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Sample records for echinococcosis

  1. Echinococcosis : disease, detection and transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craig, P.S.; Rogan, M T; Campos-Ponce, M

    2003-01-01

    Echinococcosis is one of the world's most geographically widespread parasitic zoonoses, with transmission occurring in tropical, temperate and arctic biomes. Most human infections are due to Echinococcus granulosus transmitted between domestic dogs and livestock, but this cosmopolitan species also

  2. Isolated Echinococcosis of cervical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratima Khare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis, commonly called as hydatid disease, is a parasitic infestation caused by the larva of the genus Echinococcus in human. Isolated occurrence of Echinococcosis without any evidence of visceral disease is very rare. A thorough search of the literature revealed only 11 cases of isolated cervical Echinococcosis. We report here a very rare case of isolated hydatid cyst in a 45-year-old female patient, who presented with swelling in right cervical region about 5 cm below the angle of mandible with no evidence of the disease elsewhere in the body. The case was diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology. The diagnosis was further supported by histopathology. We propose that the treating physician should also consider the differential diagnosis of Echinococcosis in the presence of an asymptomatic soft tissue mass, especially when the patient lives in an endemic area.

  3. MRI of cerebral alveolar echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaci, M.; Tunaci, A.; Engin, G.; Oezkorkmaz, B.; Ahishali, B.; Rozanes, I.

    1999-01-01

    Cerebral alveolar echinococcosis is rare. We report a case with multiple intracranial masses which show cauliflower-like contrast enhancement pattern on MRI. The lesions originated from hepatic involvement with invasion of the inferior vena cava. (orig.)

  4. Human cystic echinococcosis in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogoye, Benjamin; Menezes, Colin N.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Wahlers, Kerstin; Frean, John

    2012-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is caused by the tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus. The tapeworms resides in the small intestines of canids and the lifecycle involves both intermediate and definitive hosts. Humans are accidental intermediate hosts. Cystic echinococcosis is an economically important

  5. Computer tomographic diagnosis of echinococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haertel, M.; Fretz, C.; Fuchs, W.A.

    1980-08-01

    The computer tomographic appearances and differential diagnosis in 22 patients with echinococcosis are described; of these, twelve were of the cystic and ten of the alveolar type. The computer tomographic appearances are characterised by the presence of daughter cysts (66%) within the sharply demarkated parasitic cyst of water density. In the absence of daughter cysts, a definite aetiological diagnosis cannot be made, although there is a tendency to clasification of the occassionally multiple echinococcus cysts. The computer tomographic appearances of advanced alveolar echinococcosis are characterised by partial collequative necrosis, with clacification around the necrotic areas (90%). The absence of CT evidence of partial necrosis and calsification of the pseudotumour makes it difficult to establish a specific diagnosis. The conclusive and non-invasive character of the procedure and its reproducibility makes computer tomography the method of choice for the diagnosis and follow-up of echinococcosis.

  6. Echinococcosis: an Occupational Disease

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    M Farahmand

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydatidosis is a common infestation caused by Echinococcus spp. Solitary hydatid cyst of the lung is not uncommon but coexistence of two or more pulmonary cysts are less common. These cysts may drain into the bronchial tree or very rarely into the pleural cavity which causes a poor outcome. Certain people such as slaughters, tanners, stockbreeders, shepherds, butchers, veterinarians and all whose job makes them to work closely with animals are at higher risk of the infection and developing echinococcosis. Herein, we present a 14-year-old shepherd who developed severe chest pain and hydropneumothorax following a minor trauma to his chest. He had two pulmonary hydatid cysts, one of which drained to the left pleural cavity and caused the symptoms. Another cyst was complicated during his hospital course. The patient was treated surgically, received albendazole and discharged home uneventfully. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance for the correct diagnosis and treatment of hydatid disease in hyperendemic areas and in those whose occupation might put them at a higher risk of contraction of hydatid disease.

  7. Cystic echinococcosis of the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branci, Sonia; Ewertsen, Caroline; Thybo, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) of the liver can be treated with ultrasound-guided puncture, aspiration, injection, and re-aspiration (PAIR), with surgery and with benzimidazole derivatives. The aim of this study was to review available data concerning treatment modality and outcome for patients treated...

  8. Unusual growth rate during cystic echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valour, Florent; Khenifer, Safia; Della-Schiava, Nellie; Cotte, Eddy; Guibert, Benoit; Wallon, Martine; Durupt, Stéphane; Durieu, Isabelle

    2014-04-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a world wild zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus, leading to hepatic and lung cysts with a usually slight growth rate. We report the case of an 82year-old Algerian woman with hepatic and lung cystic echinococcosis with a 10-fold size increase in 6months. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. CT diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis in pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenya; Li Li; Xing Yan; Xie Jingxia

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the CT findings of pelvic cystic echinococcosis, and to assess the value of CT examination. Methods: Twenty-one cases of pelvic cystic echinococcosis, confirmed by clinical and pathological results, underwent CT scanning. CT characters were analyzed and compared with pathology. Results: Simple cystic echinococcosis appeared as single or multiple cystic lesions with round or oval shape, smooth boundary, and no enhancement after contrast medium administration in 3 cases; Different number and size of daughter cysts were detected inside the lesion in 17 cases; Ruptured lesions showed 'double wall', 'water snake', or 'flow ribbon' signs in 4 cases; Increase density of contents and enhanced cystic wall were demonstrated in 2 cases with companied infections. In 8 cases, calcification occurred on the cystic wall or extended inside the content. Conclusion: CT could accurately demonstrate the location, appearance, internal structure, and adjacent situation of the cystic echinococcosis, providing valuable information for correct diagnosis and treatment

  10. Problems of diagnosis and treatment of echinococcosis

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    Тунзала Али кызы Велиева

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The lack of specificity of clinical and laboratory manifestations of echinococcosis allocates to the fore diagnostic tool methods of research, which are at present leading in identifying the disease.The widespread introduction into clinical practice of modern highly informative instrumental methods such as ultrasonography (US and computed tomography (CT, significantly improved the early detection of liver echinococcosis. In conjunction with the serological reactions to echinococcosis they allow in most cases the diagnosis of the disease. However, false-negative results of serological tests in more than 10–20 % of the patients and the difficulty of differential diagnosis with small brush size and "pseudotumoral" forms of ultrasound often lead to delayed diagnosis, and thus to a deterioration of treatment results. Moreover, failure to identify at an early stage of echinococcosis virtually eliminates the possibility of conservative treatment of echinococcosis without performing surgery.It is given the profound immune disorders in patients with echinococcosis, treatment should be complex and along with the surgical removal of hydatid cyst should be included in it and biostimulating. Immunocorrecting lechebnye event. Recent require further development.Methods. The work is based on an analysis of 25 cases operated on echinococcosis in the period from January 2013 to December 2014. To confirm the diagnosis using tools (ultrasound, computed tomography, X-ray, serology (detection of antibodies to echinococcus ELISA, histological (after removal of cysts methods. The data are processed by the method of variation statistics.Results. An analysis of 25 cases of echinococcosis showed that among the 15 cases dominated by women (60 % versus 10 (40 % men. Treatment – removal of cysts of 25 patients with echinococcosis is made surgically. Among the analyzed cases in 6 (20.4 % patients had the relapsing form of the disease. The factors leading to relapse of the

  11. Cystic echinococcosis: prevalence and economic sig- nificance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tribution and economic significance of small ruminant cystic echinococcosis. A total of 850 small ruminants ..... Echinococcus granulosus infection in Spain. Zoonoses Pub. ... Biological, epidemiological, and clinical aspects of echinococcosis ...

  12. Echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Southwest and Alaska. Infected animals, such as dogs or sheep, pass the disease to humans. We can get it directly by consuming food ... with me? How often should I give my dog deworming treatments? I work with livestock. ... contagious among humans? What is the best treatment for me? How ...

  13. Coproantigens in taeniasis and echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, James C; Craig, Philip S

    2006-01-01

    The application of modern immunodiagnostic or molecular diagnostic techniques has improved the diagnosis of the taeniid cestode infections, echinococcosis and taeniasis. One particularly promising approach is the detection of parasite-specific antigens in faeces (coproantigens). This approach has been applied to both Echinoccocus and Taenia species and it has gained increasingly widespread use. Taeniid coproantigen tests are based on either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies raised against adult tapeworm antigens. These tests have the following common characteristics; they are largely genus-specific, specificity is high (>95%), parasite antigen can be detected in faeces weeks prior to patency, levels of coproantigen are independent of egg output, coproantigen is stable for days at a range of temperatures (-80 degrees C to 35 degrees C), for several months in formalin-fixed faecal samples, and coproantigen levels drop rapidly (1-5 days) following successful treatment. In the genus Taenia, most work has been done on Taenia solium and coproantigen tests have reliably detected many more tapeworm carriers than microscopy. For Echinococcus species, there is a broad positive correlation between test sensitivity and worm burden with a reliable threshold level for the test of >50 worms. Characterisation of taeniid coproantigens in order to further improve the tests is ongoing. Studies indicate taeniid coproantigens to include high molecular weight (>150 kDa), heavily glycosylated molecules with carbohydrate moieties contributing substantially to the levels of antigen detected in faeces. Application of the existing coproantigen tests in epidemiological and control programmes for Echinococcus and Taenia species infection has begun to contribute to an improved understanding of transmission and of surveillance of these important zoonotic cestodes.

  14. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensaid, A.H. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Dietemann, J.L. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Klinkert, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Kastler, B. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Gangi, A. (Dept. of Radiology B, Univ. Hospital, Strasbourg (France)); Jacquet, G. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France)); Cattin, F. (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Besancon (France))

    1994-05-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  15. Cystic echinococcosis in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahlers, Kerstin; Menezes, Colin N.; Wong, Michelle L.; Zeyhle, Eberhard; Ahmed, Mohammed E.; Ocaido, Michael; Stijnis, Cornelis; Romig, Thomas; Kern, Peter; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is regarded as endemic in sub-Saharan Africa; however, for most countries only scarce data, if any, exist. For most of the continent, information about burden of disease is not available; neither are data for the animal hosts involved in the lifecycle of the parasite, thus

  16. Cystic echinococcosis: Future perspectives of molecular epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE) has been conceived to be caused predominantly by Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (the dog-sheep strain). Recent molecular approaches on CE, however, have revealed that human cases are also commonly caused by another species, Echinococcus canadensis. All indices...

  17. Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis: CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensaid, A.H.; Dietemann, J.L.; Filippi de la Palavesa, M.M.; Klinkert, A.; Kastler, B.; Gangi, A.; Jacquet, G.; Cattin, F.

    1994-01-01

    Intracranial alveolar echinococcosis is uncommon. We report a patient with right frontal lobe and palpebral lesions secondary to a primary hepatic focus with secondary lesion in the lung. The intracranial and palpebral cystic masses were totally removed and both proved to be alveolar hydatid cysts. An unusual feature in this case is CT and MRI demonstration of dural and bony extension. (orig.)

  18. Cystic echinococcosis: prevalence and economic significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2015 to April 2016 at ELFORA export abattoir to determine the prevalence, cyst viability, organ distribution and economic significance of small ruminant cystic echinococcosis. A total of 850 small ruminants (400 sheep and 450 goats), were examined for the presence of ...

  19. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF CHILDREN ECHINOCOCCOSIS

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    Veliyeva T.A.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The problem of echinococcosis, despite the progress made in its diagnosis and treatment, currently remains poorly understood and highly relevant in pediatric Parasitology. Studies of many authors show that in recent years the number of patients with echinococcosis not only universally recognized endemic foci, but also among people in the European region, including in countries such as Romania, Germany, Austria. However, studies on the prevalence and structure of echinococcosis among children in Ukraine, are not held. Despite the large number of papers devoted to the treatment of echinococcosis, the problem of the treatment of this disease in children is still far from its final decision. Usually offered surgical treatment, which is not possible with multiple lesions of the liver or other organs. All this shows the relevance and importance for practical public health issues for further study of diagnosis and treatment of echinococcosis in children. The purpose of the study. A comparative analysis of the diagnostic efficacy of X-ray and ultrasound method in the diagnosis of echinococcosis in children. Material & methods. This work is based on a survey of 39 children with hepatic echinococcosis, were examined at the Department of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Diseases Kharkiv Medical Academy of Postgraduate Education from 2005 to 2015. Boys was 1.5 times greater (59.5% than girls - 40.5%. Children under five years of age accounted for only 4.0% of all patients, due to their limited contact with the environment when compared with older age. The greatest risk of disease was in the 10- 13 years of age, the number of children in the group reached 40.3% of the patients. The vast majority of patients (89.6% lived in rural areas. In this case, the parents of sick children from the village were engaged in farming, were in personal use livestock, dogs, which probably contributed to the invasion. Very often ill children pas¬tuhov, shepherds. 78% of

  20. Surgical treatment of hepatic echinococcosis in Prizren (Kosovo)

    OpenAIRE

    Avdaj, Afrim; Namani, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    Management option of hepatic echinococcosis represents a major challenge for a surgeon. The aim of the study was to evaluate surgical treatment of patients with hepatic echinococcosis at the surgery department of the regional hospital in Prizren (Kosovo). The medical records of 22 patients operated for hepatic echinococcosis in our department during a four year study period (2009–2013) were retrospectively reviewed. Apart from the total of 5850 operated patients, 22 cases were diagnosed for l...

  1. Economic Impact of Cystic Echinococcosis in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, Pedro L.; Budke, Christine M.; Schantz, Peter M.; Vasquez, Julio; Santivañez, Saul J.; Villavicencio, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic echinococcosis (CE) constitutes an important public health problem in Peru. However, no studies have attempted to estimate the monetary and non-monetary impact of CE in Peruvian society. METHODS: We used official and published sources of epidemiological and economic information to estimate direct and indirect costs associated with livestock production losses and human disease in addition to surgical CE-associated disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. FINDINGS: The to...

  2. OUTCOME OF MULTIVISCERAL ECHINOCOCCOSIS: A CASE REPORT

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    Hajric Zlata

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pathogen of multivisceral echinococcosis is the same agent as for single-organ echinococcosis: Echinococcus granulosus.According to the consensus of experts under the aegis of the WHO-IWGE - WHO-Informal Working Group on Echinococcosis options of treatment should be: (1 percutaneous treatment, (2 surgery, (3 anti-infective drug treatment or (4 watch and waitapproach or combinations thereof. Case report: The presented case was a seven-year-old Caucasian boy, a permanent resident of rural region near Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, who had a history of asymptomatic giant liver and small lung hydatid cyst (multivisceral echinococcosis. We consider that the patient was in the phase of secondary hydatidosis even before undergoing the first treatment PAIR method of liver and continued with adjunctive chemotherapy. Two weeks after discharge, during the adjunctive chemotherapy he had one of possible complication where pre-existed smal lung hydatid cyst gotinflamed and performed an abscess massand potential septic risk, which required surgical and antibiotic treatment. Surgery and early postoperative course were normal and the patient was discharged with recommendation to continue with previously started adjunctive chemotherapy (Albendazol according to treatment protocol. Conclusion: Most infected persons are asymptomatic and clinical manifestations vary according to the anatomic location of the cyst, so we want to indicate the importance of routine ultrasound screening of preschool children, and eventually X ray chest scan.This case report highlights the necessity of caution with choosing appropriate treatment, even though size of cyst can be irrelevant to take surgical treatment in first line instead of medical therapy.

  3. CT findings in skeletal cystic echinococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuezuen, M.; Hekimoglu, B. [Social Security Hospital, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the CT findings of skeletal cystic echinococcosis. Material and Methods: CT findings of 7 patients with pathologically confirmed skeletal cystic echinococcosis were evaluated. Results: There were 4 men and 3 women, aged 36-75 years. Hydatid cysts were located in the spine (n=2), a rib (n=3), the pelvis and a vertebra (n=1), the pelvis and the left femur (n=1). The size of the lesions varied from 1 cm to 15 cm. CT showed well defined, single or multiple cystic lesions with no contrast enhancement, no calcification, no daughter cysts, and no germinal membrane detachment. The cystic lesion had a honeycomb appearance in 2 cases, there was pathologic fracture in 2 cases, bone expansion in 5 cases, cortical thinning in 6 cases, cortical destruction in 6 cases, bone sclerosis in 1 case, and soft tissue extension in 6 cases. Conclusion: Preoperative differential diagnosis of skeletal cystic lesions should include cystic echinococcosis, especially in endemic areas, since this diagnosis may easily be missed unless kept in mind.

  4. Human cystic echinococcosis in South Africa

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    Benjamin Mogoye

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is caused by the tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus. The tapeworms resides in the small intestines of canids and the lifecycle involves both intermediate and definitive hosts. Humans are accidental intermediate hosts. Cystic echinococcosis is an economically important infection constituting a threat to public health, and is considered an emerging disease around the world. There are at least 10 Echinococcus strain types (G1 – G10, each exhibiting diversity of morphology, development and host range. The epidemiology of CE is poorly understood in South Africa. A retrospective data analysis of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS laboratory information system on echinococcosis serology, microscopy and histopathology results in eight provinces (excluding KwaZula-Natal showed an overall positivity rate in submitted diagnostic samples of 17.0% (1056/6211, with the Eastern Cape (30.4%, North West (19.0% and Northern Cape (18.0% provinces showing highest rates. The data showed considerable variability between provinces. The review also showed that most proven cases were negative on serology, implying that the actual number of patients could be underestimated. To our knowledge, no data exist about the prevalent strains of E. granulosus and this prospective study will attempt to fill that gap. The aim is to genotype strains causing the disease in South Africa. Two different polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods will be used to respectively target the 12S rRNA and nad 1 genes. To date, three samples have been genotyped as G1, G5 and G6; suggesting diversity of strains prevalent in the country, but more data is needed for a clearer picture.

  5. Cystic echinococcosis in Central Alaninate, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazar, Suleyman; Yaman, Ozan; Sahin, Izzet; Cetinkaya, F.

    2006-01-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by infection with a larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus is a serious public health problem in Turkey. Echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease; dogs and livestock are important hosts in transmission. The aim of this study is to evaluate the rate of CE in Kayseri Rural Area, Central Anatolia, Turkey. At the present study, we planned to evaluate the rate of CE in Kayseri rural area in Central Anatolia between 2000 and 2002. We investigated 2,242 subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA), and we examined the seropositivity by using Western blotting (WB). The seropositivity rate was 2.7% by ELISA and IFA. We retested seropositive serum samples and 200 seronegative sera by WB. Seropositive serum samples were studied using abdominal ultrasound and chest x-ray to confirmed the presence of hydatid cyst and we found 10 (0.5%) different localized cysts. The results of our study indicate that Kayseri rural area has a high endemicity of human CE. (author)

  6. Taeniasis, cysticercosis and echinococcosis in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikagul, Jitra; Dekumyoy, Paron; Anantaphruti, Malinee T

    2006-01-01

    Taeniasis is one of the major food-borne parasitic zoonoses in Thailand. During the years 1957-1997, the prevalence was low in most parts of the country. Recent (2000-2005) country prevalence was lower than 1%. A high prevalence (5.9%) was found among 1450 villagers from 30 villages in the North, and among 1233 stool samples from 19 provinces in the Northeast (2.8%). Taenia saginata was the dominant species. Cysticercosis in Thailand is somewhat under-reported/recorded. During the period 1965-2005, diagnosis was based on techniques other than serodiagnosis, giving a total of cysticercosis cases of less than 500. However, an immunoblot technique using delipidized cyst antigen showed 314 positive cases out of 754 samples tested in 2000-2005. Reports of neurocysticercosis appeared more often than cutaneous cysticercosis. A total of 24 cases of echinococcosis, mostly hydatid cysts (only 2 cases of alveolar cysts), were recorded during 1936-2005. These records included 3 cases of foreigners seeking surgery in hospitals in Bangkok. Most Thai patients were migrant workers from the Middle East, and only a few cases were indigenous. The prevalence of cysticercosis and echinococcosis is increasing resulting from sensitive modern diagnostic tests. Taeniasis will persist in Thailand as the consumption of raw/half-cooked meat dishes is still a normal practice for Thai people.

  7. Treatment of echinococcosis: albendazole and mebendazole - what else?

    OpenAIRE

    Hemphill, Andrew; Stadelmann, Britta; Rufener, Reto; Spiliotis, Markus; Boubaker, Ghalia; Müller, Joachim; Müller, Norbert; Gorgas, Daniela; Gottstein, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The search for novel therapeutic options to cure alveolar echinococcosis (AE), due to the metacestode of Echinococcus multilocularis, is ongoing, and these developments could also have a profound impact on the treatment of cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the closely related Echinococcus granulosus s.l. Several options are being explored. A viable strategy for the identification of novel chemotherapeutically valuable compounds includes whole-organism drug screening, employing large-scale...

  8. Combating echinococcosis in China: strengthening the research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Men-Bao; Abela-Ridder, Bernadette; Wu, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2017-11-21

    Echinococcosis is a neglected zoonotic disease, causing great morbidity and mortality due to the wide distribution of its endemic areas. China holds a high percentage in the global burden of both cystic and alveolar echinococcosis. A national survey conducted between 2012 and 2016 showed that an estimated 50 million people are at risk of contracting the disease in western China, of whom about 0.17 million are cases with echinococcosis.Despite this, research and development on echinococcosis in China is greatly inadequate compared to that in other countries. In this paper, we argue that there is a need for more research and work to be conducted in China on echinococcosis, including researching techniques in regards to diagnosis, treatment, and vaccination, and developing products through technical transformation and piloting strategies to control and even elimination.However, great opportunities exist for China to strengthen the research and development on this disease through initiatives such as Health China 2030, the Belt and Road Initiative, the China-Africa cooperation, as well as through further cooperation between China and the World Health Organization. All of these can bring us closer to controlling echinococcosis in China as well as in other countries. One element of crucial importance will be the training and development of professionals, which can be strengthened through international cooperation.

  9. Echinococcosis in the Orenburg Region: Epidemiological, Immunological and Taxonomic Aspects

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    A.G. Korneyev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to examine the manifestations of the epidemic process of echinococcosis in the population of the Orenburg region. The incidence has been studied for the period of 1994–2012 according to various sources — the official data and the data of healthcare institutions of the region, in which the surgery for echinococcosis was carried out. A serological study of serum samples of persons who hadn’t echinococcosis previously, and genetic typing of echinococci by polymerase chain reaction were carried out. The difference in incidence rates has been obtained according to different sources. The incidence of echinococcosis among the population of the Orenburg region, according to the data of medical surgical facilities, significantly exceeded the notification rate and tended to increase. There were no significant differences between the incidence in adult and child population. The incidence of echinococcosis among individual groups and professions (breeders, shepherds, hunters and their families had no significant differences with the incidence of the rest adult population. In the districts of the region, where the incidence rate was significantly higher than average regional one, echinococcosis seroprevalence was also significantly higher than in the other territories. From humans and animals one strain of echinococcus — G1 (total, domestic sheep — has been isolated.

  10. The global burden of alveolar echinococcosis.

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    Paul R Torgerson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE is known to be common in certain rural communities in China whilst it is generally rare and sporadic elsewhere. The objective of this study was to provide a first estimate of the global incidence of this disease by country. The second objective was to estimate the global disease burden using age and gender stratified incidences and estimated life expectancy with the disease from previous results of survival analysis. Disability weights were suggested from previous burden studies on echinococcosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook a detailed review of published literature and data from other sources. We were unable to make a standardised systematic review as the quality of the data was highly variable from different countries and hence if we had used uniform inclusion criteria many endemic areas lacking data would not have been included. Therefore we used evidence based stochastic techniques to model uncertainty and other modelling and estimating techniques, particularly in regions where data quality was poor. We were able to make an estimate of the annual global incidence of disease and annual disease burden using standard techniques for calculation of DALYs. Our studies suggest that there are approximately 18,235 (CIs 11,900-28,200 new cases of AE per annum globally with 16,629 (91% occurring in China and 1,606 outside China. Most of these cases are in regions where there is little treatment available and therefore will be fatal cases. Based on using disability weights for hepatic carcinoma and estimated age and gender specific incidence we were able to calculate that AE results in a median of 666,434 DALYs per annum (CIs 331,000-1.3 million. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The global burden of AE is comparable to several diseases in the neglected tropical disease cluster and is likely to be one of the most important diseases in certain communities in rural China on the Tibetan plateau.

  11. Economic impact of cystic echinococcosis in peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Pedro L; Budke, Christine M; Schantz, Peter M; Vasquez, Julio; Santivañez, Saul J; Villavicencio, Jaime

    2011-05-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) constitutes an important public health problem in Peru. However, no studies have attempted to estimate the monetary and non-monetary impact of CE in Peruvian society. We used official and published sources of epidemiological and economic information to estimate direct and indirect costs associated with livestock production losses and human disease in addition to surgical CE-associated disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. The total estimated cost of human CE in Peru was U.S.$2,420,348 (95% CI:1,118,384-4,812,722) per year. Total estimated livestock-associated costs due to CE ranged from U.S.$196,681 (95% CI:141,641-251,629) if only direct losses (i.e., cattle and sheep liver destruction) were taken into consideration to U.S.$3,846,754 (95% CI:2,676,181-4,911,383) if additional production losses (liver condemnation, decreased carcass weight, wool losses, decreased milk production) were accounted for. An estimated 1,139 (95% CI: 861-1,489) DALYs were also lost due to surgical cases of CE. This preliminary and conservative assessment of the socio-economic impact of CE on Peru, which is based largely on official sources of information, very likely underestimates the true extent of the problem. Nevertheless, these estimates illustrate the negative economic impact of CE in Peru.

  12. Economic impact of cystic echinococcosis in peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L Moro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic echinococcosis (CE constitutes an important public health problem in Peru. However, no studies have attempted to estimate the monetary and non-monetary impact of CE in Peruvian society. METHODS: We used official and published sources of epidemiological and economic information to estimate direct and indirect costs associated with livestock production losses and human disease in addition to surgical CE-associated disability adjusted life years (DALYs lost. FINDINGS: The total estimated cost of human CE in Peru was U.S.$2,420,348 (95% CI:1,118,384-4,812,722 per year. Total estimated livestock-associated costs due to CE ranged from U.S.$196,681 (95% CI:141,641-251,629 if only direct losses (i.e., cattle and sheep liver destruction were taken into consideration to U.S.$3,846,754 (95% CI:2,676,181-4,911,383 if additional production losses (liver condemnation, decreased carcass weight, wool losses, decreased milk production were accounted for. An estimated 1,139 (95% CI: 861-1,489 DALYs were also lost due to surgical cases of CE. CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary and conservative assessment of the socio-economic impact of CE on Peru, which is based largely on official sources of information, very likely underestimates the true extent of the problem. Nevertheless, these estimates illustrate the negative economic impact of CE in Peru.

  13. Recombinant antigens for immunodiagnosis of cystic echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cDNAs, termed EpC1, TPxEg and EgG5, were isolated by immunoscreening from an Echinococcus granulosus cDNA library. The recombinant phages exhibited strong reactivity with sera from humans with confirmed cystic echinococcosis (CE and with sera from mice infected with E. granulosus oncospheres. The cDNAs were subcloned into a pET vector, expressed as fusion proteins tagged with GST and affinity purified against the GST tag. Of the three recombinant proteins, EpC1 achieved the highest performance for serodiagnosis of CE in Western blot analysis using a panel of clinically defined human sera to initially address the sensitivity and specificity of the molecules. The protein yielded an overall sensitivity of 92.2% and specificity of 95.6%, levels unprecedented taking into account the large panel of 896 human sera that were tested. The strategy used may also prove suitable for improved immunodiagnosis of other parasitic infections.

  14. Abdominal Cystic Echinococcosis Treated with Albendazole. A Pediatric Cohort Study.

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    Samanta Moroni

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis is endemic in Argentina. The standard pharmacological treatment for the disease is albendazole, but surgery is a common alternative. Even though primary infection occurs mainly in the pediatric population, the optimal therapeutic option in pediatrics is not clearly defined and few pediatric cohorts with cystic echinococcosis treated with albendazole have been described to date.To describe therapeutic response to albendazole in a cohort of pediatric patients with abdominal cystic echinococcosis.Patients (0-18 years old with abdominal cystic echinococcosis who were treated with albendazole between January 1998 and August 2013. Diagnosis of abdominal cystic echinococcosis was made by ultrasound. All patients received albendazole, 10-15 mg/kg/day. Epidemiological data, symptoms, number, location and outcome of the cysts, serology and treatment received were analyzed. The parameter used to assess treatment response was cyst changes evaluated by ultrasound follow up using the WHO-IWGE classification.A total of 28 patients (with 46 abdominal cysts were included in the cohort. Mean age at enrolment was 9.4 years and mean duration of follow-up, 23.8 months. All patients resided in rural areas and had had contact with dogs. The asymptomatic form of the disease was the most common presentation. All patients received albendazole (mean duration: 142.5 days, with low incidence of adverse events. Albendazole had a positive effect on most of the cysts. Surgery was performed in 13 patients.Treatment with albendazole for uncomplicated cystic echinococcosis cysts is safe and effective, and can potentially reduce the need for surgical intervention.

  15. Abdominal Cystic Echinococcosis Treated with Albendazole. A Pediatric Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Samanta; Moscatelli, Guillermo; Bournissen, Facundo García; González, Nicolás; Ballering, Griselda; Freilij, Héctor; Salgueiro, Fabián; Altcheh, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is endemic in Argentina. The standard pharmacological treatment for the disease is albendazole, but surgery is a common alternative. Even though primary infection occurs mainly in the pediatric population, the optimal therapeutic option in pediatrics is not clearly defined and few pediatric cohorts with cystic echinococcosis treated with albendazole have been described to date. To describe therapeutic response to albendazole in a cohort of pediatric patients with abdominal cystic echinococcosis. Patients (0-18 years old) with abdominal cystic echinococcosis who were treated with albendazole between January 1998 and August 2013. Diagnosis of abdominal cystic echinococcosis was made by ultrasound. All patients received albendazole, 10-15 mg/kg/day. Epidemiological data, symptoms, number, location and outcome of the cysts, serology and treatment received were analyzed. The parameter used to assess treatment response was cyst changes evaluated by ultrasound follow up using the WHO-IWGE classification. A total of 28 patients (with 46 abdominal cysts) were included in the cohort. Mean age at enrolment was 9.4 years and mean duration of follow-up, 23.8 months. All patients resided in rural areas and had had contact with dogs. The asymptomatic form of the disease was the most common presentation. All patients received albendazole (mean duration: 142.5 days), with low incidence of adverse events. Albendazole had a positive effect on most of the cysts. Surgery was performed in 13 patients. Treatment with albendazole for uncomplicated cystic echinococcosis cysts is safe and effective, and can potentially reduce the need for surgical intervention.

  16. Polycystic echinococcosis in Colombia: the larval cestodes in infected rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, G A; Guzman, V H; Wells, E A; Angel, D

    1979-07-01

    Described are the characteristics of the polycystic larval cestodes found in an endemic area of echinococcosis in the Easter Plains of Colombia and the tissue reaction evoked in infected rodents. Of 848 free-ranging animals examined, polycystic hydatids were found in 44/93 Cuniculus paca and 1/369 Proechimys sp. None of 20 Dasyprocta fuliginosa examined was infected, but hunters provided a heart with hydatid cysts and information about two additional animals with infected livers. Recognition of an endemic area of polycystic echinococcosis provides a means to investigate the life cycle of the parasites and to study the histogenesis of the larval cestodes in susceptible laboratory animals.

  17. Autochthonous human alveolar echinococcosis in a Hungarian patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezsényi, Balázs; Strausz, Tamás; Makrai, Zita; Csomor, Judit; Danka, József; Kern, Peter; Rezza, Giovanni; Barth, Thomas F E; Casulli, Adriano

    2017-02-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a zoonotic parasitic disease causing a severe clinical condition and is known as the most deadly of all helminth infections. Moreover, this disease is also an increasing concern in Northern and Eastern Europe due to its spread in the wildlife animal host. An asymptomatic 70-year-old woman from south-western Hungary was diagnosed with multiple liver lesions. Imaging techniques (ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging), serology (ELISA, indirect hemagglutination and Western blot), and conventional staining methods (hematoxylin-eosin and periodic acid-Schiff) were used for the detection of the disease. A histopathological re-evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin block by immunohistochemical staining with the monoclonal antibody Em2G11 definitively confirmed the diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed autochthonous case of human alveolar echinococcosis in Hungary. To what extent diagnostic difficulties may contribute to underestimate this zoonosis in Eastern Europe is unknown. Differential diagnosis with alveolar echinococcosis should be considered for patients with multiple, tumor-like cystic lesions of the liver, in countries where this parasite is emerging.

  18. Echinococcosis in sub-Saharan Africa: emerging complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romig, T.; Omer, R. A.; Zeyhle, E.; Hüttner, M.; Dinkel, A.; Siefert, L.; Elmahdi, I. E.; Magambo, J.; Ocaido, M.; Menezes, C. N.; Ahmed, M. E.; Mbae, C.; Grobusch, M. P.; Kern, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis occurs in most regions of sub-Saharan Africa, but the frequency of this zoonosis differs considerably among and within countries. Especially human cases seem to be focally distributed. A number of environmental and behavioural factors partially explain this pattern, i.e.

  19. Multisystem involvement of alveolar echinococcosis in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantarci, Mecit; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Ogul, Hayri; Oral, Akgun; Eren, Suat; Gundogdu, Betul

    2014-11-13

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a chronic progressive infestation inducing a slowly progressing, life-threatening tumor-like growth in the liver. It may spread to other organs by regional extension or hematogenous or lymphatic metastasis. Herein, we report a fifteen-year-old patient diagnosed with AE of the liver and simultaneous lung and brain metastasis with a literature review.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of hepatic echinococcosis: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H. G.; Kager, P. A.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Surgery has long been considered the first-choice treatment in patients with echinococcosis of the liver. The poorly predictable outcome of older studies using mebendazole or albendazole confirmed this belief. Since the introduction of a percutaneous technique (PAIR: puncture,

  1. Surgical treatment of hepatic echinococcosis in Prizren (Kosovo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdaj, Afrim; Namani, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    Management option of hepatic echinococcosis represents a major challenge for a surgeon. The aim of the study was to evaluate surgical treatment of patients with hepatic echinococcosis at the surgery department of the regional hospital in Prizren (Kosovo). The medical records of 22 patients operated for hepatic echinococcosis in our department during a four year study period (2009–2013) were retrospectively reviewed. Apart from the total of 5850 operated patients, 22 cases were diagnosed for liver echinococcosis (0.4%). The most affected age group was from 26 to 50 years (54.5%). Female gender, 16 cases (73%), and patients living in rural places, 14 patients (64%), dominated significantly. The most affected region was Municipality of Dragash. All patients underwent ultrasonography, 13 patients underwent CT scans and 5 patients MRI of abdomen. The mean preoperative ultrasonographic diameter of cysts was 9.5 cm and maximal 21 cm. Cysts were most often localized in right hepatic lobe (77%) and subcostal laparotomy was most commonly performed (82%). The performed surgical procedures were: endocystectomy and partial pericystectomy with omentoplication according to Papadimitris (73%), endocystectomy and capitonnage and endocystectomy with external drainage (14%). The laparoscopic approach was used only in one patient. In conclusion, hepatic echinococosis was not common among operated patients at our surgery department. Subcostal laparotomy with endocystectomy and partial pericystectomy with omentoplication according to Papadimitris was most commonly used. Exact distribution of echinococcosis is needed to be analyzed with a larger cohort study including all surgery units in the country and with a longer monitoring. PMID:25568800

  2. A preliminary study of the pathogenesis of malnutrition in patients with hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

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    MA Bao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic echinococcosis has become a major threat to human health. Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis caused by Echinococcus multilocularis infection has the features of slow and insidious onset, a high probability of surgery, slow postoperative recovery, and many complications and thus does great harm to humans. Most of the patients with hepatic alveolar echinococcosis also have varying degrees of malnutrition on admission, which is closely associated with surgical tolerance, postoperative rehabilitation, and the development of complications. However, the pathogenesis of malnutrition in patients with hepatic alveolar echinococcosis remains unknown. This article elaborates on possible mechanisms and points out that malnutrition in such patients is a result of various factors and complex mechanisms.

  3. MRI and CT in alveolar echinococcosis of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duewell, S.; Marincek, B.; Schulthess, G.K. von; Ammann, R.; Zurich Univ.

    1990-01-01

    To compare the value of MRI and CT in evaluating hepatic alveolar echinococcosis a study was conducted on 30 patients. The liver was initially affected in all patients. At the time of examination, 15 patients had undergone partial liver resection. MRI showed no advantage over CT in demonstrating an echinococcal mass lesion. MRI was superior in identifying concomitant pathological changes of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic venous system due to the intrinsic contrast of vascular structures. However, CT was superior in identifying calcifications, an important attribute of the disease. MRI should only be used in imaging alveolar echinococcosis of the liver if diagnostic questions remain open after CT, in particular questions concerning venous pathology. MRI may also be used to replace CT in patients with a contraindication to urographic contrast material. (orig.) [de

  4. Cystic echinococcosis in a domestic cat (Felis catus in Italy

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    Bonelli Piero

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato is a zoonotic agent with a life cycle consisting of definitive hosts (dogs and wild carnivores, and intermediate hosts (usually ungulates. Other animals and humans may accidentally ingest eggs and contract cystic echinococcosis, acting as aberrant hosts. A 3-year-old neutered female cat was brought to a veterinary practice in Sassari (Italy with abdominal distension. Ultrasound showed multiple intraperitoneal vesicles, which on laparotomy were found to be metacestodes of E. granulosus. Videos of the extraction of cysts are provided. Phylogenetic analysis based on a fragment of the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1 mitochondrial gene identified the isolate as E. granulosus sensu stricto genotype G1, the most common genotype circulating in Europe and the Mediterranean basin. This is the first case report of cystic echinococcosis in domestic cats from Italy.

  5. Host-Parasite Relationship in Cystic Echinococcosis: An Evolving Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusano, Alessandra; Delunardo, Federica; Teggi, Antonella; Ortona, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus causes cystic echinococcosis, a neglected infectious disease that constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite being under constant barrage by the immune system, E. granulosus modulates antiparasite immune responses and persists in the human hosts with detectable humoral and cellular responses against the parasite. In vitro and in vivo immunological approaches, together with molecular biology and immunoproteomic technologies, provided us exciting insights into the mechanisms involved in the initiation of E. granulosus infection and the consequent induction and regulation of the immune response. Although the last decade has clarified many aspects of host-parasite relationship in human cystic echinococcosis, establishing the full mechanisms that cause the disease requires more studies. Here, we review some of the recent developments and discuss new avenues in this evolving story of E. granulosus infection in man. PMID:22110535

  6. Imaging diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis in young patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, F.; Ohkawa, Y.; Sato, N.; Uchino, J.; Hata, Y.

    1997-01-01

    We review the imaging findings in seven children with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. Calcification was seen on plain abdominal films in five of seven patients (66.6 %); the calcifications were small or coarse with irregular margins. Ultrasound was performed in four cases, identifying the lesions in all four as small calcifications with or without cysts. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in four cases and showed small calcifications, calcifications surrounding a cyst, or an aggregate of calcifications. Angiography was performed in all seven patients and showed changes of intrahepatic arterial stretching, overgrowth of small arteries, and a honeycomb pattern in the capillary phase. Venography revealed compression of the inferior vena cava in two patients. Serum screening together with ultrasonography and CT are useful for diagnostic imaging of alveolar echinococcosis. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Host-Parasite Relationship in Cystic Echinococcosis: An Evolving Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Siracusano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus causes cystic echinococcosis, a neglected infectious disease that constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries. Despite being under constant barrage by the immune system, E. granulosus modulates antiparasite immune responses and persists in the human hosts with detectable humoral and cellular responses against the parasite. In vitro and in vivo immunological approaches, together with molecular biology and immunoproteomic technologies, provided us exciting insights into the mechanisms involved in the initiation of E. granulosus infection and the consequent induction and regulation of the immune response. Although the last decade has clarified many aspects of host-parasite relationship in human cystic echinococcosis, establishing the full mechanisms that cause the disease requires more studies. Here, we review some of the recent developments and discuss new avenues in this evolving story of E. granulosus infection in man.

  8. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver - computed tomographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkle, E.; Usadel, S.; Vogel, J.; Kern, P.; Friedrich, J.M.; Brambs, H.J.

    1995-01-01

    In order to ascertain the typical computed tomographic findings of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis, 24 computed tomograms of 19 patients were evaluated. The liver was involved in all cases whereas the diaphragma was infiltrated in 32%, and the retroperioteneal area in 42%. The right liver lobe was affected in 65%. Both before and after intravenous bolus contrast medium administration, the lesions were mainly inhomogeneous and of low density; a masking of the lesions due to the contrast medium administration was not observed; the enhancement pattern was irregular. Calcifications were detected in 96% of the cases, cystic structures in 50%, and cholestasis in 54%. On the basis of the crucial finding of calcifications in combination with the other typical observations, CT seems to be very suitable for the evaluation of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis. (orig.) [de

  9. Cystic Echinococcosis: A Rare Case of Brain Localization

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    Ali BARADAN BAGHERI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although Hydatid disease eradicated in many countries, it is still widespread in communities where agriculture is dominant. Cystic hydatidosis is significant public health problem in the regions with endemic echinococcosis. The hydatid cysts tend to form mostly in the liver or lung. Brain involvement is very rare. In the present report, we describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in an 18-yr-old male with cerebral echinococcosis, in Shahid Madani Hospital, Karaj, Iran in 2015. The patient, presented with headache, hemiparesis, impairment of speech, vomiting, and nausea. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical exploration proved a cyst in the superior portion of left temporal lobe. Pathological examination showed it to be a solitary primary cerebral hydatid cyst. 

  10. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. Findings of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Okuhata, Yoshitaka; Yoshinobu, Takashi; Takemoto, Akiko; Himi, Kazuhisa; Mutoh, Haruomi [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Shuke, Noriyuki; Aburano, Tamio

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the findings of MR imaging obtained in patients with Echinococcus multilocularis involving the liver. For 10 patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver, the MR findings were compared with the histopathologic findings after biopsy or surgery. Conventional T1-weighted spin echo, T2-weighted spin echo and T1-weighted spin echo after Gd-DTPA were employed. The signal from the lesions of alveolar liver echinococcosis on T1-weighted images was hypointense in 16 of 23 lesions (69.6%), hyperintense in 4 (17.4%), and isointense in 3 (13.0%). The signal from the lesions on T2-weighted images was hyperintense in 20 lesions (87.0%), hypointense in 2 (8.7%), and isointense in one (4.3%). On using Gd-DTPA, 7 of 21 lesions (33.3%) were observed with rim enhancement, and 14 lesions (66.7%) were non-enhanced. We describe our clinical experience together with the various findings of MR imaging as observed in the patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. MR imaging excels in visualizing a low-intensity rim and small cystic foci, with liquefaction necrotic foci displaying a variety of signal intensities. After Gd-DTPA administration, the surrounding inflammatory granulomatous foci could be more clearly visualized. (author).

  11. Alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. Findings of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayasaka, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Okuhata, Yoshitaka; Yoshinobu, Takashi; Takemoto, Akiko; Himi, Kazuhisa; Mutoh, Haruomi; Shuke, Noriyuki; Aburano, Tamio.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the findings of MR imaging obtained in patients with Echinococcus multilocularis involving the liver. For 10 patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver, the MR findings were compared with the histopathologic findings after biopsy or surgery. Conventional T1-weighted spin echo, T2-weighted spin echo and T1-weighted spin echo after Gd-DTPA were employed. The signal from the lesions of alveolar liver echinococcosis on T1-weighted images was hypointense in 16 of 23 lesions (69.6%), hyperintense in 4 (17.4%), and isointense in 3 (13.0%). The signal from the lesions on T2-weighted images was hyperintense in 20 lesions (87.0%), hypointense in 2 (8.7%), and isointense in one (4.3%). On using Gd-DTPA, 7 of 21 lesions (33.3%) were observed with rim enhancement, and 14 lesions (66.7%) were non-enhanced. We describe our clinical experience together with the various findings of MR imaging as observed in the patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver. MR imaging excels in visualizing a low-intensity rim and small cystic foci, with liquefaction necrotic foci displaying a variety of signal intensities. After Gd-DTPA administration, the surrounding inflammatory granulomatous foci could be more clearly visualized. (author)

  12. The reconsideration of natural history of echinococcosis at Rebun Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, T

    1999-03-01

    It has been believed that the outbreak of echinococcosis at Rebun Island had ceased by 1970. The first patient was diagnosed in 1936 and 131 patients have been authorized as echinococcosis so far. The conference of measures against the outbreak had been organized in 1948 and started to eradicate Echinococcus multilocularis from the Island. Medical examination to detect the patients and the capture and autopsy of dogs and cats had been carried out hard till 1970. At that time, foxes imported from Simusiru Island in the middle Kuriles during the years 1924 to 1926 had already disappeared and it has seemed to be sure that stray dogs and cats might carry E. multilocularis and excrete infectious eggs in stead of foxes. Since we have had no real data concerning the natural history of patients with echinococcosis without any treatments, it can not be recognized the time of infection and the role of dogs or cats on the spread of echinococcosis at Rebun Island. From the new data, it is concluded that the active life cycle of E. multilocularis between foxes and vole might be closed by 1940, since the last patient infected with E. multilocularis was born in 1940 and died in 1945. Furthermore, it is estimated that more than 200 patients (3 to 4% of people at the island) might die from echinococcosis, because of the fact of the unusual increase of mortality of liver disorders and oldness observed during the years of 1940 to 1960. 81 patients with the high possibility of echinococcosis detected from 1937 to 1963 can be added to 131 authorized patients. Surprisingly, it is noticed that the standard deviations of ages of death of 94 patients born in Meiji era (1880-1912) and 59 in Taisho and Showa eras (1912-1940) are 63.16 +/- 11.68, and 34.32 +/- 11.87, respectively. It means that both old and young people might be infected simultaneously but for the long period. There was no difference between the susceptibility of young and old men to E. multilocularis. The numbers of male

  13. Human Cystic Echinococcosis: Old Problems and New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Siracusano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a widespread chronic endemic helminthic disease caused by infection with metacestodes of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. CE affects humans and has a worldwide prevalence of approximately six million. In this review, we discuss current findings in diagnosis and clinical management of CE and new concepts relating to E. granulosus molecules that directly modulate the host immune responses favouring a strong anti-inflammatory response and perpetuating parasite survival in the host. New insights into the molecular biology of E. granulosus will improve considerably our knowledge of the disease and will provide new potential therapeutic applications to treat or prevent inflammatory immune-mediated disease.

  14. Treatment of echinococcosis: albendazole and mebendazole – what else?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemphill Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for novel therapeutic options to cure alveolar echinococcosis (AE, due to the metacestode of Echinococcus multilocularis, is ongoing, and these developments could also have a profound impact on the treatment of cystic echinococcosis (CE, caused by the closely related Echinococcus granulosus s.l. Several options are being explored. A viable strategy for the identification of novel chemotherapeutically valuable compounds includes whole-organism drug screening, employing large-scale in vitro metacestode cultures and, upon identification of promising compounds, verification of drug efficacy in small laboratory animals. Clearly, the current focus is targeted towards broad-spectrum anti-parasitic or anti-cancer drugs and compound classes that are already marketed, or that are in development for other applications. The availability of comprehensive Echinococcus genome information and gene expression data, as well as significant progress on the molecular level, has now opened the door for a more targeted drug discovery approach, which allows exploitation of defined pathways and enzymes that are essential for the parasite. In addition, current in vitro and in vivo models that are used to assess drug efficacy should be optimized and complemented by methods that give more detailed information on the host-parasite interactions that occur during drug treatments. The key to success is to identify, target and exploit those parasite molecules that orchestrate activities essential to parasite survival.

  15. Advances in multidisciplinary individualized treatment of refractory hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABUDUAINI Abulizi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE is a zoonotic parasitic disease that seriously threatens the population in western China and compromises patients′ quality of life. With the continuous improvement in radical resection rate in recent years, late-stage HAE patients that were incurable in the past now have the opportunity for radical resection. However, patients who are not suitable candidates for radical resection still suffer from various complications and poor quality of life. Therefore, HAE is still considered a refractory and complex disease. The simple empirical treatment model provided by traditional professional discussion is unable to satisfy the treatment of advanced refractory HAE as it is unable to integrate specialized, standardized clinical skills for diagnosis and treatment. Multidisciplinary individualized treatment (MDT organically integrates the advantages of the available treatment into a reasonable individualized comprehensive treatment regimen. This review summarizes the advances in MDT for HAE as the best option to increase long-term survival, and suggests MDT as the first-line treatment for late-stage refractory hepatic alveolar echinococcosis.

  16. Large abdominal-pelvic cyst: An unusual presentation of hepatic echinococcosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borre, D.G.; Borre, G.E.

    1988-10-01

    The authors present an unusual form of hepatic echinococcosis characterized by a cystic mass that occupied the whole abdomen. The clinical features and the results of the diagnostic imaging procedures (ultrasound, computed tomography) are commented.

  17. Why more research needs to be done on echinococcosis in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Haroon; Ali, Shahzad; Afzal, Muhammad Sohail; Khan, Abid Ali; Raza, Hamid; Shah, Zaheer Hussain; Simsek, Sami

    2017-07-03

    Echinococcosis has a worldwide geographical distribution with endemic foci on every inhabited continent. Due to the frequent outbreaks in different parts of Pakistan in the recent past, echinococcosis is being described as a neglected tropical disease and is considered one of the most neglected parasitic diseases in the country. In endemic regions, predominantly settings with limited resources, there are high numbers of echinococcosis patients, as these communities do not have access to appropriate treatment. In Pakistan, there are limited reports on echinococcosis. The disease is prevalent in human and livestock, but this has not been sufficiently explored yet. Pakistan is an agricultural country and due to the disease's zoonotic mode of transmission, there is a dire need of future research on it. The present paper is an effort to highlight the importance of echinococcosis in Pakistan. There is a dire need for future research on echinococcosis in Pakistan as very few investigations had been carried out on this topic thus far. The prevalence of the disease in neighbouring countries highlights that Pakistan might be at severe risk of this zoonotic infection and further supports the need for more research. In Pakistan, the majority of the population lives in rural areas with limited acess to proper hygienic/sanitary facilities. These conditions favour the outbreak of diseases such as echinococcosis. The limited available data could result in higher outbreaks in the future, and thus cause the already weak healthcare system to overburden. The country has a meagre annual budget for health, which is being spent on known infections such as polio, dengue fever and hepatic viral infections. A proper surveillance system for echinococcosis is required across the country as treatment is usually expensive, complicated and may require extensive surgery and/or prolonged drug therapy. Development of new/novel drugs and other treatment modalities receives very little, if any

  18. Echinococcosis: An Economic Evaluation of a Veterinary Public Health Intervention in Rural Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Marwa; Zeng, Wu; Jenkins, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a rare but endemic condition in people in Canada, caused by a zoonotic cestode for which the source of human infection is ingestion of parasite eggs shed by canids. The objectives of this study were to identify risk factors associated with infection and to measure the cost-utility of introducing an echinococcosis prevention program in a rural area. We analyzed human case reports submitted to the Canadian Institutes for Health Information between 2002 and 2011. Over this 10 year period, there were 48 cases associated with E. granulosus/E. canadensis, 16 with E. multilocularis, and 251 cases of echinococcosis for which species was not identified (total 315 cases). Nationally, annual incidence of echinococcosis was 0.14 cases per 100 000 people, which is likely an underestimate due to under-diagnosis and under-reporting. Risk factors for echinococcosis included female gender, age (>65 years), and residing in one of the northern territories (Nunavut, Yukon, or Northwest Territories). The average cost of treating a case of cystic echinococcosis in Canada was $8,842 CAD. Cost-utility analysis revealed that dosing dogs with praziquantel (a cestocide) at six week intervals to control cystic echinococcosis is not currently cost-effective at a threshold of $20,000-100,000 per Quality Adjusted Life Year (QALY) gained, even in a health region with the highest incidence rate in Canada ($666,978 -755,051 per QALY gained). However, threshold analysis demonstrated that the program may become cost-saving at an echinococcosis incidence of 13-85 cases per 100,000 people and therefore, even one additional CE case in a community of 9000 people could result in the monetary benefits of the program outweighing costs. PMID:26135476

  19. Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: correlative US and CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didier, D.; Weiler, S.; Rohmer, P.; Lasseque, A.; Deschamps, J.P.; Vuitton, D.; Miguet, J.P.; Weill, F.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 24 cases of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE) due to Echinococcus multilocularis was assessed by US and CT. The diagnosis was confirmed in all cases by immunologic and histologic study. Both US and CT patterns of HAE showed changes of liver morphology in both contour and size. Abnormal areas of parenchyma were nodular or in fields, irregular, heterogeneous, and basically echogenic. Clustered microcalcifications were encountered within the abnormal parenchymal fields in 50% of cases, and necrotized zones occurred in 40% of cases. Dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts was commonly seen, especially on US; hilar involvement was frequent. Follow-up by both techniques can display increases of primary lesions, occurrence of new foci, and local or regional extensions. Precise evaluations of the lesions arising from correlative use of US and CT permits adequate therapeutic management.

  20. Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: correlative US and CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, D.; Weiler, S.; Rohmer, P.; Lasseque, A.; Deschamps, J.P.; Vuitton, D.; Miguet, J.P.; Weill, F.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 24 cases of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE) due to Echinococcus multilocularis was assessed by US and CT. The diagnosis was confirmed in all cases by immunologic and histologic study. Both US and CT patterns of HAE showed changes of liver morphology in both contour and size. Abnormal areas of parenchyma were nodular or in fields, irregular, heterogeneous, and basically echogenic. Clustered microcalcifications were encountered within the abnormal parenchymal fields in 50% of cases, and necrotized zones occurred in 40% of cases. Dilatation of intrahepatic bile ducts was commonly seen, especially on US; hilar involvement was frequent. Follow-up by both techniques can display increases of primary lesions, occurrence of new foci, and local or regional extensions. Precise evaluations of the lesions arising from correlative use of US and CT permits adequate therapeutic management

  1. Imaging techniques in the diagnosis of liver echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotritsch, K.H.; Goebel, N.

    1986-01-01

    Liver echinococcosis, the most frequently occuring form of parasitosis, is caused by the following two types of tapeworm: echinococcus granulosus and echinococcus multilocularis. Both types are to be found in Austria, the latter even being endemic. Imaging techniques such as computed tomography and sonography enable the diagnosis to be made easily, quickly and accurately, although the number of conditions to be considered in the differential diagnosis is considerable. A comparison of the two methods in 32 patients, 25 with echinococcus multilocularis and 7 with echinococcus granulosus demonstrates that ultrasound is slightly inferior to computed tomography. However, ultrasound should be the primary method of investigation and is of great importance in followup, whilst computed tomography is necessary pre-operatively to assess the extrahepatic involvement. (Author)

  2. Research advances in surgical treatment of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

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    Maimaiti Wasili

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE is a parasitic disease characterized by invasive growth. Major treatment methods include pharmacotherapy and surgical treatment, and surgical treatment mainly includes radical hepatectomy and palliative surgery. Radical hepatectomy is the first choice, and palliative surgery is mainly used to alleviate disease conditions and complications. Pharmacotherapy also plays an important role in the delay and control of HAE. In recent years, autologous liver transplantation has been used in the treatment of HAE and has become an effective therapy for end-stage HAE patients who cannot be cured by routine surgery. This article introduces the indications and advantages/disadvantages of radical hepatectomy and palliative surgery, as well as the experience in the application of multidisciplinary treatment, the concept of fast-track surgery, and autologous liver transplantation in the treatment of HAE patients, in order to provide a reference for the treatment of HAE.

  3. Chemotherapy of multiple abdominal echinococcosis after rupture of liver cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vutova, K.; Todorov, T.; Nikolov, I.; Aleksiev, A.

