoma, which appears as a bright signal on a dark background. Non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is superior to routine echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as it minimises susceptibility artefacts; however, the addition of this facility involves expensive magnetic resonance scanner upgrading. To avoid the cost of such upgrading, we modified our echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging parameters and then scanned 15 consecutive cases of suspected cholesteatoma or suspected recurrent cholesteatoma. Imaging results correlated well with clinical and/or operative findings. These results indicate that software adjustments can enable echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to detect cholesteatomas reliably, and as effectively as non-echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. This discovery has the potential to facilitate reliable delayed post-operative screening of canal wall up mastoidectomies, avoiding the need for a 'second look' procedure.

  2. Echo Planar Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: Possibilities and Considerations with 12- and 32-Channel Head Coils

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    John N Morelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in clinical brain magnetic resonance imaging using 32-channel head coils for signal reception continues to increase. The present investigation assesses possibilities for improving diffusion-weighted image quality using a 32-channel in comparison to a conventional 12-channel coil. The utility of single-shot (ss and an approach to readout-segmented (rs echo planar imaging (EPI are examined using both head coils. Substantial image quality improvements are found with rs-EPI. Imaging with a 32-channel head coil allows for implementation of greater parallel imaging acceleration factors or acquisition of scans at a higher resolution. Specifically, higher resolution imaging with rs-EPI can be achieved by increasing the number of readout segments without increasing echo-spacing or echo time to the degree necessary with ss-EPI - a factor resulting in increased susceptibility artifact and reduced signal-to-noise with the latter.

  3. Functional imaging of parotid glands: Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation

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    Habermann, C.R.; Cramer, M.C.; Gossrau, P.; Adam, G. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Graessner, J. [Siemens AG, Hamburg (Germany). Medical Solutions; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Oto-, Rhino-, Laryngology; Fiehler, J. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Neuroradiology; Schoder, V. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar imaging (EPI) for measuring different functional conditions of the parotid gland and to compare different measurement approaches. Materials and Methods: Parotid glands of 27 healthy volunteers were examined with a DW EPI sequence (TR 1,500 msec, TE 77 msec, field-of-view 250 x 250 mm, pixel size 2.10 x 1.95 mm, section thickness 5 mm) before and after oral stimulation with commercially available lemon juice. The b factors used were 0, 500, and 1,000 sec/mm{sup 2}. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain) and evaluated with a manually placed circular region of interest (ROI) containing 100-200 pixel. Additional ROIs including the entire parotid gland were placed on either side. The results of both measurements were compared, using the Student's t test based on the median ADC values for each person. A two-tailed p-value of less than.05 was determined to indicate statistical significance. To compare both measurement approaches, the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was calculated. Results: Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MR imaging successfully visualized the parotid gland of all volunteers. In a first step, the median ADC value per person was computed. Using ROIs of 100-200 pixels, the mean was calculated to be 1.08 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec for both parotid glands prior to simulation. After stimulation, the mean ADC was measured at 1.15 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.11 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec for both parotid glands. Evaluating the entire parotid gland, the ADC was 1.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.08 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec prior to simulation, whereas the ADC increased to 1.18 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.09 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec after simulation with lemon juice. For both types of measurements, the increase in ADC after

  4. Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in diffusion-weighted mr imaging in breast cancer: comparison with single-shot echo-planar imaging in image quality.

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    Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Park, Chang Suk; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Son, Yo Han; Porter, David Andrew; Song, Byung Joo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality of standard single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) and that of readout-segmented EPI (rs-EPI) in patients with breast cancer. Seventy-one patients with 74 breast cancers underwent both ss-EPI and rs-EPI. For qualitative comparison of image quality, three readers independently assessed the two sets of diffusion-weighted (DW) images. To evaluate geometric distortion, a comparison was made between lesion lengths derived from contrast enhanced MR (CE-MR) images and those obtained from the corresponding DW images. For assessment of image parameters, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in most criteria regarding the qualitative image quality. Anatomical structure distinction, delineation of the lesion, ghosting artifact, and overall image quality were significantly better in rs-EPI. Regarding the geometric distortion, lesion length on ss-EPI was significantly different from that of CE-MR, whereas there were no significant differences between CE-MR and rs-EPI. The rs-EPI was superior to ss-EPI in SNR and CNR. Readout-segmented EPI is superior to ss-EPI in the aspect of image quality in DW MR imaging of the breast.

  5. Detection of recurrent and primary acquired cholesteatoma with echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Evlice, A; Tarkan, Ö; Kiroğlu, M; Biçakci, K; Özdemir, S; Tuncer, Ü; Çekiç, E

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in pre-operative detection of suspected primary acquired, residual and/or recurrent cholesteatoma. Fifty-eight chronic otitis media patients with suspected cholesteatoma were thus evaluated two weeks pre-operatively, and divided into group one (41 patients, no previous surgery, suspected primary acquired cholesteatoma) and group two (17 patients, previous surgery, scheduled 'second-look' or revision surgery for suspected residual or recurrent cholesteatoma). Patients' operative, histopathology and radiological findings were compared. Cholesteatoma was found in 63 per cent of group one patients and 58 per cent of group two patients at surgery. Histopathological examination of surgical specimens indicated that imaging accurately predicted the presence or absence of cholesteatoma in 90 per cent of group one (37/41; 23 true positives, 14 true negatives) and 76 per cent of group two (13/17; seven true positives, six true negatives). Three patients in both groups were false negative diagnoses and one patient in both groups was a false positive. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of cholesteatoma were respectively 88, 93, 95 and 82 per cent in group one and 70, 85, 87 and 66 per cent in group two. Echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable technique with high sensitivity and specificity for cholesteatoma imaging.

  6. Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging improves the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted MR breast examinations at 3.0 T.

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    Bogner, Wolfgang; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Bickel, Hubert; Chmelik, Marek; Weber, Michael; Helbich, Thomas H; Trattnig, Siegfried; Gruber, Stephan

    2012-04-01

    To qualitatively and quantitatively compare the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging based on standard single-shot echo-planar imaging and readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in patients with breast cancer at 3.0 T. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained. Forty-seven patients with 49 histopathologically verified lesions were included in this study. In all patients, DW imaging, with single-shot echo-planar imaging and readout-segmented echo-planar imaging with comparable imaging parameters, was performed with a 3.0-T MR imager. Two independent readers visually assessed image quality and lesion conspicuity, and image properties (ie, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, geometric distortions) were quantified. Regions of interest were drawn in all lesions (28 malignant, 21 benign) and in the normal breast parenchyma to investigate differences in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Diagnostic accuracy was calculated on the basis of an ADC threshold of 1.25 × 10(-3) mm(2)/sec. Each reader found a higher diagnostic accuracy for readout-segmented (96%) than for single-shot (90%) echo-planar imaging. The area under the curve for readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (0.981) was significantly larger than for single-shot echo-planar imaging (0.867) (P = .026). There was no significant difference in the ADC obtained by using either DW imaging method. Lesion conspicuity and image quality of readout-segmented echo-planar imaging were rated superior to those of single-shot echo-planar imaging (P echo-planar imaging reduced geometric distortions by a factor of three. DW imaging based on readout-segmented echo-planar imaging provided significantly higher image quality and lesion conspicuity than single-shot echo-planar imaging by reducing geometric distortions, image blurring, and artifact level with a clinical high-field-strength MR imager. Thereby, readout-segmented echo-planar imaging reached a

  7. Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in diffusion-weighted MR imaging of acute infarction of the brainstem and posterior fossa: comparison of single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted sequences.

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    Byeon, Jonghyun; Kim, Jee Young; Cho, A-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI) in the diagnosis of acute infarction of the brainstem and posterior fossa, by comparing its results with those of single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) at 3-T magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-nine patients with acute infarctions of the brainstem and posterior fossa underwent both ss-EPI and rs-EPI. Two readers independently assessed two sets of diffusion-weighted (DW) images for the qualitative comparison of image quality. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated for the assessment of image parameters. There were no significant differences in the conspicuity of acute infarction upon qualitative comparison; however, distinctions of anatomical structures, susceptibility artifact, the presence of uncertain high signal intensity in the brain parenchyma, and overall image quality were significantly better in rs-EPI DW images. There were no significant differences in SNR, lesion contrast, CNR, and apparent diffusion coefficient values of acute infarction and normal thalamus between rs-EPI and ss-EPI. rs-EPI DWI is a clinically useful technique for evaluating lesions in the brainstem and posterior fossa by producing high-resolution DW images with reduced susceptibility artifact. However, there are no significant differences in the conspicuity of acute infarctions in the brainstem and posterior fossa between rs-EPI and ss-EPI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A comparative quantitative analysis of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in echo planar and PROPELLER diffusion-weighted images

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    Cho, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Hae-Kag; Yang, Han-Joon; Lee, Gui-Won; Park, Yong-Soon; Chung, Woon-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether periodically-rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can remove magnetic susceptibility artifacts and compared apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for PROPELLER DWI and the common echo planar (EP) DWI. Twenty patients that underwent brain MRI with a metal dental implant were selected. A 3.0T MR scanner was then used to obtain EP DWI, PROPELLER DWI, and corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for a b-value of 0 and 1,000 s/mm2. The frequencies of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in four parts of the brain (bilateral temporal lobes, pons, and orbit) were selected. In the ADC maps, we measured the ADC values of both sides of the temporal lobe and the pons. According to the study results, the frequency of magnetic susceptibility artifacts in PROPELLER DW images was lower than it was in EP DW images. In ADC maps, the ADC values of the bilateral temporal lobes and the pons were all higher in PROPELLER ADC maps than in EP ADC maps. Our findings show that when a high-field MRI machine is used, magnetic susceptibility artifacts can distort anatomical structures and produce high-intensity signals. Furthermore, our findings suggest that in many cases, PROPELLER DWI would be helpful in terms of achieving a correct diagnosis.

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging-guided MR spectroscopy in breast lesions using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging

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    Sun, Kun; Chai, Weimin; Zhan, Ying; Luo, Xianfu; Yan, Fuhua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China); Fu, Caixia [Siemens MRI Center, Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd, Shenzhen (China); Shen, Kunwei [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-guided magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) to characterise breast lesions. A total of 258 patients with 258 suspicious breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter were examined using DWI-guided, single-voxel MRS with RS-EPI. The mean total choline-containing compound (tCho) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and concentration were used for the interpretation of MRS data. T-tests, χ{sup 2}-tests, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses and Pearson correlations were conducted for statistical analysis. Histologically, 183 lesions were malignant, and 75 lesions were benign. Both the mean tCho SNR and concentration of malignant lesions were higher than those of benign lesions (6.23 ± 3.30 AU/mL vs. 1.26 ± 1.75 AU/mL and 3.17 ± 2.03 mmol/kg vs. 0.86 ± 0.83 mmol/kg, respectively; P < 0.0001). For a tCho SNR of 2.0 AU/mL and a concentration of 1.76 mmol/kg, the corresponding areas under the ROC curves were 0.93 and 0.90, respectively. The mean tCho SNR and concentration negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficients calculated from RS-EPI, with correlation coefficients of -0.54 and -0.48, respectively. DWI-guided MRS using RS-EPI is feasible and accurate for characterising breast lesions. (orig.)

  10. Diffusion-weighted 3D multislab echo planar imaging for high signal-to-noise ratio efficiency and isotropic image resolution.

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    Engström, Mathias; Skare, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    To acquire isotropic high-resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficient, 3D encoded diffusion-weighted MRI data. Multiple Fourier encoded slabs were combined into one full volume, using a generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisitions (GRAPPA) accelerated diffusion-weighted 3D multislab echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence with 2D phase navigation and in-plane motion correction. Reconstructed data with 1.5-mm(3) nominal resolution is presented and shown under the influence of motion and with variable slab thicknesses. The SNR efficiency between diffusion-weighted 3D multislab EPI and DW 2D ss-EPI is compared. Finally, a 1.3-mm(3) full brain scan with 45 diffusion directions is presented. Diffusion-weighted 3D multislab EPI has been presented as an alternative sequence for high-resolution and high-SNR full brain coverage diffusion studies. Compared with the gold standard 2D diffusion-weighted single-shot Echo Planar Imaging, the SNR efficiency is significantly higher. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Delineation of the white and gray matter of the normal human cervical spinal cord using diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging

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    Nagayoshi, Kensuke; Ito, Yoshinori; Monzen, Yoshio; Kimura, Shojiro [Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital (Japan); Yamaguchi, Juichiro

    1998-09-01

    To delineate the white and gray matter of the normal human cervical spinal cord, diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (DW-EPI) was performed in 11 healthy volunteers. Three axial (X-, Y- and Z-axis) anisotrophic diffusion-weighted images were obtained on a 1.5 T superconducting clinical unit using a single-shot DW-EPI sequence. On X- and Y-axis DWIs the white and gray matter could be well differentiated: the former showed high intensity and the latter low intensity. Anterior columns were clearly visible, whereas posterior columns were not. On Z-axis DWI the white and gray matter could not be differentiated at all, because both showed low intensity. In conclusion, DW-EPI can clearly delineate the white and gray matter of the cervical spinal cord, and this technique will be useful to evaluate white matter disorders such as ischemic or demyelinating disease. (author)

  12. Readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging in the assessment of orbital tumors: comparison with conventional single-shot echo-planar imaging in image quality and diagnostic performance.

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    Xu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Yanjun; Hu, Hao; Su, Guoyi; Liu, Hu; Shi, Haibin; Wu, Feiyun

    2017-12-01

    Background Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) could improve the imaging quality of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in various organs. However, whether it could improve the imaging quality and diagnostic performance for the patients with orbital tumors is still unknown. Purpose To compare the image quality and diagnostic performance of RS-EPI DWI with that of conventional single-shot EPI (SS-EPI) DWI in patients with orbital tumors. Material and Methods SS-EPI and RS-EPI DW images of 32 patients with pathologically diagnosed orbital tumors were retrospectively analyzed. Qualitative imaging parameters (imaging sharpness, geometric distortion, ghosting artifacts, and overall imaging quality) and quantitative imaging parameters (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC], signal-to-noise ratio [SNR], contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]) were assessed by two independent radiologists, and compared between SS-EPI and RS-EPI DWI. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the diagnostic value of ADC in differentiating malignant from benign orbital tumors. Results RS-EPI DW imaging produced less geometric distortion and ghosting artifacts, and better imaging sharpness and overall imaging quality than SS-EPI DWI (for all, P < 0.001). Meanwhile, RS-EPI DWI produced significantly lower SNR ( P < 0.001) and ADC ( P < 0.001), and higher contrast ( P < 0.001) than SS-EPI DWI, while producing no difference in CNR ( P = 0.137). There was no significant difference on the diagnostic performance between SS-EPI and RS-EPI DWI, when using ADC as the differentiating index ( P = 0.529). Conclusion Compared with SS-EPI, RS-EPI DWI provided significantly better imaging quality and comparable diagnostic performance in differentiating malignant from benign orbital tumors.

  13. Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging for diffusion-weighted imaging in the pelvis at 3T-A feasibility study.

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    Thian, Yee Liang; Xie, Wanying; Porter, David A; Weileng Ang, Bertrand

    2014-04-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the pelvis at 3T is prone to artifacts that diminish the image quality. Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) is a new DWI technique that can reduce the artifacts associated with standard single-shot echo-planar imaging (SS-EPI) DWI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and image quality of RS-EPI in pelvic DWI compared to SS-EPI on a 3T imaging system. Thirty patients underwent pelvic DWI on a 3T scanner with SS-EPI and RS-EPI techniques. Two blinded readers independently assessed each set of images for geometric distortion, image blurring, ghosting artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and overall image quality on a 7-point scale. Qualitative image scores were compared using paired Wilcoxon signed rank test. Interreader correlation was assessed by Spearman rank correlation. Geometric distortion, imaging blurring, ghosting artifacts, lesion conspicuity, and overall image quality were rated significantly better by both readers for RS-EPI technique (P parameters). There was moderate-high correlation between the readers (r = 0.649-0.752) for all parameters apart from lesion conspicuity (r = 0.351). Both readers preferred the RS-EPI set of DWI images in most of the cases (reader 1: 0.87, 95% CI 0.74-0.99; reader 2: 0.77, 95% CI 0.61-0.93). Mean difference and limits of agreement between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained from the two methods were 0.01 (-0.08, 0.10) × 10(-3) mm(2)/s. RS-EPI DWI images showed improved image quality compared to SS-EPI technique at 3T. RS-EPI is a feasible technique in the pelvis for producing high-resolution DWI. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. On the signal-to-noise ratio efficiency and slab-banding artifacts in three-dimensional multislab diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging.

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    Engström, Mathias; Mårtensson, Magnus; Avventi, Enrico; Skare, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) multislab diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging (EPI) has been suggested as an alternative for high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging. In this work, the key components of the sequence are investigated, optimal scan parameter settings suggested, and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis, comparing 2D diffusion-weighted EPI and 3D multislab diffusion-weighted EPI, is performed. Slab profiles were measured using 3D multislab EPI to investigate slab profile saturation effects with respect to TR, T1 and overlap between slabs. For short TR values, two methods to reduce the slab banding artifacts are proposed. Moreover, the SNR for 2D and 3D multislab (3D-MS) DWI have been simulated for various anatomical coverages and slab thicknesses. Simulated 3D multislab scans were shown to be more SNR-efficient than a corresponding 2D scan, for all investigated anatomical coverages and slab thicknesses. Slab banding artifacts being negligible for long repetition times (TRs) were strong for a TR of 2000 ms, proving that they stem from T1 -saturation effects. This banding was largely reduced by the suggested correction methods. In the low TR regime, T1 -saturation effects between adjacent slabs need to be taken in consideration to avoid slab-banding artifacts for multislab sequences. With the proposed correction methods the difference between the SNR-optimal TR and the TR where slab-banding artifacts become acceptable is reduced. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Improvement of renal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with readout-segmented echo-planar imaging at 3T.

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    Friedli, Iris; Crowe, Lindsey A; Viallon, Magalie; Porter, David A; Martin, Pierre-Yves; de Seigneux, Sophie; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2015-07-01

    To assess the feasibility of a respiratory-gated implementation of readout-segmented SE-EPI (RESOLVE) for renal diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) by comparison with single-shot SE-EPI (ss-EPI) in a phantom, healthy volunteers and chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. A fluid-filled phantom, 20 healthy volunteers and 10 CKD patients were scanned with the same parameters and coils on a 3T MR system with 3 DW sequences (b-values=0, 300, 500, 900s/mm(2)): a standard ss-EPI (Reference EPI), a ss-EPI with higher resolution, bandwidth and acceleration factor (HR-EPI) and RESOLVE with the same spatial resolution as HR-EPI but a segmentation of the readout into 5 shots. Geometric distortions, image blurring using a 'Canny' edge detection based measure, cortico-medullary differentiation measured on b0 images and ADC quantification were compared between the 3 sequences using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post-hoc Bonferroni (pdiffusion-weighted images by improving the difference in SI and ADC between the renal cortex and medulla in healthy volunteers. In CKD patients, RESOLVE showed a disappearance of this cortico-medullary ADC difference. These improvements justify further clinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional imaging of submandibular glands: diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation; Diffusionsgewichtete MRT zur Funktionsdiagnostik der Glandula submandibularis

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    Arndt, C.; Cramer, M.C.; Weiss, F.; Kaul, M.G.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Zentrum fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik und Intervention, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Graessner, J. [Siemens Medical Solutions (Germany); Petersen, K. [Zentrum fuer Psychosoziale Medizin, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [Kopf und Hautzentrum, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) to depict the submandibular glands and to measure different functional conditions. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers were examined. Diffusion weighted sequence was performed prior to stimulation. Exactly 30 seconds after a commercially available lemon juice was given orally, the diffusion weighted sequence was repeated. All examinations were performed by using a 1.5-T superconducting system with a 30 mT/m maximum gradient capability and maximum slew rate of 125 mT/m/sec (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The lower part of the circularly polarized (CP) head coil and a standard two-element CP neck array coil were used. The flexibility of the neck array coil allowed positioning the N1 element (upper part of the coil) right next to the submandibular gland. The axial diffusion-weighted EPI (echo planar imaging) sequence was performed using a matrix of 119 x 128, a field of view of 250 x 250 mm (pixel size 2.1 x 1.95 mm), a section thickness of 5 mm with an interslice gap of 1 mm. The b factors used were 0 sec/mm{sup 2}, 500 sec/mm{sup 2} and 1000 sec/mm{sup 2}. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain). After detecting the submandibular glands a region of interest (ROI) was placed manually exactly within the boarder of both submandibular glands, excluding the external carotid artery on ADC maps. These procedures were performed on all ADC slices the submandibular glands could be differentiated in before and after oral stimulation. For statistical comparison of results, a student's t-test was performed with an overall two-tailed significance level of p=0.05. Results: The visualization of the submandibular glands using the diffusion-weighted EPI sequence was possible in all of the 27 volunteers. Prior to oral stimulation an ADC of 1.31 x 10{sup -3

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the sellar region: A comparison study of BLADE and single-shot echo planar imaging sequences

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    Yiping, Lu [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Hui, Liu [MR Collaboration NE Asia, Siemens Healthcare, Siemens Ltd., China, Shanghai 201318 (China); Kun, Zhou [MR PLM APPL, Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Shenzhen 518057 (China); Daoying, Geng, E-mail: GengdaoyingGDY@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China); Bo, Yin, E-mail: yinbo7@163.com [Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Rd. Middle, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare BLADE diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) DWI on the aspects of feasibility of imaging the sellar region and image quality. Methods: A total of 3 healthy volunteers and 52 patients with suspected lesions in the sellar region were included in this prospective intra-individual study. All exams were performed at 3.0 T with a BLADE DWI sequence and a standard single-shot EP-DWI sequence. Phantom measurements were performed to measure the objective signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Two radiologists rated the image quality according to the visualisation of the internal carotid arteries, optic chiasm, pituitary stalk, pituitary gland and lesion, and the overall image quality. One radiologist measured lesion sizes for detecting their relationship with the image score. Results: The SNR in BLADE DWI sequence showed no significant difference from the single-shot EPI sequence (P > 0.05). All of the assessed regions received higher scores in BLADE DWI images than single-shot EP-DWI.

  18. Comparison of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging between turbo spin-echo and echo-planar imaging of the head and neck.

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    Mikayama, Ryoji; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Sonoda, Shinjiro; Kobayashi, Koji; Nagatomo, Kazuya; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Kawanami, Satoshi; Kamitani, Takeshi; Kumazawa, Seiji; Honda, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    To compare image quality, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM)-derived parameters between turbo spin-echo (TSE)-diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and echo-planar imaging (EPI)-DWI of the head and neck. Fourteen volunteers underwent head and neck imaging using TSE-DWI and EPI-DWI. Distortion ratio (DR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), ADC and IVIM-derived parameters were compared between the two techniques. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to analyse reproducibility between the quantitative parameters of TSE-DWI and EPI-DWI. DR of TSE-DWI was significantly smaller than that of EPI-DWI. SNR and CNR of TSE-DWI were significantly higher than those of EPI-DWI. ADC and IVIM-derived parameters of TSE-DWI showed higher values than those of EPI-DWI, although the difference was not significant. Bland-Altman analysis showed wide limits of agreement between the two sequences. TSE-DWI can produce better image quality than EPI-DWI, while TSE-DWI possibly exhibits different values of quantitative parameters. Therefore, TSE-DWI could be a good alternative to EPI-DWI for patients sensitive to distortion. However, it is not recommended to use both TSE-DWI and EPI-DWI on follow-up. • Head and neck DWI is especially sensitive to magnetic inhomogeneity. • The distortion of images was less with TSE-DWI than with EPI-DWI. • TSE-DWI can possibly exhibit higher ADC and IVIM-derived parameters than EPI-DWI. • Bland-Altman analysis showed unacceptable LoA in quantitative analysis between TSE-DWI and EPI-DWI. • It is not recommended to use both TSE-DWI and EPI-DWI for follow-up.

  19. Comparison of readout-segmented and conventional single-shot for echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging in the assessment of kidney interstitial fibrosis.

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    Friedli, Iris; Crowe, Lindsey Alexandra; de Perrot, Thomas; Berchtold, Lena; Martin, Pierre-Yves; de Seigneux, Sophie; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2017-12-01

    To compare readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) (RESOLVE) to single-shot EPI (ss-EPI) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the assessment of renal interstitial fibrosis. A phantom, eight healthy volunteers (under 30 years to avoid age-fibrosis related) and 27 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients (scheduled for kidney biopsy) were scanned (at 3T) with ss-EPI and 5-shot RESOLVE DWI (resolution: 2 × 2 × 5 mm 3 , 10 b-values). The cortico-medullary difference for each DW parameter from a monoexponential fit (ΔADC) or, segmented biexponential fit (ΔD, ΔD*, ΔF p ) were compared between both sequences. A fibrosis threshold of 40% was defined to separate all 35 subjects into low and high fibrosis groups. The linear relationship between DW parameters and percentage fibrosis (up to 80%) from Masson trichrome was assessed with the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient. Fisher Z-transform was used for R 2 correlation comparison. A coefficient of variation between ADCs of 3% was measured between both sequences in the phantom. In healthy volunteers, no significant difference was measured for all DW parameters. Both sequences separated low to high level of fibrosis with a significant decrease of ΔADC (RESOLVE P = 3.1 × 10 -6 , ss-EPI P = 0.003) and ΔD (RESOLVE P = 8.2 × 10 -5 , ss-EPI P = 0.02) in the high level of fibrosis. However, RESOLVE ΔADC had a stronger negative correlation (P = 0.04 for R 2 comparison) with fibrosis than ss-EPI ΔADC (RESOLVE R 2  = 0.65, P = 5.9 × 10 -9 , ss-EPI R 2  = 0.29, P = 8.9 × 10 -4 ). ΔD (RESOLVE) was correlated (moderately) with fibrosis (R 2  = 0.29, P = 9.2 × 10 -4 ); however, ΔD* and ΔF p did not show, in our population, a significant correlation with interstitial fibrosis (0.01 < R 2 < 0.08). ΔADC derived from both sequences correlated with fibrosis. ΔADC from RESOLVE showed better correlation with fibrosis than ΔADC from ss-EPI and therefore has potential

  20. Comparison of readout segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) and EPI with reduced field-of-VIew diffusion-weighted imaging at 3t in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Young; Shin, Hee Jung; Shin, Ki Chang; Sung, Yu Sub; Choi, Woo Jung; Chae, Eun Young; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hak Hee

    2015-12-01

    To qualitatively and quantitatively compare the diagnostic performance of rs-EPI (readout segmented echo planar imaging) and reduced FOV (field-of-view) EPI in patients with biopsy-proven breast cancer at 3T. Between November 2013 and July 2014, 96 patients (age range, 30-75 years: mean, 52 years) with breast cancer were retrospectively enrolled in this study. In all patients, rs-EPI and rFOV EPI were performed using a 3T MR scanner. Differences between two sequences were compared quantitatively by measuring the tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Two independent readers visually assessed overall image quality, lesion conspicuity, and reader preference. The regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn in the whole tumor and in the normal breast parenchyma. Comparisons of quantitative and qualitative parameters between two sequences were performed using the Mann-Whitney and the paired t-test. SNR was significantly higher in rFOV EPI than in rs-EPI (51.88 ± 27.68 vs. 76.46 ± 50.20, P EPI (P EPI were significantly lower than those of rs-EPI (P EPI were significantly higher than those of rs-EPI for both readers (P = 0.025 and EPI provided significantly higher image quality, lesion conspicuity, and SNR than rs-EPI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Study on diffusion anisotropy of cerebral ischemia using diffusion weighted echo-planar MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajima, Toshio [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-08-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia was produced by occlusion of the intracranial main cerebral artery with a silicone cylinder in Wistar rats. Diffusion-weighted echo-planar images (DW-EPls) using the motion-probing gradient (MPG) method were acquired at 1-3 hours and 24-48 hours after occlusion. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were calculated from these images in ischemic lesions and in normal unoccluded regions. Results were as follows. Ischemic lesions could be detected on the DW-EPIs at 1 hour after occlusion. The ADC of water in the brain tissue was smaller than that of free water as a result of restricted diffusion. Anisotropic diffusion that probably can be attributed to the myelin sheath was observed in the normal white matter. In the ischemic lesions, the ADC decreased rapidly within 1-3 hours after occlusion and then decreased gradually after 24-48 hours. In the ischemic white matter, diffusion anisotropy disappeared at 24-48 hours after occlusion. Diffusion-weighted imaging may have applications in the examination of pathophysiological mechanisms in cerebral ischemia by means of evaluation of ADC and diffusion anisotropy. (author)

  2. Differentiation of malignant and benign breast lesions: Added value of the qualitative analysis of breast lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using readout-segmented echo-planar imaging at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo

    2017-01-01

    To determine the added value of qualitative analysis as an adjunct to quantitative analysis for the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions in patients with breast cancer using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI). A total of 99 patients with 144 lesions were reviewed from our prospectively collected database. DWI data were obtained using rs-EPI acquired at 3.0 T. The diagnostic performances of DWI in the qualitative, quantitative, and combination analyses were compared with that of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Additionally, the effect of lesion size on the diagnostic performance of the DWI combination analysis was evaluated. The strongest indicators of malignancy on DWI were a heterogeneous pattern (P = 0.005) and an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value 1 cm group (80% vs. 95.6%, P = 0.034). Qualitative analysis of tumor morphology was diagnostically applicable on DWI using rs-EPI. This qualitative analysis adds value to quantitative analyses for lesion characterization in patients with breast cancer.

  3. Multiband echo-shifted echo planar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyacioǧlu, R.; Schulz, J.; Norris, David Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To propose the technique multiband echo-shifted (MESH) echo planar imaging (EPI), which combines the principles of echo-shifted acquisition for two-dimensional multislice EPI, with both in-plane and multiband acceleration by means of partial parallel imaging techniques. Methods MESH EPI is

  4. Single-Shot Echo-Planar Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging at 3T and 1.5T for Differentiation of Benign Vertebral Fracture Edema and Tumor Infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Rho, Myung Ho; Chung, Eun Chul; Kim, Mi Sung; Kwon, Heon Ju; Youn, In Young [Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 03181 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value using single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences at 3T and 1.5T for differentiation of benign fracture edema and tumor infiltration of the vertebral body. A total of 46 spinal examinations were included in the 1.5T MRI group, and a total of 40 spinal examinations were included in the 3T MRI group. The ADC values of the lesion were measured and calculated. The diagnostic performance of the conventional MR image containing sagittal T2-weighted fat saturated image and each diffusion weighted image (DWI) with an ADC value with different b values were evaluated. The mean ADC value of the benign lesions was higher than that of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T (p < 0.05). The sensitivity of the diagnostic performance was higher with an additional DWI in both 1.5T and 3T, but the sensitivities were similar with the addition of b values of 400 and 1000. The specificities of the diagnostic performances did not show significant differences (p value > 0.05). The diagnostic accuracies were higher when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T. Statistical differences between 1.5T and 3T or between b values of 400 and 1000 were not seen. The ADC values of the benign lesions were significantly higher than those of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T. There was no statistically significant difference in the diagnostic performances when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to the routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T.

  5. Simultaneous multi-slice echo planar diffusion weighted imaging of the liver and the pancreas: Optimization of signal-to-noise ratio and acquisition time and application to intravoxel incoherent motion analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.boss@usz.ch [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Barth, Borna; Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Piccirelli, Marco [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of Zurich (Switzerland); Reiner, Caecilia S. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To optimize and test a diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence with simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) excitation in the liver and pancreas regarding acquisition time (TA), number of slices, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image quality (IQ), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantitation accuracy, and feasibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) analysis. Materials and methods: Ten healthy volunteers underwent DWI of the upper abdomen at 3T. A SMS DWI sequence with CAIPIRINHA unaliasing technique (acceleration factors 2/3, denoted AF2/3) was compared to standard DWI-EPI (AF1). Four schemes were evaluated: (i) reducing TA, (ii) keeping TA identical with increasing number of averages, (iii) increasing number of slices with identical TA (iv) increasing number of b-values for IVIM. Acquisition schemes i-iii were evaluated qualitatively (reader score) and quantitatively (ADC values, SNR). Results: In scheme (i) no differences in SNR were observed (p = 0.321 − 0.038) with reduced TA (AF2 increase in SNR/time 75.6%, AF3 increase SNR/time 102.4%). No SNR improvement was obtained in scheme (ii). Increased SNR/time could be invested in acquisition of more and thinner slices or higher number of b-values. Image quality scores were stable for AF2 but decreased for AF3. Only for AF3, liver ADC values were systematically lower. Conclusion: SMS-DWI of the liver and pancreas provides substantially higher SNR/time, which either may be used for shorter scan time, higher slice resolution or IVIM measurements.

  6. Detection of hyperacute parenchymal hemorrhage of the brain using echo-planar T2{sup *}-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesmann, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Medizinische Universitaet zu Luebeck (Germany); Mayer, T.E.; Yousry, I.; Brueckmann, H. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany); Hamann, G.F. [Dept. of Neurology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-05-01

    We investigated the usefulness of echo-planar imaging (EPI) as well as T2{sup *}-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) to identify hyperacute hemorrhage (within 24 h after ictus) in the brain. Seven patients were examined 3.5 to 24 h after onset of symptoms using a whole-body 1.5-T MR system. Two diffusion-weighted sequences were run to obtain isotropic and anisotropic diffusion images. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated from the isotropic diffusion images. All DWI images as well as the T2*-weighted EPI images showed the hematomas as either discrete, deeply hypointense homogeneous lesions, or as lesions of mixed signal intensity containing hypointense areas. We conclude that even in the early phase after hemorrhage, sufficient amounts of paramagnetic deoxyhemoglobin are present in intracerebral hemorrhages to cause hypointensity on EPI T2{sup *}-weighted and DWI images; thus, use of ultrafast EPI allows identification of intracerebral hemorrhage. (orig.)

  7. Quiet echo planar imaging for functional and diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Jana; Price, Anthony N; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Malik, Shaihan; Ferrazzi, Giulio; Gaspar, Andreia; Hughes, Emer J; Christiaens, Daan; McCabe, Laura; Schneider, Torben; Rutherford, Mary A; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2018-03-01

    To develop a purpose-built quiet echo planar imaging capability for fetal functional and diffusion scans, for which acoustic considerations often compromise efficiency and resolution as well as angular/temporal coverage. The gradient waveforms in multiband-accelerated single-shot echo planar imaging sequences have been redesigned to minimize spectral content. This includes a sinusoidal read-out with a single fundamental frequency, a constant phase encoding gradient, overlapping smoothed CAIPIRINHA blips, and a novel strategy to merge the crushers in diffusion MRI. These changes are then tuned in conjunction with the gradient system frequency response function. Maintained image quality, SNR, and quantitative diffusion values while reducing acoustic noise up to 12 dB (A) is illustrated in two adult experiments. Fetal experiments in 10 subjects covering a range of parameters depict the adaptability and increased efficiency of quiet echo planar imaging. Purpose-built for highly efficient multiband fetal echo planar imaging studies, the presented framework reduces acoustic noise for all echo planar imaging-based sequences. Full optimization by tuning to the gradient frequency response functions allows for a maximally time-efficient scan within safe limits. This allows ambitious in-utero studies such as functional brain imaging with high spatial/temporal resolution and diffusion scans with high angular/spatial resolution to be run in a highly efficient manner at acceptable sound levels. Magn Reson Med 79:1447-1459, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in

  8. High-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging of middle ear cholesteatoma at 3.0 T MRI: usefulness of 3D turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation (TFE-DSDE) compared to single-shot echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Koji; Yoshiura, Takashi; Hiwatashi, Akio; Obara, Makoto; Togao, Osamu; Matsumoto, Nozomu; Kikuchi, Kazufumi; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of a newly developed high-resolution three-dimensional diffusion-weighted imaging method, turbo field-echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium (TFE-DSDE) in diagnosing middle-ear cholesteatoma by comparing it to conventional single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (SS-EP DWI). Institutional review board approval and informed consent from all participants were obtained. We studied 30 patients with preoperatively suspected acquired cholesteatoma. Each patient underwent an MR examination including both SS-EP DWI and DSDE-TFE using a 3.0 T MR scanner. Images of the 30 patients (60 temporal bones including 30 with and 30 without cholesteatoma) were reviewed by two independent neuroradiologists. The confidence level for the presence of cholesteatoma was graded on a scale of 0-2 (0=definite absence, 1=equivocal, 2=definite presence). Interobserver agreement as well as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for detection were assessed for the two reviewers. Excellent interobserver agreement was shown for TFE-DSDE (κ=0.821) whereas fair agreement was obtained for SS-EP DWI (κ=0.416). TFE-DSDE was associated with significantly higher sensitivity (83.3%) and accuracy (90.0%) compared to SS-EP DWI (sensitivity=35.0%, accuracy=66.7%; p<0.05). No significant difference was found in specificity (96.7% for TFE-DSDE, 98.3% for SS-EP DWI) CONCLUSION: With increased spatial resolution and reduced susceptibility artifacts, TFE-DSDE improves the accuracy in diagnosing acquired middle ear cholesteatomas compared to SS-EP DWI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Signal Intensity and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient at Varying b-values in the Brain : Diffusion Weighted-Echo Planar Image (T{sub 2} and FLAIR) Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong Kap [Dept. of Radiology, Cheomdan Medical Center, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Im, Jung Yeol [Dept. of Digital Management Information Graduate School of Nambu Univesity, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has been demonstrated to be a practical method for the diagnosis of various brain diseases such as acute infarction, brain tumor, and white matter disease. In this study, we used two techniques to examine the average signal intensity (SI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the brains of patients who ranged in age from 10 to 60 years. Our results indicated that the average SI was the highest in amygdala (as derived from DWI), whereas that in the cerebrospinal fluid was the lowest. The average ADC was the highest in the cerebrospinal fluid, whereas the lowest measurement was derived from the pons. The average SI and ADC were higher in T{sub 2}-DW-EPI than in FLAIR-DW-EPI. The higher the b-value, the smaller the average difference in both imaging techniques; the lower the b-value, the greater the average difference. Also, comparative analysis of the brains of patients who had experienced cerebral infarction showed no distinct lesion in the general MR image over time. However, there was a high SI in apparent weighted images. Analysis of other brain diseases (e.g., bleeding, acute, subacute, chronic infarction) indicated SI variance in accordance with characteristics of the two techniques. The higher the SI, the lower the ADC. Taken together, the value of SI and ADC in accordance with frequently occurring areas and various brain disease varies based on the b-value and imaging technique. Because they provide additional useful information in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with various brain diseases through signal recognition, the proper imaging technique and b-value are important for the detection and interpretation of subacute stroke and other brain diseases.

  10. View Angle Tilting Echo Planar Imaging for Distortion Correction

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Sinyeob; Hu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Geometric distortion caused by field inhomogeneity along the phase-encode (PE) direction is one of the most prominent artifacts due to a relatively low effective bandwidth along that direction in magnetic resonance echo planar imaging (EPI). This work describes a method for correcting in-plane image distortion along the PE direction using a view angle tilting (VAT) imaging technique in spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI). SE-EPI with VAT (SE-EPI-VAT) utilizes the addition of gradient blips along the slice...

  11. View Angle Tilting Echo Planar Imaging for Distortion Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sinyeob; Hu, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Geometric distortion caused by field inhomogeneity along the phase-encode (PE) direction is one of the most prominent artifacts due to a relatively low effective bandwidth along that direction in magnetic resonance echo planar imaging (EPI). This work describes a method for correcting in-plane image distortion along the PE direction using a view angle tilting (VAT) imaging technique in spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI). SE-EPI with VAT (SE-EPI-VAT) utilizes the addition of gradient blips along the slice-select (SS) direction, concurrently applied with the PE gradient blips, producing an additional phase. This phase effectively offsets an unwanted phase accumulation caused by field inhomogeneity, resulting in the removal of image distortion along the PE direction. The proposed method is simple and straightforward both in implementation and application with no scan time penalty. Therefore, it is readily applicable on commercial scanners without having any customized post-processing. The efficacy of the SE-EPI-VAT technique in the correction of image distortion is demonstrated in phantom and in vivo brain imaging. PMID:22213567

  12. Initial experience in perfusion MR imaging of intracranial major artery occlusion with echo-planar technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Mizutani, Yoshiyuki; Inaoka, Sayuki; Hachiya, Junichi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of perfusion MR imaging using a single-shot echo-planar technique in occlusion of intracranial main arteries. Our patient group consisted of 16 patients with internal carotid artery occlusion (n=9), Moyamoya disease (n=4), and middle cerebral artery occlusion (n=3). We performed the echo-planar perfusion studies with a 1.5-T unit using a free-induction-decay-type echo-planar sequence. With a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA, 30 consecutive scans were obtained at 10 sections every 2 seconds. The data were analyzed in three ways: a time-intensity curves in the territory of the involved artery (n=16); semiquantitative flow map of each section representing signal changes due to passage of Gd-DTPA (n=15); and serial images at a selected section (n=7). The time intensity curves were abnormal in 13 patients. The peak of signal drop was delayed in all of them. Flow maps showed focal flow abnormalities in 11 patients, but they were apparently normal in 4 patients probably due to collateral flow. In serial images, delay in appearance and/or disappearance of Gd-DTPA was noted in 6 patients. In patients with occlusion of intracranial main arteries, MR single-shot echo-planar technique is of clinical use because it can provide information about hemodynamic changes in a short examination time, in multiple sections, and with good temporal resolution. (author)

  13. Study of turbulent flow using Half-Fourier Echo-Planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, A.O. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Centro de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica

    2006-03-15

    The Echo-Planar Imaging technique combined with a partial Fourier acquisition method was used to obtain velocity images for liquid flows in a circular cross-section pipe at Reynolds number of up to 8000. This partial-Fourier imaging scheme is able to generate shorter echo times than the full-Fourier Echo-Planar Imaging methods, reducing the signal attenuation due to T2{sup *} and flow. Velocity images along the z axis were acquired with a time-scale of 80 ms thus obtaining a real-time description of flow in both the laminar and turbulent regimes. Velocity values and velocity fluctuations were computed with the flow image data. A comparison plot of NMR velocity and bulk velocity and a plot of velocity fluctuations were calculated to investigate the feasibility of this imaging technique. Flow encoded Echo-Planar Imaging together with a reduced data acquisition method can provide us with a real-time technique to capture instantaneous images of the flow field for both laminar and turbulent regimes. (author)

  14. Breath-hold MR cholangiopancreatography with three-dimensional, segmented, echo-planar imaging and volume rendering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr); J. Gaa; D.R. Wielopolski; M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractEnd-expiration, 21-second breath-hold, three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) was developed with segmented echo-planar imaging. In 15 healthy subjects and 14 randomly selected patients undergoing liver studies,

  15. Comparison of Turbo Spin Echo and Echo Planar Imaging for intravoxel incoherent motion and diffusion tensor imaging of the kidney at 3Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Wech, Tobias; Neubauer, Henning; Veldhoen, Simon; Bley, Thorsten Alexander; Köstler, Herbert

    2017-09-01

    Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is most commonly applied to acquire diffusion-weighted MR-images. EPI is able to capture an entire image in very short time, but is prone to distortions and artifacts. In diffusion-weighted EPI of the kidney severe distortions may occur due to intestinal gas. Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) is robust against distortions and artifacts, but needs more time to acquire an entire image compared to EPI. Therefore, TSE is more sensitive to motion during the readout. In this study we compare diffusion-weighted TSE and EPI of the human kidney with regard to intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Images were acquired with b-values between 0 and 750s/mm 2 with TSE and EPI. Distortions were observed with the EPI readout in all volunteers, while the TSE images were virtually distortion-free. Fractional anisotropy of the diffusion tensor was significantly lower for TSE than for EPI. All other parameters of DTI and IVIM were comparable for TSE and EPI. Especially the main diffusion directions yielded by TSE and EPI were similar. The results demonstrate that TSE is a worthwhile distortion-free alternative to EPI for diffusion-weighted imaging of the kidney at 3Tesla. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Comparison of Turbo Spin Echo and Echo Planar Imaging for intravoxel incoherent motion and diffusion tensor imaging of the kidney at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Wech, Tobias; Neubauer, Henning; Veldhoen, Simon; Bley, Thorsten Alexander; Koestler, Herbert [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2017-10-01

    Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is most commonly applied to acquire diffusion-weighted MR-images. EPI is able to capture an entire image in very short time, but is prone to distortions and artifacts. In diffusion-weighted EPI of the kidney severe distortions may occur due to intestinal gas. Turbo Spin Echo (TSE) is robust against distortions and artifacts, but needs more time to acquire an entire image compared to EPI. Therefore, TSE is more sensitive to motion during the readout. In this study we compare diffusion-weighted TSE and EPI of the human kidney with regard to intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Images were acquired with b-values between 0 and 750 s/mm{sup 2} with TSE and EPI. Distortions were observed with the EPI readout in all volunteers, while the TSE images were virtually distortion-free. Fractional anisotropy of the diffusion tensor was significantly lower for TSE than for EPI. All other parameters of DTI and IVIM were comparable for TSE and EPI. Especially the main diffusion directions yielded by TSE and EPI were similar. The results demonstrate that TSE is a worthwhile distortion-free alternative to EPI for diffusion-weighted imaging of the kidney at 3 Tesla.

  17. Acoustic-noise-optimized diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Martin; Blaimer, Martin; Grodzki, David M; Breuer, Felix A; Roesch, Julie; Dörfler, Arnd; Heismann, Björn; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    This work was aimed at reducing acoustic noise in diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) that might reach acoustic noise levels of over 100 dB(A) in clinical practice. A diffusion-weighted readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence was optimized for acoustic noise by utilizing small readout segment widths to obtain low gradient slew rates and amplitudes instead of faster k-space coverage. In addition, all other gradients were optimized for low slew rates. Volunteer and patient imaging experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Acoustic noise measurements were performed and analyzed for four different DWI measurement protocols at 1.5T and 3T. An acoustic noise reduction of up to 20 dB(A) was achieved, which corresponds to a fourfold reduction in acoustic perception. The image quality was preserved at the level of a standard single-shot (ss)-EPI sequence, with a 27-54% increase in scan time. The diffusion-weighted imaging technique proposed in this study allowed a substantial reduction in the level of acoustic noise compared to standard single-shot diffusion-weighted EPI. This is expected to afford considerably more patient comfort, but a larger study would be necessary to fully characterize the subjective changes in patient experience.

  18. Comparison of Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform to study echo-planar imaging flow maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez G, A.; Bowtell, R.; Mansfield, P. [Area de Procesamiento Digital de Senales e Imagenes Biomedicas. Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa. Mexico D.F. 09340 Mexico (Mexico)

    1998-12-31

    Velocity maps were studied combining Doyle and Mansfield method (1986) with each of the following transforms: Fourier, window Fourier and wavelet (Mexican hat). Continuous wavelet transform was compared against the two Fourier transform to determine which technique is best suited to study blood maps generated by Half Fourier Echo-Planar Imaging. Coefficient images were calculated and plots of the pixel intensity variation are presented. Finally, contour maps are shown to visualize the behavior of the blood flow in the cardiac chambers for the wavelet technique. (Author)

  19. Sjoegren's syndrome of the parotid gland: value of diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI for diagnosis at an early stage based on MR sialography grading in comparison with healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regier, Marc; Ries, T.; Arndt, C.; Cramer, M.C.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Graessner, J. [Siemens AG, Hamburg (Germany). Medical Solutions; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde

    2009-03-15

    To investigate the value of diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging (DW-EPI) for quantifying functional changes of the parotid gland in Sjoegren's disease and to evaluate whether ADC mapping allows for early diagnosis based on MR sialography grading. Using a DW-EPI sequence at 1.5T (b-factors: 0, 500 and 1000 sec/mm{sup 2}), the parotid glands of 52 healthy volunteers and 13 patients with histologically verified affection of Sjoegren's disease were examined. All scans were performed prior to and following gustatory stimulation with 5 ml of lemon juice. ADC maps were evaluated by placing an inordinate region-of-interest (ROI) enclosing the entire parotid gland. Sjoegren's disease was graded based on MR sialography findings using a 4-point grading-scale. Statistics included student t-test and kappa-analysis. In healthy volunteers mean ADCs of 1.14 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} /sec before and 1.2 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} /sec after stimulation were observed. Higher ADCs were determined for early-stage Sjoegren's disease, averaging 1.22 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} /sec before and 1.29 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} /sec after stimulation. Advanced disease revealed significantly lower ADCs (0.97 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} /sec (p = 0.002) before and 1.01 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2} /sec (p < 0.001) after stimulation). (orig.)

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the abdomen at 3.0 Tesla: image quality and apparent diffusion coefficient reproducibility compared with 1.5 Tesla.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenkrantz, A.B.; Oei, M.T.H.; Babb, J.S.; Niver, B.E.; Taouli, B.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare single-shot echo-planar imaging (SS EPI) diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) of abdominal organs between 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0T in healthy volunteers in terms of image quality, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and ADC reproducibility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight healthy

  1. Fast high resolution whole brain T2* weighted imaging using echo planar imaging at 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Versluis, Maarten J; Luijten, Peter R; Petridou, Natalia

    2011-06-15

    Magnetic susceptibility based (T(2)* weighted) contrast in MRI at high magnetic field strength is of great value in research on brain structure and cortical architecture, but its use is hampered by the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) efficiency of the conventional spoiled gradient echo sequence (GRE) leading to long scan times even for a limited number of slices. In this work, we show that high resolution (0.5mm isotropic) T(2)* weighted images of the whole brain can be obtained in 6min by utilizing the high SNR efficiency of echo-planar imaging (EPI). A volumetric (3D) EPI protocol is presented and compared to conventional 3D GRE images acquired with the same resolution, amount of T(2)* weighting, and imaging duration. Spatial coverage in 3D EPI was increased by a factor of 4.5 compared to 3D GRE, while also the SNR was increased by a factor of 2. Image contrast for both magnitude and phase between gray and white matter was similar for both sequences, with enhanced conspicuity of anatomic details in the 3D EPI images due to the increased SNR. Even at 7T, image blurring and distortion is limited if the EPI train length remains short (not longer than the T(2)* of the imaged tissue). 3D EPI provides steps (speed, whole brain coverage, and high isotropic resolution) that are necessary to utilize the benefits of high field MRI in research that employs T(2)* weighted imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in spinal cord ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [Stanford University, Lucas MRS/I Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare clinical diagnosis characterized by a sudden onset of paralysis, bowel and bladder dysfunction, and loss of pain and temperature perception, with preservation of proprioception and vibration sense. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) usually demonstrates intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images with cord enlargement. However, in approximately 45% of patients, MR shows no abnormality. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has been widely used for the evaluation of a variety of brain disorders, especially for acute stroke. Preliminary data suggest that DWI has the potential to be useful in the early detection of spinal infarction. We performed DWI, using navigated, interleaved, multishot echo planar imaging (IEPI), in a series of six patients with a clinical suspicion of acute spinal cord ischemia. In all patients, high signal was observed on isotropic DWI images with low ADC values (0.23 and 0.86 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/s), indicative of restricted diffusion. We analyzed the imaging findings from conventional MR sequences and diffusion-weighted MR sequences in six patients with spinal cord infarction, compared the findings with those in published series, and discuss the value of DWI in spinal cord ischemia based on current experience. Although the number of patients with described DWI findings totals only 23, the results of previously published studies and those of our study suggest that DWI has the potential to be a useful and feasible technique for the detection of spinal infarction. (orig.)

  3. Anatomical constraints on visualization of the human hippocampus using echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Shuichiro; Kirino, Takaaki [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tokyo Hospital, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8655, Tokyo (Japan); Mihara, Ban [Department of Neurology, Mihara Memorial Hospital, 366 Ohta-machi, Isesaki-city, 372-0006, Gunma (Japan); Sugishita, Morihiro [Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-8654, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Reliable visualization of the hippocampus on echo-planar imaging (EPI) is essential in analyzing memory function using functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the hippocampal area is notoriously prone to susceptibility artifacts caused by structures at the skull base, and avoiding such artifacts by appropriately selecting the subjects for a study is of practical importance. To elucidate factors affecting the extent of the artifacts we obtained EPI in a total of 62 hippocampi from 31 healthy volunteers and evaluated various anatomical measurements possibly associated with the quality of the images. The hippocampal head was sufficiently well demonstrated on 40 of 62 images (65%), and there were two parameters that significantly differed between the good (n=40) and poor (n=22) imaging studies: The vertical diameter (DV) of the opening of the internal acoustic meatus (IAM) and the pneumatization rate of the sphenoid sinus (RP-SS). From logistic regression analysis with the stepwise method, in addition to these two factors, the distance between the hippocampal body and IAM (Dhippo-IAM) and the distance between the hippocampal head and the middle cranial fossa at the skull base (Dhippo-base) were extracted. DV-IAM, RP-SS, and Dhippo-base were negatively correlated with the good imaging of the hippocampal head. On the other hand, Dhippo-IAM was positively correlated. These easily measurable parameters will be helpful in selecting subjects and in increasing the efficiency of hippocampal visualization in studies on human memory function. (orig.)

  4. Multishot echo-planar MREIT for fast imaging of conductivity, current density, and electric field distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Munish; Vidya Shankar, Rohini; Ashok Kumar, Neeta; Kodibagkar, Vikram D; Sadleir, Rosalind

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) sequences typically use conventional spin or gradient echo-based acquisition methods for reconstruction of conductivity and current density maps. Use of MREIT in functional and electroporation studies requires higher temporal resolution and faster sequences. Here, single and multishot echo planar imaging (EPI) based MREIT sequences were evaluated to see whether high-quality MREIT phase data could be obtained for rapid reconstruction of current density, conductivity, and electric fields. A gel phantom with an insulating inclusion was used as a test object. Ghost artifact, geometric distortion, and MREIT correction algorithms were applied to the data. The EPI-MREIT-derived phase-projected current density and conductivity images were compared with simulations and spin-echo images as a function of EPI shot number. Good agreement among measures in simulated, spin echo, and EPI data was achieved. Current density errors were stable and below 9% as the shot number decreased from 64 to 2, but increased for single-shot images. Conductivity reconstruction relative contrast ratios were stable as the shot number decreased. The derived electric fields also agreed with the simulated data. The EPI methods can be combined successfully with MREIT reconstruction algorithms to achieve fast imaging of current density, conductivity, and electric field. Magn Reson Med 79:71-82, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Evaluation of slice accelerations using multiband echo planar imaging at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqian; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Strupp, John; Smith, Stephen M; Feinberg, David A; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil

    2013-12-01

    We evaluate residual aliasing among simultaneously excited and acquired slices in slice accelerated multiband (MB) echo planar imaging (EPI). No in-plane accelerations were used in order to maximize and evaluate achievable slice acceleration factors at 3 T. We propose a novel leakage (L-) factor to quantify the effects of signal leakage between simultaneously acquired slices. With a standard 32-channel receiver coil at 3 T, we demonstrate that slice acceleration factors of up to eight (MB=8) with blipped controlled aliasing in parallel imaging (CAIPI), in the absence of in-plane accelerations, can be used routinely with acceptable image quality and integrity for whole brain imaging. Spectral analyses of single-shot fMRI time series demonstrate that temporal fluctuations due to both neuronal and physiological sources were distinguishable and comparable up to slice-acceleration factors of nine (MB=9). The increased temporal efficiency could be employed to achieve, within a given acquisition period, higher spatial resolution, increased fMRI statistical power, multiple TEs, faster sampling of temporal events in a resting state fMRI time series, increased sampling of q-space in diffusion imaging, or more quiet time during a scan. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Three-dimensional echo-planar cine imaging of cerebral blood supply using arterial spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Manoj; Mildner, Toralf; Schlumm, Torsten; Robertson, Scott Haile; Möller, Harald

    2016-12-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) with CYlindrical Center-out spatiaL Encoding (EPICYCLE) is introduced as a novel hybrid three-dimensional (3D) EPI technique. Its suitability for the tracking of a short bolus created by pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) through the cerebral vasculature is demonstrated. EPICYCLE acquires two-dimensional planes of k-space along center-out trajectories. These "spokes" are rotated from shot to shot about a common axis to encode a k-space cylinder. To track a bolus of labeled blood, the same subset of evenly distributed spokes is acquired in a cine fashion after a short period of pCASL. This process is repeated for all subsets to fill the whole 3D k-space of each time frame. The passage of short pCASL boluses through the vasculature of a 3D imaging slab was successfully imaged using EPICYCLE. By choosing suitable sequence parameters, the impact of slab excitation on the bolus shape could be minimized. Parametric maps of signal amplitude, transit time, and bolus width reflected typical features of blood transport in large vessels. The EPICYCLE technique was successfully applied to track a short bolus of labeled arterial blood during its passage through the cerebral vasculature.

  7. [Pulse triggering for improved diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the abdomen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürtz, P; Pauleit, D; Träber, F; Gieseke, J; Kreft, B P; van den Brink, J S; Schild, H H

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this work was to reduce the influence of motion on diffusion-weighted MR images of the abdomen by pulse triggering of single-shot sequences. Five healthy volunteers were examined both without and with finger pulse-triggering of a diffusion-weighted single-shot echo planar MR imaging sequence at 1.5 T. Series of diffusion-weighted images were acquired at different phases of the cardiac cycle by varying the time delay between finger pulse and sequence acquisition. The measurements were repeated three times. The diffusion weighted images were analysed by measuring the signal intensities and by determining the ADC values within the spleen, kidney and liver. The magnitude of motion artifacts on diffusion weighted images shows a strong dependence on the trigger delay. The optimum trigger delay is found to be between 500 and 600 ms. For these values the abdominal organs appear homogeneous on all diffusion weighted images and the strongest signal intensities are detected. At optimum triggering the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients is up to 10 times better than without triggering. Moreover, the standard deviation of the repeated measurements is smaller than 12% for all volunteers and for all organs. Without triggering the standard deviation is larger by a factor of 4 on average. Pulse triggering of single-shot sequences leads to significant reduction of motion related artifacts on diffusion weighted images of the abdomen and provides more accurate and reproducible ADC values.

  8. Respiration impacts phase difference-based field maps in echo planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Mario; Kraus, Philip; Müller, Alexander; Bley, Thorsten A; Köstler, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the influence of respiration on field maps for geometric distortion correction derived from two rapidly acquired consecutive echo planar images. Displacement maps of the brains of seven healthy volunteers were acquired under breath hold and free breathing for a 64 × 64 pixel image matrix using phase labeling for additional coordinate encoding (PLACE). The maps were transformed into undistorted gradient echo space and analyzed with regard to standard deviation and absolute deviation from an accurate reference field map derived from a multiecho reference scan. Standard deviations between PLACE field maps and absolute difference from the reference field map are a factor of about 3 higher under free breathing than under breath hold. The mean deviation decreases from 3 pixels in the slice closest to the lung to 1 pixel in the most superior slice under free breathing and from 1 to field map and thus corrupt the geometric distortion correction. The effect can be greatly reduced by acquiring the field map data under breath hold. Data acquired under free breathing can be improved with retrospective phase correction or by averaging several field maps. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Reconstruction strategy for echo planar spectroscopy and its application to partially undersampled imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Lars Peter Grüner; Schaumburg, K; Paulson, O B

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly encountered form of echo planar spectroscopy involves oscillating gradients in one spatial dimension during readout. Data are consequently not sampled on a Cartesian grid. A fast gridding algorithm applicable to this particular situation is presented. The method is optimal, i...

  10. Correcting dynamic distortions in 7T echo planar imaging using a jittered echo time sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymerska, Barbara; Poser, Benedikt A.; Bogner, Wolfgang; Visser, Eelke; Eckstein, Korbinian; Cardoso, Pedro; Barth, Markus; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a distortion correction method for echo planar imaging (EPI) that is able to measure dynamic changes in B0. Theory and Methods The approach we propose is based on single‐echo EPI with a jittering of the echo time between two values for alternate time points. Field maps are calculated between phase images from adjacent volumes and are used to remove distortion from corresponding magnitude images. The performance of our approach was optimized using an analytical model and by comparison with field maps from dual‐echo EPI. The method was tested in functional MRI experiments at 7T with motor tasks and compared with the conventional static approach. Results Unwarping using our method was accurate even for head rotations up to 8.2°, where the static approach introduced errors up to 8.2 mm. Jittering the echo time between 19 and 25 ms had no measurable effect on blood oxygenation level–dependent (BOLD) sensitivity. Our approach reduced the distortions in activated regions to distortion correction in the presence of motion. No reduction in BOLD sensitivity was observed. As such, it is suitable for application in a wide range of functional MRI experiments. Magn Reson Med 76:1388–1399, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26584148

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of thyroid nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozgeyik, Zulkif; Coskun, Sonay; Ogur, Erkin [Firat University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Dagli, A.F. [Firat University, Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey); Ozkan, Yusuf; Sahpaz, Fatih [Firat University, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Elazig (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of our study was to determine the diagnostic role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the differentiating of malignant and benign thyroid nodules by using fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology criteria as a reference standard. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the normal-looking thyroid parenchyma were also evaluated both in normal patients and in patients with nodules. Between March 2007 and February 2008, 76 consecutive patients with ultrasound-diagnosed thyroid nodules and 20 healthy subjects underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging by using single-shot spin echo, echo planar imaging. A total of 93 nodules were included in the study using the following b factors 100, 200, and 300 mm{sup 2}/s. ADC values of thyroid nodules and normal area in all subjects were calculated and compared using suitable statistical analysis. Mean ADC values for malignant and benign nodules were 0.96{+-}0.65 x 10{sup -3} and 3.06{+-}0.71 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. for b-300 factor, 0.56{+-}0.43 x 10{sup -3} and 1.80{+-}0.60 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for b-200, and 0.30{+-}0.20 x 10{sup -3} and 1.15{+-}0.43 x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, for b-300, respectively. Mean ADC values of malignant nodules were lower than benign nodules. There were significant differences in ADC values between benign and malignant nodules. ADC values among normal-appearing thyroid parenchyma of patients and normal-appearing thyroid parenchyma of healthy subjects were insignificant at all b factors. Benign nodules have higher ADC values than malignant ones. DWI may be helpful in differentiating malign and benign thyroid nodules. (orig.)