    2008-01-01

    A 23-years old man, complaining of two weeks febrile period, general weakness, easy fatigue, breathlessness and lost of weight was admitted. Hepatomegaly, ascite, leg edema were observed. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a great number of hydatid cysts in the liver, spleen and peritoneum. The patient was treated with Albendazole, given at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for six months. After one and half month of therapy the clinical status of the patient considerably improved, US and Computed tomography examination showed a decrease in size of the larger cysts, changes in cyst structure and disappearance of the smaller cysts. One and half year later almost ail cysts disappeared completely, the remaining represented some irregular spots with marked density. The results showed that Albendazole has rapid curative effect in patients with multiple abdominal echinococcosis. (authors)

  4. Ultrasonographic features of the liver with cystic echinococcosis in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hussein Awad; Elrashidy, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The present study was designed to gain information about the ultrasonographic features of livers with cystic echinococcosis, as well as to evaluate the use of ultrasonography for diagnosis of such disease in sheep. Design This was a retrospective study during the period April 2011 to March 2013. Participants A total of 22 Baladi sheep (aged three to six years) were included in this study. Based on clear hepatic ultrasonographic findings, all animals were classified into two groups: those with hepatic cysts (n=9) and without liver cysts (healthy liver, n=13). Results Biochemically, serum concentrations of γ-glutamyl transferase, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and globulins were significantly increased (P<0.01), while albumin was lowered (P<0.01) in sheep with cystic livers. Ultrasonographic findings of diseased sheep livers revealed the presence of rounded, anechoic and unilocular hydatid cysts with ellipse circumference ranged from 6–10 cm. The borders of cysts were mostly well defined. The interior of cysts contained echogenic particulate materials, septations, or fine echoes. At the 10th intercostal space, the ventral margin, size, thickness and angle of livers were higher (P<0.01), while the diameter of portal vein was lower (P<0.01) in sheep with liver cysts than control ones. Furthermore, at the 9th intercostal space, the circumference of the gall bladder was decreased in sheep with hepatic cysts (P<0.01). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of ultrasonography for diagnosis of hepatic hydatid cysts were 80 per cent and 100 per cent, and 100 per cent and 83 per cent, respectively. Conclusions Cystic echinococcosis is associated with a number of anatomical alterations in the liver tissues that can be easily recognised by ultrasound. Furthermore, ultrasonography alone or in combination with analysis of biochemical parameters reflecting liver function could be helpful for diagnosis of hepatic

  5. Serological evidence for human cystic echinococcosis in Slovenia

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    Kotar Tadeja

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE is caused by the larva of tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. Dogs and other canids are the primary definitive hosts for this parasite. CE may develop after accidental ingestion of tapeworm eggs, excreted with the feces of these animals. In the intestine, the larvae released from the eggs are nested in the liver, lungs or other organs of livestock as intermediate hosts and humans as aberrant hosts. The aim of this study was to examine serologically whether some of the patients in Slovenia, suspected of CE by imaging findings in the liver or lungs had been infected with the larva of Echinococcus granulosus. Methods Between January 1, 2002 and the end of December 2006, 1323 patients suspected of having echinococcosis were screened serologically by indirect haemagglutination assay (IHA. For confirmation and differentiation of Echinococcus spp. infection, the sera of IHA-positive patients were then retested by western blot (WB. Results Out of 127 IHA-positive sera, 34 sera were confirmed by WB and considered specific for CE. Of 34 sera of CE-positive patients sera, 32 corresponded to the characteristic imaging findings of a liver cysts and 2 to those of lung cysts. The mean age of CE-positive patients was 58.3 years. No significant differences were found between the CE-positive patients in regard to their sex. Conclusion In the study, it was found out that CE was mostly spread in the same area of Slovenia as in the past, but its prevalence decreased from 4.8 per 105 inhabitants in the period 1956–1968 to 1.7 per 105 inhabitants in the period 2002–2006. In spite of the decreased prevalence of CE in the last years, it is suggested that clinicians and public health authorities, especially in the eastern parts of Slovenia where the most CE patients come from, should pay greater attention to this disease in the future.

  6. A canine purgation study and risk factor analysis for echinococcosis in a high endemic region of the Tibetan plateau.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budke, C.M.; Campos Ponce, M.; Qian, B.F.; Torgerson, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    The Tibetan plateau of western China has been shown to have a very high prevalence of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus and human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by Echinococcus multilocularis. The domestic dog is suspected to be the primary definitive host for

  7. Gamma-Ray Treatment of Echinococcus Protoscoleces prior to Implantation in Mice Reduces Echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Li, Bo; Jiang, Shiping; Zhao, Qiang; Duo, Ji; Huang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a serious parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus tapeworms. Protoscoleces are sometimes released during surgical treatment for hydatid cysts, causing the recurrence of echinococcosis. Protoscoleces may be susceptible to radiation therapy. In this study Echinococcus protoscoleces were cultured in vitro and then divided into four different γ-ray irradiation dose groups (10 Gy, 20 Gy, 40 Gy, and 80 Gy) and a blank group. The protoscoleces were then implanted into the abdominal cavity of mice. Four months later, we observed that the incidence and weight of cysts declined with the increase of irradiation dose. γ-ray irradiation can suppress the generation of Echinococcus originated from protoscolex, the reason of which is due to the damaging to the structure of Echinococcus. Irradiation may prevent echinococcosis recurrence after surgical removal of hydatid cysts.

  8. Gamma-Ray Treatment of Echinococcus Protoscoleces prior to Implantation in Mice Reduces Echinococcosis

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    Qing Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a serious parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus tapeworms. Protoscoleces are sometimes released during surgical treatment for hydatid cysts, causing the recurrence of echinococcosis. Protoscoleces may be susceptible to radiation therapy. In this study Echinococcus protoscoleces were cultured in vitro and then divided into four different γ-ray irradiation dose groups (10 Gy, 20 Gy, 40 Gy, and 80 Gy and a blank group. The protoscoleces were then implanted into the abdominal cavity of mice. Four months later, we observed that the incidence and weight of cysts declined with the increase of irradiation dose. γ-ray irradiation can suppress the generation of Echinococcus originated from protoscolex, the reason of which is due to the damaging to the structure of Echinococcus. Irradiation may prevent echinococcosis recurrence after surgical removal of hydatid cysts.

  9. Radiologic diagnosis of echinococcosis. Radiologische Diagnostik bei Echinokokkose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobinger, B. (Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany)); Pfannenberg, A.C. (Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany)); Brambs, H.J. (Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen (Germany))

    1994-05-01

    Medical imaging and laboratory parameters permit a reliable detection and differentiation of cases of echinococcosis. Computerized tomography is a particularly valuable diagnostic tool here. In cases of liver infestation the resulting calcified foci are less readily revealed by magnetic resonance imaging than by CT, even though the former method has its merits in the diagnosis of concomitant vascular changes. If E. cysticus has invaded the lungs, the X-rays will show a sharply delineated round-to-oval cyst of uniform density, preferably in the lower and central compartments of that organ. In 1-4% of all organ infestations with E. cysticus it is the bone that has been parasitically invaded. In those cases, X-ray pictures of the osseous tissue show a light patch of a cyst-like appearance. Computerized tomography and nmr imaging are also able to visualize any soft tissue invasion beyond the limits of the diseased bony structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive method to detect bone marrow infestation. (orig./MG)

  10. CT Scanning in Identification of Sheep Cystic Echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Rui; Qi, Hongzhi; Pei, Lei; Hao, Jie; Dong, Jian; Jiang, Tao; Ainiwaer, Abudula; Shang, Ge; Xu, Lin; Shou, Xi; Zhang, Songan; Wu, Ge; Lu, Pengfei; Bao, Yongxing; Li, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    We aim to determine the efficiency of CT in identification of cystic echinococcosis in sheep. Fifty-three sheep with liver cysts confirmed by ultrasonography were subject to CT scan to evaluate the number, size, and type of the cysts in liver and lung, confirmed using necropsy. The correlation of numbers between liver cysts and lung cysts was calculated using Pearson analysis. Necropsy indicated a 98% consensus on size, location, number, and activity compared with CT scan. The viable cysts were 53.1% and 50.6% in the liver and lung, respectively. Among the cysts in liver, 35.5%, 9.5%, 5.7%, 10.2%, and 39.1% were Types CE1, CE2, CE3, CE4, and CE5, respectively. The cysts in the lungs, 17.4%, 26.9%, 12.1%, 11.6%, and 32.1%, were Types CE1, CE2, CE3, CE4, and CE5, respectively. A significant correlation was noticed between the number of cysts in liver and those in lung ( R = 0.770, P < 0.001). CT scan is a suitable tool in determining the size and type of cystic hydatid cysts in both liver and lung of sheep. A significant correlation was noticed between the numbers in liver and lung, indicating that lung infection was likely due to the expansion of liver cyst burden pressure.

  11. Cystic echinococcosis in South America: a call for action

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    Carlos F. Pavletic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cystic echinococcosis (CE or hydatidosis, a parasitic zoonosis caused by a cestode of the family Taeniidae, species Echinococcus granulosus, is endemic in Argentina, Chile, Peru, Uruguay, and southern Brazil. This report presents CE figures for these five countries in 2009 – 2014 and proposes indicators to measure national control programs. Nearly 5 000 new CE cases were diagnosed annually in the five countries during the study period. The average case fatality rate was 2.9%, which suggests that CE led to approximately 880 deaths in these countries during the 6-year period. CE cases that required secondary or tertiary health care had average hospital stays of 10.6 days, causing a significant burden to health systems. The proportion of new cases (15% in children less than 15 years of age suggests ongoing transmission. Despite figures showing that CE is not under control in South America, the long-standing implementation of national and local control programs in three of the five countries has achieved reductions in some of the indicators. The Regional Initiative for the Control of CE, which includes the five countries and provides a framework for networking and collaboration, must intensify its efforts.

  12. Percutaneous Treatment of Splenic Cystic Echinococcosis: Results of 12 Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net; Akkaya, Selçuk, E-mail: selcuk.akkaya85@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Dağoğlu, Merve Gülbiz, E-mail: drmgkartal@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Istanbul School of Medicine (Turkey); Akpınar, Burcu, E-mail: burcu-akpinar@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Erbahçeci, Aysun, E-mail: aysunerbahceci@yahoo.com [Istanbul Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Çiftçi, Türkmen, E-mail: turkmenciftci@yahoo.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey); Köroğlu, Mert, E-mail: mertkoroglu@hotmail.com [Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Akıncı, Devrim, E-mail: akincid@hotmail.com [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine (Turkey)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeCystic echinococcosis (CE) in the spleen is a rare disease even in endemic regions. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy of percutaneous treatment for splenic CE.Materials and MethodsTwelve patients (four men, eight women) with splenic CE were included in this study. For percutaneous treatment, CE1 and CE3A splenic hydatid cysts were treated with either the PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, respiration) technique or the catheterization technique.ResultsEight of the hydatid cysts were treated with the PAIR technique and four were treated with catheterization. The volume of all cysts decreased significantly during the follow-up period. No complication occurred in seven of 12 patients. Abscess developed in four patients. Two patients underwent splenectomy due to cavity infection developed after percutaneous treatment, while the spleen was preserved in 10 of 12 patients. Total hospital stay was between 1 and 18 days. Hospital stay was longer and the rate of infection was higher in the catheterization group. Follow-up period was 5–117 months (mean, 44.8 months), with no recurrence observed.ConclusionThe advantages of the percutaneous treatment are its minimal invasive nature, short hospitalization duration, and its ability to preserve splenic tissue and function. As the catheterization technique is associated with higher abscess risk, we suggest that the PAIR procedure should be the first percutaneous treatment option for splenic CE.

  13. Long-Term Albendazole Effectiveness for Hepatic Cystic Echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Jorge Luis; Gonzales, Herman Vildozola; Astuvilca, Juan; Arce-Villavicencio, Yanet; Carbajal-Gonzalez, Danny; Talledo, Lety; Willig, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term effectiveness of albendazole in the medical therapy of non-complicated hepatic cystic echinococcosis (HCE) in resource-constrained settings. We performed a retrospective review of patients starting albendazole for HCE in Lima, Peru from January 1997 to December 2007. Patients successfully recontacted underwent chart abstraction and clinical and ultrasonographic reevaluation. Descriptive statistics were used to delineate patient characteristics and treatment effectiveness at the conclusion of albendazole and after reevaluation. Patients (N = 27) were primarily female, mean age was 51. Initial treatment success at albendazole conclusion was 26% (N = 7) per patient and 37.5% (N = 24) per cyst. After 3.8 ± 2.5 years, albendazole success was 34% (N = 9) per patient and 40% (N = 24) per cyst. We found a gap in the effectiveness of albendazole HCE therapy compared with the efficacy reported in clinical trials. This underscores the need for further investigation into alternate therapeutic strategies for this neglected disease. PMID:22144447

  14. CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF ECHINOCOCCOSIS IN CHILDREN IN THE ASTRAKHAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Arakelyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: Analyze the epidemiological situation of echinococcosis in children in the Astrakhan region. In the Astrakhan region from 2001 to 2016. Registered 141 cases of echinococcosis in humans, incl. In children — 22 cases (15,6%. Among all the sick children, echinococcosis was more often reported in school-age persons — 90,9%. From the preschool age group, echinococcosis was recorded in two (9,1% unorganized children aged 5 and 6 years. The main complaints in the majority of invasive children were pain and a feeling of heaviness in the right hypochondrium — 40,9%, periodically arising cramping pain in the area of localization of the parasite — 31,8%. In rare cases, complaints of weakness and a feeling of bursting at the site of echinococcal cyst localization were noted — 4,5% each. A part of patients — 18,2% of the complaints were absent. When diagnosing, both laboratory and instrumental diagnostic methods were used. In most cases — 90,9%, the diagnosis of echinococcosis was confirmed by the enzyme immunoassay (ELISA method. Thus, recently in the territory of the Astrakhan region there has been an increase in the number of cases of human infection with echinococcus, incl. аnd children of school age. The parasite is located, as a rule, in the liver and lung. The disease was susceptible to those who had a history of permanent contact with non-undelminthic dogs. In the diagnosis of echinococcosis, the main role is played by the complex methods of ELISA, CT, ultrasound, x-ray and histological methods.  

  15. Antigen based detection of cystic echinococcosis in buffaloes using ELISA and Dot-EIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangaran, A; Bino Sundar, S T; Latha, Bhaskaran Ravi

    2017-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is caused by the larval stage of the dog tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus . The disease is recognized as one of the world's major zoonoses affecting human beings and domestic animals apart from its economic and public health importance. Development of the cysts in the intermediate host such as buffaloes occurs in the lungs, liver and other organs. In this study, detection of circulating antigen in the diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis in buffaloes was done using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and Dot-Enzyme immunoassay (Dot-EIA). The sensitivity and specificity were determined as 89 and 92 % respectively, whereas those of Dot-EIA were determined as 94 and 96 %.

  16. The occurrence of Echinococcus granulosus in dogs and cystic echinococcosis in cattle and sheep in Kosova

    OpenAIRE

    Sherifi, Kurtesh

    2010-01-01

    Surveys were carried out during the period March 2003 – February 2004 to assess the occurrence of echinococcosis in dogs and cystic echinococcosis in cattle and sheep. Additionally, the incidence of surgically treated-hydatidosis patients was investigated. Shedding of taeniid eggs was found in 23 (7.5%) out of a total of 305 dogs, using the flotation-ovassay technique. Eggs from other helminths were detected as well: hookworms 139 (45.5%), Trichuris vulpis 87 (28.5%), Toxocara canis 42 (13...

  17. Management and outcome of cardiac and endovascular cystic echinococcosis.

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    Marta Díaz-Menéndez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic echinococcosis (CE can affect the heart and the vena cava but few cases are reported. METHODS: A retrospective case series of 11 patients with cardiac and/or endovascular CE, followed-up over a period of 15 years (1995-2009 is reported. RESULTS: Main clinical manifestations included thoracic pain or dyspnea, although 2 patients were asymptomatic. Cysts were located mostly in the right atrium and inferior vena cava. Nine patients were previously diagnosed with disseminated CE. Echocardiography was the diagnostic method of choice, although serology, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and histology aided with diagnosis and follow-up. Nine patients underwent cardiac surgery and nine received long-term antiparasitic treatment for a median duration of 25 months (range 4-93 months. One patient died intra-operatively due to cyst rupture and endovascular dissemination. Two patients died 10 and 14 years after diagnosis, due to pulmonary embolism (PE and cardiac failure, respectively. One patient was lost to follow-up. Patients who had cardiac involvement exclusively did not have complications after surgery and were considered cured. There was only one recurrence requiring a second operation. Patients with vena cava involvement developed PEs and presented multiple complications. CONCLUSIONS: Cardiovascular CE is associated with a high risk of potentially lethal complications. Clinical manifestations and complications vary according to cyst location. Isolated cardiac CE may be cured after surgery, while endovascular extracardiac involvement is associated with severe chronic complications. CE should be included in the differential diagnosis of cardiovascular disease in patients from endemic areas.

  18. Anthelminthic activity of glibenclamide on secondary cystic echinococcosis in mice.

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    Julia A Loos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a worldwide parasitic zoonosis caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Current chemotherapy against this disease is based on the administration of benzimidazoles (BZMs. However, BZM treatment has a low cure rate and causes several side effects. Therefore, new treatment options are needed. The antidiabetic drug glibenclamide (Glb is a second-generation sulfonylurea receptor inhibitor that has been shown to be active against protozoan parasites. Hence, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological effects of Glb against the larval stage of E. granulosus. The in vitro activity was concentration dependent on both protoscoleces and metacestodes. Moreover, Glb combined with the minimum effective concentration of albendazole sulfoxide (ABZSO was demonstrated to have a greater effect on metacestodes in comparison with each drug alone. Likewise, there was a reduction in the cyst weight after oral administration of Glb to infected mice (5 mg/kg of body weight administered daily for a period of 8 weeks. However, in contrast to in vitro assays, no differences in effectiveness were found between Glb + albendazole (ABZ combined treatment and Glb monotherapy. Our results also revealed mitochondrial membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in Glb-treated protoscoleces. In addition, the intracystic drug accumulation and our bioinformatic analysis using the available E. granulosus genome suggest the presence of genes encoding sulfonylurea transporters in the parasite. Our data clearly demonstrated an anti-echinococcal effect of Glb on E. granulosus larval stage. Further studies are needed in order to thoroughly investigate the mechanism involved in the therapeutic response of the parasite to this sulfonylurea.

  19. Human Alveolar Echinococcosis in Poland: 1990–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahorski, Wacław L.; Knap, Józef P.; Pawłowski, Zbigniew S.; Krawczyk, Marek; Polański, Jerzy; Stefaniak, Jerzy; Patkowski, Waldemar; Szostakowska, Beata; Pietkiewicz, Halina; Grzeszczuk, Anna; Felczak-Korzybska, Iwona; Gołąb, Elżbieta; Wnukowska, Natalia; Paul, Małgorzata; Kacprzak, Elżbieta; Sokolewicz-Bobrowska, Elżbieta; Niścigorska-Olsen, Jolanta; Czyrznikowska, Aleksandra; Chomicz, Lidia; Cielecka, Danuta; Myjak, Przemysław

    2013-01-01

    Background Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by Echinococcus multilocularis infections is a dangerous old disease in the Northern Hemisphere. The aim of the paper was to collect and analyze data on human AE in Poland in the last two decades. Methodology/Principal Findings The sources of data were both the cases officially registered and detected by an active field and laboratory surveillance. The cases were verified by clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory criteria. Altogether 121 human cases of AE were detected. Among these 83 (68,6%) cases were classified as confirmed, 16 as probable and 22 as possible. During the two decades a continuous increase in detection rate was noticed. The cases were 6–82 years old at the time of diagnosis (mean - 47.7 years). Sex ratio M/F was 0.86/1.0. The AE was fatal in 23 (19%) patients (mean age at death - 54.1 years). Family agglomeration of AE was found in 4 foci, involving 9 patients. Seventy six of the cases were diagnosed in an advanced stage of disease. In all cases the liver was the primary location of AE. In 30 (24.8%) patients a spread to other organs was observed. Ninety four of the patients were treated with albendazole. In 73 (60%) patients a surgical operation was performed, including 15 liver transplantations. Conclusions/Significance The studies confirmed that AE is an emerging disease in Poland, which is the fourth country in Europe with over 120 cases detected. The results also indicate the need of a wider national programme for implementation of screening in the highest AE risk areas (north-eastern Poland) with an effort to increase the public awareness of the possibility of contracting E. multilocularis, and above all, training of the primary care physicians in the recognition of the risk of AE to allow for an early detection of this dangerous disease. PMID:23301116

  20. Acceptance of standardized ultrasound classification, use of albendazole, and long-term follow-up in clinical management of cystic echinococcosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Nicoletti, Giovanni J; Neumayr, Andreas; Brunetti, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a chronic, complex, and neglected disease. The need for a simple classification of cyst morphology that would provide an accepted framework for scientific and clinical work on cystic echinococcosis has been addressed by two documents issued by the WHO Informal Working Group on Echinococcosis in 2003 (cyst classification) and in 2010 (Expert consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of echinococcosis). Here we evaluate the use of the WHO Informal Working Group on Echinococcosis classification of hepatic cystic echinococcosis, the acceptance by clinicians of recommendations regarding the use of albendazole, and the implementation of the long-term follow-up of patients with hepatic cystic echinococcosis in the scientific literature since the WHO Informal Working Group on Echinococcosis recommendations were issued. Of the publications included in our review, 71.2% did not indicate any classification, whereas 14% used the WHO Informal Working Group on Echinococcosis classification. Seventy-four percent reported the administration of peri-interventional albendazole, although less than half reported its modality, and 51% the length of patient follow-up. A joint effort is needed from the scientific community to encourage the acceptance and implementation of these three key issues in the clinical management of cystic echinococcosis.

  1. Molecular Diagnosis of Polycystic Echinococcosis Due to Echinococcus vogeli in a Paraguayan Immigrant in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frider, B.; Alvarez Rodriguez, J.; Amante, M.; Pestalardo, M. L.; Cazorla, A.; Bresson-Hadni, S.; Millon, L.

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic echinococcosis due to Echinococcus vogeli is a rare parasitic infection that occurs in rural areas of Central and South America. Only molecular identification performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded liver tissue samples gave an unequivocal diagnosis of this disease in a Paraguayan immigrant in Argentina. PMID:23824768

  2. [Study on the ARIMA model application to predict echinococcosis cases in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    En-Li, Tan; Zheng-Feng, Wang; Wen-Ce, Zhou; Shi-Zhu, Li; Yan, Lu; Lin, Ai; Yu-Chun, Cai; Xue-Jiao, Teng; Shun-Xian, Zhang; Zhi-Sheng, Dang; Chun-Li, Yang; Jia-Xu, Chen; Wei, Hu; Xiao-Nong, Zhou; Li-Guang, Tian

    2018-02-26

    To predict the monthly reported echinococcosis cases in China with the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model, so as to provide a reference for prevention and control of echinococcosis. SPSS 24.0 software was used to construct the ARIMA models based on the monthly reported echinococcosis cases of time series from 2007 to 2015 and 2007 to 2014, respectively, and the accuracies of the two ARIMA models were compared. The model based on the data of the monthly reported cases of echinococcosis in China from 2007 to 2015 was ARIMA (1, 0, 0) (1, 1, 0) 12 , the relative error among reported cases and predicted cases was -13.97%, AR (1) = 0.367 ( t = 3.816, P ARIMA (1, 0, 0) (1, 0, 1) 12 , the relative error among reported cases and predicted cases was 0.56%, AR (1) = 0.413 ( t = 4.244, P ARIMA models as for the same infectious diseases. It is needed to be further verified that the more data are accumulated, the shorter time of predication is, and the smaller the average of the relative error is. The establishment and prediction of an ARIMA model is a dynamic process that needs to be adjusted and optimized continuously according to the accumulated data, meantime, we should give full consideration to the intensity of the work related to infectious diseases reported (such as disease census and special investigation).

  3. Time Prediction Models for Echinococcosis Based on Gray System Theory and Epidemic Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Li; Zheng, Yanling; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Xueliang; Zheng, Yujian

    2017-03-04

    Echinococcosis, which can seriously harm human health and animal husbandry production, has become an endemic in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. In order to explore an effective human Echinococcosis forecasting model in Xinjiang, three grey models, namely, the traditional grey GM(1,1) model, the Grey-Periodic Extensional Combinatorial Model (PECGM(1,1)), and the Modified Grey Model using Fourier Series (FGM(1,1)), in addition to a multiplicative seasonal ARIMA(1,0,1)(1,1,0)₄ model, are applied in this study for short-term predictions. The accuracy of the different grey models is also investigated. The simulation results show that the FGM(1,1) model has a higher performance ability, not only for model fitting, but also for forecasting. Furthermore, considering the stability and the modeling precision in the long run, a dynamic epidemic prediction model based on the transmission mechanism of Echinococcosis is also established for long-term predictions. Results demonstrate that the dynamic epidemic prediction model is capable of identifying the future tendency. The number of human Echinococcosis cases will increase steadily over the next 25 years, reaching a peak of about 1250 cases, before eventually witnessing a slow decline, until it finally ends.

  4. Time Prediction Models for Echinococcosis Based on Gray System Theory and Epidemic Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis, which can seriously harm human health and animal husbandry production, has become an endemic in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. In order to explore an effective human Echinococcosis forecasting model in Xinjiang, three grey models, namely, the traditional grey GM(1,1 model, the Grey-Periodic Extensional Combinatorial Model (PECGM(1,1, and the Modified Grey Model using Fourier Series (FGM(1,1, in addition to a multiplicative seasonal ARIMA(1,0,1(1,1,04 model, are applied in this study for short-term predictions. The accuracy of the different grey models is also investigated. The simulation results show that the FGM(1,1 model has a higher performance ability, not only for model fitting, but also for forecasting. Furthermore, considering the stability and the modeling precision in the long run, a dynamic epidemic prediction model based on the transmission mechanism of Echinococcosis is also established for long-term predictions. Results demonstrate that the dynamic epidemic prediction model is capable of identifying the future tendency. The number of human Echinococcosis cases will increase steadily over the next 25 years, reaching a peak of about 1250 cases, before eventually witnessing a slow decline, until it finally ends.

  5. Case Report: A Unique Case Of Cystic Echinococcosis in a Sahiwal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Report: A Unique Case Of Cystic Echinococcosis in a Sahiwal Cow in Narok County, Kenya. JA Omega, PK Koskei. Abstract. A three and a half year old pregnant Sahiwal cow born and reared just outside the Maasai Mara National Game Reserve in Narok County, Kenya was noticed to walk slowly, cough occasionally ...

  6. [Alveolar echinococcosis in the French province of Ardennes: isolated case or new focus?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaquit, J; Gallego, A; Usseglio, F; Liance, M; Favriel, J M

    1998-09-01

    The first three autochthonous cases of alveolar echinococcosis were diagnosed in the Ardennes area (France). This is the most occidental localization of this disease in Northern Europe. The authors discuss these cases with an epidemiological regard. They are looking for relationships with natural parasitic cycle in the neighbouring country Belgium and their consequences on local public health in the future.

  7. [How can we prevent alveolar echinococcosis? Ecosystem and risk management viewpoints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Keita; Oku, Yuzaburo; Kamiya, Masao; Doi, Rikuo; Tamashiro, Hidehiko

    2002-01-01

    This article focuses on understanding epidemiological features of alveolar echinococcosis and discussing its prevention and control, especially from a viewpoint of the ecosystem and risk management. Publications on alveolar echinococcosis throughout the world were systematically reviewed with special reference to ecology, epidemiology and countermeasures. Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by accidental infection with larva of the parasite Echinococcus multilocularis is fatal to humans unless diagnosed at an early stage. No effective control measures have been identified so far because it is difficult to fully understand the ecology of the parasite and its intermediate and definitive hosts. It is also not easy to determine the precise infection route to humans mainly because of the long latent period. In Hokkaido, infection rates among red foxes have recently risen even in low endemic districts. Not only stray and domestic dogs but also some pigs in Hokkaido have been found to be infected. While the number of reported human cases is still small, around 10 cases per year, local residents seem to be threatened with the risk of infection. We predict that the incidence of alveolar echinococcosis among humans in Japan will increase in the near future if no effective preventive measures are conducted. In addition, Echinococcus multilocularis infection has the potential to affect the economy of Hokkaido because of its impact on the agricultural and tourist industries. Well-designed epidemiological surveys are therefore urgently required, in the context of ecosystem and risk management prior to large outbreaks. International collaboration is also desired.

  8. Ovarian echinococcosis in a 4-year old girl - case report | Stanev ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydatid disease of the genital organs is very rare with an incidence of 0.2%. This disease has no specific symptoms and findings. It is usually diagnosed intraoperatively. We present a case of a four-year old girl with ovarian echinococcosis, who had earlier been operated on in the Clinic of Pediatric Surgery University ...

  9. A systematic review of the epidemiology of echinococcosis in domestic and wild animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belen Otero-Abad

    Full Text Available Human echinococcosis is a neglected zoonosis caused by parasites of the genus Echinococcus. The most frequent clinical forms of echinococcosis, cystic echinococcosis (CE and alveolar echinococcosis (AE, are responsible for a substantial health and economic burden, particularly to low-income societies. Quantitative epidemiology can provide important information to improve the understanding of parasite transmission and hence is an important part of efforts to control this disease. The purpose of this review is to give an insight on factors associated with echinococcosis in animal hosts by summarising significant results reported from epidemiological studies identified through a systematic search.The systematic search was conducted mainly in electronic databases but a few additional records were obtained from other sources. Retrieved entries were examined in order to identify available peer-reviewed epidemiological studies that found significant risk factors for infection using associative statistical methods. One hundred studies met the eligibility criteria and were suitable for data extraction. Epidemiological factors associated with increased risk of E. granulosus infection in dogs included feeding with raw viscera, possibility of scavenging dead animals, lack of anthelmintic treatment and owners' poor health education and indicators of poverty. Key factors associated with E. granulosus infection in intermediate hosts were related to the hosts' age and the intensity of environmental contamination with parasite eggs. E. multilocularis transmission dynamics in animal hosts depended on the interaction of several ecological factors, such as hosts' population densities, host-prey interactions, landscape characteristics, climate conditions and human-related activities.Results derived from epidemiological studies provide a better understanding of the behavioural, biological and ecological factors involved in the transmission of this parasite and hence

  10. Review of "Echinococcus and Echinococcosis, Part A." edited by R. C. Andrew Thompson, Alan J. Lymbery and Peter Deplazes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira

    2017-09-04

    Thompson RCA, Deplazes P, Lymbery AJ, Editors. Echinococcus and Echinococcosis, Part A. Volume 95, Advances in Parasitology 95. Academic Press; 2017. 525 pages, ISBN 978-0-12-8114711 (hardcover); 9780128114728 (eBook).

  11. Long-term experience on surgical treatment of alveolar echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenschoen, Klaus; Carli Buttenschoen, Daniela; Gruener, Beate; Kern, Peter; Beger, Hans G; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Reuter, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is life-threatening and reports on surgical procedures and results are rare, but essential. Longitudinal surveillance and long-term follow-up of patients surgically treated for AE during the periods 1982-1999 (group A) and 2000-2006 (group B). University hospital within an endemic area. The median (min-max) follow-up period was 141 (5-417) months. Forty-eight surgical procedures were performed in 36 patients with AE: 63% were partial resections of the liver (additional extrahepatic resection in ten of them), 17% just extrahepatic resections, 10% biliodigestive anastomosis, and 10% exploratory laparotomies. Seventy-five percent of the operations were first-time procedures, 25% done due to a relapse. Forty-two percent of the operations were estimated to be curative (R0), whereas 58% were palliative (R1, R2). All patients had additional medical treatment and periodical follow-up. Two out of 18 (11%) patients, estimated to have had curative surgery, developed a relapse 42 and 54 months later. R0-resection rates depended on the primary, neighboring, metastasis stage of AE (S1, 100%; S2, 100%; S3a, 33%; S3b, 27%; S4, 11%). During the period 2000-2006 elective radical surgery for AE was done only if a safe distance of at least 2 cm was attainable. This concept was associated with an increased R0-resection rate of 87% for group B compared to 24% for group A. Operative procedures done to control complicated courses of AE (jaundice, cholangitis, vascular compression, bacterial superinfection) have not been curative (R2) in 82% because the disease had spread into irresectable structures. Morbidity was 19%. All patients with curative resections are alive. Fifty-six percent of the patients with palliative treatment are alive as long as 14-237 months, 28% died from AE 164-338 months after diagnosis (late lethality), and 17% died due to others diseases 96-417 months after diagnosis of AE. One out of seven (14%) patients suffering from suppurative

  12. 1H MR spectroscopy characteristics of cerebral alveolar echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Yibanu Abudureheman; Jiang Chunhui; Yao Weihong; Tian Xiongling; Zhang Deqing; Liu Chen; Liu Wenya; Wen Hao

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) in patients with cerebral alveolar echinococcosis (CAE). Methods: Thirteen patients with 33 lesions proven to be CAE histologically and clinically were examined by conventional MRI and 2D multi-voxel spectroscopy with a 3.0 T double gradient superconductivity magnetic resonance scanner. Concentrations of the metabolites containing N-acetyl-aspartic-acid (NAA), Choline (Cho), Creatine (Cr), lipids and lactic acid (Lip + Lac), myo-Inositol (mI) were detected and the value of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr, (Lip + Lac)/Cr, mI/Cr were calculated. The values of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr, (Lip + Lac)/Cr, mI/Cr were compared between the lesions and the contralateral normal brain parenchyma. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: CAE 1 H MRS in the lesions was characterized by the decrease of Cho, NAA to varying degrees, and a visible lipid with or without lactate peak. Compared with the control group, the ratio of NAA/Cr was decreased markedly, whereas Cho/Cr, mI/Cr increased mildly and (Lip + Lac)/Cr increased markedly in the lesions. The medians and interquartile ranges of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr, (Lip + Lac)/Cr and mI/Cr in the lesions were: 1.88 (1.24-2.23), 1.32 (1.07-1.58), 32.96 (24.59-47.30) and 0.91 (0.67-1.08), respectively. The medians and interquartile ranges of Cho/Cr, NAA/Cr, (Lip + Lac)/Cr and mI/Cr of control group were 0.84 (0.704-0.98), 2.00 (1.80-2.18), 0.90 (0.74-0.99) and 0.26 (0.18-0.31), respectively. There were statistically significant differences of the measures between the lesions and the control regions (Z=-5.932, -6.086, -6.946, -6.984, P<0.01). Conclusions: Multi-voxel 1 H MRS can reflect pathological characteristics of CAE. 1 H MRS provides metabolic information for diagnosis of CAE and may be a supplement to conventional magnetic resonance examination. (authors)

  13. The role of calcification for staging cystic echinococcosis (CE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosch, Waldemar; Kauffmann, Guenter W. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Section of Clinical Tropical Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaenisch, Thomas [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Section of Clinical Tropical Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital of Heidelberg, Section of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    The prevalence of calcified cysts and the significance of calcification as a sign of cyst inactivity in cystic echinococcosis (CE) was evaluated. Seventy-eight patients (36 females, 42 males, mean age 40.8 {+-} 16.9 years) with CE, having a total of 137 abdominal cysts (116 hepatic, three splenic, one renal and 17 peritoneal cysts), were diagnosed and followed-up by ultrasound during and after albendazole treatment or as part of the watch-and-wait approach recording changes in the cyst wall and content. In 48 patients with 94 cysts, computed tomography (CT) imaging was additionally available and was correlated with ultrasound findings. Cyst wall calcification was classified into (1) ''sprinkled'', (2) ''eggshell-like'', and (3) ''circular''. Calcification of the cyst wall and/or cyst content was detected in 67 echinococcal cysts (48.9% of all cysts) in 39 patients (15 females, 24 males, mean age 40.8 {+-} 14.8 years). Of the total of 67 calcified cysts, only 23 were compatible with WHO type CE5, 18 with WHO type CE4. Judged by cyst content, the remaining 26 were of WHO type CE1, CE2 and CE3 (n = 1, n = 8, and n = 17, respectively). During a mean period of 34.3 months ({+-}21.3 months) the majority of cysts (n = 32) did not exhibit any change in cyst content and wall properties. Fourteen cysts showed signs of progressive involution, five cysts (all of WHO type CE3) of renewed activity defined by recurring fluid collection. In 16 cysts, no follow-up was available due to surgery or drop out. Calcification of the cyst is not restricted to the inactive WHO cyst types CE4 and CE5, but occurs in all stages and in up to 50% of cysts. The completeness and, most importantly, the stability of consolidation of cyst content over time predicts cyst inactivity more reliably. (orig.)

  14. A new data management system for the French National Registry of human alveolar echinococcosis cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbonnier Amandine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE is an endemic zoonosis in France due to the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis. The French National Reference Centre for Alveolar Echinococcosis (CNR-EA, connected to the FrancEchino network, is responsible for recording all AE cases diagnosed in France. Administrative, epidemiological and medical information on the French AE cases may currently be considered exhaustive only on the diagnosis time. To constitute a reference data set, an information system (IS was developed thanks to a relational database management system (MySQL language. The current data set will evolve towards a dynamic surveillance system, including follow-up data (e.g. imaging, serology and will be connected to environmental and parasitological data relative to E. multilocularis to better understand the pathogen transmission pathway. A particularly important goal is the possible interoperability of the IS with similar European and other databases abroad; this new IS could play a supporting role in the creation of new AE registries.

  15. Comparison of the serological tests ICT and ELISA for the diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jenny; Sako, Yasuhito; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Richou, Carine; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Ito, Akira; Millon, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Serological diagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a key element for efficient patient treatment management. A rapid immunochromatography test kit (ICT) using the recombinant Em18 antigen (rEm18) was recently developed. The aim of our study was to assess this test on a panel of sera from French patients with alveolar echinococcosis and control patients. In a blind test, a total of 112 serum samples were tested including samples of AE (n = 30), cystic echinococcosis [CE] (n = 15), and polycystic echinococcosis [PE] (n = 1). For the comparison, 66 sera from patients with hepatocarcinoma, fascioliasis, toxocariasis, Caroli's disease, or autoimmune chronic active hepatitis were used. The diagnostic test sets we used were the rEm18-ICT and two validated ELISAs with rEm18 and Em2-Em18 antigens, respectively. For the ICT, 27/30 sera from AE patients, 4/15 sera from CE patients and the PE patient serum were positive. One serum from the control panel (toxocariasis) was positive for the ICT. The rEm18-ICT sensitivity (90.0%) and specificity (92.7%) for detection of Em18-specific antibodies confirmed it as a relevant tool for AE diagnosis. The rEm18-ELISA had a sensitivity of 86.7% and specificity of 91.5%, and the Em2-Em18-ELISA had a sensitivity of 96.7% and specificity of 87.8%. However, when AE patient sera are recorded as weak in intensity with the ICT, we recommend a double reading and use of a reference sample if the ICT is used for patient follow-up. © J. Knapp et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  16. Echinococcosis and other parasitic infections in domestic dogs from urban areas of an argentinean Patagonian city

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Verónica; Viozzi, Gustavo; Garibotti, Gilda; Zacharias, Daniela; Debiaggi, María Florencia; Kabaradjian, Surpik

    2017-01-01

    In urban populations of South America, dogs with free access to public areas represent a public health concern. The primary consequence of roaming dogs on human health is the transmission of infectious and parasitic diseases mainly through feces contamination. The main diseases likely to be transmitted are hydatidosis or echinococcosis, larva migrans, and giardiasis. In Argentina, hydatidosis ranks among the most prevalent zoonosis. Although it is considered a rural disease, the circulation o...

  17. Human and canine echinococcosis infection in informal, unlicensed abattoirs in Lima, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M Reyes

    Full Text Available Echinococcus granulosus infections are a major public health problem in livestock-raising regions around the world. The life cycle of this tapeworm is sustained between dogs (definitive host, canine echinococcosis, and herbivores (intermediary host, cystic hydatid disease. Humans may also develop cystic hydatid disease. Echinococcosis is endemic in rural areas of Peru; nevertheless, its presence or the extension of the problem in urban areas is basically unknown. Migration into Lima, an 8-million habitant's metropolis, creates peripheral areas where animals brought from endemic areas are slaughtered without veterinary supervision. We identified eight informal, unlicensed abattoirs in a peripheral district of Lima and performed a cross-sectional study in to assess the prevalence of canine echinococcosis, evaluated by coproELISA followed by PCR evaluation and arecoline purge. Eight of 22 dogs (36% were positive to coproELISA, and four (18% were confirmed to be infected with E. granulosus tapeworms either by PCR or direct observation (purge. Later evaluation of the human population living in these abattoirs using abdominal ultrasound, chest X-rays and serology, found 3 out of 32 (9.3% subjects with echinococcal cysts in the liver (two viable, one calcified, one of whom had also lung involvement and a strongly positive antibody response. Autochthonous transmission of E. granulosus is present in Lima. Informal, unlicensed abattoirs may be sources of infection to neighbouring people in this urban environment.

  18. Independent evaluation of a canine Echinococcosis Control Programme in Hobukesar County, Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, Freya; Qi, Xinwei; Tao, Jiang; Feng, Xiaohui; Mastin, Alexander; Craig, Philip S; Vuitton, Dominique A; Duan, Xinyu; Chu, Xiangdong; Zhu, Jinlong; Wen, Hao

    2015-05-01

    The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwest China is one of the world's most important foci for cystic echinococcosis. Domestic dogs are the main source for human infection, and previous studies in Xinjiang have found a canine Echinococcus spp. coproELISA prevalence of between 36% and 41%. In 2010 the Chinese National Echinococcosis Control Programme was implemented in Xinjiang, and includes regular dosing of domestic dogs with praziquantel. Six communities in Hobukesar County, northwest Xinjiang were assessed in relation to the impact of this control programme through dog necropsies, dog Echinococcus spp. coproantigen surveys based on Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) and dog owner questionnaires. We found that 42.1% of necropsied dogs were infected with Echinococcus granulosus, and coproELISA prevalences were between 15% and 70% in the communities. Although approximately half of all dog owners reported dosing their dogs within the 12 months prior to sampling, coproELISA prevalence remained high. Regular praziquantel dosing of owned dogs in remote and semi-nomadic communities such as those in Hobukesar County is logistically very difficult and additional measures should be considered to reduce canine echinococcosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevention of alveolar echinococcosis--ecosystem and risk management perspectives in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Keita; Oku, Yuzaburo; Tamashiro, Hiko

    2003-12-01

    We focused on the epidemiology of alveolar echinococcosis especially in Japan and discussed control measures to prevent an epidemic. No effective control measures against alveolar echinococcosis have been identified thus far because it is difficult to fully understand the ecology of the parasite and its hosts, i.e. the precise infection route to humans. In Hokkaido, Japan, infection rates among red foxes have recently risen even in low endemic districts. Infection seems to be spreading not only among wild foxes but also among domestic dogs. Despite only sporadic reports of human cases in Japan, we predict that the incidence of alveolar echinococcosis will increase in the near future if no effective preventive measures are put in place. An Echinococcus multilocularis epidemic would have the potential to affect the economy of Hokkaido, due to its impact on the agricultural and tourist industries. Well-designed epidemiological surveys are, therefore, urgently required prior to large outbreaks, based on understanding of the ecosystem around E. multilocularis.

  20. Image findings and follow-up of lung echinococcosis after chemotherapy with liposome-entrapped albendazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhebaiti Mahesuti; Liu Wenyan; Ma Wenli; Wen Hao; Taxipulati

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the image features of lung echinococcosis under chemotherapy with liposome-entrapped albendazole. Methods: Sixteen patients with lung echinococcosis who took orally liposome-entrapped albendazole (10 mg/kg, Bid, 3 to 10 months) were examined by X-ray film, CT or MR before therapy and followed-up by those imaging studies after therapy. The morphological changes of the lesions as reflected on imaging findings were reviewed, with correlation of the clinic check-ups and laboratory tests, to judge effectiveness of the treatment. Results: Five cases were completely cured. The treatment was effective in 6 cases, partially effective in 4 and invalid in 1 case. The imaging findings included: cavity formation in 7 cases due to hydatid cyst degeneration and absorption of cyst liquid; reduction in lesion size in 6 cases; disappearance of lesion or decrease in lesion numbers in 2 cases; increase in lesion density and blurring of cyst wall in 6 cases duo to cyst consolidation; rupture, shrinkage, collapse of cyst inner membrane in 3 cases; calcification of the cyst wall or contents in 6 cases. Conclusions: It is shown that liposome-entrapped albendazole chemotherapy has curative effect for lung echinococcosis. Imaging examinations are effective for monitoring the evolution of the disease by depicting the morphologic-pathologic changes of the lesions. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of the impact of 2 years of a dosing intervention on canine echinococcosis in the Alay Valley, Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN Kesteren, F; Mastin, A; Torgerson, P R; Mytynova, Bermet; Craig, P S

    2017-09-01

    Echinococcosis is a re-emerging zoonotic disease in Kyrgyzstan. In 2012, an echinococcosis control scheme was started that included dosing owned dogs in the Alay Valley, Kyrgyzstan with praziquantel. Control programmes require large investments of money and resources; as such it is important to evaluate how well these are meeting their targets. However, problems associated with echinococcosis control schemes include remoteness and semi-nomadic customs of affected communities, and lack of resources. These same problems apply to control scheme evaluations, and quick and easy assessment tools are highly desirable. Lot quality assurance sampling was used to assess the impact of approximately 2 years of echinococcosis control in the Alay valley. A pre-intervention coproELISA prevalence was established, and a 75% threshold for dosing compliance was set based on previous studies. Ten communities were visited in 2013 and 2014, with 18-21 dogs sampled per community, and questionnaires administered to dog owners. After 21 months of control efforts, 8/10 communities showed evidence of reaching the 75% praziquantel dosing target, although only 3/10 showed evidence of a reduction in coproELISA prevalence. This is understandable, since years of sustained control are required to effectively control echinococcosis, and efforts in the Alay valley should be and are being continued.

  2. Development and evaluation of real-time loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of cystic echinococcosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Mohamed E.; Eldigail, Mawahib H.; Elamin, Fatima M.; Ali, Ibtisam A.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Aradaib, Imadeldin E.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) or hydatidosis, caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus (EG)-complex, is a neglected parasitic disease of public health importance. The disease is endemic in many African and Mediterranean countries including the Sudan. The objective of the present study was

  3. Cystic echinococcosis in Spain: current situation and relevance for other endemic areas in Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A Rojo-Vazquez

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE remains an important health problem in many regions of the world, both where no control measures have been implemented, and where control programs have been incompletely successful with ensuing re-emergence of the disease. In Spain, official data on CE show an increase in the proportion of intermediate hosts with CE during the last few years, and autochthonous pediatric patients have been reported, a sign of active local transmission of disease. A similar picture emerges from data reported to the European Food Safety Authority by other European countries. Nevertheless, several crucial aspects related to CE that would help better understand and control the disease have not been tackled appropriately, in particular the emergence of infection in specific geographical areas. In this respect, while some data are missing, other data are conflicting because they come from different databases. We review the current situation of CE in Spain compared with areas in which similar problems in the CE field exist, and offer recommendations on how to overcome those limitations. Specifically, we believe that the introduction of national registries for CE with online data entry, following the example set by the European Registry for Alveolar Echinococcosis, would help streamline data collection on CE by eliminating the need for evaluating and integrating data from multiple regions, by avoiding duplication of data from patients who access several different health facilities over time, and by providing much needed clinical and epidemiological data that are currently accessible only to clinicians.

  4. Banding pattern indicative of echinococcosis in a commercial cysticercosis western blot

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    Tappe D

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective A commercial cysticercosis Western blot was evaluated for serological cross-reactivity of sera from patients with alveolar (AE and cystic echinococcosis (CE. Methods A total of 161 sera were examined, including 31 sera from AE-patients, 11 sera from CE-patients, 9 sera from patients with other parasitic diseases and 109 sera from patients with unrelated medical conditions. All AE-and CE-sera were also examined by the echinococcosis Western blot. Results More sera from patients with AE than with CE showed cross-reactivity in the form of ladder-like patterns ("Mikado aspect" and untypical bands at 6-8 kDa (71% and 77.4% versus 27.3% and 45.5%, respectively. In contrast, triplets of bands in the area above 50 kDa and between 24 and 39-42 kDa were more frequent in CE than in AE sera. The fuzzy band at 50-55 kDa typical for cysticercosis was absent in all AE and CE sera. Conclusions Atypical banding patterns in the cysticercosis Western blot should raise the suspicion of a metacestode infection different from Taenia solium, i.e. Echinococcus multilocularis or E. granulosus, especially when the Mikado aspect and an altered 6-8 kDa band is visible in the absence of a fuzzy 50-55 kDa band.

  5. Non-surgical and non-chemical attempts to treat echinococcosis: do they work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamarozzi Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE and alveolar echinococcosis (AE are chronic, complex and neglected diseases. Their treatment depends on a number of factors related to the lesion, setting and patient. We performed a literature review of curative or palliative non-surgical, non-chemical interventions in CE and AE. In CE, some of these techniques, like radiofrequency thermal ablation (RFA, were shelved after initial attempts, while others, such as High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound, appear promising but are still in a pre-clinical phase. In AE, RFA has never been tested, however, radiotherapy or heavy-ion therapies have been attempted in experimental models. Still, application to humans is questionable. In CE, although prospective clinical studies are still lacking, therapeutic, non-surgical drainage techniques, such as PAIR (puncture, aspiration, injection, re-aspiration and its derivatives, are now considered a useful option in selected cases. Finally, palliative, non-surgical drainage techniques such as US- or CT-guided percutaneous biliary drainage, centro-parasitic abscesses drainage, or vascular stenting were performed successfully. Recently, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP-associated techniques have become increasingly used to manage biliary fistulas in CE and biliary obstructions in AE. Development of pre-clinical animal models would allow testing for AE techniques developed for other indications, e.g. cancer. Prospective trials are required to determine the best use of PAIR, and associated procedures, and the indications and techniques of palliative drainage.

  6. Echinococcosis in children: Experience in a tertiary care hospital outside the endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberian, Griselda; Rosanova, Teresa; Inda, Laura; Sarkis, Claudia; Questa, Horacio; Paulin, Patricia; Costa, Marina; Taicz, Moira

    2017-06-01

    Echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease that is widely spread across Argentina and worldwide. It is acquired during childhood but it is more common during adulthood. The pediatric population accounts for 10-20% of all cases. This study included 47 children diagnosed with echinococcosis over a 20-year period. Their median age was 8 years old (range: 3-17); most patients had some epidemiological history, such as having lived or living in an endemic or rural area and/ or having dogs that are fed with viscera. Findings included 85% of single cysts in only one parenchyma. Cysts were most commonly located in the liver and lungs. Medical/surgical treatment was carried out in 45 patients (96%). Subsequent complications were observed in 13 patients (28%), which were more common in those with lung cysts. Three patients (6%) relapsed 1-24 months later and required a new surgery. No patient died as a result of the parasitic disease. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  7. Impact of Echinococcosis on Quality of Sheep Meat in the South Eastern Kazakhstan

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    Z. Valieva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 2,123 slaughtered adult sheep in markets of the south-east Kazakhstan established that the average contamination of animals by Echinococcus granulosus is 9.1% with primary localization of cysts in livers and lungs. The histologic structure of the muscle tissue of infected sheep displayed destructive changes with a prevalence of granular dystrophy. The amount of protein, fat, calcium and energetical value of such meat considerably decreased. Besides in the muscle tissue of the animals infected with echinococcosis there was a substantial increase of humidity and amount of ash as well as qualitative and quantitative changes of the amino acids profile. Along with damage to the synthesis of proteins and sharp insufficiency of vitamins A, E, B1, and B2 there was a shift in a lipidic exchange that was expressed as a noticeable reduction in the level of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The data support the conclusion that the meat from the sheep infected with echinococcosis is of inferior quality and quantity compared to that of healthy animals.

  8. Cystic Echinococcosis in Spain: Current Situation and Relevance for Other Endemic Areas in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo-Vazquez, Francisco A.; Pardo-Lledias, Javier; Francos-Von Hunefeld, Marcelo; Cordero-Sanchez, Miguel; Alamo-Sanz, Rufino; Hernandez-Gonzalez, Ana; Brunetti, Enrico; Siles-Lucas, Mar

    2011-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) remains an important health problem in many regions of the world, both where no control measures have been implemented, and where control programs have been incompletely successful with ensuing re-emergence of the disease. In Spain, official data on CE show an increase in the proportion of intermediate hosts with CE during the last few years, and autochthonous pediatric patients have been reported, a sign of active local transmission of disease. A similar picture emerges from data reported to the European Food Safety Authority by other European countries. Nevertheless, several crucial aspects related to CE that would help better understand and control the disease have not been tackled appropriately, in particular the emergence of infection in specific geographical areas. In this respect, while some data are missing, other data are conflicting because they come from different databases. We review the current situation of CE in Spain compared with areas in which similar problems in the CE field exist, and offer recommendations on how to overcome those limitations. Specifically, we believe that the introduction of national registries for CE with online data entry, following the example set by the European Registry for Alveolar Echinococcosis, would help streamline data collection on CE by eliminating the need for evaluating and integrating data from multiple regions, by avoiding duplication of data from patients who access several different health facilities over time, and by providing much needed clinical and epidemiological data that are currently accessible only to clinicians. PMID:21283615

  9. Modelling the transmission dynamics of cystic echinococcosis in donkeys of different ages from Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmar, Samia; Boufana, Belgees; Jebabli, Leila; Craig, Phillip S; Ayari, Hayet; Basti, Talha; Dhibi, Mokhtar; Torgerson, Paul R

    2014-09-15

    During the period from March 2006 to July 2009 a total of 2040 slaughtered donkeys were examined for cystic echinococcosis (CE). CE prevalence in donkeys was 8.48% and the infection pressure (0.0088 infections per year) and infection rate (0.0448 cysts per year) appeared to be lower than those previously reported for cattle, sheep, dromedaries and goats in Tunisia. However, the number of cysts per infection was relatively high (5.07 cysts per infection). Among the 901 collected hydatid cysts the majority were located in the liver (89.9%), 10.09% in the lungs and 4.77% were fertile (43/901). The amplification of a fragment within the mitochondrial gene coding for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) revealed that donkeys were infected with both Echinococcus equinus (horse strain, G4 genotype) and Echinococcus granulosus (sheep strain, G1 genotype). E. granulosus G1 developed into fertile cysts (15,112 protoscoleces/ml) with a protoscoleces viability of 65.78%. This investigation is the first detailed epidemiological report on cystic echinococcosis infection in donkeys for any endemic region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Alveolar Echinococcosis of the Liver: Correlative Color Doppler US, CT, and MRI Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cokun, A.; Oeztuerk, M.; Karahan, O.I.; Erdogan, N.; Ikin, S.; Guelec, M.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine and compare the imaging features of hepatic alveolar Echinococcosis using color Doppler US, CT, and MRI. Material and Methods: Abdominal CT and MRI with and without contrast agents and color Doppler US were performed on seven patients with hepatic alveolar Echinococcosis. The lesions were evaluated for location, features of echogenicity, intensity and density, calcification, and vascular, hilar, and perihepatic involvement. The diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in all patients. Results: Six patients had solitary lesions, and one displayed multiple lesions. The lesions were generally seen as heterogeneous and hyper- or hypoechoic when imaged with color Doppler US, hypodense with CT, and hypointense with MRI, in comparison with the liver parenchyma. Calcification, central necrosis, and small peripheral cysts were observed in six, seven, and four patients, respectively. Vascular flow or contrast enhancement was not observed in any of the cases. A look at the respective advantages of each method reveals that calcification was best rendered visible via CT, small peripheral cysts with T2-weighted MRI, central necrosis with CT and MRI, and perihepatic invasion with multiplanar MRI. Vascular involvement was revealed by all methods. Conclusion: Color Doppler US, CT, and MR imaging function extremely well as complementary methods in the diagnosis of HAE. Color Doppler US should be performed in these patients owing to its ability to efficiently detect the disease. Knowledge of imaging characteristics makes it possible to radiologically ascertain an early diagnosis

  11. Enhanced chemoprophylactic and clinical efficacy of albendazole formulated as solid dispersions in experimental cystic echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensel, Patricia E; Castro, Silvina; Allemandi, Daniel; Bruni, Sergio Sánchez; Palma, Santiago D; Elissondo, María Celina

    2014-06-16

    Cystic echinococcosis is a chronic, complex, and still neglected disease. Although albendazole has demonstrated efficacy, only about one-third of patients experience complete remission or cure and 30-50% of treated patients develop some evidence of a therapeutic response. Different strategies have been developed in order to improve the albendazole water solubility and dissolution rate. The aim of the current work was to investigate the chemoprophylactic and clinical efficacy of an albendazole:poloxamer 188 solid dispersion formulation on mice infected with Echinococcus granulosus metacestodes. Albendazole formulated as solid dispersion had greater chemoprophylactic and clinical efficacy than albendazole alone. The improved in therapeutic efficacy could be a consequence of the increase in the systemic availability of albendazole sulfoxide. The work reported here demonstrates that in vivo treatment with albendazole:poloxamer 188 impairs the development of the hydatid cysts. This new pharmacotechnically based strategy could be a suitable alternative for treating cystic echinococcosis in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CT diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis and evaluation after albendazole chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jingquan; Liu Yuehan; Wang Xiaogen

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the CT features and evaluate albendazole chemotherapy of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis with computed tomography (CT). Methods: Twenty-one patients of hepatic alveolar echincoccosis were diagnosed by epidemiological, clinical, serological tests, and studied with US and CT. Twenty patients were followed up by CT scanning from 1 to 9 years (mean 3.9 years) after albendazole chemotherapy. Results: CT scanning of liver before treatment displayed heterogeneous hypodense lesions, with irregular, obscure contour and calcifications According to CT features, the hepatic lesions were divided into 3 forms: solid mass in 7 cases, pseudocyst in 6 cases and mixed in 8 cases. Three patients had contrast study. The hepatic lesions were not markedly enhanced, but the lesions were seen more clearly and appeared more extensive. In follow-up examination of 20 cases, 4 were apparently cured, 5 improved, 5 stabilized, and 6 cases remained pseudocyst. Conclusion: CT scanning was of value not only for diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis, but also useful in evaluation of chemotherapeutic efficacy

  13. Neotropical echinococcosis caused by Echinococcus vogeli in a 6-year-old child: the second case report in humans in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debourgogne, Anne; Blanchet, Denis; Fior, Angela; Umhang, Gérald; Simon, Stéphane; Aznar, Christine

    2017-02-01

    Human polycystic echinococcosis is a parasitic infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus vogeli which occurs in rural areas of Central and South America. Abdominal echinococcosis caused by E. vogeli is reported for the first time in a child, a 6-year-old boy in French Guiana. The diagnosis was made by histological and molecular techniques. In tropical regions, this neglected disease must be considered even in children.

  14. Experimental cystic echinococcosis therapy: In vitro and in vivo combined 5-fluorouracil/albendazole treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensel, Patricia E; Elissondo, Natalia; Gambino, Guillermo; Gamboa, Gabriela Ullio; Benoit, J P; Elissondo, María C

    2017-10-15

    Human cystic echinococcosis is a zoonosis caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.). Although benzimidazole compounds such as albendazole (ABZ) and mebendazole have been the cornerstone of chemotherapy for the disease, there is often no complete recovery after treatment. Hence, new strategies are required to improve treatment of human cystic echinococcosis. The goals of the current study were as follows: (i) to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and ABZ combination against E. granulosus s. l. protoscoleces and cysts, (ii) to compare the clinical efficacy of 5-FU alone or in combination with ABZ in infected mice. The combination of 5-FU+ABZ had a stronger in vitro effect against larval stage than that did both drugs alone. Even at the lowest concentration of 5-FU+ABZ combination (1μg/ml), the reduction of the viability of protoscoleces and cysts was greater than that observed with drugs alone at 10μg/ml. The results were confirmed at the ultrastructural level by scanning electron microscopy. These data helped to justify the in vivo investigations assessing the therapeutic potential of the combination of 5-FU and ABZ suspension in CF-1 mice infected with E. granulosus sensu stricto (s. s.) metacestodes. Treatment with 5-FU (10mg/kg) or 5-FU (10mg/kg) + ABZ suspension (5mg/kg) reduced the weight of cysts recovered from mice compared with control groups. Interestingly, the effect of 5-FU given weekly for 5 consecutive weeks was comparable to that observed with ABZ suspension under a daily schedule during 30days. Co-administration of 5-FU with ABZ did not enhance the in vivo efficacy of drugs alone calculated in relation to cysts weights. However, the combination provoked greater ultrastructural alterations compared to the monotherapy. In conclusion, we demonstrated the efficacy of 5-FU either alone or co-administrated with ABZ against murine experimental cystic echinococcosis. Since 5-FU treatments

  15. Estimating the economic effects of cystic echinococcosis: Uruguay, a developing country with upper-middle income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgerson, P R; Carmona, C; Bonifacino, R

    2000-10-01

    Cost-benefit analyses, run before the commencement of a programme to control a parasitic disease, should include estimates of the economic losses attributable to the disease. Uruguay, a middle-income, developing country, has a recent history of persistent problems with cystic echinococcosis, in both its human population and livestock. The economic effects in Uruguay of this disease, caused by the larval stage of the canine tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus, have now been evaluated. Data on the incidence of the disease, in humans and livestock, were used to construct cost estimates. The estimated minimum cost (U.S.$2.9 million/year) was based on the condemnation costs of infected offal together with the actual costs of the hospital treatment of the human cases. The estimate of the maximum cost (U.S.$22.1 million/year) also included the production losses resulting from lower livestock efficiency and the reduced income of individuals with morbidity attributable to the disease.

  16. Abattoir based surveillance of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in the Sultanate of Oman during 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kitani, Fadya Abdullah; Al Riyami, Shumoos; Al Yahyai, Sabra; Al Rawahi, Abdulmajeed Hamood; Al Maawali, Mahir; Al Awahi, Abdulmajeed Hamood; Al Aawali, Mahir; Hussain, Muhammad Hammad

    2015-07-30

    A passive surveillance was conducted in 8 selected abattoirs belonging to 8 governorates of Oman. Routine slaughtering of 282.020 animals was observed during 2010-2013 by duty veterinarians and suspected samples (n=1440) for cystic echinococcosis (CE) from camels (n=292), cattle (n=303), goats (n=682) and sheep (n=163) were collected. In total, 587 (40.8%) samples were found positive for CE and the highest percentage (64.2%) of positive samples belonged to Dhofar (Salalah) as compared to other governorates, pOman and further molecular epidemiological work in different host species is required for the conceptualization of a comprehensive control program. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An Incidental Finding of Heart Echinococcosis in a Patient with Infective Endocarditis: a Case Report

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    Gencheva Dolina G.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic parasitic disease caused by infection with the larval stage of tapeworms from the Echinococcus genus, most commonly Echinococcus granulosus. According to WHO, more than 1 million people are affected by hydatid disease at any time.1 About 10% of the annual cases are not officially diagnosed.2 In humans, the disease is characterized by development of three-layered cysts. The cysts develop primarily in the liver and the lungs, but can also affect any other organ due to the spreading of the oncospheres. Cardiac involvement is very uncommon - only about 0.01-2% of all cases.4,5 In most cases, the cysts develop asymptomatically, but heart cysts could manifest with chest pain, dyspnea, cough, hemophtisis and can complicate with rupture. Diagnosis is based on a number of imaging techniques and positive serological tests. Treatment for cardiac localization is almost exclusively surgical.

  18. The natural history of cystic echinococcosis in untreated and albendazole-treated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, N; Kachani, M; Zeyhle, E; Macpherson, C N L

    2017-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) treatment protocols for cystic echinococcosis (CE) are based on the standardized ultrasound (US) classification. This study examined whether the classification reflected the natural history of CE in untreated and albendazole-treated patients. Data were collected during mass US screenings in CE endemic regions among transhumant populations, the Turkana and Berber peoples of Kenya and Morocco. Cysts were classified using the WHO classification. Patient records occurring prior to treatment, and after albendazole administration, were selected. 852 paired before/after observations of 360 cysts from 257 patients were analyzed. A McNemar-Bowker χ 2 test for symmetry was significant (palbendazole-treated patients was significant (palbendazole-induced changes. Regressions may reflect the stability of CE3B cysts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Epidemiological Studies on Echinococcosis and Characterization of Human and Livestock Hydatid Cysts in Mauritania

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    CB Ould Ahmed Salem

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echinococcosis/hydatidosis is considered endemic in Mauritania. The aim of this study is to present an epidemiological study on the echinococcosis in man and animals in the Nouakchott region. Methods: The internal organs from livestock carcasses were inspected for research of hydatid cysts. The hydatid fluid was examined for research of the protoscoleces. Dogs were necropsied for the collect of Echinococcus granulosus.Results: In the Nouakchott Hospital, 24 surgical operation of human hydatid cysts have been per­formed, out of which 50% were localised in the lung, 33% in the liver and 17% elsewhere. Then, the incidence rate would be of 1.2% per 100 000 inhabitants in Mauritania. In the dog, the prevalence rate is 14%. The average number of E. granulosus on the whole dogs is 172 and 1227 on the positive dogs. Concerning the livestock, hydatid cysts found in 30.1% of the dromedary, 5.5% of the cattle and 6.5 of the sheep. The fertility rate of hydatid cysts in humans (75% and camels (76% was significantly higher than that of sheep (24% and cattle (23% (P<0.0001. Hydatid infestation is characterized globally by the dominance of pulmonary localiza­tions in hu­mans (50% and camels (72.7% and in the liver in sheep (76.1% and cattle (82.3%.Conclusion: The differences between prevalence rates, the fertility of hydatid cysts and diversity sites localization observed in humans and camels of one hand and the sheep and cattle on the other hand, depends possibly the strain(s diversity of E. granulosus.

  20. Canine echinococcosis: genetic diversity of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) from definitive hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufana, B; Lett, W; Lahmar, S; Griffiths, A; Jenkins, D J; Buishi, I; Engliez, S A; Alrefadi, M A; Eljaki, A A; Elmestiri, F M; Reyes, M M; Pointing, S; Al-Hindi, A; Torgerson, P R; Okamoto, M; Craig, P S

    2015-11-01

    Canids, particularly dogs, constitute the major source of cystic echinococcosis (CE) infection to humans, with the majority of cases being caused by Echinococcus granulosus (G1 genotype). Canine echinococcosis is an asymptomatic disease caused by adult tapeworms of E. granulosus sensu lato (s.l.). Information on the population structure and genetic variation of adult E. granulosus is limited. Using sequenced data of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) we examined the genetic diversity and population structure of adult tapeworms of E. granulosus (G1 genotype) from canid definitive hosts originating from various geographical regions and compared it to that reported for the larval metacestode stage from sheep and human hosts. Echinococcus granulosus (s.s) was identified from adult tapeworm isolates from Kenya, Libya, Tunisia, Australia, China, Kazakhstan, United Kingdom and Peru, including the first known molecular confirmation from Gaza and the Falkland Islands. Haplotype analysis showed a star-shaped network with a centrally positioned common haplotype previously described for the metacestode stage from sheep and humans, and the neutrality indices indicated population expansion. Low Fst values suggested that populations of adult E. granulosus were not genetically differentiated. Haplotype and nucleotide diversities for E. granulosus isolates from sheep and human origin were twice as high as those reported from canid hosts. This may be related to self-fertilization of E. granulosus and/or to the longevity of the parasite in the respective intermediate and definitive hosts. Improved nuclear single loci are required to investigate the discrepancies in genetic variation seen in this study.

  1. Knowledge, Awareness and Practices Regarding Cystic Echinococcosis among Livestock Farmers in Basrah Province, Iraq

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    Mohanad F. Abdulhameed

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is an endemic neglected parasitic zoonosis in many of the countries of the Middle East. The disease poses a remarkable economic burden for both animals and humans. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire survey among livestock farmers in Basrah province, southern Iraq, in order to evaluate their knowledge and awareness about CE, and to understand some of the risky practices that could contribute to spread and persistence of such disease. Of the interviewed participants (N = 314, 27.4% owned dogs on their farms. Among farmers owning dogs, 76.7% (66/86 never tied up their dogs, and 43% (37/86 indicated feeding uncooked animal viscera to their dogs. The majority (96.5% of the farmers indicated that they did not de-worm their dogs at all. Only 9.8% (31/314 of the respondents indicated eating raw leafy vegetables without washing. Added to that, 32% of the interviewees indicated that they source water for domestic use from a river; meanwhile 94.3% (296/314 of them do not boil water before using it for domestic purposes. Half of the interviewed livestock farmers in Basrah were not aware about how humans get infected with CE disease, and 41.4% (130/314 did not even realize that CE is a dangerous disease to human health. Almost one in three of the respondents who owned dogs on their farms viewed de-worming of their dogs as a low priority practice. This study highlights the gap in knowledge and awareness about CE among the study population. Risky practices associated with dog keeping management and food and water handling practices were identified. The insight from this research could be used to improve the delivery of a health education message relevant to cystic echinococcosis control at the human-animal interface in Iraq.

  2. On the importance of targeting parasite stem cells in anti-echinococcosis drug development

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    Brehm Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The life-threatening diseases alveolar and cystic echinococcoses are caused by larvae of the tapeworms Echinococcus multilocularis and E. granulosus, respectively. In both cases, intermediate hosts, such as humans, are infected by oral uptake of oncosphere larvae, followed by asexual multiplication and almost unrestricted growth of the metacestode within host organs. Besides surgery, echinococcosis treatment relies on benzimidazole-based chemotherapy, directed against parasite beta-tubulin. However, since beta-tubulins are highly similar between cestodes and humans, benzimidazoles can only be applied at parasitostatic doses and are associated with adverse side effects. Mostly aiming at identifying alternative drug targets, the nuclear genome sequences of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus have recently been characterized, revealing a large number of druggable targets that are expressed by the metacestode. Furthermore, recent cell biological investigations have demonstrated that E. multilocularis employs pluripotent stem cells, called germinative cells, which are the only parasite cells capable of proliferation and which give rise to all differentiated cells. Hence, the germinative cells are the crucial cell type mediating proliferation of E. multilocularis, and most likely also E. granulosus, within host organs and should also be responsible for parasite recurrence upon discontinuation of chemotherapy. Interestingly, recent investigations have also indicated that germinative cells might be less sensitive to chemotherapy because they express a beta-tubulin isoform with limited affinity to benzimidazoles. In this article, we briefly review the recent findings concerning Echinococcus genomics and stem cell research and propose that future research into anti-echinococcosis drugs should also focus on the parasite’s stem cell population.

  3. Echinococcosis and other parasitic infections in domestic dogs from urban areas of an Argentinean Patagonian city

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    Verónica Flores

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In urban populations of South America, dogs with free access to public areas represent a public health concern. The primary consequence of roaming dogs on human health is the transmission of infectious and parasitic diseases mainly through feces contamination. The main diseases likely to be transmitted are hydatidosis or echinococcosis, larva migrans, and giardiasis. In Argentina, hydatidosis ranks among the most prevalent zoonosis. Although it is considered a rural disease, the circulation of this parasite in urban areas has been documented. The aim of this work was to survey intestinal parasites in canine feces from two low-income urban neighborhoods of Bariloche city, Argentina, and to assess their seasonal variation. During 2016, 188 fresh dog feces were collected from sidewalks in 40 randomly selected blocks from the neighborhoods. Each sample was processed by Sheater flotation and tested for a coproantigen (CAg by ELISA. The percentage of parasitized feces was 65.3% (95% CI: 55.9%-73.8%. Eleven parasite species were found, 3 protozoan, 3 cestodes, and 5 nematodes. Echinococcus sp. was present in 9.3% of the samples (95% CI: 4.7%-16.1%. Canine echinococcosis rates resulted similar to rates found previously in other neighborhoods of the city. The life cycle of Echinococcus sp. is sustained in urban areas by the entry of parasitized livestock, domiciliary slaughtering, and inadequate deposition of offal. The risk of Echinococcus sp. transmission to people in these neighborhoods is very high, due to high density of free-roaming dogs and high percentages of infected feces, similar to percentages observed in rural areas.

  4. Costs Associated with Surgically Treated Cases of Abdominal Cystic Echinococcosis: A Single Center's Experience from 2008 to 2014, Pavia, Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Narra, Roberta; Maestri, Marcello; Budke, Christine M.; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Mariconti, Mara; Nicoletti, Giovanni J.; Rinaldi, Francesca; Brunetti, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a globally distributed zoonosis caused by the Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato species complex. Four approaches are available for treatment of abdominal CE: surgery, percutaneous aspiration, chemotherapy with albendazole, and watch-and-wait. Allocation of patients to these different treatment options mainly depends on the stage of the cystic lesion. However, as available guidelines are not widely followed, surgery is often applied even without the correct indic...

  5. Cardiac echinococcosis

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    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  6. Subcutaneous infection model facilitates treatment assessment of secondary Alveolar echinococcosis in mice.

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    Tatiana Küster

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE in humans is a parasitic disease characterized by severe damage to the liver and occasionally other organs. AE is caused by infection with the metacestode (larval stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, usually infecting small rodents as natural intermediate hosts. Conventionally, human AE is chemotherapeutically treated with mebendazole or albendazole. There is, however still the need for improved chemotherapeutical options. Primary in vivo studies on drugs of interest are commonly performed in small laboratory animals such as mice and Mongolian jirds, and in most cases, a secondary infection model is used, whereby E. multilocularis metacestodes are directly injected into the peritoneal cavity or into the liver. Disadvantages of this methodological approach include risk of injury to organs during the inoculation and, most notably, a limitation in the macroscopic (visible assessment of treatment efficacy. Thus, in order to monitor the efficacy of chemotherapeutical treatment, animals have to be euthanized and the parasite tissue dissected. In the present study, mice were infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes through the subcutaneous route and were then subjected to chemotherapy employing albendazole. Serological responses to infection were comparatively assessed in mice infected by the conventional intraperitoneal route. We demonstrate that the subcutaneous infection model for secondary AE facilitates the assessment of the progress of infection and drug treatment in the live animal.

  7. Analysis of economic burden for patients with cystic echinococcosis in five hospitals in northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wen, Hao; Feng, Xiaohui; Jiang, Xiaoming; Duan, Xinyu

    2012-12-01

    The direct and indirect economic burden of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) was investigated in the five specialist hydatid hospitals in Xinjiang, PR China, to provide information for health policy in the future. A total of 2018 CE patients (age range 2-88 years) attending the hospitals were studied between 2004 and 2008. The per-person direct medical cost was US$1493.12 (95% CI 1438.43-1547.80) and the per-person direct non-medical cost was US$19.67. The indirect economic cost was US$1435.96 per person, and the disability-adjusted life-years (DALY) lost was approximately 1.03 DALY/person. This study is the first to combine the human capital method with DALYs to analyse the indirect CE economic burden in northwest China. Factors such as age, occupation and hospital level should be considered when developing polices to reduce the economic burden of CE. Copyright © 2012 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical presentation, diagnosis, therapy and outcome of alveolar echinococcosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, M; Geissbühler, U; Howard, J; Gottstein, B; Spreng, D; Frey, C F

    2015-12-05

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE), a parasitic disease primarily of the liver caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus multilocularis, is highly endemic in Switzerland. In contrast to well-established management protocols in people, little is known with regard to optimal treatment strategies in dogs. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical signs and diagnostic procedures in dogs with AE and to evaluate outcome following medical treatment alone or surgery and medical treatment. Of 23 putative AE cases between 2004 and 2014, 20 were classified as confirmed (n=18) or probable (n=2) AE, based on abdominal ultrasound, serology, cytology, histology and/or PCR. Most dogs presented with abdominal distension in an advanced stage of disease. Dogs receiving specific treatment (radical or debulking surgery together with medical treatment, or medical treatment alone) survived longer than dogs left untreated, but no difference was found between treatment types. Survival at one year was associated with absence of free abdominal fluid, absence of abdominal distension and treatment of any type. However, dogs treated with debulking surgery all faced relapse. Findings of this study suggest that in AE-affected dogs for which a therapeutic approach is regarded appropriate by owners and veterinarians, radical surgical resection and medical treatment or, if total resection is not possible, medical treatment alone should be considered. However, studies on larger numbers of dogs are necessary before definitive treatment recommendations can be made. British Veterinary Association.

  9. [Hospital care expenses caused by acute fascioliasis, cystic echinococcosis, and neurocysticercosis in Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fica, Alberto; Weitzel, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acute fascioliasis (FA), cystic echinococcosis (CE) and neurocysticercosis (NCC) are three endemic parasitic diseases in Chile for whom there is scarce information about the economic impact they represent during management at the hospital. To quantify and compare hospital care expenses caused by these three endemic helminth infections in a Chilean hospital. Retrospective analysis of hospital costs at a referral hospital in Santiago between 2006 and 2010. Hospital databases were used to identify patients with the corresponding infections, and those with sufficient data on hospital costs were included. A total of 16 patients representing 21 cases were identified and analyzed: four with AF, eleven with CE, and six with NCC. Median hospital expenses for cases with AF were US$ 1799 and mainly caused by bed-day costs. Median hospital costs for cases of CE were US$ 4707 and the most important costs components were medications, bed-day costs and consumables. NCC patients had median costs of US$ 1293, which were mainly due to bed-day costs. Non-parenchymatous or mixed forms of NCC showed a trend toward higher hospital costs compared with parenchymatous forms. Although helminth infections in Chile, an upper middle income country, are declining and considered rare in routine clinical practice, hospital care expenses caused by patients with AF, CE, and NCC are high and might still present an important economic burden to the Chilean healthcare system.

  10. Landscape and climatic characteristics associated with human alveolar echinococcosis in France, 1982 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piarroux, M; Gaudart, J; Bresson-Hadni, S; Bardonnet, K; Faucher, B; Grenouillet, F; Knapp, J; Dumortier, J; Watelet, J; Gerard, A; Beytout, J; Abergel, A; Wallon, M; Vuitton, D A; Piarroux, R

    2015-05-07

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a severe hepatic disease caused by Echinococcus multilocularis. In France, the definitive and intermediate hosts of E. multilocularis (foxes and rodents, respectively) have a broader geographical distribution than that of human AE. In this two-part study, we describe the link between AE incidence in France between 1982 and 2007 and climatic and landscape characteristics. National-level analysis demonstrated a dramatic increase in AE risk in areas with very cold winters and high annual rainfall levels. Notably, 52% (207/401) of cases resided in French communes (smallest French administrative level) with a mountain climate. The mountain climate communes displayed a 133-fold (95% CI: 95-191) increase in AE risk compared with communes in which the majority of the population resides. A case-control study performed in the most affected areas confirmed the link between AE risk and climatic factors. This arm of the study also revealed that populations residing in forest or pasture areas were at high risk of developing AE. We therefore hypothesised that snow-covered ground may facilitate predators to track their prey, thus increasing E. multilocularis biomass in foxes. Such climatic and landscape conditions could lead to an increased risk of developing AE among humans residing in nearby areas.

  11. Polycystic echinococcosis in the state of Acre, Brazil: contribution to patient diagnosis, treatment and prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira, Nilton Ghiotti; de Siqueira, Cláudia Maria Villar Maziero; Rodrigues-Silva, Rosângela; Soares, Manoel do Carmo P; Póvoa, Marinete Marins

    2013-01-01

    The lack of knowledge regarding polycystic hydatid disease results in delayed or even incorrect diagnosis. The lack of systematic information regarding treatment also makes it difficult to assess the results and prognosis in patients with peritoneal and hepatic lesions caused by Echinococcus vogeli. Here we describe the clinical features of patients, propose a radiological classification protocol and describe a therapeutic option for the treatment of hydatid disease that previously had only been used for cases of cystic echinococcosis (Echinococcus granulosus). A prospective cohort study was initiated in 1999 and by 2009 the study included 60 patients. These patients were classified according to the PNM classification (parasite lesion, neighbouring organ invasion and metastases) and placed in one of three therapeutic modalities: (i) chemotherapy with albendazole at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day, (ii) surgical removal of cysts or (iii) percutaneous puncture of the cysts via puncture, aspiration, injection and re-aspiration (PAIR). The results were stratified according to therapeutic outcome: "cure", "clinical improvement", "no improvement", "death" or "no information". The PNM classification was useful in indicating the appropriate therapy in cases of polycystic hydatid disease. In conclusion, surgical therapy produced the best clinical results of all the therapies studied based on "cure" and "clinical improvement" outcomes. The use of PAIR for treatment requires additional study. PMID:23903966

  12. [Analysis of human cyst echinococcosis in a northern Chilean region from 2008 to 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Aguilar, Andrea; Junod, Tania; Campillay, Mauricio; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Landaeta-Aqueveque, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    The Coquimbo Region in Chile has the highest incidence of hydatidosis in central and northern Chile. To analyze the incidence of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) in the Coquimbo Region between 2008 and 2012. Official records of reported cases were analyzed. The association of the location, age and sex with the presence/absence of CE was analyzed by means of logistic regressions. The incidence was reported as cases per 100,000 inhabitants. The mean annual incidence was 2.6 cases per 100,000 inhabitants, which ranged from 3.1 (2010) to 1.9 (2012) cases. The districts with higher incidence were Punitaqui (21.2 cases), Paihuano (9 cases), Rio Hurtado (8 cases), Canela (8.1 cases), Monte Patria (7.9 cases), Vicuña (6.9 cases) and Combarbalá (6.9 cases). The incidence in these locations was significantly higher than elsewhere in the region. Males had a significantly higher incidence than females (3.3 and 1.8 respectively). Incidence increased significantly with age, notably increasing after 45 years of age. Rural locations had the highest incidences of CE in the Coquimbo Region. The disease was reported more commonly in adults and mainly in men.

  13. Computed Tomography Perfusion Imaging for the Diagnosis of Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Recep; Kantarci, Mecit; Genc, Berhan; Ogul, Hayri; Gundogdu, Betul; Yilmaz, Omer

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a rare life-threatening parasitic infection. Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging has the potential to provide both quantitative and qualitative information about the tissue perfusion characteristics. The purpose of this study was the examination of the characteristic features and feasibility of CTP in AE liver lesions. Material and Methods: CTP scanning was performed in 25 patients who had a total of 35 lesions identified as AE of the liver. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), portal venous perfusion (PVP), arterial liver perfusion (ALP), and hepatic perfusion indexes (HPI) were computed for background liver parenchyma and each AE lesion. Results: Significant differences were detected between perfusion values of the AE lesions and background liver tissue. The BV, BF, ALP, and PVP values for all components of the AE liver lesions were significantly lower than the normal liver parenchyma (p<0.01). Conclusions: We suggest that perfusion imaging can be used in AE of the liver. Thus, the quantitative knowledge of perfusion parameters are obtained via CT perfusion imaging. PMID:29531482

  14. Surveillance of Human Echinococcosis in Castilla-Leon (Spain between 2000-2012.

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    Amparo Lopez-Bernus

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is an important health problem in many areas of the world including the Mediterranean region. However, the real CE epidemiological situation is not well established. In fact, it is possible that CE is a re-emerging disease due to the weakness of current control programs.We performed a retrospective observational study of inpatients diagnosed with CE from January 2000 to December 2012 in the Western Spain Public Health-Care System.During the study period, 5510 cases of CE were diagnosed and 3161 (57.4% of the cases were males. The age mean and standard deviation were 67.8 ± 16.98 years old, respectively, and 634 patients (11.5% were younger than 45 years old. A total of 1568 patients (28.5% had CE as the primary diagnosis, and it was most frequently described in patients 70 year old associated with other causes of comorbidity. The period incidence rate was 17 cases per 105 person-years and was significantly higher when compared to the incidence declared through the Notifiable Disease System (1.88 cases per 105 person-years; p<0.001.CE in western Spain is an underestimated parasitic disease. It has an active transmission, with an occurrence in pediatric cases, but has decreased in the recent years. The systematic search of Hospital Discharge Records of the National Health System Register (HDR may be a more accurate method than other methods for the estimation of the incidence of CE in endemic areas.

  15. Progress in the pharmacological treatment of human cystic and alveolar echinococcosis: Compounds and therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles-Lucas, Mar; Casulli, Adriano; Cirilli, Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Human cystic and alveolar echinococcosis are helmintic zoonotic diseases caused by infections with the larval stages of the cestode parasites Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis, respectively. Both diseases are progressive and chronic, and often fatal if left unattended for E. multilocularis. As a treatment approach, chemotherapy against these orphan and neglected diseases has been available for more than 40 years. However, drug options were limited to the benzimidazoles albendazole and mebendazole, the only chemical compounds currently licensed for treatment in humans. To compensate this therapeutic shortfall, new treatment alternatives are urgently needed, including the identification, development, and assessment of novel compound classes and drug targets. Here is presented a thorough overview of the range of compounds that have been tested against E. granulosus and E. multilocularis in recent years, including in vitro and in vivo data on their mode of action, dosage, administration regimen, therapeutic outcomes, and associated clinical symptoms. Drugs covered included albendazole, mebendazole, and other members of the benzimidazole family and their derivatives, including improved formulations and combined therapies with other biocidal agents. Chemically synthetized molecules previously known to be effective against other infectious and non-infectious conditions such as anti-virals, antibiotics, anti-parasites, anti-mycotics, and anti-neoplastics are addressed. In view of their increasing relevance, natural occurring compounds derived from plant and fungal extracts are also discussed. Special attention has been paid to the recent application of genomic science on drug discovery and clinical medicine, particularly through the identification of small inhibitor molecules tackling key metabolic enzymes or signalling pathways. PMID:29677189

  16. Molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus isolates from Bulgarian human cystic echinococcosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinova, Irina; Spiliotis, Markus; Wang, Junhua; Muhtarov, Marin; Chaligiannis, Ilias; Sotiraki, Smaro; Rainova, Iskra; Gottstein, Bruno; Boubaker, Ghalia

    2017-03-01

    Although cystic echinococcosis (CE) is highly endemic in Bulgaria, there is still scarce information about species and/or genotypes of the Echinococcus granulosus complex that infect humans. Our study tackled the genetic diversity of E. granulosus complex in a cohort of 30 Bulgarian CE patients. Ten animal E. granulosus isolates from neighboring Greece were additionally included. Specimens were comparatively analyzed for partial sequences of five mitochondrial (mt) (cox I, nad I, rrnS, rrnL, and atp6) and three nuclear (nc) genes (act II, hbx 2, and ef-1α) using a PCR-sequencing approach. All 30 Bulgarian isolates were identified as E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) and were showing identical sequences for each of the three examined partial nc gene markers. Based upon concatenated sequences from partial mtDNA markers, we detected 10 haplotypes: 6 haplotypes (H1-H6) clustering with E. granulosus s.s. (G1) and 4 haplotypes (H9-H13) grouping with E. granulosus s.s. (G3), with H1 and H10 being the most frequent in Bulgarian patients. The haplotypes H1, H4, and H11 were also present in Greek hydatid cyst samples of animal origin. In conclusion, E. granulosus s.s. (G1 and G3 genotypes) is the only causative agent found so far to cause human CE in Bulgaria. However, further studies including larger sample sizes and other additional geographic regions in Bulgaria will have to be performed to confirm our results.

  17. Cystic echinococcosis in cattle dairy farms: spatial distribution and epidemiological dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Antonio; Bosco, Antonio; Pipia, Anna Paola; Tamponi, Claudia; Musella, Vincenzo; Costanzo, Nicola; Testoni, Francesco; Montisci, Antonio; Mocci, Giovanni; Longhi, Alessandro; Tilocca, Laura; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Varcasia, Antonio

    2017-05-29

    A study monitoring cystic echinococcosis (CE) in adult dairy cattle from intensive livestock farms located in the municipality of Arborea (Sardinia, Italy) was carried out between 2012 and 2015. A retrospective study of veterinary reporting forms of post-mortem inspections in 10 different Italian slaughterhouses was also performed. In addition, data on viability and molecular characterisation of hydatid cysts removed from parasitised organs in cattle was carried out. A geographical information system (GIS) with data layers of the study area and the geo-referenced points of 160 cattle farms was constructed. CE was found in 21.9% (35/160) of the surveyed farms. The retrospective study revealed that 0.05% (13/23,656) of adult slaughtered animals (over one year of age) from Arborea had tested positive to CE. The results stratified per year showed the following CE prevalences: 0.09% (5/5673) in 2012; 0.02% (1/5682) in 2013; 0.08% (5/6261) in 2014; and 0.03% (2/6040) in 2015 (χ2 with 3 degrees of freedom=3.81; P=0.282). The E. granulosus sensu stricto (formerly called G1 or sheep strain) was detected in all cysts subjected to molecular analysis. The GIS analysis showed that CE is fairly resilient in the Arborea territory where most of cattle farms are located, while a small cluster of cases was found located in the southeastern part of Arborea, close to districts where sheep farms are situated. The present survey reports the presence of CE in Sardinian dairy cattle intensive farms and suggests that the parasitic pressure of CE in the island continues to be very strong.

  18. Postoperative changes in serum cytokines profile and nitric oxide levels in patients with cystic echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refik M.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine serum cytokines and nitric oxide (NO levels in patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE. 28 patients with CE were studied and all underwent surgery. Serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin IL- 1β, receptor of soluble IL-2R (sIL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, nitrate/nitrite, and C-reactive protein (CRP were determined before and after induction of treatment. Data were compared with those obtained from 28 healthy volunteers. IL-6 was elevated in all CE patients (100%. IL-8 was increased in 11/28 (39.3%. Increased levels of IL-2R and TNF-α were found in a limited number of them particularly those showing cysts in the central area of the liver (5/28, 6/28. IL-1β level was not elevated in any patient except in secondary severe CE. CRP and nitrate/nitrite levels were also increased. A positive correlation between CRP and IL-6 (r = 0.74; p < 0.001 was found confirming the link between inflammation due to CE and activation of monocytes. All patients completely recovered and the levels of the studied parameters reverted to normal levels except one patient in whom severe recurrent disease occurred two years after the first operation. These results suggest that there are different immunoregulatory events and cytokines response during CE and may be in part related to slight monocytosis and in part to Th2 activation. IL-6, NO and CRP were unambiguously involved in the host parasite interaction and therefore may be useful markers in monitoring CE management and evaluating surgical stress.

  19. Protoscolecidal Effect of Berberis vulgaris Root Extract and Its Main Compound, Berberine in Cystic Echinococcosis.

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    Hossein Mahmoudvand

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE, a zoonotic parasitic infection caused by the metacestode (larvae stage of dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus and recognized as a major economic and public health concern in the world. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro scolicidal effect of methanolic extract of Berberis vulgaris L. roots and its main compound, berberine against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts.For this purpose, protoscoleces were aseptically aspirated from sheep livers having hydatid cysts. Various concentrations of the methanolic extract (0.25-2 mg/ml and berberine (0.062- 0.5 mg/ml were used for 5 to 30 min. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed by eosin exclusive test.In the present study, all of the various concentrations of the B. vulgaris methanolic extract (0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/ml and berberine (0.062, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/ml revealed significant (P<0.05 scolicidal effects against protoscoleces of E. granulosus in a dose-dependent manner. Both berberine and methanolic extract exhibited 100% inhibition against protoscoleces of E. granulosus at the concentration of 2.0 and 0.5 mg/ml after 10 min incubation, respectively.According to the results, both B. vulgaris methanolic extract and berberine alone demonstrated high scolicidal activities against protoscoleces of hydatid cysts in low concentration and short exposure time on in vitro model. However, in vivo efficacy of B. vulgaris and berberine also requires to be evaluated using an animal model with hydatid infection.

  20. T-lymphocyte cytokine mRNA expression in cystic echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, S; Kern, P

    1997-04-01

    In the present study we investigated cytokine mRNA expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE) after stimulation with different antigens. By using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) we could demonstrate that restimulation with crude Echinococcus granulosus antigen (Eg-Ag) induced or enhanced Th2 cytokine mRNA expression, especially IL-5 (by using antigen from sheep cyst fluid) in 23 out of 26 investigated CE patients and IL-10 (by using antigen from camel cyst fluid) in 10 out of 10 investigated CE patients. In contrast, IL-5 mRNA expression was absent in PBMC of healthy controls after Eg-Ag stimulation. To determine the specificity of this reaction we stimulated PBMC from 11 CE patients with crude Echinococcus multilocularis antigen (Em-Ag) and PBMC from 8 CE patients with Toxocara canis antigen (Tc-Ag). We found that the PBMC of patients showed a similar mRNA cytokine pattern on stimulation with Em-Ag when compared with Eg-Ag stimulation. The cytokine mRNA pattern on stimulation with Tc-Ag, however, resembled the cytokine mRNA pattern of unstimulated PBMC. Furthermore, the stimulation of PBMC with crude Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen (H37Ra) and purified protein derivative (PPD) of M. tuberculosis revealed distinct IL-5 mRNA expression in all investigated CE patients, whereas in healthy controls IL-5 mRNA expression was very weak or totally absent. Thus, our results indicate an induction of Th2 cytokine mRNA expression in CE patients, which is frequently observed in parasite infections. Interestingly, this response persists after stimulation with tuberculosis antigens, which normally induce Th1 response.

  1. Progress in the pharmacological treatment of human cystic and alveolar echinococcosis: Compounds and therapeutic targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Siles-Lucas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Human cystic and alveolar echinococcosis are helmintic zoonotic diseases caused by infections with the larval stages of the cestode parasites Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis, respectively. Both diseases are progressive and chronic, and often fatal if left unattended for E. multilocularis. As a treatment approach, chemotherapy against these orphan and neglected diseases has been available for more than 40 years. However, drug options were limited to the benzimidazoles albendazole and mebendazole, the only chemical compounds currently licensed for treatment in humans. To compensate this therapeutic shortfall, new treatment alternatives are urgently needed, including the identification, development, and assessment of novel compound classes and drug targets. Here is presented a thorough overview of the range of compounds that have been tested against E. granulosus and E. multilocularis in recent years, including in vitro and in vivo data on their mode of action, dosage, administration regimen, therapeutic outcomes, and associated clinical symptoms. Drugs covered included albendazole, mebendazole, and other members of the benzimidazole family and their derivatives, including improved formulations and combined therapies with other biocidal agents. Chemically synthetized molecules previously known to be effective against other infectious and non-infectious conditions such as anti-virals, antibiotics, anti-parasites, anti-mycotics, and anti-neoplastics are addressed. In view of their increasing relevance, natural occurring compounds derived from plant and fungal extracts are also discussed. Special attention has been paid to the recent application of genomic science on drug discovery and clinical medicine, particularly through the identification of small inhibitor molecules tackling key metabolic enzymes or signalling pathways.

  2. Evaluation of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis with multi-slices spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenya; Lou Jianru; Xing Yan; Wang Jing; Wang Haitao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the multi-slices spiral CT (MSCT) findings of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE), and to evaluate the value of MSCT for diagnosis of HAE. Methods: Twenty-six cases with HAE were scanning by MSCT. The raw data were transmitted to advanced workstation for reconstruction imaging. Correlated studies were made between the CT features and pathology or other imaging results. Results: Altogether 28 lesions were detected. They all revealed as heterogeneous hypodense mass with ill-defined boundary in plain CT but were easily being distinguished from surrounding parenchyma after contrast medium injection. Characteristics of the lesions include different amount of calcification (26/26), liquefied necrosis in center area (20/26), peripheral lacunae or alveolar signs (15/26 ), compensatory hypertrophy of healthy hepatic part (18/26) and the retraction in the involved hepatic lobe or segment (12/26). The lesions that located at or extended to hepatic hilum caused dilatation of intra-hepatic biliary ducts (9/26), splenomegaly (12/26 ), and ascites (1/26). MSCT angiography (CTA) depicted signs of abnormalities of hepatic vessels such as compression, displacement, encasement and occlusion. Compared with findings of operation, the sensitivity, specificity and positive prediction value of CTA for evaluating the hepatic artery system disorders were 88%, 96% and 93%, respectively; and for portal venous system were 95%, 100% and 95%, respectively; while for hepatic venous system were 96%, 86% and 96%, respectively. Conclusion: MSCT is able to comprehensive display the CT features and vessels complication of HAE. It provides reliable imaging for both accuracy diagnosis and proper treatment of the disease. (authors)

  3. [Knowledge and practices regarding cystic echinococcosis and trichinellosis in users and companions of users of the Hospital Comunitario de Salud Familiar El Carmen, Biobio Region, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa-Navarro, Raúl; González, Jorge; Junod, Tania; Melín-Coloma, Millaray; Landaeta-Aqueveque, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    We surveyed users of the Hospital Comunitario de Salud Familiar El Carmen and their companions to analyze knowledge and practices regarding cystic echinococcosis and trichinellosis. Most people recognized risky practices. Previous attendance at talks and working in agricultural-livestock enhanced the knowledge. Age, sex and formal education were not associated with the knowledge. Knowledge was not associated with practices.

  4. [Correlation between HLA-DB1 genes and susceptibility to echinococcosis in Tibetan population in Tibetan Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu-Feng, Gao; Xiu-Min, Han; Xue-Fei, Zhang; Yong-Shun, Wang; Wei, Wang; Ya-Min, Guo; Yong-Shou, Li

    2017-10-23

    To determine the susceptibility genes and resistance genes in HLA-DRB1 alleles in Tibetan patients with cystic and alveolar hydatid diseases, so as to provide the references for the research of the genetic characteristics and infection mechanism of Tibetan hydatid diseases. The case control method was applied. The Tibetan patients with cystic and alveolar hydatid diseases (63 and 73 cases respectively) in Yushu and Guoluo Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, and unrelated healthy people (60 cases) in this area were selected as the study subjects. The polymerase chain reaction-sequence based typing (PCR-SBT) technique was applied for genotyping of HLA-DRB1, and the comparison of the gene frequency. The frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in the alveolar/cystic echinococcosis group was lower than that in the control group ( χ 2 = 4.71, 4.31, both P < 0.05). HLA-DRB1*04 genotypes may be associated with the resistance of cystic and alveolar echinococcosis and its resistance genes.

  5. Human cystic echinococcosis in Turkey: a preliminary study on DNA polymorphisms of hydatid cysts removed from confirmed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsten, Serra; Boufana, Belgees; Ciftci, Turkmen; Akinci, Devrim; Karaagaoglu, Ergun; Ozkuyumcu, Cumhur; Casulli, Adriano; Akhan, Okan

    2018-04-01

    Cystic echinococcosis caused by the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato s.l is endemic in Turkey with a high public health impact particularly in rural areas. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic variation and population structure of E. granulosus s.s using metacestode isolates removed from surgically confirmed patients originating from several regions in Turkey and to investigate the occurrence of autochthonous transmission. Using DNA extracted from a total of 46 human-derived CE isolates, we successfully analysed an 827-bp fragment within the cox1 mitochondrial gene and confirmed the causative agent of human cystic echinococcosis in patients included in this study to be Echinococcus granulosus s.s (G1 and G3 genotypes). The haplotype parsimony network consisted of 28 haplotypes arranged within three main clusters and the neutrality indices were both negative and significant indicating negative selection or population expansion. The assessment carried out in this study using GenBank nucleotide sequence data from Turkey for sheep and cattle hosts demonstrated the importance of autochthonous transmission with sheep, cattle and humans harbouring the same haplotypes. Further studies are required to investigate the biological significance, if any, of E. granulosus s.s haplotypes and the genetic variability of CE from human patients using longer nucleotide sequences and a larger sample set.

  6. Performance of polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis using serum, urine, and cyst fluid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Dr; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a chronic zoonosis which presents with variable clinical manifestations. Currently the diagnosis of this disease is based on radiological findings and serological tests which lack specificity. Although antigen detection from the cyst fluid is the most specific, it is seldom done due to the complications involved. Detecting the presence of Echinococcus granulosus specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could provide a definitive diagnosis of CE. An in-house PCR assay was devised to detect E. granulosus specific DNA in serum, urine and hydatid cyst fluid. The ability of the PCR to detect E. granulosus in the above mentioned samples were observed in comparison with other antigen and antibody detection tests. Serum samples from surgically confirmed patients of CE with ruptured cysts contained the corresponding DNA while the in the majority of cases who had an intact cyst had no DNA of E. granulosus in their serum. DNA of E. granulosus was not found to be excreted in urine. PCR performed equal to antigen detection ELISA while testing hydatid cyst fluid samples. Serum and urine might not serve as useful samples for the molecular diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis. However, PCR can be useful on serum samples to detect ruptured hydatid cysts and on hydatid cyst fluid to confirm the parasitic diagnosis.

  7. Potential risk factors associated with human alveolar echinococcosis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conraths, Franz J; Probst, Carolina; Possenti, Alessia; Boufana, Belgees; Saulle, Rosella; La Torre, Giuseppe; Busani, Luca; Casulli, Adriano

    2017-07-01

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a severe zoonotic disease caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. AE is commonly associated with a long incubation period that may last for more than ten years. The objective of this systematic literature review was to identify and summarize the current knowledge on statistically relevant potential risk factors (PRFs) associated with AE in humans. Six bibliographic databases were searched, generating a total of 1,009 publications. Following the removal of duplicate records and the exclusion of papers that failed to meet the criteria of a previously agreed a priori protocol, 23 publications were retained; however, 6 of these did not contain data in a format that allowed their inclusion in the meta-analysis. The remaining 17 publications (6 case-control and 11 cross-sectional studies) were meta-analysed to investigate associations between AE and PRFs. Pooled odds ratios (OR) were used as a measure of effect and separately analysed for case-control and cross-sectional studies. In the case-control studies, the following PRFs for human AE showed higher odds of outcome: "dog ownership", "cat ownership", "have a kitchen garden", "occupation: farmer", "haymaking in meadows not adjacent to water", "went to forests for vocational reasons", "chewed grass" and "hunting / handling foxes". In the cross-sectional studies, the following PRFs showed higher odds of outcome: "dog ownership", "play with dogs", "gender: female", "age over 20 years", "ethnic group: Tibetan", "low income", "source of drinking water other than well or tap", "occupation: herding" and "low education". Our meta-analysis confirmed that the chance of AE transmission through ingestion of food and water contaminated with E. multilocularis eggs exists, but showed also that food- and water-borne PRFs do not significantly increase the risk of infection. This systematic review analysed international peer-reviewed articles that have over the years

  8. Potential risk factors associated with human alveolar echinococcosis: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz J Conraths

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE is a severe zoonotic disease caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. AE is commonly associated with a long incubation period that may last for more than ten years. The objective of this systematic literature review was to identify and summarize the current knowledge on statistically relevant potential risk factors (PRFs associated with AE in humans.Six bibliographic databases were searched, generating a total of 1,009 publications. Following the removal of duplicate records and the exclusion of papers that failed to meet the criteria of a previously agreed a priori protocol, 23 publications were retained; however, 6 of these did not contain data in a format that allowed their inclusion in the meta-analysis. The remaining 17 publications (6 case-control and 11 cross-sectional studies were meta-analysed to investigate associations between AE and PRFs. Pooled odds ratios (OR were used as a measure of effect and separately analysed for case-control and cross-sectional studies. In the case-control studies, the following PRFs for human AE showed higher odds of outcome: "dog ownership", "cat ownership", "have a kitchen garden", "occupation: farmer", "haymaking in meadows not adjacent to water", "went to forests for vocational reasons", "chewed grass" and "hunting / handling foxes". In the cross-sectional studies, the following PRFs showed higher odds of outcome: "dog ownership", "play with dogs", "gender: female", "age over 20 years", "ethnic group: Tibetan", "low income", "source of drinking water other than well or tap", "occupation: herding" and "low education". Our meta-analysis confirmed that the chance of AE transmission through ingestion of food and water contaminated with E. multilocularis eggs exists, but showed also that food- and water-borne PRFs do not significantly increase the risk of infection.This systematic review analysed international peer-reviewed articles that have over the

  9. The disease burden of human cystic echinococcosis based on HDRs from 2001 to 2014 in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Piseddu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is an important neglected zoonotic parasitic infection belonging to the subgroup of seven Neglected Zoonotic Disease (NZDs included in the World Health Organization's official list of 18 Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs. CE causes serious global human health concerns and leads to significant economic losses arising from the costs of medical treatment, morbidity, life impairments and fatality rates in human cases. Moreover, CE is endemic in several Italian Regions. The aim of this study is to perform a detailed analysis of the economic burden of hospitalization and treatment costs and to estimate the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs of CE in Italy.In the period from 2001 to 2014, the direct costs of 21,050 Hospital Discharge Records (HDRs belonging to 12,619 patients with at least one CE-related diagnosis codes were analyzed in order to quantify the economic burden of CE. CE cases average per annum are 901 (min-max = 480-1,583. Direct costs include expenses for hospitalizations, medical and surgical treatment incurred by public and private hospitals and were computed on an individual basis according to Italian Health Ministry legislation. Moreover, we estimated the DALYs for each patient. The Italian financial burden of CE is around € 53 million; the national average economic burden per annum is around € 4 million; the DALYs of the population from 2001 to 2014 are 223.35 annually and 5.26 DALYs per 105 inhabitants.In Italy, human CE is responsible for significant economic losses in the public health sector. In humans, costs associated with CE have been shown to have a great impact on affected individuals, their families and the community as a whole. This study could be used as a tool to prioritize and make decisions with regard to a surveillance system for this largely preventable yet neglected disease. It demonstrates the need of implementing a CE control program aimed at preventing the considerable economic

  10. Molecular characterization of cystic echinococcosis: First record of G7 in Egypt and G1 in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam-Eldin, Yosra H; Abdel Aaty, Heba E; Ahmed, Mona A

    2015-12-01

    Few molecular studies have identified the current status of cystic echinococcosis in Egypt. The present study aimed to ascertain the genotype(s) of Echinococcus granulosus responsible for human hydatidosis in different Egyptian governorates (regions). Animal isolates were collected from 40 camels, 5 pigs and 44 sheep. 27 human isolates were included in the present study. Specific PCR was performed and followed by DNA sequencing for mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and BLAST analysis.The sheep cysts were not hydatid cysts. G6 genotype (camel starin) predominates in human, camel and pig isolates. G7 genotype (pig strain) was detected in two human isolates and one pig isolate. G1 genotype (sheep strain) was detected in one human isolate from Yemen and in no animal isolates. This is the first record of G7 in Egypt and G1 in Yemen.

  11. Watch and Wait Management of Inactive Cystic Echinococcosis - Does the Path to Inactivity Matter - Analysis of a Prospective Patient Cohort.

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    Marija Stojkovic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overdiagnosis and overtreatment are rarely discussed in the context of NTDs despite their relevance for patients under the care of health services with limited resources where the risks of therapy induced complications are often disproportionate to the benefit. The advantages of cyst staging-based management of patients with cystic echinococcosis (CE are not yet fully explored. Questions are: Do inactive cysts (CE 4 and CE 5 need treatment and is there a difference between cysts which reach CE4 and CE5 naturally or by benzimidazole therapy?Analysis of long-term follow-up data from a prospective CE patient cohort of 223 patients of a national clinical center for echinococcosis. The event of interest "relapse" was defined as the reversal of a cyst from an inactive stage (CE4, CE5 back to an active stage. The watch &wait (ww group included 30 patients with 46 inactive cysts who never received medical treatment. The benzimidazole-treated (med group included 15 patients with 17 cysts. There was no relapse in the ww-group whereas 8/17 cysts showed relapse within 18 months after treatment in the med-group. Loss to follow-up was 15.5%.Data from the watch & wait group impressively show how stable naturally inactivated cysts are in contrast to cysts which reach inactivity through treatment with benzimidazoles. A substantial proportion of patients can be spared from treatment through cyst staging. Cysts which inactivated through a natural course do not relapse with very high likelihood. We recommend follow up of 5 years to confirm the stability of the inactive stage. Cysts driven into inactivity through benzimidazole therapy instead need careful monitoring to identify those which reactivate (around 50% within 18 months. 5 years follow-up appears safe to make a final decision on the need for further monitoring.

  12. Costs Associated with Surgically Treated Cases of Abdominal Cystic Echinococcosis: A Single Center's Experience from 2008 to 2014, Pavia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narra, Roberta; Maestri, Marcello; Budke, Christine M; Tamarozzi, Francesca; Mariconti, Mara; Nicoletti, Giovanni J; Rinaldi, Francesca; Brunetti, Enrico

    2016-08-03

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a globally distributed zoonosis caused by the Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato species complex. Four approaches are available for treatment of abdominal CE: surgery, percutaneous aspiration, chemotherapy with albendazole, and watch-and-wait. Allocation of patients to these different treatment options mainly depends on the stage of the cystic lesion. However, as available guidelines are not widely followed, surgery is often applied even without the correct indication outside referral centers. This is not only a disadvantage for the patient, but also a waste of money. In this study, we evaluated the cost of the surgical approach for abdominal CE by analyzing hospitalization costs for 14 patients admitted to the General Surgery Ward at the "San Matteo" Hospital Foundation in Pavia, Italy, from 2008 through 2014. We found that the total cost of a single hospitalization, including hospital stay, surgical intervention, personnel, drugs, and administrative costs ranged from €5,874 to 23,077 (median €11,033) per patient. Our findings confirm that surgery can be an expensive option. Therefore, surgical intervention should be limited to cyst types that do not benefit from nonsurgical therapies and appropriate case management can best be accomplished by using a cyst stage-specific approach. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. Cystic echinococcosis therapy: Albendazole-loaded lipid nanocapsules enhance the oral bioavailability and efficacy in experimentally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensel, Patricia E; Ullio Gamboa, Gabriela; Fabbri, Julia; Ceballos, Laura; Sanchez Bruni, Sergio; Alvarez, Luis I; Allemandi, Daniel; Benoit, Jean Pierre; Palma, Santiago D; Elissondo, María C

    2015-12-01

    Therapeutic failures attributed to medical management of cystic echinococcosis (CE) with albendazole (ABZ) have been primarily linked to the poor drug absorption rate resulting in low drug level in plasma and hydatid cysts. Lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) represent nanocarriers designed to encapsulate lipophilic drugs, such as ABZ. The goals of the current work were: (i) to characterize the plasma and cyst drug exposure after the administration of ABZ as ABZ-LNCs or ABZ suspension (ABZ-SUSP) in mice infected with Echinococcus granulosus, and ii) to compare the clinical efficacies of both ABZ formulations. Enhanced ABZ sulphoxide (ABZ-SO) concentration profiles were obtained in plasma and cysts from ABZ-LNC treated animals. ABZSO exposure (AUC0-LOQ) was significantly higher in plasma and cyst after the ABZ-LNC treatments, both orally and subcutaneously, compared to that observed after oral administration of ABZ-SUSP. Additionally, ABZSO concentrations measured in cysts from ABZ-LNC treated mice were 1.7-fold higher than those detected in plasma. This enhanced drug availability correlated with an increased efficacy against secondary CE in mice observed for the ABZ-LNCs, while ABZ-SUSP did not reach differences with the untreated control group. This new pharmacotechnically-based strategy could be a potential alternative to improve the treatment of human CE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cystic echinococcosis in South America: systematic review of species and genotypes of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in humans and natural domestic hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucher, Marcela Alejandra; Macchiaroli, Natalia; Baldi, Germán; Camicia, Federico; Prada, Laura; Maldonado, Lucas; Avila, Héctor Gabriel; Fox, Adolfo; Gutiérrez, Ariana; Negro, Perla; López, Raúl; Jensen, Oscar; Rosenzvit, Mara; Kamenetzky, Laura

    2016-02-01

    To systematically review publications on Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato species/genotypes reported in domestic intermediate and definitive hosts in South America and in human cases worldwide, taking into account those articles where DNA sequencing was performed; and to analyse the density of each type of livestock that can act as intermediate host, and features of medical importance such as cyst organ location. Literature search in numerous databases. We included only articles where samples were genotyped by sequencing since to date it is the most accurate method to unambiguously identify all E. granulosus s. l. genotypes. Also, we report new E. granulosus s. l. samples from Argentina and Uruguay analysed by sequencing of cox1 gene. In South America, five countries have cystic echinococcosis cases for which sequencing data are available: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru and Uruguay, adding up 1534 cases. E. granulosus s. s. (G1) accounts for most of the global burden of human and livestock cases. Also, E. canadensis (G6) plays a significant role in human cystic echinococcosis. Likewise, worldwide analysis of human cases showed that 72.9% are caused by E. granulosus s. s. (G1) and 12.2% and 9.6% by E. canadensis G6 and G7, respectively. E. granulosus s. s. (G1) accounts for most of the global burden followed by E. canadensis (G6 and G7) in South America and worldwide. This information should be taken into account to suit local cystic echinococcosis control and prevention programmes according to each molecular epidemiological situation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prevalence of echinococcosis and Taenia hydatigena cysticercosis in slaughtered small ruminants at the livestock-wildlife interface areas of Ngorongoro, Tanzania

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    M. B. Miran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Echinococcosis or hydatidosis (due to the larval stage of Echinococcus spp. and cysticercosis (due to the larval stage of Taenia hydatigena pose a significant economic losses due to slaughter condemnation and risk to public health in developing countries such as Tanzania where sanitation is poor and people live in close proximity with each other and with animals. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of and to identify the predisposing factors for echinococcosis and cysticercosis in sheep and goats at three slaughter slabs located in the livestock-wildlife interface areas of Ngorongoro, Tanzania. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional based survey was conducted, from January 2013 to April 2013, whereby a total of 180 animals comprising 90 goats and 90 sheep of both sexes were examined at postmortem for the evidence of larval stages of Echinococcus spp. (hydatid cyst and T. hydatigena (Cysticercus tenuicollis through visual inspection, incision and palpation of organs and viscera. Results: The prevalence of echinococcosis was 22.2% and 16.6%, in goats and sheep, respectively, while the overall infection rates for cysticercosis were 61.1% in goats and 42.2% in sheep. The result of this study revealed that goats and sheep in Malambo slaughter slab had significantly higher prevalence of T. hydatigena (C. tenuicollis and hydatid cysts (p<0.05 compared to other slab points. T. hydatigena (C. tenuicollis cysts were more frequently detected in the omentum than other visceral organs among the animals examined. Conclusion: In conclusion, the observed high prevalence of the two metacestodes larval stages leads to high condemnation rates of edible offals and raises significant public health concerns. This underscores for the need to undertake more extensive epidemiological investigations to better determine the causal factors, economic impact, and public health importance of the disease in this livestock-wildlife interface setting.

  16. Prevalence of echinococcosis and Taenia hydatigena cysticercosis in slaughtered small ruminants at the livestock-wildlife interface areas of Ngorongoro, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miran, M B; Kasuku, A A; Swai, E S

    2017-04-01

    Echinococcosis or hydatidosis (due to the larval stage of Echinococcus spp.) and cysticercosis (due to the larval stage of Taenia hydatigena ) pose a significant economic losses due to slaughter condemnation and risk to public health in developing countries such as Tanzania where sanitation is poor and people live in close proximity with each other and with animals. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of and to identify the predisposing factors for echinococcosis and cysticercosis in sheep and goats at three slaughter slabs located in the livestock-wildlife interface areas of Ngorongoro, Tanzania. A cross-sectional based survey was conducted, from January 2013 to April 2013, whereby a total of 180 animals comprising 90 goats and 90 sheep of both sexes were examined at postmortem for the evidence of larval stages of Echinococcus spp. (hydatid cyst) and T. hydatigena ( Cysticercus tenuicollis ) through visual inspection, incision and palpation of organs and viscera. The prevalence of echinococcosis was 22.2% and 16.6%, in goats and sheep, respectively, while the overall infection rates for cysticercosis were 61.1% in goats and 42.2% in sheep. The result of this study revealed that goats and sheep in Malambo slaughter slab had significantly higher prevalence of T. hydatigena ( C. tenuicollis ) and hydatid cysts (p<0.05) compared to other slab points. T. hydatigena ( C. tenuicollis ) cysts were more frequently detected in the omentum than other visceral organs among the animals examined. In conclusion, the observed high prevalence of the two metacestodes larval stages leads to high condemnation rates of edible offals and raises significant public health concerns. This underscores for the need to undertake more extensive epidemiological investigations to better determine the causal factors, economic impact, and public health importance of the disease in this livestock-wildlife interface setting.