  12. Accelerated 3D echo-planar imaging with compressed sensing for time-resolved hyperpolarized 13 C studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Benjamin J; Lau, Justin Y C; Chen, Albert P; Cunningham, Charles H

    2017-02-01

    To enable large field-of-view, time-resolved volumetric coverage in hyperpolarized 13 C metabolic imaging by implementing a novel data acquisition and image reconstruction method based on the compressed sensing framework. A spectral-spatial pulse for single-resonance excitation followed by a symmetric echo-planar imaging (EPI) readout was implemented for encoding a 72 × 18 cm2 field of view at 5 × 5 mm2 resolution. Random undersampling was achieved with blipped z-gradients during the ramp portion of the echo-planar imaging readout. The sequence and reconstruction were tested with phantom studies and consecutive in vivo hyperpolarized 13 C scans in rats. Retrospectively and prospectively undersampled data were compared on the basis of structural similarity in the reconstructed images and the quantification of the lactate-to-pyruvate ratio in rat kidneys. No artifacts or loss of resolution are evident in the compressed sensing reconstructed images acquired with the proposed sequence. Structural similarity analysis indicate that compressed sensing reconstructions can accurately recover spatial features in the metabolic images evaluated. A novel z-blip acquisition sequence for compressed sensing accelerated hyperpolarized 13 C 3D echo-planar imaging was developed and demonstrated. The close agreement in lactate-to-pyruvate ratios from both retrospectively and prospectively undersampled data from rats shows that metabolic information is preserved with acceleration factors up to 3-fold with the developed method. Magn Reson Med 77:538-546, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Volumetric MRI thermometry using a three-dimensional stack-of-stars echo-planar imaging pulse sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan, Sumeeth V; Grissom, William A

    2017-08-07

    To measure temperature over a large brain volume with fine spatiotemporal resolution. A three-dimensional stack-of-stars echo-planar imaging sequence combining echo-planar imaging and radial sampling with golden angle spacing was implemented at 3T for proton resonance frequency-shift temperature imaging. The sequence acquires a 188x188x43 image matrix with 1.5x1.5x2.75 mm3 spatial resolution. Temperature maps were reconstructed using sensitivity encoding (SENSE) image reconstruction followed by the image domain hybrid method, and using the k-space hybrid method. In vivo temperature maps were acquired without heating to measure temperature precision in the brain, and in a phantom during high-intensity focused ultrasound sonication. In vivo temperature standard deviation was less than 1°C at dynamic scan times down to 0.75 s. For a given frame rate, scanning at a minimum repetition time (TR) with minimum acceleration yielded the lowest standard deviation. With frame rates around 3 s, the scan was tolerant to a small number of receive coils, and temperature standard deviation was 48% higher than a standard two-dimensional Fourier transform temperature mapping scan, but provided whole-brain coverage. Phantom temperature maps with no visible aliasing were produced for dynamic scan times as short as 0.38 s. k-Space hybrid reconstructions were more tolerant to acceleration. Three-dimensional stack-of-stars echo-planar imaging temperature mapping provides volumetric brain coverage and fine spatiotemporal resolution. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. The clinical utility of reduced-distortion readout-segmented echo-planar imaging in the head and neck region: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyasu, Sho; Iima, Mami; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Morisawa, Nobuko; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Porter, David A. [Siemens AG, MED MR PLM AW Neurology, Allee am Roethelheimpark 2, Erlangen (Germany); Ito, Juichi [Kyoto University, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Le Bihan, Denis [Kyoto University, Human Brain Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto (Japan); Neurospin, CEA-Saclay Center, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate whether readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (RS-EPI) diffusion weighted image (DWI) can diminish image distortion in the head and neck area, compared with single-shot (SS)-EPI DWI. We conducted phantom and patient studies using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 16-channel coil. For the phantom study, we evaluated distortion and signal homogeneity in gel phantoms. For the patient study, 29 consecutive patients with clinically suspicious parotid lesions were prospectively enrolled. RS-EPI and SS-EPI DWI were evaluated by two independent readers for identification of organ/lesion and distortion, using semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and contrast-noise ratios of parotid tumours (if present; n = 15) were also compared. The phantom experiments showed that RS-EPI provided less distorted and more homogeneous ADC maps than SS-EPI. In the patient study, RS-EPI was found to provide significantly less distortion in almost all organs/lesions (p < 0.05), according to both semiquantitative scales and quantitative scores. There was no significant difference in ADC values and contrast-noise ratios between the two DWI techniques. The distortion in DWI was significantly reduced with RS-EPI in both phantom and patient studies. The RS-EPI technique provided more homogenous images than SS-EPI, and can potentially offer higher image quality in the head and neck area. (orig.)

  15. Fast susceptibility-weighted imaging with three-dimensional short-axis propeller (SAP)-echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Samantha J; Yeom, Kristen W; Moseley, Michael E; Skare, S

    2015-05-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in neuroimaging can be challenging due to long scan times of three-dimensional (3D) gradient recalled echo (GRE), while faster techniques such as 3D interleaved echo-planar imaging (iEPI) are prone to motion artifacts. Here we outline and implement a 3D short-axis propeller echo-planar imaging (SAP-EPI) trajectory as a faster, motion-correctable approach for SWI. Experiments were conducted on a 3T MRI system. The 3D SAP-EPI, 3D iEPI, and 3D GRE SWI scans were acquired on two volunteers. Controlled motion experiments were conducted to test the motion-correction capability of 3D SAP-EPI. The 3D SAP-EPI SWI data were acquired on two pediatric patients as a potential alternative to 2D GRE used clinically. The 3D GRE images had a better target resolution (0.47 × 0.94 × 2 mm, scan time = 5 min), iEPI and SAP-EPI images (resolution = 0.94 × 0.94 × 2 mm) were acquired in a faster scan time (1:52 min) with twice the brain coverage. SAP-EPI showed motion-correction capability and some immunity to undersampling from rejected data. While 3D SAP-EPI suffers from some geometric distortion, its short scan time and motion-correction capability suggest that SAP-EPI may be a useful alternative to GRE and iEPI for use in SWI, particularly in uncooperative patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reconstruction strategy for echo planar spectroscopy and its application to partially undersampled imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, L G; Schaumburg, K; Paulson, O B

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly encountered form of echo planar spectroscopy involves oscillating gradients in one spatial dimension during readout. Data are consequently not sampled on a Cartesian grid. A fast gridding algorithm applicable to this particular situation is presented. The method is optimal, i...... or fewer interleaves per acquisition. The method is of particular interest when large bandwidths are needed (e.g., for high field scanning) and for scanners with limited gradient performance. The unavoidable artifacts resulting from undersampling are demonstrated to be acceptable for spectroscopy with long...

  17. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Nao; Kose, Katsumi

    2016-10-11

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (~54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach.

  18. Echo-Planar Imaging for a 9.4 Tesla Vertical-Bore Superconducting Magnet Using an Unshielded Gradient Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    KODAMA, Nao; KOSE, Katsumi

    2016-01-01

    Echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequences were developed for a 9.4 Tesla vertical standard bore (∼54 mm) superconducting magnet using an unshielded gradient coil optimized for live mice imaging and a data correction technique with reference scans. Because EPI requires fast switching of intense magnetic field gradients, eddy currents were induced in the surrounding metallic materials, e.g., the room temperature bore, and this produced serious artifacts on the EPI images. We solved the problem using an unshielded gradient coil set of proper size (outer diameter = 39 mm, inner diameter = 32 mm) with time control of the current rise and reference scans. The obtained EPI images of a phantom and a plant sample were almost artifact-free and demonstrated the promise of our approach. PMID:27001398

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in leukodystrophies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patay, Zoltan [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Radiology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-01

    Leukodystrophies are genetically determined metabolic diseases, in which the underlying biochemical abnormality interferes with the normal build-up and/or maintenance of myelin, which leads to hypo- (or arrested) myelination, or dysmyelination with resultant demyelination. Although conventional magnetic resonance imaging has significantly contributed to recent progress in the diagnostic work-up of these diseases, diffusion-weighted imaging has the potential to further improve our understanding of underlying pathological processes and their dynamics through the assessment of normal and abnormal diffusion properties of cerebral white matter. Evaluation of conventional diffusion-weighted and ADC map images allows the detection of major diffusion abnormalities and the identification of various edema types, of which the so-called myelin edema is particularly relevant to leukodystrophies. Depending on the nature of histopathological changes, stage and progression gradient of diseases, various diffusion-weighted imaging patterns may be seen in leukodystrophies. Absent or low-grade myelin edema is found in mucopolysaccharidoses, GM gangliosidoses, Zellweger disease, adrenomyeloneuropathy, L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, classical phenylketonuria, Van der Knaap disease and the vanishing white matter, medium grade myelin edema in metachromatic leukodystrophy, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and HMG coenzyme lyase deficiency and high grade edema in Krabbe disease, Canavan disease, hyperhomocystinemias, maple syrup urine disease and leukodystrophy with brainstem and spinal cord involvement and high lactate. (orig.)

  20. Development of a symmetric echo planar imaging framework for clinical translation of rapid dynamic hyperpolarized 13 C imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jeremy W; Vigneron, Daniel B; Larson, Peder E Z

    2017-02-01

    To develop symmetric echo planar imaging (EPI) and a reference scan framework for hyperpolarized 13 C metabolic imaging. Symmetric, ramp-sampled EPI with partial Fourier reconstruction was implemented on a 3T scanner. The framework for acquiring a reference scan on the 1 H channel and applied to 13 C data was described and validated in both phantoms and in vivo metabolism of [1-13 C]pyruvate. Ramp-sampled, symmetric EPI provided a substantial increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the phantom experiments. The reference scan acquired on the 1 H channel yielded 13 C phantom images that varied in mean signal intensity Ramp-sampled, symmetric EPI with spectral-spatial excitation of a single metabolite provides a fast, robust, and clinically efficacious approach to acquire hyperpolarized 13 C dynamic molecular imaging data. The gains of this efficient sampling, combined with partial Fourier methods, enables large matrix sizes required for human studies. Magn Reson Med 77:826-832, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. 3D spatially encoded and accelerated TE-averaged echo planar spectroscopic imaging in healthy human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zohaib; Wilson, Neil E; Thomas, M Albert

    2016-03-01

    Several different pathologies, including many neurodegenerative disorders, affect the energy metabolism of the brain. Glutamate, a neurotransmitter in the brain, can be used as a biomarker to monitor these metabolic processes. One method that is capable of quantifying glutamate concentration reliably in several regions of the brain is TE-averaged (1) H spectroscopic imaging. However, this type of method requires the acquisition of multiple TE lines, resulting in long scan durations. The goal of this experiment was to use non-uniform sampling, compressed sensing reconstruction and an echo planar readout gradient to reduce the scan time by a factor of eight to acquire TE-averaged spectra in three spatial dimensions. Simulation of glutamate and glutamine showed that the 2.2-2.4 ppm spectral region contained 95% glutamate signal using the TE-averaged method. Peak integration of this spectral range and home-developed, prior-knowledge-based fitting were used for quantitation. Gray matter brain phantom measurements were acquired on a Siemens 3 T Trio scanner. Non-uniform sampling was applied retrospectively to these phantom measurements and quantitative results of glutamate with respect to creatine 3.0 (Glu/Cr) ratios showed a coefficient of variance of 16% for peak integration and 9% for peak fitting using eight-fold acceleration. In vivo scans of the human brain were acquired as well and five different brain regions were quantified using the prior-knowledge-based algorithm. Glu/Cr ratios from these regions agreed with previously reported results in the literature. The method described here, called accelerated TE-averaged echo planar spectroscopic imaging (TEA-EPSI), is a significant methodological advancement and may be a useful tool for categorizing glutamate changes in pathologies where affected brain regions are not known a priori. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) : [3,4-(CH2)-C-13] glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, DL

    1999-01-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with C-13-H-1 J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo

  3. Diuretic-enhanced gadolinium excretory MR urography: comparison of conventional gradient-echo sequences and echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C C; Tacke, J; Adam, G B; Haage, P; Jung, P; Jakse, G; Günther, R W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of different gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted gradient-echo techniques in excretory MR urography. In 74 urologic patients, excretory MR urography was performed using various T1-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) sequences after injection of gadolinium-DTPA and low-dose furosemide. The examinations included conventional GRE sequences and echo-planar imaging (GRE EPI), both obtained with 3D data sets and 2D projection images. Breath-hold acquisition was used primarily. In 20 of 74 examinations, we compared breath-hold imaging with respiratory gating. Breath-hold imaging was significantly superior to respiratory gating for the visualization of pelvicaliceal systems, but not for the ureters. Complete MR urograms were obtained within 14-20 s using 3D GRE EPI sequences and in 20-30 s with conventional 3D GRE sequences. Ghost artefacts caused by ureteral peristalsis often occurred with conventional 3D GRE imaging and were almost completely suppressed in EPI sequences (p urography, the entire pelvicaliceal system was imaged by acquisition of a fast single-slice sequence and the conventional 2D GRE technique provided superior morphological accuracy than 2D GRE EPI projection images (p excretory MR urography especially in old or critically ill patients unable to suspend breathing for more than 20 s. Conventional GRE sequences are superior to EPI in high-resolution detail MR urograms and in projection imaging.

  4. Diuretic-enhanced gadolinium excretory MR urography: comparison of conventional gradient-echo sequences and echo-planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Tacke, J.; Adam, G.B.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W. [Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Jung, P.; Jakse, G. [Univ. of Technology, Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Urology

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of different gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted gradient-echo techniques in excretory MR urography. In 74 urologic patients, excretory MR urography was performed using various T1-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) sequences after injection of gadolinium-DTPA and low-dose furosemide. The examinations included conventional GRE sequences and echo-planar imaging (GRE EPI), both obtained with 3D data sets and 2D projection images. Breath-hold acquisition was used primarily. In 20 of 74 examinations, we compared breath-hold imaging with respiratory gating. Breath-hold imaging was significantly superior to respiratory gating for the visualization of pelvicaliceal systems, but not for the ureters. Complete MR urograms were obtained within 14-20 s using 3D GRE EPI sequences and in 20-30 s with conventional 3D GRE sequences. Ghost artefacts caused by ureteral peristalsis often occurred with conventional 3D GRE imaging and were almost completely suppressed in EPI sequences (p < 0.0001). Susceptibility effects were more pronounced on GRE EPI MR urograms and calculi measured 0.8-21.7% greater in diameter compared with conventional GRE sequences. Increased spatial resolution degraded the image quality only in GRE-EPI urograms. (orig.)

  5. Sparse registration of diffusion weighted images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzali, Maryam; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2017-11-01

    Registration is a critical step in group analysis of diffusion weighted images (DWI). Image registration is also necessary for construction of white matter atlases that can be used to identify white matter changes. A challenge in the registration of DWI is that the orientation of the fiber bundles should be considered in the process, making their registration more challenging than that of the scalar images. Most of the current registration methods use a model of diffusion profile, limiting the method to the used model. We propose a model-independent method for DWI registration. The proposed method uses a multi-level free-form deformation (FFD), a sparse similarity measure, and a dictionary. We also propose a synthesis K-SVD algorithm for sparse interpolation of images during the registration process. We utilize two dictionaries: analysis dictionary is learned based on diffusion signals while synthesis dictionary is generated based on image patches. The proposed multi-level approach registers anatomical structures at different scales. T-test is used to determine the significance of the differences between different methods. We have shown the efficiency of the proposed approach using real data. The method results in smaller generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) root mean square (RMS) error (0.05 improvements, p = 0.0237) and angular error (0.37 ° improvement, p = 0.0330) compared to the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) method and advanced normalization tools (ANTs). Sparse registration of diffusion signals enables registration of diffusion weighted images without using a diffusion model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Accelerated three-dimensional cine phase contrast imaging using randomly undersampled echo planar imaging with compressed sensing reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, Tamer A; Akçakaya, Mehmet; Goddu, Beth; Berg, Sophie; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate an accelerated three-dimensional (3D) cine phase contrast MRI sequence by combining a randomly sampled 3D k-space acquisition sequence with an echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. An accelerated 3D cine phase contrast MRI sequence was implemented by combining EPI readout with randomly undersampled 3D k-space data suitable for compressed sensing (CS) reconstruction. The undersampled data were then reconstructed using low-dimensional structural self-learning and thresholding (LOST). 3D phase contrast MRI was acquired in 11 healthy adults using an overall acceleration of 7 (EPI factor of 3 and CS rate of 3). For comparison, a single two-dimensional (2D) cine phase contrast scan was also performed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) rate 2 and approximately at the level of the pulmonary artery bifurcation. The stroke volume and mean velocity in both the ascending and descending aorta were measured and compared between two sequences using Bland-Altman plots. An average scan time of 3 min and 30 s, corresponding to an acceleration rate of 7, was achieved for 3D cine phase contrast scan with one direction flow encoding, voxel size of 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) , foot-head coverage of 6 cm and temporal resolution of 30 ms. The mean velocity and stroke volume in both the ascending and descending aorta were statistically equivalent between the proposed 3D sequence and the standard 2D cine phase contrast sequence. The combination of EPI with a randomly undersampled 3D k-space sampling sequence using LOST reconstruction allows a seven-fold reduction in scan time of 3D cine phase contrast MRI without compromising blood flow quantification. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Retrospective correction of B0-field-induced geometric distortions in multislice echo planar images: a 3D solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Roderick W.; Coburn, Edward A.

    2000-04-01

    A method has been developed to utilize a 3D B0 fieldmap, with a multi-volume-of-interest segmentation map, to quantify and correct geometric distortions in echo-planar images. The purpose is to provide accurate co-registration of anatomical MRI to functional MRI time course sequences. A data structure capable of extracting and reporting the necessary information forms a central part of the solution. Images were obtained from a 1.5 Tesla scanner with an experimental y-gradient insert coil. Two 3D-gradient echo sequences supply the data needed to calculate the B0 map across the volume. Segmentation of the volume into brain/background produces the data needed for the phase unwrapping and volume(s) of interest generation, from which the global B0 variation map is obtained. Subsequent EPI acquisition yields the fMRI time- course information. Tests were carried out on a phantom and a human volunteer engaged in a motor task (finger-tapping). Strong distortions were measured, and subsequently corrected, particularly near the petrous bone/mastoid air cells and in the frontal and maxillary sinuses. Additionally, a strong eddy current resulting from the unshielded y-gradient was detected. The method facilitates geometric distortion correction through an imaging volume, containing multiple regions of interest within a slice, starting from a single starting point.

  8. Study of the reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Haibo; Li, Yadi; Li, Hui; Wang, Bo; Hu, Bin

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to compare the imaging quality, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and application values between reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging (rFOV DWI) and single-shot echo-planar-imaging diffusion-weighted imaging (SS-EPI DWI) of breast tissue. For 87 cases (75 with normal breast tissue, 12 with mammary cancer), breasts were scanned with SS-EPI DWI and rFOV DWI (b values, 800 s/mm(2)). Image quality and ADC values of breast tissue images were compared between SS-EPI DWI and rFOV DWI. The average image quality score for the 87 cases was 4.73 in rFOV DWI and 3.62 in SS-EPI DWI. The difference was statistically significant (P breast tissue was 1.696 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s by rFOV DWI and 1.832 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s by SS-EPI DWI, and the difference was statistically significant (P breast cancer was 1.065 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s by rFOV DWI and 1.192 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s by SS-EPI DWI, which was a statistically significant difference (P images with higher resolution and less distortion than SS-EPI DWI, and this difference may be helpful in disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Designing hyperbolic secant excitation pulses to reduce signal dropout in gradient-echo echo-planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wastling, Stephen J; Barker, Gareth J

    2015-09-01

    To design hyperbolic secant (HS) excitation pulses to reduce signal dropout in the orbitofrontal and inferior temporal regions in gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) for functional MRI (fMRI) applications. An algorithm based on Bloch simulations optimizes the HS pulse parameters needed to give the desired signal response across the range of susceptibility gradients observed in the human head (approximately ±250 μT·m(-1) ). The impact of the HS pulse on the signal, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) sensitivity, and ability to detect resting state BOLD signal changes was assessed in six healthy male volunteers at 3T. The optimized HS pulse (μ = 4.25, β = 3040 Hz, A0 = 12.3 μT, Δf = 4598 Hz) had a near uniform signal response for through-plane susceptibility gradients in the range ±250 μT·m(-1) . Signal, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, BOLD sensitivity, and the detectability of resting state networks were all partially recovered in the orbitofrontal and inferior temporal regions; however, there were signal losses of up to 50% in regions of homogeneous field (and signal loss from in-plane susceptibility gradients remained). The HS pulse reduced signal dropout and could be used to acquire task and resting state fMRI data without loss of spatial coverage or temporal resolution. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. High resolution CBV assessment with PEAK-EPI: k-t-undersampling and reconstruction in echo planar imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramb, Rebecca; Mader, Irina; Jung, Bernd; Hennig, Jürgen; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2017-06-01

    Achieving higher spatial resolution and improved brain coverage while mitigating in-plane susceptibility artifacts in the assessment of perfusion parameters, such as cerebral blood volume, in echo planar imaging (EPI)-based dynamic susceptibility contrast weighted cerebral perfusion measurements. PEAK-EPI, an EPI sequence with interleaved readout trajectories and three different strategies for autocalibration-signal acquisition (inplace, dynamic extra and extra) is presented. Performance of each approach is analyzed in vivo based on flip angle variation induced dynamics, assessing temporal fidelity, temporal SNR and g-factors. All approaches are compared with conventional GRAPPA reconstructions. PEAK-EPI with inplace autocalibration-signal at R = 5 is then compared with the standard clinical EPI protocol in six patients, using two half-dose dynamic susceptibility contrast weighted cerebral perfusion measurements per subject. PEAK-EPI acquisition facilitates a substantial increase of spatial resolution at a higher number of slices per TR and provides improved SNR compared to conventional GRAPPA. High dependency of the resulting reconstruction quality on the type of autocalibration-signal acquisition is observed. PEAK-EPI with inplace autocalibration-signal achieves high temporal fidelity and initial feasibility is shown. The obtained high resolution cerebral blood volume maps reveal more detailed information than in corresponding standard EPI measurements and facilitate detailed delineation of tumorous tissue. Magn Reson Med 77:2153-2166, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting using echo-planar imaging: Joint quantification of T1 and T2∗ relaxation times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Benedikt; Zimmer, Fabian; Zapp, Jascha; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Schad, Lothar R

    2017-11-01

    To develop an implementation of the magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) paradigm for quantitative imaging using echo-planar imaging (EPI) for simultaneous assessment of T1 and T2∗. The proposed MRF method (MRF-EPI) is based on the acquisition of 160 gradient-spoiled EPI images with rapid, parallel-imaging accelerated, Cartesian readout and a measurement time of 10 s per slice. Contrast variation is induced using an initial inversion pulse, and varying the flip angles, echo times, and repetition times throughout the sequence. Joint quantification of T1 and T2∗ is performed using dictionary matching with integrated B1+ correction. The quantification accuracy of the method was validated in phantom scans and in vivo in 6 healthy subjects. Joint T1 and T2∗ parameter maps acquired with MRF-EPI in phantoms are in good agreement with reference measurements, showing deviations under 5% and 4% for T1 and T2∗, respectively. In vivo baseline images were visually free of artifacts. In vivo relaxation times are in good agreement with gold-standard techniques (deviation T1 : 4 ± 2%, T2∗: 4 ± 5%). The visual quality was comparable to the in vivo gold standard, despite substantially shortened scan times. The proposed MRF-EPI method provides fast and accurate T1 and T2∗ quantification. This approach offers a rapid supplement to the non-Cartesian MRF portfolio, with potentially increased usability and robustness. Magn Reson Med 78:1724-1733, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. SSH-EPI diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the spine with low b values: is it useful in differentiating malignant metastatic tumor infiltration from benign fracture edema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztekin, Ozgur; Ozan, Ebru; Hilal Adibelli, Zehra; Unal, Gökhan; Abali, Yusuf

    2009-07-01

    Conventional MR sequences are sometimes not helpful in differentiating benign from pathologic fractures. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences (diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)/SSH-EPI) with low b value in differentiating malignant metastatic tumor infiltration of vertebral bone marrow from benign vertebral fracture edema. A total of 47 patients, 20 with benign fractures and 27 with tumor infiltration, were included in this prospective study. Diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained by single-shot echo-planar imaging technique with diffusion gradient (b = 300 s/mm2; TR/TE, 1,400/100), using a 1.5 T MR scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images and short inversion time inversion-recovery images were available for all 64 lesions. The lesions on DWI/SSH-EPI were categorized as having hypo-, iso-, or hyperintense signal intensity relative to normal vertebrae by two experienced radiologists. We evaluated signal intensity patterns on DWI/SSH-EPI in 64 lesions, which showed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images in both benign fractures and metastasis. With the exception of sclerotic metastases in two patients, malignant metastatic tumor infiltration was hyperintense with respect to normal bone marrow on diffusion-weighted images; all but four benign vertebral fractures were isointense with respect to normal bone marrow. Single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences (DWI/SSH-EPI) with low b value provided excellent distinction between metastatic tumor infiltration and benign vertebral fracture edema. Hyperintense signal intensity on DWI/SSH-EPI was highly specific for the diagnosis of metastatic tumor infiltration of the spine.

  14. Dynamic echo-planar MR imaging of the diaphragm for a 3D dynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craighero, S.; Coulomb, M. [Hopital Michallon, Department of Radiology, La Tronche Grenoble (France); Promayon, E.; Baconnier, P. [Universite J. Fourier, Faculte de Medecine, TIMC-IMAG CNRS UMR 5525, Institut d' Ingenierie de l' Information de Sante, La Tronche Grenoble (France); Lebas, J.F. [Hopital Michallon, The Unity of MRI, La Tronche Grenoble (France)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the feasibility of 3D reconstructions of the diaphragm during the respiratory cycle using EPI sequences (EPI acquisition, 270 ms/image, on a healthy subject breathing spontaneously and at 0.1 Hz). Continuously recorded respiratory signal allowed for retrospective synchronization with respiratory phases for reconstruction of successive diaphragm surfaces using a specifically designed software. Displacements, area and volume changes of the diaphragm were quantified. Our measurements were comparable with the data in the literature. Reconstructed surfaces allowed in vivo diaphragm dynamic evaluation in terms of displacements, area and volume variations. EPI has adequate spatial and temporal resolution for studying diaphragm dynamics during natural breathing. (orig.)

  15. Dynamic multi-coil technique (DYNAMITE) shimming for echo-planar imaging of the human brain at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Umesh Rudrapatna, S; Nixon, Terence W; de Graaf, Robin A

    2015-01-15

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large-scale brain connectivity

  16. Dynamic Multi-Coil Technique (DYNAMITE) Shimming for Echo-Planar Imaging of the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Rudrapatna, S. Umesh; Nixon, Terence W.; de Graaf, Robin A.

    2014-01-01

    Gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (EPI) is the primary method of choice in functional MRI and other methods relying on fast MRI to image brain activation and connectivity. However, the high susceptibility of EPI towards B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity poses serious challenges. Conventional magnetic field shimming with low-order spherical harmonic (SH) functions is capable of compensating shallow field distortions, but performs poorly for global brain shimming or on specific areas with strong susceptibility-induced B0 distortions such as the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Excellent B0 homogeneity has been demonstrated recently in the human brain at 7 Tesla with the DYNAmic Multi-coIl TEchnique (DYNAMITE) for magnetic field shimming (Juchem et al., J Magn Reson (2011) 212:280-288). Here, we report the benefits of DYNAMITE shimming for multi-slice EPI and T2* mapping. A standard deviation of 13 Hz was achieved for the residual B0 distribution in the human brain at 7 Tesla with DYNAMITE shimming and was 60% lower compared to conventional shimming that employs static zero through third order SH shapes. The residual field inhomogeneity with SH shimming led to an average 8 mm shift at acquisition parameters commonly used for fMRI and was reduced to 1.5-3 mm with DYNAMITE shimming. T2* values obtained from the prefrontal and temporal cortices with DYNAMITE shimming were 10-50% longer than those measured with SH shimming. The reduction of the confounding macroscopic B0 field gradients with DYNAMITE shimming thereby promises improved access to the relevant microscopic T2* effects. The combination of high spatial resolution and DYNAMITE shimming allows largely artifact-free EPI and T2* mapping throughout the brain, including prefrontal and temporal lobe areas. DYNAMITE shimming is expected to critically benefit a wide range of MRI applications that rely on excellent B0 magnetic field conditions including EPI-based fMRI to study various cognitive processes and assessing large

  17. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ileocolonic Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Mie A; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Nathan, Torben

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (dw- MRI) utilizes differences in the motion of water molecules between tissues for image formation without administration of contrast materials. Inflammation in the bowel wall slows water transit resulting in lower apparent diffusions...

  18. Technique of diffusion weighted imaging and its application in stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Enzhong; Tian, Jie; Han, Ying; Wang, Huifang; Li, Wu; He, Huiguang

    2003-05-01

    To study the application of diffusion weighted imaging and image post processing in the diagnosis of stroke, especially in acute stroke, 205 patients were examined by 1.5 T or 1.0 T MRI scanner and the images such as T1, T2 and diffusion weighted images were obtained. Image post processing was done with "3D Med System" developed by our lab to analyze data and acquire the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map. In acute and subacute stage of stroke, the signal in cerebral infarction areas changed to hyperintensity in T2- and diffusion-weighted images, normal or hypointensity in T1-weighted images. In hyperacute stage, however, the signal was hyperintense just in the diffusion weighted imaes; others were normal. In the chronic stage, the signal in T1- and diffusion-weighted imaging showed hypointensity and hyperintensity in T2 weighted imaging. Because ADC declined obviously in acute and subacute stage of stroke, the lesion area was hypointensity in ADC map. With the development of the disease, ADC gradually recovered and then changed to hyperintensity in ADC map in chronic stage. Using diffusion weighted imaging and ADC mapping can make a diagnosis of stroke, especially in the hyperacute stage of stroke, and can differentiate acute and chronic stroke.

  19. [Utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in severe focal traumatic brain injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Valderrey, F; Muñiz-Montes, J R; López-García, J A; Villegas-Del Ojo, J; Málaga-Gil, J; Galván-García, R

    2013-01-01

    To describe the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in a series of severe traumatic brain injuries, their clinical and outcome features, and possible implications. A descriptive, observational case-series study was carried out. Patients with severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) admitted to the ICU were subjected to MRI study using a 1.5 T scanner. Diffusion-weighted images (DWMR) were obtained using the following echo-planar pulse sequence: TR 10000 ms, TE 126.9 ms, with b values 1000 s/mm2 in the three spatial dimensions. Combining the three sets of images, an isotropic image conforming a map of the mean ADCs was obtained. DWMR was performed in 23 patients with severe TBI admitted to the ICU between 2001 and 2004. In the MR images we selected 26 regions of interest (ROIs) where ADC was recorded. We observed a clear increase in diffusion in non-treated space-occupying lesions versus other types of injuries and the normal values. A poorer outcome was recorded in patients with lower ADC values. Mean ADC in the lesions was greater than the normal values and greater in contusions than in other types of injuries, as an expression of extracellular edema. ADCs were decreased in patients with a poor outcome, suggesting an association between ischemia and the patient prognosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  20. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2003-03-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland, Ltd.

  1. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in 12 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chun Chou

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a potentially devastating neurologic syndrome, but timely treatment may lead to complete reversal of the disease course. We reviewed 12 cases of PRES and describe the clinical history and imaging findings, including conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, and calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC maps, used to establish the diagnosis of PRES. Three male and nine female patients aged between 11 and 70 years (mean, 37 years with clinical and imaging findings consistent with PRES were enrolled in the study. All patients had undergone conventional MRI and 10 had undergone additional DWI studies. Ten patients had follow-up MRI studies. DWI was performed using a 1.5T system with a single-shot spin-echo echo-planar pulse sequence. Initial and follow-up neuroimaging and clinical history were reviewed. Lesions were almost always present over the posterior circulation, mainly the parieto-occipital region, affecting primarily the white matter. The anterior circulation region, brainstem, cerebellum, deep cerebral white matter, and thalamus were also involved in five cases. Conventional MRI revealed hyperintensity on T2- weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. DWI showed isointensity and increased signal intensity on ADC values in all cases, indicating vasogenic edema. Clinical and MRI follow-up showed that the symptoms and radiologic abnormalities could be reversed after appropriate treatment of the causes of PRES in most patients (9 of 10. In one patient, the ADC value was lower on follow-up images, indicating cytotoxic edema with ischemic infarct. DWI was a useful complement to MRI in the diagnosis of PRES.

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging of breast tumours at 3 Tesla and 7 Tesla: a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, S.; Minarikova, L.; Zaric, O.; Chmelik, M.; Strasser, B.; Trattnig, S.; Bogner, W. [Medical University Vienna, MRCE, Department of Biomedical imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, K.; Baltzer, P.; Helbich, T. [Medical University Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-05-15

    To compare bilateral diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) at 3 T and 7 T in the same breast tumour patients. Twenty-eight patients were included in this IRB-approved study (mean age 56 ± 16 years). Before contrast-enhanced imaging, bilateral DWI with b = 0 and 850 s/mm{sup 2} was performed in 2:56 min (3 T) and 3:48 min (7 T), using readout-segmented echo planar imaging (rs-EPI) with a 1.4 x 1.4 mm{sup 2} (3 T)/0.9 x 0.9 mm{sup 2} (7 T) in-plane resolution. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were assessed. Twenty-eight lesions were detected (18 malignant, 10 benign). CNR and SNR were comparable at both field strengths (p > 0.3). Mean ADC values at 7 T were 4-22 % lower than at 3 T (p ≤ 0.03). An ADC threshold of 1.275 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s resulted in a diagnostic specificity of 90 % at both field strengths. The sensitivity was 94 % and 100 % at 3 T and 7 T, respectively. 7-T DWI of the breast can be performed with 2.4-fold higher spatial resolution than 3 T, without significant differences in SNR if compared to 3 T. (orig.)

  3. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in MELAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshita, T.; Oka, M.; Imon, Y.; Watanabe, C.; Katayama, S.; Yamaguchi, S. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Kajima, T.; Mimori, Y.; Nakamura, S.

    2000-09-01

    Clinical features of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) resemble those of cerebral infarcts, but the pathogenesis of infarct-like lesions is not fully understood. To characterise these infarct-like lesions, we studied two patients with MELAS using diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI before and after stroke-like episodes and measured the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the new infarct-like lesions. These gave high signal on DWI and had much higher ADC than normal-appearing regions. The ADC remained high even 30 days after a stroke-like episode then decreased in lesions, with or without abnormality as shown by conventional MRI. We speculate that early elevation of ADC in the acute or subacute phase reflects vasogenic rather than cytotoxic edema. The ADC of the lesions, which disappeared almost completely with clinical improvement, returned to normal levels, which may reflect tissue recovery without severe damage. To our knowledge, this is the first study of DWI in MELAS. (orig.)

  4. Scan time reduction for readout-segmented EPI using simultaneous multislice acceleration: Diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 and 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Robert; Jezzard, Peter; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Clare, Stuart; Porter, David A; Miller, Karla L

    2014-07-30

    Readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI) can provide high quality diffusion data because it is less prone to distortion and blurring artifacts than single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI), particularly at higher resolution and higher field. Readout segmentation allows shorter echo-spacing and echo train duration, resulting in reduced image distortion and blurring, respectively, in the phase-encoding direction. However, these benefits come at the expense of longer scan times because the segments are acquired in multiple repetitions times (TRs). This study shortened rs-EPI scan times by reducing the TR duration with simultaneous multislice acceleration. The blipped-CAIPI method for slice acceleration with reduced g-factor SNR loss was incorporated into the diffusion-weighted rs-EPI sequence. The rs- and ss-EPI sequences were compared at a range of resolutions at both 3 and 7 Tesla in terms of image fidelity and diffusion postprocessing results. Slice-accelerated clinically useful trace-weighted images and tractography results are presented. Tractography analysis showed that the reduced artifacts in rs-EPI allowed better discrimination of tracts than ss-EPI. Slice acceleration reduces rs-EPI scan times providing a practical alternative to diffusion-weighted ss-EPI with reduced distortion and high resolution. Magn Reson Med, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Liver imaging at 3.0 T: Diffusion-induced black-blood echo-planar imaging with large anatomic volumetric coverage as an alternative for specific absorption rate-intensive echo-train spin-echo sequences: Feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C. van den Bos (Indra); S.M. Hussain (Shahid); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); P.A. Wielopolski (Piotr)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractInstitutional Review Board approval and signed informed consent were obtained by all participants for an ongoing sequence optimization project at 3.0 T. The purpose of this study was to evaluate breath-hold diffusion-induced blackblood echo-planar imaging (BBEPI) as a potential

  6. [Importance of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging at differentiation of cholesteatoma and granulation tissue in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzcu, Göksel; Yardımcı, Aytül Hande; Turna, Önder; Göner, Reyyan Elif; Acıoğlu, Engin

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to report the significance of echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (EP-DWI) in preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of patients with surgically corrected cholesteatoma and granulation tissue according to DWI and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Ninety-one patients (52 males, 39 females; mean age 40.7±15.8 years; range 3 to 77 years) who admitted to radiology clinic of our hospital between December 2009 and May 2011 with a pre-diagnosis of chronic otitis media with primary acquired cholesteatoma and assessed preoperatively in our clinic by ear magnetic resonance imaging and DWI were included in the study. Diffusion-weighted imaging results were compared with operative findings and pathology results. Patients were retrospectively evaluated using picture archiving and communication system. Diffusion-weighted imaging and ADC images were examined qualitatively and quantitatively. Ninety-one patients suspected of cholesteatoma were operated. According to the results of operations, 50 patients had cholesteatoma and 41 patients had granulation tissue. The mean DWI values of patients with cholesteatoma were significantly higher than patients with granulation tissue (p<0.05). The mean ADC values of patients with cholesteatoma were significantly lower than patients with granulation tissue (p<0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of EP-DWI in detection of cholesteatoma were 97.6% and 92.0%, respectively. Echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging by using ADC and DWI is a valuable tool with high sensitivity and specificity rates in detecting cholesteatoma particularly bigger than 5 mm and in differentiating them from other pathologies.

  7. Interpolation of diffusion weighted imaging datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim B; Lundell, Henrik; Burke, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    anatomical details and signal-to-noise-ratio for reliable fibre reconstruction. We assessed the potential benefits of interpolating DWI datasets to a higher image resolution before fibre reconstruction using a diffusion tensor model. Simulations of straight and curved crossing tracts smaller than or equal...... to the voxel size showed that conventional higher-order interpolation methods improved the geometrical representation of white-matter tracts with reduced partial-volume-effect (PVE), except at tract boundaries. Simulations and interpolation of ex-vivo monkey brain DWI datasets revealed that conventional...... interpolation methods fail to disentangle fine anatomical details if PVE is too pronounced in the original data. As for validation we used ex-vivo DWI datasets acquired at various image resolutions as well as Nissl-stained sections. Increasing the image resolution by a factor of eight yielded finer geometrical...

  8. Value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the differentiation between benign and malignant cervical lymph nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, Konstantin [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: holzapfel@roe.med.tum.de; Duetsch, Sabrina; Fauser, Claudius [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany); Eiber, Matthias; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Gaa, Jochen [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, D-81675 Munich (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate echo-planar diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in the differentiation between benign and malignant cervical lymph nodes. Materials and methods: 35 consecutive patients with 55 enlarged (>10 mm) cervical lymph nodes underwent MR imaging at 1.5-T. DWI was performed using a single-shot echo-planar (SSEPI) MR imaging sequence with b values (b: diffusion factor) of 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were reconstructed for all patients and ADC values were calculated for each lymph node. Imaging results were correlated with histopathologic findings after neck dissection or surgical biopsy, findings in PET/CT or imaging follow-up. Mann-Whitney test was used for statistical analysis and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed. Results: Cervical lymph node enlargement was secondary to metastases from squamous cell carcinomas [n = 25], non-Hodgkin's lymphoma [n = 6], reactive lymphadenitis [n = 20], cat scratch lymphadenitis [n = 2] and sarcoidosis [n = 2]. The mean ADC values (x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) were 0.78 {+-} 0.09 for metastatic lymph nodes, 0.64 {+-} 0.09 for lymphomatous nodes and 1.24 {+-} 0.16 for benign cervical lymph nodes. ADC values of malignant lymph nodes were significantly lower than ADC values of benign lymph nodes. 94.3% of lesions were correctly classified as benign or malignant using a threshold ADC value of 1.02 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. Conclusion: According to our first experience, DWI using a SSEPI sequence allows reliable differentiation between benign and malignant cervical lymph nodes.

  9. Ultrahigh field single-refocused diffusion weighted imaging using a matched-phase adiabatic spin echo (MASE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyvorne, Hadrien; O'Halloran, Rafael; Balchandani, Priti

    2016-05-01

    To improve ultrahigh field diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the presence of inhomogeneous transmit B1 field by designing a novel semi-adiabatic single-refocused DWI technique. A 180° slice-selective, adiabatic radiofrequency (RF) pulse of 4 ms duration was designed using the adiabatic Shinnar-Le Roux algorithm. A matched-phase slice-selective 90° RF pulse of 8 ms duration was designed to compensate the nonlinear phase of the adiabatic 180° RF pulse. The resulting RF pulse combination, matched-phase adiabatic spin echo (MASE), was integrated into a single-shot echo planar DWI sequence. The performance of this sequence was compared with single-refocused Stejskal-Tanner (ST), twice-refocused spin echo (TRSE) and twice-refocused adiabatic spin echo (TRASE) in simulations, phantoms, and healthy volunteers at 7 Tesla (T). In regions with inhomogeneous B1 , MASE resulted in increased signal intensity compared with ST (up to 64%). Moderate increase in specific absorption rate (35-39%) was observed for adiabatic RF pulses. MASE resulted in higher signal homogeneity at 7T, leading to improved visualization of measures derived from diffusion-weighted images such as white matter tractography and track density images. Efficient adiabatic SLR pulses can be adapted to single-refocused DWI, leading to substantially improved signal uniformity when compared with conventional acquisitions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel

    2015-06-16

    Jun 16, 2015 ... The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of normal myelination in infantile brain. Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel. 1. , Moataz M. Montasser *, Ashraf N. Etaby. 2. ,. Reda M.A. Darweesh. 3. Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt. Received 2 June ...

  11. Value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmad Hafez Ahmad Alsayed Afifi

    2012-10-12

    Oct 12, 2012 ... Value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the prediction of cancer prostate. Ahmad Hafez Ahmad Alsayed Afifi a,. *, Ashraf Naguib Etaby a. ,. Mohamad Alsayed Yousef Ahmad b. , Yasmin Tarek Farghaly a a Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt.

  12. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim of the work: To demonstrate the role of Diffusion Weighted Imaging and ADC maps in assessing normal progression of the infantile brain myelination. Patients and methods: The present work included 30 infants with normal MRI study of the brain, normal psychomotor development and normal neurological examination.

  13. Ghost reduction in echo-planar imaging by joint reconstruction of images and line-to-line delays and phase errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, Julianna D; Welch, E Brian; Grissom, William A

    2017-10-16

    To correct line-to-line delays and phase errors in echo-planar imaging (EPI). EPI-trajectory auto-corrected image reconstruction (EPI-TrACR) is an iterative maximum-likelihood technique that exploits data redundancy provided by multiple receive coils between nearby lines of k-space to determine and correct line-to-line trajectory delays and phase errors that cause ghosting artifacts. EPI-TrACR was efficiently implemented using a segmented FFT and was applied to in vivo brain data acquired at 7 T across acceleration (1×-4×) and multishot factors (1-4 shots), and in a time series. EPI-TrACR reduced ghosting across all acceleration factors and multishot factors, compared to conventional calibrated reconstructions and the PAGE method. It also achieved consistently lower ghosting in the time series. Averaged over all cases, EPI-TrACR reduced root-mean-square ghosted signal outside the brain by 27% compared to calibrated reconstruction, and by 40% compared to PAGE. EPI-TrACR automatically corrects line-to-line delays and phase errors in multishot, accelerated, and dynamic EPI. While the method benefits from additional calibration data for initialization, it was not a requirement for most reconstructions. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  14. Diffusion-weighted imaging in ischaemic stroke: a follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, J. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University of Essen (Germany); Dept. of Neurology, Inselspital, University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inselspital, University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Mattle, H.P. [Dept. of Neurology, Inselspital, University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Heid, O.; Remonda, L.; Schroth, G. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Inselspital, University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2000-03-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DWI) echo-planar (EPI) MRI has been used for imaging acute ischaemic stroke. We used DWI and conventional spin-echo (SE) MRI to study the dynamics of ischaemic human stroke. We examined 30 patients (mean age 57.5 years, range 27-82 years, median 57 years) with a diagnosis of stroke. They were examined in the acute (120 min to 47 h, mean 15.3 h), subacute (8 days) and chronic (2-3 months) stages of ischaemia using clinical scores and MRI. Imaging was performed on an 1.5-T imager. Anisotropic DWI with diffusion gradients in all three axes, an isotropic tensor trace pulse DWI sequence and SE MRI were used. In all patients both DWI sequences showed a decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the acute stage, even when SE images did not reveal signal abnormalities. Clinical features correlated with lesion site but not size. The ADC was initially 19.6-43 % less than that of nonischaemic tissue and increased to normal after 7 days in conventionally treated patients and after 2-5 days in patients who underwent intra-arterial fibrinolysis. In the chronic stage the ADC rose by up to 254.4 %. In patients who did not undergo fibrinolysis DWI changes correlated with the final infarct size (P < 0.05). It was possible to differentiate acute from chronic ischaemic lesions. We conclude that DWI is a sensitive and practicable tool for detecting early cerebral ischaemia. It is possible to predict in the acute stage the final size of an infarct. DWI may be helpful for clinical decisions and for monitoring therapy. (orig.)

  15. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in the evaluation of epidural spinal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, Christina; Mueller-Mang, Christina [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Koller, Anke [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Bammer, Roland [Stanford University, Lucas MRI/S Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford (United States); Thurnher, Majda M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Neuroradiology Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-12-15

    Epidural spinal cord compression is one of the most critical emergency conditions requiring medical attention and requires prompt and adequate treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the role of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis and differentiation of epidural spinal lesions. Three patients with epidural lymphoma, two with sarcoma and three with epidural metastatic disease were imaged on a 1.5T MRI unit. DWI was performed using navigated, interleaved, multi-shot echo planar imaging (IEPI). Three region of interest (ROI)-measurements were obtained on corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and the mean ADC value was used for further analysis. The cellularity of tumors was determined as the N/C ratio (nucleus/cytoplasma ratio) from histological samples. The ADC values and N/C ratios of lesions were compared using a Kruskal-Wallis test. The mean ADC of the lymphomas was 0.66 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, that of the sarcomas was 0.85 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and the ADC of the metastatic lesions was 1.05 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; however, the differences were not statistically significant. Mean N/C ratios in the lymphoma, sarcomas and metastases were 4:1, 2:1, and 2.6:1, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between the groups (p < 0.025). Although not statistically significant due to the small patient sample, our results clearly show a tendency toward decreased diffusivity in neoplastic lesions with higher cellularity. The data from our study suggest that DWI is a feasible and potentially useful technique for the evaluation of epidural lesions that cause spinal cord compression on a per-patient basis. (orig.)

  16. Correction of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Søren; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Jespersen, Sune N; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Tanderup, Kari; Pedersen, Erik M

    2014-08-01

    Geometrical distortion is a major obstacle for the use of echo planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in planning of radiotherapy. This study compares geometrical distortion correction methods of DW-MRI at time of brachytherapy (BT) in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. In total 21 examinations comprising DW-MRI, dual gradient echo (GRE) for B₀ field map calculation and T2-weighted (T2W) fat-saturated MRI of eight patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were acquired during BT with a plastic tandem and ring applicator in situ. The ability of B0 field map correction (B₀M) and deformable image registration (DIR) to correct DW-MRI geometric image distortion was compared to the non-corrected DW-MRI including evaluation of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for the gross tumor volume (GTV). Geometrical distortion correction decreased tandem displacement from 3.3 ± 0.9 mm (non-corrected) to 2.9 ± 1.0 mm (B₀M) and 1.9 ± 0.6 mm (DIR), increased mean normalized cross-correlation from 0.69 ± 0.1 (non- corrected) to 0.70 ± 0.10 (B₀M) and 0.77 ± 0.1 (DIR), and increased the Jaccard similarity coefficient from 0.72 ± 0.1 (non-corrected) to 0.73 ± 0.06 (B₀M) and 0.77 ± 0.1 (DIR). For all parameters only DIR corrections were significant (p < 0.05). ADC of the GTV did not change significantly with either correction method. DIR significantly improved geometrical accuracy of DW-MRI, with remaining residual uncertainties of less than 2 mm, while no significant improvement was seen using B₀ field map correction.

  17. Usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficient in ovarian cystic tumors using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Suk Hee; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Song, Sang Gook; Kim, Jin Woong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Heong Joong; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in patients with ovarian cystic tumors. During past 12 months, we studied 30 patients who were clinically suspected of having ovarian cystic tumors and who underwent DWI using a 1.5 T MR unit, Eight patients with small cystic ovarian lesions of less than 3 cm in diameter and insufficient DWI were excluded from the calculation of the ADC values. The remaining twenty-six cystic ovarian lesions in 22 patients were classified into four groups; ovarian cysts, cystadenomas, other benign tumors, and malignant tumors. DWI was obtained using single-shot spin echo planar imaging and two gradient steps (b values of 0, 800 sec/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were measured using regions-of-interest (ROI) in the cystic components of the DWI located in the same section as the T2-weighted image and away from the septation and solid components. The mean ADC values were 0.196 {+-} 0.105 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/sec in the ovarian cysts, 1.312 {+-} 1.064 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/sec in the cystadenomas, 0.274 {+-} 0.124 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/sec in the other benign tumors, and 1.011 {+-} 0.080 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/sec in the malignant tumors. The differences in the ADC values between the ovarian cysts and cystadenomas, the ovarian cysts and malignant tumors, the cystadenomas and other benign tumors, and the other benign tumors and mailgnant tumors were statistically significant ({rho} < 0.01). There was no statistically significant difference in the ADC values between the ovarian cysts and other benign tumors, or between the cystadenomas and malignant tumors ({rho} > 0.05). The calculated ADC values using DWI should be helpful in the differential diagnosis of cystic ovarian tumors.

  18. Value of 3 Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessing liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalavrentios, Lavrentios; Sinakos, Emmanouil; Chourmouzi, Danai; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Drevelegas, Konstantinos; Constantinides, Manos; Drevelegas, Antonios; Talwalkar, Jayant; Akriviadis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the new generation 3 Tesla technology, and especially diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in predicting liver fibrosis. The aim of our pilot study was to assess the clinical performance of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of liver parenchyma for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). 18 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD underwent DWI with 3 Tesla MRI. DWI was performed with single-shot echo-planar technique at b values of 0-500 and 0-1000 s/mm2. ADC was measured in four locations in the liver and the mean ADC value was used for analysis. Staging of fibrosis was performed according to the METAVIR system. The median age of patients was 52 years (range 23-73). The distribution of patients in different fibrosis stages was: 0 (n=1), 1 (n=7), 2 (n=1), 3 (n=5), 4 (n=4). Fibrosis stage was poorly associated with ADC at b value of 0-500 s/mm2 (r= -0.30, P=0.27). However it was significantly associated with ADC at b value of 0-1000 s/mm2 (r= -0.57, P=0.01). For this b value (0-1000 s/mm2) the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.93 for fibrosis stage ≥3 and the optimal ADC cut-off value was 1.16 ×10-3 mm2/s. 3 Tesla DWI can possibly predict the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

  19. Large deformation diffeomorphic registration of diffusion-weighted imaging data

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Pei; Niethammer, Marc; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2014-01-01

    Registration plays an important role in group analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) data. It can be used to build a reference anatomy for investigating structural variation or tracking changes in white matter. Unlike traditional scalar image registration where spatial alignment is the only focus, registration of DWI data requires both spatial alignment of structures and reorientation of local signal profiles. As such, DWI registration is much more complex and challenging than scalar im...

  20. Slice-accelerated gradient-echo echo planar imaging dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI with blipped CAIPI: effect of increasing temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Tomohiro; Hori, Masaaki; Kamagata, Koji; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Irie, Ryusuke; Hagiwara, Akifumi; Hamasaki, Nozomi; Aoki, Shigeki

    2018-01-01

    To assess the influence of high temporal resolution on the perfusion measurements and image quality of perfusion maps, by applying simultaneous-multi-slice acquisition (SMS) dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). DSC-MRI data using SMS gradient-echo echo planar imaging sequences in 10 subjects with no intracranial abnormalities were retrospectively analyzed. Three additional data sets with temporal resolution of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 s were created from the raw data sets of 0.5 s. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume, mean transit time (MTT), time to peak (TTP), and time to maximum tissue residue function (T max ) measurements were performed, as was visual perfusion map analysis. The perfusion parameter for temporal resolution of 0.5 s (reference) was compared with each synthesized perfusion parameter. CBF, MTT, and TTP values at temporal resolutions of 1.5 and 2.0 s differed significantly from the reference. The image quality of MTT, TTP, and T max maps deteriorated with decreasing temporal resolution. The temporal resolution of DSC-MRI influences perfusion parameters and SMS DSC-MRI provides better image quality for MTT, TTP, and T max maps.

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute demyelinating myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecca, Chiara; Cereda, Carlo; Tschuor, Silvia; Staedler, Claudio; Nadarajah, Navarajah; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Gobbi, Claudio [Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Servizio di Neurologia e Neuroradiologia, Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Lugano (Switzerland); Wetzel, Stephan [Swiss Neuro Institute (SNI), Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Hirslanden Klinik Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Santini, Francesco [University of Basel Hospital, Division of Radiological Physics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a reference MRI technique for the evaluation of neurological disorders. Few publications have investigated the application of DWI for inflammatory demyelinating lesions. The purpose of the study was to describe diffusion-weighted imaging characteristics of acute, spinal demyelinating lesions. Six consecutive patients (two males, four females; aged 28-64 years) with acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions were studied in a prospective case series design from June 2009 to October 2010. We performed magnetic resonance imaging studies from 2 to 14 days from symptom onset on the patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (n = 3) or clinically isolated syndrome (n = 3). Main outcome measures were diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient pattern (ADC) of acute spinal cord demyelinating lesions. All spinal lesions showed a restricted diffusion pattern (DWI+/ADC-) with a 24% median ADC signal decrease. A good correlation between clinical presentation and lesion site was observed. Acute demyelinating spinal cord lesions show a uniform restricted diffusion pattern. Clinicians and neuro-radiologists should be aware that this pattern is not necessarily confirmatory for an ischaemic aetiology. (orig.)

  2. Accelerated magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging of the median nerve using simultaneous multi-slice echo planar imaging with blipped CAIPIRINHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Boss, Andreas; Manoliu, Andrei; Andreisek, Gustav; Runge, Val M.; Guggenberger, Roman [University Hospital of Zurich, University of Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Piccirelli, Marco [University Hospital of Zurich, Department of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Bhat, Himanshu [Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility of MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the median nerve using simultaneous multi-slice echo planar imaging (EPI) with blipped CAIPIRINHA. After federal ethics board approval, MR imaging of the median nerves of eight healthy volunteers (mean age, 29.4 years; range, 25-32) was performed at 3 T using a 16-channel hand/wrist coil. An EPI sequence (b-value, 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}; 20 gradient directions) was acquired without acceleration as well as with twofold and threefold slice acceleration. Fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD) and quality of nerve tractography (number of tracks, average track length, track homogeneity, anatomical accuracy) were compared between the acquisitions using multivariate ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Acquisition time was 6:08 min for standard DTI, 3:38 min for twofold and 2:31 min for threefold acceleration. No differences were found regarding FA (standard DTI: 0.620 ± 0.058; twofold acceleration: 0.642 ± 0.058; threefold acceleration: 0.644 ± 0.061; p ≥ 0.217) and MD (standard DTI: 1.076 ± 0.080 mm{sup 2}/s; twofold acceleration: 1.016 ± 0.123 mm{sup 2}/s; threefold acceleration: 0.979 ± 0.153 mm{sup 2}/s; p ≥ 0.074). Twofold acceleration yielded similar tractography quality compared to standard DTI (p > 0.05). With threefold acceleration, however, average track length and track homogeneity decreased (p = 0.004-0.021). Accelerated DTI of the median nerve is feasible. Twofold acceleration yields similar results to standard DTI. (orig.)

  3. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Renal Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karadeli

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings of the patients with renal lesions and to explore ADC values of cystic and solid lesions. Materials and Methods: 20 patients with renal lesion (16 men, 4 women were included in the study. All patients evaluated with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging. 9 patients had renal cell carcinoma, one patient had oncocytoma and 10 patients had cyst. Results: Between all ADC values of lesions and ADC values of normal kidney parenchyma were significantly different. In addition, ADC values of malignant lesions were significantly lower than ADC values of normal kidney parenchyma and cyst. The lowest ADC value of malignant lesions was 0.75x 10-3 mm2 / s. The ADC values of malignant lesions varied between 0.75x 10-3 - 2.25x 10-3 mm2 / s values for ADC (b0, 111, 222, 333 s/mm2 . Whereas the lowest ADC value of cysts were calculated 2.81x 10-3 mm2 / s. All cysts had hyperintense signal on T2 weighted and diffusion-weighted images and high ADC values on ADC maps. Malignant lesions had low ADC values on ADC maps. Conclusion: The technique has the advantage that it is non-invasive without need for gadolinium administration, takes about 2 minute. This method provides qualitative and quantitative infomation on tissue characterization. DA-MRI and ADC values are important for characterization of renal lesions. Especially, utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the patients with risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF could be beneficial. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1.000: 27-36

  4. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Renal Lesion Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Karadeli

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: The technique has the advantage that it is non-invasive without need for gadolinium administration, takes about 2 minute. This method provides qualitative and quantitative infomation on tissue characterization. DA-MRI and ADC values are important for characterization of renal lesions. Especially, utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the patients with risk for nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF could be beneficial. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(1: 27-36

  5. Fast diffusion tensor imaging and tractography of the whole cervical spinal cord using point spread function corrected echo planar imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Hans Magnus Henrik; Barthelemy, Dorothy; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging has been used in a number of spinal cord studies, but severe distortions caused by susceptibility induced field inhomogeneities limit its applicability to investigate small volumes within acceptable acquisition times. A way to evaluate image distortions is to map the poin...

  6. Echo-Planar Imaging Based J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    homonuclear J-resolved NMR spectroscopy of macro- molecules . J Magn Reson 1832;53:529–535. 32. Wilman A, Allen P. The response of the strongly coupled AB...Moskowitz CS, et al. Transition zone prostate: features , detection, localization, and staging at endorectal MR imaging. Radiology 2006;239:784–792. 21...ADC may provide an additional feature that could further increase the specificity of diagnosis for PCa. The variation in reported ADC values could be

  7. Combination of chemical suppression techniques for dual suppression of fat and silicone at diffusion-weighted MR imaging in women with breast implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dow-Mu; Hughes, J. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sutton (United Kingdom); Blackledge, M.; Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J. [Institute of Cancer Research, CR UK-EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton (United Kingdom); Burns, S. [Nuada 3T MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Stemmer, A.; Kiefer, B. [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Silicone breast prostheses prove technically challenging when performing diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the breasts. We describe a combined fat and chemical suppression scheme to achieve dual suppression of fat and silicone, thereby improving the quality of diffusion-weighted images in women with breast implants. MR imaging was performed at 3.0 and 1.5 T in women with silicone breast implants using short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) fat-suppressed echo-planar (EPI) diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) on its own and combined with the slice-select gradient-reversal (SSGR) technique. Imaging was performed using dedicated breast imaging coils. Complete suppression of the fat and silicone signal was possible at 3.0 T using EPI DWI with STIR and SSGR, evaluated with dedicated breast coils. However, a residual silicone signal was still perceptible at 1.5 T using this combined approach. Nevertheless, a further reduction in silicone signal at 1.5 T could be achieved by employing thinner slice partitions and the addition of the chemical-selective fat-suppression (CHESS) technique. DWI using combined STIR and SSGR chemical suppression techniques is feasible to eliminate or reduce silicone signal from prosthetic breast implants. (orig.)

  8. Reversible diffusion weighted imaging changes in propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Amit; Amatya, Sirisa Kandel; Yeh, E Ann

    2013-01-01

    Propionic acidemia is an inborn error of metabolism with neurologic manifestations. We describe a 3-year-old boy with propionic acidemia presenting with a metabolic crisis including headache, vomiting, and altered mental status with metabolic acidosis. Electroencephalography showed focal slowing in right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed restricted diffusion with apparent diffusion coefficient correlate in the right parietooccipital region. Correction of metabolic acidosis led to clinical improvement and normalization of MRI diffusion weighted imaging/apparent diffusion coefficient changes. This article suggests that restricted diffusion resulting from metabolic crises in propionic acidemia may be reversible in some cases.

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging in neuroradiology; Diffusionsgewichtung in der Neuroradiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlamann, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging is becoming increasingly more important in neuroradiology. Formerly this technique was mainly used in stroke diagnostics but the spectrum of applications is becoming increasingly larger. Diffusion-weighted imaging is a useful tool for differentiation between metastases and abscesses, for assessment of the depth of invasiveness of tumors and to differentiate inflammation from astrocytomas. It has now become a standard technique in multiple sclerosis imaging. A further advantage in addition to the diagnostic capabilities is the speed of the sequence which makes it insensitive to movement artefacts. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusionsgewichtung erhaelt in der Neuroradiologie einen immer hoeheren Stellenwert. War sie frueher hauptsaechlich in der Schlaganfalldiagnostik verbreitet, erweitert sich das Anwendungsspektrum immer mehr. Die Diffusionsgewichtung ist sowohl ein hilfreiches Werkzeug zur Differenzierung zwischen Metastasen und Abszessen als auch zur Beurteilung der Invasionstiefe von Tumoren oder zur Unterscheidung von Entzuendungen und Astrozytomen. Sie gehoert mittlerweile zum Standard in der MS-Bildgebung. Ein weiterer Vorteil neben der diagnostischen Aussagekraft ist die Schnelligkeit der Sequenz, die damit sehr unempfindlich gegenueber Bewegungsartefakten ist. (orig.)

  10. Diffusion weighted imaging in cystic fibrosis disease: beyond morphological imaging

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    Ciet, Pierluigi [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands); Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Andrinopoulou, Eleni Rosalina [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Colagrande, Stefano [University of Florence - Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Radiodiagnostic Unit n. 2, Florence (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To explore the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess inflammatory lung changes in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) CF patients referred for their annual check-up had spirometry, chest-CT and MRI on the same day. MRI was performed in a 1.5 T scanner with BLADE and EPI-DWI sequences (b = 0-600 s/mm{sup 2}). End-inspiratory and end-expiratory scans were acquired in multi-row scanners. DWI was scored with an established semi-quantitative scoring system. DWI score was correlated to CT sub-scores for bronchiectasis (CF-CT{sub BE}), mucus (CF-CT{sub mucus}), total score (CF-CT{sub total-score}), FEV{sub 1}, and BMI. T-test was used to assess differences between patients with and without DWI-hotspots. Thirty-three CF patients were enrolled (mean 21 years, range 6-51, 19 female). 4 % (SD 2.6, range 1.5-12.9) of total CF-CT alterations presented DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots coincided with mucus plugging (60 %), consolidation (30 %) and bronchiectasis (10 %). DWI{sub total-score} correlated (all p < 0.0001) positively to CF-CT{sub BE} (r = 0.757), CF-CT{sub mucus} (r = 0.759) and CF-CT{sub total-score} (r = 0.79); and negatively to FEV{sub 1} (r = 0.688). FEV{sub 1} was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in patients without DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots strongly correlated with radiological and clinical parameters of lung disease severity. Future validation studies are needed to establish the exact nature of DWI-hotspots in CF patients. (orig.)

  11. Role of diffusion weighted imaging in musculoskeletal infections: Current perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Yogesh [Yale New Haven Health System at Bridgeport Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Khaleel, Mohammad [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); Boothe, Ethan; Awdeh, Haitham [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Accurate diagnosis and prompt therapy of musculoskeletal infections are important prognostic factors. In most cases, clinical history, examination and laboratory findings help one make the diagnosis, and routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to identify the extent of the disease process. However, in many situations, a routine MRI may not be specific enough especially if the patient cannot receive contrast intravenously, thereby delaying the appropriate treatment. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can help in many such situations by providing additional information, accurate characterization and defining the extent of the disease, so that prompt treatment can be initiated. In this article, we illustrate the imaging findings of the spectrum of musculoskeletal infections, emphasizing the role of DWI in this domain. (orig.)