  17. Post-treatment follow-up study of abdominal cystic echinococcosis in tibetan communities of northwest Sichuan Province, China.

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    Tiaoying Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human cystic echinococcosis (CE, caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, with the liver as the most frequently affected organ, is known to be highly endemic in Tibetan communities of northwest Sichuan Province. Antiparasitic treatment with albendazole remains the primary choice for the great majority of patients in this resource-poor remote area, though surgery is the most common approach for CE therapy that has the potential to remove cysts and lead to complete cure. The current prospective study aimed to assess the effectiveness of community based use of cyclic albendazole treatment in Tibetan CE cases, and concurrently monitor the changes of serum specific antibody levels during treatment.Ultrasonography was applied for diagnosis and follow-up of CE cases after cyclic albendazole treatment in Tibetan communities of Sichuan Province during 2006 to 2008, and serum specific IgG antibody levels against Echinococcus granulosus recombinant antigen B in ELISA was concurrently monitored in these cases. A total of 196 CE cases were identified by ultrasound, of which 37 (18.9% showed evidence of spontaneous healing/involution of hepatic cyst(s with CE4 or CE5 presentations. Of 49 enrolled CE cases for treatment follow-up, 32.7% (16 were considered to be cured based on B-ultrasound after 6 months to 30 months regular albendazole treatment, 49.0% (24 were improved, 14.3% (7 remained unchanged, and 4.1% (2 became aggravated. In general, patients with CE2 type cysts (daughter cysts present needed a longer treatment course for cure (26.4 months, compared to cases with CE1 (univesicular cysts (20.4 months or CE3 type (detached cyst membrane or partial degeneration of daughter cysts (9 months. In addition, the curative duration was longer in patients with large (>10 cm cysts (22.3 months, compared to cases with medium (5-10 cm cysts (17.3 months or patients with small (<5 cm cysts (6 months. At diagnosis, seven (53.8% of 13 cases with CE1 type

  18. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis – Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas; Veeser, Mira; Weber, Tim F.; Sauer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE) results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography) balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology. Methods Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed. Results Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed “sustained clinical success” and four patients “assisted therapeutic success,” of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS). There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed. Conclusions Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current

  19. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis--Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Stojkovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology.Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed.Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed "sustained clinical success" and four patients "assisted therapeutic success," of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS. There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed.Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current ERC guidelines and is minimally disruptive

  20. Endoscopic Treatment of Biliary Stenosis in Patients with Alveolar Echinococcosis--Report of 7 Consecutive Patients with Serial ERC Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Junghanss, Thomas; Veeser, Mira; Weber, Tim F; Sauer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Biliary vessel pathology due to alveolar echicococcosis (AE) results in variable combinations of stenosis, necrosis and inflammation. Modern management strategies for patients with cholestasis are desperately needed. The aim is proof of principle of serial ERC (endoscopic retrograde cholangiography) balloon dilation for AE biliary pathology. Retrospective case series of seven consecutive patients with AE-associated biliary pathology and ERC treatment in an interdisciplinary endoscopy unit at a University Hospital which hosts a national echinococcosis treatment center. The AE patient cohort consists of 106 patients with AE of the liver of which 13 presented with cholestasis. 6/13 received bilio-digestive anastomosis and 7/13 patients were treated by ERC and are reported here. Biliary stricture balloon dilation was performed with 18-Fr balloons at the initial and with 24-Fr balloons at subsequent interventions. If indicated 10 Fr plastic stents were placed. Six patients were treated by repeated balloon dilation and stenting, one by stenting only. After an acute phase of 6 months with repeated balloon dilation, three patients showed "sustained clinical success" and four patients "assisted therapeutic success," of which one has not yet reached the six month endpoint. In one patient, sustained success could not be achieved despite repeated insertion of plastic stents and balloon dilation, but with temporary insertion of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS). There was no loss to follow up. No major complications were observed. Serial endoscopic dilation is a standard tool in the treatment of benign biliary strictures. Serial endoscopic intervention with balloon dilation combined with benzimidazole treatment can re-establish and maintain biliary duct patency in AE associated pathology and probably contributes to avoid or postpone bilio-digestive anastomosis. This approach is in accordance with current ERC guidelines and is minimally disruptive for patients.

  1. Human cystic echinococcosis in Morocco: Ultrasound screening in the Mid Atlas through an Italian-Moroccan partnership.

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    Houda Chebli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a neglected parasitic zoonosis with considerable socioeconomic impact on affected pastoral communities. CE is endemic throughout the Mediterranean, including Morocco, where the Mid Atlas is the most prevalent area for both human and animal infection. The highest hospital annual incidence of human CE is recorded in the provinces of Ifrane and El Hajeb. However, hospital-based statistics likely underestimate the real prevalence of infection, as a proportion of cases never reach medical attention or official records.In 2012, a project on clinical management of CE in Morocco was launched with the aims of estimating the prevalence of human abdominal CE in selected rural communes of the above mentioned provinces using ultrasound (US screening and training local physicians to implement US-based focused assessment and rational clinical management of CE according to the WHO-IWGE Expert Consensus. A total of 5367 people received abdominal US during four campaigns in April-May 2014. During the campaigns, 24 local general practitioners received >24 hours of hands-on training and 143 health education sessions were organized for local communities. We found an overall CE prevalence of 1.9%, with significantly higher values in the rural communes of Ifrane than El Hajeb (2.6% vs 1.3%; p<0.001. CE cysts were predominantly in inactive stage, especially in older age groups. However, active cysts were present also in adults, indicating acquisition of infection at all ages. Province of residence was the only risk factor consistently associated with CE infection.Our results show a high prevalence and on-going, likely environmental transmission of CE in the investigated provinces of Morocco, supporting the implementation of control activities in the area by national health authorities and encouraging the acceptance and divulgation of diagnosis and treatment algorithms based on imaging for CE at both national and local level.

  2. [Parasitological study of 78 cases of human cystic echinococcosis collected between 2005 to 2012 in Mustapha hospital center of Algiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zait, H; Boulahbel, M; Normand, A C; Zait, F; Achir, I; Guerchani, M K; Chaouche, H; Ladjadj, Y; Hamrioui, B

    2014-12-01

    secondary echinococcosis or the relapses postoperatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding cystic echinococcosis and sheep herding in Peru: a mixed-methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Veronika; Westgard, Christopher M; Bayer, Angela M; García, Patricia J

    2017-07-06

    The parasitic disease, cystic echinococcosis (CE), is prevalent in low-income, livestock-raising communities and 2000 new people will be diagnosed this year in South America alone. The disease usually passes from livestock to dogs to humans, making it a zoonotic disease and part of the One Health Initiative. Control of CE has been infamously difficult; no endemic areas of South America have succeeded in maintaining sustainable eradication of the parasite. For the current study, we aimed to gain a better understanding of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of rural sheep farmers and other community leaders regarding their sheep herding practices and perspectives about a control program for CE. We also hope to identify potential barriers and opportunities that could occur in a control program. The authors conducted Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) surveys and semi-structured interviews in rural communities in the highlands of Peru. The KAP surveys were administered to 51 local shepherds, and the semi-structured interviews were administered to 40 individuals, including shepherds, community leaders, and health care providers. We found that the shepherds already deworm their sheep at a median of 2 times per year (N = 49, range 2-4) and have a mean willingness-to-pay of U.S. $ 0.60 for dog dewormer medication (N = 20, range = 0.00- $2.00 USD). We were not able to learn the deworming agent or agents that were being used, for neither sheep nor dogs. Additionally, 90% of shepherds slaughter their own sheep (N = 49). We also learned that the main barriers to an effective control program include: lack of education about the cause and control options for CE, accessibility to the distant communities and sparse grazing pastures, and a lack of economic incentive. Findings suggest it may be feasible to develop an effective CE control program which can be used to create an improved protocol to control CE in the region.

  4. Long-term follow-up of metabolic activity in human alveolar echinococcosis using FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, S.; Gruener, B.; Kern, P.; Buck, A.K.; Blumstein, N.; Reske, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: [ 18 F]fluoro-deoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG-PET) detects metabolic activity in alveolar echinococcosis (AE). The slow changes in metabolic and morphological characteristics require long-term follow-up of patients. This is the first study to evaluate metabolic activity over may years, hereby assessing the utility of FDG-PET for the evaluation of disease progression and response to treatment. Patients, methods: 15 patients received a follow-up FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (integrated PET/CT) with a median of 6.5 years after the first PET in 1999. Number and location of enhanced metabolic activity in the area of AE lesions was determined. Quantification of intensity of metabolic activity was assessed by calculation of mean standardized uptake values. Results: AE lesions in 11/15 patients had been metabolically inactive initially, but only two showed permanent inactivity over the course of 81 months. Interestingly, in two patients metabolic activity was newly detected after 80 and 82 months. Benzimidazole treatment was intermittently discontinued in seven cases. Persisting activity at FDG-PET demanded continued benzimidazole treatment in four patients. Neither treatment duration, lesional size, calcifications nor regressive changes correlated with metabolic activity. Conclusion: treatment responses are heterogeneous and vary from progressive disease despite treatment to long-term inactive disease with discontinued treatment. Lack of metabolic activity indicates suppressed parasite activity and is not equivalent to parasite death. However, metabolic activity may remain suppressed for years, allowing for temporary treatment discontinuation. Relapses are reliably detected with PET and restarting benzimidazole treatment prevents parasite expansion. (orig.)

  5. Screening of the Open Source Malaria Box Reveals an Early Lead Compound for the Treatment of Alveolar Echinococcosis.

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    Britta Stadelmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The metacestode (larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis causes alveolar echinococcosis (AE, a very severe and in many cases incurable disease. To date, benzimidazoles such as albendazole and mebendazole are the only approved chemotherapeutical treatment options. Benzimidazoles inhibit metacestode proliferation, but do not act parasiticidal. Thus, benzimidazoles have to be taken a lifelong, can cause adverse side effects such as hepatotoxicity, and are ineffective in some patients. We here describe a newly developed screening cascade for the evaluation of the in vitro efficacy of new compounds that includes assessment of parasiticidal activity. The Malaria Box from Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV, comprised of 400 commercially available chemicals that show in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum, was repurposed. Primary screening was carried out at 10 μM by employing the previously described PGI assay, and resulted in the identification of 24 compounds that caused physical damage in metacestodes. Seven out of these 24 drugs were also active at 1 μM. Dose-response assays revealed that only 2 compounds, namely MMV665807 and MMV665794, exhibited an EC50 value below 5 μM. Assessments using human foreskin fibroblasts and Reuber rat hepatoma cells showed that the salicylanilide MMV665807 was less toxic for these two mammalian cell lines than for metacestodes. The parasiticidal activity of MMV665807 was then confirmed using isolated germinal layer cell cultures as well as metacestode vesicles by employing viability assays, and its effect on metacestodes was morphologically evaluated by electron microscopy. However, both oral and intraperitoneal application of MMV665807 to mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes did not result in any reduction of the parasite load.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Liposomal Albendazole and Tablet-Albendazole Against Hepatic Cystic Echinococcosis: A Non-Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haitao; Song, Tao; Shao, Yingmei; Aili, Tuergan; Ahan, Ayifuhan; Wen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of liposomal albendazole (L-ABZ) and tablet-albendazole (T-ABZ) for the treatment of human hepatic cystic echinococcosis (CE). Sixty patients with single cyst (CE1) or daughter cyst (CE2) were included in this study and were nonrandomly divided into the L-ABZ group (n = 30, 10  mg/kg per day, p.o., b.i.d.) and T-ABZ group (n = 30, 12-20 mg/kg per day, p.o., b.i.d.), respectively. The treatment duration lasted for 6 months, during which dynamic follow-up was carried out to evaluate the clinical efficacy through calculating the total effective rates (TERs). Measurement data and numerous data were analyzed by the chi-square test. Two-sided tests were performed for all the statistical tests. In our study, 2 patients were lost in the follow-up in the L-ABZ group. One patient was lost in the follow-up in the T-ABZ group, and 1 patient was withdrawal from the study due to receiving surgery. Significant difference was identified in the 3-month TERs of L-ABZ group and T-ABZ group (33.3% vs 76.7%, P  0.05). Based on our study, both T-ABZ and L-ABZ are effective for treating human CE. The TER in the L-ABZ group is superior to that of T-ABZ.

  7. Towards the international collaboration for detection, surveillance and control of taeniasis/ cysticercosis and echinococcosis in Asia and the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira; Wandra, Toni; Sato, Marcello O; Mamuti, Wulamu; Xiao, Ning; Sako, Yasuhito; Nakao, Minoru; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Munehiro; Craig, Philip S

    2006-01-01

    Both cysticercosis and echinococcosis are potentially among the most serious helminth zoonoses threatening human health worldwide. However, due to the lack of reliable tools for confirmation or identification of patients or infected animals, epidemiological data are expected to be underestimated. Conversely, sometimes, such data are over estimated due to the lack of specificity. The most important issue for doing field surveys is that they use evidence based science. In this communication, advanced immunological and molecular tools for detection of individuals infected with either metacestodes or adult tapeworms are briefly overviewed, and the applications of such tools for epidemiological surveys in Indonesia, China and other countries are introduced. As immunological tools are based on antigen-antibody responses, there may exist some cross-reactions. Therefore, immunodiagnostic tools are expected to be useful for primary screening, and should be combined with confirmation of direct parasitological evidence (morphology or DNA), and imaging techniques for cysts. As a risk factor for human cysticercosis is the presence of tapeworm carriers, detection of taeniasis cases and differentiation of the three human Taenia species (Taenia solium, T. saginata and T. asiatica) in Asia and the Pacific requires consideration. Similarly, in northwest China, Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis are coendemic and differentiation of these species is required in humans and definitive hosts. It is stressed that combination of several tools for identification of the parasite and for confirmation of diseases is important for obtaining highly reliable data before consideration of control of these zoonoses. Recent projects coordinated by Asahikawa Medical College have concentrated on immunological and molecular diagnostic techniques transferable to colleagues from endemic regions of Asia and the Pacific, and on organization of two international symposia to establish a platform

  8. Usefulness of contrast-enhanced wide-band Doppler ultrasonograpy to diagnose alveolar echinococcosis of the liver and evaluate the effect of the treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yasuaki; Fujimoto, Yoshinori E-mail: yfujimot@asahikawa-med.ac.jp; Hosoki, Yayoi; Suzuki, Masako; Inoue, Mitsutaka; Sakurai, Shinobu; Ohtake, Takaaki; Ohhira, Masumi; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2003-12-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus multicularis and most commonly involves the liver. Early diagnosis and accurate evaluation of the effect of the treatment are essential to improve the prognosis of patients with alveolar echinococcosis of the liver (AEL). The aim of this study was to demonstrate the characteristic imaging of AEL by contrast-enhanced Dynamic Flow (CE-DF) employing a wide-band Doppler technique for the diagnosis and the accurate evaluation of the effect of the treatment. Four patients with five AEL lesions before treatment or during medication were examined by CE-DF. All of the five AEL lesions examined by CE-DF revealed a defect with an irregular and distinct margin like a worm-eaten defect appearance, which was never observed on other hepatic lesions, in liver perfusion image during post-vascular phase. In addition, CE-DF made it possible to measure the size of AEL lesions accurately because the margin was detected distinctly. These data suggest that CE-DF is clinically useful for the diagnosis of AEL and the evaluation of the effect of the treatment.

  9. A Community-Based Study to Estimate the Seroprevalence of Trichinellosis and Echinococcosis in the Roma and Non-Roma Population of Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolová, Daniela; Halánová, Monika; Janičko, Martin; Jarčuška, Peter; Reiterová, Katarína; Jarošová, Júlia; Madarasová Gecková, Andrea; Pella, Daniel; Dražilová, Sylvia

    2018-02-02

    Trichinellosis and cystic and alveolar echinococcosis are serious parasitic diseases transmissible between animals and humans. Moreover, alveolar echinococcosis is considered one of the most dangerous of human helminthoses. Roma communities are particularly numerous in Central and Eastern Europe. They are often concentrated in economically undeveloped regions and live in segregated localities with unsatisfactory housing and sanitary conditions. The study aimed to find out the seroprevalence of Trichinella and Echinococcus infections in the Roma population of segregated settlements and to compare it with the seropositivity of the non-Roma population of eastern Slovakia. Out of 823 samples, three sera showed seropositivity to Trichinella in the ELISA (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test. Subsequent Western blot reaction (WB) confirmed seropositivity in two Roma women. ELISA seropositivity to E. multilocularis was recorded in six persons (0.73%), and five (0.61%) respondents were seropositive to E. granulosus , but WB confirmed the presence of antibodies to Echinococcus spp. in one Roma participant. Positive persons suffered from unspecific clinical symptoms; Trichinella -positive persons reported headache, cough, fatigue, and muscle pain. The Echinococcus -positive participant suffered from headache and back pain. The study showed that the worse living conditions of the Roma community did not significantly influence the occurrence of Trichinella and Echinococcus infections in this minority.

  10. A Community-Based Study to Estimate the Seroprevalence of Trichinellosis and Echinococcosis in the Roma and Non-Roma Population of Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Antolová

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Trichinellosis and cystic and alveolar echinococcosis are serious parasitic diseases transmissible between animals and humans. Moreover, alveolar echinococcosis is considered one of the most dangerous of human helminthoses. Roma communities are particularly numerous in Central and Eastern Europe. They are often concentrated in economically undeveloped regions and live in segregated localities with unsatisfactory housing and sanitary conditions. The study aimed to find out the seroprevalence of Trichinella and Echinococcus infections in the Roma population of segregated settlements and to compare it with the seropositivity of the non-Roma population of eastern Slovakia. Out of 823 samples, three sera showed seropositivity to Trichinella in the ELISA (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Subsequent Western blot reaction (WB confirmed seropositivity in two Roma women. ELISA seropositivity to E. multilocularis was recorded in six persons (0.73%, and five (0.61% respondents were seropositive to E. granulosus, but WB confirmed the presence of antibodies to Echinococcus spp. in one Roma participant. Positive persons suffered from unspecific clinical symptoms; Trichinella-positive persons reported headache, cough, fatigue, and muscle pain. The Echinococcus-positive participant suffered from headache and back pain. The study showed that the worse living conditions of the Roma community did not significantly influence the occurrence of Trichinella and Echinococcus infections in this minority.

  11. Performance of the commercially available SERION ELISA classic Echinococcus IgG test for the detection of cystic echinococcosis in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarink, M J; Koelewijn, R; Slingerland, B C G C; Tielens, A G M; van Genderen, P J J; van Hellemond, J J

    2018-06-28

    Diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis (CE) is at present mainly based on imaging techniques. Serology has a complementary role, partly due to the small number of standardized and commercially available assays. Therefore we examined the clinical performance of the SERION ELISA classic Echinococcus IgG test. Using 10 U/ml as a cut-off point, and serum samples from 50 CE patients and 105 healthy controls, the sensitivity and specificity were 98.0% and 96.2%, respectively. If patients with other infectious diseases were used as negative controls, the specificity decreased to 76.9%, which causes poor positive predictive values. However, if results between 10 and 15 U/ml are classified as indecisive, the specificity of positive results (≥15 U/ml) increased to 92.5% without greatly affecting the sensitivity (92.0%). Using this approach in combination with imaging studies, the SERION ELISA classic Echinococcosis IgG test can be a useful aid in the diagnosis of CE.

  12. The correlation of CT perfusion imaging with microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor in hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Ren Bo; Liu Wenya; Wen Hao; Qing Song; Xie Weidong; Sun Yajing; Wang Haitao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation of CT perfusion imaging with microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE). Methods: Multi-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging was performed in 27 patients with HAE. Time-density curves(TDC) of the HAE peripheral area was drawn from the region of interest (ROI) with perfusion functional software. CT perfusion parameters including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and permeability surface area product (PS) were calculated. MVD and VEGF expression of pathological specimens were examined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34, anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody. The CT perfusion parameters, MVD and VEGF were compared in different types of TDC with t test. The correlation of CT perfusion parameters with MVD and VEGF were analyzed with Spearman test. Results: In this group, 21 cases which TDC lower than that of the liver were classified as type Ⅰ, the others 6 cases TDC higher than the liver were of type Ⅱ TDC. TDC perfusion parameters of the two types were as follows, BF: (111.7±27.6), (158.9±39.5) ml · 100 g -1 · min -1 , BV: (15.1±6.2) , (26.8±8.4) ml/100 g, MTT: (7.0±4.4), (7.7±3.1) s, PS: (51.7±17.3), (51.0±20.5) ml ·100 g -1 · min -1 . The significant differences of BF, BV and MVD [(20.5±5.4)/HP, (37.2±7.5)/HP, respectively] were found between two types (t=-7.897, -18.783, -5.223, P 0.05). The correlation was found between the MVD and BF and BV in the type Ⅱ TDC group (r=0.789 and 0.878, respectively) and no correlation was found between MVD and each CT perfusion parameters in the type Ⅰ TDC group (P>0.05). There was no correlation between the VEGF expression and CT perfusion parameters in two types of TDC (P>0.05). Conclusion: CT perfusion imaging with different type of TDC reflected different situation of angiogenesis in HAE peripheral area, which could be a potential technique to illustrate the

  13. MHC-DQB1 Variation and Its Association with Resistance or Susceptibility to Cystic Echinococcosis in Chinese Merino Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiao Hui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE, one of the world’s most geographically widespread diseases, still represents a considerable economic and public health significance, although a variety of methods has been used to control the disease. It has been demonstrated that genetic factors, especially variations in MHC loci, can influence the outcome of CE infection in the human population. The study described here was designed to determine whether variation in MHC-DQB1 was associated with susceptibility or resistance to CE in sheep. If so, it would lay a theoretical foundation for breeding disease resistance sheep in future. This study was carried out on 204 Chinese Merino sheep, including 101 CE sheep and 103 healthy controls. The polymorphism of MHC-DQB1 exon 2 was detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method, and x2 test was used to compare genotype frequencies between CE sheep and healthy controls. A total of 22 alleles and 42 genotypes were identified in DQB1 exon 2 in Chinese Merino sheep. In addition, x2 test showed that frequencies of DQB1-TaqIaa and DQB1-HaeIIInn genotypes were significantly higher in the healthy group (82.5% and 57.3%, respectively than that in the CE group (57.4% and 28.9%, respectively (both p values = 0, OR = 0.286, 0.303, respectively, suggesting that these genotypes appeared to be associated with resistance to CE. Whereas, frequencies of DQB1-TaqIab and DQB1-HaeIIImn genotypes were significantly higher in the CE group (36.9% and 32.0%, respectively, as compared with the healthy group (16.5% and 11.15%, respectively (p = 0.001, 0.001 and OR = 2.963, 3.629, respectively, indicating that these genotypes might be associated with susceptibility to CE. It is concluded that the genetic polymorphism within MHC-DQB1 might influence immune responses to pathogens, thus leading to the development of CE or protection against CE in Chinese Merino sheep, which would pave the way for breeding

  14. Assessment of the effect of Allium sativum on serum nitric oxide level and hepatic histopathology in experimental cystic echinococcosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nehad Mahmoud; Ibrahim, Ayman Nabil; Ahmed, Naglaa Samier

    2016-09-01

    The current study was carried out to evaluate the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of Allium sativum on experimental cystic echinococcosis by measuring the serum nitric oxide level and studying hepatic histopathological changes. The experimental animals were divided into five groups, ten mice in each, group (I): prophylactic; group (II): therapeutic; group (III): prophylactic and therapeutic; group (IV): infected nontreated; group (V): non infected non treated. The results showed that serum nitric oxide was significantly increased as a result of infection in all infected groups compared to group V. Statistical significant difference was noted in serum nitrate level in group I at 1st and 8th week post infection compared to the same time interval in group IV. In group II, statistical significance was noticed only at the 1st week post infection. Statistical significant difference was noted in serum nitrate level in group III at 1st, 4th, 6th and 8th week post infection compared to same time interval in group IV. Hydatid cysts developed in livers of mice of group IV as early as 4 weeks of infection while no cysts were found in groups I,II and III. Histopathologically there were moderate pathological changes in group I and group II as hepatocytes showed moderate steatosis, moderate venous congestion and inflammatory cellular infiltrate with foci of degeneration and necrosis. While livers of mice of group III showed mild steatosis, mild venous congestion, mild inflammatory cellular infiltrate, no necrosis and no biliary hyperplasia. Accordingly, that garlic (Allium sativum) may be a promising phototherapeutic agent for cystic echinococcosis.

  15. Early diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of cystic echinococcosis in remote rural areas in Patagonia: impact of ultrasound training of non-specialists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Del Carpio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a chronic, complex and neglected disease caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. The effects of this neglect have a stronger impact in remote rural areas whose inhabitants have no chances of being diagnosed and treated properly without leaving their jobs and travelling long distances, sometimes taking days to reach the closest referral center. BACKGROUND: In 1980 our group set up a control program in endemic regions with CE in rural sections of Rio Negro, Argentina. Since 1997, we have used abdominopelvic ultrasound (US as a screening method of CE in school children and determined an algorithm of treatment. OBJECTIVES: To describe the training system of general practitioners in early diagnosis and treatment of CE and to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the field program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 2000, to overcome the shortage of radiologists in the area, we set up a short training course on Focused Assessment with Sonography for Echinococcosis (FASE for general practitioners with no previous experience with US. After the course, the trainees were able to carry out autonomous ultrasound surveys under the supervision of the course faculty. From 2000 to 2008, trainees carried out 22,793 ultrasound scans in children from 6 to 14 years of age, and diagnosed 87 (0.4% new cases of CE. Forty-nine (56.4% were treated with albendazole, 29 (33.3% were monitored expectantly and 9 (10.3% were treated with surgery. DISCUSSION: The introduction of a FASE course for general practitioners allowed for the screening of CE in a large population of individuals in remote endemic areas with persistent levels of transmission, thus overcoming the barrier of the great distance from tertiary care facilities. The ability of local practitioners to screen for CE using US saved the local residents costly travel time and missed work and proved to be an efficacious and least expensive intervention tool for

  16. Echinococcus granulosus infection and options for control of cystic echinococcosis in Tibetan communities of Western Sichuan Province, China.

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    Yu Rong Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human cystic echinococcosis (CE is highly endemic in the Tibetan regions of Sichuan where most families keep guard dogs and where there are considerable numbers of ownerless/stray dogs. Strong Buddhist beliefs do not allow for elimination of stray dogs, and many strays are actually fed and adopted by households or monasteries. On account of the high altitude (3900-5000 m, pasturage is the major agricultural activity in this area. The harsh mountainous climate often leads to many grazing animals dying on the pasture at the end of a hard winter. The skin and some meat are taken, and the rest of the animal is left for scavenging birds and animals. The poor sanitation and hygiene, the Buddhist doctrine of allowing old livestock to die naturally, plus the unrestricted disposal of animal viscera post-slaughter may be responsible for the high prevalence of human CE in this setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As part of a large collaborative control program for CE in Ganzi County, situated in the west of Sichuan Province, surveillance for Echinococcus infection in domestic dogs using a coproantigen method and necropsy of unwanted dogs was carried out prior to (in 2000 and after (in 2005 dog anthelminthic treatment (5 mg/kg oral praziquantal at 6 month intervals to determine the efficacy of the treatment for control. The prevalence of E. granulosus only in dogs by necropsy was 27% and 22%, and prevalence of both Echinococcus spp. by necropsy was 63% and 38%; prevalence of both Echinococcus spp. by coproantigen analysis was 50% and 17%. Necropsy of sheep/goats (age <1 to 12 years (prevalence of E. granulosus in 1-6-year-old animals was 38% and in 10-12-year-old animals was 70% and yaks (age 4 years (prevalence of E. granulosus was 38% was undertaken to determine the baseline transmission pressure. Protoscoleces were only found in very old sheep/goats and yaks. Necropsy of dogs in the Datangma district indicated that there was no apparent

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Human Cystic Echinococcosis in the Cusco Region of the Peruvian Highlands Diagnosed Using Focused Abdominal Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Hou, Amy; Morales, Maria Luisa; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Vilca, Freddy; Mozo, Karen; Bascope, Ruben; White, A Clinton; Brunetti, Enrico; Chen, Lin; Cabada, Miguel M

    2017-06-01

    AbstractLatin America is among the highly endemic regions for cystic echinococcosis (CE). In Peru, an estimated 1,139 disability-adjusted life years are lost annually from surgical treatment of CE. This is comparable with the combined total for Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Chile. The prevalence of human infection has been investigated in the central Peruvian Andes, but there are no community-based screening data from other regions of Peru. We carried out a population survey in January 2015 using abdominal ultrasound to estimate the prevalence of abdominal CE in the Canas and Canchis provinces, in the Cusco region of Peru. Among 1,351 subjects screened, 41 (3%) had CE. There was significant variation between communities with similar socioeconomic features in a small geographical area. A history of CE was reported by 4.1% of the screened subjects, among whom 30.3% still had CE on ultrasound. Among patients reporting previous CE treatment, 14.9% had CE in active stages. Limited education, community of residence, and knowing people with CE in the community were associated with CE. These results demonstrate a significant burden of CE in the region and suggest the need for further investigations, control activities, and optimization of clinical management for CE in this area.

  18. Cystic echinococcosis in Poland: genetic variability and the first record of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (G1 genotype) in the country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sałamatin, Rusłan; Kowal, Jerzy; Nosal, Paweł; Kornaś, Sławomir; Cielecka, Danuta; Jańczak, Dawid; Patkowski, Waldemar; Gawor, Jakub; Kornyushin, Vadim; Golab, Elzbieta; Šnábel, Viliam

    2017-11-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases affecting humans and livestock worldwide, and is endemic in Poland. A set of six isolates on larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato tapeworms collected from three humans, two pigs and one sheep from Polish foci of CE was examined by DNA sequencing of two mitochondrial genes (cox1, rrnS). The results demonstrated the presence of E. canadensis and E. granulosus sensu stricto in the investigated hydatid cysts. The former species was found in all five isolates from pigs and humans derived from central Poland. In a sheep hydatid cyst originating from Lesser Poland Voivodeship in southern Poland, E. granulosus s. s. (G1 genotype) was identified. This is the first report of an unambiguously autochthonous infection with E. granulosus s. s. in Poland. The global distribution and host affiliations of the commonly occurring G1 microvariant with nucleotide change 56C/T in cox1, detected here in Polish sheep, are discussed. The finding that sheep harboured E. granulosus s. s. may have important consequences for developing effective hydatid control programmes in Poland due to its longer maturation rate in dogs compared with E. canadensis G7. This may lead to greater expenditures for purchasing anthelmintics to provide an appropriate dosing regime in sheep-raising areas of the country.

  19. Time series analysis based on two-part models for excessive zero count data to detect farm-level outbreaks of swine echinococcosis during meat inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yasumoto; Makita, Kohei

    2017-12-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis is a parasite that causes highly pathogenic zoonoses and is maintained in foxes and rodents on Hokkaido Island, Japan. Detection of E. multilocularis infections in swine is epidemiologically important. In Hokkaido, administrative information is provided to swine producers based on the results of meat inspections. However, as the current criteria for providing administrative information often results in delays in providing information to producers, novel criteria are needed. Time series models were developed to monitor autocorrelations between data and lags using data collected from 84 producers at the Higashi-Mokoto Meat Inspection Center between April 2003 and November 2015. The two criteria were quantitatively compared using the sign test for the ability to rapidly detect farm-level outbreaks. Overall, the time series models based on an autoexponentially regressed zero-inflated negative binomial distribution with 60th percentile cumulative distribution function of the model detected outbreaks earlier more frequently than the current criteria (90.5%, 276/305, ppart model with autoexponential regression can adequately deal with data involving an excessive number of zeros and that the novel criteria overcome disadvantages of the current criteria to provide an earlier indication of increases in the rate of echinococcosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of a newly designed sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of hydatid antigen in serum, urine and cyst fluid for diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaya, Dr; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2013-07-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic disease of humans with variable clinical manifestations. Imaging and immunological methods are currently the mainstay of diagnosis of this disease. Although the immunological tests for detection of anti-echinococcal antibodies have several disadvantages, they are widely being used. Antigen is far more superior than antibody detection test as they can provide a specific parasitic diagnosis. A sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was designed using antibodies to 24 kDa urinary hydatid antigen for the detection of hydatid antigens in urine, serum and cyst fluid specimens. The performance of this novel test was compared with that of other hydatid antibody detection ELISA and enzyme immune transfer blot (EITB) using radiological and surgical confirmation as the gold standard. The antigen detection ELISA showed 100% sensitivity and specificity when tested with cyst fluid. On testing urine and serum, the antigen detection ELISA was found to be more specific than antibody detection ELISA. EITB was found to be the most sensitive and specific test. ELISA using polyclonal antibodies against 24 kDa urinary hydatid protein was moderately sensitive to detect hydatid antigen in serum and urine. Hence polyclonal antibodies to 24 kDa urinary hydatid antigen can be used as an alternative source of antibody to detect hydatid antigen in serum, urine and cyst fluid. In the present study, EITB was found to be highly specific test for detection of hydatid antibodiesin serum. 24 kDa protein was found to be specific and of diagnostic value in CE.

  1. Detection of Echinococcus multilocularis and other foodborne parasites in fox, cat and dog faeces collected in kitchen gardens in a highly endemic area for alveolar echinococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulle, Marie-Lazarine; Bastien, Matthieu; Richard, Yolan; Josse-Dupuis, Émilie; Aubert, Dominique; Villena, Isabelle; Knapp, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis, Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara spp. are foodborne parasites whose eggs or oocysts are spread in the environment via canid or felid faeces. They can cause infections in humans following the raw consumption of contaminated fruit or vegetables. In this study, their occurrence was investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in 254 carnivore faeces deposited in 94 kitchen gardens of northeastern France that were sampled between two and six times from October 2011 to April 2013. Less than 25% of the sampled kitchen gardens contained more than 75% of the collected faeces. Of the 219 faeces that could be attributed to an emitter, cat accounted for 58%, fox for 32% and dog for 10%. Echinococcus multilocularis was detected in 35%, 11% and 7% of fox, dog and cat faeces, respectively, and Toxocara spp. in 33%, 12% and 5.5% of cat, fox and dog faeces, respectively. Toxoplasma gondii was detected in 2/125 cat faeces and 2/21 dog faeces. The 34 faeces that tested positive for E. multilocularis were found in only 19 out of the 94 sampled kitchen gardens, and the 40 faeces that tested positive for Toxocara spp. were found in 28 of them. Consequently, some kitchen gardens appeared particularly at risk of human exposure to foodborne parasites, including E. multilocularis responsible for alveolar echinococcosis (AE), which is a serious zoonosis. In endemic areas, kitchen garden owners should be informed about the zoonotic risk linked to carnivore faeces deposits and encouraged to set up preventive measures. © M.-L. Poulle et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  2. Detection of Echinococcus multilocularis and other foodborne parasites in fox, cat and dog faeces collected in kitchen gardens in a highly endemic area for alveolar echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulle Marie-Lazarine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus multilocularis, Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara spp. are foodborne parasites whose eggs or oocysts are spread in the environment via canid or felid faeces. They can cause infections in humans following the raw consumption of contaminated fruit or vegetables. In this study, their occurrence was investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in 254 carnivore faeces deposited in 94 kitchen gardens of northeastern France that were sampled between two and six times from October 2011 to April 2013. Less than 25% of the sampled kitchen gardens contained more than 75% of the collected faeces. Of the 219 faeces that could be attributed to an emitter, cat accounted for 58%, fox for 32% and dog for 10%. Echinococcus multilocularis was detected in 35%, 11% and 7% of fox, dog and cat faeces, respectively, and Toxocara spp. in 33%, 12% and 5.5% of cat, fox and dog faeces, respectively. Toxoplasma gondii was detected in 2/125 cat faeces and 2/21 dog faeces. The 34 faeces that tested positive for E. multilocularis were found in only 19 out of the 94 sampled kitchen gardens, and the 40 faeces that tested positive for Toxocara spp. were found in 28 of them. Consequently, some kitchen gardens appeared particularly at risk of human exposure to foodborne parasites, including E. multilocularis responsible for alveolar echinococcosis (AE, which is a serious zoonosis. In endemic areas, kitchen garden owners should be informed about the zoonotic risk linked to carnivore faeces deposits and encouraged to set up preventive measures.

  3. An abattoir-based study on the prevalence and economic losses due to cystic echinococcosis in slaughtered herbivores in Ahwaz, south-western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, N A; Meshkehkar, M

    2011-03-01

    A 10-year (1998-2008) retrospective study was carried out to investigate the prevalence and long-term trend of hydatid disease in slaughtered herbivores in the large complex abattoir of Ahwaz (the capital of Khuzestan province, south-western Iran). A total of 3,583,417 animals including 2,815,982 sheep, 427,790 goats and 339,645 cattle were inspected macroscopically for hydatid cysts in the 10-year period, and overall 155,555 (4.24%) livers and 228,172 (6.37%) lungs were condemned. Cystic echinococcosis (CE) was responsible for 36.08% and 48.04% of total liver and lung condemnations, respectively. The prevalence of pulmonary hydatid disease in sheep, goats and cattle was 2.22, 5.43 and 6.99%, respectively; on the other hand, the prevalence of hepatic hydatid disease for those animals was 1.26, 2.57 and 2.80%, respectively. Data showed an overall downward long-term trend for CE in all livestock slaughtered during the study period (P trend was still observed. The total annual economic loss incurred due to hydatidosis in all ruminants slaughtered at Ahwaz municipal abattoir was estimated to be US$459,659.6, based on the market prices in the year 2008. This number corresponds to a loss of US$300,620.4 for cattle, US$123,490.0 for sheep and US$35,549.2 for goats. The current results provide baseline data for the future monitoring of this potentially important disease in the region, and also suggest that a thorough investigation leading to a disease control strategy is required to reduce the economic and public health consequences of CE.

  4. Cystic echinococcosis in marketed offal of sheep in Basrah, Iraq: Abattoir-based survey and a probabilistic model estimation of the direct economic losses due to hydatid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhameed, Mohanad F; Habib, Ihab; Al-Azizz, Suzan A; Robertson, Ian

    2018-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a highly endemic parasitic zoonosis in Iraq with substantial impacts on livestock productivity and human health. The objectives of this study were to study the abattoir-based occurrence of CE in marketed offal of sheep in Basrah province, Iraq, and to estimate, using a probabilistic modelling approach, the direct economic losses due to hydatid cysts. Based on detailed visual meat inspection, results from an active abattoir survey in this study revealed detection of hydatid cysts in 7.3% (95% CI: 5.4; 9.6) of 631 examined sheep carcasses. Post-mortem lesions of hydatid cyst were concurrently present in livers and lungs of more than half (54.3% (25/46)) of the positive sheep. Direct economic losses due to hydatid cysts in marketed offal were estimated using data from government reports, the one abattoir survey completed in this study, and expert opinions of local veterinarians and butchers. A Monte-Carlo simulation model was developed in a spreadsheet utilizing Latin Hypercube sampling to account for uncertainty in the input parameters. The model estimated that the average annual economic losses associated with hydatid cysts in the liver and lungs of sheep marketed for human consumption in Basrah to be US$72,470 (90% Confidence Interval (CI); ±11,302). The mean proportion of annual losses in meat products value (carcasses and offal) due to hydatid cysts in the liver and lungs of sheep marketed in Basrah province was estimated as 0.42% (90% CI; ±0.21). These estimates suggest that CE is responsible for considerable livestock-associated monetary losses in the south of Iraq. These findings can be used to inform different regional CE control program options in Iraq.

  5. Detection of Echinococcus multilocularis and other foodborne parasites in fox, cat and dog faeces collected in kitchen gardens in a highly endemic area for alveolar echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulle, Marie-Lazarine; Bastien, Matthieu; Richard, Yolan; Josse-Dupuis, Émilie; Aubert, Dominique; Villena, Isabelle; Knapp, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis, Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara spp. are foodborne parasites whose eggs or oocysts are spread in the environment via canid or felid faeces. They can cause infections in humans following the raw consumption of contaminated fruit or vegetables. In this study, their occurrence was investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in 254 carnivore faeces deposited in 94 kitchen gardens of northeastern France that were sampled between two and six times from October 2011 to April 2013. Less than 25% of the sampled kitchen gardens contained more than 75% of the collected faeces. Of the 219 faeces that could be attributed to an emitter, cat accounted for 58%, fox for 32% and dog for 10%. Echinococcus multilocularis was detected in 35%, 11% and 7% of fox, dog and cat faeces, respectively, and Toxocara spp. in 33%, 12% and 5.5% of cat, fox and dog faeces, respectively. Toxoplasma gondii was detected in 2/125 cat faeces and 2/21 dog faeces. The 34 faeces that tested positive for E. multilocularis were found in only 19 out of the 94 sampled kitchen gardens, and the 40 faeces that tested positive for Toxocara spp. were found in 28 of them. Consequently, some kitchen gardens appeared particularly at risk of human exposure to foodborne parasites, including E. multilocularis responsible for alveolar echinococcosis (AE), which is a serious zoonosis. In endemic areas, kitchen garden owners should be informed about the zoonotic risk linked to carnivore faeces deposits and encouraged to set up preventive measures. PMID:28748783

  6. Intra-cystic concentrations of albendazole-sulphoxide in human cystic echinococcosis: a systematic review and analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Felix; Naderer, Judith; Skuhala, Tomislava; Groger, Mirjam; Auer, Herbert; Kaczirek, Klaus; Waneck, Fredrik; Ramharter, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a widespread zoonosis caused by the species complex Echinococcus granulosus. Albendazole (ABZ)-the first-line anthelminthic drug for medical treatment of CE-is metabolized in vivo to the active derivative ABZ-sulphoxide (ABZ-SO). Target-site ABZ-SO concentrations in the hydatid cyst mediate the anthelminthic effect in CE. Primary outcome of this systematic review of individual patient data was the intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentration stratified by cyst size, location, calcification status and use of praziquantel. Studies reporting intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations in humans were identified by a systematic search. A pooled analysis of individual patient data was performed to assess intra-cystic concentrations. Pharmacokinetic data of 121 individual cysts were analysed. There was no correlation between plasma and intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations (rho = -0.03, p = 0.76). Intra-cystic drug concentrations were also not associated with sex and treatment duration. Use of praziquantel in combination with ABZ was associated with higher plasma (median 540 vs. 240 μg/L; p = 0.04) but not intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations (median 220 vs. 199 μg/L; p = 0.36). Relative drug concentrations in hepatic cysts were higher than in other cysts (0.8 vs. 0.4; p = 0.05). Intra-cystic concentrations were higher in calcified than non-calcified cysts (median 897 vs. 245 μg/L; p = 0.03). There was a trend towards higher intra-cystic concentrations in smaller sized cysts (β = -17.2 μg/L/cm; 95th CI, -35.9 to 1.6; p = 0.07). This study demonstrates that mean intra-cystic drug concentrations are similar to plasma concentrations on a population level. However, in individual patients plasma concentrations are not directly predictive for intra-cystic concentrations. The use of booster drugs was not associated with higher intra-cystic ABZ-SO concentrations in this analysis.

  7. Computed tomography in hepatic echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choliz, J.D.; Olaverri, F.J.L.; Casas, T.F.; Zubieta, S.O.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was used to evaluate 50 cases of hydatid disease of the liver. It was definite in 49 cases and negative in one case. Pre- and postcontrast scans were performed. CT may reveal the exact location and extension of cysts and possible complications. However, a false-negative case was found in a hydatid cyst located in a fatty liver

  8. Construction and Identification of a Recombinant Plasmid Encoding Echinococcus granulosus Oncosphere Antigen (EG95Abstract Background: Cystic echinococcosis (CE, as a zoonotic disease cause to health threat and economic losses. Despite implemented cont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh MAZAHERI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: Cystic echinococcosis (CE, as a zoonotic disease cause to health threat and economic losses. Despite implemented control programs, few countries have been able to decrease or eliminate this infection. Vaccination of the intermediate host offers an additional strategy to control the parasite transmission and EG95 antigen is considered more than the others in the vaccine issue. According to the high protection induced by the EG95 recombinant vaccine, this study was designed to construct recombinant plasmid formulation of EG95 antigen.Methods: In 2015, the Echinococcus granulosus eggs were recovered from an infected dog in Parasitological laboratory of Tarbiat Modares University in Tehran, Iran. Following hatching, the oncospheres of E. granulosus were activated to increase the presence of the desired mRNA. The extracted mRNA was transcribed to the cDNA which used as template in RT-PCR. Then the EG95 gene cloned into pET28a vector and the recombinant plasmids expression was  investigated in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Results:  The recombinant plasmid encoding EG95 antigen was successfully constructed and identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. In vitro expression of the EG95 antigen was confirmed in prokary­otic and eukaryotic systems by SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis.Conclusion: Because of potential advantages of DNA vaccines, including ability to induce long-term immune responses, low production cost and stability in different temperatures, this study carried out to construct the EG95 gene into a vector. This recombinant vector can be evaluated in further studies as a DNA vaccine may provide new prospects for the development of a vaccine against cystic hydatid disease.

  9. Outcome after Discontinuing Long-Term Benzimidazole Treatment in 11 Patients with Non-resectable Alveolar Echinococcosis with Negative FDG-PET/CT and Anti-EmII/3-10 Serology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpe, Katrin D. M.; Grimm, Felix; Deplazes, Peter; Huber, Sabine; Bertogg, Kaja; Fischer, Dorothee R.; Müllhaupt, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Benzimidazoles are efficacious for treating non-resectable alveolar echinococcosis (AE), but their long-term parasitocidal (curative) effect is disputed. In this study, we prospectively analyzed the potential parasitocidal effect of benzimidazoles and whether normalization of FDG-PET/CT scans and anti-Emll/3-10-antibody levels could act as reliable "in vivo" parameters of AE-inactivation permitting to abrogate chemotherapy with a low risk for AE-recurrence. Method This prospective study included 34 patients with non-resectable AE subdivided into group A (n = 11), followed-up after diagnosis and begin of chemotherapy at months 6, 12 and 24, and group B (n = 23) with a medium duration of chemotherapy of 10 (range 2–25) years. All patients were assessed by FDG-PET/CT examinations and anti-EmII/3-10 serology. Chemotherapy was abrogated in patients with normalization of FDG-PET/CT and serum anti-EmII/3-10 levels. These patients were closely followed-up for AE recurrence. Endpoint (parasitocidal efficacy) was defined by the absence of AE-recurrence >24 months after stopping treatment. Results Normalization of FDG-PET/CT scan and anti-EmII/3-10 levels occurred in 11 of 34 patients (32%). After abrogation of chemotherapy in these 11 patients, there was no evidence of AE-recurrence within a median of 70.5 (range 16–82) months. However, the patients’ immunocompetence appears pivotal for the described long-term parasitocidal effect of benzimidazoles. Conclusions The combination of negative FDG-PET/CT-scans and anti-EmII/3-10 antibody levels seem to be reliable parameters for assessing in vivo AE-larval inactivity after long-term benzimidazole chemotherapy. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00658294 PMID:26389799

  10. The image and anatomical study of echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoh, Kazuo; Arakawa, Keiji

    1986-01-01

    Serial computed tomographic (CT) examinations of 37 rats infected with Echinococcus multilocularis were reviewed. In all cases the diagnosis was confirmed by pathologic examination. Small low density areas like hepatic cysts were visualized in the early stage. Honey comb appearance was characteristic in the late stage. Calcifications and central liqueation were also demonstrated. We must give specific attention to these findings to detect the alveolor echinococcal lesions of the liver. (author)

  11. Hepatic echinococcosis ruptured into the biliary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Steenbergen, W.; Fevery, J.; Broeckaert, L.; Ponette, E.; Marchal, G.; Baert, A.; Penninckx, F.; Kerremans, R.; De Groote, J.

    1987-01-01

    Three patients are described with hepatic involvement by Echinococcus granulosus, complicated by spontaneous rupture into the biliary tract. Abdominal computed tomography, showing the cystic wall, the presence of wall calcifications, daughter cysts and wall enhancement, provided a correct diagnosis of hepatic hydatidosis in all patients. Dilatation of the bile ducts with the presence of intraluminal material was clearly shown by sonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. On sonography, the intraluminal material appeared as amorphous, sludge-like hydatid sand, and as daughter cysts. On ERCP, the intrabiliary parasitic material appeared as non-homogeneous, irregularly shaped and mobile filling defects. Other findings at ERCP were displacement and distortion of intrahepatic bile ducts by the hepatic cysts and a mild dilatation of the pancreatic duct. (Auth.)

  12. [Clinical aspects and classification of echinococcosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokov, Sh A; Vasil'ev, R Kh

    1978-04-01

    350 cases of alveococcosis were examined with the use of clinical and generally available methods of laboratory analysis. This study helped to find out the characteristic symptoms of the disease and their incidence rate. A clinico-anatomical classification of alveoccoccosis, based on local and general manifestations, localization of a primary focus, anatomic form of the growth of an alveococcal node and the degree of its propagation in the liver parenchima, has been developed. The suggested classification promotes a correct construction of a detailed clinical diagnosis and complete solution of the problems of therapeutic tactics.

  13. Investigación experimental de la equinococosis canina a partir de quiste hidatídico de origen porcino en México Experimental investigation of canine echinococcosis from swine hydatic cyst in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Zuñiga-A

    1999-06-01

    ção e os outros cada 5 dias até o 55º dia. No segundo grupo, foram sacrificados no 55º dia. Foram encontrados ovos do cestóides em fezes a partir do 51º dia pós-infeção. A avaliação morfológica foi feita por meio de observação microscópica da raspagem de mucosa intestinal. RESULTADOS: Dos 50 cestóides analisados, 10 corresponderam a cada um dos cães infectados, 49 (98% mostraram 3 proglotides e 1 (2% continha só 4; 18 (36% dos cestóides apresentavam um proglotide grávido. Na availação clínica, o número de leucócitos e a quantidade de proteínas plasmáticas foram significantemente maiores no grupo testemunha (P OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the infection and obtain the adult state of the cestode, echinococcosis was reproduced in dogs using the hydatic cyst of swine. METHODS: Two groups were formed, one of five and the other of three dogs, each animal in the experimental group was given two grams of germinative membrane of fertile hydatic cyst by oral route. The second was the control group. Both groups were evaluated clinically, serologically and parasitologically. One animal was killed on the 35th day after infection and each five successive days until the 55th day. In the second group all the animals were killed on the 55th day. Eggs of the cestode were observed in feces from the 51st post-infection day. The morphological evaluation was made through microscopic observation of the mucous intestine scraping. RESULTS: Fifty cestodes were analyzed, ten from each of the infected dogs, 49 (98% presented three proglottids and 1 (2% had four; 18 (36% of the cestodes presented a gravid proglottid. The length of the strobila varied from 1.6 to 2.6 mm. The average of the long and short hooks was 31 and 34, respectively. The length of the long hooks varied from 0.081 to 0.09 mm, the short hooks from 0.034 to 0.041 mm. The quantity of plasmatic proteins and the number of leukocytes were significantly greater in the control group (P < 0.05; the quantity of alpha

  14. Evaluación de dos pruebas de inmunoblot con antígeno hidatídico de caprino y ovino para el diagnóstico de equinococosis humana Evaluation of two immunoblot tests with goat and sheep hydatid antigen for human echinococcosis diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Miranda

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Para estimar el valor diagnóstico del antígeno hidatídico de caprino y de ovino en la prueba de inmunoblot para echinococosis quística, se usó 135 sueros, de los cuales 70 procedían de pacientes con hidatidosis confirmada por el hallazgo de protoescólices y membrana en el estudio anatomopatológico con la pieza quirúrgica; 45 a pacientes con otras enfermedades parasitarias y 20 a personas aparentemente sanas. La sensibilidad, la especificidad, el valor predictivo positivo y negativo de la prueba de inmunoblot, con antígeno hidatídico de caprino fue de 92,8%, 100%, 100% y 92,8%, respectivamente; mientras que de ovino fueron 91,4%, 95,3%, 95,5% y 91,1 %, respectivamente. El índice kappa fue de 0,93 para el antígeno caprino y de 0,86 con el ovino en relación con el estudio anatomopatológico. Se recomienda el uso de ambos antígenos para el diagnóstico serológico de la equinococosis quística humana.To estimate the diagnosis value of goat and ovine antigen for echinococcosis immunoblot test, 135 serums were used, of which 70 were coming from patients with hydatid disease confirmed by the finding of proto scolex and membrane in the pathology study of surgical piece, 45 from patients with other parasitic diseases and 20 apparently healthy people. The sensitivity, the specificity, positive and negative predictive value of immunoblot test, with hidatyd antigen of goat was of 92.8%, 100%, 100%, 92.8%, respectively, than for ovine antigen was 91.4%, 95.3%, 95.5%, 91.1%, respectively. Kappa index was 0.93 for goat antigen and 0.86 with sheep in relation to the pathological study. We recommended the use of both antigens for the serologic diagnosis of human echinococcosis.

  15. Critical analysis of cystic echinococcosis control programs and praziquantel use in South America, 1974-2010 Análisis crítico de los programas de control de la equinococosis quística y uso del prazicuantel en América del Sur, 1974-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Larrieu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is one of the most prevalent zoonoses in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru, and Uruguay. Control programs in South America were originally modeled after programs developed in insular territories, such as Tasmania and New Zealand. The advent and proven effectiveness of praziquantel, plus the experience of insular models, produced high expectations for rapid advances; however, after 30 years of praziquantel use, no endemic area in South America has obtained eradication. In fact, only modest gains in CE control have been made and impact on prevalence among humans has been slight. A major impediment has been the infrastructure needed to administer praziquantel to dogs in rural areas 8 times per year over numerous years, a requirement for rapid attack stage 1. Such an infrastructure has not been financially or politically sustainable in endemic areas, which tend to be the poorest. On the other hand, certain areas in Argentina have had success with simple and economically viable alternatives. Based primarily on continuous field work supported by the local community, these strategies have significantly decreased transmission to humans, the health sector's main objective. In addition, new possibilities and tools, such as the EG95 vaccine, are being evaluated; as are early detection and treatment of asymptomatic carriers.La equinococosis quística (EQ es una de las zoonosis más prevalentes en Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Perú y Uruguay. Los programas de control en América del Sur fueron originalmente hechos a imitación de los programas desarrollados en territorios insulares, como Tasmania y Nueva Zelandia. El advenimiento y la eficacia comprobada del prazicuantel, sumados a la experiencia de los modelos insulares, dieron lugar a altas expectativas de adelantos rápidos; sin embargo, después de 30 años de uso del prazicuantel, ninguna zona endémica en América del Sur ha logrado la erradicación de la enfermedad. De hecho, solo

  16. Diagnosis of echinococcosis of the liver by angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, K.; Treugut, H.; Mahnke, B.; Barth, V.; Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart

    1980-01-01

    Twenty patients with Echinococcus cysticus and 15 with E. alveolaris were studied. Selective upper abdominal angiographies, performed in most of these cases, were reviewed retrospectively for typical angiographic changes. In a large percentage, E. cysticus demonstrated typical cystic and expansive signs; atypical vessels were rarely seen. How the 'rim sign' develops is demonstrated. Usual signs of E. alveolaris are incomplete solid and necrotic space occupying lesions, as seen also in malignancy. Although angiography offers a high diagnostic rate in hepatic manifestation of this parasitic disease, it has been superseded today by sonography and computer tomography. It is, however, still a valuable investigation in pre-operative work-up. (orig.) [de

  17. Diagnosis of echinococcosis of the liver by angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, K.; Treugut, H.; Mahnke, B.; Barth, V.

    1980-07-01

    Twenty patients with Echinococcus cysticus and 15 with E. alveolaris were studied. Selective upper abdominal angiographies, performed in most of these cases, were reviewed retrospectively for typical angiographic changes. In a large percentage, E. cysticus demonstrated typical cystic and expansive signs; atypical vessels were rarely seen. How the 'rim sign' develops is demonstrated. Usual signs of E. alveolaris are incomplete solid and necrotic space occupying lesions, as seen also in malignancy. Although angiography offers a high diagnostic rate in hepatic manifestation of this parasitic disease, it has been superseded today by sonography and computer tomography. It is, however, still a valuable investigation in pre-operative work-up.

  18. Metformin exhibits preventive and therapeutic efficacy against experimental cystic echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Julia A.; Dávila, Valeria A.; Rodrígues, Christian R.; Petrigh, Romina; Zoppi, Jorge A.; Crocenzi, Fernando A.; Cumino, Andrea C.

    2017-01-01

    Metformin (Met) is an anti-hyperglycemic and potential anti-cancer agent which may exert its anti-proliferative effects via the induction of energetic stress. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of Met against the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Metformin showed significant dose- and time-dependent killing effects on in vitro cultured protoscoleces and metacestodes. Notably, the combination of Met together with the minimum effective concentration of ABZSO had a synergistic effect after days 3 and 12 on metacestodes and protoscoleces, respectively. Oral administration of Met (50 mg/kg/day) in E. granulosus-infected mice was highly effective in reducing the weight and number of parasite cysts, yet its combination with the lowest recommended dose of ABZ (5 mg/kg/day) was even more effective. Coincidentally, intracystic Met accumulation was higher in animals treated with both drugs compared to those administered Met alone. Furthermore, the safe plant-derived drug Met exhibited remarkable chemopreventive properties against secondary hydatidosis in mice. In conclusion, based on our experimental data, Met emerges as a promising anti-echinococcal drug as it has proven to efficiently inhibit the development and growth of the E. granulosus larval stage and its combination with ABZ may improve the current anti-parasitic therapy. PMID:28182659

  19. Metformin exhibits preventive and therapeutic efficacy against experimental cystic echinococcosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Loos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Metformin (Met is an anti-hyperglycemic and potential anti-cancer agent which may exert its anti-proliferative effects via the induction of energetic stress. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of Met against the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Metformin showed significant dose- and time-dependent killing effects on in vitro cultured protoscoleces and metacestodes. Notably, the combination of Met together with the minimum effective concentration of ABZSO had a synergistic effect after days 3 and 12 on metacestodes and protoscoleces, respectively. Oral administration of Met (50 mg/kg/day in E. granulosus-infected mice was highly effective in reducing the weight and number of parasite cysts, yet its combination with the lowest recommended dose of ABZ (5 mg/kg/day was even more effective. Coincidentally, intracystic Met accumulation was higher in animals treated with both drugs compared to those administered Met alone. Furthermore, the safe plant-derived drug Met exhibited remarkable chemopreventive properties against secondary hydatidosis in mice. In conclusion, based on our experimental data, Met emerges as a promising anti-echinococcal drug as it has proven to efficiently inhibit the development and growth of the E. granulosus larval stage and its combination with ABZ may improve the current anti-parasitic therapy.

  20. Efficacy of Albendazole-Chitosan Microsphere-based Treatment for Alveolar Echinococcosis in Mice.

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    Maitiseyiti Abulaihaiti

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the pharmacology and anti-parasitic efficacy of albendazole-chitosan microspheres (ABZ-CS-MPs for established intraperitoneal infections of Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes in an experimental murine model. Male outbred Kunming mice infected with E. multilocularis Metacestodes were administered with three ABZ formulations, namely, ABZ-CS-MPs, Liposome-Albendazole (L-ABZ, and albendazole tablet (ABZ-T. Each of the ABZ formulations was given orally at three different doses of 37.5, 75, and 150 mg/kg, three times a week for 12 weeks postinfection. After administering the drugs, we monitored the pharmacological performance and anti-parasitic efficacy of ABZ-CS-MPs compared with L-ABZ, and ABZ-T treated mice. ABZ-CS-MPs reduced the weight of tissues containing E. multilocularis metacestodes most effectively compared with the ABZ-T group and untreated controls. Metacestode grown was Highly suppressed during treatment with ABZ-CS-MPs. Significantly higher plasma levels of ABZ metabolites were measured in mice treated with ABZ-CS-MPs or L-ABZ compared with ABZ-T. In particular, enhanced ABZ-sulfoxide concentration profiles were observed in the mice given 150 mg/kg of ABZ-CS-MPs, but not in the mice treated with L-ABZ. Histological examination showed that damages caused disorganization of both the germinal and laminated layers of liver hyatid cysts, demolishing their characteristic structures after treatment with ABZ-CS-MPs or L-ABZ. Over time, ABZ-CS-MPs treatment induced a shift from Th2-dominant to Th1-dominant immune response. CS-MPs As a new carrier exhibited improved absorption and increased bioavailability of ABZ in the treatment of E. multilocularis infections in mice.

  1. Epidemiological surveillance of cystic echinococcosis in dogs, sheep farms and humans in the Rio Negro Province

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, Alicia; Costa, María T.; Gustavo, Cantoni; Mancini, Sergio; Mercapide, Carlos; Herrero, Eduardo; Volpe, Marcela; Araya, Daniel; Talmon, Gabriel; Chiosso, Carlos; Vázquez, Gabriela; Del Carpio, Mario; Santillán, Graciela; Larrieu, Edmundo

    2006-01-01

    La vigilancia de la equinococcosis quística para detectar infestación por Echinococcus granulosus en la Provincia de Río Negro en el período 1980-2002 fue efectuada en el hombre mediante encuestas serológicas y ultrasonográficas en población joven, y en el perro por el test de arecolina. Dadas las limitaciones de esta técnica, se planteó suplantarla por el complejo copro ELISA Western Blot en heces caninas recolectadas del suelo. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue comparar las ventajas y li...

  2. Clinical application of dual energy spectral CT method in patients with hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

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    Yi Jiang

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: DESCT could provide more information by using monochromatic images, iodine-based material decomposition images and the quantitative analysis of IC than traditional CT for the diagnosis of HE.

  3. Severe and unusual hepatic lesions asociated with alveolar echinococcosis (Echinococcus multilocularis) in a Gorilla g. gorilla

    OpenAIRE

    Polledo, Laura; Martínez-Fernández, B.; González, J.; Ferreras, Mª del Carmen; García Iglesias, M. J.; García Marín, Juan Francisco

    2011-01-01

    1 página.-- Trabajo presentado al II Iberic Meeting of Veterinary Pathology.--XVI Annual Meeting of the Portuguese Society of Animal Pathology.-- Annual Meeting of the Spanisch Society of Veterinary Anatomical Pathology. (Lisboa, Portugal, 1-3 de junio de 2011).

  4. Sonographic findings in complications in cystic echinococcosis. [CT findings for comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueckel, C.; Beyer, D.; Lorenz, R.; Stelzner, M.

    1987-07-01

    Apart from the difficult differential diagnosis of hydatid liver disease, diagnostic problems may increase in chronic disease because of complications. Compression or infiltration of bile ducts is the most common complication occuring in 16%. Other complications are infiltration of adjacent organs and structures, for instance the right kidney and the diaphragm, or the (often iatrogenic) rupture of hydatid cysts with intraperitoneal spread. Preoperative sonographic diagnosis is important in influencing the surgical procedure.

  5. CASE REPORT CASE CASE R Multi-organ echinococcosis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... lesions in the spleen and the liver (Figs 2 and 3). The indirect haemag- glutination (IHA) serological test ... Three cysts noted in the spleen, as well as a solitary cyst in the inferior region of the ... from fomites or contaminated water, and by direct contact with dogs. After ingestion, embryos escape from the ova, ...

  6. Canine echinococcosis in northern Jordan: increased prevalence and dominance of sheep/dog strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qaoud, Khaled M; Abdel-Hafez, Sami K; Craig, Philip S

    2003-06-01

    A total of 112 stray and semi-stray dogs (Canis familiaris) from four different geographical areas in northern and middle Jordan were necropsied to evaluate the prevalence and intensity of intestinal helminthiasis. Of these, 33 dogs (29.5%) were infected with Echinococcus granulosus and 61 (54.5%) with other Taenia species. Other cestodes found included Dipylidium caninum in 36 dogs (32.1%), Diplopylidium in 6 dogs (5.4%), Mesocestoides sp. in 3 dogs (2.7%) and Joyuexiella in 1 dog (0.9%). Toxocara nematodes were found in 10 dogs (9.2%) and only 1 dog was positive for acanthocephalans. Among the dogs infected with E. granulosus, 8 dogs (24.2%) had a worm load higher than 1,000 worms. The ratio of infected male to female dogs was 1.9:1.0. Strain analysis of E. granulosus using random primers revealed the dominance of the G1 strain (sheep/dog strain) in the region. Only one dog harbored another E. granulosus strain, which resembled the G4 strain pattern.

  7. Diagnosing and staging of cystic echinococcosis: how do CT and MRI perform in comparison to ultrasound?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Stojkovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Imaging plays the key role in diagnosing and staging of CE. The description of CE-specific imaging features and the WHO CE cyst classification is based on ultrasound. The reproducibility of the ultrasound-defined features of CE cysts is variable in MR- and CT-imaging. This is of particular importance for cysts that are not accessible by US and because of the increasing availability and overuse of CT and MR imaging. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Retrospective analysis of patients with abdominal CE cysts of an interdisciplinary CE clinic who had CT and/or MRI scans performed additionally to US imaging. All images were read and interpreted by the same senior radiologist experienced in the diagnosis of CE. US, CT and MR images were staged according to the WHO classification criteria. The agreement beyond chance was quantified by kappa coefficients (κ. 107 patients with 187 CE cysts met the inclusion criteria. All cysts were assessed by US, 138 by CT, and 125 by MRI. The level of agreement beyond chance of the individual CE stages 1-4 was clearly lower for CT, with κ ranging from 0.62 to 0.72, compared to MRI with values of κ between 0.83 and 1.0. For CE5 cysts CT (κ = 0.95 performed better than MRI (κ = 0.65. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound remains the corner stone of diagnosis, staging and follow up of CE cysts. MRI reproduces the ultrasound-defined features of CE better than CT. If US cannot be performed due to cyst location or patient-specific reasons MRI with heavily T2-weighted series is preferable to CT.

  8. Efficacy of Albendazole-Chitosan Microsphere-based Treatment for Alveolar Echinococcosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulaihaiti, Maitiseyiti; Wu, Xiang-Wei; Qiao, Lei; Lv, Hai-Long; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Aduwayi, Nasrul; Wang, Yan-Jie; Wang, Xin-Chun; Peng, Xin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pharmacology and anti-parasitic efficacy of albendazole-chitosan microspheres (ABZ-CS-MPs) for established intraperitoneal infections of Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes in an experimental murine model. Male outbred Kunming mice infected with E. multilocularis Metacestodes were administered with three ABZ formulations, namely, ABZ-CS-MPs, Liposome-Albendazole (L-ABZ), and albendazole tablet (ABZ-T). Each of the ABZ formulations was given orally at three different doses of 37.5, 75, and 150 mg/kg, three times a week for 12 weeks postinfection. After administering the drugs, we monitored the pharmacological performance and anti-parasitic efficacy of ABZ-CS-MPs compared with L-ABZ, and ABZ-T treated mice. ABZ-CS-MPs reduced the weight of tissues containing E. multilocularis metacestodes most effectively compared with the ABZ-T group and untreated controls. Metacestode grown was Highly suppressed during treatment with ABZ-CS-MPs. Significantly higher plasma levels of ABZ metabolites were measured in mice treated with ABZ-CS-MPs or L-ABZ compared with ABZ-T. In particular, enhanced ABZ-sulfoxide concentration profiles were observed in the mice given 150 mg/kg of ABZ-CS-MPs, but not in the mice treated with L-ABZ. Histological examination showed that damages caused disorganization of both the germinal and laminated layers of liver hyatid cysts, demolishing their characteristic structures after treatment with ABZ-CS-MPs or L-ABZ. Over time, ABZ-CS-MPs treatment induced a shift from Th2-dominant to Th1-dominant immune response. CS-MPs As a new carrier exhibited improved absorption and increased bioavailability of ABZ in the treatment of E. multilocularis infections in mice.

  9. Heterogenity of Echinococcus canadensis genotype 6 - the main causative agent of cystic echinococcosis in Birjand, Eastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamian, Mehdi; Haghighi, Fatemeh; Hemmati, Mina; Taylor, Walter Robert; Salehabadi, Alireza; Ghatee, Mohammad Amin

    2017-10-15

    Little is known about the genotypes of Echinococcus spp. and their life cycles in eastern Iran. We analysed the partial sequences of the nad1 and cox1 genes from 17 isolates from hydatid cyst-infected patients (n=9), camels (n=5) and sheep (n=3) in Birjand, eastern Iran. A new primer pair was also used to amplify the long fragment (1180bp) of the cox1 gene. All camel and eight human isolates were G6 strains of Echinococcus canadensis while one human isolate and the three sheep isolates were G1 genotypes (sheep strain) of E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.). Nad1 and cox1 sequence analyses showed high G6 genetic homogeneity, similar to previously reported G6 strains from southeast and central Iran, Sudan and Mauritania. Low nucleotide and haplotype diversity similar to G6 strains from Russia (Altai republic) and Kazakhstan was also found, consistent with a bottleneck effect. In this study, G6 was the most common Echinococcus genotype. Genetic homogeneity of east, southeast and central Iranian G6 and its low genetic diversity may be due limited mobility and contact between humans and camels from other regions because of large, inhospitable deserts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Neotropical echinococcosis: second report of Echinococcus vogeli natural infection in its main definitive host, the bush dog (Speothos venaticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Carmo Pereira Soares, Manoel; Souza de Souza, Alex Junior; Pinheiro Malheiros, Andreza; Nunes, Heloisa Marceliano; Almeida Carneiro, Liliane; Alves, Max Moreira; Farias da Conceição, Bernardo; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Marins Póvoa, Marinete

    2014-04-01

    The bush dog (Speothos venaticus) acts as the natural definitive host in the life cycle of Echinococcus vogeli, the causative agent of polycystic hydatid disease, a zoonotic neglected disease in the South America. We report a case of natural infection by Echinococcus vogeli in a bush dog from the Brazilian Amazon, confirmed by the morphological and morphometric examination of adult parasites and their hooks obtained from the small intestine of the canid. Additionally, mitochondrial DNA sequence analysis corroborated these findings. This is the second report of natural infection by E. vogeli in a bush dog. © 2013.

  11. Diagnosis of canine echinococcosis: comparison of coproantigen detection with necropsy in stray dogs and red foxes from northern Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shehabi F.S.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used as a diagnostic test for Echinococcus granulosus infection by detecting coproantigens in 94 stray dogs Canis familiaris and eight red foxes (Vulpes vulpes from northern Jordan. The results were analyzed in relation to actual helminth infection as revealed by necropsy. The infection rate of dogs with E. granulosus was 13.8 % with a worm load ranging between 3 - > 10,000 per infected dog. In contrast, eight of 13 E. granulosus infected dogs were coproantigen positive (overall sensitivity 61.5 %. The sensitivity increased to 87.5 % and 100 % in dogs harboring > 20 and > 100 worms/dog, respectively. The specificity of coproantigen-ELISA was 91 %. The greatest cross-reactivity was found in dogs infected with Dipylidium caninum. The positive and negative predictive values for the coproantigen-ELISA test were 50 % and 94.2 %, respectively. Thus, a coproantigen negative dog is most probably truly negative for E. granulosus. In contrast, a coproantigen positive dog may not be truly positive for E. granulosus, except if it has a high worm burden of > 100 worms/animal.

  12. Coprological survey of alimentary tract parasites in dogs from Zambia and evaluation of a coproantigen assay for canine echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, N; Nakamura, S; Inoue, T; Oku, Y; Katakura, K; Matsumoto, J; Mathis, A; Chembesofu, M; Phiri, I G K

    2011-01-01

    Faecal samples were collected from the rectum of 540 domestic dogs from four districts (Lusaka, Katete, Petauke and Luangwa) in Zambia between 2005 and 2006 and prevalences of canine alimentary tract parasites were determined by coprological examination. Thirteen different ova and parasites including strongyle (43.3%), Spirocerca lupi (18.7%), taeniid (13.1%), Toxocara canis (7.6%), Sarcocystis sp.* (7.5%), Isospora sp.* (5.7%), Physaloptera sp.* (4.6%), Capillaria sp.* (2.8%), Dipylidium caninum (2.2%), Mesocestoides sp.* (2.0%), Ascaris sp.* (1.7%), Trichuris vulpis* (0.4%) and Schistosoma mansoni* (0.4%) were detected, Ascaris and Schistosoma probably originating from coprophagy. The species with asterisks and later-described Taenia multiceps are for the first time reported from dogs in Zambia. A coproantigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CoproAg-ELISA) developed for Echinococcus spp. revealed 43 positive dogs and 37 of these harboured taeniid eggs. From 63 of the 71 taeniid egg-positive samples, eggs and DNA thereof were isolated and subjected to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction for differentiating E. granulosus sensu lato, E. multilocularis and Taenia spp. Amplicons indicative for Taenia spp. were obtained from 60 samples. Sequencing of amplicons spanning part of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene, which was possible with 38 samples, revealed 35 infections with T. hydatigena and 3 with T. multiceps. Therefore, the CoproAg-ELISA showed some positives, but concrete evidence for the existence of canine E. granulosus infection could not be established. Comparison of the results of the CoproAg-ELISA and Taenia species identification indicated that the CoproAg-ELISA cross-reacts with patent infections of T. hydatigena (57%) and T. multiceps (33%). PMID:22185947

  13. First report of a human case of polycystic echinococcosis due to Echinococcus vogeli from neotropical area of Peru, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somocurcio, José R; Sánchez, Elizabeth L; Náquira, César; Schilder, José; Rojas, Francisco; Chacón, Pedro; Yabar, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    We report a human case of polycystic hidatidosis due to Echinococcus vogeli from Contamana (Department of Loreto) village located in the central jungle of Peru. The patient is a 44 year-old lady, teacher, who carried a painless liver mass since a year ago. She was submitted to abdominal surgery and the liver mass was removed and showed multiple cysts containing colorless liquid as is showed in the polycystic hidatidosis. The morphology and measure of the hooks obtained from the liquid contained in the cysts are from Echinococcus vogeli. It is the first report of this parasitism in Perú.

  14. Th9/IL-9 Profile in Human Echinococcosis: Their Involvement in Immune Response during Infection by Echinococcus granulosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan Pang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Th9 cells have been reported to contribute to immune responses; however, the role of Th9 cells in Echinococcus granulosus infection is unknown. This study is to determine whether Th9 cells and IL-9 are involved in human Echinococcus granulosus infection. Compared with healthy controls (HC group, the mRNA levels of PU.1, IL-9, and GATA-3 were significantly increased in patients before therapy (CE group, as revealed by qRT-PCR. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the percentages of Th9 and Th2 cells in CE group were significantly higher. The levels of IL-9, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β in CE group were also significantly increased, as detected by CBA assay. The percentages of Th9 and Th2 cells in CE group were positively correlated. After treatments of surgery in combination with albendazole, the PU.1 and GATA-3 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in patients after therapy (PCE group compared with CE group. The numbers of Th9 and Th2 cells and levels of IL-9, IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β were also significantly decreased in PCE group. In conclusion, the ratios of Th9 cells and IL-9 levels were significantly decreased after treatment, suggesting that Th9/IL-9 may be involved in immune response induced by Echinococcus granulosus infection.

  15. [Epidemiological profile of 290 cases of human cystic echinococcosis diagnosed in the Mustapha University Hospital (Algiers) from 2006 to 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zait, H; Achir, I; Guerchani, M K; Hamrioui, B

    2013-10-01

    This study reports a series of 290 cases of hydatidosis confirmed by the surgery and/or the imagery with a positive immuno-diagnosis collected between 1st January 2006 and 31 March 2011 at parasitology-mycology laboratory of hospital university center of Mustapha of Algiers. Our aim is to specify, through the listed cases, the epidemiological aspects of this affection and compared with those obtained in two previous Algerian epidemiological investigations carried out, between 1963-1964 and 1966-1975. It is a retrospective (2006-2008) and prospective (2008-2011) study. The parasitological diagnosis was carried out by the direct macroscopic and/or microscopic identification of the parasite and indirect diagnosis based on four techniques: passive hemagglutination, Elisa IgG "Echinococcus granulosus", Western Blot IgG "Echinococcus" and electrophoresis. The study shows that this affection is still prerogative of the young adult. It bring out also in this study that the child of school age (ten years), in particular the boy, pays a heavy tribute. At the child, the preferential pulmonary seat of the hydatic disease is not devoid of risk. At adult, this parasitic disease mainly affect the active woman. Generally, the epidemiological and clinical characteristics join the endemic countries data and confirmed the row of our country among them. The transmission seems as strong as in the past, in spite of a much better social educational level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Echinococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Echinococcosis is an infection caused by either the Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis tapeworm. The infection is also ... References Fischer PR, Cabada MM, White AC. Echinococcosis ( Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis ). In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  17. First report of a human case of polycystic echinococcosis due to Echinococcus vogeli from neotropical area of Peru, South America Primer reporte de un caso humano de echinococcosis poliquística causada por E. vogeli procedente del área neotropical del Perú, America del Sur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Somocurcio

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a human case of polycystic hidatidosis due to Echinococcus vogeli from Contamana (Department of Loreto village located in the central jungle of Peru. The patient is a 44 year-old lady, teacher, who carried a painless liver mass since a year ago. She was submitted to abdominal surgery and the liver mass was removed and showed multiple cysts containing colorless liquid as is showed in the polycystic hidatidosis. The morphology and measure of the hooks obtained from the liquid contained in the cysts are from Echinococcus vogeli. It is the first report of this parasitism in Perú.Reportamos un caso humano de hidatidosis poliquística debido a Echinococcus vogeli procedente de Contamana (Departamento de Loreto, localidad ubicada en la selva central del Perú. La paciente es una mujer de 44 años de edad, profesora, quien portaba una hepatomegalia no dolorosa de un año de evolución. Sometida a intervención quirúrgica, se removió la masa hepática que macroscópicamente mostró múltiples quistes conteniendo líquido incoloro. El examen microscópico correspondió a una hidatidosis poliquística. El examen y medida de los ganchos obtenidos del contenido de los quistes correspondieron a Echinococcus vogeli. Es el primer reporte de este parasitismo en el Perú.

  18. MRI findings and diagnosis of brain echinococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miriguli Shayiti; Jia Wenxiao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristic findings of brain echinococcosis on MRI. Methods: The MRI findings of 18 patients with pathologically confirmed brain echinococcosis were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Among the patients, there were 9 cases of cystic echinococcosis and 9 cases of alveolar echinococcosis. In cystic echinococcosis, MRI revealed homogeneously hypointensity on T 1 WI and hyperintensity on T 2 WI, while it showed low signal intensity inside the cysts on FLAIR and DWI. In 6 cases of cystic echinococcosis, no edema was detected surrounding the lesions, while edema resulting from cyst rupture was found in 3 cases. The cystic walls were visible in 6 cases, obscure in 3 cases. The ruptured hydatid cysts in 3 cases showed slight ring enhancement. Alveolar echinococcosis appeared as multiple lesions with isointensity on T 1 WI and hypointensity on T 2 WI, surrounded by vasogenic edema. The 'charcoal-like' hypointensity and innumerous hyperintense bubbles of 1-10 mm in diameter inside the lesions on T 2 -weighted MR images were characteristic for lesions of alveolar echinococcosis. The lesions revealed hypointensity on DWI and showed irregular ring enhancement after injection of Gd-DTPA. Perfusion-weighted MR imaging revealed low relative cerebral blood volume. Conclusion: MRI can demonstrate lesions of brain echinococcosis accurately due to its advantages of multiorientation and multiparameter. It is clinically valuable. (authors)

  19. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  20. Equinococosis/hidatidosis en la VII Región de Chile: diagnóstico e intervención educativa Echinococcosis/hydatidosis in Region VII of Chile: diagnosis and educational intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Werner Apt; Carlos Pérez; Ercira Galdamez; Sergio Campano; Flavio Vega; Danilo Vargas; Jorge Rodríguez; Clara Retamal; Pedro Cortés; Inés Zulantay; Paul H. de Rycke

    2000-01-01

    El presente estudio se proyectó para un trabajo simultáneo en tres ámbitos: a) diagnóstico serológico y radiológico y tratamiento quirúrgico de la hidatidosis en la población humana asintomática; b) diagnóstico animal y tratamiento de los perros, y c) evaluación de conocimientos e intervención educativa en familias campesinas y en profesionales y técnicos en salud, agropecuaria y educación, con el fin de contribuir al control del ciclo de transmisión de la enfermedad. Se efectuaron pruebas de...

  1. Echinococcus multilocularis: An Emerging Pathogen in Hungary and Central Eastern Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sréter, Tamás; Széll, Zoltán; Egyed, Zsuzsa

    2003-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of human alveolar echinococcosis, is reported for the first time in Red Foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Hungary. This parasite may be spreading eastward because the population of foxes has increased because of human interventions, and this spread may result in the emergence of alveolar echinococcosis in Central Eastern Europe. PMID:12643838

  2. Dogs’ gastrointestinal parasites and their association with public health in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Kohansal Mohammad Hasan; Fazaeli Asghar; Nourian Abbasali; Haniloo Ali; Kamali Koorosh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Dogs harbour zoonotic parasites that cause serious infections in humans, such as visceral larva migrans, ocular larva migrans, cystic echinococcosis, and alveolar echinococcosis. Studies on dogs’ gastrointestinal parasites in different geographical locations are required to increase knowledge of the risk of canine zoonoses in human populations.

  3. Significant increase of Echinococcus multilocularis prevalencein foxes, but no increased predicted risk for humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; Dam-Deisz, W.D.C.; Roon, van A.M.; Takumi, K.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of the zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, causative agent ofalveolar echinococcosis (AE), poses a public health risk. A previously designed risk mapmodel predicted a spread of E. multilocularis and increasing numbers of alveolar echinococ-cosis patients in the province of

  4. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Caused by Hydatid Cyst of the First Rib-Rare But Important

    OpenAIRE

    Levy Faber, Dan; Best, Lael-Anson; Militianu, Daniela; Ben Nun, Alon

    2010-01-01

    Hydatid cysts are usually located in the liver and lungs. Skeletal echinococcosis is relatively rare and that of the rib is exceptional. Less than 50 cases of costal echinococcosis have been reported in the literature so far. To our knowledge, only one case report of thoracic outlet syndrome due to echinococcal cyst in the first rib was described in 1995. Accurate pre-operative diagnosis is important but may be challenging in some cases. Reported here is a case of echinococcosis of the first ...

  5. Search Results | Page 80 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-01-01

    Results 791 - 800 of 8492 ... International Development Research Centre (IDRC) supported research study on Echinococcosis/Hydatidosis which was carried out between 1992 and 2001 in Kathmandu Metropolitan City Nepal. Published date. January 1, 2009. Studies.

  6. Impact of overgrazing on the transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis in Tibetan pastoral communities of Sichuan Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Qian; Xiao, Yong-fu; Vuitton, Dominique A; Schantz, Peter M; Raoul, Francis; Budke, Christine M; Campos-Ponce, Maiza; Craig, Philip S; Giraudoux, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Overgrazing was assumed to increase the population density of small mammals that are the intermediate hosts of Echinococcus multilocularis, the pathogen of alveolar echinococcosis in the Qinghai Tibet Plateau. This research tested the hypothesis that overgrazing might promote

  7. Comparative prevalence of hydatidosis in slaugh- tered domestic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    were collected in a plastic bags for examination in the nearest veterinary clinic ... hydatidosis/echinococcosis is an endemic parasitic problem occurring in cam- .... sheet and then subjected to descriptive analysis by using SPPS for windows.

  8. Echinococcus granulosus Prevalence in Dogs in Southwest Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyeduntan Adejoju Adediran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a public health parasitic disease that is cosmopolitan (Echinococcus granulosus in its distribution. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris have been recognised as the definitive host of the parasite. The present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of canine echinococcosis in Southwest Nigeria using direct enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to detect sera antigen. Two hundred and seventy-three (273 canine sera were tested for the presence of Echinococcus antigen. Purpose of keeping (hunting or companion, age (young or adult, and sex of each dog were considered during sampling. Total prevalence recorded was 12.45% (34/273. There was significant difference (P0.05 between young and adult dogs. There was no association between sex and prevalence of canine echinococcosis. The result of this study established the presence of canine echinococcosis in Southwest Nigeria; thus there is the possibility of occurrence of zoonotic form of the disease (human cystic hydatid diseases in the region.

  9. Investigation of zoonotic infections in risk groups in Ordu University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-15

    Feb 15, 2016 ... 2017 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Abstract. Aims:Zoonotic ... Investigation of zoonotic infections in risk groups in ..... of Cystic Echinococcosis in Veterinary Surgeons. Turkish ...

  10. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Prevalence of echinococcosis in dogs and wild carnivores in selected Serengeti ecosystem areas of Tanzania ... Evaluation of the thermotolerance of an inactivated rabies vaccine for dogs

  11. Molecular discrimination of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis by sequencing and a new PCR-RFLP method with the potential use for other Echinococcus species

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAKALAR, Çağrı; KUK, Salih; ERENSOY, Ahmet; DAĞLI, Adile Ferda; ÖZERCAN, İbrahim Hanifi

    2015-01-01

    To develop a novel polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol using a new genomic marker sequence and a novel set of restriction enzymes in order to detect and discriminate 2 Echinococcus species, E. granulosus and E. multilocularis, found in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human tissues. Materials and methods: DNA was isolated from 11 FFPE human tissue samples positive for cystic echinococcosis or alveolar echinococcosis. A mitochondrial...

  12. Echinococcal disease of the bone: An unusual cause of a pathological fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Goodier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is caused by the larva of the tapeworm, Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multiloccularis and is endemic in many rural areas of Southern Africa. Echinococcosis of the bone is an unusual manifestation of echinococcal disease and a rare cause of a lytic lesion of bone. This report describes a 30-yr old female who presented with an Echinococcal cyst of the right radius complicated by a pathological fracture.

  13. Vigilancia epidemiológica de la equinococcosis quística en perros, establecimientos ganaderos y poblaciones humanas en la provincia de Río Negro Epidemiological surveillance of cystic echinococcosis in dogs, sheep farms and humans in the Rio Negro Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Pérez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La vigilancia de la equinococcosis quística para detectar infestación por Echinococcus granulosus en la Provincia de Río Negro en el período 1980-2002 fue efectuada en el hombre mediante encuestas serológicas y ultrasonográficas en población joven, y en el perro por el test de arecolina. Dadas las limitaciones de esta técnica, se planteó suplantarla por el complejo copro ELISA Western Blot en heces caninas recolectadas del suelo. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue comparar las ventajas y limitaciones de las dos técnicas para medir la prevalencia de la infección en el perro, y evaluar la prevalencia actual de la infección en el hombre y en el perro. El área de trabajo comprendió 7 Departamentos endémicos con Programas de desparasitación canina sistemática (Area Programa y 4 Departamentos no endémicos como Area Testigo. El test de arecolina se aplicó en los perros, con concurrencia voluntaria de sus propietarios (muestreo no aleatorizado. Las muestras para detección de coproantígenos fueron obtenidas de establecimientos ganaderos seleccionados en forma aleatorizada. En el hombre se determinó la prevalencia mediante tamizajes ultrasonográficos en escolares de 6 a 14 años y la incidencia por medio del sistema oficial de notificación de casos sintomáticos. Se dosificaron con arecolina 416 perros resultando 19 (5.2% positivos en el Area Programa y ninguno positivo en el Area Testigo. Para la detección de coproantígenos se obtuvieron 748 muestras de materia fecal de 271 establecimientos ganaderos, resultando 37 muestras y 32 establecimientos (13.6% positivos en el Area Programa y 4 muestras y 4 establecimientos (11.4%, IC: 0.3-32.3 positivos en el Área Testigo. En el Area Programa se efectuaron 7421 ecografías abdominales a escolares, detectándose 40 (0.5% casos con imágenes compatibles con hidatidosis, mientras en el área testigo se efectuaron 1732 ecografías con 9 (0.5% casos positivos. El test de arecolina aportó información de la prevalencia individual mientras que la detección de coproantigenos permitió mejorar la calidad de la información identificándose establecimientos donde concentrar acciones de control. El estudio permitió identificar nuevas áreas de transmisión.The surveillance of infection for Echinococcus granulosus in the Province of Rio Negro during 1980-2002 included serological and ultrasonographic screening in humans and arecoline test in dogs. In lieu of the limitations of the arecoline test the proposal was to supplant that test for the copro Elisa-copro/Western Blot complex applied to feces collected from the environment. The objective was to compare the pros and cons of the two tests and to evaluate the human and the canine infection prevalence. The working area encompassed 7 Departments with systematic canine parasiticide activities (Program Area and 4 Departments, not endemic, as Control Area. The arecoline test was applied to the dogs in assembled groups with the voluntary participation of their owners (not randomized sampling. Samples for the detection of coproantigens were obtained from sheep farms selected at random and analyzed by the complex copro-Elisa /Western Blot. Prevalence in man was determined by screening the school population (6 to 14 years old by ultrasound, and by means of the compulsory notification of cases from the official system. Dogs (416 were tested with arecoline, 365 of which belonged to the Program Area. Of these 19 (5.2% resulted positive, while none of 51 dogs from the Control Area were positive. Samples (748 of feces were tested to detect coproantigens, obtaining 37 positive samples within the Program Area and 4 within the Control Area. Farms (271 from the livestock estate unit were evaluated, out of which 236 belonged to the Program Area, gave 32 (13.6% positive results, while 4 (11.4% of 35 from the Control Area resulted positive. Sonography tests (7421 were done in the Program Area detecting 40 (0.5% carriers, while in the Control Area, over 1732 tests, 9 (0.5% resulted positive. The arecoline test provides information about the dog prevalence while the detection of coproantigens in feces collected from the environment allowed to enhance the quality of the information, and the identification of environments where specific control activities focusing on risk must be concentrated. Also the study allowed to recognize new transmission areas.

  14. Immunodiagnosis of Echinococcus Infections: Confirmatory Testing and Species Differentiation by a New Commercial Western Blot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liance, Martine; Janin, Veronique; Bresson-Hadni, Solange; Vuitton, Dominique-Angele; Houin, Rene; Piarroux, Renaud

    2000-01-01

    The Echinococcus Western Blot IgG (LDBIO Diagnostics, Lyon, France), using a whole larval antigen from Echinococcus multilocularis, was evaluated for serodiagnosis and differentiation between two human parasitic infections of worldwide importance: cystic echinococcosis, due to Echinococcus granulosus, and alveolar echinococcosis, due to E. multilocularis. Fifty and 61 serum samples from patients with cystic and alveolar echinococcosis, respectively, were used for assessing diagnostic sensitivity. The sensitivity of the assay was compared with those of screening tests used for these applications. Sera used for assessing cross-reactivities were from 154 patients with other diseases, either parasitic or not. The assay allowed the detection of serum immunoglobulin G antibodies in 97% of Echinococcus-infected patients. It had a higher sensitivity than screening assays for the detection for each echinococcosis. The assay allowed us to correctly distinguish between E. granulosus- and E. multilocularis-infected patients in 76% of cases. It did not allow us to distinguish active from inactive forms of both echinococcoses. The occurrence of cross-reactivities with neurocysticercosis indicates the necessity for retesting sera with species-specific antigens, for rare patients with neurologic disorders. This study shows the usefulness of the commercially available Echinococcus Western Blot IgG for the serological confirmation of human echinococcosis. PMID:11015390

  15. Computerized tomography in diagnosis of parasitic hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filimonov, G.P.; Garibashvili, R.N.; Tumol'skaya, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt has been made to estimate the diagnostic importance of computerized tomography (CT) in cases of hepatic echinococcosis and alveococcosis to outline the semiotics of these lesions and to establish an order of using CT in a general diagnostic complex. 73 patients at the age of 15-70 (49 with echinococcosis, 24-alveococcosis) have been supervised. The analysis of the results of clinical CT application in cases of parasitic hepatic lesions has shown that CT permits not only to reveal parasitic nodes up to 2 cm size in the liver and other organs but give also their topographoanatomic characteristic. By means of CT one can determine interrelations of parasitic formation with vessels and hepatic bileducts, vena cava inferior, other organs. One can judge at the same time on their compression and germination, remote echinococcosis residues, other complications

  16. Budd-Chiari syndrome complicating hydatid liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robotti, G.C.; Meister, F.; Schroeder, R.; Bern Univ.; Bern Univ.

    1985-01-01

    In two female patients a diagnosis of Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to hepatic echinococcosis was established by CT. One patient developed acute Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to E. granulosus lesions of the liver. The second patient presented with a picture of chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome secondary to alveolar echinococcosis. CT findings of Budd-Chiari syndrome included ascites, low density areas in the liver parenchyma, hypertrophy of the caudate lobe, non visualisation of the hepatic veins, occlusion of the retrohepatic inferior vena cava and enlarged retroperitoneal veins. (orig.) [de

  17. Primary Echinococcus Cyst of the Thyroid: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Yildirim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis, although eradicated in many countries, is still widespread in communities where agriculture is dominant. Cystic hydatidosis is a significant public health problem in the regions with endemic echinococcosis. The hydatid cysts tend to form in the liver or lung, but may also be found in other organs of the body such as brain, heart, and bone, while thyroid gland involvement is rather rare. A 25 year old male presented with solitaire goiter. Laboratory tests and thyroid profile proved normal. Surgical exploration revealed hydatid cyst in the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Examination of the nodule showed it to be a solitary primary thyroid hydatid cyst.

  18. Hydatidecyster i thorax. En vigtig differentialdiagnose til tuberkulose blandt indvandrere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C; Jensen, F; Hviid, L B

    2000-01-01

    into the thoracic muscle is described in a young immigrant from Morocco to Europe (Denmark). Hydatid cyst is an important differential diagnosis from tuberculosis in immigrants from areas with endemic echinococcosis and tuberculosis, such as North Africa and the Middle East. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Nov-13...

  19. Why testes are resistant to hydatidosis: Is blood-testis-barrier ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Testes are extremely rare sites for echinococcosis. To our knowledge only three cases of testicular hydatid disease have been reported so far. In this laboratory animal model, we studied hydatidosis in rabbit testis. Fourteen male albino rabbits (body weight 2.5-3 kg) were randomized into two groups: Group A (study group), ...

  20. Why testes are resistant to hydatidosis: Is blood-testis-barrier ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was demonstrable hydatid cyst (protoscoleces and germinative layer) in testes of five rabbits from Group A, but in one rabbit, both testes were normal. In Group B, three out of four rabbits developed peritoneal hydatidosis. The mechanism of testicular resistance to echinococcosis could be due to blood-testis barrier ...

  1. Een patiënt met alveolaire echinokokkose (infectie met Echinococcus multilocularis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raasveld, M. H.; Ponsioen, C. Y.; den Boer, S.; Schipper, H. G.; Kager, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    In a 45-year-old Swiss male, who had been living in the Netherlands for 20 years, alveolar echinococcosis was diagnosed. He had probably been infected during his youth in Switzerland. His illness became symptomatic more than 20 years later. The diagnosis was reached by microscopic examination of

  2. The prevalance of Echinococcus multilocularis in foxes in Limburg 2002-2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giessen JWB van der; Vries A de; Chu ML; Stortelder V; Mulder JL; Lezenne Coulander C de; Teunis P; MGB

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a survey carried out between January 2002 and March 2003 to determine the prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in the province of Limburg, the Netherlands. Echinococcus multilocularis is the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis, a very

  3. Cardiac Hydatid Disease in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.E. Sukhareva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article describes hydatid disease involving the heart and own clinical observation of hydatid disease of rare localization — multiple organ echinococcosis with lesion of the heart, liver and kidneys in 11-year-old child, successfully operated in the cardiac surgery center. Postoperative catamnesis was 12 years.

  4. Rare manifestation of echinococcus cysticus presented in CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrazidlo, W.; Rieber, A.; Schneider, S.; Brambs, H.J.; Friedel, P.; Heidelberg Univ.

    1989-01-01

    A case of primary spinal echinococcus with bone destruction is presented and the findings in CT and MR imaging are discussed. Although CT and MRI are complementary studies for the diagnosis of the spinal echinococcosis, MRI is the study of choice for prolonged follow-up of complicated cases. (orig.) [de

  5. Laboratory Diagnosis of Echinococcus spp. in Human Patients and Infected Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siles-Lucas, M; Casulli, A; Conraths, F J; Müller, N

    2017-01-01

    Among the species composing the genus Echinococcus, four species are of human clinical interest. The most prevalent species are Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis, followed by Echinococcus vogeli and Echinococcus oligarthrus. The first two species cause cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) respectively. Both diseases have a complex clinical management, in which laboratory diagnosis could be an adjunctive to the imaging techniques. To date, several approaches have been described for the laboratory diagnosis and followup of CE and AE, including antibody, antigen and cytokine detection. All of these approaches are far from being optimal as adjunctive diagnosis particularly for CE, since they do not reach enough sensitivity and/or specificity. A combination of several methods (e.g., antibody and antigen detection) or of several (recombinant) antigens could improve the performance of the adjunctive laboratory methods, although the complexity of echinococcosis and heterogeneity of clinical cases make necessary a deep understanding of the host-parasite relationships and the parasite phenotype at different developmental stages to reach the best diagnostic tool and to make it accepted in clinical practice. Standardization approaches and a deep understanding of the performance of each of the available antigens in the diagnosis of echinococcosis for the different clinical pictures are also needed. The detection of the parasite in definitive hosts is also reviewed in this chapter. Finally, the different methods for the detection of parasite DNA in different analytes and matrices are also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. First report of Echinococcus shiquicus in dogs from eastern Qinghai-Tibet plateau region, China.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boufana, B.; Qui, J.; Chen, X.; Budke, C.; Campos Ponce, M.; Craig, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Echinococcus shiquicus was discovered in foxes and pika wildlife hosts in Sichuan Province, China in 2005. Faecal samples from dogs collected in a previous echinococcosis purgation survey from Shiqu County, Ganzi Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Sichuan) were screened by coproPCR to investigate the

  7. Control Strategy for Echinococcus multilocularis

    OpenAIRE

    Hegglin, Daniel; Deplazes, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of zoonotic alveolar echinococcosis, can be controlled effectively by the experimental delivery of anthelminthic baits for urban foxes. Monthly baiting over a 45-month period was effective for long-lasting control. Trimonthly baiting intervals were far less effective and did not prevent parasite recovery.

  8. Echinococcus multilocularis in carnivores from the Klatovy district of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínek, K.; Kolářová, L.; Červený, Jaroslav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 75, c. 1 (2001), s. 61-66 ISSN 0022-149X R&D Projects: GA MZd NJ4962 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : alveolar echinococcosis * Vulpes vulpes * red fox Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.698, year: 2001 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?aid=709408

  9. First molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus (sensu stricto) genotype 1 among cattle in Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Mohamed E.; Salim, Bashir; Grobusch, Martin P.; Aradaib, Imadeldin E.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.) is the causative agent of cystic echinococcosis (CE), which is a cosmopolitan zoonotic parasitic disease infecting humans and a wide range of mammalian species including cattle. Currently, little information is available on the genetic diversity

  10. Echinococcus spp.: Tapeworms that Pose a Danger to Both Animals and Humans – a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brožová A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Species of the genus Echinococcus (Cestoda; Taeniidae are minute tapeworms of carnivores. Their larvae are known as hydatids (metacestode, which proliferate asexually in various mammals. Like the majority of cestodes, Echinococcus spp. require two different host species to complete their life cycle. Definitive hosts harbouring the adult cestodes in the small intestine are exclusively carnivores of the Canidae and Felidae families. A wide range of mammal species including humans is susceptible to infection by the metacestode of Echinococcus spp., which develops in their viscera. The disease, caused by species of the genus Echinococcus, is called echinococcosis, and it is one of the most dangerous zoonoses in the world. The traditional species Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis are agents of significant diseases due to the high number of cases and the wide geographical species range. The taxonomy of the genus is controversial; in the current state of ongoing complex revisions, the agent of cystic echinococcosis E. granulosus sensu lato is divided into five species (E. granulosus sensu stricto, E. felidis, E. equinus, E. ortleppi, E. canadensis, in addition to the agents of alveolar echinococcosis (E. multilocularis, E. shiquicus and polycystic/unicystic echinococcosis (E. vogeli, E. oligarthrus. Here we provide an overview of the current situation, which continues to develop.

  11. First insights into species and genotypes of Echinococcus in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogoye, Benjamin K.; Menezes, Colin N.; Wong, Michelle L.; Stacey, Sarah; von Delft, Dirk; Wahlers, Kerstin; Wassermann, Marion; Romig, Thomas; Kern, Peter; Grobusch, Martin P.; Frean, John

    2013-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a serious and neglected parasitic zoonosis that is regarded as an emerging disease world-wide. Effective control of the disease is based on understanding the variability of Echinococcus granulosus (sensu lato), as genotypic characteristics may influence lifecycle patterns,

  12. Molecular discrimination of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis by sequencing and a new PCR-RFLP method with the potential use for other Echinococcus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şakalar, Çağrı; Kuk, Salih; Erensoy, Ahmet; Dağli, Adile Ferda; Özercan, İbrahim Hanifi; Çetınkaya, Ülfet; Yazar, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    To develop a novel polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) protocol using a new genomic marker sequence and a novel set of restriction enzymes in order to detect and discriminate 2 Echinococcus species, E. granulosus and E. multilocularis, found in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human tissues. DNA was isolated from 11 FFPE human tissue samples positive for cystic echinococcosis or alveolar echinococcosis. A mitochondrial genomic marker region was amplified and sequenced using a novel primer pair and a new PCR-RFLP protocol was developed for the detection and discrimination of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis using a set of restriction enzymes including AccI, MboI, MboII, and TsoI. The selected marker region was amplified using DNA isolated from FFPE human tissue samples positive for cystic echinococcosis or alveolar echinococcosis and the discrimination of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis was accomplished by use of the novel PCR-RFLP method. In this PCR-RFLP protocol, use of any single restriction enzyme is enough for the discrimination of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis. The PCR-RFLP protocol can be potentially used for the discrimination of 5 other Echinococcus species: E. oligarthus, E. shiquicus, E. ortleppi, E. canadensis, and E. vogeli.

  13. First report on circulation of Echinococcus ortleppi in the one humped camel (Camelus dromedaries), Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Mohamed E.; Eltom, Kamal H.; Musa, Nasreen O.; Ali, Ibtisam A.; Elamin, Fatima M.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Aradaib, Imadeldin E.

    2013-01-01

    Echinococcus granulosus (EG) complex, the cause of cystic echinococcosis (CE), infects humans and several other animal species worldwide and hence the disease is of public health importance. Ten genetic variants, or genotypes designated as (G1-G10), are distributed worldwide based on genetic

  14. PR.Latent-class methods to evaluate diagnostics tests for echinococcus infections in dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartnack, S.; Budke, C.M.; Craig, P.S.; Jiamin, Q.; Boufana, B.; Campos Ponce, M.; Torgerson, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of canine echinococcosis can be a challenge in surveillance studies because there is no perfect gold standard that can be used routinely. However, unknown test specificities and sensitivities can be overcome using latent-class analysis with appropriate data. Methodology: We

  15. Hydatid lung cyst in a 5-year-old boy presenting with prolonged fever

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cystic echinococcosis is the larval cystic stage (echinococcal cysts) of a small taeniid-type tapeworm (Echinococcus granulosus) that may cause illness in intermediate hosts, generally herbivorous animals and people who are infected accidentally. Pulmonary hydatid cysts are typical, involving one lobe in 72% of cases, ...

  16. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  17. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2015-08-13

    Aug 13, 2015 ... Middle East, Mediterranean region, Central Europe, Australia and. South America) [1, 2]. The incidence of musculoskeletal echinococcosis including involvement of subcutaneous tissue is 1%-. 5.4% among all cases of hydatid disease [2]. In this report, we present a case of recurrent hydatid cysts involving ...

  18. Page 82 - 85.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    herbivores such as sheep, goat, camel, cattle and omnivores such as swine and humans1. In humans, echinococcosis is endemic in countries where sheep breeding is common, and where there is close contact with dogs2. The prevalence of ...

  19. Effect of dose increase or cimetidine co-administration on albendazole bioavailability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H. G.; Koopmans, R. P.; Nagy, J.; Butter, J. J.; Kager, P. A.; van Boxtel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    The low bioavailability of albendazole affects the therapeutic response in patients with echinococcosis. Cimetidine co-administration is reported to improve bioavailability. To analyze the assumed dose-dependent bioavailability of albendazole, we administered 5 to 30 mg/kg albendazole to 6 male

  20. ADVANZ – control of neglected zoonotic diseases using one health and ecohealth approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarnak, Christopher; Mukaratirwa, S.; Johansen, Maria Vang

    , echinococcosis, and taeniasis/cysticercosis. Five other diseases have also been declared neglected, i.e. brucellosis, bovine tuberculosis, anthrax, human African trypanosomiasis, and leishmaniasis. The best strategic approach to transmission control and management of these diseases involves integrated One Health...

  1. Hydatid Cyst of Tongue: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Aggarwal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hydatid disease or human cystic echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis, endemic in the cattle and dog rearing region worldwide as well as in some parts of India.Cystic echinococcosis affects mostly the liver and lung (80%, but tongue is one of the very rare sites. Case Report A 10 year old boy had presented with an isolated cystic lesion in tongue, which was expelled spontaneously with no residual lesion. On detailed examination, no other site in the body was involved. Discussion Parasitic cyst of the tongue is rare entity. Microbiological and histopathological examination helped clinch the diagnosis Hydatid cyst should be considered as a differential diagnosis in isolated cystic lesion of tongue, especially in the risk group.

  2. Biology and Systematics of Echinococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R C A

    2017-01-01

    The biology of Echinococcus, the causative agent of echinococcosis (hydatid disease) is reviewed with emphasis on the developmental biology of the adult and metacestode stages of the parasite. Major advances include determining the origin, structure and functional activities of the laminated layer and its relationship with the germinal layer; and the isolation, in vitro establishment and characterization of the multipotential germinal cells. Future challenges are to identify the mechanisms that provide Echinococcus with its unique developmental plasticity and the nature of activities at the parasite-host interface, particularly in the definitive host. The revised taxonomy of Echinococcus is presented and the solid nomenclature it provides will be essential in understanding the epidemiology of echinococcosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [First report of Echinococcus vogeli in a paca in Misiones province, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaychipi, Katherina A; Helou, Marcia; Dematteo, Karen; Macchiaroli, Natalia; Cucher, Marcela; Rosenzvit, Mara; D'Alessandro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We report the first finding of Echinococcus vogeli in a paca, Cuniculus paca, in the tropical forest of Misiones, in the north of Argentina. The presence of the bush dog, Speothos venaticus, E. vogelís only natural definitive host, was also reported. The polycystic hydatids, 2 to 3 cm in diameter, were only found in the liver of an adult paca. The size range of the hooks and the relative proportion blade/handle did not show significant differences with respect to the ones reported for E. vogeli. The size of E. granulosus hooks, measured for comparison purposes, was significantly smaller (p E. vogeli in Argentina. The probability of finding neotropical echinococcosis in humans reinforces the need to expand the search for E. vogeli in Argentina. Echinococcosis due to E. vogeli is very aggressive and may cause death in about a third of the human population affected.

  4. Compare the Difference of B-cell Epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 Proteins Selected through Bioinformatic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Mengting; Zhang, Fengbo; Zhu, Yuejie; Zhao, Xiao; Ding, Jianbing

    2018-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, as a zoonosis, seriously endangers humans and animals, so early diagnosis of this disease is particularly important. Therefore, this study is to predict B-cell epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 proteins by bioinformatics software. B-cell epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 proteins are predicted using DNAStar and IEDB software. The results suggest that there are two potential B-cell epitopes in EgAgB1, which located in the 8-15 and 31-37 amino acid residue segments. And two potential B-cell epitopes in EgAgB2, located in the 20∼27 and 47∼53 amino acid residue segments. This study predicted the B-cell epitopes of EgAgB1 and EgAgB3 proteins, which laid the foundation for the early diagnosis of Cystic echinococcosis.

  5. Laparoscopic Removal of Pelvic Hydatid Cysts in Young Female: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedar Gorad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infection caused by larval stages of dog tapeworms belonging to the genus Echinococcus (family taeniidae and is also referred to as echinococcosis. Human cystic echinococcosis caused by E. granulosus is the most common presentation and probably accounts for more than 95% of the estimated 2-3 million annual worldwide cases. The liver (70–80% and lungs (15–25% are the most frequent locations for echinococcal cysts. The diagnosis is made through the combined assessment of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. The treatment is mainly surgical, and, with appropriate diagnosis and treatment, prognosis is good. With advances and increasing experience in laparoscopic surgery, many more attempts have been made to offer the advantage of such a procedure to these patients (Chowbey et al. (2003.

  6. Boiling sheep liver or lung for 30 minutes is necessary and sufficient to kill Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces in hydatid cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper disposal of carcasses and offal after home slaughter is difficult in poor and remote communities and therefore dogs readily have access to hydatid cysts containing offal from livestock, thus completing the parasite cycle of Echinococcus granulosus and putting communities at risk of cystic echinococcosis. Boiling livers and lungs which contain hydatid cysts could be a simple, efficient and energy- and time-saving way to kill the infectious protoscoleces. The aim of this study was to provide precise practical recommendations to livestock owners. Our results show that boiling the whole sheep liver and/or lung, with single or multiple hydatid cysts, for 30 min is necessary and sufficient to kill E. granulosus protoscoleces in hydatid cysts. Advertising on this simple rule in at-risk communities would be an efficient and cheap complement to other veterinary public health operations to control cystic echinococcosis.

  7. In silico cloning and B/T cell epitope prediction of triosephosphate isomerase from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Ye, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Because the methods of diagnosis and treatment for cystic echinococcosis were limited, it is still necessary to screen target proteins for the development of new anti-hydatidosis vaccine. In this study, the triosephosphate isomerase gene of E. granulosus was in silico cloned. The B cell and T cell epitopes were predicted by bioinformatics methods. The cDNA sequence of EgTIM was composition of 1094 base pairs, with an open reading frame of 753 base pairs. The deduced amino acid sequences were composed of 250 amino acids. Five cross-reactive epitopes, locating on 21aa-35aa, 43aa-57aa, 94aa-107aa, 115-129aa, and 164aa-183aa, could be expected to serve as candidate epitopes in the development of vaccine against E. granulosus. These results could provide bases for gene cloning, recombinant expression, and the designation of anti-hydatidosis vaccine.

  8. Predictors of Echinococcus multilocularis prevalence in definitive and intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeuchi-Storm, Nao; Woolsey, Ian David; Jensen, Per Moestrup

    2015-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis (EM) is a pathogenic and potentially fatal cestode causing human alveolar echinococcosis (AE). A meta-analysis was conducted using a generalized estimation equation approach (GEE) to assess the effect of taxonomic, environmental and diagnostic variables on EM prevalenc...... there was some indication of publication bias in this dataset. This study also highlights the possible importance of temperature and precipitation to EM transmission. This implies the possibility of a changing climate affecting the future distribution of the parasite.......Echinococcus multilocularis (EM) is a pathogenic and potentially fatal cestode causing human alveolar echinococcosis (AE). A meta-analysis was conducted using a generalized estimation equation approach (GEE) to assess the effect of taxonomic, environmental and diagnostic variables on EM prevalence...

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of cysts of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'perovich, B.I.; Mitasov, V.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    Is is shown that ultrasonography, computer tomography, laparoscopy provide for liver cyst detection. Parasitic cyst of Echinococcus and opisthhordeiasis nature are subject to surgical treatment. Selective procedures under echinococcosis include echinococcotomy and liver resection, and under opisthorchiasis - liver resection. Under nonparasitic liver cysts of minor size dynamic observation is advisable, under medium, hard and multiple complication cysts - sergical treatment is advisable. Selective procedures under non-complicated cysts include cyst resection with tamponage using omentum, and under complicated multiple cysts - liver resection

  10. First molecular identification of Echinococcus vogeli and Echinococcus granulosus (sensu stricto) G1 revealed in feces of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) from Acre, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves, Leandro Batista; Teixeira, Paulo Eduardo Ferlini; Silva, Sidnei; de Oliveira, Fernanda Bittencourt; Garcia, Daniel Daipert; de Almeida, Fernanda Barbosa; Rodrigues-Silva, Rosângela; Machado-Silva, José Roberto

    2017-01-14

    Echinococcus granulosus (sensu lato) (s.l.) and Echinococcus vogeli are causative agents of chronic zoonotic diseases such as cystic and polycystic echinococcosis, respectively. In Brazil, polycystic echinococcosis has a restricted geographical distribution in the North Region, while cystic echinococcosis is observed in the South Region. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) fed with raw viscera represent a risk factor for E. granulosus (s.l.) infection in the South Region. Although this practice is frequent, it remains unclear whether domestic dogs are infected with E. vogeli in the state of Acre, located in the Amazon basin in the North Region of Brazil. The aim of this study was to investigate this gap in the polycystic echinococcosis epidemiology. Sixty-five fecal samples were collected from the ground in five municipalities (Sena Madureira, n = 14; Rio Branco, n = 06; Bujari, n = 06; Xapuri, n = 30; and Epitaciolândia, n = 09) located in the state of Acre, northern Brazil. The samples were screened for parasites by copro-PCR using the cox1 gene associated with automated sequencing. Echinococcus vogeli was molecularly confirmed in a sample from Sena Madureira and E. granulosus (sensu stricto) (s.s.) (G1) in a sample from Rio Branco. These findings indicate that molecular assays are useful in typing Echinococcus taxa from fecal samples of dogs in northern Brazil. The present study is the first molecular record of E. vogeli in domestic dogs found in the state of Acre, reinforcing their role as a source of infection for humans. Because E. granulosus (s.s.) (G1) was detected for the first time in the North Region, from the epidemiological standpoint this finding is highly relevant, because it expands the known geographical distribution, which was previously restricted to the South Region of Brazil.