  12. Mapping measures of microscopic diffusion anisotropy in human brain white matter in vivo with double-wave-vector diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Marco; Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate that rotationally invariant measures of the diffusion anisotropy on a microscopic scale can be mapped in human brain white matter in vivo. Echo-planar imaging experiments (resolution 3.0 × 3.0 × 3.0 mm(3) ) involving two diffusion-weighting periods (δ = 22 ms, Δ = 25 ms) in the same acquisition, so-called double-wave-vector or double-pulsed-field-gradient diffusion-weighting experiments, were performed on a 3 T whole-body magnetic resonance system with a long mixing time ( τm=45 ms) between the two diffusion weightings. The disturbing influences of background gradient fields, eddy currents, and the finite mixing time can be minimized using 84 direction combinations based on nine directions and their antipodes. In healthy volunteers, measures of the microscopic diffusion anisotropy ( IMA and MA indexes) could be mapped in white matter across the human brain. The measures were independent (i) of the absolute orientation of the head and of the diffusion directions and (ii) of the predominant fiber orientation. Compared to the fractional anisotropy derived from the conventional diffusion tensor, the double-wave-vector indexes exhibit a narrower distribution, which could reflect their independence of the fiber orientation distribution. Mapping measures of the microscopic diffusion anisotropy in human brain white matter is feasible in vivo and could help to characterize tissue microstructure in the healthy and pathological brain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the abdomen with pulse triggering; Kardiale Triggerung zur verbesserten abdominellen MR-Diffusionsbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muertz, P.; Pauleit, D.; Traeber, F.; Kreft, B.P.; Schild, H.H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Gieseke, J.; Brink, J.S. van den [Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to reduce the influence of motion on diffusion-weighted MR images of the abdomen by pulse triggering of single-shot sequences. Methods: Five healthy volunteers were examined both without and with finger pulse-triggering of a diffusion-weighted single-shot echo planar MR imaging sequence at 1.5 T. Series of diffusion-weighted images were acquired at different phases of the cardiac cycle by varying the time delay between finger pulse and sequence acquisition. The measurements were repeated three times. The diffusion weighted images were analysed by measuring the signal intensities and by determining the ADC values within the spleen, kidney and liver. Results: The magnitude of motion artifacts on diffusion weighted images shows a strong dependence on the trigger delay. The optimum trigger delay is found to be between 500 and 600 ms. For these values the abdominal organs appear homogeneous on all diffusion weighted images and the strongest signal intensities are detected. At optimum triggering the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients is up to 10 times better than without triggering. Moreover, the standard deviation of the repeated measurements is smaller than 12% for all volunteers and for all organs. Without triggering the standard deviation is larger by a factor of 4 on average. Conclusion: Pulse triggering of single-shot sequences leads to significant reduction of motion related artifacts on diffusion weighted images of the abdomen and provides more accurate and reproducible ADC values. (orig.) [German] Ziel: In dieser Arbeit ist die Frage untersucht worden, ob sich die stoerenden Bewegungseinfluesse bei der Diffusionsbildgebung des Abdomens durch Pulstriggerung der Single-Shot-Sequenzen reduzieren lassen. Methoden: Fuenf Probanden wurden sowohl ohne als auch mit Fingerpulstriggerung einer Single-Shot-SE-EPI-Diffusionssequenz bei 1,5 T untersucht, wobei Diffusionsbildserien in verschiedenen Herzphasen durch Variation der

  14. Diagnostic performance of conventional diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging for the liver fibrosis and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosun, Mesude, E-mail: mesude.tosun@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Inan, Nagihan, E-mail: inannagihan@ekolay.net [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin, E-mail: htssarisoy@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Akansel, Gur, E-mail: gakansel@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Gumustas, Sevtap, E-mail: svtgumustas@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Gürbüz, Yeşim, E-mail: yesimgurbuz2002@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey); Demirci, Ali, E-mail: alidemirci@kocaeli.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of liver apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measured with conventional diffusion-weighted imaging (CDI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis and inflammation. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients with histologic diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis and 34 healthy volunteers were included in this prospective study. All patients and healthy volunteers were examined by 3 T MRI. CDI and DTI were performed using a breath-hold single-shot echo-planar spin echo sequence with b factors of 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. ADCs were obtained with CDI and DTI. Histopathologically, fibrosis of the liver parenchyma was classified with the use of a 5-point scale (0–4) and inflammation was classified with use of a 4-point scale (0–3) in accordance with the METAVIR score. Quantitatively, signal intensity and the ADCs of the liver parenchyma were compared between patients stratified by fibrosis stage and inflammation grade. Results: With a b factor of 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, the signal intensity of the cirrhotic livers was significantly higher than those of the normal volunteers. In addition, ADCs reconstructed from CDI and DTI of the patients were significantly lower than those of the normal volunteers. Liver ADC values inversely correlated with fibrosis and inflammation but there was only statistically significant for inflammatory grading. CDI performed better than DTI for the diagnosis of fibrosis and inflammation. Conclusion: ADC values measured with CDI and DTI may help in the detection of liver fibrosis. They may also give contributory to the inflammatory grading, particularly in distinguishing high from low grade.

  15. Compensation of slice profile mismatch in combined spin- and gradient-echo echo-planar imaging pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedeskamp, Heiko; Straka, Matus; Bammer, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Combined acquisition of gradient-echo and spin-echo signals in MRI time series reveals additional information for perfusion-weighted imaging and functional MRI because of differences in the sensitivity of gradient-echo and spin-echo measurements to the properties of the underlying vascular architecture. The acquisition of multiple echo trains within one time frame facilitates the simultaneous estimation of the transversal relaxation parameters R2 and R2*. However, the simultaneous estimation of these parameters tends to be incorrect in the presence of slice profile mismatches between signal excitation and subsequent refocusing pulses. It is shown here that improvements in pulse design reduced R2 and R2* estimation errors. Further improvements were achieved by augmented parameter estimation through the introduction of an additional parameter δ to correct for discordances in slice profiles to facilitate more quantitative measurements. Moreover, the analysis of time-resolved acquisitions revealed that the temporal stability of R2 estimates could be increased with improved pulse design, counteracting low contrast-to-noise ratios in spin-echo-based perfusion and functional MRI. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Diffusion-weighted images of intracranial cyst-like lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergui, M.; Zhong, J.; Sales, S. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University of Turin (Italy); Bradac, G.B. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, University of Turin (Italy); Neuroradiologia Universitaria, Ospedale S. G. Battista, Turin (Italy)

    2001-10-01

    Magnetic resonance sequences may be designed to evaluate the diffusion movements of the protons (diffusion-weighted images, DWI). In these images, a bright signal identifies a region where the diffusion along a spatial axis is restricted. The contents of a cystic lesion frequently have the signal intensities of a generic homogeneous hyperproteinic fluid (hypointensity in T1-, hyperintensity in T2-weighted images). DWI may give further information about the microscopic organisation of these fluids: a hyperintense signal indicates the presence of a restricted diffusion, due to some kind of microscopic organisation, at the cellular or macromolecular level. This may provide additional information useful for clinical purposes. We obtained DWI in 24 consecutive patients with intracranial cystic lesions, (19 intra-axial: five abscesses, five gliomas, six metastases, two demyelinating lesions, one neurocysticercosis; five extra-axial: two arachnoid cysts, two epidermoid cysts, one cholesteatoma). We found a strongly hyperintense signal, indicating restricted diffusion, in brain abscesses, epidermoid cysts and cholesteatoma; all the remaining lesions were hypointense or mildly hyperintense. We found these data useful in critical diagnoses, such as in differentiating abscesses from tumours, and in identifying elusive tumours such as epidermoid cysts. (orig.)

  17. Large deformation diffeomorphic registration of diffusion-weighted imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Niethammer, Marc; Shen, Dinggang; Yap, Pew-Thian

    2014-12-01

    Registration plays an important role in group analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) data. It can be used to build a reference anatomy for investigating structural variation or tracking changes in white matter. Unlike traditional scalar image registration where spatial alignment is the only focus, registration of DWI data requires both spatial alignment of structures and reorientation of local signal profiles. As such, DWI registration is much more complex and challenging than scalar image registration. Although a variety of algorithms has been proposed to tackle the problem, most of them are restricted by the diffusion model used for registration, making it difficult to fit to the registered data a different model. In this paper we describe a method that allows any diffusion model to be fitted after registration for subsequent multifaceted analysis. This is achieved by directly aligning DWI data using a large deformation diffeomorphic registration framework. Our algorithm seeks the optimal coordinate mapping by simultaneously considering structural alignment, local signal profile reorientation, and deformation regularization. Our algorithm also incorporates a multi-kernel strategy to concurrently register anatomical structures at different scales. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach using in vivo data and report detailed qualitative and quantitative results in comparison with several different registration strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanemura, Hideaki; Aihara, Masao

    2008-06-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis may be associated with clinical features of frontal lobe dysfunction. We previously reported that frontal lobe volume falls significantly as clinical stage progresses, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-based brain volumetry. The hypothesis that frontal volume increases correlate with clinical improvement, however, was not tested in our previous study. Therefore, we reevaluated our patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, to determine whether apparent diffusion coefficient maps can characterize the clinical course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. We studied an 8-year-old boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, using serial diffusion-weighted imaging magnetic resonance imaging, and measured the regional apparent diffusion coefficient. The regional apparent diffusion coefficient of the frontal lobe decreased significantly with clinical progression, whereas it increased to within normal range during clinical improvements. The apparent diffusion coefficient of the other regions did not change. These results suggest that the clinical signs of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis are attributable to frontal lobe dysfunction, and that apparent diffusion coefficient measurements may be useful in predicting the clinical course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

  19. Accelerated High Spatial Resolution Diffusion-Weighted Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Benoit; Afacan, Onur; Taquet, Maxime; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Gholipour, Ali; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of a series of anisotropically oversampled acquisitions (so-called anisotropic "snapshots") and reconstruction in the image space has recently been proposed to increase the spatial resolution in diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), providing a theoretical 8x acceleration at equal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to conventional dense k-space sampling. However, in most works, each DW image is reconstructed separately and the fact that the DW images constitute different views of the same anatomy is ignored. In addition, current approaches are limited by their inability to reconstruct a high resolution (HR) acquisition from snapshots with different subsets of diffusion gradients: an isotropic HR gradient image cannot be reconstructed if one .of its anisotropic snapshots is missing, for example due to intra-scan motion, even if other snapshots for this gradient were successfully acquired. In this work, we propose a novel multi-snapshot DWI reconstruction technique that simultaneously achieves HR reconstruction and local tissue model estimation while enabling reconstruction from snapshots containing different subsets of diffusion gradients, providing increased robustness to patient motion and potential for acceleration. Our approach is formalized as a joint probabilistic model with missing observations, from which interactions between missing snapshots, HR reconstruction and a generic tissue model naturally emerge. We evaluate our approach with synthetic simulations, simulated multi-snapshot scenario and in vivo multi-snapshot imaging. We show that (1) our combined approach ultimately provides both better HR reconstruction and better tissue model estimation and (2) the error in the case of missing snapshots can be quantified. Our novel multi-snapshot technique will enable improved high spatial characterization of the brain connectivity and microstructure in vivo.

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging in normal fetal brain maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J.F. [University Children' s Hospital UKBB, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Basel (Switzerland); Confort-Gouny, S.; Le Fur, Y.; Viout, P.; Cozzone, P. [UMR-CNRS 6612, Faculte de Medecine, Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre de Resonance Magnetique Biologique et Medicale, Marseille (France); Bennathan, M.; Chapon, F.; Fogliarini, C.; Girard, N. [Universite de la Mediterranee, Department of Neuroradiology AP-HM Timone, Marseille (France)

    2007-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides information about tissue maturation not seen on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. The aim of this study is to analyze the evolution over time of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of normal fetal brain in utero. DWI was performed on 78 fetuses, ranging from 23 to 37 gestational weeks (GW). All children showed at follow-up a normal neurological evaluation. ADC values were obtained in the deep white matter (DWM) of the centrum semiovale, the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe, in the cerebellar hemisphere, the brainstem, the basal ganglia (BG) and the thalamus. Mean ADC values in supratentorial DWM areas (1.68 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s) were higher compared with the cerebellar hemisphere (1.25 {+-} 0.06 mm{sup 2}/s) and lowest in the pons (1.11 {+-} 0.05 mm{sup 2}/s). Thalamus and BG showed intermediate values (1.25 {+-} 0.04 mm{sup 2}/s). Brainstem, cerebellar hemisphere and thalamus showed a linear negative correlation with gestational age. Supratentorial areas revealed an increase in ADC values, followed by a decrease after the 30th GW. This study provides a normative data set that allows insights in the normal fetal brain maturation in utero, which has not yet been observed in previous studies on premature babies. (orig.)

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute bacterial meningitis in infancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, W.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hunter, J.V.; Simon, E.M.; Haselgrove, J. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Bacterial meningitis is frequently fatal or leads to severe neurological impairment. Complications such as vasculitis, resulting in infarcts, should be anticipated and dealt with promptly. Our aim was to demonstrate the complications of meningitis by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in patients who deteriorated despite therapy. We studied 13 infants between the ages of 1 day and 32 months who presented with symptoms ranging from fever and vomiting to seizures, encephalopathy and coma due to bacterial meningitis, performing MRI, including DWI, 2-5 days after presentation. Multiple infarcts were found on DWI in 12 of the 13, most commonly in the frontal lobes (in 10). Global involvement was seen in four children, three of whom died; the fourth had a very poor outcome. In one case abnormalities on DWI were due to subdural empyemas. We diagnosed vasculitis in three of five patients studied with MRA. We think DWI an important part of an MRI study in infants with meningitis. Small cortical or deep white-matter infarcts due to septic vasculitis can lead to tissue damage not easily recognized on routine imaging and DWI can be used to confirm that extra-axial collections represent empyemas. (orig.)

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging in characterization of cystic pancreatic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrasegaran, K., E-mail: ksandras@iupui.edu [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Akisik, F.M.; Patel, A.A.; Rydberg, M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cramer, H.M.; Agaram, N.P. [Department of Pathology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Schmidt, C.M. [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Aim: To evaluate whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can characterize or predict the malignant potential of cystic pancreatic lesions. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) database over a 2-year period revealed 136 patients with cystic pancreatic lesions. Patients with DWI studies and histological confirmation of cystic mass were included. In patients with known pancreatitis, lesions with amylase content of >1000 IU/l that resolved on subsequent scans were included as pseudocysts. ADC of cystic lesions was measured by two independent reviewers. These values were then compared to categorize these lesions as benign or malignant using conventional MRI sequences. Results: Seventy lesions were analysed: adenocarcinoma (n = 4), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; n = 28), mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN; n = 9), serous cystadenoma (n = 16), and pseudocysts (n = 13). There was no difference between ADC values of malignant and non-malignant lesions (p = 0.06), between mucinous and serous tumours (p = 0.12), or between IPMN and MCN (p = 0.42). ADC values for low-grade IPMN were significantly higher than those for high-grade or invasive IPMN (p = 0.03). Conclusion: ADC values may be helpful in deciding the malignant potential of IPMN. However, they are not useful in differentiating malignant from benign lesions or for characterizing cystic pancreatic lesions.

  3. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in transient ischaemic attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamy, C.; Calvet, D.; Domigo, V.; Mas, J. [de l' Hopital Sainte-Anne, Service de Neurologie, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Oppenheim, C.; Naggara, O.; Meder, J.F. [Hoepital Sainte-Anne, Departement d' Imagere Morphologique et Fonchonnille, Paris (France)

    2006-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency and the characteristics of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) abnormalities in patients with transient ischaemic attack (TIA). We analysed data of 98 consecutive patients (mean age: 60.6{+-}15.4 years, 56 men) admitted between January 2003 and April 2004 for TIA. Age, gender, symptom type and duration, delay from onset to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), probable or possible TIA and cause of TIA were compared in patients with (DWI+) and without (DWI-) lesions on DWI. Volume and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of DWI lesions were computed. DWI revealed ischaemic lesions in 34 patients (34.7%). Lesions were small (mean volume: 1.9 cm{sup 3}{+-}3.3), and ADC was moderately decreased (mean ADC ratio: 79.5%). The diagnosis of TIA was considered as probable in all DWI+ patients. A multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that TIA duration greater than or equal to 60 min (OR, 7.6; 95% CI, 2.3-25.7), aphasia (OR, 9.2; 95% CI, 2.7-31.4) and motor deficit (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.5-17.8) were independent predictors of DWI lesions. Prolonged TIA duration, aphasia and motor deficits are associated with DWI lesions. More than half of TIA patients with symptoms lasting more than 60 min have DWI lesions. (orig.)

  4. In vivo high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging of mouse brain at 16.4 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman I Alomair

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the rodent brain at ultra-high magnetic fields (> 9.4 Tesla offers a higher signal-to-noise ratio that can be exploited to reduce image acquisition time or provide higher spatial resolution. However, significant challenges are presented due to a combination of longer T1 and shorter T2/T2* relaxation times and increased sensitivity to magnetic susceptibility resulting in severe local-field inhomogeneity artefacts from air pockets and bone/brain interfaces. The Stejskal-Tanner spin echo diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI sequence is often used in high-field rodent brain MRI due to its immunity to these artefacts. To accurately determine diffusion-tensor or fibre-orientation distribution, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI with strong diffusion weighting (b >3000 s/mm2 and at least 30 diffusion-encoding directions are required. However, this results in long image acquisition times unsuitable for live animal imaging. In this study, we describe the optimization of HARDI acquisition parameters at 16.4T using a Stejskal-Tanner sequence with echo-planar imaging (EPI readout. EPI segmentation and partial Fourier encoding acceleration were applied to reduce the echo time (TE, thereby minimizing signal decay and distortion artefacts while maintaining a reasonably short acquisition time. The final HARDI acquisition protocol was achieved with the following parameters: 4 shot EPI, b = 3000 s/mm2, 64 diffusion-encoding directions, 125×150 μm2 in-plane resolution, 0.6 mm slice thickness, and 2h acquisition time. This protocol was used to image a cohort of adult C57BL/6 male mice, whereby the quality of the acquired data was assessed and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI derived parameters were measured. High-quality images with high spatial and angular resolution, low distortion and low variability in DTI-derived parameters were obtained, indicating that EPI-DWI is feasible at 16.4T to study animal models of white

  5. In vivo high angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging of mouse brain at 16.4 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomair, Othman I; Brereton, Ian M; Smith, Maree T; Galloway, Graham J; Kurniawan, Nyoman D

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the rodent brain at ultra-high magnetic fields (> 9.4 Tesla) offers a higher signal-to-noise ratio that can be exploited to reduce image acquisition time or provide higher spatial resolution. However, significant challenges are presented due to a combination of longer T1 and shorter T2/T2* relaxation times and increased sensitivity to magnetic susceptibility resulting in severe local-field inhomogeneity artefacts from air pockets and bone/brain interfaces. The Stejskal-Tanner spin echo diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence is often used in high-field rodent brain MRI due to its immunity to these artefacts. To accurately determine diffusion-tensor or fibre-orientation distribution, high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) with strong diffusion weighting (b >3000 s/mm2) and at least 30 diffusion-encoding directions are required. However, this results in long image acquisition times unsuitable for live animal imaging. In this study, we describe the optimization of HARDI acquisition parameters at 16.4T using a Stejskal-Tanner sequence with echo-planar imaging (EPI) readout. EPI segmentation and partial Fourier encoding acceleration were applied to reduce the echo time (TE), thereby minimizing signal decay and distortion artefacts while maintaining a reasonably short acquisition time. The final HARDI acquisition protocol was achieved with the following parameters: 4 shot EPI, b = 3000 s/mm2, 64 diffusion-encoding directions, 125×150 μm2 in-plane resolution, 0.6 mm slice thickness, and 2h acquisition time. This protocol was used to image a cohort of adult C57BL/6 male mice, whereby the quality of the acquired data was assessed and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) derived parameters were measured. High-quality images with high spatial and angular resolution, low distortion and low variability in DTI-derived parameters were obtained, indicating that EPI-DWI is feasible at 16.4T to study animal models of white matter (WM

  6. High signal in bone marrow at diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) in healthy children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Avenarius, Derk [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Olsen, Oeystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    In our experience, diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) is hard to interpret in children who commonly have foci of restricted diffusion in their skeletons unrelated to pathology, sometimes in an asymmetrical pattern. This raises serious concern about the accuracy of DWIBS in cancer staging in children. To describe the signal distribution at DWIBS in the normal developing lumbar spine and pelvic skeleton. Forty-two healthy children underwent an MR DWIBS sequence of the abdomen and pelvis. An axial short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence was used. Two radiologists did a primary review of the images and based on these preliminary observations, separate scoring systems for the lumbar spine, pelvis and proximal femoral epiphyses/femoral heads were devised. Visual evaluation of the images was then performed by the two radiologists in consensus. The scoring was repeated separately 2 months later by a third radiologist. Restricted diffusion was defined as areas of high signal compared to the background. Coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) reformats were used to assess the vertebral bodies. For the pelvis, the extension of high signal for each bone was given a score of 0 to 4. Cohen's Kappa interobserver agreement coefficients of signal distribution and asymmetry were calculated. All children had areas of high signal, both within the lumbar vertebral bodies and within the pelvic skeleton. Three patterns of signal distribution were seen in the lumbar spine, but no specific pattern was seen in the pelvis. There was a tendency toward a reduction of relative area of high signal within each bone with age, but also a widespread interindividual variation. Restricted diffusion is a normal finding in the pelvic skeleton and lumbar spine in children with an asymmetrical distribution seen in 48% of normal children in this study. DWIBS should be used with caution for cancer staging in children as this could

  7. Contrast-enhanced CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging: Performance as a prognostic factor in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukukura, Yoshihiko, E-mail: fukukura@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City 890-8544 (Japan); Takumi, Koji [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City 890-8544 (Japan); Higashi, Michiyo [Department of Human Pathology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City 890-8544 (Japan); Shinchi, Hiroyuki [Department of Surgical Oncology and Digestive Surgery, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City 890-8544 (Japan); Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Yoneyama, Tomohide; Tateyama, Akihiro [Department of Radiology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima City 890-8544 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    Objective: To determine whether contrast enhancement of CT and apparent diffusion coefficient on diffusion-weighted MR imaging are important parameters that can predict outcomes for patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods: Ninety-two patients with histologically confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who underwent quadriphasic CT (including unenhanced, pancreatic parenchymal, portal venous and delayed phases) and fat-suppressed single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 3.0 T were retrospectively analyzed to investigate prognostic factors. Overall survival curves were drawn using the Kaplan–Meier method. Effects on survival of variables including age, sex, tumor location, tumor size, TNM stage, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen, treatment, tumor contrast enhancement and apparent diffusion coefficient values were analyzed in univariate analysis using the log-rank test. Variables were analyzed in multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results: Median survival for the entire patient population was 18.2 months. Higher contrast enhancement during all phases was associated with significantly longer overall survival (P < 0.001 for all phases). The difference in overall survival between groups divided by median apparent diffusion coefficient value was not significant (P = 0.672). TNM stage (P = 0.026) and tumor contrast enhancement on CT (P = 0.027) were significantly related to survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Poor enhancement of pancreatic adenocarcinomas on enhanced CT is associated with reduced patient survival.

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the normal fetal lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balassy, Csilla; Kasprian, Gregor; Brugger, Peter C; Csapo, Bence; Weber, Michael; Hörmann, Marcus; Bankier, Alexander; Bammer, Roland; Herold, Christian J; Prayer, Daniela

    2008-04-01

    To quantify apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) changes in fetuses with normal lungs and to determine whether ADC can be used in the assessment of fetal lung development. In 53 pregnancies (20-37th weeks of gestation), we measured ADC on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the apical, middle, and basal thirds of the right lung. ADCs were correlated with gestational age. Differences between the ADCs were assessed. Fetal lung volumes were measured on T2-weighted sequences and correlated with ADCs and with age. ADCs were 2.13 +/- 0.44 microm(2)/ms (mean +/- SD) in the apex, 1.99 +/- 0.42 microm(2)/ms (mean +/- SD) in the middle third, and 1.91 +/- 0.41 microm(2)/ms (mean +/- SD) in the lung base. Neither the individual ADC values nor average ADC values showed a significant correlation with gestational age or with lung volumes. Average ADCs decreased significantly from the lung apex toward the base. Individual ADCs showed little absolute change and heterogeneity. Lung volumes increased significantly during gestation. We have not been able to identify a pattern of changes in the ADC values that correlate with lung maturation. Furthermore, the individual, gravity-related ADC changes are subject to substantial variability and show nonuniform behavior. ADC can therefore not be used as an indicator of lung maturity.

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging of breast tumours at 3 Tesla and 7 Tesla: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, S; Minarikova, L; Pinker, K; Zaric, O; Chmelik, M; Strasser, B; Baltzer, P; Helbich, T; Trattnig, S; Bogner, W

    2016-05-01

    To compare bilateral diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) at 3 T and 7 T in the same breast tumour patients. Twenty-eight patients were included in this IRB-approved study (mean age 56 ± 16 years). Before contrast-enhanced imaging, bilateral DWI with b = 0 and 850 s/mm(2) was performed in 2:56 min (3 T) and 3:48 min (7 T), using readout-segmented echo planar imaging (rs-EPI) with a 1.4 × 1.4 mm(2) (3 T)/0.9 × 0.9 mm(2) (7 T) in-plane resolution. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC), signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were assessed. Twenty-eight lesions were detected (18 malignant, 10 benign). CNR and SNR were comparable at both field strengths (p > 0.3). Mean ADC values at 7 T were 4-22% lower than at 3 T (p ≤ 0.03). An ADC threshold of 1.275 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s resulted in a diagnostic specificity of 90% at both field strengths. The sensitivity was 94% and 100% at 3 T and 7 T, respectively. 7-T DWI of the breast can be performed with 2.4-fold higher spatial resolution than 3 T, without significant differences in SNR if compared to 3 T. • 7 T provides a 2.4-fold higher resolution in breast DWI than 3 T • 7 T DWI has a high diagnostic accuracy comparable to that at 3 T • At 7 T malignant lesions had 22 % lower ADC than at 3 T (p < 0.001).

  10. Apparent diffusion coefficient value of gastric cancer by diffusion-weighted imaging: Correlations with the histological differentiation and Lauren classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Song, E-mail: songliu532909756@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Guan, Wenxian, E-mail: wenxianguan123@126.com [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang, Hao, E-mail: wanghao20140525@126.com [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Pan, Liang, E-mail: panliang2014@126.com [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhou, Zhuping, E-mail: zhupingzhou@126.com [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yu, Haiping, E-mail: haipingyu2012@126.com [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Liu, Tian, E-mail: tianliu2014@126.com [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xiaofengyang2014@126.com [Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); He, Jian, E-mail: hjxueren@126.com [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhou, Zhengyang, E-mail: zyzhou@nju.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, The Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Gastric cancers’ ADC values were significantly lower than normal gastric wall. • Gastric adenocarcinomas with different differentiation had different ADC values. • Gastric adenocarcinomas’ ADC values correlated with histologic differentiations. • Gastric cancers’ ADC values correlated with Lauren classifications. • Mean ADC value was better than min ADC value in characterizing gastric cancers. - Abstract: Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlations between histological differentiation and Lauren classification of gastric cancer and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Materials and methods: Sixty-nine patients with gastric cancer lesions underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (3.0T) and surgical resection. DWI was obtained with a single-shot, echo-planar imaging sequence in the axial plane (b values: 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}). Mean and minimum ADC values were obtained for each gastric cancer and normal gastric walls by two radiologists, who were blinded to the histological findings. Histological type, degree of differentiation and Lauren classification of each resected specimen were determined by one pathologist. Mean and minimum ADC values of gastric cancers with different histological types, degrees of differentiation and Lauren classifications were compared. Correlations between ADC values and histological differentiation and Lauren classification were analyzed. Results: The mean and minimum ADC values of gastric cancers, as a whole and separately, were significantly lower than those of normal gastric walls (all p values <0.001). There were significant differences in the mean and minimum ADC values among gastric cancers with different histological types, degrees of differentiation and Lauren classifications (p < 0.05). Mean and minimum ADC values correlated significantly (all p < 0.001) with histological differentiation (r = 0.564, 0.578) and

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the pancreas; Diffusionsbildgebung des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenberg, K. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, E010, Heidelberg (Germany); Grenacher, L.; Klauss, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has increasingly gained in importance over the last 10 years especially in cancer imaging for differentiation of malignant and benign lesions. Through development of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences DWI is not only applicable in neuroradiology but also in abdominal imaging. As a diagnostic tool of the pancreas DWI enables a differentiation between normal tissue, cancer and chronic pancreatitis. The ADC values (apparent diffusion coefficient, the so-called effective diffusion coefficient) reported in the literature for healthy pancreatic tissue are in the range from 1.49 to 1.9 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, for pancreatic cancer in the range from 1.24 to 1.46 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s and for autoimmune pancreatitis an average ADC value of 1.012 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. There are controversial data in the literature concerning the differentiation between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Using DWI-derived IVIM (intravoxel incoherent motion) the parameter f (perfusion fraction) seems to be advantageous but it is important to use several b values. In the literature the mean f value in chronic pancreatitis is around 16%, in pancreatic cancer 8% and in healthy pancreatic tissue around 25%. So far, DWI has not been helpful for differentiating cystic lesions of the pancreas. There are many references with other tumor entities and in animal models which indicate that there is a possible benefit of DWI in monitoring therapy of pancreatic cancer but so far no original work has been published. (orig.) [German] Die Diffusionsbildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) gewann in den letzten 10 Jahren insbesondere in der Tumorbildgebung zur Unterscheidung zwischen malignen und benignen Laesionen zunehmend an Bedeutung. Durch Entwicklung schnellerer MR-Sequenzen ist sie nicht nur in der Neuroradiologie, sondern auch in der Abdomenbildgebung einsetzbar. In der Pankreasdiagnostik ermoeglicht sie

  12. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the prostate: advantages of Zoomed EPI with parallel-transmit-accelerated 2D-selective excitation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierfelder, Kolja M; Scherr, Michael K; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Weiß, Jakob; Dietrich, Olaf; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G; Pfeuffer, Josef; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Theisen, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the use of 2D-selective, parallel-transmit excitation magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diffusion-weighted echo-planar imaging (pTX-EPI) of the prostate, and to compare it to conventional, single-shot EPI (c-EPI). The MRI examinations of 35 patients were evaluated in this prospective study. PTX-EPI was performed with a TX-acceleration factor of 1.7 and a field of view (FOV) of 150 × 90 mm(2), whereas c-EPI used a full FOV of 380 × 297 mm(2). Two readers evaluated three different aspects of image quality on 5-point Likert scales. To quantify distortion artefacts, maximum diameters and prostate volume were determined for both techniques and compared to T2-weighted imaging. The zoomed pTX-EPI was superior to c-EPI with respect to overall image quality (3.39 ± 0.62 vs 2.45 ± 0.67) and anatomic differentiability (3.29 ± 0.65 vs 2.41 ± 0.65), each with p EPI (0.93 ± 0.73 vs 1.49 ± 1.08), p EPI with T2-weighted imaging than c-EPI with respect to coronal (ICCs: 0.95 vs 0.93) and sagittal (0.86 vs 0.73) diameters as well as prostate volume (0.94 vs 0.92). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values did not differ significantly between the two techniques (p > 0.05). Zoomed pTX-EPI leads to substantial improvements in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the prostate with respect to different aspects of image quality and severity of artefacts. Recent technical developments in MRI allow the use of accelerated, spatially-selective excitation (parallel-transmit, pTX). pTX can be used for zoomed echo-planar prostate imaging (pTX-EPI). pTX-EPI improves different aspects of image quality in prostate MRI. Distortion artefacts are reduced by the use of pTX-EPI in prostate MRI. Further studies should aim at assessing the diagnostic accuracy of pTX-EPI.

  13. Breast cancer detection using double reading of unenhanced MRI including T1-weighted, T2-weighted STIR, and diffusion-weighted imaging: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimboli, Rubina M; Verardi, Nicola; Cartia, Francesco; Carbonaro, Luca A; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of unenhanced MRI in detecting breast cancer and to assess the impact of double reading. A total of 116 breasts of 67 women who were 36-89 years old were studied at 1.5 T using an unenhanced protocol including axial T1-weighted gradient-echo, T2-weighted STIR, and echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Two blinded readers (R1 and R2) independently evaluated unenhanced images using the BIRADS scale. A combination of pathology and negative follow-up served as the reference standard. McNemar and kappa statistics were used. Per-breast cancer prevalence was 37 of 116 (32%): 30 of 37 (81%) invasive ductal carcinoma, five of 37 (13%) ductal carcinoma in situ, and two of 37 (6%) invasive lobular carcinoma. Per-breast sensitivity of unenhanced MRI was 29 of 37 (78%) for R1, 28 of 37 (76%) for R2, and 29 of 37 (78%) for double reading. Specificity was 71 of 79 (90%) for both R1 and R2 and 69 of 79 (87%) for double reading. Double reading did not provide a significant increase in sensitivity. Interobserver agreement was almost perfect (Cohen κ = 0.873). An unenhanced breast MRI protocol composed of T1-weighted gradient echo, T2-weighted STIR, and echo-planar DWI enabled breast cancer detection with sensitivity of 76-78% and specificity of 90% without a gain in sensitivity from double reading.

  14. Diffusion weighted EPI in early cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Susumu; Cho, Keiichi; Hosaka, Sumio; Ito, Koichiro; Tajima, Natsuki; Kobayashi, Shiro [Nippon Medical School (Japan). Chiba-Hokuso Hospital; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1997-11-01

    Fifteen cases of early cerebral infarction and 14 cases of cerebral hemorrhage underwent diffusion weighted echo planar imaging. Increased intensity area was detected only 2 in 5 cases less than 3 hours from ictus, whereas infarction was correctly diagnosed in all cases over 3 hours. Infarcted area was increased on the follow-up study in 2 cases. Hematoma showed mixed intensity in hyper acute phase, very hypo in acute, mixed in subacute and very hyper in the chronic stage. High intensity area surrounded the hematoma. (author)

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosottini, M. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy); Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Tavarelli, C.; De Cori, S.; Bartolozzi, C. [University of Pisa, Department of Radiology, Pisa (Italy); Del Bono, L.; Doria, G. [Unit of Infectious Diseases AO, Pisa (Italy); Giannelli, M. [Unit of Medical Physics, Pisa (Italy); Michelassi, M.C. [Service of Neuroradiology AO, Pisa (Italy); Murri, L. [University of Pisa, Department of Neuroscience, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a severe demyelinating disease of the central nervous system due to JC polyoma virus infection of oligodendrocytes. PML develops in patients with impaired T-cell function as occurs in HIV, malignancy or immunosuppressive drugs users. Until now no imaging methods have been reported to correlate with clinical status. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a robust MRI tool in investigating white matter architecture and diseases. The aim of our work was to assess diffusion abnormalities in focal white matter lesions in patients with PML and to correlate the lesion load measured with conventional MRI and DWI to clinical variables. We evaluated eight patients with a biopsy or laboratory-supported diagnosis of PML. All patients underwent MRI including conventional sequences (fluid attenuated inversion recovery-FLAIR) and DWI. Mean diffusivity (MD) maps were used to quantify diffusion on white matter lesions. Global lesion load was calculated by manually tracing lesions on FLAIR images, while total, central core and peripheral lesion loads were calculated by manually tracing lesions on DWI images. Lesion load obtained with the conventional or DWI-based methods were correlated with clinical variables such as disease duration, disease severity and survival. White matter focal lesions are characterized by a central core with low signal on DWI images and high MD (1.853 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s), surrounded by a rim of high signal intensity on DWI and lower MD (1.1 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). The MD value of normal-appearing white matter is higher although not statistically significant (0.783 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s) with respect to control subjects (0.750 x 10{sup -3} mm2/s). Inter-rater correlations of global lesion load between FLAIR (3.96%) and DWI (3.43%) was excellent (ICC =0.87). Global lesion load on FLAIR and DWI correlates with disease duration and severity (respectively, p = 0.037, p = 0.0272 with Karnofsky scale and p = 0.0338 with

  16. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of viral encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiroglu, Yilmaz; Karabulut, Nevzat; Yagci, Baki [Pamukkale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Calli, Cem; Yunten, Nilgun; Kitis, Omer; Isaev, Hasan [Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izmir (Turkey); Kocaman, Ayse [Ege University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Izmir (Turkey)

    2006-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of viral encephalitis and its relationship with the stage of the illness. We performed conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including T1-W, T2-W and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences and DWI in 18 patients with viral encephalitis diagnosed on the basis of laboratory, clinical and radiologic findings. Based on the qualitative and quantitative comparison of the conventional MRI and DWI, the patients were divided into three groups. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the involved and contralateral normal brain tissues were computed and compared for each group. The degree of correlation between the time (TI) from the onset of neurologic symptoms to the MR examination and ADC values was determined. In group I (n=11) DWI was superior to conventional MRI in detecting the encephalitic involved sites and in depicting the borders of the encephalitic lesions. In group II (n=4) DWI was similar to conventional MRI. In group III (n=3) conventional MRI was superior to DWI. Mean ADC values of affected versus contralateral normal brain tissues were 0.458{+-}0.161 x 10{sup -3} versus 0.86{+-}0.08 x 10{sup -3} in group I, 0.670{+-}0.142 x 10{sup -3} versus 0.93{+-}0.07 x 10{sup -3} in group II, and 1.413{+-}0.211 x 10{sup -3} versus 1.05{+-}0.06 x 10{sup -3} in group III. Patients in group I had significantly lower ADC values than those in group II, while patients in group III had the highest ADC values (P<0.05). The ADC values were significantly lower in the affected sites than in the unaffected sites of patients in groups I and II, but were significantly higher in the affected sites than in the unaffected sites of patients in group III (P<0.05). There was an excellent correlation between ADC values and duration of the disease (r=0.874, P=0.01). DWI is superior to other conventional diagnostic MR sequences in the detection of early viral

  17. Diffusion-weighted imaging in the abdomen and pelvis: concepts and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qayyum, Aliya

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging allows the detection of focal solid and cystic lesions in the abdomen and pelvis and, if pitfalls are to be avoided, is most effectively used in conjunction with other imaging sequences...

  18. Detection of Traumatic Bone Marrow Lesions after Knee Trauma: Comparison of ADC Maps Derived from Diffusion-weighted Imaging with Standard Fat-saturated Proton Density-weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klengel, Alexis; Stumpp, Patrick; Klengel, Steffen; Böttger, Ina; Rönisch, Nadja; Kahn, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To compare single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with fat-saturated (FS) proton density (PD)-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging in the detection of bone marrow lesions (BMLs) after knee trauma. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained from Leipzig University. Written informed consent was waived. Three radiologists retrospectively re-examined 97 consecutive patients with reported knee trauma who underwent 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging within 90 days of knee trauma. The following sequences were used: (a) sagittal T1-weighted TSE and FS PD-weighted TSE and (b) sagittal T1-weighted TSE and single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging-derived ADC mapping. BMLs on the lateral and medial femoral condyle, lateral and medial aspect of the tibial plateau, and patella were documented. Volumetry was performed on BMLs with a thickness of at least 15 mm (major BMLs). ADC values were measured in intact bone marrow and major BMLs. A McNemar test and t tests were used as appropriate to test for significant differences between BML number and volume at an α level of .05. Results Significantly more patients showed at least one BML on ADC maps (98%, 95 of 97 patients) than on FS PD-weighted TSE images (86%, 84 of 97 patients) (P maps. Only 58% of the affected regions detected on ADC maps (170 of 293 regions) were identified on FS PD-weighted TSE images (P maps (81 cm3) than on FS PD-weighted TSE images (39 cm3) (P maps are more sensitive than corresponding FS PD-weighted TSE images for detection of BML after knee trauma and allow detection of significantly more and larger BMLs. ADC map evaluation improves diagnostic performance in regions with insufficient spectral fat saturation, such as the patella. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  19. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: 'starry sky' appearance with diffusion-weighted imaging in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crapp, Seth; Harrar, Dana; Strother, Megan; Wushensky, Curtis; Pruthi, Sumit

    2012-04-01

    We present a case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever encephalitis in a child imaged utilizing diffusion-weighted MRI. Although the imaging and clinical manifestations of this entity have been previously described, a review of the literature did not reveal any such cases reported in children utilizing diffusion-weighted imaging. The imaging findings and clinical history are presented as well as a brief review of this disease.

  20. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won E-mail: neuroman@catholic.ac.kr

    2003-03-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  1. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatipoglu, H.G.; Onbasioglu Gurbuz, M.; Sakman, B.; Yuksel, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    We present diffusion-weighted imaging findings of a case of rhombencephalitis due to Listeria monocytogenes. It is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The diagnosis is difficult by clinical findings only. In this report, we aim to draw attention to the role of conventional and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature with apparent diffusion coefficient values of diseased brain parenchyma.

  2. Malignant versus benign mediastinal lesions: quantitative assessment with diffusion weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guemuestas, Sevtap; Inan, Nagihan; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Ciftci, Ercuement; Akansel, Guer; Demirci, Ali [University of Kocaeli, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Umuttepe Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    We aimed to evaluate the performance of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in differentiating malignant from benign mediastinal lesions. Fifty-three mediastinal lesions were examined with T1- and T2-weighted (W) conventional images. Then, two diffusion-weighted images were obtained with b = 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} values and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were calculated. The statistical significance of differences between measurements was tested using the Student-t test. The mean ADC of malignant lesions was significantly lower than that of the benign masses (p < 0.001). The cut-off value of {<=} 1.39 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s indicated a malignant lesion with a sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 87%. Diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal masses. (orig.)

  3. A time-efficient acquisition protocol for multipurpose diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrband, Farshid; O'Brien, Kieran; Barth, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Several diffusion-weighted MRI techniques have been developed and validated during the past 2 decades. While offering various neuroanatomical inferences, these techniques differ in their proposed optimal acquisition design, preventing clinicians and researchers benefiting from all potential inference methods, particularly when limited time is available. This study reports an optimal design that enables for a time-efficient diffusion-weighted MRI acquisition scheme at 7 Tesla. The primary audience of this article is the typical end user, interested in diffusion-weighted microstructural imaging at 7 Tesla. We tested b-values in the range of 700 to 3000 s/mm2 with different number of angular diffusion-encoding samples, against a data-driven "gold standard." The suggested design is a protocol with b-values of 1000 and 2500 s/mm2 , with 25 and 50 samples, uniformly distributed over two shells. We also report a range of protocols in which the results of fitting microstructural models to the diffusion-weighted data had high correlation with the gold standard. We estimated minimum acquisition requirements that enable diffusion tensor imaging, higher angular resolution diffusion-weighted imaging, neurite orientation dispersion, and density imaging and white matter tract integrity across whole brain with isotropic resolution of 1.8 mm in less than 11 min. Magn Reson Med 78:2170-2184, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Value of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmad Hafez Ahmad Alsayed Afifi

    2012-10-12

    Oct 12, 2012 ... for the detection of pathology at the molecular level and fre- quent non specificity of structural imaging ... Technical advances in MR imaging have led to the develop- ment of functional MR imaging techniques such as MR ...... anatomic radical prostatectomy. The Johns Hopkins experience after 10 years.

  5. Feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis on 1.0-T open-bore MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barendregt, Anouk M.; Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Amiras, Dimitri [Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Radiology Department, St. Mary' s Hospital, Paddington, London (United Kingdom); Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of non-invasive diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the knee of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and, further, to analyze the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) levels to distinguish synovium from effusion. Standard magnetic resonance imaging of the knee including post-contrast imaging was obtained in eight patients (mean age, 12 years 8 months, five females) using an open-bore magnetic resonance imaging system (1.0 T). In addition, axially acquired echo-planar DWI datasets (b-values 0, 50, and 600) were prospectively obtained and the diffusion images were post-processed into ADC{sub 50-600} maps. Two independent observers selected a region of interest (ROI) for both synovium and effusion using aligned post-contrast images as landmarks. Mann-Whitney U test was performed to compare ADC synovium and ADC effusion. DWI was successfully obtained in all patients. When data of both observers was combined, ADC synovium was lower than ADC effusion in the ROI in seven out of eight patients (median, 1.92 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 2.40 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, p = 0.006, respectively). Similar results were obtained when the two observers were analyzed separately (observer 1: p = 0.006, observer 2: p = 0.04). In this pilot study, on a patient-friendly 1.0-T open-bore MRI, we demonstrated that DWI may potentially be a feasible non-invasive imaging technique in children with JIA. We could differentiate synovium from effusion in seven out of eight patients based on the ADC of synovium and effusion. However, to select synovium and effusion on DWI, post-contrast images were still a necessity. (orig.)

  6. Diagnosis of pericardial cysts using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousavi Negareh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Congenital pericardial cysts are benign lesions that arise from the pericardium during embryonic development. The diagnosis is based on typical imaging features, but atypical locations and signal magnetic resonance imaging sequences make it difficult to exclude other lesions. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging is a novel method that can be used to differentiate tissues based on their restriction to proton diffusion. Its use in differentiating pericardial cysts from other pericardial lesions has not yet been described. Case presentation We present three cases (a 51-year-old Caucasian woman, a 66-year-old Caucasian woman and a 77-year-old Caucasian woman with pericardial cysts evaluated with diffusion-weighted imaging using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Each lesion demonstrated a high apparent diffusion coefficient similar to that of free water. Conclusion This case series is the first attempt to investigate the utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of pericardial cysts. Diffusion-weighted imaging may be a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool for pericardial cysts when conventional imaging findings are inconclusive.

  7. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of sacral insufficiency fractures: comparison with metastases of the sacrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Woo Mok; Jang, Han Won; Kim, Sang Woo; Jang, Sung Ho; Ahn, Sang Ho; Ahn, Myun Whan

    2007-12-15

    Retrospective analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differentiating sacral insufficiency fractures from metastases of the sacrum. To determine if a steady-state free precession (SSFP) diffusion-weighted MRI is useful for differentiating sacral insufficiency fractures from metastases of the sacrum. Conventional spin-echo sequence MRI is very sensitive for the detection of pathologic lesions in the sacrum, but the differential findings between sacral insufficiency fracture and metastasis are often not obvious because of the nonspecific changes of signal intensity. Another MR sequences for differentiation is needed. Fourteen patients with sacral insufficiency fractures and 8 patients with metastasis at the sacrum were examined with MRI. Both the diffusion-weighted MRI and the spin-echo MRI were performed in all patients. Diffusion-weighted MRI sequences were based on a SSFP sequence. All the insufficiency fractures and metastasis at the sacrum revealed low signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI; low or high signal intensity was revealed on T2-weighted MRI. The contrast enhanced T1-weighted MRI showed strong enhancement at the sacrum in all cases of insufficiency fracture and metastasis. Diffusion-weighted MRI of the sacrum showed low signal intensity in all cases with sacral insufficiency fracture, but these images revealed high signal intensity in all cases with metastasis. SSFP diffusion-weighted MRI is capable of differentiating benign sacral insufficiency fractures from metastatic tumors of the sacrum.

  8. Imaging of the brain, including diffusion-weighted imaging in methylmalonic acidemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, Steven J.; Given, Curtis A. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, Room HX-311C, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Robertson, William C. [Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is a multifactorial autosomal recessive inborn error of organic acid metabolism, often presenting with neurologic findings. We report the imaging findings in a case of a child with classic neurological and laboratory findings for MMA. Imaging studies demonstrated abnormalities within the basal ganglia, particularly the globi pallidi (GP). Diffusion-weighted abnormalities seen in patients with MMA during an acute episode of metabolic acidosis and at follow-up are discussed. The authors are aware of only one prior report of serial examinations demonstrating resolution of restricted diffusion in the GP. The biochemical and pathophysiologic basis of the imaging findings of MMA are explained. (orig.)

  9. The role of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shaimaa R.A. Fadeel

    2015-06-16

    Jun 16, 2015 ... etal lobes toward the frontal and temporal lobes. Sensory fibers myelinate before motor fibers, and projection pathways earlier than association pathways; sensitive, visual, and audi- tory tracts are already myelinated at birth.3. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) studies the diffusivity of water, i.e. ...

  10. Comparison of readout segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) and EPI with reduced field‐of‐VIew diffusion‐weighted imaging at 3t in patients with breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Jin Young; Shin, Hee Jung; Shin, Ki Chang; Sung, Yu Sub; Choi, Woo Jung; Chae, Eun Young; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hak Hee

    2015-01-01

    ...‐planar imaging (ss‐EPI), which is prone to susceptibility artifacts such as geometric distortion, signal dropout, and image blurring from gradient nonlinearity and eddy currents. Because the distortions in conventional ss‐EPI are mainly due to slow traversal through k ‐space along the phase‐encoding direction, it can be improved by accelerating k ‐space...

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mürtz, P., E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, M., E-mail: Marius.Kaschner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lakghomi, A., E-mail: Asadeh.Lakghomi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J., E-mail: juergen.gieseke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Philips Healthcare, Lübeckertordamm 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, W.A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus.

  12. Improving CT-guided transthoracic biopsy of mediastinal lesions by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; TyngI, Chiang Cheng; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Gross, Jefferson Luiz; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard, E-mail: marcosduarte500@gmail.com [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hochhegger, Bruno [Universidade Federal de Ciencias da Saude de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), RS (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Benveniste, Marcelo Felipe Kuperman; Odisio, Bruno Calazans [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    Objectives: to evaluate the preliminary results obtained using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient for planning computed tomography-guided biopsies of selected mediastinal lesions. Methods: eight patients with mediastinal lesions suspicious for malignancy were referred for computed tomography-guided biopsy. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient measurement were performed to assist in biopsy planning with diffusion/computed tomography fused images. We selected mediastinal lesions that could provide discordant diagnoses depending on the biopsy site, including large heterogeneous masses, lesions associated with lung atelectasis or consolidation, lesions involving large mediastinal vessels and lesions for which the results of biopsy using other methods and histopathological examination were divergent from the clinical and radiological suspicion. Results: in all cases, the biopsy needle was successfully directed to areas of higher signal intensity on diffusion weighted sequences and the lowest apparent diffusion coefficient within the lesion (mean, 0.8 [range, 0.6–1.1]610{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), suggesting high cellularity. All biopsies provided adequate material for specific histopathological diagnoses of four lymphomas, two sarcomas and two thymoma s. Conclusion: functional imaging tools, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and the apparent diffusion coefficient, are promising for implementation in noninvasive and imaging-guided procedures. However, additional studies are needed to confirm that mediastinal biopsy can be improved with these techniques. (author)

  13. Diffusion weighted imaging with circularly polarized oscillating gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Dyrby, Tim B

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The short diffusion time regime provides an interesting probe for tissue microstructure and can be investigated with oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) experiments. Several studies report new contrasts in preclinical settings and the first in vivo human experiments have recently been...... and CP-OGSE. RESULTS: Simulations and experiments show that CP-OGSE provides the same microstructural information as OGSE but provides more robust parameter estimates with limited gradient strength. CONCLUSIONS: CP-OGSE can be an important contribution for making OGSE imaging more effective in clinical...

  14. Super-resolution reconstruction of diffusion parameters from diffusion-weighted images with different slice orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Steenkiste, Gwendolyn; Jeurissen, Ben; Veraart, Jelle; den Dekker, Arnold J; Parizel, Paul M; Poot, Dirk H J; Sijbers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI is hampered by long acquisition times, low spatial resolution, and a low signal-to-noise ratio. Recently, methods have been proposed to improve the trade-off between spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and acquisition time of diffusion-weighted images via super-resolution reconstruction (SRR) techniques. However, during the reconstruction, these SRR methods neglect the q-space relation between the different diffusion-weighted images. An SRR method that includes a diffusion model and directly reconstructs high resolution diffusion parameters from a set of low resolution diffusion-weighted images was proposed. Our method allows an arbitrary combination of diffusion gradient directions and slice orientations for the low resolution diffusion-weighted images, optimally samples the q- and k-space, and performs motion correction with b-matrix rotation. Experiments with synthetic data and in vivo human brain data show an increase of spatial resolution of the diffusion parameters, while preserving a high signal-to-noise ratio and low scan time. Moreover, the proposed SRR method outperforms the previous methods in terms of the root-mean-square error. The proposed SRR method substantially increases the spatial resolution of MRI that can be obtained in a clinically feasible scan time. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diffusion-prepared stimulated-echo turbo spin echo (DPsti-TSE): An eddy current-insensitive sequence for three-dimensional high-resolution and undistorted diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinwei; Coolen, Bram F; Versluis, Maarten J; Strijkers, Gustav J; Nederveen, Aart J

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we present a new three-dimensional (3D), diffusion-prepared turbo spin echo sequence based on a stimulated-echo read-out (DPsti-TSE) enabling high-resolution and undistorted diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). A dephasing gradient in the diffusion preparation module and rephasing gradients in the turbo spin echo module create stimulated echoes, which prevent signal loss caused by eddy currents. Near to perfect agreement of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values between DPsti-TSE and diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (DW-EPI) was demonstrated in both phantom transient signal experiments and phantom imaging experiments. High-resolution and undistorted DPsti-TSE was demonstrated in vivo in prostate and carotid vessel wall. 3D whole-prostate DWI was achieved with four b values in only 6 min. Undistorted ADC maps of the prostate peripheral zone were obtained at low and high imaging resolutions with no change in mean ADC values [(1.60 ± 0.10) × 10-3 versus (1.60 ± 0.02) × 10-3  mm2 /s]. High-resolution 3D DWI of the carotid vessel wall was achieved in 12 min, with consistent ADC values [(1.40 ± 0.23) × 10-3  mm2 /s] across different subjects, as well as slice locations through the imaging volume. This study shows that DPsti-TSE can serve as a robust 3D diffusion-weighted sequence and is an attractive alternative to the traditional two-dimensional DW-EPI approaches. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Simultaneous assessment of vessel size index, relative blood volume, and vessel permeability in a mouse brain tumor model using a combined spin echo gradient echo echo-planar imaging sequence and viable tumor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kording, Fabian; Weidensteiner, Claudia; Zwick, Stefan; Osterberg, Nadja; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Staszewski, Ori; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Reichardt, Wilfried

    2014-12-01

    Combining multiple imaging biomarkers in one magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) session would be beneficial to gain more data pertaining to tumor vasculature under therapy. Therefore, simultaneous measurement of perfusion, permeability, and vessel size imaging (VSI) using a gradient echo spin echo (GE-SE) sequence with injection of a clinically approved gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agent was assessed in an orthotopic glioma model. A combined spin echo gradient echo echo-planar imaging sequence was implemented using a single contrast agent Gd diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). This sequence was tested in a mouse brain tumor model (U87_MG), also under treatment with an antiangiogenic agent (bevacizumab). T2 maps and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were used to differentiate regions of cell death and viable tumor tissue. In viable tumor tissue regional blood volume was 5.7 ± 0.6% in controls and 5.2 ± 0.3% in treated mice. Vessel size was 18.1 ± 2.4 μm in controls and 12.8 ± 2.0 μm in treated mice, which correlated with results from immunohistochemistry. Permeability (K(trans) ) was close to zero in treated viable tumor tissue and 0.062 ± 0.024 min(-1) in controls. Our MRI method allows simultaneous assessment of several physiological and morphological parameters and extraction of MRI biomarkers for vasculature. These could be used for treatment monitoring of novel therapeutic agents such as antiangiogenic drugs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of cystic lesions of neurocysticercosis: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffin, Luciana S.; Bacheschi, Luiz A.; Machado, Luis R.; Nobrega, Jose P.S.; Coelho, Christina; Leite, Claudia C. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia]. E-mail: bacheschi@henet.usp.br

    2001-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic disease in some developing countries. It has pleomorfic clinical and imaging findings, which are variable from patient to patient. In this preliminary note, we studied the magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted images of sixteen patients presenting with cystic lesions of this disease diagnosed by clinical and laboratorial findings. All the lesions had hypointense signal and the similar apparent diffusion coefficient values as the cerebrospinal fluid. (author)

  18. Diffusion-weighted imaging of bacteria colonies in the STRAFI plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, K J; Halse, M R; Strange, J H

    2000-03-01

    Imaging colonies of bacteria in water suspension using NMR requires that the water inside the bacteria can be differentiated from the surrounding water. This is commonly carried out by using diffusion-weighted pulsed field gradient techniques. However, it is also possible to use the diffusion sensitivity inherent in stray field imaging (STRAFI). In STRAFI, the subject to be imaged is normally moved along the axis of a superconducting magnet so that it passes through the sensitive slice. However, by moving the sample in the transverse direction and by using a long copper strip in place of a surface induction coil, a diffusion-weighted one-dimensional projection profile can be obtained across the sensitive slice. Profiles from a water phantom and from a bacteria suspension show convincing discrimination between intracellular and extracellular water. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Single-shot echo-planar MR sequences in the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Yamakami, Norio; Hachiya, Junichi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to present our preliminary experience in the application of echo-planar-imaging (EPI) MR sequences for the diagnosis of intracranial infectious diseases and to assess the value of these sequences. We reviewed single-shot EPI MR images obtained at 1.5 T in 17 patients and compared these images with conventional or fast spin-echo (SE) or fluid attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. The clinical diagnoses for the 17 patients were meningitis (2 patients), encephalitis or meningoencephalitis (7 patients), brain abscess (5 patients), epidural empyema (2 patients) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (1 patient). We obtained EPI-T{sub 2}-weighted (T{sub 2}W) images in 8 patients, EPI-FLAIR images in 13 patients and EPI-diffusion-weighted (DW) images in 14 patients. Among the 8 patients for whom EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging was performed, EPI-T{sub 2}W imaging yielded superior results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 3 patients as a consequence of patient motion and equal results compared with SE-T{sub 2}W imaging in 5 patients. Among the 13 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, the EPI-FLAIR images were superior to conventional FLAIR images in 3 unstable patients. In the remaining 10 patients for whom EPI-FLAIR imaging was performed, EPI-FLAIR images were equivalent or inferior to conventional FLAIR images. In 6 patients with encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, the encephalitic lesions showed hyperintensity in EPI-DW images to a greater extent than in images obtained with the other techniques. In 3 patients, EPI-DW images also demonstrated hyperintensity for the contents of abscesses or areas of empyema that was not seen with the other imaging techniques. The value of EPI-T{sub 2}W and EPI-FLAIR imaging is limited in uncooperative patients. EPI-DW imaging was found to be of value for the evaluation of several intracranial infectious diseases. (author)

  20. ROLE OF DIFFUSION WEIGHTED IMAGING IN METHOTREXATE-INDUCED LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY IN ADULT ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKAEMIA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deb Kumar Boruah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Methotrexate (MTX is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used in haematological malignancy. Its complication in childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL is well known to cause leukoencephalopathy. However, its complications in adults are uncommon. High doses of MTX is used to prevent CNS recurrence and haematological relapse. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI plays an important role in early diagnosis. Aim of our study was to evaluate role of diffusion weighted MR imaging in Methotrexate-induced Leukoencephalopathy in adult acute lymphoblastic Leukaemia patients. METHODS A hospital based cross-sectional retrospective study was conducted. The study group comprised of 7 adult acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL patients presenting to the Departments of Radio-diagnosis, Medicine and Radiotherapy in a tertiary care hospital from April 2012 to May 2015. RESULTS In our study, 7 adult patients of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL, four patients (57.1% developed MTX toxicity in interim maintenance phase and 3 patients (42.9% developed in second maintenance phase of multidrug BFM-95 Regimen. Diffusion weighted images showed patchy multifocal restriction in 2 patients (28.6% of acute MTX neurotoxicity and no diffusion restriction in rest 5 patients (71.4%. Acute MTX neurotoxicity in two patients (28.6% had low apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC value while 3 patients (42.9% of chronic MTX neurotoxicity had high ADC value and 2 patients (28.6% of subacute MTX neurotoxicity had normal ADC value. CONCLUSIONS Prompt recognition of MTX neurotoxicity with diffusion weighted imaging and ADC value are essential to institute early treatment to improve the outcome after MTX overdose in adult ALL patients.

  1. Near-Tubular Fiber Bundle Segmentation for Diffusion Weighted Imaging: Segmentation Through Frame Reorientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Near-Tubular Fiber Bundle Segmentation for Diffusion Weighted Imaging: Segmentation Through Frame Reorientation Marc Niethammera,b, Christopher Zacha...John Melonakosc, and Allen Tannenbaumc Marc Niethammer: mn@cs.unc.edu; Christopher Zach: cmzach@cs.unc.edu; John Melonakos: jmelonak@ece.gatech.edu...modification of a recent segmentation approach by Bresson et al. allows for a convex optimization formulation of the segmentation problem, combining

  2. Quantitative aspects of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassaneze Thiago

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the added value of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI in patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT. The use of DW-MRI for response evaluation in rectal cancer still remains a widely investigated issue, as the accurate detection of pathologic complete response (pCR is critical in making therapeutic decisions.

  3. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: protocol optimization, interpretation, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Savannah C; McDonald, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) has shown promise for improving the positive predictive value of breast MR imaging for detection of breast cancer, evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and as a noncontrast alternative to MR imaging in screening for breast cancer. However, data quality varies widely. Before implementing DWI into clinical practice, one must understand the pertinent technical considerations and current evidence regarding clinical applications of breast DWI. This article provides an overview of basic principles of DWI, optimization of breast DWI protocols, imaging features of benign and malignant breast lesions, promising clinical applications, and potential future directions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression for characterizing esophageal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomizawa M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Minoru Tomizawa,1 Fuminobu Shinozaki,2 Aika Ozaki,2 Akira Baba,2 Yoshiya Fukamizu,2 Futoshi Matsunaga,2 Takao Sugiyama,3 Shigenori Yamamoto,4 Makoto Sueishi,3 Takanobu Yoshida51Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Rheumatology, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Department of Internal Medicine, National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital, Yotsukaido City, JapanPurpose: Information on the extent or structure of esophageal cancer (ESC is necessary for identifying whether the carcinoma is localized or resectable. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS are useful for this purpose.Patients and methods: One case of ESC with dysphagia presented at our hospital. Endoscopic examination revealed an elevated lesion with an ulcer, and stenosis was detected. DWI showed a high-intensity signal extending from the proximal to the distal ends of the carcinoma and extending to the tunica adventitia. A strong signal was also observed using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET. DWIBS clearly revealed ESC, and these findings, along with those from DWI, suggested that our case had stage-T3 ESC. FDG-PET did not reveal the detailed structure of the ESC. DWIBS, on the other hand, showed that the signal extended to the tunica adventitia and the lumen of the esophagus.Conclusion: These findings suggest that DWI and DWIBS are useful for the detection and assessment of ESC.Keywords: positron emission tomography, endoscopy, computed tomography, cross section, squamous cell carcinoma

  5. Diffusion weighted imaging of female pelvic cancers: Concepts and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punwani, Shonit, E-mail: shonit.punwani@gmail.com [Department of Academic Radiology, 2nd Floor Podium, University College London Hospital, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Early applications of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) were limited to neuroimaging, concentrating either on stroke or brain tumours. With recent advances in MRI hardware and software DWI is now increasingly being investigated for cancer assessment throughout the body. Clinical applications of DWI relating to female pelvic cancers have largely concentrated on detection, localisation and staging of disease. More recently investigators have started to evaluate the ability of DWI for determining tumour histology and even predicting the outcome of chemoradiation treatment. This article reviews the physical concepts of MR diffusion weighting, illustrates the biophysical basis of diffusion contrast and reports the clinical applications of DWI for cervical, endometrial, ovarian, rectal and bladder tumours.

  6. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings in a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiner, L. E-mail: heiner_lajos@freemail.hu; Demaerel, Ph

    2003-03-01

    Introduction: Herpes simplex meningoencephalitis is one of the most common viral central nervous system infection in adults. Early diagnosis is essential for treatment. Case report: We present a case of a 68-year-old female patient with herpes simplex infection. On admission, she was in severe clinical condition. Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging detected brain involvement better than conventional sequences. After acyclovir therapy, the patient fully recovered. Conclusion: DW magnetic resonance imaging is expected to provide a more sensitive imaging in herpes simplex patients than conventional sequences.

  7. Diffusion-weighted MR images and pineoblastoma. Diagnosis and follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Cruz Junior, L. Celso Hygino; Doring, Thomas M.; Domingues, Romeu C. [Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com; Araujo, Bertha; Dantas, Mario Alberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. of Radiology; Chimelli, Leila [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. of Pathology

    2008-07-01

    Pineoblastomas are uncommon pineal tumors, which demonstrate rapid growing and poor prognosis. We report the case of a 43-year-old man with an enhancing pineal region mass, which showed restriction of the diffusion on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR images. The surgical biopsy defined the diagnosis of pineoblastoma and the therapy was initiated with radiation and chemotherapy. Three months later, the follow-up MR imaging showed areas suggestive of necrosis and the DW images demonstrate no significant areas of restricted diffusion. The differential diagnosis of pineal region masses that could show restriction of diffusion is discussed. (author)

  8. Novel diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y.F.; Chang, F.C.; Hu, H.H.; Hsu, L.C. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China). Depts. of Internal Medicine and Radiology, and Neurological Inst.

    2006-12-15

    This report presents a rare case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis initially presenting with mental impairment and rapidly progressing to coma without any history of malignancy. In addition to highlighting the diagnostic difficulties, the linear high signal intensity along the cortex on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was identified accidentally. High signal change in the corresponding areas was also noted on unenhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, which may be a novel method of diagnosing leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, which should be studied further.

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging and cognition in the leukoariosis and disability in the elderly study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Ropele, Stefan; Ferro, José

    2010-01-01

    role. METHODS: In addition to a comprehensive clinical, neuropsychologic, and imaging work-up, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed in 340 participants of the multicenter leukoariosis and disability study examining the impact of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) on 65- to 85-year old individuals...... without previous disability. WMH severity was rated according to the Fazekas score. Multivariate regression analysis served to assess correlations of histogram metrics of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of whole-brain tissue, NABT, and of the mean ADC of WMH with cognitive functions. RESULTS...

  10. Main applications of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Juan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI is a functional imaging technique which can exhibit the diffusion characteristics of water molecules in vivo and thus indirectly reflect cellular density, the integrity of cell membrane, and capillary perfusion. The main applications of DW-MRI in hepatic lesions, especially in hepatocellular carcinoma, staging of liver fibrosis, and monitoring of tumor therapy, are described. Although this technique, which can be applied without need for contrast agent, is still insufficient, it will have broad application prospects with the development of software and hardware.

  11. Assessment of Activity of Crohn Disease by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-hua; Sun, Can-hui; Mao, Ren; Zhang, Zhong-wei; Jiang, Xiao-song; Pui, Margaret H.; Chen, Min-hu; Li, Zi-ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To assess the diagnostic efficacy of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for evaluating inflammatory activity in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). A total of 47 CD patients underwent MR enterography (MRE) and DWI using 3 b values of 50, 400, and 800 s/mm.2 Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of inflamed and normal bowel wall were calculated. The conventional MRE findings and DWI signal intensities were qualitatively scored from 0 to 3. The correlation between Crohn disease activity index (CDAI) and both ADCs and magnetic resonance imaging scores was analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CD activity. Of the 47 patients, 25 were active CD (CDAI≥150) and 22 were inactive (CDAI<150). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and MRE + DWI scores of active CD were significantly higher than that of inactive CD (both P < 0.001). Apparent diffusion coefficients in inflamed segments of active CD were lower than that of inactive CD (P < 0.001). The DWI scores (r = 0.74, P < 0.001), ADCs (r = −0.71, P < 0.001), MRE scores (r = 0.54, P < 0.001), and MRE + DWI scores (r = 0.66, P < 0.001) were all correlated with CDAI. The areas under the receiver-operating characteristics curves for ADCs, DWI scores, MRE scores, and MRE + DWI scores ranged from 0.83 to 0.98. The threshold ADC value of 1.17 × 10−3 mm2/s allowed differentiation of active from inactive CD with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and ADC correlated with CD activity, and had excellent diagnostic accuracy for differentiating active from inactive CD. PMID:26512584

  12. MR imaging of hypoglycemic encephalopathy: lesion distribution and prognosis prediction by diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Young-Joo; Yoo, Won-Jong; Ihn, Yon-Kwon; Kim, Jee-Young; Kim, Bum-Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Uijongbu, Kyunggi-do (Korea); Song, Ha-Hun [Cheju Halla General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jeju (Korea)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the patterns of hypoglycemic encephalopathy on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the relationship between the imaging patterns and clinical outcomes. This retrospective study included 17 consecutive patients that had hypoglycemic encephalopathy with DWI abnormalities. The topographic distributions of the DWI abnormalities of the cortex, deep gray matter, and white matter structures were assessed. In addition, possible correlation between the patterns of brain injury on DWI and clinical outcomes was investigated. There were three patterns of DWI abnormalities: involvement of both gray and white matter (n=8), selective involvement of gray matter (n=4), and selective involvement of white matter (n=5). There was no significant difference in the initial blood glucose levels among patients for each of the imaging patterns. Most patients (16/17) had bilateral symmetrical abnormalities. Among patients with bilateral symmetrical gray and/or white matter injuries, one had moderate to severe disability and 14 remained in a persistent vegetative state. The two patients with a focal unilateral white matter abnormality and a localized splenial abnormality recovered without neurological deficits. The results of this study showed that white matter was more sensitive to hypoglycemia than previously thought and there was no specific association between the patterns of injury and clinical outcomes whether the cerebral cortex, deep gray matter, and/or white matter were affected. Diffuse and extensive injury observed on the DWI predicts a poor neurologic outcome in patients with hypoglycemic injuries. (orig.)

  13. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. USE OF DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR REVEALING HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN LESIONS IN NEONATES

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Shimchenko; E. I. Kleshchenko; K. F. Goloseyev

    2014-01-01

    The article presents advantages of use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) for revealing hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions in neonates. The trial included 97 neonates with perinatal brain lesion who had been undergoing treatment at a resuscitation department or neonatal pathology department in the first month of life. The article shows high information value of diffusion-weighted images (DWI) for diagnostics of hypoxic-ischemic lesions in comparison with regular standard mo...

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Diffusion Weighted MR Images of Brain Tumor Using Signal Intensity Gradient Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Shanbhag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI in the examination and classification of brain tumors, namely, glioma and meningioma. Our hypothesis was that as signal intensity variations on diffusion weighted (DW images depend on histology and cellularity of the tumor, analysing the signal intensity characteristics on DW images may allow differentiating between the tumor types. Towards this end the signal intensity variations on DW images of the entire tumor volume data of 20 subjects with glioma and 12 subjects with meningioma were investigated and quantified using signal intensity gradient (SIG parameter. The relative increase in the SIG values (RSIG for the subjects with glioma and meningioma was in the range of 10.08–28.36 times and 5.60–9.86 times, respectively, compared to their corresponding SIG values on the contralateral hemisphere. The RSIG values were significantly different between the subjects with glioma and meningioma (P<0.01, with no overlap between RSIG values across the two tumors. The results indicate that the quantitative changes in the RSIG values could be applied in the differential diagnosis of glioma and meningioma, and their adoption in clinical diagnosis and treatment could be helpful and informative.

  16. PCATMIP: Enhancing Signal Intensity in Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, V. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Kellman, P.; Croisille, P.; Wen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI studies generally lose signal intensity to physiological motion which can adversely affect quantification/diagnosis. Averaging over multiple repetitions, often used to improve image quality, does not eliminate the signal loss. In this paper, PCATMIP, a combined principal component analysis (PCA) and temporal maximum intensity projection (TMIP) approach is developed to address this problem. Data is first acquired for a fixed number of repetitions. Assuming that physiological fluctuations of image intensities locally are likely temporally-correlated unlike random noise, a local moving boxcar in the spatial domain is used to reconstruct low-noise images by considering the most relevant principal components in the temporal domain. Subsequently, a temporal maximum intensity projection yields a high signal-intensity image. Numerical and experimental studies were performed for validation and to determine optimal parameters for increasing signal intensity and minimizing noise. Subsequently, PCATMIP was used to analyze diffusion-weighted porcine liver MRI scans. In these scans, the variability of ADC values among repeated measurements was reduced by 59% relative to averaging and there was an increase in the signal intensity with higher intensity differences observed at higher b-values. In summary, PCATMIP is a post-processing approach that corrects for bulk motion-induced signal loss and improves ADC measurement reproducibility. PMID:21590803

  17. Automatic segmentation of brain infarction in diffusion-weighted MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu; Tian, Jie

    2003-05-01

    It is important to detect the site and size of infarction volume in stroke patients. An automatic method for segmenting brain infarction lesion from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients has been developed. The method uses an integrated approach which employs image processing techniques based on anisotropic filters and atlas-based registration techniques. It is a multi-stage process, involving first images preprocessing, then global and local registration between the anatomical brain atlas and the patient, and finally segmentation of infarction volume based on region splitting and merging and multi-scale adaptive statistical classification. The proposed multi-scale adaptive statistical classification model takes into account spatial, intensity gradient, and contextual information of the anatomical brain atlas and the patient. Application of the method to diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) scans of twenty patients with clinically determined infarction was carried out. It shows that the method got a satisfied segmentation even in the presence of radio frequency (RF) inhomogeneities. The results were compared with lesion delineations by human experts, showing the identification of infarction lesion with accuracy and reproducibility.

  18. Contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging for predicting benignity of complex adnexal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Pariss, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Rene Descartes, LRI-EA4062, Paris (France); Darai, Emile [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Pariss, Department of Gynecology-Obstetrics, Paris (France); Cuenod, Charles A.; Fournier, Laure [Universite Rene Descartes, LRI-EA4062, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Toussaint, Irwin; Marsault, Claude; Bazot, Marc [Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Pariss, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively assess the contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for characterizing complex adnexal masses. Seventy-seven women (22-87 years old) with complex adnexal masses (30 benign and 47 malignant) underwent MR imaging including DWI before surgery. Conventional morphological MR imaging criteria were recorded in addition to b{sub 1,000} signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of cystic and solid components. Positive likelihood ratios (PLR) were calculated for predicting benignity and malignancy. The most significant criteria for predicting benignity were low b{sub 1,000} signal intensity within the solid component (PLR = 10.9), low T2 signal intensity within the solid component (PLR = 5.7), absence of solid portion (PLR = 3.1), absence of ascites or peritoneal implants (PLR = 2.3) and absence of papillary projections (PLR = 2.3). ADC measurements did not contribute to differentiating benign from malignant adnexal masses. All masses that displayed simultaneously low signal intensity within the solid component on T2-weighted and on b{sub 1,000} diffusion-weighted images were benign. Alternatively, the presence of a solid component with intermediate T2 signal and high b{sub 1,000} signal intensity was associated with a PLR of 4.5 for a malignant adnexal tumour. DWI signal intensity is an accurate tool for predicting benignity of complex adnexal masses. (orig.)

  19. Cerebral infarction presenting pure motor mono-paresis. Diagnosis by diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Masaya; Udaka, Fukashi; Nishinaka, Kazuto; Kubori, Tamotsu; Kameyama, Masakuni [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    We studied 10 patients with acute ischemic cerebrovascular disorders presenting paralysis confined to one limb, unaccompanied by sensory signs (pure motor monoparesis, PMM) on diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). DWI revealed fresh ischemic lesions in all patients, except for 2 cases of transient ischemic attack. On DWI, acute infarction in multiple lesions was identified, and small superficial lesions were clearly described. Superficial lesions were seen in 4 patients, and deep lesions were also seen in 4 patients. DWI is useful for lesion analysis in cerebral infarction with PMM. (author)

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging and cognition in the leukoariosis and disability in the elderly study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Ropele, Stefan; Ferro, José

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The mechanisms by which leukoariosis impacts on clinical and cognitive functions are not yet fully understood. We hypothesized that ultrastructural abnormalities of the normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) assessed by diffusion-weighted imaging played a major and independent......, executive dysfunction, and speed, which remained after adjustment for WMH lesion volume and brain atrophy and were consistent among centers. No such association was seen with the mean ADC of WMH. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrastructural abnormalities of NABT increase with WMH severity and have a strong and independent...

  1. Normal diffusion-weighted imaging in cerebral air embolism complicating angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayama, T.; Inamura, T.; Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan); Mitani, M.; Yagi, H. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Yagi Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    We report a case of cerebral air embolism resulting from accidental air infection during cerebral angiography. A 60-year-old man was accidentally injected with air via the left subclavian artery. Angiography demonstrated air within the basilar artery. The patient showed signs of posterior circulation ischaemia (confusion, blindness, gaze palsy and hemiparesis). However, MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging, showed no abnormality 4 h later. The patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen within 5 h of the embolism. All symptoms and signs resolved completely within a week. (orig.)

  2. Ovarian adenofibromas and cystadenofibromas - Magnetic resonance imaging findings including diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Mayumi [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan)], e-mail: mayumi@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Matsuzaki, Kenji; Harada, Masafumi [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Background: Ovarian adenofibromas (AF) and cystadenofibromas (CAF) belong to the surface epithelial-stromal tumors, and may appear as solid, or solid and cystic masses mimicking ovarian cancers. Purpose: To evaluate the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement for the diagnosis of ovarian AF/CAF. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance manifestations of 13 cases of ovarian AF/CAF were retrospectively evaluated. DWI was obtained in all 13 lesions, and mean ADC values in 11 lesions were compared with those in solid portions of 27 ovarian cancers. Results: Neither case with AF/CAF revealed high signal intensity on DWI, whereas all ovarian cancers showed high signal intensity on DWI. The ADC values in the solid portions of AF/CAF were significantly higher than those of ovarian cancers (P < 0.001). A cut-off value of 1.20 X 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for AF/CAF had a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 93%, positive predictive value of 82%, and negative predictive value of 93%. Conclusion: DWI with ADC measurement may be helpful in differentiating AF/CAF from ovarian cancers.

  3. On random walks and entropy in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies of neural tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, Carson; Magin, Richard L; Colon-Perez, Luis; Triplett, William; Mareci, Thomas H

    2014-02-01

    In diffusion-weighted MRI studies of neural tissue, the classical model assumes the statistical mechanics of Brownian motion and predicts a monoexponential signal decay. However, there have been numerous reports of signal decays that are not monoexponential, particularly in the white matter. We modeled diffusion in neural tissue from the perspective of the continuous time random walk. The characteristic diffusion decay is represented by the Mittag-Leffler function, which relaxes a priori assumptions about the governing statistics. We then used entropy as a measure of the anomalous features for the characteristic function. Diffusion-weighted MRI experiments were performed on a fixed rat brain using an imaging spectrometer at 17.6 T with b-values arrayed up to 25,000 s/mm(2). Additionally, we examined the impact of varying either the gradient strength, q, or mixing time, Δ, on the observed diffusion dynamics. In white and gray matter regions, the Mittag-Leffler and entropy parameters demonstrated new information regarding subdiffusion and produced different image contrast from that of the classical diffusion coefficient. The choice of weighting on q and Δ produced different image contrast within the regions of interest. We propose these parameters have the potential as biomarkers for morphology in neural tissue. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Diffusion-weighted imaging in acute stroke; Diffusionsgewichtete Bildgebung bei akutem Schlaganfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg-Saar (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) enables the early detection of acute ischemic stroke and with high sensitivity and specificity. The signal changes are based on decreased diffusion of water molecules that is caused by cytotoxic edema. Despite the possibility of early detection of ischemic changes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not normally necessary for the therapy decision; however, under some conditions, such as unknown time from onset of symptoms, multiparametric MRI including DWI can provide useful information that will influence the therapy. (orig.) [German] Die diffusionsgewichtete Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI) ermoeglicht es, den ischaemischen Schlaganfall mit hoher Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet fruehzeitig nachzuweisen. Ihre Signalveraenderungen basieren auf der eingeschraenkten Diffusion von Wassermolekuelen durch das zytotoxische Oedem, das durch die Hypoxie verursacht wird. Trotz der Moeglichkeit, ischaemische Veraenderungen fruehzeitig nachzuweisen, ist das MRT zur Therapieentscheidung beim ischaemischen Schlaganfall in der Regel nicht notwendig. In besonderen Faellen, wenn z. B. das Zeitfenster nicht bekannt ist, kann das MRT mit Diffusionsbildgebung jedoch hilfreiche Informationen liefern, die die Therapie beeinflussen. (orig.)

  5. Diffusion-weighted imaging of normal fibroglandular breast tissue : influence of microperfusion and fat suppression technique on the apparent diffusion coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Paul; Dorrius, Monique D.; Kappert, Peter; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Sijens, Paul E.

    The influence of microperfusion and fat suppression technique on the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values obtained with diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) of normal fibroglandular breast tissue was investigated. Seven volunteers (14 breasts) were scanned using diffusion weighting factors (b

  6. Diffusion-weighted imaging: basic concepts and application in cerebral stroke and head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2003-10-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the brain represents a new imaging technique that extends imaging from depiction of neuroanatomy to the level of function and physiology. DWI measures a fundamentally different physiological parameter compared with conventional MRI. Image contrast is related to differences in the diffusion rate of water molecules rather than to changes in total tissue water. DWI can reveal pathology in cases where conventional MRI remains unremarkable. DWI has proven to be highly sensitive in the early detection of acute cerebral ischemia and seems promising in the evaluation of traumatic brain injury. DWI can differentiate between lesions with decreased and increased diffusion. In addition, full-tensor DWI can evaluate the microscopic architecture of the brain, in particular white matter tracts, by measuring the degree and spatial distribution of anisotropic diffusion within the brain. This article reviews the basic concepts of DWI and its application in cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury.

  7. The application of in vivo diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging on intracranial disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisu, Toshihiko; Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)) (and others)

    1991-07-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained by using motion-probing gradient (MPG) pulses in one or three orthogonal directions in the following subjects: (1) phantom models; (2) Wistar rats with experimentally induced brain edema; (3) normal volunteers, and patients with brain tumor, brain edema or cerebral infarction. A one direction method was capable of defining diffusion anisotropy of myelinated axonal fibers in white matter. A three orthogonal gradients method was useful for demonstrating the difference in the diffusion coefficients in various diseases due to its larger total gradient strength. Faster diffusion was detected in white matter parallel to the direction of MPG; and slower diffusion was detected perpendicular to the direction of MPG because the myelin sheath restricted water diffusion. Brain tumor and vasogenic edema were shown as faster diffusion, while cytotoxic edema, cerebral ischemia, and infarction (at the subacute or early chronic stage) were shown as slower diffusion. Thus, diffusion weighted MR imaging seemed to be a useful approach to qualitative and dynamic analyses of intracranial diseases. (N.K.).

  8. An evaluation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhandan, M; Cece, H; Calik, M; Karakas, E; Dogan, F; Karakas, O

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis and staging of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The study comprised 26 patients diagnosed with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis at our clinic who were undergoing regular follow-up, and a control group of 18 subjects. Clinical staging was determined by Risk and Haddad classification; 12 at Stage II and 14 at Stage III. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images were taken of six areas (frontal, parieto-occipital, cerebellar, deep white matter, thalamus and basal ganglia) and by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, and a comparison was made between the stages and with the control group. The ADC values of all the areas of the subacute sclerosing panencephalitis patients were found to be significantly higher compared to the control group (p 0.05). The ADC values of all the areas of the Stage III patients were found to be significantly high compared to the Stage II values (p panencephalitis and to reveal differences between the stages.

  9. Noninvasive Evaluation of Trunk Muscle Recruitment after Trunk Exercises using Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Matsunaga, Naoto; Okubo, Yu; Kaneoka, Koji

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated trunk muscle recruitment in abdominal and back exercises with magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging. Twelve men performed bent-knee sit-up, crunch, trunk lateral flexion, and trunk extension exercises. We obtained axial diffusion-weighted images of the trunk before and after each exercise using a 1.5-tesla MR system, calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values from the right and left rectus abdominis, lateral abdominal, psoas major, quadratus lumborum, and intrinsic back muscles to evaluate the activity of these muscles during each exercise, and compared ADC values before and after exercise using a paired t-test. The ADCs of the rectus abdominis (right, +19.1%; left, +11.7%), lateral abdominal (right, +15.5%; left, +14.1%), and psoas major (right, +14.8%; left, +15.9%) muscles on both sides increased after the bent-knee sit-up (P muscles on both sides increased after the crunch exercise (P muscles (rectus abdominis, +12.3%; lateral abdominal muscles, +20.3%; quadratus lumborum, +17.1%; intrinsic back muscles, +12.0%; psoas major, +15.4%) (P muscles on both sides were elevated after trunk extension (right lateral abdominal muscles and left quadratus lumborum, P muscles, P muscles in abdominal and back exercises through exercise-induced activation in intramuscular water movement.

  10. Role of Perfusion-Weighted Imaging in a Diffusion-Weighted-Imaging-Negative Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Nah, Hyun Wook; Kim, Bum Joon; Ahn, Sung Ho; Kim, Jong S; Kang, Dong Wha; Kwon, Sun U

    2017-04-01

    The absence of acute ischemic lesions in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients makes it difficult to diagnose the true vascular etiologies. Among patients with DWI-negative TIA, we investigated whether the presence of a perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) abnormality implied a true vascular event by identifying new acute ischemic lesions in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in areas corresponding to the initial PWI abnormality. The included patients underwent DWI and PWI within 72 hours of TIA and also follow-up DWI at 3 days after the initial MRI. These patients had visited the emergency room between July 2009 and May 2015. Patients who demonstrated initial DWI lesions were excluded. The initial PWI abnormalities in the corresponding vascular territory were visually classified into three patterns: no abnormality, focal abnormality, and territorial abnormality. No DWI lesions were evident in initial MRI in 345 of the 443 TIA patients. Follow-up DWI was applied to 87 of these 345 DWI-negative TIA patients. Initial PWI abnormalities were significantly associated with follow-up DWI abnormalities: 8 of 43 patients with no PWI abnormalities (18.6%) had new ischemic lesions, whereas 13 of 16 patients with focal perfusion abnormalities (81.2%) had new ischemic lesions in the areas of initial PWI abnormalities [odds ratio (OR)=15.1, 95% confidence interval (CI)=3.6-62.9], and 14 of 28 patients with territorial perfusion abnormalities (50%) had new lesions (OR=3.7, 95% CI=1.2-11.5). PWI is useful in defining whether or not the transient neurological symptoms in DWI-negative TIA are true vascular events, and will help to improve the understanding of the pathomechanism of TIA.

  11. Diffusion weighted MR imaging in non-infarct lesions of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaarslan, E. [Department of Radiology, American Hospital, Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: ercankaraarslan@yahoo.com; Arslan, A. [Department of Radiology, Kocaeli University Medical School, Kocaeli (Turkey)], E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net

    2008-03-15

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a relatively new method in which the images are formed by the contrast produced by the random microscopic motion of water molecules in different tissues. Although DWI has been tried for different organ systems, it has been found its primary use in the central nervous system. The most widely used clinical application is in the detection of hyperacute infarcts and the differentiation of acute or subacute infarction from chronic infarction. Recently DWI has been applied to various other cerebral diseases. In this pictorial paper the authors demonstrated different DWI patterns of non-infarct lesions of the brain which are hyperintense in the diffusion trace image, such as infectious, neoplastic and demyelinating diseases, encephalopathies - including hypoxic-ischemic, hypertensive, eclamptic, toxic, metabolic and mitochondrial encephalopathies - leukodystrophies, vasculitis and vasculopathies, hemorrhage and trauma.

  12. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of femoral head osteonecrosis in two groups of patients: Legg-Perthes-Calve and Avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Betul Duran; Ozel, Deniz; Ozkan, Fuat; Halefoglu, Ahmet M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in patients with osteonecrosis. Patients were divided into two subgroups as avascular necrosis (AVN) of femoral head for adult group and Legg-Calvé-Perthes (LCP) patients for children. Seventeen patients with femoral head AVN (mean age 42.3 years) and 17 patients with LCP (mean age 8.2 years) were included in this study. Diagnosis confirmed with clinical and other imaging procedures among the patients complaining hip pain. DW images were obtained using the single-shot echo planar sequence and had b values of 0, 500, 1000 s/mm(2). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured from ADC maps in epiphysis of patients with AVN, both from metaphysis and epiphysis in patients with LCP, respectively. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare ADC values. The mean ADC value of femoral heads (1.285 ± 0.204 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) was increased in patients with AVN when compared to normal bone tissue (0.209 ± 0.214 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) (p < 0.01). The mean ADC values (×10(-3) mm(2)/s) of both metaphysis (0.852 ± 0.293) and epiphysis (0.843 ± 0.332) were also increased in patients with LCP and differences were statistically significant (p < 0.01). As a result, osteonecrosis shows increased ADC values. But it is a controversial concept that DWI offers a valuable data to conventional MRI or not. However, as there are report states, there is a correlation between the stage of the disease with ADC values in the LCP disease. DWI is a fast, without-contrast administration technique and provides quantitative values additional to conventional MR techniques; we believe DWI may play an additional assistance to the diagnosis and treatment for LCP patients. Multicentric larger group studies may provide additional data to this issue.

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in musculoskeletal MRI: a critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, Michael M.Y.; Tyler, Philippa A.; Saifuddin, Asif [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Padhani, Anwar R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the mainstay of diagnosis, staging and follow-up of much musculoskeletal pathology. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is a recent addition to the MR sequences conventionally employed. DWI provides qualitative and quantitative functional information concerning the microscopic movements of water at the cellular level. A number of musculoskeletal disorders have been evaluated by DWI, including vertebral fractures, bone marrow infection, bone marrow malignancy, primary bone and soft tissue tumours; post-treatment follow-up has also been assessed. Differentiation between benign and malignant vertebral fractures by DWI and monitoring of therapy response have shown excellent results. However, in other pathologies, such as primary soft tissue tumours, DWI data have been inconclusive in some cases, contributing little additional information beyond that gained from conventional MR sequences. The aim of this article is to critically review the current literature on the contribution of DWI to musculoskeletal MRI. (orig.)

  14. Diffusion-Weighted MR imaging: Clinical applications of kurtosis analysis to prostate cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Barucci, Andrea; Esposito, Marco; Olmastroni, Maristella; Zatelli, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging technique known as DWI (diffusion-weighted imaging) allows measurement of water diffusivity on a pixel basis for evaluating pathology throughout the body and is now routinely incorporated into many body MRI protocols, mainly in oncology. Indeed water molecules motion reflects the interactions with other molecules, membranes, cells, and in general the interactions with the environment. Microstructural changes as e.g. cellular organization and/or integrity then affect the motion of water molecules, and consequently alter the water diffusion properties measured by DWI. Then DWI technique can be used to extract information about tissue organization at the cellular level indirectly from water motion. In general the signal intensity in DWI can be quantified by using a parameter known as ADC (Apparent Diffusion Coefficient) emphasizing that it is not the real diffusion coefficient, which is a measure of the average water molecular motion. In the simplest models, the distribu- tion of a wat...

  15. Monitoring ankylosing spondylitis therapy by dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

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    Gaspersic, Natasa [University Medical Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, Igor [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jevtic, Vladimir [Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomsic, Matija; Praprotnik, Sonja [University Medical Centre, Department of Rheumatology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-02-15

    The effects of different therapies on enthesitis/osteitis in active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim was to assess the role of quantitative MRI in the evaluation of AS treatment efficacy. Thirty patients with active spondylitis or bilateral sacroilitis were selected and followed up for 1 year. Ten of the patients were treated only with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 10 patients additionally received at baseline an intravenous pulse of glucocorticoids and 10 patients were treated with regular infusions of infliximab. Disease activity was measured according to clinical instruments and laboratory tests. For each patient, one selected inflamed lesion was followed from baseline through control visits quantitatively by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) measuring the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and by dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCEI) with evaluation of the enhancement factor (f{sub enh}) and enhancement gradient (g{sub enh}). Clinical and quantitative MRI parameters diminished significantly with regression of the inflammatory activity. The improvement in AS was most pronounced in patients treated with infliximab; after 12 months the ADC diminished from an average of 1.31 to 0.88 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, f{sub enh} from 1.85 to 0.60, and g{sub enh} from 3.09 to 1.40 %/s. Diffusion-weighted imaging and DCEI were shown to be effective in quantifying changes in inflammation in skeletal lesions during the treatment of AS, and could therefore be convenient for assessing treatment efficacy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time DWI was used to evaluate the activity of skeletal inflammation in rheumatic diseases such as AS. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  17. Selected clinically established and scientific techniques of diffusion-weighted MRI. In the context of imaging in oncology; Ausgewaehlte klinisch etablierte und wissenschaftliche Techniken der diffusionsgewichteten MRT. Im Kontext der onkologischen Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, M.T.; Bickelhaupt, S.; Ziener, C.; Mosebach, J.; Schlemmer, H.P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Meier-Hein, K. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer medizinische Informatik, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, J.P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Urologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Kuder, T.A.; Laun, F.B. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that was established in the clinical routine primarily for the detection of brain ischemia. In the past 15 years its clinical use has been extended to oncological radiology, as tumor and metastases can be depicted in DWI due to their hypercellular nature. The basis of DWI is the Stejskal-Tanner experiment. The diffusion properties of tissue can be visualized after acquisition of at least two diffusion-weighted series using echo planar imaging and a specific sequence of gradient pulses. The use of DWI in prostate MRI was reported to be one of the first established applications that found its way into internationally recognized clinical guidelines of the European Society of Urological Radiology (ESUR) and the prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) scale. Due to recently reported high specificity and negative predictive values of 94 % and 92 %, respectively, its regular use for breast MRI is expected in the near future. Furthermore, DWI can also reliably be used for whole-body imaging in patients with multiple myeloma or for measuring the extent of bone metastases. New techniques in DWI, such as intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and histogram-based analyses represent promising approaches to achieve a more quantitative evaluation for tumor detection and therapy response. (orig.) [German] Die diffusionsgewichtete Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI), ein Verfahren aus der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT), wurde in der klinischen Routine primaer fuer die Detektion von Schlaganfaellen etabliert. Der Einsatz dieser Methode hat in den letzten 15 Jahren auch fuer die onkologische Diagnostik stark zugenommen, da Tumoren und Metastasen aufgrund ihrer hochzellulaeren Zusammensetzung in der DWI sehr gut sichtbar gemacht werden koennen. Basis der diffusionsgewichteten Bildgebung ist das Experiment nach Stejskal-Tanner. Hier

  18. The contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging to distinguishing typical from atypical meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, Bahattin [Uludag University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Bursa State Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Yildirim, Nalan; Gokalp, Gokhan; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Parlak, Mufit [Uludag University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2006-08-15

    Atypical/malignant meningiomas recur more frequently then typical meningiomas. In this study, the contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging to the differentiation of atypical/malignant and typical meningiomas and to the determination of histological subtypes of typical meningiomas was investigated. The study was performed prospectively on 39 patients. The signal intensity of the lesions was evaluated on trace and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) images. ADC values were measured in the lesions and peritumoral edema. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Mean ADC values in atypical/malignant and typical meningiomas were 0.75{+-}0.21 and 1.17{+-}0.21, respectively. Mean ADC values for subtypes of typical meningiomas were as follows: meningothelial, 1.09{+-}0.20; transitional, 1.19{+-}0.07; fibroblastic, 1.29{+-}0.28; and angiomatous, 1.48{+-}0.10. Normal white matter was 0.91{+-}0.10. ADC values of typical meningiomas and atypical/malignant meningiomas significantly differed (P<0.001). However, the difference between peritumoral edema ADC values was not significant (P>0.05). Furthermore, the difference between the subtypes of typical meningiomas and atypical/malignant meningiomas was significant (P<0.001). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings of atypical/malignant meningiomas and typical meningiomas differ. Atypical/malignant meningiomas have lower intratumoral ADC values than typical meningiomas. Mean ADC values for peritumoral edema do not differ between typical and atypical meningiomas. (orig.)

  19. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to predict response of hepatocellular carcinoma to chemoembolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Johnathan C; Naik, Neel K; Lewandowski, Robert J; Deng, Jie; Mulcahy, Mary F; Kulik, Laura M; Sato, Kent T; Ryu, Robert K; Salem, Riad; Larson, Andrew C; Omary, Reed A

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether intra-procedural diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging can predict response of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). METHODS: Sixteen patients (15 male), aged 59 ± 11 years (range: 42-81 years) underwent a total of 21 separate treatments for unresectable HCC in a hybrid magnetic resonance/interventional radiology suite. Anatomical imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (b = 0, 500 s/mm2) were performed on a 1.5-T unit. Tumor enhancement and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, mm2/s) values were assessed immediately before and at 1 and 3 mo after TACE. We calculated the percent change (PC) in ADC values at all time points. We compared follow-up ADC values to baseline values using a paired t test (α = 0.05). RESULTS: The intra-procedural sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (%) for detecting a complete or partial 1-mo tumor response using ADC PC thresholds of ±5%, ±10%, and ±15% were 77, 67, 91, and 40; 54, 67, 88, and 25; and 46, 100, 100, and 30, respectively. There was no clear predictive value for the 3-mo follow-up. Compared to baseline, the immediate post-procedure and 1-mo mean ADC values both increased; the latter obtaining statistical significance (1.48 ± 0.29 mm2/s vs 1.65 ± 0.35 × 10-3 mm2/s, P 15% predicted 1-mo anatomical HCC response with the greatest accuracy, and can provide valuable feedback at the time of TACE. PMID:20593501

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging in chronic Behcet patients with and without neurological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baysal, T.; Dogan, M.; Bulut, T.; Sarac, K. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Malatya (Turkey); Karlidag, R. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Malatya (Turkey); Ozisik, H.I. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Malatya (Turkey); Baysal, O. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Malatya (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether neurological impairment in chronic Behcet's disease (BD) patients with normal appearing brain can be assessed by means of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The averaged apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated in 22 different radiologically normal appearing brain regions in 32 patients with and without neurological findings and 20 control subjects. The ADC values in bilateral frontal, temporal and occipital normal appearing white matter were significantly higher in the patient groups compared with the control subjects (p<0.05). In these brain regions, DWI revealed differences in the ADC values between patients with neurological findings (including symptomatic and neuro-Behcet patients) and the asymptomatic patient group. The similarity of the ADC values of patients without symptoms to those of the control group allowed clear discrimination between patients with and without neurological findings. DWI may serve to assess subclinical neurological involvement in BD, even when structural changes are absent. (orig.)

  1. Neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy: diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Yeon; Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Lim, Keun Ho; Kim, Sang Tae [Asan Institute for Life Science, NMR Laboratory, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Ki Soo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Neonatology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-02-01

    We report two infants with neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy who were evaluated with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) as well as conventional MR. As in conventional MR, DWI and proton MRS revealed a predominance of abnormalities in the parieto-occipital lobes and underlying white matter including the splenium of the corpus callosum. In the acute phase of the disease, lesions on DWI showed restricted water diffusion and on DWI the characteristic lesions seemed to be more readily discernible than on conventional MRI. In the chronic phase, DWI demonstrated increased water diffusion in the affected areas showing atrophy on conventional MRI. Proton MRS revealed an increased lactate-lipid peak and a decreased NAA peak in the involved areas. DWI and proton MRS findings appear helpful in evaluating the extent and the presence of neuronal damage early in the course of neonatal hypoglycaemic encephalopathy. (orig.)

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging in transient global amnesia exposes the CA1 region of the hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Weon, Young-Cheol; Youn, Sung Won; Kim, Sung Hyun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea); Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, Sang Yun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea)

    2007-06-15

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is characterized by a sudden onset of anterograde amnesia without alteration of consciousness or personal identity. Interestingly, recent studies have reported a high frequency of small high-signal abnormalities in the hippocampus with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, and ischemia has been proposed as an etiology of TGA. We hypothesized that TGA lesions occur preferentially in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, known to be susceptible to ischemia. Over a 30-month period 34 patients with TGA underwent MRI including DW imaging within 4 days of symptom onset. Patients with high-signal abnormalities in the hippocampus on the initial DW images underwent subsequent DW and T2-weighted imaging in the coronal plane to identify the precise lesion locations. Fourteen patients had small (1-3 mm) high-signal abnormalities in the hippocampus unilaterally on DW images. One of these patients had two lesions in one hippocampus and therefore in total 15 lesions were identified: four in the hippocampal head, and 11 in the body. Eleven lesions in ten patients with available coronal images were clearly demonstrated on both coronal DW and T2-weighted images and were localized to the lateral portion of the hippocampus, corresponding to the CA1 region. Lesions associated with TGA were localized exclusively to the lateral portion of the hippocampus corresponding to the CA1 region. This finding supports the ischemic etiology of TGA; however, the pathophysiological mechanism involved requires further study. (orig.)

  3. The Monitoring of Preoperative External Detorsion with Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in a Patient with Acute Testicular Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Beyazal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular torsion is one of the main causes of acute scrotum and may result in permanent damage of the testicular tissue. Color Doppler imaging has been frequently used in the diagnosis of testicular torsion and posttreatment follow-up period of the disease. There are some studies reporting the value and usefulness of diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of testicular torsion. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no report regarding the monitoring of preoperative external detorsion in testicular torsion with diffusion-weighted imaging examination. In this article, diffusion-weighted imaging findings in the management of preoperative external detorsion in a case with testicular torsion were presented.

  4. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging indicates the severity of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Tertulino, Franklin; Schraibman, Vladimir; Ardengh, José Celso; do Espírito-Santo, Danilo Cerqueira; Ajzen, Sergio Aron; Torrez, Franz Robert Apodaca; Lobo, Edson Jose; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Goldman, Suzan Menasce

    2015-02-01

    To test the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to differentiate between different degrees of severity of acute pancreatitis (AP). Thirty-six patients who underwent DW-MRI and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were divided into patients with mild AP (mAP, n = 15), patients with necrotizing AP (nAP, n = 8), and patients with a normal pancreas (nP, n = 15; controls). The pancreas was divided into head, body, and tail, and each segment was classified according to image features: pattern 1, normal; pattern 2, mild inflammation; and pattern 3, necrosis. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured in each segment and correlated with clinical diagnoses. A total of 108 segments was assessed (three segments per patient). Segments classified as pattern 1 in the nP and mAP groups showed similar ADC values (P = 0.29). ADC values calculated for the pancreatic segments grouped according to the different image patterns (1-3) were significantly different (P < 0.001). Comparisons revealed significant differences in signal intensity between all three patterns (P < 0.05). DW-MRI was a compatible and safe image option to differentiate tissue image patterns in patients with mAP, nAP, and nP, mainly in those with contraindications to contrast-enhanced MRI (which is classically required for determining the presence of necrosis) or computed tomography. ADC measures allowed precise differentiation between patterns 1, 2, and 3.

  5. Transient global amnesia: increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, M.; Sakamoto, S.; Ishii, K. [Division of Neuroimaging Research, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders (Japan); Imamura, T.; Kazui, H.; Mori, E. [Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Hyogo Institute for Aging Brain and Cognitive Disorders, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    We report on a patient with pure transient global amnesia (TGA) whose magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a small region of increased signal intensity in the right hippocampus on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). DWI was sensitive and useful for evaluating the early stage of TGA and might help to explain the pathophysiology of TGA. (orig.)

  6. MRI of paraventricular white matter lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Analysis by diffusion-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, Fuminori; Kinoshita, Masao (Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Ohashi Hospital); Kishibayashi, Jun; Kamada, Kazuhiko; Sunohara, Nobuhiko

    1994-09-01

    Magnetic resonance images in some cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) revealed abnormal signals in both the paraventriculer white matter and in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule. We examined T[sub 2]- and diffusion-weighted MR images of these lesions in 18 cases of ALS. There were symmetrical high-signal areas in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule in all of the cases. The high-signal areas in the internal capsule corresponded to the pyramidal tracts in the anatomical atlas by Talairach. In 5 of the cases of ALS, T[sub 2]-weighted MR images showed discrete paraventricular white matter lesions as well. The mean age of the ALS patients with paraventricular white matter lesions was higher than that of the ALS patients without such lesions. Proton densities calculated from the conventional MR images were higher in both the capsular and paraventricular lesions. The diffusion coefficients perpendicular to the pyramidal tract in the internal capsular lesions were within the normal range, where as the diffusion coefficients in the paraventricular lesions were increased in all directions. Thus, diffusion anisotropy was lost in the paraventricular lesions. These findings are similar to those observed in the white matter lesions of cerebro-vascular origin. As a result, the pathology of the paraventricular lesions in ALS was confirmed to be different from that of the internal capsular lesions. (author).

  7. Radiomics assessment of bladder cancer grade using texture features from diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xiaopan; Tian, Qiang; Li, Baojuan; Wu, Yuxia; Yang, Zengyue; Liang, Zhengrong; Liu, Yang; Cui, Guangbin; Lu, Hongbing

    2017-11-01

    To 1) describe textural features from diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps that can distinguish low-grade bladder cancer from high-grade, and 2) propose a radiomics-based strategy for cancer grading using texture features. In all, 61 patients with bladder cancer (29 in high- and 32 in low-grade groups) were enrolled in this retrospective study. Histogram- and gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)-based radiomics features were extracted from cancerous volumes of interest (VOIs) on DWI and corresponding ADC maps of each patient acquired from 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A Mann-Whitney U-test was applied to select features with significant differences between low- and high-grade groups (P classifier using the optimal feature subset achieved the best performance in bladder cancer grading, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 0.861, 82.9%, 78.4%, and 87.1%, respectively. Textural features from DWI and ADC maps can reflect the difference between low- and high-grade bladder cancer, especially those GLCM features from ADC maps. The proposed radiomics strategy using these features, combined with the SVM classifier, may better facilitate image-based bladder cancer grading preoperatively. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1281-1288. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Recurrence and metastasis of lung cancer demonstrate decreased diffusion on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Katsuo; Sagawa, Motoyasu; Motomo, Nozomu; Ueno, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Makoto; Machida, Yuichiro; Maeda, Sumiko; Matoba, Munetaka; Tonami, Hisao; Ueda, Yoshimichi; Sakuma, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is reported to be useful for detecting malignant lesions. The purpose of this study is to clarify characteristics of imaging, detection rate and sensitivity of DWI for recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 36 lung cancer patients with recurrence or metastasis were enrolled in this study. While 16 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), 17 underwent MRI and CT, and 3 underwent MRI and PET-CT. Each recurrence or metastasis showed decreased diffusion, which was easily recognized in DWI. The detection rate for recurrence or metastasis was 100% (36/36) in DWI, 89% (17/19) in PET-CT and 82% (27/33) in CT. Detection rate of DWI was significantly higher than that of CT (p=0.0244) but not significantly higher than that of PET-CT (p=0.22). When the optimal cutoff value of the apparent diffusion coefficient value was set as 1.70?10-3 mm2/sec, the sensitivity of DWI for diagnosing recurrence or metastasis of lung cancer was 95.6%. DWI is useful for detection of recurrence and metastasis of lung cancer.

  9. Signal-shot echo-planner diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 3T and 1.5T for differentiation of benign vertebral fracture edema and tumor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Rho, Myung Ho; Chung, Eun Chul; Kim, Mi Sung; Kwon, Heon Ju; Youn, In Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value using single-shot echo-planar imaging sequences at 3T and 1.5T for differentiation of benign fracture edema and tumor infiltration of the vertebral body. A total of 46 spinal examinations were included in the 1.5T MRI group, and a total of 40 spinal examinations were included in the 3T MRI group. The ADC values of the lesion were measured and calculated. The diagnostic performance of the conventional MR image containing sagittal T2-weighted fat saturated image and each diffusion weighted image (DWI) with an ADC value with different b values were evaluated. The mean ADC value of the benign lesions was higher than that of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T (p < 0.05). The sensitivity of the diagnostic performance was higher with an additional DWI in both 1.5T and 3T, but the sensitivities were similar with the addition of b values of 400 and 1000. The specificities of the diagnostic performances did not show significant differences (p value > 0.05). The diagnostic accuracies were higher when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T. Statistical differences between 1.5T and 3T or between b values of 400 and 1000 were not seen. The ADC values of the benign lesions were significantly higher than those of the malignant lesions on 1.5T and 3T. There was no statistically significant difference in the diagnostic performances when either of the DWIs (b values of 400 and 1000) was added to the routine MR image for 1.5T and 3T.

  10. Evaluation of the potential of diffusion-weighted imaging in prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, V A; Kyriazi, S; Ashley, S E; DeSouza, N M

    2007-07-01

    Conventional T2-weighted (T2W) imaging alone has a poor sensitivity for prostate cancer detection. To evaluate combined T2W and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) versus T2W MRI alone for identifying tumor in patients with prostate cancer. Fifty-four consecutive patients with prostate cancer (46 stage 1 and 2, 8 stage 3) and sextant biopsies within the previous 3 months were studied. Endorectal MR images were analyzed by two radiologists (1 experienced, 1 trainee) blinded to patient information and histopathology. T2W images were scored first, followed by combined T2W and isotropic apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps calculated from DW-MRI (b = 0, 300, 500, and 800 s/mm(2)). Gland apex, middle, and base for each side were scored negative, indeterminate, or positive for tumor. Imaging data for each sextant were compared with histology. Sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement were calculated. Sensitivity and specificity for tumor identification significantly improved from 50% and 79.6% (T2W alone, experienced observer) to 73.2% and 80.8% (P<0.001), respectively. For the trainee observer, there was no improvement (44.3% and 72% T2W alone vs. 45.1% and 69.2% T2W plus ADC maps). Interobserver agreement was moderate for T2W imaging alone (kappa 0.51) and fair for T2W plus ADC maps (kappa 0.33). In an experienced observer, DW-MRI together with T2W imaging can significantly improve tumor identification in prostate cancer.

  11. Evaluation of the Potential of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Prostate Cancer Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, V.A.; Kyriazi, S.; Ashley, S.E.; Souza, N.M. de [Clinical Magnetic Resonance Group, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Inst. of Cancer Research, and Dept. of Statistics, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Background: Conventional T2-weighted (T2W) imaging alone has a poor sensitivity for prostate cancer detection. Purpose: To evaluate combined T2W and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) versus T2W MRI alone for identifying tumor in patients with prostate cancer. Material and Methods: Fifty-four consecutive patients with prostate cancer (46 stage 1 and 2, 8 stage 3) and sextant biopsies within the previous 3 months were studied. Endorectal MR images were analyzed by two radiologists (1 experienced, 1 trainee) blinded to patient information and histopathology. T2W images were scored first, followed by combined T2W and isotropic apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps calculated from DW-MRI (b = 0, 300, 500, and 800 s/mm{sup 2}). Gland apex, middle, and base for each side were scored negative, indeterminate, or positive for tumor. Imaging data for each sextant were compared with histology. Sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement were calculated. Results: Sensitivity and specificity for tumor identification significantly improved from 50% and 79.6% (T2W alone, experienced observer) to 73.2% and 80.8% (P<0.001), respectively. For the trainee observer, there was no improvement (44.3% and 72% T2W alone vs. 45.1% and 69.2% T2W plus ADC maps). Interobserver agreement was moderate for T2W imaging alone (kappa 0.51) and fair for T2W plus ADC maps (kappa 0.33). Conclusion: In an experienced observer, DW-MRI together with T2W imaging can significantly improve tumor identification in prostate cancer.

  12. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Cancer Biomarker: Consensus and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar R. Padhani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available On May 3, 2008, a National Cancer Institute (NCI-sponsored open consensus conference was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, during the 2008 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Meeting. Approximately 100 experts and stakeholders summarized the current understanding of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI and reached consensus on the use of DW-MRI as a cancer imaging biomarker. DW-MRI should be tested as an imaging biomarker in the context of well-defined clinical trials, by adding DW-MRI to existing NCI-sponsored trials, particularly those with tissue sampling or survival indicators. Where possible, DW-MRI measurements should be compared with histologic indices including cellularity and tissue response. There is a need for tissue equivalent diffusivity phantoms; meanwhile, simple fluid-filled phantoms should be used. Monoexponential assessments of apparent diffusion coefficient values should use two b values (> 100 and between 500 and 1000 mm2/sec depending on the application. Free breathing with multiple acquisitions is superior to complex gating techniques. Baseline patient reproducibility studies should be part of study designs. Both region of interest and histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient measurements should be obtained. Standards for measurement, analysis, and display are needed. Annotated data from validation studies (along with outcome measures should be made publicly available. Magnetic resonance imaging vendors should be engaged in this process. The NCI should establish a task force of experts (physicists, radiologists, and oncologists to plan, organize technical aspects, and conduct pilot trials. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network infrastructure may be suitable for these purposes. There is an extraordinary opportunity for DW-MRI to evolve into a clinically valuable imaging tool, potentially important for drug development.

  13. Diffusion-weighted imaging in ectopic pregnancy: ring of restriction sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durur-Karakaya, Afak; Seker, Mehmet; Durur-Subasi, İrmak

    2017-10-27

    To demonstrate the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of ectopic pregnancy (EP) and introduce the "ring of restriction" sign by discussing possible causes. Between January 2014 and January 2017, patients with EP and examined by MRI on a 3T scanner were retrospectively evaluated. MRI and DWI findings were recorded. A total of 40 patients were diagnosed with EP at our university hospital, 8 of whom (20%) were evaluated by MRI and DWI. All of them were haemodynamically and clinically stable and could be imaged adequately. Locations were ovary (n = 3, 37.5%), tuba (n = 2, 25%), Caesarean section scar (n = 2, 25%) and parauterine (n = 1, 12.5%). In all eight EPs, the gestational sac diameter was compatible with 7-9 weeks. With DWI, the gestational sac was seen as a thick-walled cyst-like structure. The thick wall showed diffusion restrictions in all patients (ring of restriction sign). DWI through its cellular and molecular evidence may contribute diagnosis of EP. Advances in knowledge: Being aware of the EP wall shows diffusion restriction (ring of restriction) avoids interpretation errors especially in appropriate clinical setting with no need for contrast material.

  14. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-weighted Imaging: Evaluation of the Differentiation of Solid Hepatic Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Luo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM–related parameters could be used to differentiate malignant from benign focal liver lesions (FLLs and to improve diagnostic efficiency. METHODS: Seventy-four patients with 75 lesions, including 51 malignant FLLs and 24 benign FLLs, underwent liver 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for routine examination sequences. IVIM diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI with 11 b values (0-800 s/mm2 was also acquired concurrently. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCtotal and IVIM-derived parameters, such as the pure diffusion coefficient (D, the pseudodiffusion coefficient (D⁎, and the perfusion fraction (f, were calculated and compared between the two groups. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to assess their diagnostic value. RESULTS: ADCtotal, D, and f were significantly lower in the malignant group than in the benign group, whereas D⁎ did not show a statistical difference. D had a larger area under the curve value (0.968 and higher sensitivity (92.30% for differentiation. CONCLUSION: IVIM is a useful method to differentiate malignant and benign FLLs. The D value showed higher efficacy to detect hepatic solid lesions.

  15. Assessment of allograft function using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupma Kaul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing a non-invasive method such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI could be used as a feasible and reproducible modality in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction. We assessed the functional status of the renal allograft by DWMRI and its applicability in assessment of graft dysfunction on all end-stage renal transplant patients who attained normal renal function on the 7 th day post-transplantation. Follow-up imaging of the recipient allograft was performed at the end of 90 and 180 days and in case of graft dysfunction. Kidney biopsies were performed to correlate with the corresponding MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC maps of the cortex and medulla were obtained by studying the DWMRI. The ADC values were significantly lower in the medulla compared with the cortex in normal donor kidneys and normally functioning transplanted kidneys, while they decreased significantly when rejection occurred. The reduction in ADC values occurred both in the cortex and in the medulla, and correlated with the degree of rejection on the kidney biopsies. The ADC values increased significantly during the recovery from rejection. We conclude that DWMRI can be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of transplant patients during acute rejection.

  16. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen; Diffusionsgewichtete Magnetresonanztomographie des Abdomens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Zech, C.J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) provides qualitative and quantitative information of tissue cellularity and the integrity of cellular membranes. Since DW-MRI can be performed without ionizing radiation exposure and contrast media application, DW-MRI is a particularly attractive tool for patients with allergies for gadolinium-based contrast agents or renal failure. Recent technical developments have made DW-MRI a robust and feasible technique for abdominal imaging. DW-MRI provides information on the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions and can also visualize treatment effects and early changes in chronic liver disease. In addition DW-MRI is a promising tool for the detection of inflammatory changes in patients with Crohn's disease. (orig.) [German] Die diffusionsgewichtete (DW-)MRT ermoeglicht die Erfassung qualitativer und quantitativer Informationen bzgl. der Gewebezellularitaet und Membranintegritaet. Die DW-MRT ist insbesondere bei Patienten mit einer Allergie gegen gadoliniumhaltige Kontrastmittel oder eingeschraenkter Nierenfunktion attraktiv, da ihr Einsatz nicht mit Strahlenexposition oder Kontrastmittelgabe verbunden ist. Durch technische Weiterentwicklungen ist die robuste Anwendung der DW-MRI in der Bildgebung des Abdomens seit einiger Zeit moeglich geworden. In der Leberdiagnostik lassen sich Zusatzinformationen zur Detektion und Charakterisierung von Leberlaesionen gewinnen, aber auch Therapieerfolge dokumentieren und fruehe chronische Leberveraenderungen visualisieren. Neben ihrer Rolle bei hepatologischen und onkologischen Fragestellungen erscheint der Einsatz der DW-MRT zudem bei entzuendlichen Fragestellungen wie dem Morbus Crohn sehr viel versprechend. (orig.)

  17. Transient Splenial Lesion of Corpus Callosum Associated with Antiepileptic Drug: Conventional and Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, B.; Erdogan, C.; Yildirim, N.; Gokalp, G.; Parlak, M. [Uludag Univ. Medical School, Bursa (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Transient focal lesions of splenium of corpus callosum can be seen as a component of many central nervous system diseases, including antiepileptic drug toxicity. The conventional magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the disease are characteristic and include ovoid lesions with high signal intensity at T2-weighted MRI. Limited information exists about the diffusion-weighted MRI characteristics of these lesions vanishing completely after a period of time. We examined the conventional, FLAIR, and diffusion-weighted MR images of a patient complaining of depressive mood and anxiety disorder after 1 year receiving antiepileptic medication.

  18. The effect of intravenous gadolinium-DTPA on diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ahmet Kemal; Sanli, Bayram; Karakas, Hakki Muammer; Erdem, Gulnur [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Malatya (Turkey)

    2006-07-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is usually performed before injection of intravenous paramagnetic contrast medium. Occasionally, it may be necessary to perform or to repeat DWI after such administration. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of intravenous gadodiamide (Gd [DTPA-BMA]) on DWI. DWI was performed on 88 brain lesions immediately before, immediately after, and 5-10 min following the end of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd [DTPA-BMA] administration. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of the lesions, and the SNRs of normal brain tissue were calculated on b=0 s/mm{sup 2} and b=1,000 s/mm{sup 2} DW images. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the lesions were measured on ADC maps. A paired t-test was used to determine the significance of differences between the values before and after administration of contrast medium. The lesions consisted of 23 intraaxial and 11 extraaxial masses, 19 ischemic strokes, 15 intracranial hemorrhages and 20 demyelinating lesions. Images before and after contrast administration were not significantly different regarding SNRs and CNRs on DWI. This statement was also true for strongly enhanced lesions. However, ADC values significantly decreased after contrast medium injection on early post-contrast DWI in normal brain tissue (1%, P<0.049) and (3%, P<0.008) in lesions. By contrast, on late images, ADC values were normalized. Contrast medium injection had significant and time-dependent effects on ADC values. Therefore, only pre-contrast and late DW images should be used in quantitative ADC studies. (orig.)

  19. Respiratory syncytial virus-related encephalitis: magnetic resonance imaging findings with diffusion-weighted study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Arim; Suh, Sang-il; Seol, Hae-Young [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gyu-Ri; Lee, Nam-Joon [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Baik-Lin [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common pathogen causing acute respiratory infection in children. Herein, we describe the incidence and clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of RSV-related encephalitis, a major neurological complication of RSV infection. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records and imaging findings of the patients over the past 7 years who are admitted to our medical center and are tested positive for RSV-RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. In total, 3,856 patients were diagnosed with RSV bronchiolitis, and 28 of them underwent brain MRI for the evaluation of neurologic symptoms; 8 of these 28 patients had positive imaging findings. Five of these 8 patients were excluded because of non-RSV-related pathologies, such as subdural hemorrhage, brain volume loss due to status epilepticus, periventricular leukomalacia, preexisting ventriculomegaly, and hypoxic brain injury. The incidence of RSV-related encephalitis was as follows: 3/3,856 (0.08 %) of the patients are positive for RSV RNA, 3/28 (10.7 %) of the patient underwent brain MRI for neurological symptom, and 3/8 (37.5 %) of patients revealed abnormal MR findings. The imaging findings were suggestive of patterns of rhombenmesencephalitis, encephalitis with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and limbic encephalitis. They demonstrated no diffusion abnormality on diffusion-weighted image and symptom improvement on the follow-up study. Encephalitis with RSV bronchiolitis occurs rarely. However, on brain MRI performed upon suspicion of neurologic involvement, RSV encephalitis is not infrequently observed among the abnormal MR findings and may mimic other viral and limbic encephalitis. Physicians should be aware of this entity to ensure proper diagnosis and neurologic care of RSV-positive patients. (orig.)

  20. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  1. Assessment of the link between quantitative biexponential diffusion-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MRI in the liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Kappert, Peter; Sijens, Paul E.

    Purpose: To investigate if intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) modeled diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can be linked to contrast-enhanced (CE-)MRI in liver parenchyma and liver lesions. Methods: Twenty-five patients underwent IVIM-DWI followed by multiphase CE-MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA (n = 20) or

  2. Quantitative evaluation of brain involvement in ataxia telangiectasia by diffusion weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ahmet Kemal [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Malatya 44280 (Turkey); Karakas, Hakki Muammer [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Malatya 44280 (Turkey)]. E-mail: hkarakas@inonu.edu.tr; Firat, Yezdan [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Malatya (Turkey); Yakinci, Cengiz [Inonu University Medical Faculty, Turgut Ozal Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Malatya (Turkey)

    2005-11-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in diagnosing ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and to investigate the spatial distribution of cerebral microstructural changes caused by the disease. Methods: Six AT patients (9-13 years) and nine healthy control subjects were examined on 1.5 T scanner. In addition to conventional MR images, DWI were performed with a fat suppressed, multishot spin echo EPI sequence using B values of 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}. Mean ADC values were measured from 16 different supra and infratentorial location. The difference between controls and AT patients regarding ADC values, and the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of them in discrimination were analyzed with t-tests, logistic regression analysis, ANOVA and ROC curves. Results: Conventional images of the controls were normal. In AT patients, the only conventional MR abnormality was cerebellar atrophy. The difference between both groups regarding mean ADC values was not significant for any of the cerebral structures. In contrary to cerebrum, cerebellar mean ADC values of patients and controls were statistically different (p < 0.011-0.0001). Patients and controls were classified with 100% accuracy using ADC values of cerebellar white matter and cortex together (p < 0.016). The cut-off ADC value (0.699 mm{sup 2}/s) for middle cerebellar cortex had produced highest (100%) sensitivity and specificity. There was a difference between superior, middle and inferior cerebellar cortex regarding ADC values (p < 0.026). Superior cerebellar cortex (0.987 {+-} 0.1956 mm{sup 2}/s) had higher ADC values than the middle and inferior cerebellar cortex. Conclusion: DWI provides a supplementary and objective imaging finding in AT. This finding is highly accurate in the radiological discrimination of healthy subjects and AT. Our findings also implicate that AT causes a diffuse atrophy and mostly affects superior part of the cortex.

  3. Added value of diffusion weighted imaging in pediatric central nervous system embryonal tumors surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Domenico; Severino, Mariasavina; Nozza, Paolo; Cama, Armando; Ravegnani, Marcello; D'Apolito, Gabriella; Raso, Alessandro; Milanaccio, Claudia; da Costa Leite, Claudia; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Rossi, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has an established role in primary CNS embryonal tumor (ET) characterization; however, its diagnostic utility in detecting relapse has never been determined. We aimed to compare DWI and conventional MRI sensitivity in CNS ET recurrence detection, and to evaluate the DWI properties of contrast-enhancing radiation induced lesions (RIL). Fifty-six patients with CNS ET (25 with disease relapse, 6 with RIL and 25 with neither disease relapse nor RIL) were retrospectively evaluated with DWI, conventional MRI (including both T2/FLAIR and post-contrast images), or contrast-enhanced MR imaging (CE-MRI) alone. MRI studies were independently reviewed by two neuroradiologists for detection and localization of potential brain relapses. Sensitivity for focal relapse detection was calculated for each image set on a lesion-by-lesion basis. A descriptive per subject analysis was also performed. Evaluation of follow-up MRI studies served as standard of reference. Focal recurrence detection sensitivity of DWI (96%) was significantly higher than conventional MRI (77%) and CE-MRI alone (51%) (p=0.0003 and p<0.0001). On per subject analysis there were not missed diagnoses for DWI. At the time of DWI relapse detection, conventional MRI missed 2 diagnoses, and CE-MRI 8. Analysis of medulloblastoma relapses revealed that DWI identified a higher number of focal lesions than CE-MRI in subjects with classic variant. All but one RIL did not show restricted diffusion. In conclusion, DWI is a valuable complementary technique allowing for improved detection of focal relapse in CNS ET patients, particularly in children with classic medulloblastoma, and may assist in differentiating recurrence from RIL. PMID:28947980

  4. Clinical-radiological-pathological correlation of cavernous sinus hemangioma: Incremental value of diffusion-weighted imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Abhishek; Rao, Vedula Rajni Kanth; Anantaram, Gudipati; Polnaya, Ashwin M; Desai, Sandeep; Desai, Paresh; Vadapalli, Rammohan; Panigrahi, Manas

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pathological features of these lesions and asses the incremental value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in diagnosing them. METHODS Fifteen consecutive patients (11 females and 4 males; mean age 40.93 years; age range 13-63 years) with cavernous sinus hemangiomas (CSH) who underwent examination between November 2008 and May 2016 were included for the analysis. MRI, clinical and surgical findings of each patient was retrospectively reviewed. DWI were also analysed and mean-apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was calculated. Eleven patients underwent surgical removal of the lesion and 2 patients had biopsy only. Diagnosis of CSH was confirmed histologically in 13 patients. RESULTS Eleven patients (73%) presented with headaches and 10 (66%) had cranial nerve involvement. Extra cavernous sinus extension was noted in 14 (94%). Surgery was performed in 13 (87%) and post-operative radiation was given to 4 (28%) patients. Thirteen patients remained asymptomatic on follow up. Three conspicuous imaging features were highly suggestive of the diagnosis: Lack of diffusion restriction (100%), homogeneous hyperintensity on T2 weighted image sequences (93.3%) and intense post-contrast enhancement (100%). The mean ADC was 1.82 × 10-3 ± 0.2186 cm2/s. CONCLUSION T1-weighted hypointensity with homogeneous hyperintensity on T2-weighted sequences, intense enhancement and absence of hemosiderin within the lesion on GRE sequence favour the diagnosis. Facilitated diffusion on DWI differentiates CSH from other solid cavernous sinus lesions and significantly improves the diagnostic accuracy, a critical factor for planning surgery. PMID:28932362

  5. Clinico-radiological features of subarachnoid hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images in patients with meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaguchi, T., E-mail: madarafuebuki@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Sakurai, K.; Hara, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Muto, M. [Department of Radiology, Okazaki City Hospital, Okazaki, Aichi (Japan); Nakagawa, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Tohyama, J. [Department of Radiology, Toyota-kai Medical Corporation Kariya Toyota General Hospital, Kariya, Aichi (Japan); Oguri, T. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Mitake, S. [Department of Neurology, Tosei General Hospital, Seto-shi, Aichi (Japan); Maeda, M. [Department of Radiology, Mie University School of Medicine, Tsu, Mie (Japan); Matsukawa, N.; Ojika, K. [Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shibamoto, Y. [Department of Radiology, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and radiological features of meningitis with subarachnoid diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensity. Materials and methods: The clinical features, laboratory data, and radiological findings, including the number and distribution of subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions and other radiological abnormalities, of 18 patients seen at five institutions were evaluated. Results: The patients consisted of eight males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from 4 months to 82 years (median 65 years). Causative organisms were bacteria in 15 patients, including Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Listeria monocytogenes. The remaining three were fungal meningitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans. Subarachnoid DWI hyperintense lesions were multiple in 16 of the 18 cases (89%) and predominantly distributed around the frontal lobe in 16 of the 18 cases (89%). In addition to subarachnoid abnormality, subdural empyema, cerebral infarction, and intraventricular empyema were found in 50, 39, and 39%, respectively. Compared with paediatric patients, adult patients with bacterial meningitis tended to have poor prognoses (7/10 versus 1/5; p = 0.1). Conclusion: Both bacterial and fungal meningitis could cause subarachnoid hyperintensity on DWI, predominantly around the frontal lobe. This finding is often associated with poor prognosis in adult bacterial meningitis.