  11. Early Peritoneal Immune Response during Echinococcus granulosus Establishment Displays a Biphasic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Marqués, Juan Martín; Chabalgoity, José Alejandro; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis is a worldwide distributed helminth zoonosis caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. Human secondary cystic echinococcosis is caused by dissemination of protoscoleces after accidental rupture of fertile cysts and is due to protoscoleces ability to develop into new metacestodes. In the experimental model of secondary cystic echinococcosis mice react against protoscoleces producing inefficient immune responses, allowing parasites to develop into cysts. Although the chronic phase of infection has been analyzed in depth, early immune responses at the site of infection establishment, e.g., peritoneal cavity, have not been well studied. Because during early stages of infection parasites are thought to be more susceptible to immune attack, this work focused on the study of cellular and molecular events triggered early in the peritoneal cavity of infected mice. Principal Findings Data obtained showed disparate behaviors among subpopulations within the peritoneal lymphoid compartment. Regarding B cells, there is an active molecular process of plasma cell differentiation accompanied by significant local production of specific IgM and IgG2b antibodies. In addition, peritoneal NK cells showed a rapid increase with a significant percentage of activated cells. Peritoneal T cells showed a substantial increase, with predominance in CD4+ T lymphocytes. There was also a local increase in Treg cells. Finally, cytokine response showed local biphasic kinetics: an early predominant induction of Th1-type cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-15), followed by a shift toward a Th2-type profile (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13). Conclusions Results reported here open new ways to investigate the involvement of immune effectors players in E. granulosus establishment, and also in the sequential promotion of Th1- toward Th2-type responses in experimental secondary cystic echinococcosis. These data would be relevant for designing rational therapies

  12. Scientific Opinion on Review of the European Union Summary Report on trends and sources of zoonoses, zoonotic agents and food-borne outbreaks—Terms of reference 2 to 7

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW)

    2013-01-01

    The Animal Health and Welfare (AHAW) Panel of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has evaluated the European Union Summary Report on Trends and Sources of Zoonoses, Zoonotic Agents and Food-borne Outbreaks by EFSA and ECDC (the report) with regard to data needs and subsequent analyses that will minimise the impact of existing data gaps and inconsistencies. Specific assessments performed for bovine tuberculosis, echinococcosis, Q fever, brucellosis, rabies, cysticercosis and tularaemia s...

  13. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) disrupts the structure and metabolism of human Echinococcus granulosus protoscolex in vitro with a dose effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqing; Aji, Tuerganaili; Shao, Yingmei; Jiang, Tiemin; Yang, Lei; Lv, Weimin; Chen, Yonggang; Chen, Xinhua; Wen, Hao

    2017-04-01

    The number of interventional treatments for hepatic cystic echinococcosis is increasing, but the chemicals or high temperatures used in these methodologies cause biliary complications, thus limiting their clinical applications. This experimental study aimed to apply a novel, non-thermal, non-chemical ablation method termed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) for the treatment of human hepatic cystic echinococcosis. The nsPEF treatment parameters against protoscolices from human hepatic cystic echinococcosis were optimized in vitro. The efficacy and mechanism of nsPEF treatment were also investigated. Fresh protoscolices were isolated from human hepatic cystic echinococcosis and were exposed to 300 ns of nsPEF with different field strengths (0, 7, 14, 21, and 29 kV/cm) and pulse numbers (50 and 100 pulses). Then, the viability of the nsPEF-treated protoscolices was evaluated in vitro. Morphological and ultra-structural changes were visualized with H&E staining and scanning electron microscopy. The membrane enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT) was measured. nsPEF caused dose-dependent protoscolex death. One-hundred pulses of nsPEF at 21 kV/cm or higher caused a significant increase in the death rate of protoscolices. nsPEF induced significant lethal damage with 50 pulses at 21 or 29 kV/cm and with 100 pulses at 14, 21, or 29 kV/cm, accompanied by morphological destruction and increased levels of AP and GGT membrane enzymes. Thus, nsPEF induced dose-dependent protoscolex mortality and caused destruction of protoscolices and increased membrane enzymes. The mechanism may involve direct damage to the membrane structures of the protoscolices, promoting enzyme exhaustion and disruption of metabolism.

  14. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

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    Malay Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  15. Top of the Most Dangerous Food Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O. Mochalova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a complete description of parasitic diseases, such as taeniasis and echinococcosis. According to the rating of the risk of contamination by food parasites, which was published by the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in 2014, this parasitosis is a leader. We give a historical overview of these diseases, as well as the features of clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Echinococcus equinus and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto from the United Kingdom: genetic diversity and haplotypic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufana, Belgees; Lett, Wai San; Lahmar, Samia; Buishi, Imad; Bodell, Anthony J; Varcasia, Antonio; Casulli, Adriano; Beeching, Nicholas J; Campbell, Fiona; Terlizzo, Monica; McManus, Donald P; Craig, Philip S

    2015-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is endemic in Europe including the United Kingdom. However, information on the molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus spp. from the United Kingdom is limited. Echinococcus isolates from intermediate and definitive animal hosts as well as from human cystic echinococcosis cases were analysed to determine species and genotypes within these hosts. Echinococcus equinus was identified from horse hydatid isolates, cysts retrieved from captive UK mammals and copro-DNA of foxhounds and farm dogs. Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) was identified from hydatid cysts of sheep and cattle as well as in DNA extracted from farm dog and foxhound faecal samples, and from four human cystic echinococcosis isolates, including the first known molecular confirmation of E. granulosus s.s. infection in a Welsh sheep farmer. Low genetic variability for E. equinus from various hosts and from different geographical locations was detected using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1), indicating the presence of a dominant haplotype (EQUK01). In contrast, greater haplotypic variation was observed for E. granulosus s.s. cox1 sequences. The haplotype network showed a star-shaped network with a centrally placed main haplotype (EgUK01) that had been reported from other world regions. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutation scanning analysis of genetic variation within and among Echinococcus species: implications and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-07-01

    Adult tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus (family Taeniidae) occur in the small intestines of carnivorous definitive hosts and are transmitted to particular intermediate mammalian hosts, in which they develop as fluid-filled larvae (cysts) in internal organs (usually lung and liver), causing the disease echinococcosis. Echinococcus species are of major medical importance and also cause losses to the meat and livestock industries, mainly due to the condemnation of infected offal. Decisions regarding the treatment and control of echinococcosis rely on the accurate identification of species and population variants (strains). Conventional, phenetic methods for specific identification have some significant limitations. Despite advances in the development of molecular tools, there has been limited application of mutation scanning methods to species of Echinococcus. Here, we briefly review key genetic markers used for the identification of Echinococcus species and techniques for the analysis of genetic variation within and among populations, and the diagnosis of echinococcosis. We also discuss the benefits of utilizing mutation scanning approaches to elucidate the population genetics and epidemiology of Echinococcus species. These benefits are likely to become more evident following the complete characterization of the genomes of E. granulosus and E. multilocularis.

  18. Reprint of "Survey and first molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (G1) in Pampas fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus) in Buenos Aires province, Argentina".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scioscia, Nathalia Paula; Petrigh, Romina Sandra; Beldomenico, Pablo Martín; Fugassa, Martín; Denegri, Guillermo María

    2017-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a zoonosis caused by tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.) has a world-wide distribution and its transmission is primarily maintained in a synanthropic cycle with dogs as definitive hosts and livestock species as intermediate hosts. However, many wild canids also function as definitive hosts for E. granulosus s. l. Echinococcosis in humans is mainly caused by E. granulosus sensu stricto (s. s.) G1 genotype. In the present work, we expanded the epidemiological study on echinococcosis reported cases in Pampas fox (Lycalopex gymnocercus) to provide a prevalence estimate for rural areas of southern Buenos Aires province, Argentina. Ninety-five whole intestines were analyzed using the sedimentation and counting technique with a result of 83 foxes (87.37%) harboring at least one helminth species. E. granulosus s. l. adults were found in one Pampas fox (1.05%). These adult helminthes were E. granulosus s. s. (G1) according to the genotyping analysis of a 450-bp region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO as salvage treatment for pulmonary Echinococcus granulosus infection with acute cyst rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören L. Becker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO has been used successfully for the treatment of patients with respiratory failure due to severe infections. Although rare, parasites can also cause severe pulmonary disease. Tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus give rise to the development of cystic structures in the liver, lungs, and other organs. Acute cyst rupture leads to potentially life-threatening infection, and affected patients may deteriorate rapidly. The case of a young woman from Bulgaria who was admitted to hospital with severe dyspnoea, progressive chest pain, and haemoptysis is described. Computed tomography of the chest was pathognomonic for cystic echinococcosis with acute cyst rupture. Following deterioration on mechanical ventilation, she was cannulated for veno-venous ECMO. The patient’s condition improved considerably, and she was weaned successfully from ECMO and mechanical ventilation. Following lobectomy of the affected left lower lobe, the patient was discharged home in good condition. This appears to be the first report of the successful use of ECMO as salvage treatment for a severe manifestation of a helminthic disease. Due to recent migration to Western Europe, the number of patients presenting with respiratory failure due to pulmonary echinococcosis with cyst rupture is likely to increase. Keywords: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO, Infection, Echinococcosis, Echinococcus granulosus, Hydatid disease, Infection

  20. HLA –DRB1*, DQB1* Alleles In Hydatid Patients By Molecular Typing

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    mehdi Mosayebi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Mosayebi M1, Dalimi Asl A2, Moazeni M3, Mosayebi Gh4 1. Ph.D Student, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of medicine, Tarbiat Modarres University 2. Professor, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of medicine, Tarbiat Modarres University 3. Professor, Department of Immunology, Faculty of medicine, Tarbiat Modarres University 4. Assistant professor, Department of Immunology, Faculty of medicine, Arak Medical Sciences University Abstract Background: Hydatidosis is a important disease that results from infection with larvae of the dog tape worm , Echinococcus granulosus in human and farm animals .Resistance or susceptibility to infectious diseases , for example , cystic and alveolar echinococcosis is restricted by individual host factors and immunologic responses,in many surveys has been shown.The target of this study that is the first survey dealing with the correlation between HLA-DRB1*& DQB1* alleles and cystic echinococcosis in Iranian patient,is investigation HLA-DRB1*and DQB1* allelic polymorphism in Iranian patient with hydatidosis . Materials and methods: The study was carried out on 56 patients with confirmed cystic echinococcosis and 30 apparently healthy individuals living on Arak area by HLA-DRB1*& DQB1* typing with PCR-SSP method.The first step was founding patients and blood sampling .DNA was prepared from whole blood and we used PCR-SSP with 31 primer mixes for per sample . PCR reaction mixtures were loaded in agarose gels and after electrophoresis , geles were examine under UV illumination and gel document . Analyse of results carried out with specific software and frequency& interpretation tables and homogeneity test for calculation of P-value in χ2 test with fisher΄s exact test . significant samples with logistic regression analysed and Odds-ratio calculate . Results: A statistically significant positive association was found between HLA-DQB1*02 and the occurrence of cystic echinococcosis(P<0.05,(Odds-ratio=2.87 Conclusion: The

  1. Echinococcus oligarthrus in the subtropical region of Argentina: First integration of morphological and molecular analyses determines two distinct populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabal, Juan Pablo; Avila, Hector Gabriel; Rivero, Maria Romina; Camicia, Federico; Salas, Martin Miguel; Costa, Sebastián A; Nocera, Carlos G; Rosenzvit, Mara C; Kamenetzky, Laura

    2017-06-15

    Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis that is considered as a neglected disease by the World Health Organization. The species Echinococcus oligarthrus is one of the causative agents of Neotropical echinococcosis, which is a poorly understood disease that requires a complex medical examination, may threaten human life, and is frequently associated with a low socioeconomic status. Morphological and genetic diversity in E. oligarthrus remains unknown. The aim of this work is to identify and characterize E. oligarthrus infections in sylvatic animals from the Upper Paraná Atlantic Forest in the province of Misiones, Argentina, by following an integrative approach that links morphological, genetic and ecological aspects. This study demonstrates, for the first time, one of the complete life cycles of E. oligarthrus in an important ecoregion. The Upper Paraná Atlantic Forest constitutes the largest remnant continuous forest of the Atlantic Forest, representing 7% of the world's biodiversity. This is the first molecular determination of E. oligarthrus in Argentina. In addition, the agouti (Dasyprocta azarae), the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and the puma (Puma concolor) were identified as sylvatic hosts of Neotropical echinococcosis caused by E. oligarthrus. Mitochondrial and nuclear molecular marker analyses showed a high genetic diversity in E. oligarthrus. Moreover, the genetic distance found among E. oligarthrus isolates is higher than the one observed among Echinococcus granulosus genotypes, which clearly indicates that there are at least two different E. oligarthrus populations in Argentina. This study provides valuable information to understand the underlying conditions that favour the maintenance of E. oligarthrus in sylvatic cycles and to evaluate its zoonotic significance for devising preventive measures for human and animal wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent advances in Echinococcus genomics and stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, U; Brehm, K

    2015-10-30

    Alveolar and cystic echinococcosis, caused by the metacestode larval stages of the tapeworms Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus, respectively, are life-threatening diseases and very difficult to treat. The introduction of benzimidazole-based chemotherapy, which targets parasite β-tubulin, has significantly improved the life-span and prognosis of echinococcosis patients. However, benzimidazoles show only parasitostatic activity, are associated with serious adverse side effects and have to be administered for very long time periods, underlining the need for new drugs. Very recently, the nuclear genomes of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus have been characterised, revealing a plethora of data for gaining a deeper understanding of host-parasite interaction, parasite development and parasite evolution. Combined with extensive transcriptome analyses of Echinococcus life cycle stages these investigations also yielded novel clues for targeted drug design. Recent years also witnessed significant advancements in the molecular and cellular characterisation of the Echinococcus 'germinative cell' population, which forms a unique stem cell system that differs from stem cells of other organisms in the expression of several genes associated with the maintenance of pluripotency. As the only parasite cell type capable of undergoing mitosis, the germinative cells are central to all developmental transitions of Echinococcus within the host and to parasite expansion via asexual proliferation. In the present article, we will briefly introduce and discuss recent advances in Echinococcus genomics and stem cell research in the context of drug design and development. Interestingly, it turns out that benzimidazoles seem to have very limited effects on Echinococcus germinative cells, which could explain the high recurrence rates observed after chemotherapeutic treatment of echinococcosis patients. This clearly indicates that future efforts into the development of

  3. Surveillance of Echinococcus isolates from Qinghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junying; Wang, Hu; Lin, Gonghua; Zhao, Fang; Li, Chao; Zhang, Tongzuo; Ma, Xiao; Zhang, Yongguo; Hou, Zhibin; Cai, Huixia; Liu, Peiyun; Wang, Yongshun

    2015-01-15

    Echinococcosis is highly endemic over large parts of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP), China. Based on a large number of samples, we present data on the current presence, host distribution, and genetic diversity of Echinococcus in the Qinghai Province, located in the northeastern corner of the QTP and constituting >25% of the area of the plateau. We used 521 samples (including 451 newly collected samples and 70 samples from our previous study) from humans, yaks, sheep, goats, dogs, fox, plateau pikas, and voles in 36 counties, and genotyped them using the mitochondrial DNA marker cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene and the maximum parsimony and Bayesian reconstruction methods. Based on the 792 bp sequence matrix, we recorded 177 variable sites; 157 were parsimony-informative. A total of 105 haplotypes (H1-H105) were detected, of which H1-H15 and H90-H104, H16-H17, H18-H89, and H105 belonged to Echinococcus shiquicus, Echinococcus multilocularis, Echinococcus granulosus, and Echinococcus canadensis, respectively. Our results showed that, (i) the Qinghai Province was under a high burden of Echinococcus epidemiology; (ii) E. granulosus was the main echinococcosis threat to the local people, and the followed is E. multilocularis; (iii) there are a considerable number of haplotypes shared by domestic animals (sheep, yaks, and dogs) and humans, demonstrating the close relationship between human and domestic animals epidemiology; (iv) the threat of E. shiquicus on humans and livestock can be mostly ignored, while the infection risk of E. canadensis echinococcosis should not be neglected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical treatment of hepatic Echinococcus granulosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Patkowski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Infections caused by metacestode stage of the Echinococcus granulosus in humans result in disease named cystic echinococcosis. Aim: To present the outcomes of patients treated surgically for cystic echinococcosis of the liver. Material and methods : One hundred and nineteen patients treated in the period between 1989 and 2014 due to E. granulosus infection in the Department of General, Transplant, and Liver Surgery, Medical University of Warsaw were selected for this retrospective study. Diagnostic protocol included imaging examinations, i.e. ultrasonography and computed tomography of the abdomen. Blood samples where used to proceed sequential enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using Em2plus antigen as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect E. granulosus . Results : Surgery was the choice for treatment for almost all of the patients (98.3%. In 40 (34.2% patients right hemihepatectomy, in 19 (16.2% patients left hemihepatectomy, and in 21 (17.9% patients bisegementectomy were performed. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 (3.4% patients. In 3 patients biliary fistula requiring endoscopic treatment was observed, and 1 patient had subdiaphragmatic abscess successfully treated with drainage under ultrasound guidance. None of the patients died in the postoperative period, and the 1-, 5-, and 10-year survival rates were 100.0%, 90.9%, and 87.9%, respectively. Conclusions : Surgical treatment of the symptomatic cystic echinococcosis is the modality of choice for E. granulosus infection of the liver. Despite substantial development of diagnostic methods and new management opportunities, echinococcal infection still presents a challenge for epidemiologists, pharmacologists, and clinicists.

  5. The optimum cut-off value to differentiate Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto from other species of E. granulosus sensu lato using larval rostellar hook morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, S V; Pierangeli, N B; Pianciola, L A; Mazzeo, M; Lazzarini, L E; Debiaggi, M F; Bergagna, H F J; Basualdo, J A

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato is one of the most important helminth zoonoses in the world; it affects both humans and livestock. The disease is endemic in Argentina and highly endemic in the province of Neuquén. Considerable genetic and phenotypic variation has been demonstrated in E. granulosus, and ten different genotypes (G1-G10) have been identified using molecular tools. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato may be considered a species complex, comprised of E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1-G3), E. equinus (G4), E. ortleppi (G5) and E. canadensis (G6-G10). In endemic areas, the characterization of cystic echinococcosis molecular epidemiology is important in order to apply adequate control strategies. A cut-off value for larval large hook total length to distinguish E. granulosus sensu stricto isolates from those produced by other species of the complex was defined for the first time. Overall, 1780 larval hooks of 36 isolates obtained from sheep (n= 11, G1), goats (n= 10, G6), cattle (n= 5, G6) and pigs (n= 10, G7) were analysed. Validation against molecular genotyping as gold standard was carried out using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The optimum cut-off value was defined as 26.5 μm. The proposed method showed high sensitivity (97.8%) and specificity (91.1%). Since in most endemic regions the molecular epidemiology of echinococcosis includes the coexistence of the widely distributed E. granulosus sensu stricto G1 strain and other species of the complex, this technique could be useful as a quick and economical tool for epidemiological and surveillance field studies, when fertile cysts are present.

  6. Primary echinococcus cyst of the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rensburg, P.S.J.; Joubert, I.S.; Nel, C.J.C.

    1990-01-01

    Although echinococcosis is not rare in South Africa, the location of a hydatid cyst in the thyroid is unusual. It usually presents as a solitary nodule, which may mimic a thyroid carcinoma. The routine use of aspiration cytology in the workup of cases of single thyroid nodules may complicate the further management of patients with a hydatid cyst of the thyroid; anaphylaxis and dissemination may occur and technical difficulties may be experienced during operation. A case of echinococcal cyst of the thyroid presenting as a single thyroid nodule, suspected to be thyroid cancer, is reported. 4 refs

  7. Strategies of Echinococcus species responses to immune attacks: implications for therapeutic tool development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yadong

    2013-11-01

    Echinococcus species have been studied as a model to investigate parasite-host interactions. Echinococcus spp. can actively communicate dynamically with a host to facilitate infection, growth and proliferation partially via secretion of molecules, especially in terms of harmonization of host immune attacks. This review systematically outlines our current knowledge of how the Echinococcus species have evolved to adapt to their host's microenvironment. This understanding of parasite-host interplay has implications in profound appreciation of parasite plasticity and is informative in designing novel and effective tools including vaccines and drugs for the treatment of echinococcosis and other diseases. © 2013.

  8. Gene expression profiles of the small intestinal mucosa of dogs repeatedly infected with the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Kouguchi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data set presented in this article is related to a previous research article entitled “ The timing of worm exclusion in dogs repeatedly infected with the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis” (Kouguchi et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes the genes >2-fold up- or down-regulated in the first- and repeated-infection groups compared to the healthy controls group. The gene expression profiles were generated using the Agilent-021193 Canine (V2 Gene Expression Microarray (GPL15379. The raw and normalized microarray data have been deposited with the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE105098. Keywords: E. multilocularis, Microarray, Dog, Echinococcosis, Vaccine

  9. Seroepidemiological Study of Human Hydatidosis in Rafsanjan, Kerman

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    Reza Shahrokhabadi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is one of the major zoonotic parasitic diseases that occurs throughout the world and causes considerable economic losses and public health problems in many countries. Given that sheep act as intermediate and dogs as definitive hosts of Echinococcus granulosus, hydatidosis poses both a human health risk and an economic loss to the country. Hydatid cysts can grow in any site of the human's body, but the most common locations are the liver (65% and the lungs (25% [1]. Human contamination take accidentally place through

  10. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato genotypes infecting humans--review of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rojas, Cristian A; Romig, Thomas; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variability in the species group Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato is well recognised as affecting intermediate host susceptibility and other biological features of the parasites. Molecular methods have allowed discrimination of different genotypes (G1-10 and the 'lion strain'), some of which are now considered separate species. An accumulation of genotypic analyses undertaken on parasite isolates from human cases of cystic echinococcosis provides the basis upon which an assessment is made here of the relative contribution of the different genotypes to human disease. The allocation of samples to G-numbers becomes increasingly difficult, because much more variability than previously recognised exists in the genotypic clusters G1-3 (=E. granulosus sensu stricto) and G6-10 (Echinococcus canadensis). To accommodate the heterogeneous criteria used for genotyping in the literature, we restrict ourselves to differentiate between E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1-3), Echinococcus equinus (G4), Echinococcus ortleppi (G5) and E. canadensis (G6-7, G8, G10). The genotype G1 is responsible for the great majority of human cystic echinococcosis worldwide (88.44%), has the most cosmopolitan distribution and is often associated with transmission via sheep as intermediate hosts. The closely related genotypes G6 and G7 cause a significant number of human infections (11.07%). The genotype G6 was found to be responsible for 7.34% of infections worldwide. This strain is known from Africa and Asia, where it is transmitted mainly by camels (and goats), and South America, where it appears to be mainly transmitted by goats. The G7 genotype has been responsible for 3.73% of human cases of cystic echinococcosis in eastern European countries, where the parasite is transmitted by pigs. Some of the samples (11) could not be identified with a single specific genotype belonging to E. canadensis (G6/10). Rare cases of human cystic echinococcosis have been identified as having been caused by

  11. Primary left ventricular hydatid cyst in a child: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkvatan, A.; Yelgec, N.S.; Calikoglu, U.; Olcer, T.

    2000-01-01

    The most common cause of echinococcosis in humans is Echinococcus granulosus. Although hydatid cyst is most frequently localized in liver (more than 65% of cases) and lung (25%) by means of portal and systemic circulation, it may involve other tissues and organs. Cardiac hydatid cysts account for only 0.5%-2% of all hydatid cysts, even in endemic areas. Of all cardiac hydatid cysts, the left ventricle accounts for 60%, right ventricle 10%, pericardium 7%, pulmonary artery 6%, left atrial appendage 6%, and interventricular septum 4%. We report the case of a myocardial hydatid cyst of the left ventricle in a 9-year-old boy. (author)

  12. Primary left ventricular hydatid cyst in a child: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkvatan, A. [Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Yelgec, N.S. [Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Dept. of Cardiology, Ankara (Turkey); Calikoglu, U.; Olcer, T. [Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2000-12-01

    The most common cause of echinococcosis in humans is Echinococcus granulosus. Although hydatid cyst is most frequently localized in liver (more than 65% of cases) and lung (25%) by means of portal and systemic circulation, it may involve other tissues and organs. Cardiac hydatid cysts account for only 0.5%-2% of all hydatid cysts, even in endemic areas. Of all cardiac hydatid cysts, the left ventricle accounts for 60%, right ventricle 10%, pericardium 7%, pulmonary artery 6%, left atrial appendage 6%, and interventricular septum 4%. We report the case of a myocardial hydatid cyst of the left ventricle in a 9-year-old boy. (author)

  13. Hydatid disease of the cranium: neuroradiological findings in one case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, T.; Rivera, A.; Blanco, A.

    1998-01-01

    Hydatid disease is caused by Echinococcus granulosus. The most common locations for hydatid cysts are lung and liver. The central nervous system is involved in only 2% of cases, and these cysts are usually located in the brain parenchyma. Primary involvement of the bones of the skull is very uncommon. We report the case of a child with cranial echinococcosis which presented in the form of an osteolytic lesion with an extradural cyst. This was the unique feature of the disease. The CT and MR findings are described. This presentation has rarely been reported in the literature. (Author) 5 refs

  14. Cardiac Hydatid Cyst: An Unusual Cause of Chest Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esref Tuncer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by larvae of Echinococcus granulosus. Cardiac involvement in hydatid disease is uncommon, constituting only 0.5 - 2% of all cases of hydatidosis. Most patients with cardiac echinococcosis are asymptomatic, and the disease is often latent because a hydatid cyst in the heart grows very slowly. Only approximately 10 % of patients, especially those with large hydatid cysts, have clinical manifestations. Precordial pain is the one of the common symptoms and is most often vague and does not resemble angina pectoris.

  15. Echinococcus granulosus: Cure for Cancer Revisited

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    Shiwanthi L. Ranasinghe

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Whereas a number of parasites are well recognized risk factors for a number of different cancers in mammalian hosts, there is limited information on the ability of parasitic organisms to induce anticancer effects. There are conflicting reports that echinococcosis, caused by the canine tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus, can decrease or increase cancer risk. This review considers both indirect anticancer effects as the result of adaptive immunity generated against certain echinococcal antigens and the direct effect of molecules released by E. granulosus whose activity directly inhibits cancer cell migration and growth. In conclusion, E. granulosus probably secretes molecules that can be developed as anticancer therapeutics in future.

  16. Comparison of excretory-secretory antigen and positive faecal supernatant antigen in the detection of Echinococcus granulosus infection in dogs by CIEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Prathiush

    Full Text Available Coproantigen detection of Echinococcosis in dogs by counter immunoelectrophoresis was standardized. Adult Echinococcus granulosus worms were obtained from intestine of a necropsied positive dog. Excretory-secretory antigen was prepared by culturing adult worms in Medium 199 (pH 7.4. Faeces of positive dog were collected and fecal supernatant was prepared and used for coproantigen detection. CIEP was carried out using tris-borate buffer (pH 8.0 at a constant current of 8mA/slide for 60 minutes. CIEP detected infection with both the antigens. [Vet World 2009; 2(11.000: 421-422

  17. Hydatid disease of the submandibular gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, N.; Yousaf, N.

    2001-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a tissue infection of the human caused by the larval stage of echinococcus granulosus or E. multilocularis. Hydatid cyst of the head and neck region is uncommon and the involvement of salivary glands, especially the submandibular gland, is very rare. A case of submandibular gland hydatid cyst is reported in this article, in a patient who was presented with swelling of this area of three months' duration. Examination revealed a soft, non-tender, mobile mass measuring 6x4 cm. Chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasonography were normal. Excision of the whole mass was performed and pathological examination confirmed the fine needle aspiration cytology report. (author)

  18. Prevalence of hydatid cysts in slaughtered animals in Sirte, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Hamed H; Abdel-Kader, Abdel-Kader M; Nass, Sedigh Ahmed

    2013-04-01

    The prevalence of cystic echinococcosis was studied among the livestock slaughtered in abattoir of Sirte, Libya during the period July 2004 to May 2005. The overall infection rate of 4.9% in sheep, 2.4% in goats, 2.7% in camels and 15% in cattle were observed. The increase in prevalence with age of the animals was statistically significant in the four species. In female goats, examined infection was higher in the male. Liver had higher hydatid cysts than lungs in sheep, goat while infected lungs had higher in camel.

  19. Antigen recognition by IgG4 antibodies in human trichinellosis

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    Pinelli E.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The antibody isotype response to Trichinella spiralis excretory/secretory (ES products of muscle larva was examined using sera from patients with confirmed trichinellosis. Using Western blots we identify components of the ES antigen that are recognized by IgM and IgG antibodies. A 45 kDa component was strongly recognized by different antibody classes and subclasses. We observed a 45 kDa-specific lgG4 response that was detected exclusively using sera of patients with trichinellosis and not of patients with echinococcosis, filariasis, cysticercosis, ascariasis, strongyloidiasis or toxocariasis. These results are relevant for the diagnosis of human trichinellosis.

  20. Application of microwave ablation in treatment of solid space-occupying lesions in the liver

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    DU Lei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the development of science and technology, many therapies for hepatic space-occupying lesions have emerged, such as surgical operation, chemotherapy, intervention, and biological therapy. In recent years, microwave technique for the treatment of hepatic space-occupying lesions has attracted more and more attention because of its small trauma, low expense, marked clinical effect, and few complications. This article reviews the advances in the application of microwave in the treatment of liver cancer, hepatic hemangioma, hepatic alveolar echinococcosis, and other benign hepatic space-occupying lesions.

  1. ADVANZ - Neglected zoonotc disease control through a One Health approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarnak, Christopher; Johansen, Maria Vang; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2013-01-01

    As quoted in the Lancet in December 2012, endemic and enzootic zoonoses cause about a billion cases of illness and millions of death in people every year. Of these zoonoses, the diseases such as anthrax, bovine tuberculosis, brucellosis, cysticercosis, echinococcosis (hydatid disease) and rabies...... domesticated (livestock or companion) or wild animals to people. ADVANZ is One Health NZD project, funded by the European Commission through its 7th framework program. The session will describe and discuss the initiative, which main aim is to persuade decision makers and empower stakeholders at local, regional...

  2. Molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus cysts in north Indian patients: identification of G1, G3, G5 and G6 genotypes.

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    Monika Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic echinococcosis (CE caused by the Echinococcus granulosus, is a major public health problem worldwide, including India. The different genotypes of E. granulosus responsible for human hydatidosis have been reported from endemic areas throughout the world. However, the genetic characterization of E. granulosus infecting the human population in India is lacking. The aim of study was to ascertain the genotype(s of the parasite responsible for human hydatidosis in North India. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the transmission patterns of E. granulosus, genotypic analysis was performed on hydatid cysts obtained from 32 cystic echinococcosis (CE patients residing in 7 different states of North India. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit1 (cox1 sequencing was done for molecular identification of the isolates. Most of the CE patients (30/32 were found to be infected with hydatid cyst of either G3 (53.1% or G1 (40.62% genotype and one each of G5 (cattle strain and G6 (camel strain genotype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate the zoonotic potential of G1 (sheep strain and G3 (buffalo strain genotypes of E. granulosus as these emerged as predominant genotypes infecting the humans in India. In addition to this, the present study reports the first human CE case infected with G5 genotype (cattle strain in an Asian country and presence of G6 genotype (camel strain in India. The results may have important implications in the planning of control strategies for human hydatidosis.

  3. Detection of patent infections of Echinococcus granulosus ("sheep-strain", G1) in naturally infected dogs in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherifi, Kurtesh; Rexhepi, Agim; Hamidi, Afrim; Behluli, Behlul; Zessin, Karl-Hans; Mathis, Alexander; Deplazes, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A survey was carried out to assess the occurrence of canine echinococcosis in naturally infected dogs in Kosovo. Using the flotation-ovassay technique, taeniid eggs were found in 23 (7.5%) out of a total of 305 dogs. Eggs from other helminths were detected as well: hookworms 139 (45.5%), Trichuris sp. 87 (28.5%), Toxocara sp. 42 (13.7%), Toxascaris leonina 21 (6.8%) and Dipylidium caninum eight (2.6%). From 21 of the 305 samples (6.9%), taeniids eggs could be collected. Using PCR primers specific for Echinococcus granulosus ("sheep strain", G1), four of these samples (1.3%) resulted positive. The E. granulosus isolates originated from each one stray dog, hunting dog, sheepdog and pet dog. A semi-quantitative analysis showed low to moderate egg counts (2-10 per 1 g faeces) in dogs positive for E. granulosus ("sheep strain", G1) whereas specimens with high (11-20) or very high numbers (> 20) of taeniid eggs were negative in the E. granulosus PCR. Using specific primers for the detection of E. multilocularis, all samples containing taeniid eggs were negative. This is the first report on identification of E. granulosus in dogs from Kosovo where human cystic echinococcosis is a significant medical problem.

  4. Vaccines to combat the neglected tropical diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Cole, Rhea N.; Guo, Xiaoti; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lightowlers, Marshall W.; Loukas, Alex; Petri, William; Reed, Steven; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Hotez, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) represent a group of parasitic and related infectious diseases such as amebiasis, Chagas disease, cysticercosis, echinococcosis, hookworm, leishmaniasis, and schistosomiasis. Together, these conditions are considered the most common infections in low- and middle-income countries, where they produce a level of global disability and human suffering equivalent to better known conditions such as human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and malaria. Despite their global public health importance, progress on developing vaccines for NTD pathogens has lagged because of some key technical hurdles and the fact that these infections occur almost exclusively in the world’s poorest people living below the World Bank poverty line. In the absence of financial incentives for new products, the multinational pharmaceutical companies have not embarked on substantive research and development programs for the neglected tropical disease vaccines. Here, we review the current status of scientific and technical progress in the development of new neglected tropical disease vaccines, highlighting the successes that have been achieved (cysticercosis and echinococcosis) and identifying the challenges and opportunities for development of new vaccines for NTDs. Also highlighted are the contributions being made by non-profit product development partnerships that are working to overcome some of the economic challenges in vaccine manufacture, clinical testing, and global access. PMID:21198676

  5. Phylogenetic systematics of the genus Echinococcus (Cestoda: Taeniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Minoru; Lavikainen, Antti; Yanagida, Tetsuya; Ito, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Echinococcosis is a serious helminthic zoonosis in humans, livestock and wildlife. The pathogenic organisms are members of the genus Echinococcus (Cestoda: Taeniidae). Life cycles of Echinococcus spp. are consistently dependent on predator-prey association between two obligate mammalian hosts. Carnivores (canids and felids) serve as definitive hosts for adult tapeworms and their herbivore prey (ungulates, rodents and lagomorphs) as intermediate hosts for metacestode larvae. Humans are involved as an accidental host for metacestode infections. The metacestodes develop in various internal organs, particularly in liver and lungs. Each metacestode of Echinococcus spp. has an organotropism and a characteristic form known as an unilocular (cystic), alveolar or polycystic hydatid. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have demonstrated that the type species, Echinococcus granulosus, causing cystic echinococcosis is a cryptic species complex. Therefore, the orthodox taxonomy of Echinococcus established from morphological criteria has been revised from the standpoint of phylogenetic systematics. Nine valid species including newly resurrected taxa are recognised as a result of the revision. This review summarises the recent advances in the phylogenetic systematics of Echinococcus, together with the historical backgrounds and molecular epidemiological aspects of each species. A new phylogenetic tree inferred from the mitochondrial genomes of all valid Echinococcus spp. is also presented. The taxonomic nomenclature for Echinococcus oligarthrus is shown to be incorrect and this name should be replaced with Echinococcus oligarthra. Copyright © 2013 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of anthropogenic and natural environmental changes on Echinococcus transmission in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, the People’s Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Echinococcus transmission is known to be affected by various environmental factors, which may be modified by human influence or natural events including global warming. Considerable population growth in the last fifty years in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (NHAR), the People’s Republic of China (PRC), has led to dramatic increases in deforestation and modified agricultural practices. In turn, this has resulted in many changes in the habitats for the definitive and intermediate hosts of both Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis, which have increased the risks for transmission of both parasites, affecting echinococcosis prevalence and human disease. Ecological environmental changes due to anthropogenic activities and natural events drive Echinococcus transmission and NHAR provides a notable example illustrating how human activity can impact on a parasitic infection of major public health significance. It is very important to continually monitor these environmental (including climatic) factors that drive the distribution of Echinococcus spp. and their impact on transmission to humans because such information is necessary to formulate reliable future public health policy for echinococcosis control programs and to prevent disease spread. PMID:22827890

  7. Incidentally Detected Primary Giant Renal Cystic Enchinococcosis in a Young Patient: An Underestimated Entity?

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    Emre Urer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a parasitic infestation caused by Echinococcus granulosus and is an endemic disease in many parts of world. The symptoms and signs depend on the location and size of the cyst. Renal cystic echinococcosis or hydatid cyst (HC disease of the kidney is extremely rare and constitutes only 2-4% of all cases of hydatid disease (HD. We present a 39-year-old male patient who was referred to our outpatient clinic with cystic right kidney mass that was incidentally diagnosed during hepatobiliary ultrasound for chronic hepatitis B evaluation. Routine blood tests were normal without eosinophilia. Indirect haemagglutination test was negative. Abdominal kidneys, ureters, and bladder X-ray showed an 83×95 mm sized curvilinear calcification in the right upper abdominal quadrant. Abdominal computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 10x9x10 cm sized cystic mass arising from the middle pole of the right kidney, destructing the whole upper pole and extending into the liver. Daughter vesicles were present in the cystic lesion suggesting renal HD. Right retroperitoneal exploration with flank approach and right radical nephrectomy was performed without any complications. Pathology confirmed HC lesion. Following surgery, albendazole 400 mg per os twice daily for 4 weeks was suggested.

  8. Socio-economic burden of parasitic infections in yaks from 1984 to 2017 on Qinghai Tibetan Plateau of China-A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Shahzad, Muhammad; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Xiong; Mehmood, Khalid; Zhao, Xiaodong; Li, Jiakui

    2018-04-05

    Yak is an important animal for the Tibetans at Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau of China. The burden of parasitic diseases has been a major threat to the health of yaks at this region presenting a considerable socio-economic losses and impact to yak production and local nomads. Keeping in view, we collected the published papers from 1984 to 2017 on major parasitic infections in yaks by electronic literature search from five databases including CNKI, Google, PubMed, Science Direct and Web of Science. The prevalence of Eimeria, Babesia, Theileria, Hypodermosis, Cystic echinococcosis, Alveolar echinococcosis, Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Cryptosporidium, Giardia duodenalis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Toxocara vitulorum, and Fascioliasis infection in yaks was found to be 48.02%, 13.06%, 36.11%, 59.85%, 16.93%, 0.99%, 20.50%, 5.14%, 10.00%, 3.68%, 4.07%, 22.23% and 28.7% respectively. Data presented are contemplated to enhance our current understanding on the major parasitic diseases of yaks at Qinghai Tibetan plateau, China. The main aim of this effort is to ameliorate the effects of the parasitic burden in this specie; so that, the attempts are made to minimize the incidence of these infections in future to raise the socio-economic levels of local community. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Radiological Diagnoses in the Context of Emigration: Infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, Marija; Müller, Jan; Junghanss, Thomas; Weber, Tim Frederik

    2018-02-01

     Globalization and emigration impact on the spectrum of diseases challenging health care systems. Medical practitioners have to particularly prepare for infectious diseases.  The database of a health care center specialized on tropical medicine was screened for patients with history of migration and one of the following diagnoses: Cystic echinococcosis, tuberculosis, schistosomiasis, visceral leishmaniosis, and neurocysticercosis. Representative casuistics were prepared from select case histories. Radiological pertinent knowledge was compiled based on literature search.  A small selection of frequently imported infectious diseases covers a considerable fraction of health care problems associated with migration. For cystic echinococcosis, schistosomiasis, and neurocysticercosis imaging is the most relevant diagnostic procedure defining also disease stages. Tuberculosis and visceral leishmaniosis are important differentials for malignant diseases.  Imaging plays a meaningful role in diagnosis, treatment stratification, and follow-up of imported infectious diseases. Radiological skills concerning these diseases are important for providing health care for patients in context of migration.   · Imaging plays a meaningful role in multidisciplinary care for imported infectious diseases.. · A small selection covers a considerable fraction of infectious diseases expected in context of migration.. · Stojkovic M, Müller J, Junghanss T et al. Radiological Diagnoses in the Context of Emigration: Infectious diseases. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2018; 190: 121 - 133. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. First parasitological, histopathological and molecular characterization of Echinococcus vogeli Rausch and Bernstein, 1972 from Cuniculus paca Linnaeus, 1766 in the Cerrado biome (Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt-Oliveira, Fernanda; Teixeira, Paulo; Alencar, Alba; Menezes, Rodrigo; Corrêa, Christiane; Neves, Leandro; Almeida, Fernanda; Daipert-Garcia, Daniel; Machado-Silva, José Roberto; Rodrigues-Silva, Rosângela

    2018-01-30

    Polycystic echinococcosis (PE) is caused by Echinococcus vogeli metacestodes (larval stage) in Neotropical countries. E. vogeli is trophically-transmitted between predators bush dogs (Speothos venaticus) and prey pacas (Cuniculus paca). In Brazil, reported PE cases are restricted to the Amazon biome. In this study, metacestodes from a paca hunted in Mato Grosso do Sul state (Cerrado biome) were identified morphological and histopathological techniques and further confirmed by molecular testing (sequencing of cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (cox1) gene) for the first time. Images of the whole liver showed superficial bubble-like hepatic masses. The parasitological analysis revealed large hooks (41.3 ± 1.2 μm length/12.8 ± 0.8 μm width) and small hooks (33.0 ± 1.5 μm length/11.1 ± 1.2 μm width), consistent with E. vogeli. Microscopically, the liver showed protoscoleces, a thick laminated layer, fibrosis, and inflammatory infiltrate in the adventitial layer. The DNA sequencing confirmed E. vogeli with 99% homology with sequences deposited in the GenBank. In addition, this finding greatly extends the geographic range of animal polycystic echinococcosis into the Cerrado. It is likely to occur in new biomes, where bush dogs and pacas share a given area in a trophic relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Effects of Tamoxifen against Larval Stage Echinococcus granulosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolao, María Celeste; Elissondo, María Celina; Denegri, Guillermo M.; Goya, Alejandra B.

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a zoonotic infection caused by the larval stage of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Chemotherapy currently employs benzimidazoles; however, 40% of cases do not respond favorably. With regard to these difficulties, novel therapeutic tools are needed to optimize treatment in humans. The aim of this work was to explore the in vitro and in vivo effects of tamoxifen (TAM) against E. granulosus. In addition, possible mechanisms for the susceptibility of TAM are discussed in relation to calcium homeostasis, P-glycoprotein inhibition, and antagonist effects on a putative steroid receptor. After 24 h of treatment, TAM, at a low micromolar concentration range (10 to 50 μM), inhibited the survival of E. granulosus protoscoleces and metacestodes. Moreover, we demonstrated the chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive pharmacological effects of the drug. At a dose rate of 20 mg/kg of body weight, TAM induced protection against the infection in mice. In the clinical efficacy studies, a reduction in cyst weight was observed after the administration of 20 mg/kg in mice with cysts developed during 3 or 6 months, compared to that of those collected from control mice. Since the collateral effects of high TAM doses have been largely documented in clinical trials, the use of low doses of this drug as a short-term therapy may be a novel alternative approach for human cystic echinococcosis treatment. PMID:24936598

  12. Molecular Characterization of Echinococcus granulosus Cysts in North Indian Patients: Identification of G1, G3, G5 and G6 Genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Sehgal, Rakesh; Fomda, Bashir Ahmad; Malhotra, Anil; Malla, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the Echinococcus granulosus, is a major public health problem worldwide, including India. The different genotypes of E. granulosus responsible for human hydatidosis have been reported from endemic areas throughout the world. However, the genetic characterization of E. granulosus infecting the human population in India is lacking. The aim of study was to ascertain the genotype(s) of the parasite responsible for human hydatidosis in North India. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the transmission patterns of E. granulosus, genotypic analysis was performed on hydatid cysts obtained from 32 cystic echinococcosis (CE) patients residing in 7 different states of North India. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit1 (cox1) sequencing was done for molecular identification of the isolates. Most of the CE patients (30/32) were found to be infected with hydatid cyst of either G3 (53.1%) or G1 (40.62%) genotype and one each of G5 (cattle strain) and G6 (camel strain) genotype. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate the zoonotic potential of G1 (sheep strain) and G3 (buffalo strain) genotypes of E. granulosus as these emerged as predominant genotypes infecting the humans in India. In addition to this, the present study reports the first human CE case infected with G5 genotype (cattle strain) in an Asian country and presence of G6 genotype (camel strain) in India. The results may have important implications in the planning of control strategies for human hydatidosis. PMID:23785531

  13. First molecular evidence of the simultaneous human infection with two species of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato: Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto and Echinococcus canadensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; M'rad, Selim; Ksia, Amine; Lamiri, Rachida; Mekki, Mongi; Nouri, Abdellatif; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2016-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a widespread zoonotic parasitic disease especially in Tunisia which is one of the most endemic countries in the Mediterranean area. The etiological agent, Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato, implies dogs and other canids as definitive hosts and different herbivore species as intermediate hosts. Human contamination occurs during the consumption of parasite eggs passed in the environment through canid feces. Hydatid cysts coming from a child operated for multiple echinococcosis were collected and analyzed in order to genotype and to obtain some epidemiological molecular information. Three targets, ribosomal DNA ITS1 fragment, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1), and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxydase subunit 1 (CO1) genes, were amplified and analyzed by RFLP and sequencing approach. This study presents the first worldwide report in human of a simultaneous infection with Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (genotype G1) and Echinococcus canadensis (genotype G6) species. This is also the first report of the presence of E. canadensis in the Tunisian population which argues in favor of a greater importance of this species in human infestation in Tunisia than previously believed.

  14. A novel PCR-RFLP assay for molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato and closely related species in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; M'rad, Selim; Amani, Hizem; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2016-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, due to Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.), currently affects three million people, especially in low-income countries and results in high livestock production loss. DNA-based methods demonstrated genetic variability of E. granulosus s. l., and five species were recognized to belong to the complex, including E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s) (genotypes G1-G3), Echinococcus equinus (genotype G4), Echinococcus ortleppi (genotype G5), Echinococcus canadensis (genotypes G6-G10), and the lion strain Echinococcus felidis. The characterization of Echinococcus species responsible for human and animal echinococcosis is crucial to adapt the preventive measures against this parasitic disease. The sequencing approach is the gold standard for genotyping assays. Unfortunately, developing countries do not often have access to these techniques. Based on in silico RFLP tools, we described an accurate PCR-RFLP method for Echinococcus spp. characterization. The double digestion with the HaeIII and HinfI restriction enzymes of the PCR product from nad1 gene (1071 bp) led to a clear discrimination between E. granulosus s. l. and most closely related species (Echinococcus shiquicus and Echinococcus multilocularis).Molecular procedures and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the efficiency and the reproducibility of this simple and fast PCR-RFLP method. This technique is proved useful for fresh/unfixed and FF-PET tissues and enables large-scale molecular epidemiological screening in developing countries.

  15. PRIMARY MULTILOCULAR HYDATID CYST OF NECK : A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Ramraj

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease, also known as echinococcosis or hydatidosis , is an infectious disease caused by Echinococcus. Echinococcus granulosus is the most common Echinococcus species affecting human beings. It may affect any organ and tissue in the body, in particular the liver and lung. Musculoskeletal or soft tissue hyda tidosis accounts for about 0.5% 5% of all echinococcal infections in endemic areas, and is almost always secondary to the hepatic or pulmonary disease. Even in regions where echinococcosis is endemic, hydatidosis of cervicofacial region is extremely rare. Herein, we present exceptionally rare case in a 55 year old female with an unusual localization of primary multilocular hydatid cyst in the right supraclavicular region of the neck. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose hydatid cyst in rare loc ations like this. Hydatid cyst should be considered in differential diagnosis of benign swellings of head and neck region, so that it can be managed during surgery to prevent acute anaphylaxis

  16. Bioinformatics analysis and construction of phylogenetic tree of aquaporins from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Ye, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Cyst echinococcosis caused by the matacestodal larvae of Echinococcus granulosus (Eg), is a chronic, worldwide, and severe zoonotic parasitosis. The treatment of cyst echinococcosis is still difficult since surgery cannot fit the needs of all patients, and drugs can lead to serious adverse events as well as resistance. The screen of target proteins interacted with new anti-hydatidosis drugs is urgently needed to meet the prevailing challenges. Here, we analyzed the sequences and structure properties, and constructed a phylogenetic tree by bioinformatics methods. The MIP family signature and Protein kinase C phosphorylation sites were predicted in all nine EgAQPs. α-helix and random coil were the main secondary structures of EgAQPs. The numbers of transmembrane regions were three to six, which indicated that EgAQPs contained multiple hydrophobic regions. A neighbor-joining tree indicated that EgAQPs were divided into two branches, seven EgAQPs formed a clade with AQP1 from human, a "strict" aquaporins, other two EgAQPs formed a clade with AQP9 from human, an aquaglyceroporins. Unfortunately, homology modeling of EgAQPs was aborted. These results provide a foundation for understanding and researches of the biological function of E. granulosus.

  17. Molecular genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus in the North of Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Salam Jumaah; Cavallero, Serena; Milardi, Giovanni Luigi; Gabrielli, Simona; D Amelio, Stefano; Al-Nasiri, Fatima Shihab

    2018-01-15

    Cystic echinococcosis/hydatidosis is an important cosmopolitan zoonotic disease that causes large economic losses and human suffering. The larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus are the etiological agents of cystic echinococcosis that showed different genotypes in different regions in the world. The present study was aimed at the detection of E. granulosus strains circulating in two cities from north of Iraq (Kirkuk and Sulaimania). A total of 47 specimens of hydatid cysts were collected from patients and from different domestic intermediate hosts including cattle, sheep, goat and buffalo from slaughterhouses. Molecular characterization was performed by direct sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes coding for the cytochrome c oxidase I (cox1) and the small subunit ribosomal RNA (rrnS). The results showed a high prevalence for the sheep strain (G1), an isolated finding of the buffalo strain (G3) and the presence of seven and three different microvariants for cox1 and rrnS, respectively. This is the first contribution on molecular genotyping of E. granulosus in Iraq with the observation of genotypes other than G1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Suppression of E. multilocularis hydatid cysts after ionizing radiation exposure.

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    Xin Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heavy-ion therapy has an advantage over conventional radiotherapy due to its superb biological effectiveness and dose conformity in cancer therapy. It could be a potential alternate approach for hydatid cyst treatment. However, there is no information currently available on the cellular and molecular basis for heavy-ion irradiation induced cell death in cystic echinococcosis. METHODODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: LD50 was scored by protoscolex death. Cellular and ultrastructural changes within the parasite were studied by light and electron microscopy, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and copy number were measured by QPCR, and apoptosis was determined by caspase 3 expression and caspase 3 activity. Ionizing radiation induced sparse cytoplasm, disorganized and clumped organelles, large vacuoles and devoid of villi. The initial mtDNA damage caused by ionizing radiation increased in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetic of DNA repair was slower after carbon-ion radiation than that after X-rays radiation. High dose carbon-ion radiation caused irreversible mtDNA degradation. Cysts apoptosis was pronounced after radiation. Carbon-ion radiation was more effective to suppress hydatid cysts than X-rays. CONCLUSIONS: These studies provide a framework to the evaluation of attenuation effect of heavy-ion radiation on cystic echinococcosis in vitro. Carbon-ion radiation is more effective to suppress E. multilocularis than X-rays.

  19. Pyogenic liver abscess in a child with concomitant infections – Staphylococcus aureus, Echinococcus multilocularis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Antolová D.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic liver abscess is an uncommon but important and potentially life-threatening disease that occurs whenever there is failure of clearance of an infection in the liver. Work presents a rare case of pyogenic liver abscess with confirmed bacterial aetiology of Staphylococcus aureus, subsequently confirmed Echinococcus multilocularis and suspected Mycobacterium tuberculosis liver infection in 6 years old child. Moreover, several other parasitic diseases were recorded. According to clinical presentation of diseases, it could be supposed that liver impairment caused by alveolar echinococcosis and potentially also by M. tuberculosis could be the predisposition site for the capture of Staphylococcus aureus in altered liver tissues during its haematogenous spreading, and thus contributed to the development and subsequent clinical presentation of pyogenic liver abscess. The presence of three different aetiological agents complicated the diagnostic process as well as the therapy of the patient and made her prognosis uncertain. Proper diagnosis of multiloculated liver abscesses, with echinococcosis and hepatic tuberculosis considered in the differential diagnosis, is therefore crucial to administration of early and appropriate treatment.

  20. A retrospective survey of human hydatidosis based on hospital records during the period 1990-2003 in Ngorongoro, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, E; Nonga, H E; Kynsieri, N; Cleaveland, S

    2010-12-01

    A 13-year (1990-2003) retrospective study was carried out to investigate the occurrence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in patients at Wasso hospital in Ngorongoro district, Tanzania. Hospitalization records were reviewed and confirmed cases of CE were classified according to ward of residence, age, sex, cyst location and type. A total of 171 hydatidosis patients were diagnosed and operated giving an average of 13 cases per year, equivalent to approximately 10 cases per 100,000 people per year. Cystic echinococcosis affected more females (59.1%) than males (40.9%). A significantly higher number of CE cases were recorded in individuals 30 years of age (2.3-9.4%) (P Ngorongoro district and female and youths are those most affected. These findings merit for more extensive epidemiological investigations of CE in human to better determine the prevalence, economic impact and risk factors for the disease in this district and other areas of Tanzania. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Jet set pets: examining the zoonosis risk in animal import and travel across the European Union

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    Fooks AR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthony R Fooks,1,2 Nicholas Johnson1 1Wildlife Zoonoses and Vector-Borne Diseases Research Group, Animal and Plant Health Agency, Addlestone, Surrey, 2Department of Clinical Infection, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK Abstract: Ownership of companion animals or pets is popular throughout the world. Unfortunately, such animals are susceptible to and potential reservoirs of zoonotic pathogens. Close proximity to and contact with pets can lead to human infections. The distribution of zoonotic diseases associated with companion animals such as dogs and cats is not uniform around the world, and moving animals between regions, countries, and continents carries with it the risk of relocating the pathogens they might harbor. Critical among these zoonotic diseases are rabies, echinococcosis, and leishmania. In addition, the protozoan parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Giardia duodenalis, are also significant agents for human disease of pet origin. Considerable effort is applied to controlling movements of companion animals, particularly dogs, into the European Union. However, free movement of people and their pets within the European Union is a risk factor for the translocation of diseases and their vectors. This review considers the current distribution of some of these diseases, the risks associated with pet travel, and the controls implemented within Europe to prevent the free movement of zoonotic pathogens. Keywords: zoonosis, companion animal, rabies, alveolar echinococcosis, leishmania

  2. Surgical management of splenic echinococcal disease

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    Meimarakis G

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection of the spleen with echinococcus is a rare clinical entity. Because the diagnosis of a splenic infestation with echinococcus is sometimes delayed, large hydatid cysts or pseudotumors may develop, demanding a differential surgical approach to cure the disease. Methods In a retrospective study 10 patients out of 250 with abdominal echinococcosis (4% were identified to have splenic infestation, either limited to the spleen (n = 4 or with synchronous involvement of the liver (n = 4, major omentum (n = 1, or the liver and lung (n = 1. Only one patient had alveolar echinococcosis whereas the others showed hydatid cysts of the spleen. Surgical therapy included splenectomy in 7 patients or partial cyst excision combined with omentoplasty in 3 patients. In case of liver involvement, pericystectomy was carried out simultaneously. Results There was no mortality. Postoperative complications were observed in 4 patients. Hospital stay and morbidity were not influenced when splenic procedures were combined with pericystectomies of the liver. Mean follow- up was 8.8 years and all of the patients are free of recurrence at this time. Conclusions Splenectomy should be the preferred treatment of hydatid cysts but partial cystectomy is suitable when the cysts are located at the margins of the spleen. Due to low morbidity rates, simultaneous treatment of splenic and liver hydatid cysts is recom mended.

  3. Impact of anthropogenic and natural environmental changes on Echinococcus transmission in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, the People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu Rong; Clements, Archie C A; Gray, Darren J; Atkinson, Jo-An M; Williams, Gail M; Barnes, Tamsin S; McManus, Donald P

    2012-07-24

    Echinococcus transmission is known to be affected by various environmental factors, which may be modified by human influence or natural events including global warming. Considerable population growth in the last fifty years in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (NHAR), the People's Republic of China (PRC), has led to dramatic increases in deforestation and modified agricultural practices. In turn, this has resulted in many changes in the habitats for the definitive and intermediate hosts of both Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis, which have increased the risks for transmission of both parasites, affecting echinococcosis prevalence and human disease. Ecological environmental changes due to anthropogenic activities and natural events drive Echinococcus transmission and NHAR provides a notable example illustrating how human activity can impact on a parasitic infection of major public health significance. It is very important to continually monitor these environmental (including climatic) factors that drive the distribution of Echinococcus spp. and their impact on transmission to humans because such information is necessary to formulate reliable future public health policy for echinococcosis control programs and to prevent disease spread.

  4. Study on pattern recognition of Raman spectrum based on fuzzy neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangxiang; Lv, Xiaoyi; Mo, Jiaqing

    2017-10-01

    Hydatid disease is a serious parasitic disease in many regions worldwide, especially in Xinjiang, China. Raman spectrum of the serum of patients with echinococcosis was selected as the research object in this paper. The Raman spectrum of blood samples from healthy people and patients with echinococcosis are measured, of which the spectrum characteristics are analyzed. The fuzzy neural network not only has the ability of fuzzy logic to deal with uncertain information, but also has the ability to store knowledge of neural network, so it is combined with the Raman spectrum on the disease diagnosis problem based on Raman spectrum. Firstly, principal component analysis (PCA) is used to extract the principal components of the Raman spectrum, reducing the network input and accelerating the prediction speed and accuracy of Network based on remaining the original data. Then, the information of the extracted principal component is used as the input of the neural network, the hidden layer of the network is the generation of rules and the inference process, and the output layer of the network is fuzzy classification output. Finally, a part of samples are randomly selected for the use of training network, then the trained network is used for predicting the rest of the samples, and the predicted results are compared with general BP neural network to illustrate the feasibility and advantages of fuzzy neural network. Success in this endeavor would be helpful for the research work of spectroscopic diagnosis of disease and it can be applied in practice in many other spectral analysis technique fields.