  6. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  7. Utility of diffusion-weighted imaging in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Aydin, Sibel; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Cimilli, Tan [Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey); Kilickesmez, Ozgur [Yeditepe University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-04-15

    To evaluate the value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. 119 patients with acute appendicitis and 50 controls were enrolled in this prospective study. DWI was obtained with b factors 0, 500 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} and were assessed with a visual scoring system by two radiologists followed by quantitative evaluation of the DW images and ADC maps. Histopathology revealed appendicitis in 79/92 patients (78%) who had undergone surgery. On visual evaluation, except for one patient with histopathologically proven appendicitis all inflamed appendixes were hyperintense on DWI (98.7%). Quantitative evaluation with DW signal intensities and ADC values revealed a significant difference with normal and inflamed appendixes (p < 0.001). The best discriminative parameter was signal intensity (b 500). With a cut-off value of 56 for the signal intensity the ratio had a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 97%. The cut-off ADC value at 1.66 mm{sup 2}/s had a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 99%. DWI is a valuable technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis with both qualitative and quantitative evaluation. DWI increases the conspicuity of the inflamed appendix. We recommend using DWI to diagnose acute appendicitis. (orig.)

  8. Bright intracranial lesions on diffusion-weighted images: a pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Dae Seob [Gyeongsang National University College of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a MR sequence that is used to evaluate the rate of microscopic water diffusion within the tissues. The ability to measure the rate of water diffusion is important because this is frequently altered in various disease processes. Generally, the lesions with restricted water diffusion show bright intensity on DWI, but the lesions without restricted water diffusion can also show bright intensity on DWI, which is called the 'T2 shine through effect'. With DWI, we can sensitively detect hyperacute infarction (within 6 hours after symptom onset), and this is difficult to detect with using CT and the conventional MR sequenced. The acute and subacute lesions of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and carbon monoxide intoxication also show bright intensity on the DWI. The other diseases that can show bright intensity on the DWI include acute and subacute diffuse axonal injury lesion, hyperacute and late subacute hematomas, cerebral abscess, subdural empyema, acute herpes encephalitis, various tumors and such degenerative and demyelinating diseases as multiple sclerosis, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, Wilson's disease and Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  9. The role of diffusion weighted MR imaging for differentiation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, T; Bozgeyik, Z; Ozturk, F; Burakgazi, G; Akyol, M; Coskun, S; Ozkan, Y; Ogur, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) for differentation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Fifty patients (27 Graves diseases and 23 Hashimoto thyroiditis) and twenty healthy volunteers were examined using T1, T2 and DWMRI. The patients were diagnosed on the basis of physical findings and the results of thyroid function tests and serological tests. Circular ROIs were positioned on the bilateral thyroid lobes and isthmus. All measurements were repeated three different b values including 100, 600 and 1000 s/mm2 in all cases. ADC (Apparent diffusion coefficient) maps were calculated automatically with the MR system. Mean ADC values were 2.93 × 10-3, 1.97 × 10-3 and 1.62 × 10-3 mm2/s in the healthy volunteers; 3.47 × 10-3, 2.25 × 10-3 and 1.64 × 10-3 mm2/s in Graves' disease; 2.53 × 10-3, 1.76 × 10-3, 1.28 × 10-3 mm2/s in Hashimoto thyroiditis for b100, b600 and b1000, respectively. The ADC values of the Graves diseases were higher than healty volunteers and Hashimoto thyroiditis. ADC values were statistically significant for differentation between Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease all b values (p Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease.

  10. High b-value diffusion-weighted imaging in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in HIV patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godi, Claudia [San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Department, Milan (Italy); The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); De Vita, Enrico; Davagnanam, Indran [The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Tombetti, Enrico [Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan (Italy); Haddow, Lewis [University College London, Centre for Sexual Health and HIV Research, Research Department of Infection and Population Health, London (United Kingdom); Jaeger, Hans Rolf [The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); University College Hospital, Centre of Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    An ill-defined hyperintense edge and hypointense core on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is typical of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). We aimed to investigate whether a b-value of 3,000 s/mm{sup 2} (b3000) can improve visualisation of PML, or provide different structural information compared to 1,000 s/mm{sup 2} (b1000). We retrospectively identified HIV-positive patients with confirmed PML studied under a clinical protocol including both b1000 and b3000 DWI. The rim and core of each PML lesion and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) were outlined on trace-weighted DWI. Signal intensities, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and volumes were measured and compared between b1000 and b3000. Nine lesions from seven patients were analysed. The rim and core were better visualised on b3000, with higher signal of the rim and lower signal of the core compared to NAWM. The hyperintense rim had non-restricted average ADCs, but included foci of low ADC on both b3000 and b1000. Despite similar total lesion volumes, b3000 displayed significantly larger core and smaller rim volumes than b1000. b3000 improves visualisation of this important PML hallmark. Moreover, b3000 partly reclassifies tissue from rim into core, and might provide potentially more accurate biomarkers of PML activity and prognosis. (orig.)

  11. Is diffusion-weighted imaging useful in grading and differentiating histopathological subtypes of meningiomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanverdi, S. Eser, E-mail: esersanverdi@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Ozgen, Burce, E-mail: burcem@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Oguz, Kader K., E-mail: karlioguz@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Mut, Melike, E-mail: melikem@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery (Turkey); Dolgun, Anil, E-mail: anilbarak@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Biostatistics (Turkey); Soylemezoglu, Figen, E-mail: figensoylemez@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pathology (Turkey); Cila, Aysenur, E-mail: acila@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Meningiomas are mostly benign, however atypical or malignant subtypes with more aggressive clinical course and higher recurrence rates can also be seen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether histopathological subtypes of meningiomas could be assessed preoperatively using apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Materials and methods: Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging of 177 adult patients with pathologically proven meningiomas were retrospectively evaluated. Tumor size and the degree of associated edema were noted. The signal intensity of the lesions on DW imaging was evaluated and graded. Mean ADC values were obtained as the mean of measurements from three regions of interests within the mass. ADC ratios of meningioma/contralateral normal appearing subcortical parietal white matter were also calculated. Results: The histopathological analysis revealed 135 benign, 37 atypical and 5 malignant lesions. With classification according to the subtype, the mean ADC values and ratios of benign meningiomas were as 0.99 ± 0.12 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s and 1.22 ± 0.07, respectively. ADC values for atypical and malignant groups were both 0.84 ± 0.1 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. The ADC ratios were 1.05 ± 0.1 and 0.96 ± 0.2 for atypical and malignant subtypes, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean ADC ratios of the three subtypes (ANOVA test; P ≥ 0.05). Gender, age of the patients and tumor size showed no statistically significant difference between the different histological groups. Conclusion: DW MR imaging was not found to have any additional value in determining histological behaviour nor in differentiating histopathological subtypes of meningiomas.

  12. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain in intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthurs, O J; Rega, A; Guimiot, F; Belarbi, N; Rosenblatt, J; Biran, V; Elmaleh, M; Sebag, G; Alison, M

    2017-07-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is a sensitive method for assessing brain maturation and detecting brain lesions, providing apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values as a measure of water diffusion. Abnormal ADC values are seen in ischemic brain lesions, such as those associated with acute or chronic hypoxia. The aim of this study was to assess whether ADC values in the fetal brain were different in fetuses with severe intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) compared with normal controls. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with single-shot axial DWI (b = 0 and b = 700 s/mm2 ) was performed in 30 fetuses with severe IUGR (estimated fetal weight IUGR fetuses and controls. There was no difference in gestational age at MRI between IUGR and control fetuses (IUGR, 30.2 ± 1.6 weeks vs controls, 30.7 ± 1.4 weeks). Fetal brain morphology and signals were normal in all fetuses. Brain dimensions (supratentorial ± infratentorial) were decreased (Z-score, IUGR fetuses. Compared with controls, IUGR fetuses had significantly lower ADC values in frontal white matter (1.97 ± 0.23 vs 2.17 ± 0.22 × 10-3 mm2 /s; P IUGR fetuses had a lower frontal-occipital ADC ratio than did normal fetuses (1.00 ± 0.11 vs 1.08 ± 0.05; P = 0.003). ADC values in IUGR fetuses were significantly lower than in normal controls in the frontal white matter, thalami, centrum semiovale and pons, suggesting abnormal maturation in these regions. However, the prognostic value of these ADC changes is still unknown. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sandwich sign of Borrmann type 4 gastric cancer on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao-Peng, E-mail: zxp@bjcancer.org [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Tang, Lei; Sun, Ying-Shi [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Li, Zi-Yu; Ji, Jia-Fu [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Li, Xiao-Ting [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Radiology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Liu, Yi-Qiang [Department of Pathology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China); Wu, Qi [Department of Endoscopy, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, No. 52 Fu Cheng Road, Hai Dian District, Beijing 100142 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To assess the appearance of Borrmann type 4 (BT-4) gastric cancer on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) and to investigate the potential of qualitative and quantitative DW images analysis to differentiate BT-4 gastric cancer from poorly distended normal stomach wall. Materials and methods: DWI was performed on 23 patients with BT-4 gastric cancer and 23 healthy volunteers. The signal characteristics and correlated histopathological basis of the cancers on DWI were investigated. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of cancer were compared between DWI and T1WI/T2WI{sub .} The thickness and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of cancer and normal stomach wall were compared. Results: All of the gastric cancers displayed hyperintensity compared to the nearby normal gastric wall on DWI. A three-layer sandwich sign that demonstrated high signal intensity in the inner and outer layer, and low signal intensity in the intermediate layer was observed in 69.6% of cancers on DWI. The low signal intensity represents the muscularis propria through the comparison with pathology, and it is postulated that scattering distribution of the cancer cells in this layer causes less damage and subsequently less restriction of water movement, which causes the low signal intensity on DWI. The CNR obtained with DWI was higher than that with T1WI and T2WI (P < 0.001). The mean ADC value of BT-4 gastric cancer was significantly lower than the poorly distended normal stomach wall (1.12 ± 0.23 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 1.93 ± 0.22 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, P < 0.01). Conclusion: DWI can highlight the signals of BT-4 gastric cancer which may present a characteristic three-layer sandwich sign, and ADC values are helpful in the discrimination of gastric cancer from poorly distended stomach wall.

  14. The value of diffusion weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahyar Ghafoori

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of death and is the most common cause of cancer in elderly men. Regarding to the low accuracy of screening methods such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA, Digital Rectal Examination (DRE and trans rectal ultrasound (TRUS in detection and localization of tumor, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI attracted many attentions in the past years. DWI reveals micro-molecular diffusion, which is the Brownian motion of the spins in biologic tissues. This technique can delineate pathologic lesions with high tissue contrast against generally suppressed background signal. In this paper, the value of DWI in detection of prostate cancer is studied.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the studied population are suspicious patients to prostate cancer based on high Prostatic Specific Antigen level or abnormal Digital Rectal Examination who refered for prostate biopsy to radiology department of Hazrat-e- Rasoul Hospital during the year 2011. The results of DWI are compared to biopsy results for all patients.Results: Eighty five patients are selected. The DWI sensitivity in detecting of prostate cancer is 100%, specificity 97.1% and positive and negative predictive values are 89.5% and 100%, respectively. The results showed that if DWI reports the prostate cancer as negative, the result was highly reliable and if it reports as positive, although the report was not 100% reliable, but it still had high reliability, more than 90%.Conclusion: DWI had high accuracy in detecting prostate cancer for patients with cancer. Also the accuracy of this method for patients without prostate cancer was acceptable compared to the other common methods.

  15. Diffusion-weighted perinatal postmortem magnetic resonance imaging as a marker of postmortem interval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics, London (United Kingdom); Price, Gemma C. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Carmichael, David W. [UCL Institute of Child Health, Imaging and Biophysics, London (United Kingdom); Jones, Rod; Norman, Wendy; Taylor, Andrew M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Centre for Cardiovascular Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate perinatal body organ apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values at postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (PMMR) in order to evaluate postmortem changes. Postmortem diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) of the thorax and abdomen were performed with diffusion gradient values b = 0, 500, and 1000 s/mm{sup 2} on 15 foetal and childhood cases (mean 33.3 ± 7.8 weeks gestation) compared to 44 live infants (mean age 75.5 ± 53.4 days). Mean ADC values were calculated from regions of interest (ROIs) for the lungs, liver, spleen and renal cortex, compared to normative live infantile body ADC values of similar gestational age. Mean ADC values were significantly lower in postmortem cases than in normal controls for liver (0.88 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s ± SD 0.39 vs. 1.13 ± 0.13; p < 0.05) and renal cortex (0.85 ± 0.26 vs. 1.19 ± 0.13; p < 0.05) but not spleen or muscle. Mean lung ADC values were significantly higher than normal controls (1.06 ± 0.18 vs. 0 ± 0; p < 0.001), and there was a significant correlation between postmortem interval and lung ADC (R{sup 2} = 0.55). Lung PMMR ADC values are related to postmortem interval, making them a potential marker of time since death. Further research is needed to understand the organ-specific changes which occur in the postmortem period. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of salivary glands with gustatory stimulation - Comparison before and after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yunyan; Gu, Yajia; Peng, Weijun; Mao, Jian; Lei, Yue; Shen, Xigang [Dept. of Radiology, Fudan Univ. Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Dept. of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China); Ou, Dan; He, Xiayun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Fudan Univ. Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Dept. of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan Univ., Shanghai (China)

    2013-10-15

    Background: Xerostomia is the most prominent complication in patients with head and neck carcinoma after radiotherapy (RT). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) with gustatory stimulation may contribute to the evaluation of salivary gland function. Purpose: To investigate the value of DWI for quantifying physiological changes of the parotid gland during gustatory stimulation in patients before and after RT. Material and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 28 consecutive patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma before and after RT and clinical xerostomia was also assessed. A DWI sequence was performed once at rest and continually repeated seven times during stimulation with ascorbic acid. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for parotid glands at different time points and the range of increase with stimulation were calculated. Paired two-tailed Student t tests were used to compare the ADC values before and after stimulation, and before and after RT. Results: Before RT, the ADC showed an initial increase (P<0.001) and then fluctuated during stimulation. After RT, as the clinical xerostomia changed from Grade 0 to Grade 2, the mean ADC at rest increased compared with the pre-RT value (P<0.001). A similar response to stimulation was observed, but the range of increase between the maximum ADC during stimulation and the baseline value at rest was higher post-RT than pre-RT (P=0.022). The minimum ADC during stimulation was higher than the baseline value post-RT (P=0.028), but there was no difference pre-RT (P=0.603). Conclusion: DWI combined with gustatory stimulation seems to display the physiological changes of the parotid gland following RT and may be a potential tool for non-invasively assessing salivary gland function.

  17. Inter-individual, inter-vendor comparison of diffusion-weighted MR imaging of upper abdominal organs at 3.0 tesla with an emphasis on the value of normalization with the spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Soo; Hwang, Seung Bae; Chung, Gyung Ho; Jin, Gong Yong [Dept. of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of upper abdominal organs with 2 different 3.0 tesla MR systems and to investigate the usefulness of normalization using the spleen. Forty-one patients were enrolled in this prospective study, of which, 35 patients (M:F, 27:8; mean age ± standard deviation, 62.3 ± 12.3 years) were finally analyzed. In addition to the routine liver MR protocol, single-shot spin-echo echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging using b values of 0, 50, 400, and 800 s/mm{sup 2} in 2 different MR systems was performed. ADC values of the liver, spleen, pancreas, kidney and liver lesion (if present) were measured and analyzed. ADC values of the spleen were used for normalization. The Pearson correlation, Spearman correlation, paired sample t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test and Bland-Altman method were used for statistical analysis. For all anatomical regions and liver lesions, both non-normalized and normalized ADC values from 2 different MR systems showed significant correlations (r = 0.5196-0.8488). Non-normalized ADC values of both MR systems differed significantly in all anatomical regions and liver lesions (p < 0.001). However, the normalized ADC of all anatomical regions and liver lesions did not differ significantly (p = 0.065-0.661), with significantly lower coefficient of variance than that of non-normalized ADC (p < 0.009). Normalization of the abdominal ADC values using the spleen as a reference organ reduces differences between different MR systems, and could facilitate consistent use of ADC as an imaging biomarker for multi-center or longitudinal studies.

  18. Clinical application of diffusion-weighted imaging for preoperative differentiation between uterine leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenichiro; Yuasa, Noriaki; Fujita, Miri; Fukushima, Yasuyoshi

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the clinical usefulness of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value for preoperative differentiation between uterine leiomyoma and leiomyosarcoma. This study included 10 lesions from 5 patients with pelvic leiomyosarcoma and 83 leiomyoma nodules from 76 patients, as identified by postoperative pathological examination (1 autopsy). All magnetic resonance examinations were performed with a 1.5-T superconductive magnetic resonance unit. The leiomyosarcoma lesions were readily apparent via DWI, presenting as an intermediate- to high-intensity area in the uterine wall. All low-intensity areas presented as leiomyoma nodules. The mean ADC value for the 10 leiomyosarcoma lesions was 0.791 ± 0.145 (×10(-3) mm(2)/s), significantly lower than that of the leiomyoma nodules that presented with intermediate-intensity areas, 1.472 ± 0.285 (×10(-3) mm(2)/s) (n = 41) (P < .001), and high-intensity areas (1.100 ± 0.343) (n = 9) (P = .03). Additionally, in this study, the highest ADC value for a leiomyosarcoma was 1.095, with an intermediate DWI intensity. Based on these results, we classified the patients into 2 groups: low-risk group (barely any leiomyosarcoma risk) and high-risk group. Analyses comparing the 2 groups yielded the following: sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 94.0%; positive predictive value, 66.7%; negative predictive value, 100%; and accuracy, 94.6%. We suggest that this modality using a combination of signal intensity on DWI and ADC value is very effective, simple, and easy to apply clinically for differential diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma and myoma. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease: A preliminary clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qinghai; Li, Jinning; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Minming [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Yan, Fuhua, E-mail: zemylife@163.com [Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Objective: To investigate the clinical potential of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in assessing renal pathology of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: Seventy-one CKD patients and twelve healthy volunteers were examined using DWI with prospective acquisition correction. Renal biopsy specimens from the CKD patients were scored based on the severity of renal pathology and to confirm pathology type. CKD patients were divided into three groups according to pathology scores: mild, moderate, or severe. The association between renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and pathology scores was investigated using Pearson's correlation and single factor analysis of variance. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore associations between renal ADC values and pathology score, glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine, and age. The Kruskal–Wallis H test was conducted to compare ADC values and pathology type. Results: Renal ADC values correlated negatively with pathology scores (r = −0.633, P < 0.001). The ADC values among the four groups (mild, moderate, severe impairment, and controls) were significantly different (F = 19.512, P < 0.001). However, when patients were stratified by pathology type, no significant differences were found in ADC values among these groups (χ{sup 2} = 9.929, P = 0.270). Further multiple linear regression analysis showed that only the pathology score and ADC values were related (t = −4.586, P = 0.000). Conclusions: DWI has clinical potential in assessing the severity of renal pathology in CKD and shows promise as a non-invasive and effective technique to guide therapy and follow-up.

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the kidneys in haemolytic uraemic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Jochen [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Wenzel, Ulrich [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, III. Department of Internal Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Galler, Stephanie; Schoennagel, Bjoern P.; Bannas, Peter; Yamamura, Jin; Groth, Michael; Adam, Gerhard [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Busch, Jasmin D.; Tozakidou, Magdalini [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Petersen, Kay U. [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Section for Addiction Research and Therapy, Tuebingen (Germany); Joekel, Michaela [Siemens AG Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Habermann, Christian R. [Katholisches Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    To evaluate the kidneys of patients with haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and Doppler ultrasound (US) compared with healthy controls. Fifteen patients (mean age 33.3 years; three male; 12 female) with diarrhoea-positive HUS and 15 healthy volunteers were prospectively evaluated with DWI and Doppler US. A total apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC{sub TOT}), and ADCs predominantly reflecting microperfusion (ADC{sub LOW}) and diffusion (ADC{sub HIGH}) were calculated. Doppler US evaluated renal vascularity and flow. When compared with controls, kidneys affected by HUS showed reduced cortical ADC values (ADC{sub TOT} 1.79±0.22 vs. 2.04±0.1x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, P 0.001), resulting in either low corticomedullary differences (11/15 patients) or an inverted corticomedullary pattern (4/15 patients). Reduction of cortical ADC values was associated with a decrease of cortical vascularity on Doppler US (ADC{sub TOT}, P<0.001; ADC{sub LOW}, P 0.047). Kidneys with complete absence of the cortical vasculature on Doppler US (four patients) also demonstrated limited diffusion (ADC{sub HIGH}, P 0.002). Low glomerular filtration rate, requirement for haemodialysis during hospitalization, and longer duration of haemodialysis were associated with decreased cortical diffusivity (ADC{sub TOT:} P 0.04, 0.007, and <0.001, respectively). DWI shows qualitative and quantitative abnormalities in kidneys affected by HUS, thereby extending the non-invasive assessment of renal parenchymal damage. (orig.)

  1. Intraparenchymal epidermoid cysts in the brain: diagnostic value of MR diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, X.-Y. [Medical Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Hu, C.-H. [Imaging Center, Soochow University (China)], E-mail: wpdrhxy@hotmail.com; Fang, X.-M.; Cui, L.; Zhang, Q.-H. [Medical Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2008-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the value of magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) maps in the diagnosis of intraparenchymal epidermoid cysts (ECs). Materials and methods: Six cases of histopathologically proven intraparenchymal ECs were studied. All patients were examined with conventional MR (T1WI, T2WI, contrast-enhanced T1WI) and DWI sequences. Along with the mean ADC values (mADC) of the ECs, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and grey matter (GM) were measured. Qualitative and quantitative assessments, as well as MRI findings, were retrospectively analysed using a double blind method by three radiologists in consensus. Results: Four lesions were located in the cerebellum, among them, one was accompanied by an arachnoid cyst; one huge lesion crossed the parenchyma of the frontal and temporal lobes; the other was located in the left temporal lobe. Two lesions had a homogeneous CSF-like intensity on both T1WI and T2WI. The other four were of mixed-intensity on both T1WI and T2WI. All lesions were strikingly hyperintense on DWI, and iso- or slightly hypointense on ADC (relative to the brain). The mADCs of the ECs were significantly higher than that of GM, but significantly lower than that of CSF. Three cases (3/6) were accurately diagnosed using conventional MR sequences without DWI, but in the remaining three cases, correct diagnosis could only be made with help of DWI. Conclusion: DWI sequences can facilitate the diagnosis of intraparenchymal ECs, thus alerting surgeons of the risk of chemical meningitis at surgery. The MR findings of intraparenchymal ECs are basically as the same as those of extracerebral ECs, but the former is likely to have a mixed signal. The hyperintense signal of ECs on DWI is probably caused by the T2 shine-through effect in tumour tissue.

  2. Diffusion weighted imaging in patients with rectal cancer: Comparison between Gaussian and non-Gaussian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikis, Georgios C; Marias, Kostas; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Nikiforaki, Katerina; van Heeswijk, Miriam M; Bakers, Frans C H; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Papanikolaou, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of four diffusion models, including mono and bi-exponential both Gaussian and non-Gaussian models, in diffusion weighted imaging of rectal cancer. Nineteen patients with rectal adenocarcinoma underwent MRI examination of the rectum before chemoradiation therapy including a 7 b-value diffusion sequence (0, 25, 50, 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 s/mm2) at a 1.5T scanner. Four different diffusion models including mono- and bi-exponential Gaussian (MG and BG) and non-Gaussian (MNG and BNG) were applied on whole tumor volumes of interest. Two different statistical criteria were recruited to assess their fitting performance, including the adjusted-R2 and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). To decide which model better characterizes rectal cancer, model selection was relied on Akaike Information Criteria (AIC) and F-ratio. All candidate models achieved a good fitting performance with the two most complex models, the BG and the BNG, exhibiting the best fitting performance. However, both criteria for model selection indicated that the MG model performed better than any other model. In particular, using AIC Weights and F-ratio, the pixel-based analysis demonstrated that tumor areas better described by the simplest MG model in an average area of 53% and 33%, respectively. Non-Gaussian behavior was illustrated in an average area of 37% according to the F-ratio, and 7% using AIC Weights. However, the distributions of the pixels best fitted by each of the four models suggest that MG failed to perform better than any other model in all patients, and the overall tumor area. No single diffusion model evaluated herein could accurately describe rectal tumours. These findings probably can be explained on the basis of increased tumour heterogeneity, where areas with high vascularity could be fitted better with bi-exponential models, and areas with necrosis would mostly follow mono-exponential behavior.

  3. Diffusion weighted MR imaging in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis; Diffusionsgewichtete Magnetresonanztomographie in der Diagnostik der Encephalitis disseminata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Schweigerer-Schroeter, G.; Wellnitz, J.; Wuerstle, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft Augsburg (Germany)

    2000-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is one of the best methods in diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, particularly in disclosure of active demyelinating lesions. Aim of this study was to compare diffusion weighted imaging and contrast enhancement in the detection of active lesions. A MR study with a contrast enhanced T1-weighted pulse sequence with magnetization transfer presaturation and a diffusion weighted echoplanar pulse sequence (b=1000 s/mm{sup 2}) was performed in 17 patients (11 women, 6 men) with multiple sclerosis. 29 of 239 lesions showed an increased signal intensity in diffusion weighted imaging, 24 lesions a contrast enhancement, but only 16 lesions were visible in both pulse sequences. In patients with short clinical symptomatology significant more lesions could be detected with diffusion-weighted pulse sequence in comparison to patients with long standing symptomatology showing more lesions with contrast enhancement. Hence it is likely, that both pulse sequences detect different histopathologic changes. The early detection of demyelinating lesions in diffusion weighted imaging is attributed to the extracellular edema, however the contrast enhancement is caused by a blood brain barrier abnormality. It can be expected that diffusion weighted imaging will have a high impact on imaging of multiple sclerosis not only in therapeutic trials, but also in clinical routine. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie ist eine der wichtigsten Untersuchungsmethoden in der Diagnostik der Encephalitis disseminata, insbesondere im Nachweis aktiver Entmarkungsherde. Ziel der Untersuchung war es, diffusionsgewichtete und kontrastverstaerkte Untersuchungen bezueglich der Erkennung aktiver Laesionen zu vergleichen. Bei 17 Patienten (11 Frauen, 6 Maenner) mit bekannter Encephalitis disseminata wurden sowohl eine kontrastverstaerkte T1-gewichtete Sequenz mit Magnetization-Transfer-Saettigung als auch eine diffusionsgewichtete Echoplanar-Sequenz (b=1000 s/mm{sup 2

  4. Superselective intra-arterial fibrinolysis for acute cerebral ischemic infarct : usefulness of diffusion weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Woo Mok; Lee, Se Jin [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Kyongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Sun [Kyungpook National Univ. School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, Gun Soo; Bae, Won Kyong [Chunan Hospital, Soonchunhang Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of superselective intra-arterial fibrinolysis for acute cerebral stroke and the usefulness of pre-and postfibrinolysis diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). In 41 patients with acute ischemic stroke whose treatment involved intra-arterial fibrinolysis, the occlusion site, degree of recanalization, and clinical results were compared. In 12 patients, diffusion weighted MRI was performed before fibrinolysis, and eight of these also underwent diffusion-weighted MRI after fibrinolysis. Using diffusion-weighted MRI, neurological outcomes were compared with signal intensity ratio (SIR, or the average signal intensity within the region of interest divided by that in the contralateral, nonischemic, homologous region). Twenty patients showed complete recanalization, nine partial recanalization, and in twelve there was no recanalization. Fourteen patients (34%) improved neurologically. No relationship existed between occlusion sites, degree of recanalization, and clinical outcome. Among 12 patients who underwent DWI before fibrinolysis, complete recanalization was noted in eight. Neurological improvement was seen in four patients with low SIR(<1.55), while in four with high SIR(>1.7), neurological outcome was poor despite complete recanalization. Although superselective intra-arterial fibrinolysis for acute cerebral stroke is a good therapeutic method for recanalization, the clinical outcome can be disappointing. We therefore suggest that in cases of acute cerebral ischemic infaret, SIR-as seen on DWI-might be useful for predicting the benefits of recanalization. In such cases, further investigation of the use of DWI prior to fibrinolysis is therefore needed.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of an Intramedullary Epidermoid Cyst with Dorsal Dermal Sinus Tract in a Toddler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Fazio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose and manage a rare case of a symptomatic thoracic intramedullary congenital epidermoid cyst with associated dermal sinus in a girl. Congenital intramedullary epidermoid cysts with associated dermal sinuses are very rare occurrences and seldom present symptomatically in very young children. We present a case of a 32-month old with a draining dimpled skin lesion. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated an intramedullary epidermoid with a dorsal dermal sinus tract opening to the skin surface which was confirmed surgically. The patient was treated with debulking to prevent recurrent infection and progression of neurological symptoms. This case demonstrates the use of diffuse-weighted MRI to assist in the diagnosis and surgical management of an atypical presentation of a rare developmental abnormality, which is not well documented in the pediatric radiological literature. Failure to diagnosis may have significant neurological permanent debilitating consequences.

  6. USE OF DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR REVEALING HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN LESIONS IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shimchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents advantages of use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI for revealing hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions in neonates. The trial included 97 neonates with perinatal brain lesion who had been undergoing treatment at a resuscitation department or neonatal pathology department in the first month of life. The article shows high information value of diffusion-weighted images (DWI for diagnostics of hypoxic-ischemic lesions in comparison with regular standard modes. In the event of no structural brain lesions of neonates, pronounced increase in signal characteristics revealed by DWI indicated considerable pathophysiological alterations. Subsequently, children developed structural alterations in the form of cystic encephalomalacia with expansion of cerebrospinal fluid spaces manifested with pronounced neurological deficit. DW MRI has been offered as a method of prognosticating further neurological development of children on early stages. 

  7. Diffusion-weighted imaging helps differentiate multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica-related acute optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hailin; He, Huijin; Zhang, Fang; Sha, Yan; Tian, Guohong

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values between multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO)-related acute optic neuritis (ON) patients and predict their optic nerve atrophy of optic coherence tomography (OCT) parameters. Nineteen MS and 15 NMO-related acute ON patients who underwent a diffusion-weighted imaging sequence in 3.0 Tesla MR scanner and a follow-up OCT examination after 6 months were included. The ADC values, thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and the macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) between MS and NMO related ON were assessed. The mean ADC value of the NMO-ON, (0.691 ± 0.195[SD]) × 10-3 mm2 /s, was significantly smaller (P = 0.0133) than that of MS-ON. The mean ADC value of MS-ON, (0.879 ± 0.144) × 10-3 mm2 /s, was significantly smaller (P < 0.0001) than that of control group, (1.025 ± 0.067) × 10-3 mm2 /s. Using an ADC value smaller than 0.830 × 10-3 mm2 /s as the threshold value for differentiating MS-ON from NMO-ON patients, the highest accuracy of 76.7%, with 75.0% sensitivity and 78.3% specificity, was obtained. The ADC value measured at the acute stage of ON was correlated with the thickness of the RNFL (r = 0.441; P = 0.006) and the GCC (r = 0.526; P < 0.0001) after 6 months. The ADC value might be helpful for differentiating MS-ON from NMO-ON patients. The decreased ADC value was correlated with optic nerve atrophy on OCT. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1780-1785. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Diffusion weighted imaging and estimation of prognosis using apparent diffusion coefficient measurements in ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonen, Korcan Aysun, E-mail: aysunbalc@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, State Hospital, Eski Cami district, Hastane street, N:1, 59300, Tekirdag (Turkey); Simsek, Mehmet Masum, E-mail: radyoloji@haydapasanumune.gov.tr [Department of Radiology, Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Tibbiye street, Uskudar 34200, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: Estimation of the prognosis of infarction by using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Methods: 23 patients having acute stroke symptoms with verified infarction in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. Their MRI studies were performed between 6 and 12 h after the onset of their symptoms and were repeated on the fifth day. The infarction volumes were calculated by using DWI and the patients were divided into two groups as the ones having an expansion in the infarction area (group 1, n = 16) and the others having no expansion in the infarction area (group 2, n = 7). Quantitative ADC values were estimated. The groups were compared in terms of the ADC values on ADC maps obtained from DWI, performed during the between 6 and 12 h from the onset of the symptoms, referring to the core of the infarction (ADC{sub IC}), ischemic penumbra (ADC{sub P}) and the nonischemic parenchymal tissue (ADC{sub N}). P values < 0.05 were accepted to be statistically significant. Results: During the between 6 and 12 h mean infarction volume calculated by DWI was 23.3 cm{sup 3} for group 1 patients (ranging from 1.1 to 68.6) and this was found to be 40.3 cm{sup 3} (ranging from 1.8 to 91.5) on the fifth day. For the group 2 patients these values were found to be 42.1 cm{sup 3} (ranging from 1 to 94.7) and 41.9 (ranging from 1 to 94.7) for the same intervals respectively. A significant statistical result was failed to be demonstrated between the mean ADC{sub IC} and ADC{sub N} values (p = 0.350 and p = 0.229 respectively). However the comparison of the ADC{sub P} values between the groups was found to be highly significant (p < 0.001). When the differences between the ADC{sub P} and ADC{sub IC} and ADC{sub N} and ADC{sub P} were compared the results proved to be statistically significant (p = 0.038 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions: We believe that ADC results that would be obtained from

  9. Diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy in the characterization of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanya, K.S.; Kovoor, J.M.E.; Jayakumar, P.N.; Ravishankar, S.; Kamble, R.B. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Panicker, J.; Nagaraja, D. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, Bangalore (India)

    2007-02-15

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is usually a monophasic illness characterized by multiple lesions involving gray and white matter. Quantitative MR techniques were used to characterize and stage these lesions. Eight patients (seven males and one female; mean age 19 years, range 5 to 36 years) were studied using conventional MRI (T2- and T1-weighted and FLAIR sequences), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and MRS ratios were calculated for the lesion and for normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Three patients were imaged in the acute stage (within 7 days of the onset of neurological symptoms) and five in the subacute stage (after 7 days from the onset of symptoms). ADC values in NAWM were in the range 0.7-1.24 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 0.937 {+-} 0.17 mm/s{sup 2}). ADC values of ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.37-0.68 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 0.56 {+-} 0.16 mm/s{sup 2}) and 1.01-1.31 x 10{sup -3} mm/s{sup 2} (mean 1.24 {+-} 0.13 mm/s{sup 2}) in the subacute stage. MRS ratios were obtained for all patients. NAA/Cho ratios were in the range 1.1-3.5 (mean 1.93 {+-} 0.86) in the NAWM. NAA/Cho ratios within ADEM lesions in the acute stage were in the range 0.63-1.48 (mean 1.18 {+-} 0.48) and 0.29-0.84 (mean 0.49 {+-} 0.22) in the subacute stage. The ADC values, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the acute and subacute stages (P < 0.001, P < 0.027, P < 0.047, respectively). ADC values were significantly different between lesions in the acute (P < 0.009) and subacute stages (P < 0.005) with NAWM. In addition, NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly different between lesions in the subacute stage and NAWM (P < 0.006, P < 0.007, respectively). ADEM lesions were characterized in the acute stage by restricted diffusion and in the subacute stage by free diffusion and a decrease in NAA/Cho ratios

  10. lop-DWI: A Novel Scheme for Pre-Processing of Diffusion Weighted Images in the Gradient Direction Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Farshid eSepehrband; Jeiran eChoupan; Emmanuel eCaruyer; Nyoman Dana Kurniawan; Yaniv eGal; Tieng, Quang M.; Katie eMcMahon; Viktor eVegh; Reutens, David C.; Zhengyi eYang

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We describe and evaluate a pre-processing method based on a periodic spiral sampling of diffusion-gradient directions for high angular resolution diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. Our pre-processing method incorporates prior knowledge about the acquired diffusion-weighted signal, facilitating noise reduction. Periodic spiral sampling of gradient direction encodings results in an acquired signal in each voxel that is pseudo-periodic with characteristics that allow s...

  11. EPITHET: Positive Result After Reanalysis Using Baseline Diffusion-Weighted Imaging/Perfusion-Weighted Imaging Co-Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakane, Yoshinari; Christensen, Soren; Brekenfeld, Caspar; Ma, Henry; Churilov, Leonid; Parsons, Mark W; Levi, Christopher R; Butcher, Kenneth S; Peeters, Andre; Barber, P Alan; Bladin, Christopher F; De Silva, Deidre A; Fink, John; Kimber, Thomas E; Schultz, David W; Muir, Keith W; Tress, Brian M; Desmond, Patricia M; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A

    2011-01-01

    the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET) was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of alteplase between 3 and 6 hours after stroke onset. The primary outcome of infarct growth attenuation on MRI with alteplase in mismatch patients was negative when mismatch volumes were assessed volumetrically, without coregistration, which underestimates mismatch volumes. We hypothesized that assessing the extent of mismatch by coregistration of perfusion and diffusion MRI maps may more accurately allow the effects of alteplase vs placebo to be evaluated. patients were classified as having mismatch if perfusion-weighted imaging divided by coregistered diffusion-weighted imaging volume ratio was >1.2 and total coregistered mismatch volume was ≥ 10 mL. The primary outcome was a comparison of infarct growth in alteplase vs placebo patients with coregistered mismatch. of 99 patients with baseline diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging, coregistration of both images was possible in 95 patients. Coregistered mismatch was present in 93% (88/95) compared to 85% (81/95) with standard volumetric mismatch. In the coregistered mismatch patients, of whom 45 received alteplase and 43 received placebo, the primary outcome measure of geometric mean infarct growth was significantly attenuated by a ratio of 0.58 with alteplase compared to placebo (1.02 vs 1.77; 95% CI, 0.33-0.99; P=0.0459). when using coregistration techniques to determine the presence of mismatch at study entry, alteplase significantly attenuated infarct growth. This highlights the necessity for a randomized, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial of alteplase using penumbral selection beyond 3 hours.

  12. Conspicuity of breast lesions at different b values on diffusion-weighted imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diffusion-weighted (DW imaging has shown potential to differentiate between malignant and benign breast lesions. However, different b values have been used with varied sensitivity and specificity. This study aims to prospectively evaluate the influence of b value on the detection and assessment of breast lesions. Methods Institutional review board approval and informed patient consent were obtained. Between February 2010 and September 2010, sixty women suspected of having breast cancer by clinical examination and mammography underwent bilateral breast MRI and DW imaging (with maximum b values of 600, 800, and 1000 s/mm2. Conspicuity grades of lesions at different b values on DW images were performed. Signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were recorded and compared among different b values by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Results Fifty-seven lesions from 52 recruited patients including 39/57 (68% malignant and 18/57 (32% benign were confirmed with pathology. DCE MRI accurately detected 53 lesions with the sensitivity of 93.0% and specificity of 66.7%, and DW imaging accurately detected 51 lesions with the sensitivity of 89.5% and specificity of 100%. There were no significant differences in conspicuity grades compared among the three b values (P = 0.072, although the SNR and CNR of breast lesions decreased significantly with higher b values. Mean ADCs of malignant lesions (b = 600 s/mm2, 1.07 ± 0.26 × 10-3 mm2/s; b = 800 s/mm2, 0.96 ± 0.22 × 10-3 mm2/s; b = 1000 s/mm2, 0.92 ± 0.26 × 10-3 mm2/s were significantly lower than those of benign lesions (b = 600 s/mm2, 1.55 ± 0.40 × 10-3 mm2/s; b = 800 s/mm2, 1.43 ± 0.38 × 10-3 mm2/s; b = 1000 s/mm2, 1.49 ± 0.38 × 10-3 mm2/s with all P values P = 0.303 and 0

  13. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of kidneys in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koçyiğit, Ali, E-mail: alkoc@yahoo.com [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Bayram, Recep [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey); Yüksel, Selçuk [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Denizli (Turkey); Yılmaz, İsmail; Karabulut, Nevzat [Pamukkale University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Denizli (Turkey)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) which obtain from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI), is a quantitative parameter representing the renal function and parenchymal damage in some renal disorders. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether renal tissue alterations associated with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) can be displayed by DWI. The secondary aim was to assess how ADC values change with age in kidneys with and without VUR. Materials and methods: This prospective study included 46 patients (8 boys, 38 girls; mean age 7.3 ± 4.2; range 1–15 years) with VUR and 54 control subjects (21 boys, 33 girls; mean age 7.7 ± 5.2; range 1–17 years). All subjects underwent DWI of the kidneys using b value of 600 s/mm{sup 2} in addition to MR urography. The ADC values of 71 kidneys with VUR were compared with those of 81 kidneys without VUR. Results: The mean ADC values were (1.93 ± 0.36) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.97 ± 0.24) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.83 ± 0.37) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, (1.98 ± 0.20) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s and (2.08 ± 0.42) × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s in normal kidneys, and in those with grade 1, grade 2, grade 3 and grade 4 VUR, respectively. There was no significant difference in ADC values between kidneys with and without VUR. There was a significant positive correlation between the age and ADC values both in kidneys with and without VUR (r = 0.79, p < 0.001 and r = 0.82; p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: DWI does not reveal probable parenchymal alterations in reflux nephropathy. ADC values increase with age during childhood not only in normal kidneys but also in kidneys with VUR.

  14. Comparison of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging and Arterial Spin Labeling MR Imaging in Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuankai Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas grading is important for treatment plan; we aimed to investigate the application of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in gliomas grading, by comparing with the three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (3D pCASL. 24 patients (13 high grade gliomas and 11 low grade gliomas underwent IVIM DWI and 3D pCASL imaging before operation; maps of fast diffusion coefficient (D∗, slow diffusion coefficient (D, fractional perfusion-related volume (f, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF were calculated and then coregistered to generate the corresponding parameter values. We found CBF and D∗ were higher in the high grade gliomas, whereas ADC, D, and f were lower (all P0.05. IVIM DWI showed more efficiency than 3D pCASL but less validity than conventional DWI in differentiating the high from low grade gliomas.

  15. Statistical analysis of multi-b factor diffusion weighted images can help distinguish between vasogenic and tumor-infiltrated edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendries, Christophe; Ducreux, Denis; Lacroix, Catherine; Ducot, Béatrice; Saliou, Guillaume

    2014-09-01

    The diffusion model can be transformed into a multicompartment model by means of multi-b factor diffusion-weighted sequences. We adapted a method of statistical analysis of these images and evaluated its performance to distinguish tumor-infiltrated edema from vasogenic edema. Forty-nine patients with infiltrating tumors (38 patients: low to high-grade gliomas) or vasogenic edema (11 patients: metastases, abscess, extra-axial lesions) were studied by multi-b factor diffusion-weighted imaging. Comparison of histological results and morphological and perfusion MRI defined 69 characteristic volumes of interest in the peritumoral edema of 69 distinct infiltrating lesions (40) or lesions inducing vasogenic edema (29). The factorial analysis had a sensitivity of 92.9% and a specificity of 90.6% between tumor-infiltrated and vasogenic edema. Simplified interpretation confined to values of the high and mean diffusivity compartments had a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 89.2% between strictly tumor-infiltrated edema and vasogenic edema with the advantage of simplified interpretation based on two-color parametric mapping. Discrimination between tumor-infiltrated edema and vasogenic edema can be achieved by means of a 90-s multi-b factor diffusion-weighted sequence and factorial analysis. Simplified visual and quantitative interpretation of the results should also allow integration of multi-b factor analysis into routine neuroradiology practice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Color-Coded Images: Towards a Reduction in Reading Time While Keeping a Similar Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Kitamura, Felipe; de Medeiros Alves, Srhael; Antônio Tobaru Tibana, Luis; Abdala, Nitamar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a diagnostic tool capable of providing diffusion and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map information in a single color-coded image and to assess the performance of color-coded images compared with their corresponding diffusion and ADC map. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, which sequentially enrolled 36 head MRI scans. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and ADC maps were compared to their corresponding color-coded images. Four raters had their interobserver agreement measured for both conventional (DWI) and color-coded images. Differences between conventional and color-coded images were also estimated for each of the 4 raters. Cohen's kappa and percent agreement were used. Also, paired-samples t-test was used to compare reading time for rater 1. Conventional and color-coded images had substantial or almost perfect agreement for all raters. Mean reading time of rater 1 was 47.4 seconds for DWI and 27.9 seconds for color-coded images (P = .00007). These findings are important because they support the role of color-coded images as being equivalent to that of the conventional DWI in terms of diagnostic capability. Reduction in reading time (which makes the reading easier) is also demonstrated for one rater in this study.

  17. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging with Color-Coded Images: Towards a Reduction in Reading Time While Keeping a Similar Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Campos Kitamura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a diagnostic tool capable of providing diffusion and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map information in a single color-coded image and to assess the performance of color-coded images compared with their corresponding diffusion and ADC map. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, which sequentially enrolled 36 head MRI scans. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI and ADC maps were compared to their corresponding color-coded images. Four raters had their interobserver agreement measured for both conventional (DWI and color-coded images. Differences between conventional and color-coded images were also estimated for each of the 4 raters. Cohen’s kappa and percent agreement were used. Also, paired-samples t-test was used to compare reading time for rater 1. Conventional and color-coded images had substantial or almost perfect agreement for all raters. Mean reading time of rater 1 was 47.4 seconds for DWI and 27.9 seconds for color-coded images (P=.00007. These findings are important because they support the role of color-coded images as being equivalent to that of the conventional DWI in terms of diagnostic capability. Reduction in reading time (which makes the reading easier is also demonstrated for one rater in this study.

  18. Impact of fibroglandular tissue and background parenchymal enhancement on diffusion weighted imaging of breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iacconi, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.iacconi@tin.it [Breast Unit, USL1 Massa-Carrara, Piazza Monzoni 2, Carrara 54033 (Italy); Thakur, Sunitha B., E-mail: thakurs@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Dershaw, David D., E-mail: dershawd@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology – Breast Imaging Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Brooks, Jennifer, E-mail: brooksj@mskcc.org [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 307 East 63rd Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Fry, Charles W., E-mail: charles_fry@nymc.edu [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Morris, Elizabeth A., E-mail: morrise@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology – Breast Imaging Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Aim of the paper is to evaluate if the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT) and the background enhancement(BPE) influence the detection of lesions and their quantitative analysis in diffusion weighted imaging(DWI) • The structure of the breast, including both FGT and BPE, as well as the menopausal status of the patient are not a relevant factor for lesion identification in DWI. • Quantitative analysis of normal breast is not uniform and is influenced by the amount of fibroglandular tissue,while there is no influence of background parenchymal enhancement. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the influence of the amount of fibroglandular breast tissue (FGT) and background-parenchymal enhancement (BPE) on lesion detection, quantitative analysis of normal breast tissue and of breast lesions on DWI. Materials and methods: IRB approved this retrospective study on focal findings at contrast-enhanced (CE) breast MR and DWI performed during July–December 2011. Patients with cysts, previous irradiation, silicone implants and current chemotherapy were excluded. DWI with fat suppression was acquired before dynamic acquisition (b factors: 0.1000 s/mm{sup 2}) using 1.5 and 3 T scanners. Using correlation with dynamic and T2 images, ROIs were drawn free-hand within the borders of any visible lesion and in contralateral normal breast. Fisher's exact test to evaluate visibility and Wilcoxon-rank-sum test for comparison of ADC values were used. The amount of FGT and BPE was visually assessed by concurrent MRI. Analysis was stratified by menopausal status. Results: 25/127 (20%) lesions were excluded for technical reasons. 65/102 (64%) lesions were visible on DWI (median diameter: 1.85 cm). Mass lesions (M) were more visible (43/60 = 72%) than non-mass enhancement (NME) (22/42 = 52%) and malignant lesions were more visible (55/72 = 76%) than benign (10/30 = 33%). BPE and FGT did not influence visibility of M (p = 0.35 and p = 0.57 respectively) as well

  19. Confident non-invasive diagnosis of pseudolesions of the liver using diffusion-weighted imaging at 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia; Bastati-Huber, Nina; Fakhrai, Negar; Jantsch, Marion; Puchner, Stefan; Herneth, Andreas M; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Pseudolesions of the liver including focal steatosis or non-steatosis and THID (transient hepatic intensity differences) are often challenging, especially when imaging patients with underlying malignant disease. We evaluated the efficacy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnostic work-up of pseudolesions. Forty-eight patients with pseudolesions of the liver were consecutively examined and the images were retrospectively analyzed. MRI was performed on a clinical 3T scanner using T1-GRE in-phase and opposed phase images, T2-TSE-FS, diffusion-weighted sequences (b-value 50, 300, 600), ADC mapping, and dynamic post-contrast T1-VIBE-FS sequences (32 patients received Gd-EB-DTPA and 16 patients received gadolinium chelates). All images were analyzed by two experienced radiologists in consensus. As a standard of reference, we used the T1-w GRE, in-phase and out of phase, and the contrast enhanced series, as well as long-term follow-up. In the 48 patients, a total of 116 liver lesions were found. Of these, 40 were benign and eleven were malignant focal lesions. Benign lesions included one FNH, 26 simple cysts, and twelve hemangiomas. In addition, 65 pseudolesions (20 focal steatosis, 13 focal non-steatosis, and 32 THIDs) were found. All pseudolesions could be identified either on the T1-GRE in-phase and opposed phase images or on the contrast-enhanced series, or on both. However, none of them were visible on the diffusion-weighted images. Pseudolesions are invisible on DWI (negative predictive value = 1); therefore, DWI can be used as an additional sequence to significantly increase diagnostic confidence in the differentiation between pseudolesions and other focal liver lesions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Serial diffusion-weighted imaging in a patient with MELAS and presumed cytotoxic oedema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.Y. [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital, 1000034, Peking (China); Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 2630 Sugitani, 930-0194, Toyama City, Toyama (Japan); Noguchi, K.; Ogawa, S.; Seto, H. [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 2630 Sugitani, 930-0194, Toyama City, Toyama (Japan); Takashima, S. [Second Department of Internal Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 2630 Sugitani, 930-0194, Toyama City, Toyama (Japan); Hayashi, N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 2630 Sugitani, 930-0194, Toyama City, Toyama (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    A patient with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was studied with serial diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) after stroke-like episodes and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured in an infarct-like lesion. In the acute and subacute stages, the affected area gave high signal on DWI and its ADC was much lower than that in a normal control region. In the chronic stage, the ADC became higher than that in normal brain. We therefore suggest that the stroke-like episodes did not cause vasogenic oedema but were related to energy failure and cytotoxic oedema. (orig.)

  1. MRI-guided breast vacuum biopsy: Localization of the lesion without contrast-agent application using diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Nicole; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Boss, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    In magnetic resonance-guided breast vacuum biopsies, the contrast agent for targeting suspicious lesions can typically be applied only once during an intervention, due to the slow elimination of the gadolinium chelate from the extracellular fluid space. This study evaluated the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for lesion targeting in vacuum assisted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biopsies. DWI may be used as an alternative to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with the advantage of reproducibility. However, the targeted lesion requires the characteristics of a mass-like lesion, substantial diffusion restriction, and a minimum size of approximately 1cm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys using blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannarini, Gianluca; Kessler, Thomas M; Roth, Beat; Vermathen, Peter; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2014-08-01

    Little data are available on noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging based assessment of renal function during upper urinary tract obstruction. We determined whether functional multiparametric kidney magnetic resonance imaging could monitor the treatment response in cases of acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction. Between January 2008 and January 2010, 18 patients with acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction due to calculi were prospectively enrolled to undergo kidney magnetic resonance imaging with conventional, blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences upon emergency hospital admission and after release of obstruction. We assessed functional imaging parameters of obstructed and contralateral unobstructed kidneys derived from blood oxygen level dependent (apparent spin relaxation rate) and diffusion-weighted (total apparent diffusion coefficient, pure diffusion coefficient and perfusion fraction) sequences during acute upper urinary tract obstruction and after its release. During acute obstruction the apparent spin relaxation rate and perfusion fraction were lower in the cortex (p=0.020 and 0.031) and medulla (p=0.012 and 0.190, respectively) of obstructed kidneys compared to contralateral unobstructed kidneys. After obstruction release the apparent spin relaxation rate and perfusion fraction increased in the cortex (p=0.016 and 0.004) and medulla (p=0.071 and 0.044, respectively) of formerly obstructed kidneys to values similar to those in contralateral kidneys. Total apparent diffusion coefficient and pure diffusion coefficient values did not significantly differ between obstructed and contralateral unobstructed kidneys during or after obstruction. In our patients with acute unilateral upper urinary tract obstruction due to calculi functional kidney magnetic resonance imaging using blood oxygen level dependent and diffusion-weighted sequences enabled us to monitor pathophysiological changes in obstructed kidneys during

  3. MR Imaging of Orbital Inflammatory Syndrome, Orbital Cellulitis, and Orbital Lymphoid Lesions: The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, R.; Sepahdari, A.R.; Mafee, M.F.; Putterman, A.M.; Aakalu, V.; Wendel, L.J.A.; Setabutr, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Orbital inflammatory syndrome (OIS) has clinical features that overlap with orbital lymphoid lesions and orbital cellulitis. Prompt diagnosis is needed in all 3 conditions because the management of each one differs greatly. CT and MR imaging, though useful, do not always distinguish among these conditions. The aim of this study was to identify the role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in differentiating these 3 diagnoses. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of orbital MR imaging was conducted. T1- and T2-weighted and postcontrast images were analyzed. Region-of-interest analysis was performed by using measurements in areas of abnormality seen on conventional MR imaging sequences and measurements of the ipsilateral thalamus for each patient. The DWI signal intensity of the lesion was expressed as a percentage of average thalamic intensity in each patient. Similarly, lesion apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and lesion-thalamus ADC ratios were calculated. Statistical significance was determined by the Kruskal-Wallis test, and post hoc pairwise comparisons, by the Mann-Whitney U test for DWI-intensity ratio, ADC, and ADC ratio. RESULTS A significant difference was noted in DWI intensities, ADC, and ADC ratio between OIS, orbital lymphoid lesions, and orbital cellulitis (P cellulitis. Lymphoid lesions showed lower ADC than OIS and cellulitis. A trend was seen toward lower ADC in OIS than in cellulitis (P = .17). CONCLUSIONS DWI may help differentiate OIS from lymphoid lesions and cellulitis and may allow more rapid management. PMID:18842758

  4. Sequential MR imaging (with diffusion-weighted imaging changes in metronidazole-induced encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupinder Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole-induced neuro-toxicity, though rare, is known. A characteristic spatial distribution of lesions in cerebellar dentate nuclei and dorsal pons is known. However, temporal progression of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has not been described previously. We describe two such cases which presented initially with splenial hyperintesity and showed progression to characterstic lesions. Both cases improved with stoppage of metronidazole.

  5. Correlation between magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging ADC value of endometrial stromal sarcoma and the malignant biological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hua Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation between magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging ADC value of endometrial stromal sarcoma and the malignant biological features. Methods: A total of 34 patients with endometrial stromal sarcoma who received surgical resection in Hubei Provincial Hospital of Integrated Chinese & Western Medicine between May 2014 and August 2016 were selected as the malignant group of the research, and 58 patients with uterine fibroids who received surgical resection between August 2015 and October 2016 were selected as the control group of the research. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging was done before operation to measure apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC value. The lesions were collected after operation to determine the expression of proliferation genes as well as estrogen and progestogen receptors. Results: Endometrial stromal sarcoma ADC value of malignant group was significantly lower than uterine fibroid ADC value of control group; CyclinD1, Rb, Sp1, Survivin, ERα, ERβ, PRA and PRB protein expression in endometrial stromal sarcoma lesions of malignant group were significantly higher than those of control group while SULT1E1 protein expression was significantly lower than that of control group; CyclinD1, Rb, Sp1, Survivin, ERα, ERβ, PRA and PRB protein expression in endometrial stromal sarcoma lesions of subgroup with low ADC value were significantly higher than those of subgroup with high ADC value while SULT1E1 protein expression was significantly lower than that of subgroup with high ADC value. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging ADC values can be used to evaluate the malignant biological behavior of endometrial stromal sarcoma.

  6. Preoperative CT versus diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in patients with rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael P; Løgager, Vibeke B; Skjoldbye, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world and liver metastases are seen in up to 19% of patients with colorectal cancers. Detection of liver metastases is not only vital for sufficient treatment and survival, but also for a better estimation of prognosis....... The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion weighted MRI of the liver as part of a combined MR evaluation of patients with rectal cancers and compare it with the standard preoperative evaluation of the liver with CT. Methods. Consecutive patients diagnosed with rectal cancers were....... The current standard preoperative evaluation with CT-scan results in disadvantages like missed metastases and futile operations. We recommend that patients with rectal cancer, who are scheduled for MR of the rectum, should have a DWMR of the liver performed at the same time....

  7. The diagnostic value of high-frequency power-based diffusion-weighted imaging in prediction of neuroepithelial tumour grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiye; Zhou, Peng; Lv, Bin; Liu, Mengqi; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yulin; Lou, Xin; Gui, Qiuping; He, Huiguang; Ma, Lin

    2017-12-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic value of high-frequency power (HFP) compared with the minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (MinADC) in the prediction of neuroepithelial tumour grading. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) data were acquired on 115 patients by a 3.0-T MRI system, which included b0 images and b1000 images over the whole brain in each patient. The HFP values and MinADC values were calculated by an in-house script written on the MATLAB platform. There was a significant difference among each group excluding grade I (G1) vs. grade II (G2) (P = 0.309) for HFP and among each group for MinADC. ROC analysis showed a higher discriminative accuracy between low-grade glioma (LGG) and high-grade glioma (HGG) for HFP with area under the curve (AUC) value 1 compared with that for MinADC with AUC 0.83 ± 0.04 and also demonstrated a higher discriminative ability among the G1-grade IV (G4) group for HFP compared with that for MinADC except G1 vs. G2. HFP could provide a simple and effective optimal tool for the prediction of neuroepithelial tumour grading based on diffusion-weighted images in routine clinical practice. • HFP shows positive correlation with neuroepithelial tumour grading. • HFP presents a good diagnostic efficacy for LGG and HGG. • HFP is helpful in the selection of brain tumour boundary.

  8. Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System on CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Dong Ik; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kang, Tae Wook; Song, Kyoung Doo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    To assess major imaging features of Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) on contrast-enhanced CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and to estimate whether the combination of signal intensity favouring HCC on hepatobiliary phase (HBP) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) can act as a major feature in LI-RADS. Four hundred twenty one patients with 445 observations were included. Major features of LI-RADS on CT and MRI as well as HBP and DWI features were assessed. Diagnostic performances of LR-5 according to LI-RADS v2014 and modified LI-RADS which incorporate combination of HBP and DWI were assessed. Pairwise comparisons of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed. For HCCs, capsule appearance had the highest rate of discordance between CT and MRI (32.7%), followed by washout appearance (22.2%). Specificity (75%) of LR-5 of LI-RADS v2014 was lower than that (77.1-79.2%) of modified LI-RADS. Area under the ROC curve of modified LI-RADS (0.755-0.775) was not significantly different from that of LI-RADS v 2014 (0.709) (p > 0.05). There were substantial discordances between CT and MRI for capsule and washout appearances in hepatic observations, and combination of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI might be able to be incorporated as a major feature of LI-RADS. (orig.)

  9. Early diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging lesion volumes forecast final infarct size in DEFUSE 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Hayley M; Mlynash, Michael; Inoue, Manabu; Tipirneni, Aaryani; Liggins, John; Zaharchuk, Greg; Straka, Matus; Kemp, Stephanie; Bammer, Roland; Lansberg, Maarten G; Albers, Gregory W

    2013-03-01

    It is hypothesized that early diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesions accurately estimate the size of the irreversibly injured core and thresholded perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) lesions (time to maximum of tissue residue function [Tmax] >6 seconds) approximate the volume of critically hypoperfused tissue. With incomplete reperfusion, the union of baseline DWI and posttreatment PWI is hypothesized to predict infarct volume. This is a substudy of Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging Evaluation for Understanding Stroke Evolution Study 2 (DEFUSE 2); all patients with technically adequate MRI scans at 3 time points were included. Baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI lesion volumes were determined by the RAPID software program. Final infarct volumes were assessed with 5-day fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and were corrected for edema. Reperfusion was defined on the basis of the reduction in PWI lesion volume between baseline and early follow-up MRI. DWI and PWI volumes were correlated with final infarct volumes. Seventy-three patients were eligible. Twenty-six patients with >90% reperfusion show a high correlation between early DWI volume and final infarct volume (r=0.95; PPWI (Tmax >6 seconds) volume and final infarct volume (r=0.86; P=0.002). Using all 73 patients, the union of baseline DWI and early follow-up PWI is highly correlated with final infarct volume (r=0.94; PPWI (Tmax >6 seconds) volumes provide a reasonable approximation of final infarct volume after endovascular therapy.

  10. The role of diffusion-weighted imaging in prediction liver iron concentration in beta-thalassaemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Suha; Yilmaz, Guliz; Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat

    2017-07-11

    The aim of this study was to analyse the value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) to determine the liver parenchyma iron concentration in β-thalassaemia major patients. Abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, including gradient echo sequences and DWI sequences, was undertaken of 55 β-thalassaemia major patients. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of liver parenchyma were measured in seven regions at the level of the portal bifurcation and compared with liver iron concentration (LIC). Patients with normal and mild liver dry weight (LDW) results were classified as group 1, whereas patients with moderate and severe values were classified as group 2. There was a dramatic decrease in ADC values as the severity of LIC increased. The median ADC values were 1.6-1.9 × 10(-3 ) mm(2) /sec in group 1 and 0.6-0.9 × 10(-3 ) mm(2) /sec in group 2. A negative correlation was observed between ADC and the LDW values in both groups. The ADC and LIC correlation in each subgroup was statistically significant with asymptotic 95% confidence intervals of 0.820-0.997. Diffusion-weighted imaging is sensitive to tissue changes as a result of iron accumulation and may be used to predict liver iron overload in β-thalassaemia major patients with a high sensitivity and specificity. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  11. Diffusion-weighted imaging of ovarian torsion: usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for the detection of hemorrhagic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Uchiyama, Mariko; Yano, Ryuichiro; Furui, Tatsuro; Morishige, Ken-ichirou

    2014-01-01

    We undertook this study to evaluate the need for diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in detecting hemorrhagic infarction following ovarian torsion. The study included 14 consecutive patients aged 12 to 74 years (average age, 36 years) with surgical confirmation of ovarian torsion who underwent 1.5-tesla MR imaging. Pathologically, hemorrhagic infarction was found in 7 patients. We retrospectively reviewed signal intensity on T1-, T2-, and diffusion-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in swollen ovarian stroma. Fallopian tube thickening was seen in all patients. In patients with ovarian cystic lesion, maximum cyst wall thickness was significantly higher in patients with hemorrhagic infarction (mean, 13.5 ± 4.1 mm) than those without (mean, 5.0 ± 1.0 mm) (P infarction. ADCs were significantly lower in patients with hemorrhagic infarction (1.20 ± 0.50 [× 10(-3) mm(2)/s]) than those without (2.04 ± 0.26 [× 10(-3) mm(2)/s]) (P infarction was 0.88 (7 of 8), and specificity was 1.00 (6 of 6). ADC measurements were useful for detecting hemorrhagic infarction in patients with ovarian torsion.