  5. Impact of anthropogenic and natural environmental changes on Echinococcus transmission in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, the People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Echinococcus transmission is known to be affected by various environmental factors, which may be modified by human influence or natural events including global warming. Considerable population growth in the last fifty years in Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (NHAR, the People’s Republic of China (PRC, has led to dramatic increases in deforestation and modified agricultural practices. In turn, this has resulted in many changes in the habitats for the definitive and intermediate hosts of both Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis, which have increased the risks for transmission of both parasites, affecting echinococcosis prevalence and human disease. Ecological environmental changes due to anthropogenic activities and natural events drive Echinococcus transmission and NHAR provides a notable example illustrating how human activity can impact on a parasitic infection of major public health significance. It is very important to continually monitor these environmental (including climatic factors that drive the distribution of Echinococcus spp. and their impact on transmission to humans because such information is necessary to formulate reliable future public health policy for echinococcosis control programs and to prevent disease spread.

  6. Echinococcus multilocularis and Its Intermediate Host: A Model of Parasite-Host Interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Angèle Vuitton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Host-parasite interactions in the E. multilocularis-intermediate host model depend on a subtle balance between cellular immunity, which is responsible for host's resistance towards the metacestode, the larval stage of the parasite, and tolerance induction and maintenance. The pathological features of alveolar echinococcosis. the disease caused by E. multilocularis, are related both to parasitic growth and to host's immune response, leading to fibrosis and necrosis, The disease spectrum is clearly dependent on the genetic background of the host as well as on acquired disturbances of Th1-related immunity. The laminated layer of the metacestode, and especially its carbohydrate components, plays a major role in tolerance induction. Th2-type and anti-inflammatory cytokines, IL-10 and TGF-β, as well as nitric oxide, are involved in the maintenance of tolerance and partial inhibition of cytotoxic mechanisms. Results of studies in the experimental mouse model and in patients suggest that immune modulation with cytokines, such as interferon-α, or with specific antigens could be used in the future to treat patients with alveolar echinococcosis and/or to prevent this very severe parasitic disease.

  7. Epidemiology of Tropical Neglected Diseases in Ecuador in the Last 20 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartelle Gestal, Monica; Holban, Alina Maria; Escalante, Santiago; Cevallos, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Background Tropical and zoonotic diseases are major problems in developing countries like Ecuador. Poorly designed houses, the high proportion of isolated indigenous population and under developed infrastructure represent a fertile environment for vectors to proliferate. Control campaigns in Ecuador over the years have had varying success, depending on the disease and vectors targeted. Aims In our study we analyse the current situation of some neglected diseases in Ecuador and the efficiency of the control campaigns (by measuring changes in numbers of cases reported) that the Ecuadorian government has been running to limit the spread of these infectious and parasitic diseases. Results Our study reveals that Brucellosis, Chagas Disease, Rabies and Onchocerciasis have been controlled, but small outbreaks are still detected in endemic areas. Leptospirosis and Echinococcosis have been increasing steadily in recent years in Ecuador since the first records. The same increase has been reported world-wide also. Better diagnosis has resulted in a higher number of cases being identified, particularly with regard to the linking of outdoor activities and contact with farm animals as contributing vectors. Improvements in diagnosis are due to regular professional training, implementation of automatized systems, establishing diagnosis protocols and the creation of an epidemiological vigilance network that acts as soon as a case is reported. Conclusion Control campaigns performed in Ecuador have been successful in recent years, although natural phenomena limit their efficiency. Leptospirosis and Echinococcosis infections remain a growing problem in Ecuador as it is worldwide. PMID:26394405

  8. Epidemiology of Tropical Neglected Diseases in Ecuador in the Last 20 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartelle Gestal, Monica; Holban, Alina Maria; Escalante, Santiago; Cevallos, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Tropical and zoonotic diseases are major problems in developing countries like Ecuador. Poorly designed houses, the high proportion of isolated indigenous population and under developed infrastructure represent a fertile environment for vectors to proliferate. Control campaigns in Ecuador over the years have had varying success, depending on the disease and vectors targeted. In our study we analyse the current situation of some neglected diseases in Ecuador and the efficiency of the control campaigns (by measuring changes in numbers of cases reported) that the Ecuadorian government has been running to limit the spread of these infectious and parasitic diseases. Our study reveals that Brucellosis, Chagas Disease, Rabies and Onchocerciasis have been controlled, but small outbreaks are still detected in endemic areas. Leptospirosis and Echinococcosis have been increasing steadily in recent years in Ecuador since the first records. The same increase has been reported world-wide also. Better diagnosis has resulted in a higher number of cases being identified, particularly with regard to the linking of outdoor activities and contact with farm animals as contributing vectors. Improvements in diagnosis are due to regular professional training, implementation of automatized systems, establishing diagnosis protocols and the creation of an epidemiological vigilance network that acts as soon as a case is reported. Control campaigns performed in Ecuador have been successful in recent years, although natural phenomena limit their efficiency. Leptospirosis and Echinococcosis infections remain a growing problem in Ecuador as it is worldwide.

  9. Comparison of radiography and ultrasonography in the detection of lung and liver cysts in cattle and buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwani Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Echinococcosis is the major cause of lung and liver cysts in ruminants. This study compared usefulness of radiography and ultrasonography (USG in the detection of lung and/or liver cysts in sick bovine animals. The study also worked out cooccurrence of lung and liver cysts, and whether these cysts were primary cause of sickness or not. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 45 sick bovine (37 buffaloes and 8 cattle suffering from lung and liver cysts. A complete history of illness and clinical examination was carried out. Lateral radiographs of chest and reticular region were taken. In radiographically positive or suspected cases of cysts, USG of the lung and liver region was done. Depending on the location of cyst and clinical manifestations of the animal, the cysts were categorized as primary or secondary causes of sickness. Results: Using either imaging technique, it was observed that 46.7% of the animals had both lung and liver cysts, whereas 33.3% had only lung and 20% had only liver cyst. Cysts were identified as primary cause of sickness in 31.1% animals only. For diagnosing lung cysts, radiography (71.1% and USG (62.2% had similar diagnostic utility. However, for detecting liver cysts, USG was the only imaging tool. Conclusion: The lung and liver cysts, depending on their number and size may be a primary cause of sickness in bovine. Radiography and USG are recommended, in combination, as screening tools to rule out echinococcosis.

  10. Calcified Mass on Brain CT in a Teenager with Refractory Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari, Mahmoud Reza; Brunetti, Enrico; Shobeiri, Elham; Moharamzad, Yashar

    2014-12-01

    Cerebral echinococcosis is very rare, representing 2% of all cystic echinococcosis (CE) cases. Primary echinococcal cysts of the brain are extremely rare in pediatric patients. We report on a 16-year-old boy referred to our tertiary center with intractable epilepsy for the previous three years despite receiving full doses of three antiepileptic medications. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a left frontal calcified mass. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a well-defined spherical mass in the left frontal lobe, slightly hypointense on T1-weighted and heterogeneous hyperintense on T2-weighted images with no contrast enhancement. With a broad differential list in mind, a surgical intervention was planned. During surgery, a primary calcified cerebral echinococcal cyst with severe adhesion to the adjacent dura of the frontal region was discovered and removed intact. Histopathology examination confirmed the diagnosis. Only phenobarbital was continued and no medical therapy for CE was administered. Two years after surgery, the patient remained free of seizures. In areas endemic for CE, cerebral echinococcal cyst should be included in the differential list of patients with intractable seizures. Though rare, this entity can present itself as a calcified mass on neuroimaging. Surgical removal of the calcified cyst is necessary for control and treatment of the epilepsy.

  11. Public Health Follow-up of Suspected Exposure to Echinococcus multilocularis in Southwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotz-Williams, L A; Mercer, N J; Walters, J M; Wallace, D; Gottstein, B; Osterman-Lind, E; Boggild, A K; Peregrine, A S

    2017-09-01

    In the 3 years since the first report of canine alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Ontario, three additional cases have been diagnosed in the province. Of the four cases reported to date, three have had no known history of travel outside the province. It is possible that this development is an indication of previously unrecognized environmental contamination with Echinococcus multilocularis eggs in some areas of the province. If so, there is the potential for an emerging threat to human health. This article describes a local public health department's investigation of the possible exposure to E. multilocularis of a number of individuals who had had contact with the latest of the four cases of canine AE, and summarizes a comprehensive decision process that can be used by public health departments to assist in the follow-up of such exposures. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Comparatively rare case of a child-patient's cerebral echinococcus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, A.; Simova, E.; Traykova, N.; Stoev, D.; Danev, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Echinococcosis is a parasitic condition with a wide spread in Bulgaria. The possibility of an extensive as well as various localization of the cysts is vastly accounted for. However, according to book references and data available, and medical practice, the brain is somewhat one of the loci with a rare occurrence. The authors panel has taken into consideration the case of an eight-year-old male, who was diagnosed through CT scan with a large cystic lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere with a temporal and parietal localization, as well as a partial destruction of the adjacent pyramid. The presence of an echinococcal cyst has been established through methods of surgical intervention, as well as histologic sample examination. The authors demonstrate the complete anatomical recovery of the encephalic structures of the patient through an ensuing routine CT scan

  13. In vitro effects of Blepharocalyx salicifolius (H.B.K.) O. Berg on the viability of Echinococcus ortleppi protoscoleces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noal, Charlise Bolson; Monteiro, Danieli Urach; Brum, Thiele Faccim de; Emmanouilidis, Jessica; Zanette, Regis Adriel; Morel, Ademir Farias; Stefanon, Eliza Beti de Cassia; Frosi, Marina; la Rue, Mario Luiz de

    2017-01-01

    Scolicidal agents are important in the treatment of cystic echinococcosis. This study evaluated the scolicidal activity of the plant Blepharocalyx salicifolius (H.B.K.) Berg against Echinococcus ortleppi protoscoleces. The parasite species was identified by amplifying a fragment of the gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX 1). B. salicifolius crude extract at concentrations of 100, 200, 300 and 400 mg/mL was analyzed at different times (5, 10, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min). N-butanol and ethyl acetate fractions (100 and 200 mg/ mL) were also analyzed at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min. Both fractions showed 100% scolicidal activity at the concentration of 200 mg/mL at 5 min. Gallic acid, identified as the major compound of the ethyl acetate fraction- was responsible for the observed scolicidal activity. The results showed that crude extract and fractions of B. salicifolius have scolicidal effect against E. ortleppi protoscoleces.

  14. Seronegative, complicated hydatid cyst of the lung: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Letty Susanne Engström, M.D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is an important helminthic zoonotic disease that commonly affects the liver and lungs. Imaging methods and serology establish the diagnosis in most cases. Chest x-ray can diagnose uncomplicated pulmonary hydatid cysts, whereas superinfection and/or rupture of the hydatid cyst (complicated cysts may change the radiographic appearance and lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. We report the case of a patient with hemoptysis and chest pain, where computer tomography scan of the lung suggested a large, ruptured hydatid cyst. However, serological tests with indirect hemagglutination (IHAfor Echinococcus granulosus antibodies were negative, and there was massive growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae in sputum. Based on this, we concluded that the patient had a bacterial lung abscess. The diagnosis of CE was only made after surgical removal of the cyst followed by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction.

  15. Integrated control programmes for schistosomiasis and other helminth infections in P.R. China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Xu, Jun-Fang; Li, Shi-Zhu; Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Hui-Hui; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of human schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH) has decreased significantly in the People's Republic of China (P.R. China), particularly after 2005 when the national control programmes were reinforced by forming of integrated control strategies. Furthermore, social-economic development also contributed to the decrease of schistosome and soil-transmitted helminth infections. The prevalence of the zoonotic helminthiasis, including clonorchiasis and echinococcosis, on the other hand, is either underestimated or has in fact increased due to changes in social and environmental factors. In comparison with the control strategies in force and their effects on those four kinds of helminthiasis, the challenges and control priorities for the potential transfer from control to elimination of each disease is reviewed, to provide evidence for policy-makers to act upon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. European Food Safety Authority, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control; The European Union Summary Report on Trends and Sources of Zoonoses, Zoonotic Agents and Food-borne Outbreaks in 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Helle; Borck Høg, Birgitte; Helwigh, Birgitte

    and the statistically significant decreasing trend in the case numbers continued. Eighteen Member States reached the European Union Salmonella reduction target for breeding flocks of fowl, 17 Member States met their reduction target for laying hens and 18 Member States met the reduction target for broilers...... and Yersinia from pigs and pig meat. Brucellosis and tuberculosis decreased in cattle, sheep and goat populations. In humans 1,987 Q fever cases were detected and Q fever was found in domestic ruminants. Trichinellosis and echinococcosis caused 748 and 790 human cases, respectively, and Trichinella...... and Echinococcus were mainly detected in wildlife. There were 1,259 human cases of toxoplasmosis reported and in animals Toxoplasma was most often found in sheep and goats. Rabies was recorded in one person in the European Union and the disease was also found in animals. Most of the 5,550 reported food...

  17. Intraoral hydatid cyst: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kiran Alaparthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Hydatid" is a Greek word which means "a drop of water." Hydatid cysts occur in hydatid disease or echinococcosis, which is one of the most geographically prevalent zoonosis. This zoonotic infection in humans is mainly caused by infection by the larval stage of the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. This tapeworm infestation is widespread in sheep, goats, cattle, and dogs. This chronic disease is present worldwide among herding populations who live in close proximity to dogs and herd animals. It is a serious and potentially fatal condition and symptoms may occur a long time after the early infection. The most frequently affected organs are liver, lungs, followed by bones and brain, and extremely unusual occurrence has been found in the oral cavity, which was noticed in the present case. So hereby, we reveal a very rare case of intraoral hydatid cyst in a 20-year-old female patient.

  18. Superinfection of a Dead Hepatic Echinococcal Cyst with a Cutaneous Fistulization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Cicero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE, also known as “hydatid disease” (HD, is a zoonotic infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, which infects humans as intermediate hosts through the orofecal route. Carried by the intestinal venous blood, the embryos released by the eggs of the tapeworms can reach every organ, especially the liver, turning into a hydatid cyst. Usually asymptomatic, the cysts can be incidentally detected through radiological examinations performed for other reasons. We show an unusual case of superinfection of a hydatid cyst with typical radiological features of inactivity (WHO-type CE5 with an even rarer skin fistulization passing through a subcutaneous-abdominal abscess involving the right iliac muscle.

  19. Immunological diagnosis of human hydatid cyst using Western immunoblotting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Hadipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease with worldwide distribution which is caused by the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus. Diagnosis of the disease relies on imaging techniques, but the techniques are not able to differentiate the cyst from benign or malignant tumors; hence, appropriate serologic methods are required for the differential diagnosis of the infection. Materials and Methods: In this investigation, different sheep hydatid cyst antigens probed with thirty sera of patients with hydatid cyst and also thirty human normal sera using Western immunoblotting technique. Considering results of surgery as gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of Western blotting was estimated. Results: Sera of 29, 26, and 16 patients with hydatid cyst reacted with specific bands of hydatid cyst fluid (HCF, protoscolex crude antigen, and cyst wall crude antigen, respectively. However, none of the normal human sera reacted with those specific bands. Conclusion: A 20 kDa band of sheep HCF is an appropriate antigen for serodiagnosis of hydatid cyst infection.

  20. Unusual presentation of hydatid cyst – ruptured intraventricular hydatid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha H Thakur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis in humans occurs as a result of infection by the larval stages of taenid cestodes of the genus Echinococcus. Most of the intracranial hydatids develop in brain parenchyma. Hydatid cyst within the cerebral ventricle is quite unusual. Literature review showed few case reports of childhood as well as adult intraventricular hydatid cysts. None of these cases presented for the first time with features of ruptured intraventricular cyst. This is a very rare presentation of a common disease. The possibility of infestation with E. granulosus should be included in the differential diagnosis of raised intracranial tension in patients reporting from endemic areas, because the prognosis following surgical intervention is excellent, especially in the pediatric age group.

  1. Development of Three PCR Assays for the Differentiation between Echinococcus shiquicus, E. granulosus (G1 genotype), and E. multilocularis DNA in the Co-Endemic Region of Qinghai-Tibet plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufana, Belgees; Umhang, Gérald; Qiu, Jiamin; Chen, Xingwang; Lahmar, Samia; Boué, Franck; Jenkins, David; Craig, Philip

    2013-01-01

    To investigate echinococcosis in co-endemic regions, three polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays based on the amplification of a fragment within the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1) mitochondrial gene were optimized for the detection of Echinococcus shiquicus, Echinococcus granulosus G1, and Echinococcus multilocularis DNA derived from parasite tissue or canid fecal samples. Specificity using parasite tissue-derived DNA was found to be 100% except for E. shiquicus primers that faintly detected E. equinus DNA. Sensitivity of the three assays for DNA detection was between 2 and 10 pg. Ethanol precipitation of negative PCR fecal samples was used to eliminate false negatives and served to increase sensitivity as exemplified by an increase in detection from 0% to 89% of E. shiquicus coproDNA using necropsy-positive fox samples. PMID:23438764

  2. Practical Algorisms for PCR-RFLP-Based Genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus Sensu Lato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Yong, Tae-Soon; Shin, Myeong Heon; Lee, Kyu-Jae; Park, Gab-Man; Suvonkulov, Uktamjon; Kovalenko, Dmitriy; Yu, Hak Sun

    2017-12-01

    Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) is a causative agent of cystic echinococcosis or cystic hydatid disease in humans and domestic and wild animals. The disease is a serious health problem in countries associated with poverty and poor hygiene practices, particularly in livestock raising. We introduced a practical algorism for genotyping the parasite, which may be useful to many developing countries. To evaluate the efficiency of the algorism, we genotyped 3 unknown strains isolated from human patients. We found that unknowns 1 and 3 were included in G1, G2, and G3 genotypes group and unknown 2 was included in G4 genotype (Echinococcus equinus) according to the algorisms. We confirmed these results by sequencing the 3 unknown isolates cox1 and nad1 PCR products. In conclusion, these new algorisms are very fast genotype identification tools that are suitable for evaluating E. granulosus s.l. isolated from livestock or livestock holders, particularly in developing countries.

  3. Bortezomib initiates endoplasmic reticulum stress, elicits autophagy and death in Echinococcus granulosus larval stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolao, María Celeste; Loos, Julia A.; Rodriguez Rodrigues, Christian; Beas, Viviana

    2017-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a worldwide distributed helminthic zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Benzimidazole derivatives are currently the only drugs for chemotherapeutic treatment of CE. However, their low efficacy and the adverse effects encourage the search for new therapeutic targets. We evaluated the in vitro efficacy of Bortezomib (Bz), a proteasome inhibitor, in the larval stage of the parasite. After 96 h, Bz showed potent deleterious effects at a concentration of 5 μM and 0.5 μM in protoscoleces and metacestodes, respectively (P Echinococcus cell viability, we evaluated the efficacy of Bz in combination with rapamycin and a synergistic cytotoxic effect on protoscolex viability was observed when both drugs were used together. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that Bz induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and subsequent death allowing to identify unstudied parasite-host pathways that could provide a new insight for control of parasitic diseases. PMID:28817601

  4. [Endemic zoonosis in Mediterranean area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenga, Concettina; Pugliese, Michela

    2013-01-01

    The Mediterranean is historically considered an area of high concentration of zoonoses. Mediterranean countries socio-economic features have favoured, over time, the onset of different types of zoonosis. Many of these may affect many occupational categories, first of all farmers, people working in abattoirs and processing products of animal origin. New farming activities and technologies have generated new occupational and zoonotic risks. These changes have influenced zoonosis epidemiology and have led to a gradual decrease in the number of diseases and to a reduction of some biological risks. However, brucellosis, Q fever, bovine tuberculosis cystic echinococcosis remain a strong example of zoonosis and a real risk, in the Mediterranean area especially. Therefore, an interdisciplinary collaboration between Veterinary Service, Public Health and Occupational medicine is necessary in order to plan territorial prevention.

  5. Echinococcus granulosus genotypes circulating in alpacas (Lama pacos and pigs (Sus scrofa from an endemic region in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Sánchez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of the genotypes of Echinococcus granulosus present in livestock and wild animals within regions endemic for cystic echinococcosis (CE is epidemiologically important. Individual strains display different biological characteristics that contribute to outbreaks of CE and that must be taken into account in the design of intervention programs. In this study, samples of hydatid cysts due to E. granulosus were collected from alpacas (4 in Puno and pigs (8 in Ayacucho in Peru, an endemic region for CE. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and DNA sequencing of specific regions of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 genes confirmed the presence of a strain common to sheep, the G1 genotype, in alpacas. Two different strains of E. granulosus were identified in pigs: the G1 and the G7 genotypes. This is the first report of the G1 genotype of E. granulosus in alpacas in endemic regions of CE in Peru.

  6. The impact of globalisation on the distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca K; Romig, Thomas; Jenkins, Emily; Tryland, Morten; Robertson, Lucy J

    2012-06-01

    In the past three decades, Echinococcus multilocularis, the cause of human alveolar echinococcosis, has been reported in several new countries both in definitive hosts (canids) as well as in people. Unless treated, infection with this cestode in people is fatal. In previously endemic countries throughout the Northern Hemisphere, geographic ranges and human and animal prevalence levels seem to be increasing. Anthropogenic influences, including increased globalisation of animals and animal products, and altered human/animal interfaces are thought to play a vital role in the global emergence of this pathogenic cestode. Molecular epidemiological techniques are a useful tool for detecting and tracing introductions, and differentiating these from range expansions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Equinococosis humana (quiste hidatidico: dos casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egon Lichtenberger

    1957-04-01

    Full Text Available Se describen dos casos de quiste indatídico hepático en pacientes colombianos, oriundos del Chocó y de la Guajira, respectivamente. La equinococosis es posiblemente más frecuente en Colombia de lo que comúnmente se supone. Se hace un corto resumen de la anatomía patológica, morfología, ciclo vital, epidemiología y medios diagnósticos de esta parasitosis. The author describes two cases of hepatic echinococcosis demonstrating again, as correa henao and bojanini have done before, that this parasitosis exists in Colombia and is probably more common than usually believed. The pathology, morphology, life cycle, epidemiology, symptomatology and diagnosis are briefly reviewed.

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Injury and Emergency Diseases of Chest Organs

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    A. M. Khadjibaev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal of research: to evaluate efficiency of videothoracoscopy in diagnosis and treatment of patients with injuries and emergency diseases ща chest organs.Material and methods: Study wasbased on treatment results analysis of 2111 patients with injuries and chest organs emergency diseases, who were treated at Republican Research Centre of Emergency Medicine in 2001-2014. Chest trauma made up 1396 (66,1% victims. There were 477 (22,6% patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. At the stages of initial diagnosis, the radiologic evaluations, CT investigations and videothoracoscopies were performed. In chest trauma patients the videothoracoscopy underwent in 844 cases, in spontaneous pneu#mothorax this method was employed in 290 patients. Complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were observed in 238 (11,3% patients and complicated forms of lung echinococcosis were evident in 72 patients.Results. Videothoracoscopy and video-assisted interventions allowed to eliminate lungs and pleura pathology in 1206 (57,1% patients, whereas the traditional methods were effective only in 905 cases (42,9%.Conclusions. Investigation methods such as multiplanar radioscopy, radiography, chest CT and videothora-coscopy must be included into algorithm of diagnosis and surgical treatment of chest injuries and emergency diseases of chest organs. At chest trauma the videothoracoscopy allows to avoid broad thoracotomy from 9,4% to 4,7% of cases, to reduce the frequency of repeated interventions from 17,4% to 0,5% and diminish a number of early postsurgery complications from 25,4% to 10,9%. Videothoracoscopy of chest traumas allows to reduce frequency of repeated interventions from 19,8 to 1,7%.

  9. Echinococcus metacestode: in search of viability markers.

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    Gottstein, Bruno; Wang, Junhua; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence; Vuitton, Dominique A; Müller, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that most humans infected with Echinococcus spp. exhibit resistance to disease. When infection leads to disease, the parasite is partially controlled by host immunity: in case of immunocompetence, the normal alveolar echinococcosis (AE) or cystic echinococcosis (CE) situation, the metacestode grows slowly, and first clinical signs appear years after infection; in case of impaired immunity (AIDS; other immunodeficiencies), uncontrolled proliferation of the metacestode leads to rapidly progressing disease. Assessing Echinococcus multilocularis viability in vivo following therapeutic interventions in AE patients may be of tremendous benefit when compared with the invasive procedures used to perform biopsies. Current options are F18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), which visualizes periparasitic inflammation due to the metabolic activity of the metacestode, and measurement of antibodies against recEm18, a viability-associated protein, that rapidly regresses upon metacestode inactivation. For Echinococcus granulosus, similar prognosis-associated follow-up parameters are still lacking but a few candidates may be listed. Other possible markers include functional and diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and measurement of products from the parasite (circulating antigens or DNA), and from the host (inflammation markers, cytokines, or chemokines). Even though some of them have been promising in pilot studies, none has been properly validated in an appropriate number of patients until now to be recommended for further use in clinical settings. There is therefore still a need to develop reliable tools for improved viability assessment to provide the sufficient information needed to reliably withdraw anti-parasite benzimidazole chemotherapy, and a basis for the development of new alternative therapeutic tools. © B. Gottstein et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  10. Genome-wide identification of microRNA targets in the neglected disease pathogens of the genus Echinococcus.

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    Macchiaroli, Natalia; Maldonado, Lucas L; Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Cucher, Marcela; Gismondi, María Inés; Kamenetzky, Laura; Rosenzvit, Mara Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, are key regulators of gene expression at post-transcriptional level and play essential roles in biological processes such as development. MiRNAs silence target mRNAs by binding to complementary sequences in the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTRs). The parasitic helminths of the genus Echinococcus are the causative agents of echinococcosis, a zoonotic neglected disease. In previous work, we performed a comprehensive identification and characterization of Echinococcus miRNAs. However, current knowledge about their targets is limited. Since target prediction algorithms rely on complementarity between 3'UTRs and miRNA sequences, a major limitation is the lack of accurate sequence information of 3'UTR for most species including parasitic helminths. We performed RNA-seq and developed a pipeline that integrates the transcriptomic data with available genomic data of this parasite in order to identify 3'UTRs of Echinococcus canadensis. The high confidence set of 3'UTRs obtained allowed the prediction of miRNA targets in Echinococcus through a bioinformatic approach. We performed for the first time a comparative analysis of miRNA targets in Echinococcus and Taenia. We found that many evolutionarily conserved target sites in Echinococcus and Taenia may be functional and under selective pressure. Signaling pathways such as MAPK and Wnt were among the most represented pathways indicating miRNA roles in parasite growth and development. Genome-wide identification and characterization of miRNA target genes in Echinococcus provide valuable information to guide experimental studies in order to understand miRNA functions in the parasites biology. miRNAs involved in essential functions, especially those being absent in the host or showing sequence divergence with respect to host orthologs, might be considered as novel therapeutic targets for echinococcosis control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunogenicity Evaluation of A Synthetic Peptide EgP-29aa134-142 from Echinococcus granulosus In BALB /c Strain Mice

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    Sh. Jafari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cystic echinococcosis or hydatid disease is a widely endemic helminthic  zoonotic disease caused by infection with metacestodes the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. P-29, a 29-kDa antigen from E. granulosus, is a protoscolex specific component. The immunologic cross reactivity between P-29 and a major diagnostic antigen of E. granulosus (Ag5 indicated that P-29 might be another useful antigen of E. granulosus to be used in diagnosis or in multi epitope vaccines to prevent secondary echinococcosis. In this study, the peptide epitope regions after the identification and synthesis were evaluated in order to determine the effect of stimulating an immune response in a mouse model. Methods: In this study, the p29 antigen epitope regions of the parasite Echinococcus granulosus detected by the IEDB Bioinformatics software and a 8 amino acids sequence were synthesized. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously three times with two weeks interval. Fourteen days after last immunization spleen tissues were extracted and splenocytes were cultured in presence of antigen for 72 hours. Supernatants were collected and used for cytokine assay by Quantikine  ELISA kit. Results: Sandwich ELISA results were analyzed and showed significant difference in IFN-γ but no significant differences observed in levels of two cytokines IL-4, IL-10, between immunized and control groups. Conclusion: This study has assessed the effect of synthetic peptide EgP-29aa134-142 on the immune response and our results showed that the peptide can increase IFN-γ and therefore induce activation of innate Immunity as well as CTL and Th1 response.

  12. Prevalence and genotypic characterization of bovine Echinococcus granulosus isolates by using cytochrome oxidase 1 (Co1) gene in Hyderabad, Pakistan.

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    Ehsan, Muhammad; Akhter, Nasreen; Bhutto, Bachal; Arijo, Abdullah; Ali Gadahi, Javaid

    2017-05-30

    Cystic echinococcosis is an important zoonotic disease; it has serious impacts on animals as well as human health throughout the world. Genotypic characterization of Echinocossus granulosus (E. granulosus) in buffaloes has not been addressed in Pakistan. Therefore, the present study was conducted to evaluate the incidence and genotypic characterization of bovine E. granulosus. Out of 832 buffaloes examined, 112 (13.46%) were found infected. The favorable site for hydatid cyst development was liver (8.65%) followed by lungs (4.80%). The rate of cystic echinococcosis was found higher in females 14.43% than males 9.77%. The females above seven years aged were more infected as compared to the young ones. The partial sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) gene was used for identification and molecular analysis of buffalo's E. granulosus isolates. The alignment of redundant sequences were compared with already identified 10 genotypes available at National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) GenBank. The sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of all randomly selected buffalo isolates were belong to the G1- G3 complex (E. granulosus sensu stricto). All sequences were diverse from the reference sequence. No one showed complete identity to the buffalo strain (G3), representing substantial microsequence variability in G1, G2 and G3 genotypes. We evaluated the echinococcal infectivity and first time identification of genotypes in buffaloes in Sindh, Pakistan. This study will lead to determine accurate source of this zoonotic disease to humans in Pakistan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel zoonotic genotype related to Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto from southern Ethiopia.

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    Wassermann, Marion; Woldeyes, Daniel; Gerbi, Banchwosen Mechal; Ebi, Dennis; Zeyhle, Eberhard; Mackenstedt, Ute; Petros, Beyene; Tilahun, Getachew; Kern, Peter; Romig, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Complete mitochondrial and two nuclear gene sequences of a novel genotype (GOmo) related to Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto are described from a metacestode isolate retrieved from a human patient in southwestern Ethiopia. Phylogenetically, the genotype is positioned within the E. granulosus sensu stricto/Echinococcus felidis cluster, but cannot easily be allocated to either species. Based on different mitochondrial DNA markers, it is closest to the haplotype cluster that currently defines the species E. granulosus sensu stricto (which includes variants showing the widely cited G1, G2 and G3 sequences), but is clearly not part of this cluster. Pairwise distances between GOmo and E. granulosus sensu stricto are in the range of those between the most distant members of the Echinococcus canadensis complex (G6-10) that were recently proposed as separate species. At this stage, we prefer to list GOmo informally as a genotype rather than giving it any taxonomic rank because our knowledge rests on a single isolate from a dead-end host (human), and its lifecycle is unknown. According to data on molecularly characterised Echinococcus isolates from this region, GOmo has never been found in the usual livestock species that carry cystic echinococcosis and the possibility of a wildlife source of this newly recognised zoonotic agent cannot be excluded. The discovery of GOmo adds complexity to the already diverse array of cystic echinococcosis agents in sub-Saharan Africa and challenges hypotheses on the biogeographical origin of the E. granulosus sensu stricto clade. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto, Echinococcus canadensis (G7), and Echinococcus ortleppi in fertile hydatid cysts isolated from cattle in Southern Brazil.

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    Urach Monteiro, Danieli; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Weiblen, Carla; Correia Ribeiro, Tatiana; Emmanouilidis, Jéssica; Tonin, Alexandre Alberto; de Avila Botton, Sônia; de la Rue, Mário Luiz

    2016-12-01

    Echinococcosis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic infection that affects humans and animals. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize the fertile hydatid cysts from bovine viscera in order to verify different species and/or genotypes present in Southern Brazil. Firstly, cysts were collected from a slaughterhouse, which received animals from different regions of Rio Grande do Sul State (RS), considered an important area of occurrence of cystic echinococcosis. In total, 2396 cysts were analyzed by microscopy to verify the presence of protoscoleces. Protoscoleces were detected in 291 samples and were classified as fertile hydatid cysts. Total DNA was extracted from protoscoleces and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two hundred and fifty-one samples were identified by PCR and characterized as G5/G6/G7 genotypes, of which 40 belonged to Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (G1-G3). PCR was also performed, using G5-specific primers to identify 250 samples as Echinococcus ortleppi (G5). Only one sample was identified as Echinococcus canadensis (G7) by DNA sequencing using primers specific for the coxI gene. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed and identified three distinct groups E1 (G5), E2 (G7), and E3 (G1-G3), which were grouped according to similarity of their sequences. The study highlights the fact that E. granulosus sensu stricto, E. ortleppi, and E. canadensis (G7) were infecting cattle in RS, emphasizing the adaptation of different species of Echinococcus to this intermediate host. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Excisional treatment of renal hydatid cyst mimicking renal tumor with diode laser technique: A case report.

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    Uçar, Murat; Karagözlü Akgül, Ahsen; Çelik, Fatih; Kılıç, Nizamettin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, which is one of the most important helminthic infestations, is a serious life-threatening health problem in developing countries. Hydatid cyst of the kidney is a rare condition in children that can be treated with medical therapy or surgical treatment in some resistant cases. Here, we present a case of renal hydatid cyst that was treated with laparoscopic excision with diode laser. A 15-year-old female patient was admitted with abdominal pain. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a 32 × 23 × 19-mm solid mass with cystic component at lower pole of right kidney. An indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test for echinococcosis granulosus was positive at a 1:320 titer. Other laboratory tests were within normal limits. The patient received albendazole therapy for 3 months. The follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed a solitary lesion with exophytic extensions that contained large separations. No contrast enhancement could be detected after gadolinium injection. As no regression could be detected radiologically, surgical treatment was planned. Laparoscopic renal lower pole mass cyst excision with diode laser was performed (Figure). The patient was hospitalized for 1 day without any blood transfusion. Histopathological examination was consistent with hydatid cyst of the kidney. Diagnosis of hydatid cyst of the kidney is generally made incidentally and can be misdiagnosed as a primary kidney tumor. Radiological studies may be insufficient for accurate diagnosis. In our case, laparoscopic excision of cyst and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of cyst hydatid. At the postoperative second month the ultrasonography of kidneys were normal. For patients from endemic areas, hydatid cyst should always be included in the differential diagnosis. Laparoscopic excision of renal hydatid cysts with diode laser is a feasible and safe technique for resistant cases. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier

  16. The burden of parasitic zoonoses in Nepal: a systematic review.

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    Brecht Devleesschauwer

    Full Text Available Parasitic zoonoses (PZs pose a significant but often neglected threat to public health, especially in developing countries. In order to obtain a better understanding of their health impact, summary measures of population health may be calculated, such as the Disability-Adjusted Life Year (DALY. However, the data required to calculate such measures are often not readily available for these diseases, which may lead to a vicious circle of under-recognition and under-funding.We examined the burden of PZs in Nepal through a systematic review of online and offline data sources. PZs were classified qualitatively according to endemicity, and where possible a quantitative burden assessment was conducted in terms of the annual number of incident cases, deaths and DALYs.Between 2000 and 2012, the highest annual burden was imposed by neurocysticercosis and congenital toxoplasmosis (14,268 DALYs [95% Credibility Interval (CrI: 5450-27,694] and 9255 DALYs [95% CrI: 6135-13,292], respectively, followed by cystic echinococcosis (251 DALYs [95% CrI: 105-458]. Nepal is probably endemic for trichinellosis, toxocarosis, diphyllobothriosis, foodborne trematodosis, taeniosis, and zoonotic intestinal helminthic and protozoal infections, but insufficient data were available to quantify their health impact. Sporadic cases of alveolar echinococcosis, angiostrongylosis, capillariosis, dirofilariosis, gnathostomosis, sparganosis and cutaneous leishmaniosis may occur.In settings with limited surveillance capacity, it is possible to quantify the health impact of PZs and other neglected diseases, thereby interrupting the vicious circle of neglect. In Nepal, we found that several PZs are endemic and are imposing a significant burden to public health, higher than that of malaria, and comparable to that of HIV/AIDS. However, several critical data gaps remain. Enhanced surveillance for the endemic PZs identified in this study would enable additional burden estimates, and a more

  17. Taxonomy, phylogeny and molecular epidemiology of Echinococcus multilocularis: From fundamental knowledge to health ecology.

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    Knapp, Jenny; Gottstein, Bruno; Saarma, Urmas; Millon, Laurence

    2015-10-30

    Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most severe parasitic diseases in humans and represents one of the 17 neglected diseases prioritised by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 2012. Considering the major medical and veterinary importance of this parasite, the phylogeny of the genus Echinococcus is of considerable importance; yet, despite numerous efforts with both mitochondrial and nuclear data, it has remained unresolved. The genus is clearly complex, and this is one of the reasons for the incomplete understanding of its taxonomy. Although taxonomic studies have recognised E. multilocularis as a separate entity from the Echinococcus granulosus complex and other members of the genus, it would be premature to draw firm conclusions about the taxonomy of the genus before the phylogeny of the whole genus is fully resolved. The recent sequencing of E. multilocularis and E. granulosus genomes opens new possibilities for performing in-depth phylogenetic analyses. In addition, whole genome data provide the possibility of inferring phylogenies based on a large number of functional genes, i.e. genes that trace the evolutionary history of adaptation in E. multilocularis and other members of the genus. Moreover, genomic data open new avenues for studying the molecular epidemiology of E. multilocularis: genotyping studies with larger panels of genetic markers allow the genetic diversity and spatial dynamics of parasites to be evaluated with greater precision. There is an urgent need for international coordination of genotyping of E. multilocularis isolates from animals and human patients. This could be fundamental for a better understanding of the transmission of alveolar echinococcosis and for designing efficient healthcare strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Survey of public knowledge about Echinococcus multilocularis in four European countries: Need for proactive information

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    Romig Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public information about prevention of zoonoses should be based on the perceived problem by the public and should be adapted to regional circumstances. Growing fox populations have led to increasing concern about human alveolar echinococcosis, which is caused by the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. In order to plan information campaigns, public knowledge about this zoonotic tapeworm was assessed. Methods By means of representative telephone interviews (N = 2041, a survey of public knowledge about the risk and the prevention of alveolar echinococcosis was carried out in the Czech Republic, France, Germany and Switzerland in 2004. Results For all five questions, significant country-specific differences were found. Fewer people had heard of E. multilocularis in the Czech Republic (14% and France (18% compared to Germany (63% and Switzerland (70%. The same effect has been observed when only high endemic regions were considered (Czech Republic: 20%, France: 17%, Germany: 77%, Switzerland: 61%. In France 17% of people who knew the parasite felt themselves reasonably informed. In the other countries, the majority felt themselves reasonably informed (54–60%. The percentage that perceived E. multilocularis as a high risk ranged from 12% (Switzerland to 43% (France. In some countries promising measures as deworming dogs (Czech Republic, Switzerland were not recognized as prevention options. Conclusion Our results and the actual epidemiological circumstances of AE call for proactive information programs. This communication should enable the public to achieve realistic risk perception, give clear information on how people can minimize their infection risk, and prevent exaggerated reactions and anxiety.

  19. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the identification of Echinococcus multilocularis infections in canine definitive hosts.

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    Ni, Xingwei; McManus, Donald P; Yan, Hongbin; Yang, Jifei; Lou, Zhongzi; Li, Hongmin; Li, Li; Lei, Mengtong; Cai, Jinzhong; Fan, Yanlei; Li, Chunhua; Liu, Quanyuan; Shi, Wangui; Liu, Xu; Zheng, Yadong; Fu, Baoquan; Yang, Yurong; Jia, Wanzhong

    2014-05-30

    Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the metacestode larval stage of Echinococcus multilocularis, is a zoonosis of public health significance and is highly prevalent in northwest China. To effectively monitor its transmission, we developed a new rapid and cheap diagnostic assay, based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), to identify canine definitive hosts infected with E. multilocularis. The primers used in the LAMP assay were based on the mitochondrial nad5 gene of E. multilocularis and were designed using Primer Explorer V4 software. The developed LAMP assay was compared with a conventional PCR assay, using DNA extracted from the feces of dogs experimentally infected with E. multilocularis, on 189 dog fecal samples collected from three E. multilocularis-endemic regions in Qinghai province, the People's Republic of China, and 30 negative control copro-samples from dogs from an area in Gansu province that had been subjected to an intensive de-worming program. Light microscopy was also used to examine the experimentally obtained and field collected dog copro-samples for the presence of E. multilocularis eggs. The E. multilocularis-positivity rates obtained for the field-collected fecal samples were 16.4% and 5.3% by the LAMP and PCR assays, respectively, and all samples obtained from the control dogs were negative. The LAMP assay was able to detect E. multilocularis DNA in the feces of experimentally infected dogs at 12 days post-infection, whereas the PCR assay was positive on the 17th day and eggs were first detectable by light microscopy at day 44 post-challenge. The earlier specific detection of an E. multilocularis infection in dog copro-samples indicates that the LAMP assay we developed is a realistic alternative method for the field surveillance of canines in echinococcosis-endemic areas.

  20. [Detection of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis in cyst samples using a novel single tube multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction].

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    Can, Hüseyin; İnceboz, Tonay; Caner, Ayşe; Atalay Şahar, Esra; Karakavuk, Muhammet; Döşkaya, Mert; Çelebi, Fehmi; Değirmenci Döşkaya, Aysu; Gülçe İz, Sultan; Gürüz, Yüksel; Korkmaz, Metin

    2016-04-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis, respectively, are important helminthic diseases worldwide as well as in our country. Epidemiological studies conducted in Turkey showed that the prevalence of CE is 291-585/100.000. It has also been showed that the seroprevalence of AE is 3.5%. For the diagnosis of CE and AE, radiological (ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance) and serological methods, in addition to clinical findings, are being used. The definitive diagnosis relies on pathological examination When the hydatid cysts are sterile or does not contain protoscolex, problems may occur during pathological discrimination of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis species. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) targeting mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis using Echi S (5'-TTTATGAATATTGTGACCCTGAGAT-3') and Echi A (5'-GGTCTTAACTCAACTCATGGAG-3') primers and three different probes; Anchor Ech (5'-GTTTGCCACCTCGATGTTGACTTAG-fluoroscein-3'), Granulosus (5'-LC640-CTAAGGTTTTGGTGTAGTAATTGATATTTT-phosphate-3') and Multilocularis (5'-LC705-CTGTGATCTTGGTGTAGTAGTTGAGATT-phosphate-3') that will enable the diagnosis of CE and AE in same assay. During M-RTR-PCR, plasmids containing E.granulosus (GenBank: AF297617.1) and E.multilocularis (GenBank: NC_000928.2) mitochondrial 12S rRNA regions were used as positive controls. Cysts samples of patients which were pathologically confirmed to be CE (n: 10) and AE (n: 15) and healthy human DNA samples (n: 25) as negative control as well as DNA samples of 12 different parasites (Taenia saginata, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Fasciola hepatica, Enterobius vermicularis, Toxoplasma gondii, Pneumocystis jirovecii, Trichomonas vaginalis, Cryptosporidium hominis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax) were used to develop M

  1. Excretory/secretory-products of Echinococcus multilocularis larvae induce apoptosis and tolerogenic properties in dendritic cells in vitro.

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    Justin Komguep Nono

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alveolar echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus multilocularis larvae, is a chronic disease associated with considerable modulation of the host immune response. Dendritic cells (DC are key effectors in shaping the immune response and among the first cells encountered by the parasite during an infection. Although it is assumed that E.multilocularis, by excretory/secretory (E/S-products, specifically affects DC to deviate immune responses, little information is available on the molecular nature of respective E/S-products and their mode of action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established cultivation systems for exposing DC to live material from early (oncosphere, chronic (metacestode and late (protoscolex infectious stages. When co-incubated with Echinococcus primary cells, representing the invading oncosphere, or metacestode vesicles, a significant proportion of DC underwent apoptosis and the surviving DC failed to mature. In contrast, DC exposed to protoscoleces upregulated maturation markers and did not undergo apoptosis. After pre-incubation with primary cells and metacestode vesicles, DC showed a strongly impaired ability to be activated by the TLR ligand LPS, which was not observed in DC pre-treated with protoscolex E/S-products. While none of the larvae induced the secretion of pro-inflammatory IL-12p70, the production of immunosuppressive IL-10 was elevated in response to primary cell E/S-products. Finally, upon incubation with DC and naïve T-cells, E/S-products from metacestode vesicles led to a significant expansion of Foxp3+ T cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report on the induction of apoptosis in DC by cestode E/S-products. Our data indicate that the early infective stage of E. multilocularis is a strong inducer of tolerance in DC, which is most probably important for generating an immunosuppressive environment at an infection phase in which the parasite is highly vulnerable to host attacks. The

  2. The Echinococcus canadensis (G7) genome: a key knowledge of parasitic platyhelminth human diseases.

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    Maldonado, Lucas L; Assis, Juliana; Araújo, Flávio M Gomes; Salim, Anna C M; Macchiaroli, Natalia; Cucher, Marcela; Camicia, Federico; Fox, Adolfo; Rosenzvit, Mara; Oliveira, Guilherme; Kamenetzky, Laura

    2017-02-27

    The parasite Echinococcus canadensis (G7) (phylum Platyhelminthes, class Cestoda) is one of the causative agents of echinococcosis. Echinococcosis is a worldwide chronic zoonosis affecting humans as well as domestic and wild mammals, which has been reported as a prioritized neglected disease by the World Health Organisation. No genomic data, comparative genomic analyses or efficient therapeutic and diagnostic tools are available for this severe disease. The information presented in this study will help to understand the peculiar biological characters and to design species-specific control tools. We sequenced, assembled and annotated the 115-Mb genome of E. canadensis (G7). Comparative genomic analyses using whole genome data of three Echinococcus species not only confirmed the status of E. canadensis (G7) as a separate species but also demonstrated a high nucleotide sequences divergence in relation to E. granulosus (G1). The E. canadensis (G7) genome contains 11,449 genes with a core set of 881 orthologs shared among five cestode species. Comparative genomics revealed that there are more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between E. canadensis (G7) and E. granulosus (G1) than between E. canadensis (G7) and E. multilocularis. This result was unexpected since E. canadensis (G7) and E. granulosus (G1) were considered to belong to the species complex E. granulosus sensu lato. We described SNPs in known drug targets and metabolism genes in the E. canadensis (G7) genome. Regarding gene regulation, we analysed three particular features: CpG island distribution along the three Echinococcus genomes, DNA methylation system and small RNA pathway. The results suggest the occurrence of yet unknown gene regulation mechanisms in Echinococcus. This is the first work that addresses Echinococcus comparative genomics. The resources presented here will promote the study of mechanisms of parasite development as well as new tools for drug discovery. The availability of a high

  3. Seasonal pattern of Echinococcus re-infection in owned dogs in Tibetan communities of Sichuan, China and its implications for control.

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    Wang, Qian; Yu, Wen-Jie; Zhong, Bo; Shang, Jing-Ye; Huang, Liang; Mastin, Alexander; Renqingpengcuo; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Guang-Jia; He, Wei; Giraudoux, Patrick; Wu, Wei-Ping; Craig, Philip S

    2016-07-05

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) are highly endemic in Tibetan communities of Sichuan Province. Previous research in the region indicated that domestic dog was the major source of human infection, and observations indicated that domestic dog could have more access to intermediate hosts of Echinococcus spp.: both domestic livestock (CE) viscera and small mammals (AE), in early winter and again in spring. We hypothesized that there would therefore be a significant increase in the risk of canine infection with Echinococcus spp. in these two seasons and conducted a reinfection study to investigate this further. Faecal samples were collected from owned dogs in seven townships in Ganze Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (Sichuan Province, China), and Echinococcus spp. infection status was determined using copro-antigen ELISA. Dogs were sampled in April (spring), July (early summer), September/October (autumn/early winter) and December (winter) in 2009; and in April (spring) 2010. Dogs were treated with praziquantel following each of the five sample collections to eliminate any tapeworms. Information on dog sex, age and body weight was also collected. The t-test, Fisher's exact test, Poisson regression and logistic regression were used to compare means and prevalences, and to identify factors associated with infection status. The proportion of female dogs was significantly lower than that of male dogs; female dogs had significantly higher (22.78 %) baseline copro-ELISA prevalence than males (11.88 %). Dog body weight, sex, age, county and previous infection status at any sampling point had no influence on the re-infection prevalence in general. Poisson regression did not found a significant influence on the re-infection prevalence due to different deworming/sampling time spans. Dogs exhibited significantly higher re-infection prevalences in spring and early summer of 2009 and in early winter between September/October and December of 2009

  4. Time course of gene expression profiling in the liver of experimental mice infected with Echinococcus multilocularis.

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    Renyong Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alveolar echinococcosis (AE is a severe chronic parasitic disease which behaves like a slow-growing liver cancer. Clinical observations suggest that the parasite, Echinococcus multilocularis (E. multilocularis influences liver homeostasis and hepatic cell metabolism. However, this has never been analyzed during the time course of infection in the common model of secondary echinococcosis in experimental mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were assessed using DNA microarray analysis, 1, 2, 3 and 6 months after injection of E. multilocularis metacestode in the liver of susceptible mice. Data were collected at different time points to monitor the dynamic behavior of gene expression. 557 differentially expressed genes were identified at one or more time points, including 351 up-regulated and 228 down-regulated genes. Time-course analysis indicated, at the initial stage of E. multilocularis infection (month 1-2, that most of up-regulated pathways were related to immune processes and cell trafficking such as chemokine-, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, and down-regulated pathways were related to xenobiotic metabolism; at the middle stage (month 3, MAPK signaling pathway was maintained and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR signaling pathway emerged; at the late stage (month 6, most of up-regulated pathways were related to PPAR signaling pathway, complement and coagulation cascades, while down-regulated pathways were related to metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a random selection of 19 genes confirmed the reliability of the microarray data. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was increased in the liver of E. multilocularis infected mice from 2 months to 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: E. multilocularis metacestode definitely exerts a deep influence on liver homeostasis, by modifying a number of gene

  5. COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF HYDATID DISEASE OF LIVER AND MANAGEMENT AT PERIPHERAL TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Karunaharan Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hydatid Disease (HD is a zoonotic disease caused by the larvae of Echinococcosis granulosus, now become a rare clinical entity in teaching medical college hospitals. This is due to the public education about the disease, mode of spread and treatment available. The aim of the study is to review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic methods available, organs affected and treatment available in the tertiary hospitals and outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Data Collection- Patients with upper right abdominal pain with radiological and ultrasound findings are included in the study. About twenty patients are taken for this study. Medical managements, surgical procedure done and outcomes are recorded, tabulated and analysed. Research Design- Prospective Study, Research Setting- KAPV Govt. Medical College and Mahatma Gandhi Memorial Govt. Hospital, Trichy, Tamilnadu. Duration- 7 yrs. (2009 to 2016 Sample Size- Twenty. Inclusion CriteriaPatients between 12 to 70 years of age of both sexes. Patient having right upper abdomen or epigastric pain with positive radiological and ultrasound findings. Patient willing to participate in the study. Exclusion Criteria- Patients more than 70 years not willing to participate in the study patients absconded in between the management. RESULTS Liver is a commonest solid organ affected by the hydatid disease. Most of the diagnosis are made accidentally when the patients are investigated for some other diseases. The commonest clinical presentation is right abdominal or epigastric pain with hepatomegaly. The average age group is 45 years. X-ray abdomen, ultrasound abdomen are the most useful investigations. Asymptomatic uncomplicated small cyst less than 5 cms are managed with medical treatment. Symptomatic large cysts are submitted for surgical intervention. CONCLUSION The main source of income in majority of rural population is agriculture and sheep and cattle grazing. WHO is working towards the

  6. In vivo activity of albendazole in combination with thymol against Echinococcus multilocularis.

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    Albani, Clara María; Pensel, Patricia Eugenia; Elissondo, Natalia; Gambino, Guillermo; Elissondo, María Celina

    2015-09-15

    Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and is usually lethal if left untreated. The current strategy for treating human AE is surgical resection of the parasite mass complemented by chemotherapy with benzimidazole compounds. However, reliable chemotherapeutic alternatives have not yet been developed stimulating the research of new treatment strategies such as the use of medicinal plants. The aim of the current study was to investigate the efficacy of the combination albendazole (ABZ)+thymol on mice infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes. For this purpose, mice infected with parasite material were treated daily for 20 days with ABZ (5 mg/kg), thymol (40 mg/kg) or ABZ (5 mg/kg)+thymol (40 mg/kg) or left untreated as controls. After mice were euthanized, cysts were removed from the peritoneal cavity and the treatment efficacy was evaluated by the mean cysts weight, viability of protoscoleces and ultrastructural changes of cysts and protoscoleces. The application of thymol or the combination of ABZ+thymol resulted in a significant reduction of the cysts weight compared to untreated mice. We also found that although ABZ and thymol had a scolicidal effect, the combination of the two compounds had a considerably stronger effect showing a reduction in the protoscoleces viability of 62%. These results were also corroborated by optical microscopy, SEM and TEM. Protoscoleces recovered from ABZ or thymol treated mice showed alterations as contraction of the soma region, rostellar disorganization and presence of blebs in the tegument. However both drugs when combined lead to a total loss of the typical morphology of protoscoleces. All cysts removed from control mice appeared intact and no change in ultrastructure was detected. In contrast, cysts developed in mice treated with ABZ revealed changes in the germinal layer as reduction in cell number, while the treatment with thymol or the ABZ+thymol combination

  7. Disappearance rate of praziquantel-containing bait around villages and small towns in southern Bavaria, Germany.

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    Janko, Christof; König, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) has increasingly occupied urban areas in central Europe. Meanwhile, prevalence of infection in foxes with the small fox tapeworm (Echinococcus multilocularis) has increased, thereby increasing the human risk of infection with the parasite, which causes alveolar echinococcosis. Baiting strategies to counteract E. multilocularis have been implemented in cities and the open countryside, but there are few data on the situation in villages and small towns (edges for 7 days after distribution. Disappearance rates were 89.2% in villages, 88.8% in small towns, and 91.8% in settlement edges. More than 75% of the bait was consistently taken within the first three nights. There were no significant differences in disappearance rates between years or among seasons (Cox proportional hazard model). The survival time of the bait in small towns (P=0.021) and villages (P=0.026) depended on the zone (zone 1, first row of houses bordering on open countryside; zone 2, second to fourth rows, zone 3; beyond the fifth row) in which bait was distributed. In villages, the probability of bait being eaten in zone 1 was 119% higher than it was in zone 3 (P=0.007). In small towns, the probability was 60% higher (P=0.006).

  8. Genotypic characterization of Echinococcus granulosus in Iranian goats

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    Mohammad Reza Youssefi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate and characterize the genotype of Echinococcus granulosus (E. granulosus from goats in Mazandaran Province, Northern Iran. Methods: A total of 120 goats were screened from abattoirs of Mazandaran Province, Northern Iran. Forty out of 120 samples were infected with cystic echinococcosis and 29 out of 40 infected samples were fertile hydatid cysts (containing protoscolices which were collected from the livers and lungs of infected goats. DNA samples were extracted from the protoscolices and characterized by mitochondrial DNA sequencing of part of the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 gene. Results: Sequences analysis of nine fertile hydatid cysts indicated that all isolated samples were infected with the G1 sheep strain and two sequences were belonged to G1 4 and G1c microvarients of the G1 genotype. Conclusions: The results showed that goats act as alternative intermediate hosts for sheep strain. G1 genotype seems to be the main route of transmission and it should be considered in further studies.

  9. Fresh fruits, vegetables and mushrooms as transmission vehicles for Echinococcus multilocularis in highly endemic areas of Poland: reply to concerns.

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    Lass, Anna; Szostakowska, Beata; Myjak, Przemysław; Korzeniewski, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis is a tapeworm that may cause alveolar echinococcosis (AE), one of the most dangerous parasitic zoonoses. As in the case of other foodborne diseases, unwashed fruits and vegetables, contaminated with dispersed forms of E. multilocularis, may serve as an important transmission route for this parasite. In this article, we reply to the incorrect interpretation of results of our study concerning the detection of E. multilocularis DNA in fresh fruit, vegetable and mushroom samples collected from the highly endemic areas of the Warmia-Masuria Province, Poland, to dispel any doubts. The accusations formulated by the commentators concerning our paper are unfounded; moreover, these commentators demand information which was beyond the purview of our study. Making generalisations and drawing far-reaching conclusions from our work is also unjustified. The majority of positive samples were found in only a few hyperendemic communities; this information corresponds with the highest number of both infected foxes and AE cases in humans recorded in this area. Our findings indicate that E. multilocularis is present in the environment and may create a potential risk for the inhabitants. These people should simply be informed to wash fruits and vegetables before eating. No additional far-reaching conclusions should be drawn from our data. We believe these commentators needlessly misinterpreted our results and disseminated misleading information. Nevertheless, we would like to encourage any readers simply to contact us if any aspects of our study are unclear.

  10. [Effect comparison between two ELISA kits in IgG antibody detection of Echinococcus granulosus].