  12. Histological grade of hepatocellular carcinoma correlates with arterial enhancement on gadoxetic acid-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Chou; Chen, Ran-Chou; Chou, Chen-Te; Lin, Chun-Yi; Yu, Chih-Yung; Liu, Chang-Hsien; Chou, Jung-Mao; Hsu, Hsian-He; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2014-12-01

    To retrospectively determine the correlation between heptic tumor signal intensity on gadoxetic acid-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MR images and histopathological grading of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 79 patients with 141 surgically resected HCCs. The signal intensity and its relationship with histopathological grade were assessed. We measured the apparent diffusion correlation (ADC) values and calculated arterial enhancement ratios, washout ratios, and relative intensity ratios of HCCs relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma in gadoxetic-enhanced MR images in order to determine their relationship to the histological grade. Morphological evaluation showed that larger tumor size and extrahepatic extension were associated with higher histologic grade (p enhancement on gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR images and low ADC are predictive of worse histological grades of HCC.

  13. Introduction to the basic principles and techniques of diffusion-weighted imaging; Einfuehrung in die Grundlagen und Techniken der Diffusionsbildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laun, F.B. [DKFZ Heidelberg, Abteilung Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); DKFZ Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Sektion Quantitative Bildbasierte Krankheitscharakterisierung, Heidelberg (Germany); Fritzsche, K.H. [DKFZ Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Sektion Quantitative Bildbasierte Krankheitscharakterisierung, Heidelberg (Germany); DKFZ Heidelberg, Medizinische und Biologische Informatik, Heidelberg (Germany); Kuder, T.A. [DKFZ Heidelberg, Abteilung Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Stieltjes, B. [DKFZ Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie, Sektion Quantitative Bildbasierte Krankheitscharakterisierung, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    This article gives an overview of the many different technical aspects of diffusion-weighted imaging and a review of the physical and mathematical background. Specific terms, such as free and restricted diffusion are introduced and elucidated. The measurement of diffusion by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and which phenomena can occur are described. Finally, an overview of current developments in diffusion imaging and its application in research is presented. (orig.) [German] Dieser Artikel bietet dem Leser einen Ueberblick ueber die verschiedenen Techniken der Diffusionsbildgebung und deren physikalisch-mathematische Hintergruende. Begriffe wie freie und eingeschraenkte Diffusion werden eingefuehrt und erklaert. Die Messung der Diffusion mittels MRT wird beschrieben und verschiedene der dabei auftretenden Phaenomene erklaert. Schliesslich wird eine Auswahl aktueller, forschungsrelevanter Diffusionsbildgebungstechniken vorgestellt. (orig.)

  14. Whole-body MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and diffusion-weighted imaging for the staging of multiple myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutoit, Julie C.; Verstraete, Koenraad L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive imaging technique for the detection of bone marrow infiltration, and has therefore recently been included in the new diagnostic myeloma criteria, as proposed by the International Myeloma Working Group. Nevertheless, conventional MRI only provides anatomical information and is therefore only of limited use in the response assessment of patients with multiple myeloma. The additional information from functional MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, can improve the detection rate of bone marrow infiltration and the assessment of response. This can further enhance the sensitivity and specificity of MRI in the staging of multiple myeloma patients. This article provides an overview of the technical aspects of conventional and functional MRI techniques with practical recommendations. It reviews the diagnostic performance, prognostic value, and role in therapy assessment in multiple myeloma and its precursor stages. (orig.)

  15. Prediction of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour grade with MR imaging features: added value of diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotfalizadeh, Emad; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre; Allaham, Wassim [University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Ronot, Maxime; Vilgrain, Valerie [University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, Centre de Recherche Biomedicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Wagner, Mathilde [University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Radiology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); INSERM U1149, Centre de Recherche Biomedicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Cros, Jerome; Couvelard, Anne [University Paris Diderot, Paris (France); University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Pathology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); Hentic, Olivia; Ruzniewski, Philippe [University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Department of Gastroenterology, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France)

    2017-04-15

    To evaluate the value of MR imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the grading of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNET). Between 2006 and 2014, all resected pNETs with preoperative MR imaging including DWI were included. Tumour grading was based on the 2010 WHO classification. MR imaging features included size, T1-w, and T2-w signal intensity, enhancement pattern, apparent (ADC) and true diffusion (D) coefficients. One hundred and eight pNETs (mean 40 ± 33 mm) were evaluated in 94 patients (48 women, 51 %, mean age 52 ± 12). Fifty-five (51 %), 42 (39 %), and 11 (10 %) tumours were given the following grades (G): G1, G2, and G3. Mean ADC and D values were significantly lower as grade increased (ADC: 2.13 ± 0.70, 1.78 ± 0.72, and 0.86 ± 0.22 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, and D: 1.92 ± 0.70, 1.75 ± 0.74, and 0.82 ± 0.19 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s G1, G2, and G3, all p < 0.001). A higher grade was associated with larger sized tumours (p < 0.001). The AUROC of ADC and D to differentiate G3 and G1-2 were 0.96 ± 0.02 and 0.95 ± 0.02. Optimal cut-off values for the identification of G3 were 1.19 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for ADC (sensitivity 100 %, specificity 92 %) and 1.04 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for D (sensitivity 82 %, specificity 92 %). Morphological/functional MRI features of pNETS depend on tumour grade. DWI is useful for the identification of high-grade tumours. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion-weighted and PET/MR Imaging after Radiation Therapy for Malignant Head and Neck Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Rager, Olivier; Dulguerov, Pavel; Burkhardt, Karim; Ailianou, Angeliki; Becker, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting imaging studies of the irradiated neck constitutes a challenge because of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations, the variable appearances of recurrent tumors, and functional and metabolic phenomena that mimic disease. Therefore, morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT), and software fusion of PET and MR imaging data sets are increasingly used to facilitate diagnosis in clinical practice. Because MR imaging and PET often yield complementary information, PET/MR imaging holds promise to facilitate differentiation of tumor recurrence from radiation therapy-induced changes and complications. This review focuses on clinical applications of DW and PET/MR imaging in the irradiated neck and discusses the added value of multiparametric imaging to solve diagnostic dilemmas. Radiologists should understand key features of radiation therapy-induced tissue alterations and potential complications seen at DW and PET/MR imaging, including edema, fibrosis, scar tissue, soft-tissue necrosis, bone and cartilage necrosis, cranial nerve palsy, and radiation therapy-induced arteriosclerosis, brain necrosis, and thyroid disorders. DW and PET/MR imaging also play a complementary role in detection of residual and recurrent disease. Interpretation pitfalls due to technical, functional, and metabolic phenomena should be recognized and avoided. Familiarity with DW and PET/MR imaging features of expected findings, potential complications, and treatment failure after radiation therapy increases diagnostic confidence when interpreting images of the irradiated neck. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2015.

  17. Double-wave-vector diffusion-weighted imaging reveals microscopic diffusion anisotropy in the living human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Marco; Finsterbusch, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Diffusion-tensor imaging is widely used to characterize diffusion in biological tissue, however, the derived anisotropy information, e.g., the fractional anisotropy, is ambiguous. For instance, low values of the diffusion anisotropy in brain white matter voxels may reflect a reduced axon density, i.e., a loss of fibers, or a lower fiber coherence within the voxel, e.g., more crossing fibers. This ambiguity can be avoided with experiments involving two diffusion-weighting periods applied successively in a single acquisition, so-called double-wave-vector or double-pulsed-field-gradient experiments. For a long mixing time between the two periods such experiments are sensitive to the cells' eccentricity, i.e., the diffusion anisotropy present on a microscopic scale. In this study, it is shown that this microscopic diffusion anisotropy can be detected in white matter in the living human brain, even in a macroscopically isotropic region-of-interest (fractional anisotropy = 0). The underlying signal difference between parallel and orthogonal wave vector orientations does not show up in standard diffusion-weighting experiments but is specific to the double-wave-vector experiment. Furthermore, the modulation amplitude observed is very similar for regions-of-interest with different fractional anisotrpy values. Thus, double-wave-vector experiments may provide a direct and reliable access to white matter integrity independent of the actual fiber orientation distribution within the voxel. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Diffusion kurtosis imaging of the liver at 3 Tesla: in vivo comparison to standard diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budjan, Johannes; Sauter, Elke A; Zoellner, Frank G; Lemke, Andreas; Wambsganss, Jens; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Attenberger, Ulrike I

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional techniques like diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) are gaining more and more importance in liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) is an advanced technique that might help to overcome current limitations of DWI. Purpose To evaluate DKI for the differentiation of hepatic lesions in comparison to conventional DWI at 3 Tesla. Material and Methods Fifty-six consecutive patients were examined using a routine abdominal MR protocol at 3 Tesla which included DWI with b-values of 50, 400, 800, and 1000 s/mm2. Apparent diffusion coefficient maps were calculated applying a standard mono-exponential fit, while a non-Gaussian kurtosis fit was used to obtain DKI maps. ADC as well as Kurtosis-corrected diffusion ( D) values were quantified by region of interest analysis and compared between lesions. Results Sixty-eight hepatic lesions (hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] [n = 25]; hepatic adenoma [n = 4], cysts [n = 18]; hepatic hemangioma [HH] [n = 18]; and focal nodular hyperplasia [n = 3]) were identified. Differentiation of malignant and benign lesions was possible based on both DWI ADC as well as DKI D-values ( P values were in the range of 0.04 to < 0.0001). Conclusion In vivo abdominal DKI calculated using standard b-values is feasible and enables quantitative differentiation between malignant and benign liver lesions. Assessment of conventional ADC values leads to similar results when using b-values below 1000 s/mm2 for DKI calculation.

  19. Indication of revascularization for cerebral main trunk occlusion using MR diffusion weighted image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Tohru; Saito, Koji; Okuyama, Tohru; Hirano, Akira; Irie, Shinsuke; Inamura, Shigeru [Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    We characterize the usefulness of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) in revascularization therapy of acute cerebral main trunk occlusion. Twenty patients who underwent revascularization therapy were studied: 17 underwent local intra-arterial fibrinolysis (LIF) and 3 underwent embolectomy. Complete recanalization was obtained in 18 of the 20 patients. In the remaining 2 patients, recanalization was partial. Initial DWI in the acute phase was performed 30 minutes to 6 hours after onset, and the DWI findings could be classified into 4 types. In 17 patients with complete recanalization, the hyperintensity areas (HIAs) on the initial DWI were changed to infarctions after recanalization, and in 5 of these patients, infracted areas became more extended than the initial hyperintensity areas. Three patients with the type 1 finding (no HIA) made good recovery after recanalization and follow-up MRI showed no abnormal intensity, except for 1 patient. In 5 patients with the type 2 finding (HIAs in the perforator's territories), 3 patients with complete recanalization made good recovery, but 2 patients with partial recanalization had a hemorrhagic event in the hyperintensity area on the initial DWI. In 10 patients with the type 3 finding (scattered HIAs in the cortex), clinical outcome of the therapy depended on the location of hyperintensity area on initial DWI. In 2 patients with the type 4 finding (extended HIAs), 1 patient showed clinical improvement and the hyperintensity area on follow-up MRI became smaller than that on the initial DWI. The other patient had a hemorrhagic event with a fatal outcome. A comparison of clinical outcome between revascularization and conservative therapy group showed the incidence of good outcome was higher in the revascularization group of type 1, 2 and 3. DWI could be a useful diagnostic technique for detecting severe ischemic and perhaps irreversibly damaged lesions. The initial DWI provided valuable and reliable information and our proposed

  20. Detection of active sacroiliitis with ankylosing spondylitis through intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ying-hua [Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Academy of Orthopedics, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Shao-lin; Zhao, Xiang-cheng; Hu, Shao-yong; Liu, Zhen-hua [Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Academy of Orthopedics, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Zai-yi; Chen, Xin; Liang, Chang-hong [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Mei Ms, Ying-jie [Philips Healthcare, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Electronics Hong Kong Ltd, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-09-15

    To confirm feasibility and assess intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) to differentiate active sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis. Forty-one patients were divided into two groups, an active group (n = 20) and a chronic group (n = 21), according to the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and laboratory parameters. In addition, 21 healthy volunteers were chosen as the control group. Tissue diffusivity (D{sub slow}), perfusion fraction (f), and pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sub fast}) values were obtained for all three groups. One-way analysis of variance and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed for all parameters. There was good interobserver agreement on the measurements between the two observers. The optimal cut-off values (with respective AUC, sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio) between active and chronic groups were D{sub slow} = 0.53 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (0.976, 90 %, 95.2 %, 18.9, 0.10) and f = 0.09 (0.545, 20 %, 95.5 %, 4.2, 0.84), and between chronic and control groups were D{sub slow} = 0.22 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (0.517, 9.52 %, 100 %, no number, 0.9) and f = 0.09 (0.935, 95.24 %, 80.95 %, 5, 0.059). D{sub slow} and f of IVIM diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI in AS show a significant difference in the values of diffusion of water molecules and fractional perfusion-related volume among the three groups. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of the link between quantitative biexponential diffusion-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MRI in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Hildebrand; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Kappert, Peter; Sijens, Paul E

    2017-05-01

    To investigate if intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) modeled diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can be linked to contrast-enhanced (CE-)MRI in liver parenchyma and liver lesions. Twenty-five patients underwent IVIM-DWI followed by multiphase CE-MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA (n=20) or Gd-DOTA (n=5) concluded with IVIM-DWI. Diffusion (Dslow), microperfusion (Dfast), its fraction (ffast), wash-in-rate (Rearly) and late-enhancement-rate (Rlate) of Gd-EOB-DTPA were calculated voxel-wise for the liver. Parenchyma and lesions were segmented. Pre-contrast IVIM was compared 1) between low, medium and high Rearly for parenchyma 2) to post-contrast IVIM substantiated with simulations 3) between low and high Rlate per lesion type. Dfast and ffast increased (Pquantitative liver imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging in assessing pathological response of tumor in breast cancer subtype to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shangang; Ren, Ruimei; Chen, Zhaoqiu; Wang, Yongsheng; Fan, Tingyong; Li, Chengli; Zhang, Pinliang

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for reflecting and predicting pathological tumor response in breast cancer subtype to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The retrospective study included 176 patients with breast cancer who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations before and after NAC prior to surgery. The pre- and post-NAC apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of tumor were measured respectively on DWI. The pathological response was classified into either a complete response (pCR) or as a noncomplete response (pNCR) to NAC with the Miller & Payne system. The relationship between the ADC value and the pathological response was assessed according to intrinsic subtypes (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, and triple negative) defined by immunohistochemical features. Multiple comparisons respectively showed that pre-NAC and post-NAC ADC were significantly different among four subtypes (P breast cancer subtypes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Is diffusion-weighted imaging a significant indicator of the development of vascularization in hypovascular hepatocellular lesions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Kenichi; Saito, Kazuhiro; Saguchi, Toru; Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Taira, Junichi; Imai, Yasuharu; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Akata, Soichi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in predicting the development of vascularization in hypovascular hepatocellular lesions (HHLs). Forty-two HHLs that were diagnosed by computed tomographic (CT) arteriography were evaluated retrospectively. The lesion on DWI was classified as isointense, hypointense, or hyperintense. Follow-up studies that included intravenous dynamic CT or magnetic resonance imaging were performed. The 730-day cumulative developments of vascularization in hypointense, isointense, and hyperintense lesions were 17%, 30%, and 40%, respectively. The differences among these developments were not statistically significant. The signal intensity on DWI showed no significant difference in the development of vascularization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. lop-DWI: A Novel Scheme for Pre-Processing of Diffusion-Weighted Images in the Gradient Direction Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrband, Farshid; Choupan, Jeiran; Caruyer, Emmanuel; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Gal, Yaniv; Tieng, Quang M.; McMahon, Katie L.; Vegh, Viktor; Reutens, David C.; Yang, Zhengyi

    2015-01-01

    We describe and evaluate a pre-processing method based on a periodic spiral sampling of diffusion-gradient directions for high angular resolution diffusion magnetic resonance imaging. Our pre-processing method incorporates prior knowledge about the acquired diffusion-weighted signal, facilitating noise reduction. Periodic spiral sampling of gradient direction encodings results in an acquired signal in each voxel that is pseudo-periodic with characteristics that allow separation of low-frequency signal from high frequency noise. Consequently, it enhances local reconstruction of the orientation distribution function used to define fiber tracks in the brain. Denoising with periodic spiral sampling was tested using synthetic data and in vivo human brain images. The level of improvement in signal-to-noise ratio and in the accuracy of local reconstruction of fiber tracks was significantly improved using our method. PMID:25628600

  5. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in acute Wernicke's encephalopathy associated with pseudomembranous colitis: a case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hye On; Lee, Yong Chul; Park, Tai Hwan; Yoo, Seung Min; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beum; Kim, Kun Sang [Chung-Ang University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is a common complication of thiamine deficiency among chronic alcoholics. However, there have been few reports about MR imaging findings, including the diffusion-weighted changes of this neurologic disorder, in nonalcoholic patients. We present here a rare case of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy that developed in a patient who received prolonged total parenteral nutrition for his pseudomembranous colitis. The MR imaging, including the diffusion-weighted imaging, was performed at the onset of disease and during follow-up. The diagnosis was made by the characteristic MR imaging findings and it was supported by the clinical features. The initial and follow-up MR imaging findings with diffusion-weighted imaging changes are described and correlated with the clinical status.

  6. Gas-induced susceptibility artefacts on diffusion-weighted MRI of the rectum at 1.5 T - Effect of applying a micro-enema to improve image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griethuysen, Joost J M; Bus, Elyse M; Hauptmann, Michael; Lahaye, Max J; Maas, Monique; Ter Beek, Leon C; Beets, Geerard L; Bakers, Frans C H; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J

    2018-02-01

    Assess whether application of a micro-enema can reduce gas-induced susceptibility artefacts in Single-shot Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) Diffusion-weighted imaging of the rectum at 1.5 T. Retrospective analysis of n = 50 rectal cancer patients who each underwent multiple DWI-MRIs (1.5 T) from 2012 to 2016 as part of routine follow-up during a watch-and-wait approach after chemoradiotherapy. From March 2014 DWI-MRIs were routinely acquired after application of a preparatory micro-enema (Microlax ® ; 5 ml; self-administered shortly before acquisition); before March 2014 no bowel preparation was given. In total, 335 scans were scored by an experienced reader for the presence/severity of gas-artefacts (on b1000 DWI), ranging from 0 (no artefact) to 5 (severe artefact). A score ≥3 (moderate-severe) was considered a clinically relevant artefact. A random sample of 100 scans was re-assessed by a second independent reader to study inter-observer effects. Scores were compared between the scans performed without and with a preparatory micro-enema using univariable and multivariable logistic regression taking into account potential confounding factors (age/gender, acquisition parameters, MRI-hardware, rectoscopy prior to MRI). Clinically relevant gas-artefacts were seen in 24.3% (no micro-enema) vs. 3.7% (micro-enema), odds ratios were 0.118 in univariable and 0.230 in multivariable regression (P = 0.0005 and 0.0291). Mean severity score (±SD) was 1.19 ± 1.71 (no-enema) vs 0.32 ± 0.77 (micro-enema), odds ratios were 0.321 (P < 0.0001) and 0.489 (P = 0.0461) in uni- and multivariable regression, respectively. Inter-observer agreement was excellent (κ0.85). Use of a preparatory micro-enema shortly before rectal EPI-DWI examinations performed at 1.5 T MRI significantly reduces both the incidence and severity of gas-induced artefacts, compared to examinations performed without bowel preparation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Diffusion-weighted imaging properties of uterine fibroids pre- and post-uterine fibroid embolisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirpalani, Anish, E-mail: kirpalania@smh.ca [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, St. Michael’s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, 3CC, Toronto, ON M5B 1W8 (Canada); Chong, Jennifer [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, St. Michael’s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, 3CC, Toronto, ON M5B 1W8 (Canada); Yang, Natalie [Department of Radiology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084 (Australia); Jenkins, Sarah J. [Department of Radiology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL A1B 3V6 (Canada); Nisenbaum, Rosane [Centre for Research on Inner City Health, the Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, ON M5B 1W8 (Canada); Prabhudesai, Vikramaditya; Anthwal, Shalini; Colak, Errol [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, St. Michael’s Hospital, 30 Bond Street, 3CC, Toronto, ON M5B 1W8 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Change in ADC and contrast enhancement of uterine fibroids following UFE was studied. • ADC of fibroids rises post-UFE. Previous studies assessing this change have conflicting results. • ADC rise post-UFE is associated with degree of loss of contrast enhancement. • ADC measurement using DWI is not yet a proven replacement for GBCA-enhanced MRI. - Abstract: Objective: To determine the change in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of uterine fibroids following uterine fibroid embolisation (UFE), and if the ADC change correlates with either volume loss or degree of contrast enhancement post-UFE. Materials and methods: This study was approved by our institutional review board with waiver of consent. The pelvic MRI examinations, including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) using 4 b-values, of 50 consecutive patients prior to and 6 months post-UFE were analyzed. The volume, ADC and amount of enhancement were calculated for each fibroid both pre- and post-UFE. The percent residual enhancement for each fibroid was categorized as either: no (0–1%) residual enhancement or residual (>1%) enhancement. Statistical analysis compared ADC, enhancement and volume for each fibroid pre- and post-UFE using paired t-tests and Pearson correlation coefficients. Results: The mean ADC of all (n = 88) fibroids pre-UFE was 1.30 ± 0.20 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, and increased to 1.68 ± 0.24 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s post-UFE (p < 0.0001). Lower pre-UFE ADC correlated with greater ADC change post-UFE (r = −0.50; p < 0.0001). There was no correlation between ADC change and volume change post-UFE (r = 0.07; p = 0.59). However, fibroids with no residual enhancement post-UFE had larger ADC change than those with residual enhancement (p = 0.003). Conclusion: The ADC of fibroids rises post-UFE. ADC change post-UFE is associated with the degree of loss of enhancement and may therefore be valuable in predicting response to treatment in pre-procedural counseling.

  8. Diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke based on time-to-peak and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Eguchi, Tsuneyoshi; Sora, Shigeo; Izumi, Masafumi; Hiyama, Hirofumi [Kameda General Hospital, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan); Ueki, Keisuke [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-07-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of the hemodynamics of the brain is essential for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. This study investigated whether time-to-peak and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are useful for predicting the course of stroke. Fourteen patients with non-lacunar acute ischemic stroke underwent emergent MR imaging within 24 hours from the onset followed by cerebral angiography and xenon-enhanced computed tomography (CT). Serial CT was obtained to monitor changes in the size and nature of the infarct. Volumes of the abnormal lesions demonstrated on time-to-peak (V{sub T}) or diffusion-weighted (V{sub D}) images were measured, and the ratio of V{sub T} to V{sub D} was calculated. Based on this ratio, patients were classified into three groups: Group 1 (V{sub T}/V{sub D} 0.5-1.5, n=9), Group 2 (V{sub T}/V{sub D}>1.5, n=3), and Group 3 (V{sub T}/V{sub D}<0.5, n=2). The size of the infarct detected as a low-density area on serial CT scans did not change significantly throughout the course in Group 1 patients, but showed enlargement in all three patients in Group 2. Two patients in Group 3 had major trunk occlusion followed by spontaneous reperfusion, and both developed hemorrhagic transformation. Our study showed that classification of ischemic stroke based on the V{sub T}/V{sub D} ratio was predictive of the time course of the infarct, and may be useful in selecting the initial therapeutic procedure immediately after the onset of stroke. (author)

  9. Diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis in diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Samir, Sieza

    2017-04-01

    To study the diagnostic performance of diffusion weighted MR imaging in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis in diabetic foot. This prospective study was carried out on 41 patients with diabetic foot, 22 males and 19 females with mean age of 51 years. They underwent diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the foot. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the bony lesions were calculated by two reviewers and correlated with the surgical findings or biopsy. The kappa statistic (k) was used to estimate the proportion of inter-observer agreement of two reviewers. The mean ADC of acute diabetic osteoarthropathy was 1.27±0.19×10(-3)mm(2)/s for reviewer 1 and 1.26±0.21×10(-3)mm(2)/s for reviewer 2. The mean ADC value in diabetic osteomyelitis was 0.86±0.11×10(-3)mm(2)/s for reviewer 1 and 0.85±0.12×10(-3)mm(2)/s for reviewer 2. There was excellent inter-observer agreement of ADC value of bony lesions in diabetic foot by both reviewers (K=0.93). There was statistically significant difference in the ADC values of both groups (P=0.001). The cut-off point of ADC value of both reviewers used in differentiating acute diabetic osteoarthropathy and osteomyelitis were 0.98×10(-3)mm(2)/s and 1.04×10(-3)mm(2)/s with an accuracy of 94% and 93% and area under the curve of 0.94 and 0.93 respectively. We conclude that the ADC value is a non-invasive imaging parameter that can help in differentiation of diabetic osteoarthropathy from osteomyelitis with excellent inter-observer agreement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution of collateral fibers in the monkey cervical spinal cord detected with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Ptito, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    techniques. We calculate the diffusion tensor and the persistent angular structure (PAS), a multi-fiber reconstruction technique, from high quality post mortem data of a perfusion-fixed vervet monkey cervical spinal cord sample and simulated crossing fiber data. Our results show that (i) cylindrical geometry......Diffusion anisotropy monitored with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) is a sensitive marker to monitor developmental or pathological microstructural changes in spinal cord. The white matter is often treated as a unidirectional axonal bundle but collateral fibers branching off...... in the white matter of the spinal cord is an invalid assumption due to collateral fibers. We also demonstrate that (ii) collateral fibers can be resolved as distinct peaks in the water diffusion propagator in white matter using multi-fiber models. Finally, we show that (iii) crossing fibers are mainly located...

  11. Scan parameters and the diffusion emphasis effect in diffusion-weighted imaging using a motion-probing gradient preparation pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Tanji, Hajime; Yamaki, Tomoya; Obara, Makoto; Machida, Yoshio

    2014-07-01

    Diffusion-sensitized driven equilibrium preparation (DSDE) is a gradient echo (GRE) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence that employs a motion-probing gradient (MPG) preparation pulse and phase cycling. In DSDE, several scan parameters of the MPG preparation pulse and the GRE sequence affect diffusion sensitivity. Our investigation of the relationship between these scan parameters and the diffusion emphasis effect revealed the importance of "prep.TE" in the MPG preparation pulse and "TFE shot interval" in the gradient echo sequence. Appropriate choice of these parameters allows DSDE to provide a similar DWI to that of conventional single-shot SEEPI DWI. We therefore concluded DSDE to be a useful DWI method.

  12. [Examination of upper abdominal region in high spatial resolution diffusion-weighted imaging using 3-Tesla MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masaki; Matsushita, Hiroki; Oosugi, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuyasu; Yaegashi, Taku; Anma, Takeshi

    2009-03-20

    The advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-Tesla) has the possibility of contributing to the improvement of high spatial resolution without causing image deterioration. In this study, we compared SNR and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value with 3-Tesla as the condition in the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) parameter of the 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (1.5-Tesla) and we examined the high spatial resolution images in the imaging method [respiratory-triggering (RT) method and breath free (BF) method] and artifact (motion and zebra) in the upper abdominal region of DWI at 3-Tesla. We have optimized scan parameters based on phantom and in vivo study. As a result, 3-Tesla was able to obtain about 1.5 times SNR in comparison with the 1.5-Tesla, ADC value had few differences. Moreover, the RT method was effective in correcting the influence of respiratory movement in comparison with the BF method, and image improvement by the effective acquisition of SNR and reduction of the artifact were provided. Thus, DWI of upper abdominal region was a useful sequence for the high spatial resolution in 3-Tesla.

  13. Effect of gadolinium injection on diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) imaging of breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) provides both qualitative and quantitative imaging of breast lesions and are usually performed before contrast material injection (CMI). This study aims to assess whether the administration of gadolinium significantly affects DWIBS imaging. 200 patients were prospectively evaluated by MRI with STIR, TSE-T2, pre-CMI DWIBS, contrast enhanced THRIVE-T1 and post-CMI DWIBS sequences. Pre and post-CMI DWIBS were analyzed searching for the presence of breast lesions and calculating the ADC value. ADC values of ≤1.44×10(-3) mm(2)/s were considered suspicious for malignancy. This analysis was then compared with the histological findings. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy (DA), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative (NPV) were calculated for both sequences and represented by ROC analysis. Pre and post-CMI ADC values were compared by using the paired t test. In 150/200 (59%) patients, pre and post-CMI DWIBS indicated the presence of breast lesions, 53 (35%) with ADC values of >1.44×10(-3) mm(2)/s and 97 (65%) with ADC≤1.44×10(-3) mm(2)/s. Pre-CMI and post-DWIBS sequences obtained the same sensitivity, specificity, DA, PPV and NPV values of 97%, 83%, 89%, 79% and 98%. The mean ADC value of benign lesions was 1.831±0.18×10(-3) mm(2)/s before and 1.828±0.18×10(-3) mm(2)/s after CMI. The mean ADC value of the malignant lesions was 1.146±0.16×10(-3) mm(2)/s before and 1.144±0.16×10(-3) mm(2)/s after CMI. No significant difference was found between pre and post CMI ADC values (p>0.05). DWIBS imaging is not influenced by CMI. Breast MR protocol could be modified by placing DWIBS after dynamic contrast enhanced sequences in order to maximize patient cooperation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diffusion Weighted Imaging of the Uterus: Regional ADC Variation with Oral Contraceptive Usage and Comparison with Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messiou, Christina; Morgan, Veronica A.; Silva, Sonali S. de; Souza, Nandita M. de (Cancer Research UK Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey (United Kingdom)); Ind, Thomas E. (Dept. of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, St George' s Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom))

    2009-07-15

    Background: There is growing interest in diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cervical carcinoma but normal uterine appearances and effects of the oral contraceptive pill (OCP) have not been described. Purpose: To establish apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for normal regions of uterus, determine the effect of the OCP on these values, and compare them with ADCs from cervical cancer. Material and Methods: Twenty-seven premenopausal women (19 taking the OCP) with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) were studied with T2W and diffusion weighted MRI (DW-MRI). Regions of interest were drawn on ADC maps by visual matching with T2W images on different zones of the uterus and values compared between women not taking and taking the OCp.A further group of 25 women with clinically obvious tumors of the cervix were also studied with T2W and DW-MRI and ADC values of tumor were compared with ADC values of cervical epithelium and stroma. Results: The ADC values of adjacent zones of the uterus and cervix were significantly different from one another (P<0.001). The junctional zone was seen as a band of restricted diffusion between endometrium and outer myometrium. The ADC value of the junctional zone of the uterus was significantly greater (P<0.001) in patients taking the OCP than those patients not taking the OCp.There was no significant affect of the OCP on the ADC values of other uterine zones. Conclusion: The zonal anatomy of the uterus is well demonstrated by DW-MRI with hormonal effects secondary to the OCP affecting junctional zone alone. ADC of cervical tumor is significantly different to cervical epithelium and stroma indicating a role in cervical cancer detection and local staging

  15. The role of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the female pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Evis, E-mail: es220@radiol.cam.ac.uk [University Department of Radiology, Box 218, Level 5, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Rockall, Andrea, E-mail: Andrea.Rockall@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7ED (United Kingdom); Rangarajan, Deepa, E-mail: rdrangarajan@googlemail.com [Department of Radiology, Box 218, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A., E-mail: rahel.kubik@ksb.ch [Institute of Radiology, Department of Medical Services, Kantonsspital Baden Im Ergel, CH-5404 Baden (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    Functional imaging by means of dynamic multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is now part of the standard imaging protocols for evaluation of the female pelvis. DCE-MRI and DW-MRI are important MR imaging techniques which enable the radiologist to move from morphological to functional assessment of diseases of the female pelvis. This is mainly due to the limitations of morphologic imaging, particularly in lesion characterization, accurate lymph node staging, assessment of tumour response and inability to differentiate post-treatment changes from tumour recurrence. DCE-MRI improves the accuracy of T2WI in staging of endometrial cancer. It also helps differentiate tumour recurrence from radiation fibrosis in patients with cervical cancer. DCE-MRI improves characterization of cystic adnexal lesions and detection of small peritoneal implants in patients with ovarian cancer. DW-MRI is valuable in preoperative staging of patients with endometrial and cervical cancer, especially in detection of extra-uterine disease. It does increase reader's confidence for detection of recurrent disease in gynaecological malignancies and improves detection of small peritoneal implants in patients with ovarian cancer. In this review article we give an overview of both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI techniques, concentrating on their main clinical application in the female pelvis, and present a practical approach of the added value of these techniques according to the main pathological conditions, highlighting the pearls and pitfalls of each technique.

  16. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging for differentiating borderline from malignant epithelial tumours of the ovary: pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shu Hui; Qiang, Jin Wei; Ma, Feng Hua; Cai, Song Qi; Li, Hai Ming [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Jinshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Guo Fu [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Shanghai (China); Wang, Li [Fudan University, Department of Pathology, Jinshan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-15

    To investigate diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for differentiating borderline from malignant epithelial tumours of the ovary. This retrospective study included 60 borderline epithelial ovarian tumours (BEOTs) in 48 patients and 65 malignant epithelial ovarian tumours (MEOTs) in 54 patients. DW imaging as well as conventional MR imaging was performed. Signal intensity on DW imaging was assessed and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value was measured. The results were correlated with histopathology and cell density. The majority of MEOTs showed high signal intensity on DW imaging, whereas most BEOTs showed low or moderate signal intensity (P = 0.000). The mean ADC value of the solid components in BEOTs (1.562 ± 0.346 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was significantly higher than in MEOTs (0.841 ± 0.209 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). A threshold value of 1.039 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s permitted the distinction with a sensitivity of 97.0 %, a specificity of 92.2 % and an accuracy of 96.4 %. There was an inverse correlation between ADC value and cell density (r = -0.609; P = 0.0000) which was significantly lower in BEOTs than in MEOTs. DW imaging is useful for differentiating borderline from malignant epithelial tumours of the ovary. (orig.)

  17. IgG4-related kidney disease: MRI findings with emphasis on the usefulness of diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bohyun; Kim, Jin Hee, E-mail: kimjhrad@amc.seoul.kr; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2014-07-15

    Objectives: To investigate the imaging findings of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related kidney disease (IgG4-KD) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and to evaluate the usefulness of DWI in lesion detection. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included 31 patients with IgG4-KD who underwent MRI covering both kidneys. Two radiologists reviewed in consensus the MR images to determine the distribution pattern (location, laterality, and multiplicity) and the visually assessed signal intensity (hypointense, isointense or hyperintense) of the renal lesions compared to the normal renal parenchyma on each sequence. Per-patient sensitivity for detecting IgG4-KD and the number of detectable lesions were compared in T2-weighted images, DWI, and dynamic contrast-enhanced images. Results: IgG4-KD typically manifested as bilateral (83.9%), multiple (93.5%), and renal parenchymal (87.1%) nodules appearing isointense (93.5%) on T1-weighted images, hypointense (77.4%) on T2-weighted images, hyperintense (100%) on DWI (b = 1000), and hypointense (83.3%) in the arterial phase and with a progressive enhancement pattern on dynamic contrast-enhanced images. The sensitivity of DWI for detecting IgG4-KD was significantly higher than that of T2-weighted images (100% vs. 77.4%, P = 0.034). The median number of detectable lesions was significantly greater in DWI (n = 9) than in T2-weighted images (n = 2) and dynamic contrast-enhanced images (n = 5) (P ≤ 0.008). Conclusions: The characteristic MRI findings of IgG4-KD were bilateral, multiple, renal parenchymal nodules with T2 hypointensity, diffusion restriction, and a progressive enhancement pattern. As DWI was useful in the detection of IgG4-KD, adding DWI to conventional MRI for patients suspected of having IgG4-KD may enhance the diagnosis.

  18. Added value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of pancreatic fluid collection infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borens, Bruno [Polyclinique Santa Maria, Nice (France); Arvanitakis, Marianna; Eisendrath, Pierre; Toussaint, Emmanuel; Deviere, Jacques [Erasme Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Brussels (Belgium); Absil, Julie; Matos, Celso; Bali, Maria Antonietta [Erasme Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); El Bouchaibi, Said [Epicura, Ath (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of infection in pancreatic fluid collections (PFC). Forty-patients with PFC requiring endoscopic-transmural drainage underwent conventional-MR and DW-MR imaging (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) before endoscopy. MR images were divided into two sets (set1, conventional-MR; set2, conventional-MR, DW-MR and ADC maps) and randomized. Two independent readers performed qualitative and quantitative (apparent diffusion coefficient, ADC) image analysis. Bacteriological analysis of PFC content was the gold standard. Non-parametric tests were used for comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV), positive predictive value (PPV) and accuracy were calculated for the two sets for both readers. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) were drawn to assess quantitative DW-MR imaging diagnostic performance. For both readers, sensitivity, specificity, NPV, PPV and accuracy for infected PFCs were higher for set2 (P >.05). ADC were lower in infected versus non-infected PFCs (P ≤.031). Minimum ADC cut-off: 1,090 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 1 and 1,012 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for reader 2 (sensitivity and specificity 67 % and 96 % for both readers). Qualitative information provided by DW-MR may help to assess PFCs infection. Infected PFCs show significantly lower ADCs compared to non-infected ones. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic value of lymph node metastasis by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Qin He

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The ADC values in CC tissues with LN metastasis were significantly lower than those without LN metastasis, suggesting that DWI appears to improve diagnostic performance and can be a useful adjunct imaging for identifying LN metastasis in CC patients.

  20. Slice accelerated diffusion-weighted imaging at ultra-high field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Koopmans, Peter J; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Norris, David G; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L; Heidemann, Robin M

    2014-04-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data with very high isotropic resolution can be obtained at 7T. However, for extensive brain coverage, a large number of slices is required, resulting in long acquisition times (TAs). Recording multiple slices simultaneously (SMS) promises to reduce the TA. A combination of zoomed and parallel imaging is used to achieve high isotropic resolution dMRI data with a low level of distortions at 7T. The blipped-CAIPI (controlled aliasing in parallel imaging) approach is used to acquire several slices simultaneously. Due to their high radiofrequency (RF) power deposition and ensuing specific absorption rate (SAR) constraints, the commonly used multiband (MB) RF pulses for SMS imaging are inefficient at 7T and entail long repetition times, counteracting the usefulness of SMS acquisitions. To address this issue, low SAR multislice Power Independent of Number of Slices RF pulses are employed. In vivo dMRI results with and without SMS acceleration are presented at different isotropic spatial resolutions at ultra high field strength. The datasets are recorded at a high angular resolution to detect fiber crossings. From the results and compared with earlier studies at these resolutions, it can be seen that scan time is significantly reduced, while image quality is preserved. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Necrotic cervical nodes: Usefulness of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in the differentiation of suppurative lymphadenitis from malignancy

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    Kato, Hiroki, E-mail: hkato@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Kanematsu, Masayuki, E-mail: masa_gif@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Gifu University School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); High-level Imaging Diagnosis Center, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Kato, Zenichiro, E-mail: zenkato@mac.com [Department of Pediatrics, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Teramoto, Takahide, E-mail: t-tera@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Pediatrics, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Mizuta, Keisuke, E-mail: kmizuta@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Aoki, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: aoki@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Otolaryngology, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Makita, Hiroki, E-mail: makitah@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan); Kato, Keizo, E-mail: keizo@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Sciences, Gifu University School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of diffusion-weighted (DW) MR imaging for the differentiation between suppurative lymphadenitis and malignancy in necrotic cervical lymph nodes. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with suppurative lymphadenitis, 40 with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), eight with lymphoma, and six with thyroid cancer were accompanied by necrotic cervical nodes. All 69 patients underwent 1.5-T MR imaging including DW and 58 underwent gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Necrotic area-to-spinal cord signal intensity ratios (SIR) on T1-, T2- and DW images and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) [10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s] were correlated with the pathologies. Results: Nineteen necrotic cervical nodes with suppurative lymphadenitis, 67 with SCC, 10 with lymphoma, and 12 with thyroid cancer were identified. SIR on DW images was higher in suppurative lymphadenitis (2.50 ± 1.21) than in malignancies (1.29 ± 0.67) (p < .01), and ADC value was lower in suppurative lymphadenitis (0.89 ± 0.21) than in malignancies (1.46 ± 0.46) (p < .01). SIR on T1-weighted images was higher in thyroid cancer (1.95 ± 0.53) than in suppurative lymphadenitis (0.87 ± 0.17), SCC (0.92 ± 0.13), and lymphoma (0.95 ± 0.09) (p < .01). No significant difference in SIR on T2-weighted images was found between suppurative lymphadenitis (1.46 ± 0.50) and malignancies (1.61 ± 0.56). Conclusion: DW imaging with ADC measurements may play a supplementary role in the differentiation of necrotic cervical nodes between suppurative lymphadenitis and malignancy.

  2. High and ultra-high b-value diffusion-weighted imaging in prostate cancer: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetter, Axel; Nensa, Felix; Lipponer, Christine; Guberina, Nika; Olbricht, Tobias; Schenck, Marcus; Schlosser, Thomas W; Gratz, Marcel; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is routinely used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of prostate cancer. However, the routine use of b values higher than 1000 s/mm(2) is not clear up to present. Moreover, the complex diffusion behavior of malignant and benign prostate tissues hampers precise predictions of contrast in DWI images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. To quantitatively analyze DWI with different b values in prostate cancer and to identify b values best suitable for cancer detection. Forty-one patients with histologically proven prostate cancer were examined with high resolution T2-weighted imaging and DWI at 3 Tesla. Five different b values (0, 800, 1000, 1500, 2000 s/mm(2)) were applied. ADC values of tumors and reference areas were measured on ADC maps derived from different pairs of b values. Furthermore, signal intensities of DW images of tumors and reference areas were measured. For analysis, contrast ratios of ADC values and signal intensities of DW images were calculated and compared. No significant differences were found between contrast ratios measured on ADC maps of all analyzed b value pairs (P = 0.43). Contrast ratios calculated from signal intensities of DW images were highest at b values of 1500 and 2000 s/mm(2) and differed significantly from contrast ratios at b values of 800 and 1000 s/mm(2) (P < 0.01). Whereas contrast in ADC maps does not significantly change with different b values, contrast ratios of DW images are significantly higher at b-values of 1500 and 2000 s/mm(2) in comparison to b values of 800 and 1000 s/mm(2). Therefore, diagnostic performance of DWI in prostate cancer might be increased by application of b values higher than 1000 s/mm(2). © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  3. Early new diffusion-weighted imaging lesions appear more often in stroke patients with a multiple territory lesion pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braemswig, Tim Bastian; Usnich, Tatiana; Albach, Fredrik N; Brunecker, Peter; Grittner, Ulrike; Scheitz, Jan F; Fiebach, Jochen B; Nolte, Christian H

    2013-08-01

    New diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesions are common in patients with acute ischemic stroke. They are associated with an initial nonsingle lesion pattern. Previous studies have not analyzed this association in detail. We differentiated nonsingle lesions in 1 vascular supply territory only (scattered lesion pattern) from nonsingle lesions in ≥2 vascular supply territory (multiple territory lesion -pattern). Patients with an acute ischemic stroke underwent 3 MRI (3T) examinations: on admission, on the following day, and 4 to 7 days after symptom onset. First, DWI lesions were delineated manually by raters blinded to clinical details. Second, DWI images were coregistered and analyzed visually for new hyperintensities. The initial lesion pattern was categorized as single, scattered, or multiple territory. Of 340 patients enrolled, 43% had a single lesion pattern, 40% had a scattered lesion pattern, and 17% had a multiple territory lesion pattern. In multivariable analysis, the categorical variable lesion pattern was independently associated with new DWI lesions (odds ratio multiple territory lesion pattern, 3.64 [95% confidence interval, 1.75-7.58]; odds ratio scattered lesion pattern, 1.96 [95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.56]). Patients with multiple territory lesion pattern had significantly more often diabetes mellitus, and their new lesions were more often located remotely from the initial area of hypoperfusion compared with patients with scattered lesion pattern. Lesion pattern on initial image is an independent risk factor for new DWI lesions. The risk for new DWI lesions is highest in patients with multiple territory lesion pattern.

  4. Lymphoma and inflammation in the orbit: Diagnostic performance with diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Song, Liyuan; Wang, Xinyan; Li, Jing; Xian, Junfang; Wang, Feifei; Tan, Pan

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the combination of both in the differential diagnosis of lymphoma and inflammation in the orbit. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board and the informed consent requirement was waived. A total of 53 patients underwent preoperative 3T MRI. Parameters of DWI and DCE MRI were evaluated in these 30 patients with orbital lymphoma and 23 patients with orbital inflammation. The diagnostic performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and parameters derived from DCE MRI of orbital lymphoma and orbital inflammation differed significantly (ADC, T max , contrast index [CI], enhancement ratio [ER], and washout ratio [WR]: P inflammation (P = 0.016 for reviewer 1; P = 0.001 for reviewer 2). The combination of DWI and DCE MRI can improve diagnostic performance in differentiating lymphoma from inflammation in the orbit compared with DWI alone. 3 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1438-1445. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Urinary Epithelial Cancer with Upper Urinary Tract Obstruction: Preliminary Results

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    Takeuchi, M.; Matsuzaki, K.; Kubo, H.; Nishitani, H. [Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Various malignant tumors of the body show high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). In the genitourinary region, DWI is expected to have a role in detecting urinary epithelial cancer noninvasively. Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of DWI for the diagnosis of urinary epithelial cancer with upper urinary tract obstruction. Material and Methods: Twenty upper urinary tract cancers in 16 patients were evaluated by high-b-value DWI (b=800s/mm2). The signal intensity was visually evaluated, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured. Results: All urinary epithelial cancers showed high signal intensity on DWI. The ADC in cancerous lesions was 1.31{+-}0.27 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, which was significantly lower than that of the lumens of the ureter or renal pelvis (3.32{+-}0.44 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; P<0.001). Maximum intensity projection images of DWI in combination with static-fluid MR urography provided three-dimensional entire urinary tract imaging with the extension of tumors. Conclusion: DWI is useful in the tumor detection and in evaluating the tumor extension of urinary epithelial cancer in patients with upper urinary tract obstruction.

  6. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Urinary Epithelial Cancer with Upper Urinary Tract Obstruction: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, M.; Matsuzaki, K.; Kubo, H.; Nishitani, H. (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Univ. of Tokushima, Tokushima (Japan))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Various malignant tumors of the body show high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). In the genitourinary region, DWI is expected to have a role in detecting urinary epithelial cancer noninvasively. Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of DWI for the diagnosis of urinary epithelial cancer with upper urinary tract obstruction. Material and Methods: Twenty upper urinary tract cancers in 16 patients were evaluated by high-b-value DWI (b=800s/mm2). The signal intensity was visually evaluated, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were measured. Results: All urinary epithelial cancers showed high signal intensity on DWI. The ADC in cancerous lesions was 1.31+-0.27 x 10-3 mm2/s, which was significantly lower than that of the lumens of the ureter or renal pelvis (3.32+-0.44 x 10-3 mm2/s; P<0.001). Maximum intensity projection images of DWI in combination with static-fluid MR urography provided three-dimensional entire urinary tract imaging with the extension of tumors. Conclusion: DWI is useful in the tumor detection and in evaluating the tumor extension of urinary epithelial cancer in patients with upper urinary tract obstruction

  7. Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Early Diagnosis of Neonatal Adrenoleukodystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nuri Sener

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A newborn baby girl developed seizures right after birth. On the fourth day, the baby was examined using diffusion sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and diagnosed to have neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Laboratory findings confirmed the diagnosis. This is the first case of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD where diffusion MRI sequence helped in the diagnosis. We find association of NALD with seizures at birth is an extremely rare occurrence, and so far, only one case has been mentioned in the literature.

  8. Co-analysis of brain structure and function using fMRI and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jeffrey S; Greenberg, Adam S; Pyles, John A; Pathak, Sudhir K; Behrmann, Marlene; Schneider, Walter; Tarr, Michael J

    2012-11-08

    The study of complex computational systems is facilitated by network maps, such as circuit diagrams. Such mapping is particularly informative when studying the brain, as the functional role that a brain area fulfills may be largely defined by its connections to other brain areas. In this report, we describe a novel, non-invasive approach for relating brain structure and function using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This approach, a combination of structural imaging of long-range fiber connections and functional imaging data, is illustrated in two distinct cognitive domains, visual attention and face perception. Structural imaging is performed with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fiber tractography, which track the diffusion of water molecules along white-matter fiber tracts in the brain (Figure 1). By visualizing these fiber tracts, we are able to investigate the long-range connective architecture of the brain. The results compare favorably with one of the most widely-used techniques in DWI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI is unable to resolve complex configurations of fiber tracts, limiting its utility for constructing detailed, anatomically-informed models of brain function. In contrast, our analyses reproduce known neuroanatomy with precision and accuracy. This advantage is partly due to data acquisition procedures: while many DTI protocols measure diffusion in a small number of directions (e.g., 6 or 12), we employ a diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI)(1, 2) protocol which assesses diffusion in 257 directions and at a range of magnetic gradient strengths. Moreover, DSI data allow us to use more sophisticated methods for reconstructing acquired data. In two experiments (visual attention and face perception), tractography reveals that co-active areas of the human brain are anatomically connected, supporting extant hypotheses that they form functional networks. DWI allows us to create a "circuit diagram" and reproduce it on an individual-subject basis

  9. Detecting Acute Myocardial Infarction by Diffusion-Weighted versus T2-Weighted Imaging and Myocardial Necrosis Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiyang; Chen, Min; Li, Yongjun; Wang, YaLing; Zhang, Shijun; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-10-01

    We used a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction to study the signal evolution of ischemic myocardium on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI). Eight Chinese miniature pigs underwent percutaneous left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery occlusion for 90 minutes followed by reperfusion, which induced acute myocardial infarction. We used DWI preprocedurally and hourly for 4 hours postprocedurally. We acquired turbo inversion recovery magnitude T2-weighted images (TIRM T2WI) and late gadolinium enhancement images from the DWI slices. We measured the serum myocardial necrosis markers myoglobin, creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, and cardiac troponin I at the same time points as the magnetic resonance scanning. We used histochemical staining to confirm injury. All images were analyzed qualitatively. Contrast-to-noise ratio (the contrast between infarcted and healthy myocardium) and relative signal index were used in quantitative image analysis. We found that DWI identified myocardial signal abnormity early (acute myocardial infarction and identified the infarct-related high signal more often than did TIRM T2WI: 7 of 8 pigs (87.5%) versus 3 of 8 (37.5%) ( P =0.046). Quantitative image analysis yielded a significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio and relative signal index between infarcted and normal myocardium on DWI. However, within 4 hours after infarction, the serologic myocardial injury markers were not significantly positive. We conclude that DWI can be used to detect myocardial signal abnormalities early after acute myocardial infarction-identifying the infarction earlier than TIRM T2WI and widely used clinical serologic biomarkers.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging for the differentiation of true progression from pseudoprogression following concomitant radiotherapy with temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woong Jae; Choi, Seung Hong; Park, Chul-Kee; Yi, Kyung Sik; Kim, Tae Min; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Il Han

    2012-11-01

    The assessment of the therapeutic response of high-grade gliomas treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using temozolomide is difficult because of the frequent occurrence of early imaging changes that are indistinguishable from tumor progression, termed pseudoprogression. The purpose of this study was to determine whether diffusion-weighted imaging could be used to differentiate true progression and pseudoprogression. Magnetic resonance images and diffusion-weighted images obtained within 2 months of CCRT completion in patients with high-grade gliomas were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 22 patients with increases in measurable enhancing regions were identified and classified into true progression and pseudoprogression groups on the basis of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images obtained 12 weeks after CCRT. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps, respectively, was performed to discriminate true progression and pseudoprogression. Statistical analyses were performed using Fisher's exact test, unpaired t tests, and receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The true progression group showed a higher incidence of homogeneous or multifocal high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images (seven of 10 patients [70%]), whereas rim high or no high signal intensity (10 of 12 [83%]) was observed in the pseudoprogression group (P = .027). True progression was defined by newly appearing or enlarged enhancing lesions with mean apparent diffusion coefficient values of 1200 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s inside the radiation field after CCRT; the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 80% (eight of 10), 83.3% (10 of 12), and 81.2% (18 of 22), respectively. The assessment of diffusion-weighted images for patients with increases of measurable enhancing regions 2 months after CCRT completion is useful for differentiating true progression from pseudoprogression. Copyright © 2012 AUR. Published by

  11. Correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient value on diffusion-weighted MR imaging and Gleason score in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Reinikainen, P; Vanhanen, A; Kapanen, M; Vierikko, T; Ryymin, P; Hyödynmaa, S; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, P-L

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) correlates with prostate cancer aggressiveness and further to compare the diagnostic performance of ADC and normalized ADC (nADC: normalized to non-tumor tissue). Thirty pre-treatment patients (mean age, 69years; range: 59-78years) with prostate cancer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination, including DWI with three b values: 50, 400, and 800s/mm(2). Both ADC and nADC were correlated with the Gleason score obtained through transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. The tumor minimum ADC (ADCmin: the lowest ADC value within tumor) had an inverse correlation with the Gleason score (r=-0.43, Pcorrelated with the Gleason score (r=-0.52 and r=-0.55, P<0.01; respectively), and they were lower in patients with Gleason score 3+4 than those with Gleason score 3+3 (P<0.01; respectively). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the area under the ROC curve was 0.765, 0.818, or 0.833 for the ADCmin, nADCmin, or nADCmean; respectively, in differentiating between Gleason score 3+4 and 3+3 tumors. Tumor ADCmin, nADCmin, and nADCmean are useful markers to predict the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging of breast cancer: association with histopathological features and subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunju; Ko, Kyounglan; Kim, Daehong; Min, Changki; Kim, Sungheon G; Joo, Jungnam; Park, Boram

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the associations between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM)-derived parameters and histopathological features and subtypes of breast cancer. Pre-operative MRI from 275 patients with unilateral breast cancer was analyzed. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and IVIM parameters [tissue diffusion coefficient (Dt), perfusion fraction (fp) and pseudodiffusion coefficient] were obtained from cancer and normal tissue using diffusion-weighted imaging with b-values of 0, 30, 70, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 800 s mm(-2). We then compared the IVIM parameters of tumours with different histopathological features and subtypes. The ADC and Dt were lower and fp was higher in cancers than in normal tissues (p cancer than in low Ki-67 cancer (p = 0.019), whereas ADC showed no significant difference (p = 0.309). Luminal B [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative] cancer showed lower ADC (p = 0.003) and Dt (p = 0.001) than other types. We found low tissue diffusivity in high Ki-67 cancer and luminal B (HER2-negative) cancer using IVIM imaging. Low tissue diffusivity is more clearly shown in high Ki-67 tumours and luminal B (HER2-negative) tumours with the IVIM model.

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of Growth Plates around the Knees of Adolescent Soccer Players by Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zmago Krajnc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To quantitatively evaluate growth plates around the knees in adolescent soccer players utilizing the diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI. Methods. The knees and adjacent growth plates of eleven 14-year-old male soccer players were evaluated by MRI before (end of season’s summer break and after two months of intense soccer training. MRI evaluation was conducted in coronal plane by PD-FSE and DWI. All images were screened for any major pathological changes. Later, central growth plate surface area (CGPSA was measured and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values were calculated in two most central coronal slices divided into four regions: distal femur medial (DFM, distal femur lateral (DFL, proximal tibia medial (PTM, and proximal tibia lateral (PTL. Results. No gross pathology was diagnosed on MRI. CGPSA was not significantly reduced: DFM 278 versus 272, DFL 265 versus 261, PTM 193 versus 192, and PTL 214 versus 210. ADC decrease was statistically significant only for PTM: DFM 1.27 versus 1.22, DFL 1.37 versus 1.34, PTM 1.13 versus 1.03 (p=0.003, and PTL 1.28 versus 1.22. Conclusions. DWI measurements indicate increased cellularity in growth plates around knees in footballers most prominent in PTM after intense training. No detectable differences on a standard PD-FSE sequence were observed.

  14. Diffusion-weighted imaging findings in Perthes disease with dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtracted (DGS) MR correlation: a preliminary study

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    Merlini, Laura; Anooshiravani, Mehrak; Hanquinet, Sylviane [Geneva University Hospital, Unit of Pediatric Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Combescure, Christophe [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Biostatistics, Geneva (Switzerland); De Rosa, Vincenzo [University Hospital of Geneva, Clinic of Pediatric Orthopedics, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-03-15

    Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCP) is necrosis of the proximal femoral epiphysis of vascular origin. Clinical course and outcome in LCP disease varies considerably between different patients. Earlier prognostic criteria than those offered by conventional radiography are necessary to identify children who require prompt surgical treatment. To assess the significance of signal alteration on diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI MR) in LCP. Twelve boys with unilateral LCP disease (Catterall grade 2 and 3), at the initial sclerotic stage and early fragmentation phase, underwent dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtracted (DGS) and DWI MR. For DGS MR, the lateral pillar enhancement was recorded. For DWI imaging, we measured ADC values in the diseased and the unaffected epiphyses and metaphyses. Receiver operating characteristic curves were performed to analyze the performance of DWI in establishing agreement with the results of DGS MR, which is the gold standard for prognosis. Femoral epiphysis increased diffusivity was observed in the affected hip in all cases. Increased metaphysis diffusivity in the affected side was observed in all cases with absent lateral pillar enhancement at DGS MR. DWI seems to be a noninvasive means of distinguishing between Perthes disease with favourable and unfavourable prognosis. (orig.)

  15. Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

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    Yu, Mi Hye [Konkuk University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Bo Yun [Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae-You [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seung-Yong; Yi, Nam-Joon; Suh, Kyung-Suk [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for the detection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Our study population comprised 77 patients with 140 CRLMs who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI within 1 month prior to surgery: group A (without NAC, n = 38) and group B (with NAC, n = 39). Two radiologists independently assessed all MR images and graded their diagnostic confidence for CRLM on a 5-point scale. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) were calculated and compared between the two groups. Diagnostic accuracy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI in group B was slightly lower than in group A, but a statistically significant difference was not observed (observer 1: A{sub z}, 0.926 in group A, 0.905 in group B; observer 2: A{sub z}, 0.944 in group A, 0.885 in group B; p > 0.05). Sensitivity and PPV of group B were comparable to those of group A (observer 1: sensitivity = 93.5 % vs. 93.6 %, PPV = 95.1 % vs. 86.9 %; observer 2: sensitivity = 96.8 % vs. 91.0 %; PPV = 90.0 % vs. 89.7 %; all p > 0.05). Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI including DWI provided good diagnostic performance with high sensitivity (>90 %) for the detection of CRLMs, regardless of the influence of NAC. (orig.)

  16. PI-RADS version 2: quantitative analysis aids reliable interpretation of diffusion-weighted imaging for prostate cancer

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    Park, Sung Yoon; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    To determine whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) ratio aids reliable interpretation of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-six consecutive patients with PCa who underwent DWI and surgery were included. Based on pathologic tumour location, two readers independently performed DWI scoring according to the revised Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADSv2). ADC ratios of benign to cancerous prostatic tissue were then measured independently and compared between cases showing concordant and discordant DWI scores ≥4. Area under the curve (AUC) and threshold of ADC ratio were analyzed for DWI scores ≥4. The rate of inter-reader disagreement for DWI score ≥4 was 11.8% (9/76). ADC ratios were higher in concordant vs. discordant DWI scores ≥4 (median, 1.7 vs. 1.1-1.2; p < 0.001). For DWI scores ≥4, the AUCs of ADC ratios were 0.970 for reader 1 and 0.959 for reader 2. In patients with an ADC ratio >1.3, the rate of inter-reader disagreement for DWI score ≥4 decreased to 5.9-6.0%. An ADC ratio >1.3 yielded 100% (reader 1, 54/54; reader 2, 51/51) positive predictive value for clinically significant cancer. ADC ratios may be useful for reliable interpretation of DWI score ≥4 in PI-RADSv2. (orig.)

  17. Diffusion weighted imaging distinguishes the vegetative state from the minimally conscious state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Espejo, Davinia; Bekinschtein, Tristan; Monti, Martin M; Pickard, John D; Junque, Carme; Coleman, Martin R; Owen, Adrian M

    2011-01-01

    The vegetative (VS) and minimally conscious (MCS) states are currently distinguished on the basis of exhibited behaviour rather than underlying pathology. Although previous histopathological studies have documented different degrees of diffuse axonal injury as well as damage to the thalami and brainstem regions in VS and MCS, these differences have not been assessed in vivo, and therefore, do not provide a measurable pathological marker to aid clinical diagnosis. Currently, the diagnostic decision-making process is highly subjective and prone to error. Indeed, previous work has suggested that up to 43% of patients in this group may be misdiagnosed. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to study the neuropathology of 25 vegetative and minimally conscious patients in vivo and to identify measures that could potentially distinguish the patients in these two groups. Mean diffusivity (MD) maps of the subcortical white matter, brainstem and thalami were generated. The MCS and VS patients differed significantly in subcortical white matter and thalamic regions, but appeared not to differ in the brainstem. Moreover, the DTI results predicted scores on the Coma Recovery Scale (pclassified the patients in to their appropriate diagnostic categories with an accuracy of 95%. The results suggest that this method may provide an objective and highly accurate method for classifying these challenging patient populations and may therefore complement the behavioural assessment to inform the diagnostic decision making process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of uterine leiomyomas following uterine artery embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Olivier; Shotar, Eimad; Guerrache, Youcef; Place, Vinciane; Oprea, Raluca; Le Dref, Olivier; Boudiaf, Mourad [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Paris (France); Soyer, Philippe; Dohan, Anthony [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Dautry, Raphael; Sirol, Marc [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Ricbourg, Aude [Hopital Lariboisiere-AP-HP, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Paris (France)

    2016-10-15

    To test whether variations in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of uterine leiomyomas after uterine artery embolization (UAE) may correlate with outcome and assess the effects of UAE on leiomyomas and normal myometrium with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Data of 49 women who underwent pelvic MRI before and after UAE were retrospectively reviewed. Uterine and leiomyoma volumes, ADC values of leiomyomas, and normal myometrium were calculated before and after UAE. By comparison with baseline ADC values, a significant drop in leiomyoma ADC was found at 6-month post-UAE (1.096 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 0.712 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, respectively; p < 0.0001), but not at 48-h post-UAE. Leiomyoma devascularization was complete in 40/49 women (82 %) at 48 h and in 37/49 women (76 %) at 6 months. Volume reduction and leiomyoma ADC values at 6 months correlated with the degree of devascularization. There was a significant drop in myometrium ADC after UAE. Perfusion defect of the myometrium was observed at 48 h in 14/49 women (28.5 %) in association with higher degrees of leiomyoma devascularization. Six months after UAE, drop in leiomyoma ADC values and volume reduction correlate with the degree of leiomyoma devascularization. UAE affects the myometrium as evidenced by a drop in ADC values and initial myometrial perfusion defect. (orig.)

  19. Extracranial Soft-Tissue Tumors: Repeatability of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Estimates from Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfield, Jessica M; Tunariu, Nina; Rata, Mihaela; Miyazaki, Keiko; Jerome, Neil P; Germuska, Michael; Blackledge, Matthew D; Collins, David J; de Bono, Johann S; Yap, Timothy A; deSouza, Nandita M; Doran, Simon J; Koh, Dow-Mu; Leach, Martin O; Messiou, Christina; Orton, Matthew R

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To assess the repeatability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) estimates in extracranial soft-tissue diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging across a wide range of imaging protocols and patient populations. Materials and Methods Nine prospective patient studies and one prospective volunteer study, performed between 2006 and 2016 with research ethics committee approval and written informed consent from each subject, were included in this single-institution study. A total of 141 tumors and healthy organs were imaged twice (interval between repeated examinations, 45 minutes to 10 days, depending the on study) to assess the repeatability of median and mean ADC estimates. The Levene test was used to determine whether ADC repeatability differed between studies. The Pearson linear correlation coefficient was used to assess correlation between coefficient of variation (CoV) and the year the study started, study size, and volumes of tumors and healthy organs. The repeatability of ADC estimates from small, medium, and large tumors and healthy organs was assessed irrespective of study, and the Levene test was used to determine whether ADC repeatability differed between these groups. Results CoV aggregated across all studies was 4.1% (range for each study, 1.7%-6.5%). No correlation was observed between CoV and the year the study started or study size. CoV was weakly correlated with volume (r = -0.5, P = .1). Repeatability was significantly different between small, medium, and large tumors (P < .05), with the lowest CoV (2.6%) for large tumors. There was a significant difference in repeatability between studies-a difference that did not persist after the study with the largest tumors was excluded. Conclusion ADC is a robust imaging metric with excellent repeatability in extracranial soft tissues across a wide range of tumor sites, sizes, patient populations, and imaging protocol variations. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  20. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy secondary to diphtheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination: diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Hale; Ozgul, Esra; Agildere, Ahmet Muhtesem [Baskent University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    We present a previously healthy 6-month-old boy who was admitted to our hospital with lethargy, hypotonia and focal clonic seizures 6 days following diptheria, tetanus toxoid and whole-cell pertussis vaccination. A diagnosis of acute necrotising encephalopathy was made with the aid of MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton MR spectroscopy. (orig.)

  1. Utility of Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Multiple B Values in Evaluation of Pancreatic Malignant and Benign Lesions and Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeli, Elif; Erbay, Gurcan; Parlakgumus, Alper; Koc, Zafer

    2018-02-01

    To determine the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging in evaluation of pancreatic lesions and in differentiation of benign from malignant lesions. Descriptive study. Baskent University Adana Teaching and Research Center, Adana, Turkey, between September 2013 and May 2015. Forty-three lesions [pancreas adenocarcinoma (n=25)], pancreatitis (n=10), benign lesion (n=8)] were utilized with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with multiple b-values. Different ADC maps of diffusion weighted images by using b-values were acquired. The median ADC at all b values for malignant lesions was significantly different from that for benign lesions (pvalues were compared between benign lesions/normal parenchyma and malignant lesions/normal parenchyma, there was a significant statistical difference in all b values between benign and malignant lesions except at b 50 and b 200 (pvalue (AUC=0.804) was more effective than the lesion ADC for b 600 value (AUC=0.766) in differentiation of benign and malignant lesions. The specificity and sensitivity of the lesion/normal parenchyma ADC ratio were higher than those of ADC values of lesions. When the ADC was compared between benign lesions and pancreatitis, a significant difference was found at all b values (pvalue combinations (p>0.05). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images can be helpful in differentiation of pancreatic carcinoma and benign lesions. Lesion ADC / normal parenchyma ADC ratios are more important than lesion ADC values in assessment of pancreatic lesions.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the pancreas: optimizing b-value for visualization of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Shindo, Toshikazu; Hakamada, Hiroto; Takumi, Koji; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Nakajo, Masanori; Kamimura, Kiyoshisa; Umanodan, Aya; Ideue, Junnichi; Yoshiura, Takashi [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Radiology, Kagoshima City (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    To determine the optimal b-value of 3.0-T diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for visualizing pancreatic adenocarcinomas Fifty-five patients with histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma underwent DWI with different b-values (b = 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 s/mm{sup 2}) at 3.0 T. For each b-value, we retrospectively evaluated DWI findings of pancreatic adenocarcinomas (clear hyperintensity relative to the surrounding pancreas, hyperintensity with an unclear distal border, and isointensity) and image quality, and measured tumour-to-pancreas signal intensity (SI) ratios. DWI findings, image quality, and tumour-to-pancreas SI ratios were compared between the four b-values. There was a significantly higher incidence of tumours showing clear hyperintensity on DWI with b-value of 1500 s/mm{sup 2} than on that with b-value of 1000 s/mm{sup 2} (P < 0.001), and on DWI with b-value of 1000 s/mm{sup 2} than on that with b-value of 500 s/mm{sup 2} (P < 0.001). The tumour-to-distal pancreas SI ratio was higher with b-value of 1500 s/mm{sup 2} than with b-value of 1000 s/mm{sup 2} (P < 0.001), and with b-value of 1000 s/mm{sup 2} than with b-value of 500 s/mm{sup 2} (P < 0.001). A lower image quality was obtained at increasing b-values (P < 0.001); the lowest scores were observed with b-value of 2000 s/mm{sup 2}. The use of b = 1500 s/mm{sup 2} for 3.0-T DWI can improve the delineation of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  3. Value of diffusion-weighted imaging in predicting parametrial invasion in stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Jae; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Sung Yoon; Park, Byung Kwan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bohyun [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in evaluating parametrial invasion (PMI) in stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer. A total of 117 patients with stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer who underwent preoperative MRI and radical hysterectomy were included in this study. Preoperative clinical variables and MRI variables were analysed and compared between the groups with and without pathologically proven PMI. All variables except age were significantly different between patients with and without pathologic PMI (P < 0.05). All variables except squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen were also significantly correlated with pathologic PMI on univariate analysis (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that PMI on MRI (P < 0.001) and tumour apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) (P = 0.029) were independent predictors of pathologic PMI. Area under the curve of PMI on MRI increased significantly from 0.793 to 0.872 when combined with tumour ADC (P = 0.002). When PMI on MRI was further stratified by tumour ADC, the false negative rate was 2.0 % (1/49). In stage IA2-IIA cervical cancer, tumour ADC and PMI on MRI seem to be independent predictors of pathologic PMI. Combining the two predictors improved the diagnostic performance of identifying patients at low risk of pathologic PMI. (orig.)

  4. Severity of White Matter Lesions Correlates with Subcortical Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Abnormalities and Predicts Stroke Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hui; Zhao, Lu; Pei, Lulu; Song, Bo; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Kai; Xu, Yafang; Li, Yusheng; Wu, Jun; Xu, Yuming

    2017-08-31

    The severity of white matter lesions (WMLs) has been strongly linked to small-vessel diseases or lacunar infarction. The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between severity of WMLs and distribution of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) hyperintensities, and to explore whether the severity of WMLs is an independent neuroimaging predictor of stroke risk after transient symptoms with infarction (TSI). We evaluated the presence and severity of WMLs on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences using the age-related white matter changes scale and the location and size of hyperintensities on DWI sequences, respectively, in a prospective cohort study of TSI patients. The primary end point was recurrent stroke within 90 days. A total of 191 consecutive TSI patients were eligible for inclusion in the present analysis. The average age of the patients was 57.3 ± 12.8 years. DWI abnormalities occurred more often in the deep white matter with increasing severity of WMLs (P matter in TSI patients and contributed to an increased risk of recurrent stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of insignificant prostate cancer in potential candidates for active surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Heon; Jeong, Jae Yong; Lee, Sin Woo; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Jeon, Seong Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    To investigate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) could help improve the prediction of insignificant prostate cancer in candidates for active surveillance (AS). Enrolled in this retrospective study were 287 AS candidates who underwent DW-MRI before radical prostatectomy. Patients were stratified into two groups; Group A consisted of patients with no visible tumour or a suspected tumour ADC value > 0.830 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec and Group B consisted of patients with a suspected tumour ADC value < 0.830 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec. We compared pathological outcomes in each group. Group A had 243 (84.7 %) patients and Group B had 44 (15.3 %) patients. The proportion of organ-confined Gleason ≤ 6 disease and insignificant prostate cancer was significantly higher in Group A than Group B (61.3 % vs. 38.6 %, p = 0.005 and 47.7 % vs. 25.0 %, p = 0.005, respectively). On multivariate analysis, a high ADC value was the independent predictor of organ-confined Gleason ≤ 6 disease and insignificant prostate cancer (odds ratio = 2.43, p = 0.011 and odds ratio = 2.74, p = 0.009, respectively). Tumour ADC values may be a useful marker for predicting insignificant prostate cancer in candidates for AS. (orig.)

  6. Quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in malignant breast lesions using different b value combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsen, Line B. [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiation Biology, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1078, Oslo (Norway); Fangberget, Anne [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); Geier, Oliver [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Physics, The Interventional Centre, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, P.O. Box 4950, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Division of Diagnostics and Intervention, Norwegian Radium Hospital, P.O. Box 4959, Oslo (Norway); Buskerud University College, Department of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 7053, Drammen (Norway)

    2013-04-15

    To explore how apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in malignant breast lesions are affected by selection of b values in the monoexponential model and to compare ADCs with diffusion coefficients (Ds) obtained from the biexponential model. Twenty-four women (mean age 51.3 years) with locally advanced breast cancer were included in this study. Pre-treatment diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed using a 1.5-T system with b values of 0, 50, 100, 250 and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. Thirteen different b value combinations were used to derive individual monoexponential ADC maps. All b values were used in the biexponential model. Median ADC (including all b values) and D were 1.04 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (range 0.82-1.61 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.84 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s (range 0.17-1.56 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between ADCs and Ds. For clinically relevant b value combinations, maximum deviation between ADCs including and excluding low b values (<100 s/mm{sup 2}) was 11.8 %. Selection of b values strongly affects ADCs of malignant breast lesions. However, by excluding low b values, ADCs approach biexponential Ds, demonstrating that microperfusion influences the diffusion signal. Thus, care should be taken when ADC calculation includes low b values. (orig.)

  7. Diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging as markers of clinical behavior in children with optic pathway glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost, Sarah C. [Swedish Neuroscience Institute, Department of Neurosurgery, Seattle, WA (United States); Ackerman, Joseph W. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Garbow, Joel R. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Manwaring, Linda P. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Genetics and Genomic Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Gutmann, David H. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); McKinstry, Robert C. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8131, St. Louis, MO (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2008-12-15

    Optic pathway gliomas (OPGs) are common pediatric brain tumors that pose significant clinical challenges with regard to predicting which tumors are likely to become symptomatic and require treatment. These tumors can arise sporadically or in the context of the inherited cancer predisposition syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Few studies have suggested biological or imaging markers that predict the clinical course of this disease. In this cross-sectional study, we hypothesized that the clinical behavior of OPGs in children can be differentiated by diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. A total of 27 children with OPG were studied using DW and DCE MRI protocols. Diffusivity and permeability were calculated and correlated with the clinical behavior the OPG. Mean diffusivity values of 1.39 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms and mean permeability values of 2.10 ml/min per 100 cm{sup 3} of tissue were measured. Clinically aggressive OPGs had significantly higher mean permeability values (P = 0.05) than clinically stable tumors. In addition, there was a strong correlation between clinical aggressiveness and the absence of NF1 (P < 0.01). These results suggest that DCE MRI might be a useful biomarker for clinically aggressive OPG, which should be confirmed in larger prospective longitudinal studies. (orig.)

  8. Value of diffusion-weighted imaging when added to magnetic resonance enterographic evaluation of Crohn disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha S; Nimkin, Katherine; Aranson, Thomas; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    MR enterography is increasingly utilized for noninvasive evaluation of disease activity in young patients with Crohn disease and has great impact on clinical management. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a rapid MR imaging technique that measures molecular diffusion of water and is sensitive to the inflammatory process; however, its value to MR enterography has not been rigorously evaluated. To determine whether the addition of DWI to MR enterography is helpful in evaluating Crohn disease activity in young patients when compared to a histological reference. In this single-institution retrospective study, we searched an imaging database for the period January 2010 to December 2012 to identify patients age 19 years and younger who had MR enterography with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). We used an electronic medical record search to identify those who had MR enterography and colonoscopy performed within 28 days of each other. All MR enterography scans were performed on a 1.5-T or 3-T clinical MR scanner with phased-array torso coil configuration using standard pulse sequences as well as axial DWI with b values of 50, 400 and 800. Bowel segments were evaluated for disease activity based on standard MR enterography sequences; in addition, segmental apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated based on DWI. Histological reference for disease activity was based on assessment for mucosal inflammatory changes on endoscopic biopsy. MR enterography and DWI evaluation were performed in a blinded fashion with respect to histological results. We included imaging of 78 bowel segments from 27 patients (mean age 14.5 ± 3.02 years) with known Crohn disease in the study. The mean ADC for bowel segments with active disease was 1.56 ± 0.7 × 10(3) mm(2)/s compared with 2.58 ± 1.4 × 10(3) mm(2)/s for segments without active disease, a difference that was statistically significant (P disease compared with standard MR enterography (69.2% and

  9. Reversible diffusion weighted imaging hyperintensities during the acute phase of ischemic stroke in pediatric moyamoya disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Goichiro; Ihara, Satoshi; Morota, Nobuhito

    2016-08-01

    Moyamoya disease is one of the primary causes of pediatric ischemic stroke, especially in East Asia. Areas of high signal intensity on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) with decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values usually point to irreversible ischemic damage. Reversibility of these DWI hyperintensities during the acute phase of ischemic stroke in pediatric moyamoya disease has not previously been reported. A 3-year-old girl was admitted to our emergency department due to sudden onset speech impairment and right hemiplegia. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a multilobal low-density area in the left cerebral hemisphere. The area was hyperintense on DWI with decreased ADC values. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography revealed stenosis of the bilateral internal carotid artery bifurcations and their branches. Acute cerebral infarction due to moyamoya disease was diagnosed. MR images taken 4 days later showed resolution of most of the DWI hyperintensity areas. The initial decline in the ADC of the reversible DWI hyperintensities was less severe compared to the irreversible lesion. Within several days after onset, the patient became ambulatory although the follow-up MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images taken 2 weeks after onset revealed thinning of the corresponding cortical gyri. These findings indicate that a wide area of DWI hyperintensity during the acute phase of ischemic stroke can be reversed by appropriate treatment in pediatric moyamoya disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of reversible DWI hyperintensities over a wide cortical area during the acute phase of ischemic stroke in pediatric moyamoya disease.

  10. Modern MRI tools for the characterization of acute demyelinating lesions: value of chemical shift and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueker, W.; Mehnert, F.; Mader, I.; Naegele, T. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Tuebingen Medical School, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Ruff, J. [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany); Gaertner, S. [Department of Neurology, University of Tuebingen Medical School, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Acute demyelinating lesions occur in various inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Apart from multiple sclerosis, most cases can be attributed to an overshooting immunological response to infectious agents called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM). ADEM, which is mostly characterized by a monophasic course, has a multiphasic variant (MDEM). The early application of corticosteroids has been shown to be beneficial for the outcome; thus, an early diagnosis is highly desirable. Furthermore, the differential diagnosis ruling out neoplastic disorders may be difficult using conventional MRI alone. The potential diagnostic value of advanced MR techniques such as chemical shift imaging (CSI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was investigated in a patient with MDEM, who had a new lesion in continuity with the initial disease manifestation. CSI was performed at 1.5 T with a long echo time of 135 ms for the evaluation of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and choline (Cho) and with short TE of 30 ms for macromolecules (mm) and myo-Inositol (mI). DWI was performed using a single-shot isotropic EPI sequence. Whereas acute and chronic areas of demyelination were neither distinguishable on T2- nor on contrast-enhanced T1-weigted images, CSI and DWI revealed different metabolite concentrations and diffusion characteristics within the composite lesion, clearly separating acute from chronic areas of demyelination. In conclusion, the addition of CSI and DWI may add to the diagnostic power of MRI in the setting of demyelinating disorders by identifying areas of acute and chronic demyelination, even in the absence of contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  11. Whole body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosavi, Firas; Laurell, Anna; Ahlström, Håkan

    2015-11-01

    Whole body (WB) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become increasingly utilized in cancer imaging, yet the clinical utility of these techniques in follow-up of testicular cancer patients has not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of WB MRI with continuous table movement (CTM) technique, including multistep DWI in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer. WB MRI including DWI was performed in follow-up of 71 consecutive patients (median age, 37 years; range 19-84) with histologically confirmed testicular cancer. WB MRI protocol included axial T1-Dixon and T2-BLADE sequences using CTM technique. Furthermore, multi-step DWI was performed using b-value 50 and 1000 s/mm(2). One criterion for feasibility was patient tolerance and satisfactory image quality. Another criterion was the accuracy in detection of any pathological mass, compared to standard of reference. Signal intensity in DWI was used for evaluation of residual mass activity. Clinical, laboratory and imaging follow-up were applied as standard of reference for the evaluation of WB MRI. WB MRI was tolerated in nearly all patients (69/71 patients, 97%) and the image quality was satisfactory. Metal artifacts deteriorated the image quality in six patients, but it did not influence the overall results. No case of clinical relapse was observed during the follow-up time. There was a good agreement between conventional WB MRI and standard of reference in all patients. Three patients showed residual masses and DWI signal was not restricted in these patients. Furthermore, DWI showed abnormally high signal intensity in a normal-sized retroperitoneal lymph node indicating metastasis. The subsequent (18)F-FDG PET/CT could verify the finding. WB MRI with CTM technique including multi-step DWI is feasible in follow-up of patients with testicular cancer. DWI may contribute to important added-value data to conventional MRI sequences

  12. PI-RADS version 2: quantitative analysis aids reliable interpretation of diffusion-weighted imaging for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Yoon; Shin, Su-Jin; Jung, Dae Chul; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Young Deuk; Rha, Koon Ho; Hong, Sung Joon; Oh, Young Taik

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) ratio aids reliable interpretation of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for prostate cancer (PCa). Seventy-six consecutive patients with PCa who underwent DWI and surgery were included. Based on pathologic tumour location, two readers independently performed DWI scoring according to the revised Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADSv2). ADC ratios of benign to cancerous prostatic tissue were then measured independently and compared between cases showing concordant and discordant DWI scores ≥4. Area under the curve (AUC) and threshold of ADC ratio were analyzed for DWI scores ≥4. The rate of inter-reader disagreement for DWI score ≥4 was 11.8% (9/76). ADC ratios were higher in concordant vs. discordant DWI scores ≥4 (median, 1.7 vs. 1.1-1.2; p 1.3, the rate of inter-reader disagreement for DWI score ≥4 decreased to 5.9-6.0%. An ADC ratio >1.3 yielded 100% (reader 1, 54/54; reader 2, 51/51) positive predictive value for clinically significant cancer. ADC ratios may be useful for reliable interpretation of DWI score ≥4 in PI-RADSv2. • The ADC ratio correlated positively with DWI score of PI-RADSv2. • ADC ratio >1.3 was associated with concordant interpretation of DWI score ≥4. • ADC ratio >1.3 was associated with high PPV for clinically significant cancer. • ADC ratio is useful for reliable interpretation of DWI scoring in PI-RADSv2.

  13. Sequential cranial ultrasound and cerebellar diffusion weighted imaging contribute to the early prognosis of neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaretha J Brouwer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the contribution of sequential cranial ultrasound (cUS and term-equivalent age magnetic resonance imaging (TEA-MRI including diffusion weighted imaging (DWI to the early prognosis of neurodevelopmental outcome in a cohort of very preterm infants (gestational age [GA] <31 weeks. STUDY DESIGN: In total, 93 preterm infants (median [range] GA in weeks: 28.3 [25.0-30.9] were enrolled in this prospective cohort study and underwent early and term cUS as well as TEA-MRI including DWI. Early cUS abnormalities were classified as normal, mild, moderate or severe. Term cUS was evaluated for ex-vacuo ventriculomegaly (VM and enlargement of the extracerebral cerebrospinal fluid (eCSF space. Abnormalities on T1- and T2-weighted TEA-MRI were scored according to Kidokoro et al. Using DWI at TEA, apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs were measured in four white matter regions bilaterally and both cerebellar hemispheres. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed at two years' corrected age (CA using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, third edition. Linear regression analysis was conducted to explore the correlation between the different neuroimaging modalities and outcome. RESULTS: Moderate/severe abnormalities on early cUS, ex-vacuo VM and enlargement of the eCSF space on term cUS and increased cerebellar ADC values on term DWI were independently associated with worse motor outcome (p<.05. Ex-vacuo VM on term cUS was also related to worse cognitive performance at two years' CA (p<.01. CONCLUSION: These data support the clinical value of sequential cUS and recommend repeating cUS at TEA. In particular, assessment of moderate/severe early cUS abnormalities and ex-vacuo VM on term cUS provides important prognostic information. Cerebellar ADC values may further aid in the prognostication of gross motor function.

  14. Automatic Brain Lesion Detection and Classification Based on Diffusion-Weighted Imaging using Adaptive Thresholding and a Rule-Based Classifier

    OpenAIRE

    Saad, N. M.; Syed A.R. Abu-Bakar; A.F. Muda; Sobri Muda; A. R. Syafeeza

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a brain lesion detection and classification approach using thresholding and a rule-based classifier is proposed. Four types of brain lesions based on diffusion-weighted imaging i.e. acute stroke, solid tumor, chronic stroke, and necrosis are analyzed. The analysis is divided into four stages: pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction, and classification. In the detection and segmentation stage, the image is divided into 8x8 macro-block regions. Adaptive thresholding t...

  15. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) as a quantitative parameter in diffusion weighted MR imaging in gynecologic cancer: Dependence on b-values used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Tanderup, Kari; Haack, Søren

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has gained interest as an imaging modality for assessment of tumor extension and response to cancer treatment. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of the choice of b-values on the calculation of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) for locally ad...... advanced gynecological cancer and to estimate a stable interval of diffusion gradients that allows for best comparison of the ADC between patients and institutions....

  16. Additional Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging to Evaluate Prognostic Factors of Breast Cancer: Correlation with the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Cho, Sung Bum; Bae, Jeoung Won

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with diverse prognoses. The main prognostic determinants are lymph node status, tumor size, histological grade, and biological factors, such as hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67 protein levels, and p53 expression. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can be used to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) that provides information related to tumor cellularity and the integrity of the cell membranes. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether ADC measurements could provide information on the prognostic factors of breast cancer. A total of 71 women with invasive breast cancer, treated consecutively, who underwent preoperative breast MRIs with DWI at 3.0 Tesla and subsequent surgery, were prospectively included in this study. Each DWI was acquired with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm(2). The mean ADC values of the lesions were measured, including the entire lesion on the three largest sections. We performed histopathological analyses for the tumor size, lymph node status, histological grade, hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67, p53, and molecular subtypes. The associations with the ADC values and prognostic factors of breast cancer were evaluated using the independent-samples t test and the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A low ADC value was associated with lymph node metastasis (P < 0.01) and with high Ki-67 protein levels (P = 0.03). There were no significant differences in the ADC values among the histological grade (P = 0.48), molecular subtype (P = 0.51), tumor size (P = 0.46), and p53 protein level (P = 0.62). The pre-operative use of the 3.0 Tesla DWI could provide information about the lymph node status and tumor proliferation for breast cancer patients, and could help determine the optimal treatment plan.

  17. Comparison of magnetic resonance elastography and diffusion-weighted imaging for differentiating benign and malignant liver lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennedige, Tiffany P.; Hallinan, James Thomas Patrick Decourcy; Teo, Lynette Li San [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Leung, Fiona P. [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); South West Radiology, Liverpool, NSW (Australia); Iyer, Sridhar; Chang, Stephen; Madhavan, Krishna Kumar [National University Health System, Department of Surgery, Singapore (Singapore); Wang, Gang [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); University of Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Wee, Aileen [National University Hospital, National University Health System, Department of Pathology, Singapore (Singapore); Venkatesh, Sudhakar K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Comparison of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for differentiating malignant and benign focal liver lesions (FLLs). Seventy-nine subjects with 124 FLLs (44 benign and 80 malignant) underwent both MRE and DWI. MRE was performed with a modified gradient-echo sequence and DWI with a free breathing technique (b = 0.500). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and stiffness maps were generated. FLL mean stiffness and ADC values were obtained by placing regions of interest over the FLLs on stiffness and ADC maps. The accuracy of MRE and DWI for differentiation of benign and malignant FLL was compared using receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. There was a significant negative correlation between stiffness and ADC (r = -0.54, p < 0.0001) of FLLs. Malignant FLLs had significantly higher mean stiffness (7.9kPa vs. 3.1kPa, p < 0.001) and lower mean ADC (129 vs. 200 x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s, p < 0.001) than benign FLLs. The sensitivity/specificity/positive predictive value/negative predictive value for differentiating malignant from benign FLLs with MRE (cut-off, >4.54kPa) and DWI (cut-off, <151 x 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were 96.3/95.5/97.5/93.3 % (p < 0.001) and 85/81.8/88.3/75 % (p < 0.001), respectively. ROC analysis showed significantly higher accuracy for MRE than DWI (0.986 vs. 0.82, p = 0.0016). MRE is significantly more accurate than DWI for differentiating benign and malignant FLLs. (orig.)

  18. A macroscopic view of microstructure: using diffusion-weighted images to infer damage, repair, and plasticity of white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, L

    2014-09-12

    Since its introduction in the early 1990s, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has played a crucial role in the non-invasive evaluation of tissue microstructure of brain parenchyma in vivo. Diffusion anisotropy, in particular, has been extensively used to infer histological changes due to brain maturation and pathology, as it shows a clear dependence on tissue architecture. Although the resolution used in most studies lies in the macroscopic range, the information provided originates at the microscopic level and, as such, diffusion MRI serves as a microscope that can reveal profound details of tissue with direct clinical and research applications. The interpretation of diffusion parameters of white matter rests on what is known to drive diffusion anisotropy, namely axonal membranes, density and coherence, as well as myelin sheaths. However, these factors interact to modulate anisotropy, making interpretations potentially difficult. While there are numerous publications that report diffusion changes in response to particular, histologically confirmed tissue abnormalities in animal models of disease, the microscopic correlates of altered diffusion parameters due to neurological disorders in humans have been difficult to characterize. Animal models may provide insight into the mechanisms involved, but do not necessarily provide accurate representations of the human condition, making human diffusion MRI studies with direct histological confirmation crucial for our understanding of tissue changes secondary to neurodevelopment and disease. This work provides a synopsis of tissue characteristics that give rise to highly informative, specific diffusion patterns, and also of how methodological and artifactual aspects can provide erroneous diffusion measurements that do not accurately reflect tissue and may lead to misinterpretation of results. Examples of diffusion changes due to human conditions are provided to illustrate the wealth of applications of

  19. Diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: correlation with clinical course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheolkyu [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of); Chang, YoungHee; Kim, SangYun [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is a fatal disease with variable clinical courses. The presence or absence of basal ganglia (BG) involvement has been reported to be associated with clinical course. We investigated the association of clinical course of sCJD with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) as well as BG involvement at early stage. DWI and single voxel proton MRS were performed in 14 patients with sCJD during the initial diagnostic workup. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and metabolites were measured in medial occipitoparietal cortices where large hyperintense DWI lesions were found in all patients. The presence or absence of BG involvement, ADC, N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) ratios, and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were correlated with disease duration (i.e., the time from the symptom onset to death). The disease duration ranged from 2 to 31 months (median, 16). Hyperintense DWI lesions were observed bilaterally in both cortices and basal ganglia in eight patients and in cortices alone in six patients. Patients with BG involvement had shorter disease duration (median, 6.8 versus 20.5; p = 0.039) than those without and lower NAA/Cr ratios (median, 1.41 versus 2.03; p = 0.001). ADC and Cho/Cr ratios were not significantly different between the patients with BG involvement and those without. By multiple regression analysis, NAA/Cr ratios had the greatest correlation with the disease duration (p = 0.029). The disease duration of sCJD was variable. NAA/Cr ratios of the affected brain at the early stage of sCJD can be used as a useful parameter in predicting the clinical course. (orig.)

  20. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in primary rectal cancer staging demonstrates but does not characterise lymph nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijnen, Luc A.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mondal, Dipanjali [John Radcliffe Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oxford, England (United Kingdom); Riedl, Robert G. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, AZ, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    To evaluate the performance of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) for the detection of lymph nodes and for differentiating between benign and metastatic nodes during primary rectal cancer staging. Twenty-one patients underwent 1.5-T MRI followed by surgery ({+-} preoperative 5 x 5 Gy). Imaging consisted of T2-weighted MRI, DWI (b0, 500, 1000), and 3DT1-weighted MRI with 1-mm isotropic voxels. The latter was used for accurate detection and per lesion histological validation of nodes. Two independent readers analysed the signal intensity on DWI and measured the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) for each node (ADC{sub node}) and the ADC of each node relative to the mean tumour ADC (ADC{sub rel}). DWI detected 6 % more nodes than T2W-MRI. The signal on DWI was not accurate for the differentiation of metastatic nodes (AUC 0.45-0.50). Interobserver reproducibility for the nodal ADC measurements was excellent (ICC 0.93). Mean ADC{sub node} was higher for benign than for malignant nodes (1.15 {+-} 0.24 vs. 1.04 {+-} 0.22 *10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s), though not statistically significant (P = 0.10). Area under the ROC curve/sensitivity/specificity for the assessment of metastatic nodes were 0.64/67 %/60 % for ADC{sub node} and 0.67/75 %/61 % for ADC{sub rel}. DWI can facilitate lymph node detection, but alone it is not reliable for differentiating between benign and malignant lymph nodes. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of early renal allograft dysfunction with blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Yoon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo, E-mail: chankyokim@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Byung Kwan [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Ju; Lee, Sanghoon [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Wooseong [Department of Nephrology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • R2* and ADC in renal allografts are moderately correlated with eGFR. • R2* and ADC are lower in early allograft dysfunction than normal allograft function. • No significant difference between AR and ATN was found in both R2* and ADC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3 T for assessment of early renal allograft dysfunction. Materials and methods: 34 patients with a renal allograft (early dysfunction, 24; normal, 10) were prospectively enrolled. BOLD MRI and DWI were performed at 3 T. R2* and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured in cortex and medulla of the allografts. Correlation between R2* or ADC values and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was investigated. R2* or ADC values were compared among acute rejection (AR), acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and normal function. Results: In all renal allografts, cortical or medullary R2* and ADC values were moderately correlated with eGFR (P < 0.05). Early dysfunction group showed lower R2* and ADC values than normal function group (P < 0.05). AR or ATN had lower R2* values than normal allografts (P < 0.05), and ARs had lower cortical ADC values than normal allografts (P < 0.05). No significant difference of R2* or ADC values was found between AR and ATN (P > 0.05). Conclusion: BOLD MRI and DWI at 3 T may demonstrate early functional state of renal allografts, but may be limited in characterizing a cause of early renal allograft dysfunction. Further studies are needed.

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of experimental breast cancer bone metastases – A correlation study with histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, Maximilian [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Hematology, Oncology and Rheumatology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Seyler, Lisa; Bretschi, Maren; Semmler, Wolfhard [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bäuerle, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.baeuerle@uk-erlangen.de [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Radiology, University Medical Center Erlangen, Palmsanlage 5, 90154 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To validate imaging parameters from diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with immunohistology and to non-invasively assess microstructure of experimental breast cancer bone metastases. Materials and methods: Animals bearing breast cancer bone metastases were imaged in a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner. HASTE sequences were performed to calculate apparent diffusion coefficients. Saturation recovery turbo FLASH sequences were conducted while infusing 0.1 mmol/l Gd–DTPA for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to quantify parameters amplitude A and exchange rate constant k{sub ep}. After imaging, bone metastases were analyzed immunohistologically. Results: We found correlations of the apparent diffusion coefficients from diffusion-weighted imaging with tumor cellularity as assessed with cell nuclei staining. Histological vessel maturity was correlated negatively with parameters A and k{sub ep} from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Tumor size correlated inversely with cell density and vessel permeability as well as positively with mean vessel calibers. Parameters from the rim of bone metastases differed significantly from values of the center. Conclusion: In vivo diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in experimental bone metastases provide information about tumor cellularity and vascularity and correlate well with immunohistology.

  3. Atypical idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating lesions (IIDL): Conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) findings in 42 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelblinger, Claus; Fruehwald-Pallamar, Julia [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Kubin, Klaus [CT/MRI Institut Dr. Klaus Kubin, Salzburg (Austria); Wallner-Blazek, Mirja [Department of Neurology, Medical University Graz, Graz (Austria); Hauwe, Luc van den [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Macedo, Leonardo [Department of Radiology, CEDIMAGEM, Centro - Juiz de Fora (Brazil); Puchner, Stefan B. [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Thurnher, Majda M., E-mail: majda.thurnher@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR imaging characteristics with conventional and advanced MR imaging techniques in patients with IIDL. Methods: MR images of the brain in 42 patients (20 male, 22 female) with suspected or known multiple sclerosis (MS) from four institutions were retrospectively analyzed. Lesions were classified into five different subtypes: (1) ring-like lesions; (2) Balo-like lesions; (3) diffuse infiltrating lesions; (4) megacystic lesions; and (5) unclassified lesions. The location, size, margins, and signal intensities on T1WI, T2WI, and diffusion-weighted images (DWI), and the ADC values/ratios for all lesions, as well as the contrast enhancement pattern, and the presence of edema, were recorded. Results: There were 30 ring-like, 10 Balo-like, 3 megacystic-like and 16 diffuse infiltrating-like lesions were detected. Three lesions were categorized as unclassified lesions. Of the 30 ring-like lesions, 23 were hypointense centrally with a hyperintense rim. The mean ADC, measured centrally, was 1.50 ± 0.41 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. The mean ADC in the non-enhancing layers of the Balo-like lesions was 2.29 ± 0.17 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, and the mean ADC in enhancing layers was 1.03 ± 0.30 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Megacystic lesions had a mean ADC of 2.14 ± 0.26 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s. Peripheral strong enhancement with high signal on DWI was present in all diffuse infiltrating lesions. Unclassified lesions showed a mean ADC of 1.43 ± 0.13 mm{sup 2}/s. Conclusion: Restriction of diffusion will be seen in the outer layers of active inflammation/demyelination in Balo-like lesions, in the enhancing part of ring-like lesions, and at the periphery of infiltrative-type lesions.

  4. Role of coronal high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging in acute optic neuritis: a comparison with axial orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping [Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai Institution of Medical Imaging, Shanghai (China); Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Sha, Yan; Wan, Hailin; Wang, Feng [Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Tian, Guohong [Eye and ENT Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-08-15

    Through a comparison with the axial orientation, we aimed to evaluate the role of coronal high-resolution diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in acute optic neuritis based on diagnostic accuracy and the reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements. Orbital DWI, using readout-segmented, parallel imaging, and 2D navigator-based reacquisition (RESOLVE-DWI), was performed on 49 patients with acute vision loss. The coronal (thickness = 3 mm) and axial (thickness = 2 mm) diffusion images were evaluated by two neuroradiologists retrospectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated through diagnostic test; the inter- and intra-observer reliabilities were assessed with a weighted Cohen's kappa test. In addition, the agreement of ADC measurement among observers was evaluated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CV), and Bland-Altman plots. Comparison of ADC values was also performed by unpaired t test. Among the 49 patients, 47 clinically positive optic nerves and 51 clinically negative optic nerves were found. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 85.1/87.2%, 90.2/94.12%, and 87.8/90.8%, respectively, for coronal RESOLVE-DWI and 83.0/85.1%, 66.7/76.5%, and 75.5/79.6%, respectively, for axial RESOLVE-DWI. The inter-observer kappa values were 0.710 and 0.806 for axial and coronal RESOLVE-DWI, respectively, and the intra-observer kappa values were 0.822 and 0.909, respectively (each P < 0.0001). Regarding the reproducibility of ADC measurements on axial and coronal RESOLVE-DWI, the ICCs among observers were 0.846 and 0.941, respectively, and the CV values were 7.046 and 4.810%, respectively. Bland-Altman plots revealed smaller inter-observer variability on coronal RESOLVE-DWI. ADC values were significantly lower in positive group (each P < 0.0001). Higher specificity and better reproducibility of ADC measurements were found for coronal RESOLVE-DWI, which demonstrated the

  5. Evaluation of Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging as a Technique for Detecting Bone Marrow Edema in Patients with Osteitis Pubis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toslak, Iclal Erdem; Cekic, Bulent; Turk, Aysen; Eraslan, Ali; Parlak, A Eda

    2017-10-10

    Our aims were to determine the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) in the detection of bone marrow edema (BME) and explore the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) alterations in patients with osteitis pubis (OP). 42 consecutive patients clinically suspected to have athletic pubalgia and 31 control subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects underwent diagnostic focused magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DWI at b values of 0 and 600 s/mm 2 . Two radiologists reviewed the images for the presence of active OP. The presence of subchondral BME and contrast enhancement were considered to indicate active OP. ADC values were measured from public bodies of both groups. DWI results were correlated with routine MRI findings. Receiver-operating-characteristic curves were formed. Cut-off values for ADC, sensitivity and specificity values were measured. 36/42 (85%) of the cases had BME/enhancement on routine MRIs and identified as active OP. ADC measurements of the patients were greater than the controls (P < 0.05). For the optimal cut-off values DWI showed sensitivity and specificity values of 97.3%, and 90.3%, for the right, and 97.1%, and 96.7% for the left side, respectively (Area under the curve 0.965 and 0.973). Intra-and inter-rater reliability for readers were substantial-perfect for all sessions. DWI is fast, accurate, and highly reproducible technique for the detection of BME in patients with active OP. It allows distinct bone marrow contrast without the use of gadolinium contrast, increases visual perception of active lesions, gives objective information by quantifying the diffusion coefficients, thus increase diagnostic confidence. We suggest the use of DWI as a cost-effective adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of active OP particularly in early cases and inconclusive diagnostic MRI. Future studies are necessary to determine the utility of DWI to evaluate severity of the disease and treatment response before returning athletes

  6. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy in children with liver cirrhosis: diffusion-weighted MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Ezzat, Amany [Mansoura University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura (Egypt); Abdalla, Ahmed; Megahed, Ahmed; Barakat, Tarek [Mansoura Children Hospital, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Unit, Mansoura Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this work was to detect minimal hepatic encephalopathy (minHE) in children with diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) of the brain. Prospective study conducted upon 30 consecutive children (age range 6-16 years, 21 boys and 9 girls) with liver cirrhosis and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy control children. Patients with minHE (n = 17) and with no minHE (n = 13) groups and control group underwent DWI, {sup 1}H-MRS, and neuropsychological tests (NPTs). The glutamate or glutamine (Glx), myoinositol (mI), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) at the right ganglionic region were determined at {sup 1}H-MRS. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value and metabolic ratios of Glx/Cr, mI/Cr, and Cho/Cr were calculated. There was elevated ADC value and Glx/Cr and decreased mI/CI and Ch/Cr in patients with minHE compared to no minHE and control group. There was significant difference between minHE, no minHE, and control group in the ADC value (P = 0.001 for all groups), GLx/Cr (P = 0.001 for all groups), mI/Cr (P = 0.004, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively), Ch/Cr (P = 0.001 for all groups), and full-scale IQ of NPT (P = 0.001, 0.001, and 0.143, respectively). The NPT of minHE had negative correlation with ADC value (r = -0.872, P = 0.001) and GLx/Cr (r = -0.812, P = 0.001) and positive correlation with mI/Cr (r = 0.732, P = 0.001). DWI and {sup 1}H-MRS are imaging modalities that can detect minHE in children with liver cirrhosis and correlate well with parameters of NPT. (orig.)

  7. Role of PROPELLER diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient in the evaluation of pituitary adenomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Omar M. [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Department of Radiology, South Egypt Cancer Institute, Assiut University, Assiut 71515 (Egypt); Tominaga, Atsushi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Amatya, Vishwa Jeet [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Ohtaki, Megu [Department of Environmetrics and Biometrics, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakoguchi, Tetsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yasuyuki [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Takeshima, Yukio [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Abe, Nobukazu; Akiyama, Yuji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); El-Ghoriany, Ahmad I. [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut 71515 (Egypt); Alla, Abdel Karim H. Abd; El-Sharkawy, Mostafa A.M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Assiut University, Assiut 71515 (Egypt); Arita, Kazunori [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima (Japan); Kurisu, Kaoru [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan); Yamasaki, Fumiyuki, E-mail: fyama@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8551 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The relationship between tumor consistency and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values is controversial. We evaluated the role of the ADC using an advanced diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) technique. We employed periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) DWI acquired on a 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner to assess the consistency of pituitary adenomas and examined the relationship between the ADC and the hormone secretion status of the tumors and their MIB-1 labeling index (MIB-1 LI). Materials and methods: The study protocol was approved by our institutional review board. We retrospectively studied 24 operated patients with pituitary adenomas who had undergone PROPELLER DWI on a 3-T MRI scanner. Conventional MRI findings were expressed as the ratio of the signal intensity (SI) in the lesions to the SI of the normal white matter and the degree of contrast enhancement. Minimum-, mean-, and maximum ADC (ADC{sub min}, ADC{sub mean}, ADC{sub max}) values were calculated. The consistency of the tumors was determined by neurosurgeons. All surgical specimens were submitted for histological study to calculate the MIB-1 LI and the percent collagen content. Preoperative MRI-, intraoperative-, and histological findings were analyzed by a statistician. Results: Our study included 15 soft-, 5 fibrous-, and 4 hard tumors. Tumor consistency was strongly associated with the percent collagen content. However, neither the tumor consistency nor the percent collagen content was correlated with MRI findings or ADC values. The SI of growth hormone-producing adenomas on T2-WI was lower than of the other pituitary adenomas studied (p < 0.01); no other significant difference was found in the ADC or on conventional MRI between pituitary adenomas with different secretory functions. The MIB-1 LI of pituitary adenomas was not correlated with their appearance on conventional MRI or their ADC values. Conclusion: Using the

  8. Diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of mesenteric small bowel tumours with Magnetic Resonance-enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amzallag-Bellenger, Elisa; Nguyen, Truong Luong Francis; Amara, Nedjoua; Hoeffel, Christine [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims Cedex (France); Hopital Robert Debre, Pole d' imagerie, Department of Radiology, Cedex Reims (France); Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); Barbe, Coralie [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Statistics, Reims Cedex (France); Hopital Robert Debre, Pole d' imagerie, Department of Radiology, Cedex Reims (France)

    2014-11-15

    To retrospectively investigate the added value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for detecting mesenteric small bowel tumours (MSBTs) via MR-enterography. MR-enterographies of 98 patients with suspected MSBTs were blindly analyzed by two independent readers for the presence of MSBTs. Four imaging sets including ''standard'' (Haste and TrueFisp), ''standard + DWI,'' ''standard + gadolinium-enhanced'' and ''standard + DWI + gadolinium-enhanced'' were reviewed. Diagnostic performance of different readings were compared with McNemar's test. Twenty-nine MSBTs were pathologically confirmed. For R1 (junior radiologist) sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for the detection of MSBTs via standard MRI were 52 % [95 % CI: 34 %-70 %] (15/29), 94 % [95 % CI: 89 %-100 %] (65/69), 79 % [95 % CI: 61 %-97 %] (15/19), 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-91 %] (65/79) and 82 % [95 % CI: 74 %-89 %] (80/98), respectively. For R2 (senior radiologist) they were 76 % [95 % CI: 60 %-91 %] (22/29), 96 % [95 % CI: 91-100 %] (66/69), 88 % [95 % CI: 75 %-100 %] (22/25), 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-97 %] (66/73) and 90 % [95 % CI: 84 %-96 %] (88/98), respectively. Adding DWI they were 72 % [95 % CI: 56 %-89 %] (21/29), 91 % [95 % CI: 85 %-98 %] (63/69), 78 % [95 % CI: 62 %-94 %] (21/27), 89 % [95 % CI: 81 %-96 %] (63/71) and 87 % [95 % CI: 80 %-94 %] (85/98) for R1 and 79 % [95 % CI: 65 %-94 %] (23/29), 97 % [95 % CI: 93 %-100 %] (67/69), 92 % [95 % CI: 81 %-100 %] (23/25), 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-98 %] (67/73) and 92 % [95 % CI: 86 %-97 %] (90/98) for R2. Sensitivities for tumour detection were higher after adding DWI to standard MRI, although only for R1 was this significant (P = 0.03). Adding DWI to standard + gadolinium-enhanced MRI did not significantly increase MR performance. DWI improves MSBT detection via MR-enterography compared to standard unenhanced MR-enterography, especially for unexperienced readers. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of CT perfusion summary maps to early diffusion-weighted images in suspected acute middle cerebral artery stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, John; Payabvash, Seyedmehdi [Hennepin County and University of Minnesota Medical Centers, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Salazar, Pascal [Vital Images, A Division of Toshiba Medical, Minnetonka, MN (United States); Jagadeesan, Bharathi; Palmer, Christopher S.; Truwit, Charles L. [Hennepin County and University of Minnesota Medical Centers, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); McKinney, Alexander M., E-mail: mckinrad@umn.edu [Hennepin County and University of Minnesota Medical Centers, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Objectives: To assess the accuracy and reliability of one vendor's (Vital Images, Toshiba Medical, Minnetonka, MN) automated CT perfusion (CTP) summary maps in identification and volume estimation of infarcted tissue in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) distribution infarcts. Subjects and methods: From 1085 CTP examinations over 5.5 years, 43 diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-positive patients were included who underwent both CTP and DWI <12 h after symptom onset, with another 43 age-matched patients as controls (DWI-negative). Automated delay-corrected postprocessing software (DC-SVD) generated both infarct “core only” and “core + penumbra” CTP summary maps. Three reviewers independently tabulated Alberta Stroke Program Early CT scores (ASPECTS) of both CTP summary maps and coregistered DWI. Results: Of 86 included patients, 36 had DWI infarct volumes ≤70 ml, 7 had volumes >70 ml, and 43 were negative; the automated CTP “core only” map correctly classified each as >70 ml or ≤70 ml, while the “core + penumbra” map misclassified 4 as >70 ml. There were strong correlations between DWI volume with both summary map-based volumes: “core only” (r = 0.93), and “core + penumbra” (r = 0.77) (both p < 0.0001). Agreement between ASPECTS scores of infarct core on DWI with summary maps was 0.65–0.74 for “core only” map, and 0.61–0.65 for “core + penumbra” (both p < 0.0001). Using DWI-based ASPECTS scores as the standard, the accuracy of the CTP-based maps were 79.1–86.0% for the “core only” map, and 83.7–88.4% for “core + penumbra.” Conclusion: Automated CTP summary maps appear to be relatively accurate in both the detection of acute MCA distribution infarcts, and the discrimination of volumes using a 70 ml threshold.

  10. Glioma: application of whole-tumor texture analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging for the evaluation of tumor heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Jin Ryu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To apply a texture analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC maps to evaluate glioma heterogeneity, which was correlated with tumor grade. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients with glioma (WHO grade II (n = 8, grade III (n = 10 and grade IV (n = 22 underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, and the corresponding ADC maps were obtained. Regions of interest containing the lesions were drawn on every section of the ADC map containing the tumor, and volume-based data of the entire tumor were constructed. Texture and first order features including entropy, skewness and kurtosis were derived from the ADC map using in-house software. A histogram analysis of the ADC map was also performed. The texture and histogram parameters were compared between low-grade and high-grade gliomas using an unpaired student's t-test. Additionally, a one-way analysis of variance analysis with a post-hoc test was performed to compare the parameters of each grade. RESULTS: Entropy was observed to be significantly higher in high-grade gliomas than low-grade tumors (6.861±0.539 vs. 6.261±0.412, P  = 0.006. The fifth percentiles of the ADC cumulative histogram also showed a significant difference between high and low grade gliomas (836±235 vs. 1030±185, P = 0.037. Only entropy proved to be significantly different between grades III and IV (6.295±0.4963 vs. 7.119±0.3165, P<0.001. The diagnostic accuracy of ADC entropy was significantly higher than that of the fifth percentile of the ADC histogram (P = 0.0034 in distinguishing high- from low-grade glioma. CONCLUSION: A texture analysis of the ADC map based on the entire tumor volume can be useful for evaluating glioma grade, which provides tumor heterogeneity.

  11. Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Predicting Sensitivity to Chemoradiotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Soichiro [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Koga, Fumitaka, E-mail: f-koga.uro@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Shuichiro [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan); Ishii, Chikako; Tanaka, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Ochanomizu Surugadai Clinic, Tokyo (Japan); Tanaka, Hajime; Komai, Yoshinobu; Saito, Kazutaka; Masuda, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori [Department of Urology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In chemoradiation (CRT)-based bladder-sparing approaches for muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), patients who respond favorably to induction CRT enjoy the benefits of bladder preservation, whereas nonresponders do not. Thus, accurate prediction of CRT sensitivity would optimize patient selection for bladder-sparing protocols. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is a functional imaging technique that quantifies the diffusion of water molecules in a noninvasive manner. We investigated whether DW-MRI predicts CRT sensitivity of MIBC. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 23 MIBC patients (cT2/T3 = 7/16) who underwent induction CRT consisting of radiotherapy to the small pelvis (40 Gy) with two cycles of cisplatin (20 mg/day for 5 days), followed by partial or radical cystectomy. All patients underwent DW-MRI before the initiation of treatment. Associations of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with CRT sensitivity were analyzed. The proliferative potential of MIBC was also assessed by analyzing the Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in pretherapeutic biopsy specimens. Results: Thirteen patients (57%) achieved pathologic complete response (pCR) to CRT. These CRT-sensitive MIBCs showed significantly lower ADC values (median, 0.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.43-0.77) than CRT-resistant (no pCR) MIBCs (median, 0.84 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s; range, 0.69-1.09; p = 0.0003). Multivariate analysis identified ADC value as the only significant and independent predictor of CRT sensitivity (p < 0.0001; odds ratio per 0.001 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s increase, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08). With a cutoff ADC value at 0.74 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s, sensitivity/specificity/accuracy in predicting CRT sensitivity was 92/90/91%. Ki-67 LI was significantly higher in CRT-sensitive MIBCs (p = 0.0005) and significantly and inversely correlated with ADC values ({rho} = -0.67, p = 0

  12. The Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Ovarian Lesions: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jung Kim

    Full Text Available The ability of contrast-enhanced MRI to distinguish between malignant and benign ovarian masses is limited. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI in differentiating malignant from benign ovarian masses.A comprehensive literature search was performed in several authoritative databases to identify relevant articles. The weighted mean difference (WMD and corresponding 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated. We also used subgroup analysis to analyze study heterogeneity, and evaluated publication bias.The meta-analysis is based on 21 studies, which reported the findings for 731 malignant and 918 benign ovarian masses. There was no significant difference in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values for DWI between benign and malignant lesions (WMD = 0.22, 95% CI = -0.02-0.47, p = 0.08. Subgroup analysis by benign tumor type revealed higher ADC values (or a trend toward higher values for cysts, cystadenomas and other benign tumors compared to malignant masses (cyst: WMD = 0.54, 95% CI = -0.05-1.12, p = 0.07; cystadenoma: WMD = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.38-1.07, p < 0.0001; other benign tumor: WMD = 0.16, 95% CI = -0.13-0.46, p = 0.28. On the other hand, lower ADC values (or a trend toward lower values were observed for endometrioma and teratoma compared to malignant masses (endometrioma: WMD = -0.09, 95% CI = -0.47-0.29, p = 0.64; teratoma: WMD = -0.49, 95% CI = -0.85-0.12, p = 0.009. Subgroup analysis by mass property revealed higher ADC values in cystic tumor types than in solid types for both benign and malignant tumors. Significant study heterogeneity was observed. There was no notable publication bias.Quantitative DWI is not a reliable diagnostic method for differentiation between benign and malignant ovarian masses. This knowledge is essential in avoiding misdiagnosis of ovarian masses.

  13. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the normal endometrium: temporal and spatial variations of the apparent diffusion coefficient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornasa, Francesca; Montemezzi, Stefania [Dept. of Radiology, San Bonifacio Hospital, Verona (Italy)], e-mail: francescafornasa@libero.it

    2012-06-15

    Background: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) is increasingly used in the diagnosis of endometrial disease. No complete knowledge, however, exists yet of the influence of physiology on the endometrial apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values on which DWI is based. Purpose: To establish whether the ADC values measured with DWI in the endometrium of healthy reproductive-aged women significantly vary from the early proliferative to the periovulatory phase of the menstrual cycle and between the fundus and the isthmus of the uterus. Material and Methods: In 17 women the endometrial ADC values measured on the fifth menstrual day, both at the fundus and at the isthmus of the uterus, were compared to the values obtained on the 14th day before the subsequent cycle. In 81 women (menstrual day: fifth through 21st) the endometrial ADC values measured at the fundus were compared to the values obtained at the isthmus of the uterus. All examinations were performed with a 1.5 T magnet (b values: 0 and 800 mm/s{sup 2}). The results were analyzed by means of Student's t-test per paired data. Results: The endometrial ADC values measured on the fifth day of the menstrual cycle were lower than those obtained in the periovulatory phase both at the fundus (mean 0.923 vs. 1.256 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) and at the isthmus (mean 1.297 vs. 1.529 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) of the uterus. The endometrial ADC values measured at the fundus of the uterus were lower than those obtained at the isthmus (mean 1.132 vs. 1.420 x 10{sup -}3 mm{sup 2}/s) through the menstrual cycle. All these differences were highly significant (P < 0.001) at statistical analysis. Conclusion: Physiological variations occurring in endometrial ADC values of healthy women should be considered by the radiologists when interpreting DWI examinations in patients with endometrial disease.

  14. Motion-robust parameter estimation in abdominal diffusion-weighted MRI by simultaneous image registration and model estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurugol, Sila; Freiman, Moti; Afacan, Onur; Domachevsky, Liran; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M; Callahan, Michael J; Warfield, Simon K

    2017-07-01

    Quantitative body DW-MRI can detect abdominal abnormalities as well as monitor response-to-therapy for applications including cancer and inflammatory bowel disease with increased accuracy. Parameter estimates are obtained by fitting a forward model of DW-MRI signal decay to the observed data acquired with several b-values. The DW-MRI signal decay models typically used do not account for respiratory, cardiac and peristaltic motion, however, which may deteriorate the accuracy and robustness of parameter estimates. In this work, we introduce a new model of DW-MRI signal decay that explicitly accounts for motion. Specifically, we estimated motion-compensated model parameters by simultaneously solving image registration and model estimation (SIR-ME) problems utilizing the interdependence of acquired volumes along the diffusion-weighting dimension. To accomplish this, we applied the SIR-ME model to the in-vivo DW-MRI data sets of 26 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and achieved improved precision of the estimated parameters by reducing the coefficient of variation by 8%, 24% and 8% for slow diffusion (D), fast diffusion (D*) and fast diffusion fraction (f) parameters respectively, compared to parameters estimated with independent registration in normal-appearing bowel regions. Moreover, the parameters estimated with the SIR-ME model reduced the error rate in classifying normal and abnormal bowel loops to 12% for D and 10% for f parameter with a reduction in error rate by 13% and 11% for D and f parameters, respectively, compared to the error rate in classifying parameter estimates obtained with independent registration. The experiments in DW-MRI of liver in 20 subjects also showed that the SIR-ME model improved the precision of parameter estimation by reducing the coefficient of variation to 7% for D, 23% for D*, and 8% for the f parameter. Using the SIR-ME model, the coefficient of variation was reduced by 4%, 14% and 6% for D, D* and f parameters, respectively, compared

  15. Clinical utility of high b-value diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in post-resuscitative encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, Hitoshi; Danjou, Wataru; Yamazaki, Kei [Sapporo City General Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    It is very important to estimate brain functional capacity immediately after successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to determine subsequent treatment strategy and to elucidate the pathophysiology of patients with post-resuscitative encephalopathy. However, computed tomography scanning, electric encephalography and conventional magnetic resonance imaging do not contribute significantly to the assessment of brain functions immediately after CPR. Recently, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) has been applied to the patients with post-resuscitative encephalopathy. However, no papers have described serial clinical and repeated DW-MRI studies of patients during the acute phase of post-resuscitative encephalopathy. Moreover, in some cases, high signal intensity in the cortex after CPR is indistinguishable from normal cortex. Thus, we tried to apply high b-value DW-MRI to estimate the brain function of patients with post-resuscitative encephalopathy. This study was performed on 11 patients with post-resuscitative encephalopathy and 5 healthy volunteers as controls. DW-MRI was performed using GYROSCAN 1.5 Tesla MR imager (Philips) with single-shot echo-planner imaging sequences performed 3 times, first within 24 hours after CPR, second between day 3 to 6, and third more than 7 days after CPR. And we tested the usefulness of DW-MRI at 800, 1000, 1500, 2000 and 3000 in b value. Five patients survived, one fully recovered and four remained in a vegetative state. The other six died with clinical brain death. The first DW-MRI revealed in high signal intensity in the frontal and the parietal lobes in all patients who eventually progressed to a vegetative state or brain death. This result was much more wide-spread in the latter patients, while it was never seen in the patients who recovered fully. The high signal intensity areas increased in follow-up DW-MRI studies. The signal intensity remained high in some parts, while it decreased in other parts with

  16. Interleaved diffusion-weighted EPI improved by adaptive partial-Fourier and multi-band multiplexed sensitivity-encoding reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We report a series of techniques to reliably eliminate artifacts in interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) based diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Methods First, we integrate the previously reported multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE) algorithm with a new adaptive Homodyne partial-Fourier reconstruction algorithm, so that images reconstructed from interleaved partial-Fourier DWI data are free from artifacts even in the presence of either a) motion-induced k-space energy peak displacement, or b) susceptibility field gradient induced fast phase changes. Second, we generalize the previously reported single-band MUSE framework to multi-band MUSE, so that both through-plane and in-plane aliasing artifacts in multi-band multi-shot interleaved DWI data can be effectively eliminated. Results The new adaptive Homodyne-MUSE reconstruction algorithm reliably produces high-quality and high-resolution DWI, eliminating residual artifacts in images reconstructed with previously reported methods. Furthermore, the generalized MUSE algorithm is compatible with multi-band and high-throughput DWI. Conclusion The integration of the multi-band and adaptive Homodyne-MUSE algorithms significantly improves the spatial-resolution, image quality, and scan throughput of interleaved DWI. We expect that the reported reconstruction framework will play an important role in enabling high-resolution DWI for both neuroscience research and clinical uses. PMID:24925000

  17. Differential Diagnosis of Axillary Inflammatory and Metastatic Lymph Nodes in Rabbit Models by Using Diffusion-Weighted Imaging: Compared with Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun Ping; Zhang, Yun Ting; Yu, Chunshui; Bai, Renju; Sun, Haoran [Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin (China); Liao, Qian [The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi (China)

    2012-07-15

    This experiment aims to determine the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the differentiation of axillary inflammatory lymph nodes from metastatic lymph nodes in rabbit models in comparison with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Conventional MRI and DWI were performed at 4 weeks after successful inoculation into the forty female New Zealand white rabbits' mammary glands. The size-based and signal-intensity-based criteria and the relative apparent diffusion coefficient (rADC) value were compared between the axillary inflammatory lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, with histopathological findings as the reference standard. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the aforementioned criteria and rADC value in differentiating the axillary inflammatory lymph nodes from metastatic lymph nodes. Thirty-two axillary inflammatory lymph nodes and 46 metastatic ones were successfully isolated and taken into pathological analysis. The differences of the aforementioned criteria between the two groups were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the rADC value of the inflammatory lymph nodes (0.9 {+-} 0.14) was higher than that of metastatic ones (0.7 {+-} 0.18), with significant difference (p = 0.016). When the rADC value was chosen as 0.80, the area under the ROC curve is greater than all other criteria, and the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for differentiating two groups were 86.2%, 79.3%, 81.2%, 84.2%, and 85.6%, respectively. Diffusion-weighted imaging is a promising new technique for differentiating axillary inflammatory lymph nodes from metastatic lymph nodes. Compared with routine magnetic resonance sequences, DWI could provide more useful physiological and functional information for diagnosis.

  18. Inter-Observer Agreement on Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation for Diagnosis of Acute Ischemic Stroke Among Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz ORAY

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI is a highly sensitive tool for the detection of early ischemic stroke and is excellent at detecting small and early infarcts. Nevertheless, conflict may arise and judgments may differ among different interpreters. Inter-observer variability shows the systematic difference among different observers and is expressed as the kappa (Κ coefficient. In this study, we aimed to determinate the inter-observer variability among emergency physicians in the use of DW-MRI for the diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. Methods: Cranial DW-MRI images of 50 patients were interpreted in this retrospective observational cross-sectional study. Patients who were submitted to DW-MRI imaging for a suspected acute ischemic stroke were included in the study, unless the scans were ordered by any of the reviewers or they were absent in the system. The scans were blindly and randomly interpreted by four emergency physicians. Inter-observer agreement between reviewers was evaluated using Fleiss’ Κ statistics. Results: The mean kappa value for high signal on diffusion-weighted images (DWI and for reduction on apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were substantial (k=0.67 and moderate (k=0.60 respectively. The correlation for detection of the presence of ischemia and location was substantial (k: 0.67. There were 18 false-positive and 4 false-negative evaluations of DWI, 15 false positive and 8 false-negative evaluations of ADC. Conclusions: Our data suggest that DW-MRI is reliable in screening for ischemic stroke when interpreted by emergency physicians in the emergency department. The levels of stroke identification and variability show that emergency physicians may have an acceptable level of agreement. Key words: Emergency department, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, inter-observer agreement, ischemic stroke

  19. An Ex Vivo Imaging Pipeline for Producing High- Quality and High-Resolution Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn; Baaré, William F.C.; Alexander, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and related multifiber reconstruction algorithms allow the study of in vivo microstructure and, by means of tractography, structural connectivity. Although reconstruction algorithms are promising imaging tools, high‐quality diffusion‐weighted imaging (DWI) datasets...... complexity, to establish an ex vivo imaging pipeline for generating high‐quality DWI datasets. Perfusion fixation ensured that tissue characteristics were comparable to in vivo conditions. There were three main results: (i) heat conduction and unstable tissue mechanics accounted for time‐varying artefacts...... in the DWI dataset, which were present for up to 15 h after positioning brain tissue in the scanner; (ii) using fitted DT, q‐ball, and persistent angular structure magnetic resonance imaging algorithms, any b‐value between ∼2,000 and ∼8,000 s/mm2, with an optimal value around 4,000 s/mm2, allowed...

  20. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for bladder cancer: fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging helps evaluate depth of invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minsu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Deuk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate the utility of fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for evaluating depth of invasion in bladder cancer. We included 62 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgically confirmed urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder. An experienced genitourinary radiologist analysed the depth of invasion (T stage <2 or ≥2) using T2WI, DWI, T2WI plus DWI, and fused DWI and T2WI (fusion MRI). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were investigated. Area under the curve (AUC) was analysed to identify T stage ≥2. The rate of patients with surgically confirmed T stage ≥2 was 41.9% (26/62). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 50.0%, 55.6%, 44.8%, 60.6% and 53.2%, respectively, with T2WI; 57.7%, 77.8%, 65.2%, 71.8% and 69.4%, respectively, with DWI; 65.4%, 80.6%, 70.8%, 76.3% and 74.2%, respectively, with T2WI plus DWI and 80.8%, 77.8%, 72.4%, 84.9% and 79.0%, respectively, with fusion MRI. AUC was 0.528 with T2WI, 0.677 with DWI, 0.730 with T2WI plus DWI and 0.793 with fusion MRI for T stage ≥2. Fused high b value DWI and T2WI may be a promising non-contrast MRI technique for assessing depth of invasion in bladder cancer. (orig.)

  1. Intravoxel Incoherent Motion MR Imaging in the Head and Neck: Correlation with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Department of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon 22711 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Young Jin [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 47392 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D{sup *} and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, T{sub max}, E{sub max}, initial AUC{sub 60}, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D{sup *} and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D{sup *} (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck.

  2. Intravoxel incoehrent motion MR imaging in the head and neck: Correlation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiao Quan; Choi, Young Jun; Sung, Yu Sub; Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun; Heo, Young Jin; Beak, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate the correlation between perfusion- and diffusion-related parameters from intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and those from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging in tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck. We retrospectively enrolled 20 consecutive patients with head and neck tumors with MR imaging performed using a 3T MR scanner. Tissue diffusivity (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D{sup *}), and perfusion fraction (f) were derived from bi-exponential fitting of IVIM data obtained with 14 different b-values in three orthogonal directions. We investigated the correlation between D, f, and D{sup *} and model-free parameters from the DCE-MRI (wash-in, T{sub max}, E{sub max}, initial AUC{sub 60}, whole AUC) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in the tumor and normal masseter muscle using a whole volume-of-interest approach. Pearson's correlation test was used for statistical analysis. No correlation was found between f or D{sup *} and any of the parameters from the DCE-MRI in all patients or in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (p > 0.05). The ADC was significantly correlated with D values in the tumors (p < 0.001, r = 0.980) and muscles (p = 0.013, r = 0.542), despite its significantly higher value than D. The difference between ADC and D showed significant correlation with f values in the tumors (p = 0.017, r = 0.528) and muscles (p = 0.003, r = 0.630), but no correlation with D{sup *} (p > 0.05, respectively). Intravoxel incoherent motion shows no significant correlation with model-free perfusion parameters derived from the DCE-MRI but is feasible for the analysis of diffusivity in both tumors and normal muscles of the head and neck.

  3. Prediction of recovery from a post-traumatic coma state by diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in patients with diffuse axonal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, W.B.; Liu, G.R.; Wu, R.H. [Shantou University Medical College, Department of Radiology, Second Hospital, Shantou, Guangdong (China); Li, L.P. [Shantou University Medical College, Injury Prevention Research Center, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2007-03-15

    To determine whether diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings combined with initial clinical factors indicate the depth of shearing lesions in the brain structure and therefore relate to coma duration in diffuse axonal injury (DAI). A total of 74 adult patients (48 male and 26 female) with DAI were examined with conventional MR imaging and diffusion-weighted MR imaging between 2 hours and 20 days after injury. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained and the mean ADC values of each region of interest (ROI) were measured using MRI console software. The involvement of the brainstem, deep gray matter, and corpus callosum was determined for each sequence separately as well as for the combination of all sequences. The correlations between MR imaging findings indicating the presence of apparent brain injury combined with initial clinical factors were determined. Clinical characteristics, such as initial score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS), age and number of all lesions, and ADC scores were predictive of the duration of coma. It was possible to predict post-traumatic coma duration in DAI from cerebral MR imaging findings combined with clinical prognostic factors in the acute to subacute stage after head injury. Age, ADC scores, GCS score and number of lesions were highly significant in predicting coma duration. The technique presented here might provide a tool for in vivo detection of DAI to allow the prediction of the coma duration during the early stages in patients with traumatic brain injury. (orig.)

  4. Noise-Compensated, Bias-Corrected Diffusion Weighted Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging via a Stochastically Fully-Connected Joint Conditional Random Field Model

    CERN Document Server

    Boroomand, Ameneh; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is a powerful tool in imaging-based prostate cancer (PCa) screening and detection. Endorectal coils are commonly used in DW-MRI to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acquisition, at the expense of significant intensity inhomogeneities (bias field) that worsens as we move away from the endorectal coil. The presence of bias field can have a significant negative impact on the accuracy of different image analysis tasks, as well as the accuracy of PCa tumor localization, thus leading to increased inter- and intra-observer variability. The previously proposed bias field correction methods often suffer from undesired noise amplification that can reduce the image quality of the resulting bias-corrected DW-MRI data. Here, we propose a unified data reconstruction approach that enables joint compensation of bias field as well as data noise in diffusion weighted endorectal magnetic resonance (DW-EMR) imaging. The proposed noise-compensated, bias-corrected...

  5. Increased signal intensity of prostate lesions on high b-value diffusion-weighted images as a predictive sign of malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quentin, Michael; Schimmoeller, Lars; Antoch, Gerald; Blondin, Dirk [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Arsov, Christian; Rabenalt, Robert; Albers, Peter [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Urology, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    The evaluation of lesions detected in prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with increased signal intensity (SI) on high b-value diffusion-weighted images as a sign of malignancy. One hundred and three consecutive patients with prostate MRI examination and MRI-guided in-bore biopsy were retrospectively included in the study. MRI-guided in-bore biopsy histologically confirmed prostate cancer in 50 patients (n = 92 lesions). The other 53 patients (n = 122 lesions) had negative bioptical results. In patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer, 46 of the 92 lesions had visually increased SI on the high b-value images compared with the peripheral zone (SI = +27 ± 16%) or the central gland (SI = +37 ± 19%, P < 0.001 respectively). In patients with a negative biopsy, ten of the 122 lesions had visually increased SI (compared with the peripheral zone, SI = +29 ± 18%, and with the central gland, SI = +41 ± 15%, P < 0.001 respectively). Neither the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values nor the Gleason Score of lesions with increased SI were significantly different from lesions without increased SI. Visually increased SI on the high b-value images of diffusion-weighted imaging using standard b-values is a sign of malignancy but can occasionally also be a feature of benign lesions. However, it does not indicate more aggressive tumours. (orig.)

  6. EPITHET: Positive Result After Reanalysis Using Baseline Diffusion-Weighted Imaging/Perfusion-Weighted Imaging Co-Registration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nagakane, Yoshinari; Christensen, Soren; Brekenfeld, Caspar; Ma, Henry; Churilov, Leonid; Parsons, Mark W; Levi, Christopher R; Butcher, Kenneth S; Peeters, Andre; Barber, P Alan; Bladin, Christopher F; De Silva, Deidre A; Fink, John; Kimber, Thomas E; Schultz, David W; Muir, Keith W; Tress, Brian M; Desmond, Patricia M; Davis, Stephen M; Donnan, Geoffrey A

    2011-01-01

    the Echoplanar Imaging Thrombolytic Evaluation Trial (EPITHET) was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase II trial of alteplase between 3 and 6 hours after stroke onset...

  7. Non-mass-like enhancement on contrast-enhanced breast MR imaging: lesion characterization using combination of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Matsuo, Yoshio; Kamitani, Takeshi; Setoguchi, Taro; Okafuji, Takashi; Soeda, Hiroyasu; Sakai, Shuji; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu; Kubo, Makoto; Tokunaga, Eriko; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Honda, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of a combination of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) in characterization of lesions showing non-mass-like enhancement on breast MR imaging and to find the strongest discriminators between carcinoma and benignancy. We analyzed consecutive MR images in 45 lesions showing non-mass like enhancement in 41 patients. We analyzed lesion size, distribution, internal enhancement, kinetic curve pattern, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. We applied univariate and multivariate analyses to find the strongest indicators for malignancy. In a validation study, 22 non-mass-like enhancement lesions in 21 patients were examined. We calculated diagnostic accuracy when we presume category 4b, 4c, and 5 lesions as malignant or high to moderate suspicion for malignancy, and category 4a and 3 as low suspicion for malignancy or benign. Segmental distribution (P=0.018), clumped internal enhancement (P=0.005), and ADC less than 1.3 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s (P=0.047) were the strongest MR indicators of malignancy. In a validation study, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were 87% (13/15), 86% (6/7), 93% (13/14), 75% (6/8) and 86% (19/22), respectively. The combination of DCE-MRI and DWI showed high diagnostic accuracy in characterization of non-mass-like enhancement lesions on breast MR images. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictive values of diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging in evaluating the efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Min Lin,1 Man-Man Tian,1 Wei-Ping Zhang,2 Li Xu,1 Ping Jin1 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Oncology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: This study explored the predictive values of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI in evaluating the efficacy of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. A total of 118 HCC patients treated with TACE were selected from April 2013 to November 2015. T1-weighted imaging (T1WI/T2-weighted imaging (T2WI, DWI, and PWI were performed on all patients before and after TACE. Efficacy was evaluated according to modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic power of quantitative DWI and PWI parameters in evaluating the efficacy of TACE for HCC patients. Among the 118 HCC patients, there were 17 cases (14.4% with complete response, 50 cases (42.4% with partial response, 28 cases (23.7% with stable disease, and 23 cases (19.5% with progressive disease. There were 67 patients in the effective group (complete response + partial response and 51 patients in the ineffective group (stable disease + progressive disease. Before TACE, there were significant differences in maximum tumor diameter (MTD, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, slow ADC (Dslow, fast ADC (Dfast, transfer constant of vessel at the maximum level (Ktrans, and rate constant of backflux (Kep between the effective and ineffective groups (all P<0.05. After TACE, the effective group exhibited lower MTD, Dfast, and Kep and higher ADC and Dslow than the ineffective group (all P<0.05. Tumor regression rate negatively correlated with MTD, Ktrans, Kep, and Dfast but positively correlated with ADC and Dslow. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis suggested that the area under the

  9. Diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging with background body signal suppression/T2 image fusion for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Tanaka, Satomi; Sunaoshi, Takafumi; Kano, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Eriko; Shite, Misaki; Haga, Ryouta; Fukamizu, Yoshiya; Fujita, Toshiyuki; Kagayama, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-07-01

    Prompt and accurate diagnosis is critical in the treatment of acute cholecystitis. Diffusion-weighted whole-body magnetic resonance imaging with background body signal suppression/T2 image fusion (DWIBS/T2) identifies areas with high signal intensity, corresponding to inflammation. In the present study, the records and images of patients with acute cholecystitis who underwent DWIBS/T2 between January 2013 and March 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 11 patients with acute cholecystitis were enrolled. In one patient, DWIBS/T2 identified a thickened wall and high signal intensity, with high signal intensity in the pericholecystic space that suggested localized peritonitis. Positive DWIBS/T2 results indicating acute cholecystitis were obtained in 10/11 patients, with a sensitivity of 90.9%. In addition, wall thickening and high signal intensity were absent in DWIBS/T2 images when wall thickening was not detected by computed tomography. Wall thickening and high signal intensity was attenuated when patients with acute cholecystitis were clinically treated. These data suggest that a thickened gallbladder wall and high signal intensity are indicative of acute cholecystitis and that DWIBS/T2 may be a useful technique in evaluating the severity of acute cholecystitis.

  10. Evaluation of Possible Prognostic Factors of Fulminant Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) on Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donmez, F.Y.; Aslan, H.; Coskun, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) may be a rapidly progressive disease with different clinical outcomes. Purpose: To investigate the radiological findings of fulminant ADEM on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, and to correlate these findings with clinical outcome. Material and Methods: Initial and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in eight patients were retrospectively evaluated for distribution of lesions on FLAIR images and presence of hemorrhage or contrast enhancement. DWI of the patients was evaluated as to cytotoxic versus vasogenic edema. The clinical records were analyzed, and MRI results and clinical outcome were correlated. Results: Four of the eight patients died, three had full recovery, and one had residual cortical blindness. The distribution of the hyperintense lesions on FLAIR sequence was as follows: frontal (37.5%), parietal (50%), temporal (37.5%), occipital (62.5%), basal ganglia (50%), pons (37.5%), mesencephalon (37.5%), and cerebellum (50%). Three of the patients who died had brainstem involvement. Two patients had a cytotoxic edema, one of whom died, and the other developed cortical blindness. Six patients had vasogenic edema: three of these patients had a rapid progression to coma and died; three of them recovered. Conclusion: DWI is not always helpful for evaluating the evolution or predicting the outcome of ADEM. However, extension of the lesions, particularly brainstem involvement, may have an influence on the prognosis.

  11. Quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images: differentiation between prostate cancer and normal tissue based on a computer-aided diagnosis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ge; Wang, Chengyan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Juan; Yang, Xuedong; Wang, He; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Xiaoying

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is considered to be one of the dominant modalities used in prostate cancer (PCa) detection and the assessment of lesion aggressiveness, especially for peripheral zone (PZ) PCa. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), which is capable of automatically extracting and evaluating image features, can integrate multiple parameters and improve the detection of PCa. In this study, 13 quantitative image features were extracted from DWI by CAD, and diagnostic efficacy was analyzed in both the PZ and transition zone (TZ). The results demonstrated that there was a significant difference (P<0.05) between PCa and non-PCa for nine of the 13 features in the PZ and five of the 13 features in the TZ. Besides, the prediction outcome of CAD had a strong correlation with the DWI scores that were graded by experienced radiologists according to the Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System Version 2 (PI-RADS v2).

  12. Compared with the Conventional MR Imaging, Do the Constructive Interference Steady State Sequence and Diffusion Weighted Imaging Aid in the Diagnosis of Lumbar Disc Hernias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Hasan; Kizilgoz, Volkan; Hekimoglu, Baki

    2011-12-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and Constructive Interference Steady State (CISS) sequences in the depiction of lumbar disc hernias, including sequestrated and extruded discs. 100 patients; 35 males and 65 females, with 3 sequestration-16 extruded and 81 protruded all together 100 herniated discs were involved in this study. If a patient had more than one herniated disc, then the more precise herniation was included. All the MRI procedures were handled in Siemens Symphony Power 1.5 T. magnet. DWI- Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC mapping) and CISS sequences were obtained in axial planes. Statistical analysis of CISS and DWI results were analysed by fischer's test, chi square statistics. CISS sequence had a 89% sensitivity, 100% specificity for all lumbar disc hernias, had 100% sensitivity and specificity in the evaluation of sequestrated and extruded discs. DWI had a 77% sensitivity and %100 specificity, had 100% sensitivity and 50% specificity in the evaluation of extrusion, 100% sensitivity and specificity in the evaluation of sequestration. CISS sequence and quantitative DWI may be alternative imaging modalities to the routine MR imaging sequences in the depiction of lumbar disc hernias, including sequestration and extruded discs.

  13. The role of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging in the differentiation of parasellar meningioma and cavernous haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Lou, Xin; Liu, Meng-Yu; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Shi, Kai-Ning; Ma, Lin

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and three-dimensional arterial spin labelling perfusion imaging (3D-ASL) in distinguishing cavernous haemangioma from parasellar meningioma, using histological data as a reference standard. Patients with parasellar meningioma or parasellar cavernous haemangioma underwent conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) followed by DWI and 3D-ASL using a 3.0 Tesla MRI. The minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (minADC) from DWI and the maximal normalized cerebral blood flow (nCBF) from 3D-ASL were measured in each tumour. Diagnosis was confirmed by histology. MinADC was significantly lower and nCBF significantly higher in meningioma (n = 19) than cavernous haemangioma (n = 15). There was a significant negative correlation between minADC and nCBF (r = -0.605). DWI and 3D-ASL are useful in differentiating cavernous haemangiomas from parasellar meningiomas, particularly in situations when the appearance on conventional MRI sequences is otherwise ambiguous. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification and vascular territory of ischemic stroke lesions diagnosed by diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jong-Won; Park, Su Hyun; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Wook-Joo; Park, Jung Hyun; Ko, Youngchai; Yang, Mi Hwa; Jang, Myung Suk; Han, Moon-Ku; Jung, Cheolkyu; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Oh, Chang Wan; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2014-08-11

    The association between the location and the mechanism of a stroke lesion remains unclear. A diffusion-weighted imaging study may help resolve this lack of clarity. We studied a consecutive series of 2702 acute ischemic stroke patients whose stroke lesions were confirmed by diffusion-weighted imaging and who underwent a thorough etiological investigation. The vascular territory in which an ischemic lesion was situated was identified using standard anatomic maps of the dominant arterial territories. Stroke subtype was based on the Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment, or TOAST, classification. Large-artery atherosclerosis (37.3%) was the most common stroke subtype, and middle cerebral artery (49.6%) was the most frequently involved territory. Large-artery atherosclerosis was the most common subtype for anterior cerebral, middle cerebral, vertebral, and anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarctions. Small vessel occlusion was the leading subtype in basilar and posterior cerebral artery territories. Cardioembolism was the leading cause in superior cerebellar artery territory. Compared with carotid territory stroke, vertebrobasilar territory stroke was more likely to be caused by small vessel occlusion (21.4% versus 30.1%, Pterritory infarction was frequently caused by cardioembolism (44.2%) in carotid territory and by large-artery atherosclerosis (52.1%) in vertebrobasilar territory. Information on vascular territory of a stroke lesion may be helpful in timely investigation and accurate diagnosis of stroke etiology. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of brain diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging comparison with 1.5 T and 3.0 T units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    DWI of biological effects are independent of magnetic field strength in various regions. High field strength, however, does affect the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and artifacts of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) images, which ultimately will influence the quantitative of diffusion imaging . In this study, the effects of field strength on DWI are reviewed. The effects of the diseases also are discussed. Comparing DWI in cerebellum, WM, GM, Hyperacute region measurements both as a function of field strength (1.5 T and 3.0 T). Overall, the SNR of the DWI roughly doubled going from 1.5 T to 3.0 T. In summary, DWI studies at 3.0 T is provided significantly improved DWI measurements relative to studies at 1.5 T.

  16. Diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression/T2 image fusion for the diagnosis of colorectal polyp and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Uchiyama, Katsuhiro; Fugo, Kazunori; Sunaoshi, Takafumi; Ozaki, Aika; Sugiyama, Eriko; Baba, Akira; Kano, Daisuke; Shite, Misaki; Haga, Ryota; Fukamizu, Yoshiya; Kagayama, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Kishimoto, Takashi; Ishige, Naoki

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression/T2 image fusion (DWIBS/T2) is useful for the diagnosis of cancer as it presents a clear contrast between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue. The present study investigated the limitations and advantages of DWIBS/T2 with regards to the diagnosis of colorectal polyp (CP) or cancer (CRC). The current study included patients diagnosed with CP or CRC following colonoscopy, who were subjected to DWIBS/T2 between July 2012 and March 2015. Patient records were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were subjected to DWIBS/T2 when they presented with abdominal cancers or inflammation. Colonoscopy was performed as part of screening, or if patients had suspected colon cancer or inflammatory bowel disease. A total of 8 male and 7 female patients were enrolled in the present study. All patients, with the exception of one who had been diagnosed with CRC following colonoscopy, had positive results and all patients diagnosed with CP following a colonoscopy, with the exception of one, had negative results on DWIBS/T2. Thus, CRC was detected by DWIBS/T2, while CP was not (P=0.0028). The diameter of CRC lesions was significantly larger than that of CP (Paffected by lesion diameter and depth of invasion.

  17. Diffusion anisotropy color-coded map of cerebral white matter: quantitative comparison between orthogonal anisotropic diffusion-weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwano, Ikuko; Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Yamaguchi, Mao; Saito, Ayumi; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Ogawa, Akira

    2013-04-01

    Diffusion anisotropy color-coded maps of cerebral white matter can be generated from orthogonal anisotropic diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) using the three-dimensional anisotropy contrast (3DAC) technique, but its precision has not been fully validated. Hence, we attempted to determine whether 3DAC is comparable to a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) color map. We examined 15 healthy individuals and generated color-coded maps using 3DAC as well as using primary eigenvector (e1) and fractional anisotropy (FA) from identical DTI datasets. The difference in the direction of the 3DAC vector from e1 (θ) in cerebral white matter was evaluated. Correlations between θ and FA or obliqueness of e1 were also examined. In cerebral white matter, θ had significantly negative and positive correlations with FA values and e1 obliqueness, respectively. Among white matter tracts, the pyramidal tract, cingulum, and corpus callosum, which had significantly high FA and/or low obliqueness, exhibited similar coloration and significantly smaller θ (4.4° ± 1.6°, 9.3° ± 2.8°, and 11.2° ± 1.1°, respectively) than the entire white matter (13.9° ± 1.1°). The 3DAC could visualize directional information of white matter tracts as precisely DTI-based color maps did, particularly when FA was large and/or e1 directions were orthogonal. Copyright © 2012 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted imaging with conventional MR imaging for differentiating complex solid and cystic ovarian tumors at 1.5T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preoperative characterization of complex solid and cystic adnexal masses is crucial for informing patients about possible surgical strategies. Our study aims to determine the usefulness of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC for characterizing complex solid and cystic adnexal masses. Methods One-hundred and 91 patients underwent diffusion-weighted (DW magnetic resonance (MR imaging of 202 ovarian masses. The mean ADC value of the solid components was measured and assessed for each ovarian mass. Differences in ADC between ovarian masses were tested using the Student’s t-test. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC was used to assess the ability of ADC to differentiate between benign and malignant complex adnexal masses. Results Eighty-five patients were premenopausal, and 106 were postmenopausal. Seventy-four of the 202 ovarian masses were benign and 128 were malignant. There was a significant difference between the mean ADC values of benign and malignant ovarian masses (p -3 mm2/s may be the optimal one for differentiating between benign and malignant tumors. Conclusions A high signal intensity within the solid component on T2WI was less frequently in benign than in malignant adnexal masses. The combination of DW imaging with ADC value measurements and T2-weighted signal characteristics of solid components is useful for differentiating between benign and malignant ovarian masses.

  19. Evaluation of malignant and benign renal lesions using diffusion-weighted MRI with multiple b values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbay, Gurcan; Koc, Zafer; Karadeli, Elif (Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey)), Email: koczafer@gmail.com; Kuzgunbay, Baris; Goren, M. Resit (Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Urology, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey)); Bal, Nebil (Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Pathology, Baskent Univ., Ankara (Turkey))

    2012-04-15

    Background: Limited data are available regarding the use of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with multiple b values for characterization of renal lesions. Purpose: To demonstrate and compare the diagnostic performance of DW-MRI with multiple b values for renal lesion characterization. Material and Methods: Sixty-three lesions (36 malignant, 27 benign) in 60 consecutive patients (48 men, 12 women; age 60 +- 12.5 years) with solid/cystic renal lesion diagnosed after MRI were included prospectively. Single-shot echo-planar DW abdominal MRI (1.5T) was obtained using seven b values with eight apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), signal intensities, lesion ADCs, and lesion/normal parenchyma ADC ratios were analyzed. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed. Results: The mean signal intensities of malignant lesions (at b0, 50, and 200 s/mm2) were significantly lower than those of benign lesions (P < 0.05). The mean ADC values at all b value combinations of malignant lesions were significantly lower than those of benign lesions (P < 0.000), excluding the ADC value at b50 s/mm2. ADC with all b values could better distinguish between benign and malignant lesions. A 1.35 x 10-3 mm2/s threshold ADC value permitted this distinction with 85.2% sensitivity and 65.6% specificity. The lesion/normal parenchyma ADC ratio was more effective than the lesion ADC. Conclusion: In addition to the ADC value, the signal intensity curve on DW images using multiple b values could be helpful for differentiation of malignant and benign renal lesions

  20. Diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI in lung cancers. ADC test-retest repeatability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, Alex; Papoutsaki, Marianthi Vasiliki; Blackledge, Matthew; DeSouza, Nandita M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Cancer Imaging Centre, Surrey (United Kingdom); Waterton, John C. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas University, Milan (Italy); Stroobants, Sigrid [Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen (Belgium); Kuijer, Joost [Vrije Universiteit Medisch Centrum, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Morgan, Veronica [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-11-15

    To determine the test-retest repeatability of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) measurements across institutions and MRI vendors, plus investigate the effect of post-processing methodology on measurement precision. Thirty malignant lung lesions >2 cm in size (23 patients) were scanned on two occasions, using echo-planar-Diffusion-Weighted (DW)-MRI to derive whole-tumour ADC (b = 100, 500 and 800 s/mm{sup -2}). Scanning was performed at 4 institutions (3 MRI vendors). Whole-tumour volumes-of-interest were copied from first visit onto second visit images and from one post-processing platform to an open-source platform, to assess ADC repeatability and cross-platform reproducibility. Whole-tumour ADC values ranged from 0.66-1.94x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (mean = 1.14). Within-patient coefficient-of-variation (wCV) was 7.1% (95% CI 5.7-9.6%), limits-of-agreement (LoA) -18.0 to 21.9%. Lesions >3 cm had improved repeatability: wCV 3.9% (95% CI 2.9-5.9%); and LoA -10.2 to 11.4%. Variability for lesions <3 cm was 2.46 times higher. ADC reproducibility across different post-processing platforms was excellent: Pearson's R{sup 2} = 0.99; CoV 2.8% (95% CI 2.3-3.4%); and LoA -7.4 to 8.0%. A free-breathing DW-MRI protocol for imaging malignant lung tumours achieved satisfactory within-patient repeatability and was robust to changes in post-processing software, justifying its use in multi-centre trials. For response evaluation in individual patients, a change in ADC >21.9% will reflect treatment-related change. (orig.)

  1. MR relaxometry in chronic liver diseases: Comparison of T1 mapping, T2 mapping, and diffusion-weighted imaging for assessing cirrhosis diagnosis and severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassinotto, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.cassinotto@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); INSERM U1053, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Feldis, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.feldis@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); Vergniol, Julien, E-mail: julien.vergniol@chu-bordeaux.fr [Centre D’investigation de la Fibrose Hépatique, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); Mouries, Amaury, E-mail: amaury.mouries@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); Cochet, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.cochet@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The use of MR to classify cirrhosis in different stages is a new interesting field. • We compared liver and spleen T1 mapping, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging. • MR relaxometry using liver T1 mapping is accurate for the diagnosis of cirrhosis. • Liver T1 mapping shows that values increase with the severity of cirrhosis. • Diffusion-weighted imaging is less accurate than T1 mapping while T2 mapping is not reliable. - Abstract: Background: MR relaxometry has been extensively studied in the field of cardiac diseases, but its contribution to liver imaging is unclear. We aimed to compare liver and spleen T1 mapping, T2 mapping, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for assessing the diagnosis and severity of cirrhosis. Methods: We prospectively included 129 patients with normal (n = 40) and cirrhotic livers (n = 89) from May to September 2014. Non-enhanced liver T1 mapping, splenic T2 mapping, and liver and splenic DWI were measured and compared for assessing cirrhosis severity using Child-Pugh score, MELD score, and presence or not of large esophageal varices (EVs) and liver stiffness measurements using Fibroscan{sup ®} as reference. Results: Liver T1 mapping was the only variable demonstrating significant differences between normal patients (500 ± 79 ms), Child-Pugh A patients (574 ± 84 ms) and Child-Pugh B/C patients (690 ± 147 ms; all p-values <0.00001). Liver T1 mapping had a significant correlation with Child-Pugh score (Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.46), MEDL score (0.30), and liver stiffness measurement (0.52). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of liver T1 mapping for the diagnosis of cirrhosis (O.85; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.77–0.91), Child-Pugh B/C cirrhosis (0.87; 95%CI, 0.76–0.93), and large EVs (0.75; 95%CI, 0.63–0.83) were greater than that of spleen T2 mapping, liver and spleen DWI (all p-values < 0.01). Conclusion: Liver T1 mapping is a promising new diagnostic

  2. Whole-Body MRI Virtual Autopsy Using Diffusion-weighted Imaging With Background Suppression (DWIBS) at 3 T in a Child Succumbing to Chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Kemp, Marnie L; Meiring, Michelle

    2017-03-01

    We report the use of diffusion-weighted imaging with background suppression (DWIBS) in pediatric virtual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) autopsy of a child who succumbed to chordoma. A 10-year-old girl who succumbed to relapse of a chordoma underwent whole-body virtual MRI autopsy 12 hours postmortem with short Tau inversion recovery (STIR) and DWIBS on 3 T, which demonstrated the primary mass, local and cardiac invasion, and metastatic disease to the thorax, abdomen, head/neck, and musculoskeletal system. Postmortem virtual MRI autopsy including DWIBS successfully demonstrated the transthoracic spread of chordoma and invasion of the heart, resulting in blood-borne metastases. Motion and respiratory artifact were not factors during virtual autopsy using DWIBS on 3 T, making ideal use of this technology.

  3. Endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion: diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Gigin; Lu, Hsin-Ying [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Institute for Radiological Research, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Clinical Phenome Center, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Huang, Yu-Ting; Lin, Yu-Chun; Ng, Shu-Hang; Ng, Koon-Kwan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Institute for Radiological Research, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Chao, Angel; Lai, Chyong-Huey [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Gynecologic Cancer Research Center, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Clinical Trial Center, Guishan, Taoyuan (China); Wu, Ren-Chin [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou and Chang Gung University, Department of Pathology, Guishan, Taoyuan (China)

    2017-05-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for detecting cervical stromal invasion in endometrial cancer. Eighty-three consecutive women with endometrial cancer underwent preoperative evaluation in a 3-T unit, including T2-weighted, DW (b = 0 and 1000 s/mm{sup 2}), and DCE MR imaging. Two radiologists independently assessed presence of cervical stromal invasion, with histopathological reference as gold standard. For assessing cervical stromal invasion, the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, respectively for Reader 1/Reader 2, were as follows: DW MR imaging - 95.2 %/91.6 %, 91.7 %/100 %, and 95.8 %/90.1 %; DCE MR imaging - 91.6 %/88 %, 58.3 %/50 %, and 97.2 %/94.4 %. The diagnostic performance of DW MR imaging (Reader 1: areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.98; Reader 2: AUC = 0.97) was significantly higher than that of DCE MR imaging (p = 0.009 for Reader 2) or T2-weighted MR imaging (Reader 1: p = 0.006; Reader 2: p = 0.013). Patients with cervical stromal invasion showed a significantly greater canal width (p < 0.0001) and myometrial invasion extent (p = 0.006). DW MR imaging has superior diagnostic performance compared with DCE MR imaging in the detection of cervical stromal invasion. (orig.)

  4. Combined diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging of patients with acute osteoporotic vertebral fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biffar, Andreas [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Sourbron, Steven [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Division of Medical Physics, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dietrich, Olaf [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Schmidt, Gerwin [Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Ingrisch, Michael [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Josef Lissner Laboratory for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Baur-Melnyk, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.baur@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Clinical Radiology - Grosshadern, LMU Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the potential and to analyze parameter correlations of combined quantitative diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and high-temporal-resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in vertebral bone marrow (vBM) of patients with osteoporosis and acute vertebral compression fractures, providing additional information for a better understanding of the physiological background of parameter changes. Materials and methods: 20 patients with acute osteoporotic fractures were examined with DWI and DCE-MRI at 1.5 T. DCE-MRI was performed with a 2D saturation-recovery turbo-FLASH sequence, acquiring 300 dynamics with a temporal resolution of 1 s. For DWI measurements, a DW HASTE sequence with b-values from 100 to 600 s/mm{sup 2} was applied. In each patient, ROIs were drawn manually in the fractures and in normal appearing vertebrae. For DCE-MRI, the concentration-time curves of these ROIs were analyzed using a two-compartment tracer-kinetic model in the lesions, providing separate estimates of perfusion and permeability, and a one-compartment model in normal vBM, providing only a mixed representation of perfusion and permeability in terms of a mixed flow parameter K{sup trans} and the extracellular volume (ECV). In the case of DWI, attenuation curves were fitted to a monoexponential decay model to determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Results: Mean perfusion parameters and ADCs were significantly (p < 0.001) different in the fractures compared to adjacent normal appearing vertebrae (K{sup trans}: 7.81 mL/100 mL/min vs. 14.61 mL/100 mL/min, ECV: 52.84 mL/100 mL vs. 4.61 mL/100 mL, ADC: 1.71 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s vs. 0.57 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). ADCs showed a significant correlation with the ECV. Conclusion: The quantitative analysis of DWI and DCE-MRI could distinguish osteoporotic fractures from normal appearing vertebrae. A significant correlation found between ECV and ADCs might be able to explain the cause for the increased

  5. Qualitative and quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging of the breast at 3T - A useful adjunct to contrast-enhanced MRI in characterization of breast lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Bansal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To distinguish between benign and malignant breast lesions on the basis of their signal intensity on diffusion-weighted imaging and their apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values at 3 T MRI, along with histopathological correlation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 500 patients who underwent 3 T MRI between August 2011 and May 2013 was done. Of these, 226 patients with 232 lesions that were proved by histopathology were included in the study. ADC values were calculated at b values of 0, 1000, and 1500 s/mm2 after identification on contrast-enhanced images and appropriate ROI(Region of interest placement. ADC value and histopathology correlation was analyzed. Results: Out of 232 lesions, 168 lesions were histologically malignant and 64 were histologically benign. With an ADC cut-off value of 1.1 ×10−3 mm2/s for malignant lesions, a sensitivity of 92.80% and specificity of 80.23% was obtained. Out of 12/232 false-negative lesions, 6 were mucinous carcinoma in which a high ADC value of 1.8-1.9 ×10−3 mm2/s was obtained. Purely DCIS (Ductal carcinoma in situ lesions presenting as non-mass-like enhancement had a high ADC value of 1.2-1.5 ×10−3 mm2/s, thereby reducing specificity. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted Imaging and quantitative assessment by ADC values may act as an effective parameter in increasing the diagnostic accuracy and specificity of contrast-enhanced breast MRI in characterization of breast lesions.

  6. Comparison of PET-CT and magnetic resonance diffusion weighted imaging with body suppression (DWIBS) for initial staging of malignant lymphomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stéphane, Velasco, E-mail: stephane.velasco@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Radiology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Samuel, Burg, E-mail: s.burg@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris CHU Saint Louis, 40 rue de Bichat, 75 010 Paris (France); Vincent, Delwail, E-mail: v.delwail@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Hematology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Joelle, Guilhot, E-mail: j.guilhot@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Hematology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Remy, Perdrisot, E-mail: r.perdrisot@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Francois, Guilhot Gaudeffroy, E-mail: f.guilhot-gaudeffroy@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Hematology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France); Jean-Pierre, Tasu, E-mail: j.p.tasu@chu-poitiers.fr [Department of Radiology, CHU de Poitiers, rue de la milétrie, 86000 Poitiers (France)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical impact of diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in staging of malignant lymphoma. Methods: Twenty-three patients with proven malignant lymphomas were prospectively enrolled. DWIBS (b = 0, 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) examinations and PET-CT were performed respectively on an Intera 1.5 T unit and a Gyroscan PET-CT scan (Philips Medical system, Best, the Netherland). The criteria for positive node involvement were a size over 10 mm or an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value under 0.75 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s for nodes under 10 mm. For extranodal analysis, a high or heterogeneous signal on DWIBS was considered as positive. In cases of discordance, the reference standard for each region or organ was established at 6 months after the diagnosis according to all available clinical, biological information, as well as histological evidence or follow-up to prove or disprove the presence of disease. Results: DWIBS and PET-CT results were congruent in 333 node regions on the 345 areas analyzed, with excellent agreement (κ = 0.97, P < 0.0001). From 433 organs analyzed (one patient had splenectomy) extranodal disease was detected in 22 organs on DWIBS. The two imaging techniques agreed on 430 organs (κ = 0.99, P < 0.0001). Finally, Ann Arbor stages based on DWIBS and those of PET/CT were in agreement for 23 patients. Conclusions: For malignant lymphoma in a pre-therapeutic context, agreement between diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging and PET/CT is high for Ann Arbor staging.

  7. Diffusion Weighted Imaging in Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: Current Efficiency as a Standalone Sequence for an Unenhanced MRI Experience - a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechifor-Boilă I.A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI is the main sequence in the multiparametric prostate MRI protocol together with T2 and dynamic contrast-enhanced T1, leading to detection rates up to 60% in prostate cancer diagnosis. However, the use of intravenous contrast can have severe side-effects, making the use of unenhanced MRI sequences essential. The aim of our study was to assess the feasibility and efficiency of DWI as a standalone MRI technique for prostate cancer diagnosis. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study at our department (09.2014-05.2015 and formed a study lot consisting in five prostate cancer patients that were scheduled for radical prostatectomy. Multiparametric MRI was performed (with DWI and T2 sequences and the images were interpreted according to the PI-RADS system. The final histopathological result after prostatectomy served as gold standard. Results: A series of 9 lesions were detected and analyzed on DWI. At qualitative interpretation, DWI had a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 50%. The corresponding positive and negative likelihood ratios were 1.71 and 0.286, respectively (p=0.417. ADC analysis revealed a mean value of 1.2*10-3mm2/s for the benign lesions while the corresponding value was 0.8*10-3 for the malignant ones, regardless of tumor size and Gleason scoring. Conclusion: DWI is a feasible technique in the current clinical environment, with a good sensitivity and a medium specificity. Furthermore, an association to the anatomical T2 sequence could enhance the diagnostic efficiency of DWI and should be assessed in larger studies.

  8. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng [302 Hospital of Chinese People' s Liberation Army, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhi-Ye; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yan; Ma, Lin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Lou, Xin [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gui, Qiu-Ping [People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Beijing (China); Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan [General Electric Healthcare (China) Co., Ltd., Beijing; Wang, Danny J.J. [University of California, Department of Neurology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. (orig.)

  9. Clinical characteristics of unknown symptom onset stroke patients with and without diffusion-weighted imaging and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery mismatch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomalla, Götz; Boutitie, Florent; Fiebach, Jochen B.

    2018-01-01

    Background Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) mismatch was suggested to identify stroke patients with unknown time of symptom onset likely to be within the time window for thrombolysis. Aims We aimed to study clinical characteristics associated with DWI......-FLAIR mismatch in patients with unknown onset stroke. Methods We analyzed baseline MRI and clinical data from patients with acute ischemic stroke proven by DWI from WAKE-UP, an investigator-initiated, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of MRI-based thrombolysis in stroke patients with unknown time of symptom...... symptom onset stroke patients with and without DWI-FLAIR mismatch. DWI-FLAIR mismatch as an indicator of stroke onset within 4.5 h shows no relevant association with commonly collected clinical characteristics of stroke patients. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov . Unique...

  10. On a fractional order calculus model in diffusion weighted breast imaging to differentiate between malignant and benign breast lesions detected on X-ray screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Steudle, Franziska; Paech, Daniel; Mlynarska, Anna; Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Lederer, Wolfgang; Daniel, Heidi; Freitag, Martin; Delorme, Stefan; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate a fractional order calculus (FROC) model in diffusion weighted imaging to differentiate between malignant and benign breast lesions in breast cancer screening work-up using recently introduced parameters (βFROC, DFROC and μFROC). This retrospective analysis within a prospective IRB-approved study included 51 participants (mean 58.4 years) after written informed consent. All patients had suspicious screening mammograms and indication for biopsy. Prior to biopsy, full diagnostic contrast-enhanced MRI examination was acquired including diffusion-weighted-imaging (DWI, b = 0,100,750,1500 s/mm2). Conventional apparent diffusion coefficient Dapp and FROC parameters (βFROC, DFROC and μFROC) as suggested further indicators of diffusivity components were measured in benign and malignant lesions. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were calculated to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the parameters. 29/51 patients histopathologically revealed malignant lesions. The analysis revealed an AUC for Dapp of 0.89 (95% CI 0.80-0.98). For FROC derived parameters, AUC was 0.75 (0.60-0.89) for DFROC, 0.59 (0.43-0.75) for βFROC and 0.59 (0.42-0.77) for μFROC. Comparison of the AUC curves revealed a significantly higher AUC of Dapp compared to the FROC parameters DFROC (p = 0.009), βFROC (p = 0.003) and μFROC (p = 0.001). In contrast to recent description in brain tumors, the apparent diffusion coefficient Dapp showed a significantly higher AUC than the recently proposed FROC parameters βFROC, DFROC and μFROC for differentiating between malignant and benign breast lesions. This might be related to the intrinsic high heterogeneity within breast tissue or to the lower maximal b-value used in our study.

  11. On a fractional order calculus model in diffusion weighted breast imaging to differentiate between malignant and benign breast lesions detected on X-ray screening mammography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bickelhaupt

    Full Text Available To evaluate a fractional order calculus (FROC model in diffusion weighted imaging to differentiate between malignant and benign breast lesions in breast cancer screening work-up using recently introduced parameters (βFROC, DFROC and μFROC.This retrospective analysis within a prospective IRB-approved study included 51 participants (mean 58.4 years after written informed consent. All patients had suspicious screening mammograms and indication for biopsy. Prior to biopsy, full diagnostic contrast-enhanced MRI examination was acquired including diffusion-weighted-imaging (DWI, b = 0,100,750,1500 s/mm2. Conventional apparent diffusion coefficient Dapp and FROC parameters (βFROC, DFROC and μFROC as suggested further indicators of diffusivity components were measured in benign and malignant lesions. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC were calculated to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the parameters.29/51 patients histopathologically revealed malignant lesions. The analysis revealed an AUC for Dapp of 0.89 (95% CI 0.80-0.98. For FROC derived parameters, AUC was 0.75 (0.60-0.89 for DFROC, 0.59 (0.43-0.75 for βFROC and 0.59 (0.42-0.77 for μFROC. Comparison of the AUC curves revealed a significantly higher AUC of Dapp compared to the FROC parameters DFROC (p = 0.009, βFROC (p = 0.003 and μFROC (p = 0.001.In contrast to recent description in brain tumors, the apparent diffusion coefficient Dapp showed a significantly higher AUC than the recently proposed FROC parameters βFROC, DFROC and μFROC for differentiating between malignant and benign breast lesions. This might be related to the intrinsic high heterogeneity within breast tissue or to the lower maximal b-value used in our study.

  12. A robust multi-shot scan strategy for high-resolution diffusion weighted MRI enabled by multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan-Kuei; Guidon, Arnaud; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Song, Allen W

    2013-05-15

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) data have been mostly acquired with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) to minimize motion induced artifacts. The spatial resolution, however, is inherently limited in single-shot EPI, even when the parallel imaging (usually at an acceleration factor of 2) is incorporated. Multi-shot acquisition strategies could potentially achieve higher spatial resolution and fidelity, but they are generally susceptible to motion-induced phase errors among excitations that are exacerbated by diffusion sensitizing gradients, rendering the reconstructed images unusable. It has been shown that shot-to-shot phase variations may be corrected using navigator echoes, but at the cost of imaging throughput. To address these challenges, a novel and robust multi-shot DWI technique, termed multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), is developed here to reliably and inherently correct nonlinear shot-to-shot phase variations without the use of navigator echoes. The performance of the MUSE technique is confirmed experimentally in healthy adult volunteers on 3Tesla MRI systems. This newly developed technique should prove highly valuable for mapping brain structures and connectivities at high spatial resolution for neuroscience studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantifying Pathology in Diffusion Weighted MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caan, M.W.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis algorithms are proposed for quantification of pathology in Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DW-MRI) data. Functional evidence for brain diseases can be explained by specific structural loss in the white matter of the brain. That is, certain biomarkers may exist where the

  14. [Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Sato, Mitsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution "cranial nerve imaging", which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region.

  15. Diffusion-weighted imaging for assessment of synovial inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A promising imaging biomarker as an alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barendregt, Anouk M.; Gulik, E.C. van [Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Academic Medical Center/University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis West, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis Oost, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-11-15

    To compare dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in quantifying synovial inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn in the synovium of JIA patients on T1 DCE and T2 DWI, followed by extraction of the maximum enhancement (ME), maximum initial slope (MIS), time to peak (TTP), % of different time intensity curve shapes (TIC) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the ROIs. Mann-Whitney-U test was used for comparing parameters between MRI-active and -inactive patients (defined by the juvenile arthritis MRI scoring system). Spearman's rank was used to analyse the correlation between DCE and DWI. Thirty-five JIA patients (18 MRI active and 17 MRI inactive) were included. Median age was 13.1 years and 71% were female. ME, MIS, TTP, % TIC 5 and ADC were significantly different in MRI-active versus MRI-inactive JIA with median ADC 1.49 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in MRI-active and 1.25 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in MRI-inactive JIA, p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval of difference in medians =0.11-0.53 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s. ADC correlated to ME, MIS and TIC 5 shapes (r = 0.62, r = 0.45, r = -0.51, respectively, all p < 0.05). Similar to DCE parameters, DWI-derived ADC is significantly different in MRI-active JIA as compared to MRI-inactive JIA. The non-invasiveness of DWI combined with its possibility to detect synovial inflammation shows the potential of DWI. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging predicts survival in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer shortly after selective internal radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Simon, Birgit; Luetkens, Julian Alexander; Traeber, Frank; Schmeel, Leonard Christopher; Schild, Hans Heinz; Hadizadeh, Dariusch Reza [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Sabet, Amir [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitaet Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Saarland, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Homburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    To investigate whether quantifications of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can predict overall survival (OS) in patients with liver-predominant metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) following selective internal radiation therapy with {sup 90}Yttrium-microspheres (SIRT). Forty-four patients underwent DWI 19 ± 16 days before and 36 ± 10 days after SIRT. Tumour-size and intratumoral minimal ADC (minADC) values were measured for 132 liver metastases on baseline and follow-up DWI. Optimal functional imaging response to treatment was determined by receiver operating characteristics and defined as ≥22 % increase in post-therapeutic minADC. Survival analysis was performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox-regression comparing various variables with potential impact on OS. Median OS was 8 months. The following parameters were significantly associated with median OS: optimal functional imaging response (18 vs. 5 months; p < 0.001), hepatic tumour burden <50 % (8 vs. 5 months; p = 0.018), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scale <1 (10 vs. 4 months; p = 0.012) and progressive disease according to Response and Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (8 vs. 3 months; p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, optimal functional imaging response and hepatic tumour burden remained independent predictors of OS. Functional imaging response assessment using minADC changes on DWI may predict survival in CRC shortly after SIRT. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood-brain barrier permeability in ischemic stroke using diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Yash V; Lu, Jianfei; Shen, Qiang; Cerqueira, Bianca; Duong, Timothy Q

    2017-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging has recently been proposed to quantify the rate of water exchange (K w ) across the blood-brain barrier in humans. This study aimed to evaluate the blood-brain barrier disruption in transient (60 min) ischemic stroke using K w magnetic resonance imaging with cross-validation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology in the same rats. The major findings were: (i) at 90 min after stroke (30 min after reperfusion), group K w magnetic resonance imaging data showed no significant blood-brain barrier permeability changes, although a few animals showed slightly abnormal K w . Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging confirmed this finding in the same animals. (ii) At two days after stroke, K w magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant blood-brain barrier disruption. Regions with abnormal K w showed substantial overlap with regions of hyperintense T 2 (vasogenic edema) and hyperperfusion. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue histology confirmed these findings in the same animals. The K w values in the normal contralesional hemisphere and the ipsilesional ischemic core two days after stroke were: 363 ± 17 and 261 ± 18 min -1 , respectively (P magnetic resonance imaging is sensitive to blood-brain barrier permeability changes in stroke, consistent with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and Evans blue extravasation. K w magnetic resonance imaging offers advantages over existing techniques because contrast agent is not needed and repeated measurements can be made for longitudinal monitoring or averaging.

  18. MR diffusion-weighted imaging-based subcutaneous tumour volumetry in a xenografted nude mouse model using 3D Slicer: an accurate and repeatable method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zelan; Chen, Xin; Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Liang, Cuishan; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2015-10-22

    Accurate and repeatable measurement of the gross tumour volume(GTV) of subcutaneous xenografts is crucial in the evaluation of anti-tumour therapy. Formula and image-based manual segmentation methods are commonly used for GTV measurement but are hindered by low accuracy and reproducibility. 3D Slicer is open-source software that provides semiautomatic segmentation for GTV measurements. In our study, subcutaneous GTVs from nude mouse xenografts were measured by semiautomatic segmentation with 3D Slicer based on morphological magnetic resonance imaging(mMRI) or diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI)(b = 0,20,800 s/mm(2)) . These GTVs were then compared with those obtained via the formula and image-based manual segmentation methods with ITK software using the true tumour volume as the standard reference. The effects of tumour size and shape on GTVs measurements were also investigated. Our results showed that, when compared with the true tumour volume, segmentation for DWI(P = 0.060-0.671) resulted in better accuracy than that mMRI(P method(P methods. Therefore, DWI-based semiautomatic segmentation, which is accurate and reproducible and also provides biological information, is the optimal GTV measurement method in the assessment of anti-tumour treatments.

  19. Aspectos generales de las secuencias de difusión de imagen en resonancia magnética Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: general concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ahualli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La secuencia de difusión en resonancia magnética (RM ha sido aceptada como una técnica útil que determina el movimiento de las moléculas de agua en los tejidos y permite valorar cualitativa y cuantitativamente el coeficiente de difusión. Para comprender cómo funcionan dichas secuencias, es necesario familiarizarse con los principios físicos de la difusión del agua y las bases conceptuales de la técnica. Resulta fundamental conocer los requerimientos específicos acerca del hardware y tiempo de adquisición así como las ventajas, limitaciones y errores de interpretación potenciales de esta novel técnica.Diffusion-weighted imaging has been accepted as a powerful imaging technique. It gives insight into the movement of water molecules in tissue and enables qualitative and quantitative assessment of tissue diffusivity (apparent diffusion coefficient. To fully understand how diffusion MR imaging works, it is helpful to be familiar with the physical principles of water diffusion and the conceptual basis of imaging technique. Knowledge of the technique-specific requirements with regard to hardware and acquisition time, as well as the advantages, limitations, and potential interpretation pitfalls of this novel technique, is especially useful.

  20. A meta-analysis of diffusion-weighted and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging for the detection of liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilgrain, Valerie; Ronot, Maxime [University Hospitals Paris Nord Val de Seine, Beaujon, Department of Radiology, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Clichy, Hauts-de-Seine (France); University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Paris (France); INSERM U1149, Centre de Recherche Biomedicale Bichat-Beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Esvan, Maxime; Caumont-Prim, Aurore [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, Unite d' Epidemiologie et de Recherche Clinique, Paris (France); INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique 1418, module Epidemiologie Clinique, Paris (France); Aube, Christophe [CHU d' Angers, Department of Radiology, Angers (France); Universite d' Angers, Laboratoire HIFIH, LUNAM, Angers (France); Chatellier, Gilles [Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, Unite d' Epidemiologie et de Recherche Clinique, Paris (France); INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique 1418, module Epidemiologie Clinique, Paris (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Faculte de Medecine, Paris (France)

    2016-12-15

    To obtain the diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted (DW) and gadoxetic-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of liver metastases. A comprehensive search (EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane) was performed to identify relevant articles up to June 2015. Inclusion criteria were: liver metastases, DW-MR imaging and/or gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging, and per-lesion statistics. The reference standard was histopathology, intraoperative observation and/or follow-up. Sources of bias were assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. A linear mixed-effect regression model was used to obtain sensitivity estimates. Thirty-nine articles were included (1,989 patients, 3,854 metastases). Sensitivity estimates for DW-MR imaging, gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and the combined sequence for detecting liver metastases on a per-lesion basis was 87.1 %, 90.6 % and 95.5 %, respectively. Sensitivity estimates by gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging and the combined sequence were significantly better than DW-MR imaging (p = 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively), and the combined MR sequence was significantly more sensitive than gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging (p < 0.0001). Similar results were observed in articles that compared the three techniques simultaneously, with only colorectal liver metastases and in liver metastases smaller than 1 cm. In patients with liver metastases, combined DW-MR and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging has the highest sensitivity for detecting liver metastases on a per-lesion basis. (orig.)

  1. Everyman's prostate phantom: kiwi-fruit substitute for human prostates at magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G.; Murer, Sophie; Kuhn, Marissa [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, Ulrike L. [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Oncology Centre Munich (IOZ), Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Scheidler, Juergen [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Radiology Centre Munich (RZM), Muenchen (Germany); Scherr, Michael [University of Munich (' ' Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet' ' , LMU), Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); BG Unfallklinik Murnau, Department of Radiology, Murnau am Staffelsee (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    To apply an easy-to-assemble phantom substitute for human prostates in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2WI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and 3D magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Kiwi fruit were fixed with gel hot and cold compress packs on two plastic nursery pots, separated by a plastic plate, and submerged in tap water inside a 1-L open-spout plastic watering can for T2WI (TR/TE 7500/101 ms), DWI (5500/61 ms, ADC b50-800 s/mm{sup 2} map) and MRS (940/145 ms) at 3.0 T, with phased array surface coils. One green kiwi fruit was additionally examined with an endorectal coil. Retrospective comparison with benign peripheral zone (PZ) and transitional zone (TZ) of prostate (n = 5), Gleason 6-7a prostate cancer (n = 8) and Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (n = 7) validated the phantom. Mean contrast between central placenta (CP) and outer pericarp (OP, 0.346-0.349) or peripheral placenta (PP, 0.364-0.393) of kiwi fruit was similar to Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer and PZ (0.308) in T2WI. ADC values of OP and PP (1.27 ± 0.07-1.37 ± 0.08 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}) resembled PZ and TZ (1.39 ± 0.17-1.60 ± 0.24 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}), while CP (0.91 ± 0.14-0.99 ± 0.10 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}) resembled Gleason 7b-9 prostate cancer (1.00 ± 0.25 mm{sup 2}/s x 10{sup -3}). MR spectra showed peaks of citrate and myo-inositol in kiwi fruit, and citrate and ''choline+creatine'' in prostates. The phantom worked with an endorectal coil, too. The kiwi fruit phantom reproducibly showed zones similar to PZ, TZ and cancer in human prostates in T2WI and DWI and two metabolite peaks in MRS and appears suitable to compare different MR protocols, coil systems and scanners. (orig.)

  2. Astrocytic tumour grading: a comparative study of three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling, dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hua-Feng; Chen, Zhi-Ye; Lou, Xin; Wang, Yu-Lin; Gui, Qiu-Ping; Wang, Yan; Shi, Kai-Ning; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Zheng, Dan-Dan; Wang, Danny J J; Ma, Lin

    2015-12-01

    We hypothesized that three-dimensional pseudocontinuous arterial spin labelling (pCASL) may have similar efficacy in astrocytic tumour grading as dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion-weighted imaging (DSC-PWI), and the grading accuracy may be further improved when combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Forty-three patients with astrocytic tumours were studied using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), pCASL, and DSC-PWI. Histograms of ADC and normalized tumour cerebral blood flow values (nCBF on pCASL and nrCBF on DSC-PWI) were measured and analyzed. The mean 10 % ADC value was the DWI parameter that provided the best differentiation between low-grade astrocytoma (LGA) and high-grade astrocytoma (HGA). The nCBF and nrCBF (1.810 ± 0.979 and 2.070 ± 1.048) in LGA were significantly lower than those (4.505 ± 2.270 and 5.922 ± 2.630) in HGA. For differentiation between LGA and HGA, the cutoff values of 0.764 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s for mean 10 % ADC, 2.374 for nCBF, and 3.464 for nrCBF provided the optimal accuracy (74.4 %, 86.1 %, and 88.6 %, respectively). Combining the ADC values with nCBF or nrCBF could further improve the grading accuracy to 97.7 % or 95.3 %, respectively. pCASL is an alternative to DSC-PWI for astrocytic tumour grading. The combination of DWI and contrast-free pCASL offers a valuable choice in patients with risk factors. • pCASL shows positive correlation with DSC-PWI in astrocytic tumour grading. • ADC values based on ADC histograms can be an objective method. • Combination of DWI and pCASL or DSC-PWI can improve grading accuracy.

  3. The diagnostic efficacy of quantitative liver MR imaging with diffusion-weighted, SWI, and hepato-specific contrast-enhanced sequences in staging liver fibrosis - a multiparametric approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feier, Diana [Medical University of Vienna, General Hospital of Vienna (AKH), Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Emergency County Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Balassy, Csilla; Bastati, Nina; Fragner, Romana; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Medical University of Vienna, General Hospital of Vienna (AKH), Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Wrba, Friedrich [Medical University of Vienna, General Hospital of Vienna (AKH), Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-02-15

    To assess the diagnostic efficacy of multiparametric MRI using quantitative measurements of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the liver parenchyma on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), signal intensity (SI) on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), and gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted imaging during the hepatobiliary phase for the staging of liver fibrosis. Seventy-seven patients underwent a 3T MRI examination, including DWI/SWI sequences and gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. Liver fibrosis according to liver biopsy was staged using the Metavir fibrosis score: F0 (n = 21, 27.3 %); F1 (n = 7, 9.1 %); F2 (n = 8, 10.4 %); F3 (n = 12, 15.6 %); and F4 (n = 29, 37.7 %). SI of the liver was defined using region-of-interest measurements to calculate the ADC values, the relative enhancement (RE) in the hepatobiliary phase, and the liver-to-muscle ratio (LMR) measurements for SWI. The values of RE, LMR, and ADC measurements were statistically significantly different among the five fibrosis stages (p < 0.004). Combining the three parameters in a multiparametric approach, the AUC for detecting F1 stage or greater (≥ F1) was 94 %, for F2 or greater (≥F2) was 95 %, for F3 or greater (≥F3) was 90 %, and for stage F4 was 93 %. Multiparametric MRI is an efficient non-invasive diagnostic tool for the staging of liver fibrosis. (orig.)

  4. Non-invasive detection of infection in acute pancreatic and acute necrotic collections with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islim, Filiz; Salik, Aysun Erbahceci; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Guven, Koray; Alis, Halil; Turhan, Ahmet Nuray

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) to the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-related collections. A total of 21 DW-MRI, and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 20 patients diagnosed as acute pancreatitis with acute peri-pancreatic fluid or necrotic collections. Collections were classified as infected or sterile according to the culture and follow-up results. Collections with gas bubbles on CT images were considered to be infected. Collections with peripheral bright signals on DW-MRI images were considered to be positive, whereas those without signals were considered to be negative. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the peripheral and central parts of the collections were measured. Student's t test was used to compare the means of ADC values of independent groups. Apart from one false positive result, the presence of infection was detected by DW-MRI with 95.2% accuracy. The sensitivity and accuracy of DW-MRI were higher than CT for the detection of infection. The ADC values in the central parts of the collections were significantly different between the infected and sterile groups. DW-MRI can be used as a non-invasive technique for the detection of infection in acute pancreatitis-associated collections.

  5. Use of intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted MR imaging for assessment of treatment response to invasive fungal infection in the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Chenggong; Xiong, Wei; Wu, Yuankui; Li, Caixia; Xu, Yikai [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Jun; Wei, Qi; Feng, Ru; Liu, Qifa [Southern Medical University, Department of Hematology, Nanfang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, New Territories, Hon Kong (China)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) -derived parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) could act as imaging biomarkers for predicting antifungal treatment response. Forty-six consecutive patients (mean age, 33.9 ± 13.0 y) with newly diagnosed invasive fungal infection (IFI) in the lung according to EORTC/MSG criteria were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3.0 T using 11 b values (0-1000 sec/mm{sup 2}). ADC, pseudodiffusion coefficient D*, perfusion fraction f, and the diffusion coefficient D were compared between patients with favourable (n=32) and unfavourable response (n=14). f values were significantly lower in the unfavourable response group (12.6%±4.4%) than in the favourable response group (30.2%±8.6%) (Z=4.989, P<0.001). However, the ADC, D, and D* were not significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed f to be a significant predictor for differentiation, with a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 92.9%. IVIM-MRI is potentially useful in the prediction of antifungal treatment response to patients with IFI in the lung. Our results indicate that a low perfusion fraction f may be a noninvasive imaging biomarker for unfavourable response. (orig.)

  6. Differentiation of thyroid nodules using diffusion-weighted MRI

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lamiss Mohamed Abd el Aziz

    2014-10-19

    Oct 19, 2014 ... Diffusion weighted MRI;. ADC mapping. Abstract Background: Thyroid nodule evaluation is usually done using a fine needle aspiration cytology/biopsy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion weighted imaging to differentiate benign from malignant thyroid nodules. Methods: Sixty-one ...

  7. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging during radiotherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer - treatment response assessment using different segmentation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted

    2015-01-01

    .01), and the volumes changed significantly during treatment (p clustering (mean± sd: 0...... into external beam RT (WK2RT) and one week prior to brachytherapy (PREBT). Volumes on DW-MRI were segmented using three semi-automatic segmentation methods: "cluster analysis", "relative signal intensity (SD4)" and "region growing". Segmented volumes were compared to the gross tumor volume (GTV) identified on T.......52 ± 0.3). There was no significant difference in mean ADC value compared at same treatment time. Mean tumor ADC value increased significantly (p treatment time. CONCLUSION: Among the three semi-automatic segmentations of hyper-intense intensities on DW-MR images...

  8. MR Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Diffusion Weighted Imaging and (3D) Hydrogen 1 (1H) MR Spectroscopy in Comparison with Histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, J.; Salomon, G.; Buchert, R.; Hohenstein, A.; Graessner, J.; Huland, H.; Graefen, M.; Adam, G.; Wedegaetner, U.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate retrospectively the impact of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and (3D) hydrogen 1 (1H) MR-spectroscopy (MRS) on the detection of prostatic cancer in comparison to histological examinations. Materials and Methods: 50 patients with suspicion of prostate cancer underwent a MRI examination at a 1.5T scanner. The prostate was divided into sextants. Regions of interest were placed in each sextant to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)-values. The results of the DWI as well as MRS were compared retrospectively with the findings of the histological examination. Sensitivity and specificity of ADC and metabolic ratio (MET)—both separately and in combination—for identification of tumor tissue was computed for variable discrimination thresholds to evaluate its receiver operator characteristic (ROC). An association between ADC, MET and Gleason score was tested by the non-parametric Spearman ρ-test. Results. The average ADC-value was 1.65 ± 0.32mm2/s × 10−3 in normal tissue and 0.96±0.24 mm2/s × 10−3 in tumor tissue (mean ± 1 SD). MET was 0.418 ± 0.431 in normal tissue and 2.010 ± 1.649 in tumor tissue. The area under the ROC curve was 0.966 (95%-confidence interval 0.941–0.991) and 0.943 (0.918–0.968) for DWI and MRS, respectively. There was a highly significant negative correlation between ADC-value and the Gleason score in the tumor-positive tissue probes (n = 62, ρ = −0.405, P = .001). MRS did not show a significant correlation with the Gleason score (ρ = 0.117, P = .366). By using both the DWI and MRS, the regression model provided sensitivity and specificity for detection of tumor of 91.9% and 98.3%, respectively. Conclusion. The results of our study showed that both DWI and MRS should be considered as an additional and complementary tool to the T2-weighted MRI for detecting prostate cancer. PMID:22091382

  9. MR Imaging of Prostate Cancer: Diffusion Weighted Imaging and (3D Hydrogen 1 (1H MR Spectroscopy in Comparison with Histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Yamamura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate retrospectively the impact of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI and (3D hydrogen 1 (1H MR-spectroscopy (MRS on the detection of prostatic cancer in comparison to histological examinations. Materials and Methods: 50 patients with suspicion of prostate cancer underwent a MRI examination at a 1.5T scanner. The prostate was divided into sextants. Regions of interest were placed in each sextant to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC-values. The results of the DWI as well as MRS were compared retrospectively with the findings of the histological examination. Sensitivity and specificity of ADC and metabolic ratio (MET—both separately and in combination—for identification of tumor tissue was computed for variable discrimination thresholds to evaluate its receiver operator characteristic (ROC. An association between ADC, MET and Gleason score was tested by the non-parametric Spearman -test. Results. The average ADC-value was 1.65±0.32mm2/s × 10-3 in normal tissue and 0.96±0.24 mm2/s × 10-3 in tumor tissue (mean ± 1 SD. MET was 0.418±0.431 in normal tissue and 2.010±1.649 in tumor tissue. The area under the ROC curve was 0.966 (95%-confidence interval 0.941–0.991 and 0.943 (0.918–0.968 for DWI and MRS, respectively. There was a highly significant negative correlation between ADC-value and the Gleason score in the tumor-positive tissue probes (=62, =−0.405, =.001. MRS did not show a significant correlation with the Gleason score (=0.117, =.366. By using both the DWI and MRS, the regression model provided sensitivity and specificity for detection of tumor of 91.9% and 98.3%, respectively. Conclusion. The results of our study showed that both DWI and MRS should be considered as an additional and complementary tool to the T2-weighted MRI for detecting prostate cancer.

  10. Dynamic Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion Weighted MR Imaging (DWI) for Differentiation between Benign and Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Assili S; Fathi Kazerooni A; Aghaghazvini L; Saligheh Rad. H.R.; Pirayesh Islamian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salivary gland tumors form nearly 3% of head and neck tumors. Due to their large histological variety and vicinity to facial nerves, pre-operative diagnosis and differentiation of benign and malignant parotid tumors are a major challenge for radiologists. Objective: The majority of these tumors are benign; however, sometimes they tend to transform into a malignant form. Functional MRI techniques, namely dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE-) MRI and diffusion-weighted ...

  11. Histologic