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    Chu, Yan-Hong; Cai, Yu-Chun; Ai, Lin; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Jia; Chen, Jia-Xu

    2013-06-01

    To compare the effects of two ELISA kits on IgG antibody detection of human Echinococcus granulosus. A Total of 134 sera of patients with echinococcosis, paragonimiasis westermani, clonorchiasis sinensis, schistosomiasis japonica, and cysticercosis cellulosae, and normal persons were detected by two IgG ELISA kits produced by different companies. Furthermore, the specificity, sensitivity and cross reactivity were counted and analyzed statistically. The sensitivity and specificity were extremely high of the two kits as 100.00%. The cross-reactivity rates were 25.00% (paragonimiasis westermani), 26.09% (clonorchiasis sinensis), 10.00% (schistosomiasis japonica), and 87.5% (cysticercosis), respectively, by using the kit produced by the Combined Company in Shenzhen; the cross-reactivity rates were 5.00% (paragonimiasis westermani), 13.04% (clonorchiasis sinensis), 20.00% (schistosomiasis japonica), and 93.75% (cysticercosis) respectively, by using the kit produced by Haitai Company in Zhuhai. In addition, there was a significant difference of Paragonimus westermani detection (P 0.05) between the two kits. Both ELISA kits on IgG antibody detection of human Echinococcus granulosus have the advantages of a high sensitivity, specificity, convenience and high-speed. However, it is also in urgent need to further solve the cross-reactivity of Echinococcus granulosus with other parasites, in order to improve the accuracy of early diagnosis.

  11. [Contribution of palaeopathology to defining the pathocoenosis of infectious diseases (Part two)].

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    Sabbatani, S; Fiorino, S

    2009-03-01

    In the second part of their review the authors focus on palaeopathological studies, performed in mummified tissues, with reference to infectious diseases. The analysis of samples obtained from both natural and artificial mummies may provide, in some favourable events, a more complete knowledge of these findings in comparison to information obtained from only comprehensive examination of the skeleton. The acquired data enable us to understand not only the diseases which afflicted mankind, but also dietary and hygiene conditions of ancient populations. We report knowledge acquired regarding some palaeopathological conditions, including schistosomiasis, smallpox, cisticercosis, trichinosis, ascaridiasis, echinococcosis, filariasis, hepatitis E virus, condylomatosis, pulmonary tubercolosis, pediculosis, visceral leishmaniasis as well as Diphyllobotrium sp., Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Fasciola hepatica infestations. In addition some interesting findings concerning the relationship between dietary and food intake colonized by streptomyces are described. This review reports the discovery of human remains from different geographic areas: while most of these studies describe findings in two Mediterranean countries (Italy and Egypt), some refer to Britain and German-speaking countries (Austria and Germany) as well as the area in Africa known as Nubia, along the Nile. Both histological and biomolecular diagnosis are useful not only to identify a specific disease in a subject from the remote past, but also to achieve information concerning its frequency and evolution. Such knowledge may thus allow us to understand the intensity of cultural exchanges and links among different populations and the role of these relationships in transmitting and spreading infectious diseases in a certain geographic area.

  12. Europe's neglected infections of poverty.

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    Hotez, Peter J; Gurwith, Meredith

    2011-09-01

    To review the prevalence, incidence, and geographic distribution of the major neglected infections of poverty in Europe as a basis for future policy recommendations. We reviewed the literature from 1999 to 2010 for neglected tropical diseases listed by PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases (http://www.plosntds.org/static/scope.action) and the geographic regions and countries of (continental) Europe. Reference lists of identified articles and reviews were also hand searched, as were World Health Organization databases. In Eastern Europe, the soil-transmitted helminth infections (especially ascariasis, trichuriasis, and toxocariasis), giardiasis, and toxoplasmosis remain endemic. High incidence rates of selected food-borne helminthiases including trichinellosis, opisthorchiasis, taeniasis, and echinococcosis also occur, while brucellosis and leptospirosis represent important bacterial zoonoses. Turmoil and economic collapse following the war in the Balkans, the fall of Communism, and Europe's recent recession have helped to promote their high prevalence and incidence rates. In Southern Europe, vector-borne zoonoses have emerged, including leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, and key arboviral infections. Additional vulnerable populations include the Roma, orphans destined for international adoption, and some immigrant groups. Among the policy recommendations are increased efforts to determine the prevalence, incidence, and geographic distribution of Europe's neglected infections, epidemiological studies to understand the ecology and mechanisms of disease transmission, and research and development for new control tools. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pigs and wild boar in Corsica harbor Echinococcus canadensis G6/7 at levels of concern for public health and local economy.

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    Umhang, Gérald; Richomme, Céline; Hormaz, Vanessa; Boucher, Jean-Marc; Boué, Franck

    2014-05-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a parasitic zoonosis widespread in the Mediterranean area. The parasite is commonly maintained in a domestic cycle involving dogs and livestock species. As no new data have been made available for the last 15 years concerning the French Mediterranean island of Corsica, a cross-sectional survey at the slaughterhouse was conducted in 2009-2010 to describe the current presence of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in intermediate hosts. Only pig infections with the G6/7 genotype of Echinococcus canadensis were observed. No infection was detected in other breeding species but this should be interpreted with caution because 75% of the cows inspected during the survey were calves, and all sheep and goats were younger than two months old. In parallel four wild boars harvested during the 2010-2011 hunting season were also infected by the same genotype. These data constitute the first report of E. canadensis in France and the first molecular characterization of E. granulosus sensu lato in a wild species in France. The current prevalence observed in pigs (5.9%, n=2527) highlights the fact that CE is still of economic concern on Corsica, an island where certain regional products are produced using pig's liver ("Figatelli"). This prevalence, and the similar one observed in wild boars (4.0%, n=101), is a consequence of certain breeding practices and hunting practices which enable circulation of the parasite in the environment in close contact with humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. First insights into species and genotypes of Echinococcus in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogoye, Benjamin K; Menezes, Colin N; Wong, Michelle L; Stacey, Sarah; von Delft, Dirk; Wahlers, Kerstin; Wassermann, Marion; Romig, Thomas; Kern, Peter; Grobusch, Martin P; Frean, John

    2013-09-23

    Cystic echinococcosis is a serious and neglected parasitic zoonosis that is regarded as an emerging disease world-wide. Effective control of the disease is based on understanding the variability of Echinococcus granulosus (sensu lato), as genotypic characteristics may influence lifecycle patterns, development rate, and transmission. No molecular epidemiological research has previously been conducted to shed light on genotypes responsible for the disease in South Africa. To identify strains circulating in the country, parasite material was collected from patients between August 2010 and September 2012 and analyzed by PCR/RFLP methods. A total of 32 samples was characterized as E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1-G3) (81%), E. canadensis (G6/7) (16%) and E. ortleppi (G5) (3%). Furthermore, two co-amplifying G6/7 genotypes were confirmed as G7 by sequencing. This is the first report on genotyping of Echinococcus species in South Africa, and, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of the G5 and G7 genotypes from humans in Africa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A flotation/sieving method to detect Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara spp. eggs in soil by real-time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umhang, Gérald; Bastien, Matthieu; Renault, Camille; Faisse, Marine; Caillot, Christophe; Boucher, Jean-Marc; Hormaz, Vanessa; Poulle, Marie-Lazarine; Boué, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Soil can be a source of human infection by many zoonotic helminth species including Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxocara spp. The prevention of alveolar echinococcosis could be greatly improved through the identification of at-risk areas. Yet very few data are available about the detection of E. multilocularis in soil, while more studies have been reported for Toxocara spp. Identification of soil contamination by E. multilocularis eggs requires the use of specific methods. This study describes the development of a method for the detection of E. multilocularis in soil samples with the concentration of eggs using a flotation/sieving method and detection by duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Toxocara spp. egg detection was also undertaken due to the widespread presence of this parasite in soil, despite it being considered less pathogenic. Method sensitivity of 100% was reached for the detection of 10 E. multilocularis eggs spiked in 10 g of soil. Concerning Toxocara spp., method sensitivity was lower but assumed to be due to the reduced effectiveness of the DNA extraction protocol. The parasitological status for E. multilocularis and Toxocara spp. of 63 carnivore fecal samples collected in highly endemic rural areas of France and of soil samples collected under and near these fecal samples was compared. The contamination of soil samples collected under positive fecal samples for E. multilocularis (n = 3) or Toxocara spp. (n = 19) confirmed the transfer of eggs from the definitive host to the environment. PMID:28737135

  16. Morphometric characteristics of the metacestode Echinococcus vogeli Rausch & Bernstein, 1972 in human infections from the northern region of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, F; Oliveira, F; Neves, R; Siqueira, N; Rodrigues-Silva, R; Daipert-Garcia, D; Machado-Silva, J R

    2015-07-01

    Polycystic echinococcosis, caused by the larval stage (metacestode) of the small-sized tapeworm, Echinococcus vogeli, is an emerging parasitic zoonosis of great public health concern in the humid tropical rainforests of South and Central America. Because morphological and morphometric characteristics of the metacestode are not well known, hydatid cysts from the liver and the mesentery were examined from patients following surgical procedures. Whole mounts of protoscoleces with rostellar hooks were examined under light and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Measurements were made of both large and small hooks, including the total area, total length, total width, blade area, blade length, blade width, handle area, handle length and handle width. The results confirmed the 1:1 arrangement of hooks in the rostellar pad and indicated, for the first time, that the morphometry of large and small rostellar hooks varies depending upon the site of infection. Light and confocal microscopy images displayed clusters of calcareous corpuscles in the protoscoleces. In conclusion, morphological features of large and small rostellar hooks of E. vogeli are adapted to a varied environment within the vertebrate host and such morphological changes in calcareous corpuscles occur at different stages in the maturation of metacestodes.

  17. The EG95 Antigen of Echinococcus spp. Contains Positively Selected Amino Acids, which May Influence Host Specificity and Vaccine Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Karen Luisa; Gottstein, Bruno; Ayala, Francisco Jose

    2009-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonotic parasitic disease of humans and various herbivorous domestic animals (intermediate hosts) transmitted by the contact with wild and domestic carnivores (definitive hosts), mainly foxes and dogs. Recently, a vaccine was developed showing high levels of protection against one parasite haplotype (G1) of Echinococcus granulosus, and its potential efficacy against distinct parasite variants or species is still unclear. Interestingly, the EG95 vaccine antigen is a secreted glycosylphosphatydilinositol (GPI)-anchored protein containing a fibronectin type III domain, which is ubiquitous in modular proteins involved in cell adhesion. EG95 is highly expressed in oncospheres, the parasite life cycle stage which actively invades the intermediate hosts. After amplifying and sequencing the complete CDS of 57 Echinococcus isolates belonging to 7 distinct species, we uncovered a large amount of genetic variability, which may influence protein folding. Two positively selected sites are outside the vaccine epitopes, but are predicted to alter protein conformation. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses indicate that EG95 isoform evolution is convergent with regard to the number of beta-sheets and alpha-helices. We conclude that having a variety of EG95 isoforms is adaptive for Echinococcus parasites, in terms of their ability to invade different hosts, and we propose that a mixture of isoforms could possibly maximize vaccine efficacy. PMID:19401778

  18. In vitro and ex vivo activity of Melaleuca alternifolia against protoscoleces of Echinococcus ortleppi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Danieli Urach; Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Weiblen, Carla; DE Avila Botton, Sônia; Funk, Nadine Lysyk; DE Bona DA Silva, Cristiane; Zanette, Régis Adriel; Schwanz, Thiago Guilherme; DE LA Rue, Mário Luiz

    2017-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease of difficult diagnosis and treatment. The use of protoscolicidal agents in procedures is of utmost importance for treatment success. This study was aimed at analysing the in vitro and ex vivo activity of Melaleuca alternifolia oil (tea tree oil - TTO), its nanoemulsion formulation (NE-TTO) and its major component (terpinen-4-ol) against Echinococcus ortleppi protoscoleces obtained from cattle. Concentrations of 2·5, 5 and 10 mg mL-1 of TTO, 10 mg mL-1 of NE-TTO and 1, 1·5 and 2 mg mL-1 of terpinen-4-ol were evaluated in vitro against protoscoleces at 5, 10, 15 and 30 min. TTO was also injected directly into hydatid cysts (ex vivo analysis, n = 20) and the viability of protoscoleces was evaluated at 5, 15 and 30 min. The results indicated protoscolicidal effect at all tested formulations and concentrations. Terpinen-4-ol (2 mg mL-1) activity was superior when compared with the highest concentration of TTO. NE-TTO reached a gradual protoscolicidal effect. TTO at 20 mg mL-1 showed 90% protoscolicidal action in hydatid cysts at 5 min. The results showed that TTO affects the viability of E. ortleppi protoscoleces, suggesting a new protoscolicidal option to the treatment of cystic equinococcosis.

  19. Molecular identification of Echinococcus multilocularis infection in small mammals from Northeast, Iran.

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    Molouk Beiromvand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alveolar echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the metacestode of Echinococcus multilocularis. Many species of small mammals, including arvicolid rodents or Ochotona spp., are natural intermediate hosts of the cestode. The main aim of this study was to identify natural intermediate hosts of E. multilocularis in Chenaran County, Razavi Khorasan Province, northeastern Iran, where the prevalence of infected wild and domestic carnivores is high. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A program of trapping was carried out in five villages in which this cestode was reported in carnivores. The livers of 85 small mammals were investigated for the presence of E. multilocularis infection using multiplex PCR of mitochondrial genes. Infections were identified in 30 specimens: 23 Microtus transcaspicus, three Ochotona rufescens, two Mus musculus, one Crocidura gmelini, and one Apodemus witherbyi. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A range of small mammals therefore act as natural intermediate hosts for the transmission of E. multilocularis in Chenaran County, and the prevalence suggested that E. multilocularis infection is endemic in this region. The existence of the life cycle of this potentially lethal cestode in the vicinity of human habitats provides a significant risk of human infection.

  20. Prevalence of Serum IgG Antibodies to Cystic Echinococcus Antigen among Patients in an Uzbekistan Emergency Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Jin; Han, Sung Sik; Anvarov, Khikmat; Khajibaev, Abdukhakim; Choi, Min-Ho; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is one of the most widespread zoonotic helminthiases, which can last an asymptomatic infection for several years. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate serum antibody prevalence of CE among asymptomatic people in Uzbekistan using ELISA. A total of 2,547 serum samples were collected, 66 from confirmed CE patients and 2,481 of patients with other diseases than CE at a hospital in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The serum samples were screened for CE specific IgG antibodies by ELISA using cystic fluid antigen obtained from sheep. The serum antibody positive rate was 89.4% (59/66) in CE and 3.6% (89/2,481) in other disease patients. The present ELISA recognized 89.4% sensitivity and 96.4% specificity. The ELISA absorbance of positive samples was distributed 0.271-0.971 for CE and 0.273-0.887 for other disease patients. The other disease patients with high absorbance over 0.3 were 50 (2.0%) who were presumed to be active CE patients. The patients in their 40s showed the highest positive rate of 5.2% (P=0.181), and women were 4.4% while men were 3.1% positive (P=0.136). The data confirmed that there are many asymptomatic patients of CE in Tashkent. It is indicated that CE is an endemic disease of public health importance in Uzbekistan.

  1. Suppression of nemo-like kinase by miR-71 in Echinococcus multilocularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaola; Zhang, Xueyong; Yang, Jing; Jin, Xiaoliang; Ding, Juntao; Xiang, Haitao; Ayaz, Mazhar; Luo, Xuenong; Zheng, Yadong

    2017-12-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes are a causative pathogen for alveolar echinococcosis in human beings, and have been found to express miRNAs including emu-miR-71. miR-71 is evolutionarily conserved and highly expressed across platyhelminths, but little is known about its role. Here it was shown that emu-miR-71 was differentially expressed in protoscoleces and was unlikely to be expressed in neoblasts. The results of the luciferase assay indicated that emu-miR-71 was able to bind in vitro to the 3'-UTR of emu-nlk, encoding a key regulator of cell division, causing significant downregulation of luciferase activity (p < 0.01) compared to the negative control and the construct with mutations in the binding site. Consistent with the decreased luciferase activity, transfection of emu-miR-71 mimics into protoscoleces notably repressed emu-NLK (p < 0.05). These results demonstrate the suppression of emu-nlk by emu-miR-71, potentially involved in the protoscolex development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunization of rhesus macaques with Echinococcus multilocularis recombinant 14-3-3 antigen leads to specific antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, Karen; Gottstein, B; Becker, T; Stahl-Hennig, C; Kaup, F-J; Mätz-Rensing, K

    2017-01-01

    E. multilocularis (Em) is the etiologic agent of alveolar echinococcosis (AE), a severe and potentially fatal disease, primarily affecting the liver of and occurring in aberrant intermediate hosts, e.g., humans and non-human primates. Due to increasing numbers of spontaneous cases of AE in the Old World monkey colonies of the German Primate Center, the question arose as to whether vaccination of non-human primates may represent a useful prophylactic approach. In this pilot study, the recombinant antigen Em14-3-3, which has provided a 97 % protection against E. multilocularis challenge infection in rodent models, was used for the first time to immunize rhesus macaques. In order to increase immunogenicity, the antigen was formulated with different adjuvants including Quil A®, aluminum hydroxide (alum), and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Also, different vaccination regimens were tested. All vaccinated animals developed antigen-specific antibodies. While Quil A® induced a local adverse reaction, alum proved to be the most potent adjuvant in terms of induced antibody levels, longevity as well as tolerability. In conclusion, our pilot study demonstrated that recombinant Em14-3-3 is safe and immunogenic in rhesus monkeys. As a next step, efficacy of the vaccination remains to be explored.

  3. Echinococcus multilocularis in North America: the great unknown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massolo, Alessandro; Liccioli, Stefano; Budke, Christine; Klein, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, studies have begun to shed light on the distribution and genetic characterization of Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis (AE), in North America. Recent findings indicate that the parasite is likely expanding its range in the central region of the United States and Canada and that invasions of European strains might have occurred. In our review, we present the available data on E. multilocularis infections in wild and domestic animals and humans in North America and emphasize the lack of knowledge on the distribution of the parasite in wild and domestic hosts. Furthermore, we stress the need to better understand the complexity of host communities and their roles in shaping the transmission and distribution of the parasite. We hypothesize that a lack of knowledge about AE by North American physicians might result in the misdiagnosis of cases and an underestimation of disease incidence. The endemic presence of the parasite in urban areas and a recent human case in Alberta, Canada, suggest that the scientific community may need to reconsider the local public health risks, re-assess past cases that might have been overlooked and increase surveillance efforts to identify new cases of human AE. PMID:25531581

  4. Estimated prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in rac-coon dogs Nyctereutes procyonoides in northern Branden-burg, Germany

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    Sabine SCHWARZ, Astrid SUTOR, Christoph STAUBACH, Roswitha MATTIS, Kirsten TACKMANN, Franz Josef CONRATHS

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the larval stage of the small fox tapeworm, is a lethal zoonotic infection if left untreated. E. multilocularis is distributed in the Northern Hemisphere and lives in the small intestines of carnivores, mainly canids. The main definitive host of E. multilocularis in European countries is the red fox (Vulpes vulpes and in the last ten years new endemic areas for the parasite in Central Europe have been identified. In some areas, for instance in Germany, the raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides - a spreading neozoon - must be regarded as an additional definitive host for E. multilocularis. In 2001 this parasite was found for the first time in raccoon dogs in the Federal State of Brandenburg, Germany. Between 2000 and 2008, 1,252 raccoon dogs from Brandenburg were examined by the Intestinal Scraping Technique. The majority of samples were obtained in five northern counties and all 60 animals that tested positive for E. multilocularis were located there. The estimated true prevalence calculated by a beta-binomial- model ranged from 6%–12% [Current Zoology 57 (5: 655–661, 2011].

  5. Imported disease of dogs and cats exotic to Ireland: echinococcus multilocularis

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    Goodfellow Mark

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes in legislation that facilitate the movement of animals within the European Union may increase the risk that some microbial and parasitic organisms, currently exotic to Ireland, will be introduced by travelled pet animals. It is possible that the fox tapeworm, Echinococcus multilocularis, might be introduced in that manner from any of the several member states in which it is endemic. Red foxes are the principal definitive hosts of E. multilocularis but dogs and cats can also be infected. Infection in the definitive host is of little clinical significance, but aberrant infection of humans results in alveolar echinococcosis, a debilitating disease that has a high mortality rate. Humans acquire the organism by ingestion of Echinococcus multilocularis eggs excreted by definitive hosts; the larval metacestodes develop primarily in the liver, in the initial asymptomatic phase as small, well-encapsulated cysts. Over time, perhaps five to 15 years, progressive local infiltration and secondary cyst development at distant sites occur with resultant clinical signs. Patients with infiltrative liver disease present with cholestatic jaundice, epigastric pain, fatigue, weight loss and hepatomegaly. If left untreated, the disease can be fatal. This paper recounts the life cycle of the parasite, and discusses the control measures on which its exclusion from Ireland depend. Strict adherence to the routine worming of travelled dogs with praziquantel, at appropriate doses, 24 to 48 hours prior to entry into the country will minimise the likelihood of introduction of this zoonosis.

  6. Dynamics of the force of infection: insights from Echinococcus multilocularis infection in foxes.

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    Fraser I Lewis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the force of infection (FOI is an essential part of planning cost effective control strategies for zoonotic diseases. Echinococcus multilocularis is the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis in humans, a serious disease with a high fatality rate and an increasing global spread. Red foxes are high prevalence hosts of E. multilocularis. Through a mathematical modelling approach, using field data collected from in and around the city of Zurich, Switzerland, we find compelling evidence that the FOI is periodic with highly variable amplitude, and, while this amplitude is similar across habitat types, the mean FOI differs markedly between urban and periurban habitats suggesting a considerable risk differential. The FOI, during an annual cycle, ranges from (0.1,0.8 insults (95% CI in urban habitat in the summer to (9.4, 9.7 (95% CI in periurban (rural habitat in winter. Such large temporal and spatial variations in FOI suggest that control strategies are optimal when tailored to local FOI dynamics.

  7. Isolation and purification of Echinococcus granulosus antigen B from hydatid cyst fluid using three different methods

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    Shirazi, S.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst, the larval stage of cestodes Echinococcus spp., is recognized as a zoonotic infection in the world. The World Health Organization (WHO has recently classified echinococcosis in a group of neglected tropical diseases. The prevalence of Echinococcus granulosus infection is high in Iran due to the presence of various intermediate hosts in this country. Considering the rising trend of this zoonotic parasitic disease based on national epidemiological studies, diagnosis is of great significance. WHO has suggested the use of specific antigens, especially antigen B (AgB for serological diagnostic tests. In general, AgB is a polymeric lipoprotein, which disintegrates into 8.12, 16, and 20.24 kDa subunits. In the present study, we applied three different methods for AgB isolation from hydatid cyst fluid (HCF and compared their efficacy in AgB isolation. Finally, the protein concentration of this antigen was measured by Bradford assay and confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The results showed that the application of polyethylene glycol (PEG 4000 as a thickener agent beside purification of HCF in dialysis bag and filtering and also dialysis against acetate buffer leading to the best quantity in purified antigen B.

  8. Worldwide risks of animal diseases: introduction.

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    Pearson, J E

    2006-01-01

    Animal diseases impact food supplies, trade and commerce, and human health and well-being in every part of the world. Outbreaks draw the attention of those in agriculture, regulatory agencies, and government, as well as the general public. This was demonstrated by the 2000-2001 foot and mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks that occurred in Europe, South America, Asia and Africa and by the recent increased occurrence of emerging diseases transmitted from animals to humans. Examples of these emerging zoonotic diseases are highly pathogenic avian influenza, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, West Nile virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome. There is also the risk of well-known and preventable zoonotic diseases, such as rabies, brucellosis, leishmaniasis, and echinococcosis/hydatidosis, in certain countries; these diseases have a high morbidity with the potential for a very high mortality. Animal agriculturalists should have a global disease awareness of disease risks and develop plans of action to deal with them; in order to better respond to these diseases, they should develop the skills and competencies in politics, media interactions, and community engagement. This issue of Veterinaria Italiana presents information on the risk of animal diseases; their impact on animals and humans at the international, national, industry, and societal levels; and the responses to them. In addition, specific information is provided on national and international disease monitoring, surveillance and reporting, the risk of spread of disease by bioterrorism and on import risk analysis.

  9. [An analysis on funded theses in the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng-yun; Zhang, Zheng-yan; Sheng, Hui-feng

    2014-12-01

    The published articles of the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012 (including original articles, experimental researches, field researches and clinical researches) were statistically analyzed. Together 258 research papers were published in the 4 years, and funded papers occupied 82.2% (212/258). The number of papers funded by 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 foundations projects was 116, 58, 29, 7 and 2, respectively. 61.8% (131/212) of the foundations projects were at the national level; 28.3% (60/212) were at provincial and ministerial level. The papers supported by academy and international agencies accounted for 7.1% (15/212), 2.8% (6/212), respectively. The funded thesis mainly referred to schistosomiasis (35, 16.5%), cystic echinococcosis (29, 13.7%), malaria (24, 11.3%), toxoplasmosis (22, 10.4%), and cysticercosis (9, 4.2%). Five fields covered in these papers were as follows: epidemiology (29, 13.7%), immunology and diagnosis (53, 25%), molecular biology (75, 35.4%), etiology (28,13.2%), and pharmacology (24, 11.3%). The ratio of founded paper was 0.70, 0.67, 0.74, and 0.65 during 2009-2012, respectively. The high ratio of founded paper indicated that this journal is with domestic and abroad importance in the field of parasitology.

  10. Zoonotic helminths affecting the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Nowaday, zoonoses are an important cause of human parasitic diseases worldwide and a major threat to the socio-economic development, mainly in developing countries. Importantly, zoonotic helminths that affect human eyes (HIE) may cause blindness with severe socio-economic consequences to human communities. These infections include nematodes, cestodes and trematodes, which may be transmitted by vectors (dirofilariasis, onchocerciasis, thelaziasis), food consumption (sparganosis, trichinellosis) and those acquired indirectly from the environment (ascariasis, echinococcosis, fascioliasis). Adult and/or larval stages of HIE may localize into human ocular tissues externally (i.e., lachrymal glands, eyelids, conjunctival sacs) or into the ocular globe (i.e., intravitreous retina, anterior and or posterior chamber) causing symptoms due to the parasitic localization in the eyes or to the immune reaction they elicit in the host. Unfortunately, data on HIE are scant and mostly limited to case reports from different countries. The biology and epidemiology of the most frequently reported HIE are discussed as well as clinical description of the diseases, diagnostic considerations and video clips on their presentation and surgical treatment. Homines amplius oculis, quam auribus credunt Seneca Ep 6,5 Men believe their eyes more than their ears PMID:21429191

  11. Effects of X-ray on the metacestodes of Echinococcus granulosus in vitro.

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    Mao, Rui; Wu, Ge; Wang, Hui; Lu, Pengfei; Li, Jun; Li, Haitao; Ainiwaer, Aimudula; Bai, Yiwei; Shu, Mingyang; Bao, Yongxing; Zhang, Wenbao

    2017-09-21

    Radiotherapy may represent an alternative treatment modality for cystic echinococcosis (CE), but there is no adequate evidence for it up to now. In this study, we aim to investigate the parasiticidal effects of X-ray on the metacestodes of Echinococcus granulosus in vitro. Protoscoleces obtained from sheep naturally infected with CE were cultivated in RPMI 1640 medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) at 37 °C in 5% CO 2 . Upon encystation on day 14, the metacestodes were subjected to various intensities of X-ray. Metacestode structures were observed using light microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Real-Time PCR was carried out to determine the expression of EgTPX, EgHSP70, EgEPC1 and Caspase-3. On day 14, encystation was noticed in the majority of protoscoleces in the control group. In the X-ray groups, the encystation rate showed significant decrease compared with that of the control group (P granulosus. Irradiation triggered increased expression of EgTPX, EgHSP70, EgEPC1 and Caspase-3.

  12. Microdiversity of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rojas, C A; Ebi, D; Gauci, C G; Scheerlinck, J P; Wassermann, M; Jenkins, D J; Lightowlers, M W; Romig, T

    2016-07-01

    Echinococcus granulosus (sensu lato) is now recognized as an assemblage of cryptic species, which differ considerably in morphology, development, host specificity (including infectivity/pathogenicity for humans) and other aspects. One of these species, E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.), is now clearly identified as the principal agent causing cystic echinococcosis in humans. Previous studies of a small section of the cox1 and nadh1 genes identified two variants of E. granulosus s.s. to be present in Australia; however, no further work has been carried out to characterize the microdiversity of the parasite in its territory. We have analysed the sequence of the full length of the cox1 gene (1609 bp) from 37 isolates of E. granulosus from different hosts and geographic regions of Australia. The analysis shows that seven haplotypes of E. granulosus s.s. not previously described were found, together with five haplotypes known to be present in other parts of the world, including the haplotype EG01 which is widespread and present in all endemic regions. These data extend knowledge related to the geographical spread and host range of E. granulosus s.s. in a country such as Australia in which the parasite established around 200 years ago.

  13. Molecular identification of Echinococcus granulosus on the Tibetan Plateau using mitochondrial DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D; Song, X; Wang, N; Zhong, X; Wang, J; Liu, T; Jiang, Z; Dawa, T; Gu, X; Peng, X; Yang, G

    2015-10-30

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important worldwide zoonotic disease that causes large economic losses and human suffering. Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of CE, exhibits different genotypes in different locations. In order to identify its genotypes and analyze its genetic structure on the Tibetan Plateau, we collected 72 hydatid cysts from different intermediate hosts and amplified and sequenced their mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2) genes. Seventy isolates were identified as the E. granulosus G1 genotype, while two isolates belonged to the G6 genotype. There were 18 haplotypes among the 70 E. granulosus isolates, which exhibited a star-like network pattern and shared a common haplotype (H1). There was little difference between geographical sub-populations. Our results suggest that a recent E. granulosus population expansion occurred on the Tibetan Plateau, suggesting that E. granulosus was introduced into China. This study increases the basic molecular data needed for the molecular diagnosis, epidemiology, prevention, and control of Echinococcus diseases.

  14. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a P38-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Guodong; Li, Jing; Zhang, Chuanshan; Li, Liang; Bi, Xiaojuan; Li, Chaowang; Fan, Jinliang; Lu, Xiaomei; Vuitton, Dominique A; Wen, Hao; Lin, Renyong

    2016-12-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) treatment urgently requires a novel drug. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are a family of Ser/Thr protein kinases, but still have to be characterized in Echinococcus granulosus . We identified a 1,107 bp cDNA encoding a 368 amino acid MAPK protein (Egp38) in E. granulosus . Egp38 exhibits 2 distinguishing features of p38-like kinases: a highly conserved T-X-Y motif and an activation loop segment. Structural homology modeling indicated a conserved structure among Egp38, EmMPK2, and H. sapiens p38α, implying a common binding mechanism for the ligand domain and downstream signal transduction processing similar to that described for p38α. Egp38 and its phosphorylated form are expressed in the E. granulosus larval stages vesicle and protoscolices during intermediate host infection of an intermediate host. Treatment of in vitro cultivated protoscolices with the p38-MAPK inhibitor ML3403 effectively suppressed Egp38 activity and led to significant protoscolices death within 5 days. Treatment of in vitro-cultivated protoscolices with TGF-β1 effectively induced Egp38 phosphorylation. In summary, the MAPK, Egp38, was identified in E. granulosus , as an anti-CE drug target and participates in the interplay between the host and E. granulosus via human TGF-β1.

  15. Infection of dogs with Echinococcus granulosus: causes and consequences in an hyperendemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; Cabaret, Jacques; M'rad, Selim; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2015-04-17

    Tunisia is a hyper endemic country for human echinococcosis. The infection is transmitted via the eggs of Echinococcus granulosus which are passed in the faeces of the definitive canid host. This study evaluated the contamination rate of the dog faeces in different climatic conditions at eight different geographic regions throughout Tunisia. Dog faecal samples were collected from the soil and the Echinococcus eggs were identified using microscopic and molecular (Eg1121/1122 PCR, Egss1 PCR and Nad1 PCR-RFLP) tools. The contamination index of dog faeces by E. granulosus eggs ranged from 8.3% to 41.3% depending on the region. Comparisons of the dog faecal contamination rate against human incidence found them to be independent. Neither human prevalence nor dog contamination index appeared to be related to climatic conditions or geographic characteristics. The genetic variability of E. granulosus samples was different within each region but was not related to geographic distance which is indicative of local divergent evolutions rather than isolation by distance. A high environmental dog contamination index does not necessarily correspond to high prevalence in humans as transmission is strongly linked to human behavior and hygiene.

  16. Genetic variability of Echinococcus granulosus based on the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Jiahai; Hu, Dandan; Zhong, Xiuqin; Jiang, Zhongrong; Yang, Aiguo; Deng, Shijin; Guo, Li; Tsering, Dawa; Wang, Shuxian; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is the etiological agent of cystic echinococcosis, a major zoonotic disease of both humans and animals. In this study, we assessed genetic variability and genetic structure of E. granulosus in the Tibet plateau, using the complete mitochondrial 16 S ribosomal RNA gene for the first time. We collected and sequenced 62 isolates of E. granulosus from 3 populations in the Tibet plateau. A BLAST analysis indicated that 61 isolates belonged to E. granulosus sensu stricto (genotypes G1-G3), while one isolate belonged to E. canadensis (genotype G6). We detected 16 haplotypes with a haplotype network revealing a star-like expansion, with the most common haplotype occupying the center of the network. Haplotype diversity and nucleotide diversity were low, while negative values were observed for Tajima's D and Fu's Fs. AMOVA results and Fst values revealed that the three geographic populations were not genetically differentiated. Our results suggest that a population bottleneck or population expansion has occurred in the past, and that this explains the low genetic variability of E. granulosus in the Tibet Plateau.

  17. Detection of Echinococcus granulosus infection in dogs

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    Dalimi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Echinococcosis is an important zoonosis in the sheep rising areas of Iran. To develop a simple andreliable diagnostic method for Echinococcus infection in definitive hosts, E. granulosus polyoclonalantibodies (PolyAbs were prepared from adult worm in rabbit. A selected PoAb was used for coproantigendetection in faecal samples obtained from animals naturally infected with Echinococcus and compared withnecropsy method. Finally, the sensitivity and specificity of the test were evaluated. The results indicated E.granulosus worms was detected in 36 (43% of small intestine contents of dogs. The results obtained by CpAg- ELISA test showed 30 (36.14% positive and 53 (63.86% negative cases. The sensitivity andspecificity of CpAg-ELISA test were evaluated 83.33% and 100% respectively. In conclusion, the present result suggests that, CpAg-ELISA is a valid test for detection of E. granulosus infection in living dogs. Thus it is appropriate to apply for epidemiological study.

  18. Molecular characterization and serodiagnostic potential of a novel dithiol glutaredoxin 1 from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xingju; Yan, Min; Hu, Dandan; Wang, Yu; Wang, Ning; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2016-08-17

    The larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus is the etiological agent of cystic echinococcosis (CE), which causes serious morbidity and mortality in many areas. There is no reliable method to monitor sheep CE. Here, we characterize E. granulosus glutaredoxin 1 (Eg-Grx1) and report an improved immunodiagnostic method for CE. We cloned and expressed recombinant Eg-Grx1 and generated antibodies. We analyzed the location of the protein in different parasite stages by fluorescence immunohistochemistry, detected the immunogenicity of recombinant Eg-Grx1, and developed an indirect ELISA (iELISA) for CE serodiagnosis. Eg-Grx1 is a classic dithiol Grx with several GSH-binding motifs. Native Eg-Grx1 protein was distributed in the tegument of protoscoleces, the whole germinal layer, and the parenchymatous tissue of adult worms. Recombinant Eg-Grx1 exhibited good immunoreactivity to CE-infected sheep serum. An iELISA using this antigen showed specificity of 64.3 % (9/14) and sensitivity of 1:3200, and the diagnostic accordance rate was 97.9 % (47/48) compared with the results of necropsy. We characterized a novel Grx (Eg-Grx1) from a parasitic helminth and present a comprehensive analysis of the sequence and structure of this protein. The recombinant Eg-Grx1 protein showed good potential serodiagnostic performance, and we established an iELISA method, which may contribute to the surveillance of sheep CE in epidemic areas.

  19. Genetic Characterization of Echinococcus granulosus from a Large Number of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples of Human Isolates in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Sima; Torbaghan, Shams Shariat; Dabiri, Shahriar; Babaei, Zahra; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, presents an important medical and veterinary problem globally, including that in Iran. Different genotypes of E. granulosus have been reported from human isolates worldwide. This study identifies the genotype of the parasite responsible for human hydatidosis in three provinces of Iran using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. In this study, 200 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from human CE cases were collected from Alborz, Tehran, and Kerman provinces. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene were performed for genetic characterization of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates from this study and reference sequences of different genotypes was done using a maximum likelihood method. In total, 54.4%, 0.8%, 1%, and 40.8% of the samples were identified as the G1, G2, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. The findings of the current study confirm the G1 genotype (sheep strain) to be the most prevalent genotype involved in human CE cases in Iran and indicates the high prevalence of the G6 genotype with a high infectivity for humans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the first documented human CE case in Iran infected with the G2 genotype. PMID:25535316

  20. The effect of Echinococcus granulosus on spleen cells and TGF-β expression in the peripheral blood of BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, S; Chen, X; Zhang, J; Xu, F; Fang, H; Hou, J; Zhang, X; Wu, X; Chen, X

    2017-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the cestode Echinococcus granulosus (E. granulosus) is a zoonotic parasitic disease. The effective immune evasion mechanisms of E. granulosus allow it to parasitize its hosts. However, the status of the innate and adaptive immune cells and their contributions to E. granulosus progression remain poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to determine the impact of E. granulosus infection on T cells, NK cell responses and TGF-β expression during the early infection phase in BALB/c mice. In E. granulosus infections, there was an increasing tendency in the percentage of CD4 + CD25 + T cells and CD4 + Foxp3 + T cells and peripheral blood TGF-β levels and relative expression of the Foxp3 gene. Moreover, there were a decreasing tendency in the percentage of NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity and the expression of NKG2D on NK cells. The TGF-β1/Smad pathway was activated by E. granulosus in mice. Above results can be reversed by the inhibitor SB-525334 (potent activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor). These results suggest that the TGF-β/Smad pathway plays an important role in changes of T-cell or NK cell responses. These results may contribute to revealing the preliminary molecular mechanisms in establishing hydatid infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Investigation of Echinococcus multilocularis in Environmental Definitive Host Feces in the Asian and the European Parts of Turkey

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    Ali Tümay Gürler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to investigate the presence of Echinococcus multilocularis in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes in two regions of Turkey—central Anatolia (in Asia Minor and Thrace (in the European part of Turkey. A total of 405 putative fox feces were collected from central Anatolia (186 specimens in 59 locations and from Thrace (219 specimens in 114 locations. All samples were examined by the flotation and sieving method for taeniid eggs, and positive and putative samples were further analyzed by multiplex PCR. In seven samples from three locations in central Anatolia (5.1% and in one (0.9% from Thrace, E. multilocularis DNA was amplified, and this result was confirmed with another PCR specific for E. multilocularis. In addition, Echinococcus granulosus s.l. was found in two (0.5% of the samples. Although alveolar echinococcosis (AE is known as a serious zoonosis in Turkey, this is the first field study detecting E. multilocularis in collected fecal samples documenting the environmental contamination with eggs of this zoonotic parasite.

  2. High-resolution phylogeography of zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto genotype G1 with an emphasis on its distribution in Turkey, Italy and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkar, Liina; Laurimäe, Teivi; Simsek, Sami; Balkaya, Ibrahim; Casulli, Adriano; Manfredi, Maria Teresa; Ponce-Gordo, Francisco; Varcasia, Antonio; Lavikainen, Antti; González, Luis Miguel; Rehbein, Steffen; VAN DER Giessen, Joke; Sprong, Hein; Saarma, Urmas

    2016-11-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is the causative agent of cystic echinococcosis. The disease is a significant global public health concern and human infections are most commonly associated with E. granulosus sensu stricto (s. s.) genotype G1. The objectives of this study were to: (i) analyse the genetic variation and phylogeography of E. granulosus s. s. G1 in part of its main distribution range in Europe using 8274 bp of mtDNA; (ii) compare the results with those derived from previously used shorter mtDNA sequences and highlight the major differences. We sequenced a total of 91 E. granulosus s. s. G1 isolates from six different intermediate host species, including humans. The isolates originated from seven countries representing primarily Turkey, Italy and Spain. Few samples were also from Albania, Greece, Romania and from a patient originating from Algeria, but diagnosed in Finland. The analysed 91 sequences were divided into 83 haplotypes, revealing complex phylogeography and high genetic variation of E. granulosus s. s. G1 in Europe, particularly in the high-diversity domestication centre of western Asia. Comparisons with shorter mtDNA datasets revealed that 8274 bp sequences provided significantly higher phylogenetic resolution and thus more power to reveal the genetic relations between different haplotypes.

  3. Primary hydatid cyst in gastrocnemius muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswata Bharati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis, which is caused by the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus, results from the presence of one or more massive cysts or hydatids, and can involve any organ, including the liver, lungs, heart, brain, kidneys, and long bones. Muscle hydatidosis is usually secondary in nature, resulting from spread of larval tissue from a primary site after spontaneous or trauma-induced cyst rupture or after release of viable parasite material during invasive treatment procedures. Primary muscle hydatidosis is extremely uncommon, because implantation at this site would require passage through the filters of the liver and lung. Intramuscular hydatid cyst can cause a variety of diagnostic problems, especially in the absence of typical radiologic findings. We present an unusual case of a primary hydatid cyst found in the popliteal fossa of the right knee of a 52-year-old woman, presenting as an enlarging soft-tissue tumor for 6 months associated with pain. The mass initially was diagnosed to be Backer′s cyst by ultrasonography, but later it was confirmed postoperatively through histopathological studies to be due to hydatid disease. In regions where hydatidosis is endemic, hydatid cyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of any unusual muscular mass.

  4. Detection of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus ortleppi in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Nirmal Kumar; Armua-Fernandez, Maria Teresa; Kinzang, Dukpa; Gurung, Ratna B; Wangdi, Phuntsho; Deplazes, Peter

    2017-04-01

    In this pilot study, fecal samples were collected from community dogs around slaughterhouses and from the city of Thimphu (n=138) as well as from carnivores in the forest area around a farm in Bhutan (n=28). Samples were analyzed microscopically for the presence of taeniid eggs by the floatation and sieving method. Further molecular analyses of 20 samples of community dogs positive for taeniid eggs confirmed 10 Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato and one Taenia hydatigena case. From 14 environmental fecal samples from the forest area positive for taeniid eggs, one contained E. granulosus s.l., six T. hydatigena and one Taenia taeniaeformis DNA. In the remaining samples considered positive for taeniid eggs, no molecular confirmation could be achieved. Additionally, Echinococcus cysts were collected from locally slaughtered cattle and imported cattle organs. Seven Echinococcus cysts (one fertile) from the local animals and 35 (four fertile) from imported cattle organs were confirmed as E. granulosus (G1-3) by PCR/sequencing. One Echinococcus cyst each from a local animal and from an imported cattle organ (both fertile) were confirmed to be Echinococcus ortleppi (G5). Sterile Echinococcus cysts were also collected from local yaks (n=10), and all revealed to be E. granulosus (G1-G3). Hospital records of cystic echinococcosis in humans and the presence of Echinococcus spp. in dogs and ungulates indicate the existence of local transmission for both E. ortleppi and E. granulosus in Bhutan. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Use of FTA® card methodology for sampling and molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, Franck; El Berbri, Ikhlass; Hormaz, Vanessa; Boucher, Jean-Marc; El Mamy, Ahmed Bezeid; Traore, Abdallah; Fihri, Ouafaa Fassi; Petavy, Anne-Françoise; Dakkak, Allal; Umhang, Gérald

    2017-02-01

    Cystic Echinococcosis is a parasitic disease caused by the cestode Echinococcus granulosus widely distributed in Africa. Monitoring of this parasite requires access to cyst samples on intermediate hosts observed at the slaughterhouse. In order to facilitate sampling in the field and analysis, the French National Reference Laboratory for Echinococcus spp. has developed a tissue derived from DNA sampling with FTA ® card technology. The DNA samples were taken by applying the FTA ® paper on the germinal layer after opening the cysts. The sampling technique was validated using frozen cysts (n = 76) stored in the laboratory and from field samples (n = 134) taken at the slaughterhouse by veterinarian technicians during meat inspection in Morocco, Mali and Mauritania. DNA was extracted after several weeks of storage at room temperature. PCR assays were performed using primers for generic cestode (cox1) and amplified fragments were sequenced. All samples taken in the lab and 80% of field samples were capable of molecular characterization. Cyst-derived DNA from FTA ® samples can be useful for easy sampling, storage and rapid, safe and cheap shipment. The use of the FTA methodology will facilitate studies in the field to investigate the presence and genetic characterization of E. granulosus sensu lato in African countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of a colloidal gold immunochromatographic strip based on HSP70 for the rapid detection of Echinococcus granulosus in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Xunhui; Yu, Yingchao; Chen, Xueqiu; Zhang, Zhuangzhi; Yang, Yi; Du, Aifang

    2017-06-15

    Echinococcus granulosus is the causative pathogen of cystic echinococcosis, a serious disease endangering human and animal health. In this study, an immunochromatographic strip was developed based on the recombinant protein Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) for the serological detection of E. granulosus. The protocol completes within 20min requiring no specialized equipment or chemical reagents, while specificity tests confirmed no cross-reactivity with positive serum of Fasciola hepatica, Haemonchus contortus, Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) and Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). The strips remained stable after storage at 4°C for up to 8 months. Both immunochromatographic strip and ELISA tests were applied to detect E. granulosus antibody in a total of 728 serum samples obtained from slaughter houses in Zhejiang Province. Our data revealed positive rates of 2.61 and 1.65% by immunochromatographic strip and ELISA methods, respectively. The immunochromatographic strip test developed in this study provides a simple, specific and rapid method of E. granulosus antibody detection and infected sheep monitoring. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Echinococcus canadensis (G7) and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (G1) in swine of southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, D U; Botton, S A; Tonin, A A; Azevedo, M I; Graichen, D A S; Noal, C B; de la Rue, M L

    2014-05-28

    The cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important zoonotic disease caused by the parasite Echinococcus spp. In Brazil, this parasite is present in Rio Grande do Sul (RS) state, border with Argentina and Uruguay, causing several damages to human and animal health. This study aimed to identify Echinococcus spp. in hydatid cysts of swine and evaluate the similarity of the genotypes through the phylogenetic analysis. A total of 3,101,992 swine were slaughtered in the central/northern region of RS/Brazil, during 2008-2012. Five isolates were characterized as hydatid cyst by molecular analysis, based on the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox-I). The genotypes E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1) (n=2) and E. canadensis (G7) (n=3) were identified in the hydatid cysts. The swine represents a potential intermediate host for different genotypes of Echinococcus spp., besides it can contribute to the perpetuation of the parasite's life cycle in rural areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular genotyping of Echinococcus granulosus using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded preparations from human isolates in unusual tissue sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizem, A; M'rad, S; Oudni-M'rad, M; Mestiri, S; Hammedi, F; Mezhoud, H; Zakhama, A; Mokni, M; Babba, H

    2016-07-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus remains a serious problem worldwide for issues relating to public health and the economy. The most predominantly affected sites are the liver and the lungs, but other organs such as the heart, the spleen and the peritoneum can also be infected. Access to cysts from uncommon sites has limited genomic and molecular investigations. In the present study, genotypes of E. granulosus sensu lato were identified from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues (FF-PETs) implicated in human CE. Tissue samples were obtained from 57 patients with histologically confirmed CE. DNA samples were analysed using Egss 1 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific to the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E. granulosus sensu stricto. All cysts were typed as E. granulosus sensu stricto with up to 35% of the liver and 16.6% of lungs being the most frequently infected, and up to 48.4% of samples being from rare sites. No correlation was found between cyst site and either the gender or the age of patients. This study demonstrates the possibility of exploiting atypical cysts using FF-PET samples and highlights the predominance of E. granulosus sensu stricto species in the Tunisian population, even in unusual infection sites.

  9. Protoscolicidal effects of chenodeoxycholic acid on protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongjuan; Lei, Ying; Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhuo; Xing, Guoqiang; Lv, Hailong; Jiang, Yufeng

    2016-08-01

    Dissemination of protoscoleces-rich fluid during surgical operation for cystic echinococcosis is a major cause of its recurrence. Instillation of a scolicidal agent into hydatid cysts to reduce the risk of spillage of viable protoscoleces is an integral part of the surgical technique employed by many surgeons. In this study, the protoscolicidal effect of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) was investigated. Freshly isolated protoscoleces were subjected to CDCA treatment (500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 μmol/L), and the effects on protoscoleces were investigated with the help of 0.1% eosin staining, electron microscopy, and colorimetric assay of caspase-3 like activity. Dose-dependent mortality of Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces was observed within a few days of CDCA treatment. The treated protoscoleces showed loss of viability, and morphological changes such as contraction of the soma region, formation of blebs, rostellar disorganization, loss of hooks, destruction of microtriches, and formation of vesicles, lipid droplets, and lamellar bodies. Apoptosis was evident in the treated protoscoleces, as compared to the control group, which were cultivated for nearly 3 months. Our study indicates a therapeutic potential for CDCA as a protoscolicidal agent against E. granulosus. However, further studies are needed to test the long-term effects of CDCA in animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato GENOTYPES IN DOMESTIC LIVESTOCK AND HUMANS IN GOLESTAN PROVINCE, IRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHARBATKHORI, Mitra; TANZIFI, Asal; ROSTAMI, Sima; ROSTAMI, Masoomeh; HARANDI, Majid FASIHI

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a globally parasitic zoonosis caused by larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus. This study investigated E. granulosus genotypes isolated from livestock and humans in the Golestan province, northern Iran, southeast of the Caspian sea, using partial sequencing data of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase 1 (nad1) mitochondrial genes. Seventy E. granulosus isolates were collected from animals in slaughterhouses: 18 isolates from sheep, 40 from cattle, nine from camels, two from buffaloes and one from a goat, along with four human isolates (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues) from CE patients of provincial hospitals. All isolates were successfully analysed by PCR amplification and sequencing. The sequence analysis found four E. granulosus genotypes among the 74 CE isolates: G1 (78.3%), G2 (2.7%), G3 (15%) and G6 (4%). The G1-G3 complex genotype was found in all of the sheep, goat, cattle and buffalo isolates. Among the nine camel isolates, the frequency of G1-G3 and G6 genotypes were 66.7% and 33.3%, respectively. All four human CE isolates belonged to E. granulosus sensu stricto. This study reports the first occurrence of the G2 genotype in cattle from Iran and confirms the previously reported G3 genotype in camels in the same country. PMID:27253740

  11. Molecular identification of Echinococcus granulosus isolates from ruminants in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roinioti, Erifylli; Papathanassopoulou, Aegli; Theodoropoulou, Ioanna; Simsek, Sami; Theodoropoulos, Georgios

    2016-08-15

    Cystic echinococcosis is a parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus, a cestode with worldwide distribution. Data on the circulating Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Greek livestock is scant. The aim of the present study was to conduct a genetic analysis of 82 Echinococcus granulosus isolates from ruminants in Greece, including areas which until today have not been the subject of studies. The analysis relied on a PCR assay targeting cytochrome c oxidase, subunit 1 gene (CO1), followed by bidirectional sequence analysis of the amplification product. Eighty (n=80) of the 82 (97.6%) isolates were allocated to Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (G1-G3) and were classified in 13 distinct haplotypes (9 common and 4 novel) with 12 polymorphic sites. The presence of the dominant haplotype EG1 as was documented in the European populations, was indicated in the country. Almost all regions shared the same common haplotype. In comparison to this predominant haplotype, the number of the nucleotide changes in all the other haplotypes ranged from 1 to 5. All nucleotide changes proved to be transitions (A↔G or C↔T). Two fertile hydatid cysts of sheep origin in different areas (Arkadia, Ilia) of the Peloponnese were identified as Echinococcus canadensis (G7 genotype). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction of In Vivo Fluorescent Imaging of Echinococcus granulosus in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibo; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Xuyong; Xia, Jie; Guo, Jun; Wang, Xiaoyi; Hou, Jixue; Zhang, Hongwei; Chen, Xueling; Wu, Xiangwei

    2016-06-01

    Human hydatid disease (cystic echinococcosis, CE) is a chronic parasitic infection caused by the larval stage of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. As the disease mainly affects the liver, approximately 70% of all identified CE cases are detected in this organ. Optical molecular imaging (OMI), a noninvasive imaging technique, has never been used in vivo with the specific molecular markers of CE. Thus, we aimed to construct an in vivo fluorescent imaging mouse model of CE to locate and quantify the presence of the parasites within the liver noninvasively. Drug-treated protoscolices were monitored after marking by JC-1 dye in in vitro and in vivo studies. This work describes for the first time the successful construction of an in vivo model of E. granulosus in a small living experimental animal to achieve dynamic monitoring and observation of multiple time points of the infection course. Using this model, we quantified and analyzed labeled protoscolices based on the intensities of their red and green fluorescence. Interestingly, the ratio of red to green fluorescence intensity not only revealed the location of protoscolices but also determined the viability of the parasites in vivo and in vivo tests. The noninvasive imaging model proposed in this work will be further studied for long-term detection and observation and may potentially be widely utilized in susceptibility testing and therapeutic effect evaluation.

  13. First report of Echinococcus granulosus (genotype G6) in a dog in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauti, S; Traoré, A; Crump, L; Zinsstag, J; Grimm, F

    2016-02-15

    Cystic echinococcosis is one of the most widespread and important helminthic zoonoses, caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato. However, to date there is little information about the disease in West Africa. Faecal and fur samples from 193 dogs, the main final hosts, were collected in 2010 and 2011 in Bamako, Mali. Taeniid eggs were found microscopically in 28/118 (24%) and 80/223 (36%) faecal and fur samples, respectively. One faecal and one fur sample from the same dog were positive for E. granulosus s. l. DNA. In the remaining 27 faecal (96%) and 77 fur samples (96%) only Taenia DNA was detected. Three microscopically positive fur samples were negative by PCR. Sequence analysis of part of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 gene identified the parasite as E. granulosus (genotype G6; Echinococcus canadensis). This is the first study to focus on the final host of E. granulosus s. l. in Mali and the first report of E. canadensis in Mali. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High intraspecific variability of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Rojas, Cristian A; Ebi, Dennis; Paredes, Rodolfo; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Urriola, Nicole; Roa, Juan Carlos; Manterola, Carlos; Cortes, Sandra; Romig, Thomas; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2017-04-01

    Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto is the major cause of cystic echinococcosis in most human and animal cases in the world and the most widespread species within the E. granulosus sensu lato complex. E. granulosus s.s. remains endemic in South America together with other species of the Echinococcus genus, especially in some areas in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru. Except for a single human case caused by E. canadensis (G6) described in the literature, only E. granulosus s.s. has been found in the Chilean territory. In the current study 1609bp of the cox1 gene from 69 Chilean isolates of E. granulosus s.s. from humans and animals were analysed. In total, 26 cox1 haplotypes were found, including the widespread haplotype EG01 (22 isolates) and also EGp1 (5), EgRUS7 (1), EgAus02 (1) and EgAus03 (2). Twenty-one different haplotype not previously described were identified from 38 Chilean isolates designated EgCL1-EgCL21. Previous work had described low variability of E. granulosus s.s. in South America, based on isolates from Peru. Results obtained in this work challenge the previously described idea of the low diversity of the parasite in South America, and warrant future investigation on the origin and spread of the parasite in the continent after the Spanish arrival. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Different protein of Echinococcus granulosus stimulates dendritic induced immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yana; Wang, Qiang; Lv, Shiyu; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2015-06-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a chronic infectious disease that results from a host/parasite interaction. Vaccination with ferritin derived from Echinococcus granulosus is a potential preventative treatment. To understand whether ferritin is capable of inducing a host immune response, we investigated the response of dendritic cells (DCs) to both recombinant ferritin protein and the hydatid fluid (HF) of E. granulosus. We evaluated the immunomodulatory potential of these antigens by performing, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and in vivo imaging of monocyte-derived murine DCs. During antigen stimulation of DCs, ferritin cause DCs maturation and induced higher levels of surface marker expression and activated T-cell proliferation and migration. On contrary, HF failed to induce surface marker expression and to stimulate T-cell proliferation. In response to HF, DCs produced interleukin-6 (IL-6), but no IL-12 and IL-10. DCs stimulated with ferritin produced high levels of cytokines. Overall, HF appears to induce host immunosuppression in order to ensure parasite survival via inhibits DC maturation and promotes Th2-dependent secretion of cytokines. Although ferritin also promoted DC maturation and cytokine release, it also activates CD4+T-cell proliferation, but regard of the mechanism of the Eg.ferritin induce host to eradicate E. granulosus were not clear.

  16. Rapid Identification of Echinococcus granulosus and E. canadensis Using High-Resolution Melting (HRM) Analysis by Focusing on a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Ahmad Hosseini; Harandi, Majid Fasihi; Tajaddini, Mohammadhasan; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Mohtashami-Pour, Mehdi; Pestehchian, Nader

    2016-07-22

    High-resolution melting (HRM) is a reliable and sensitive scanning method to detect variation in DNA sequences. We used this method to better understand the epidemiology and transmission of Echinococcus granulosus. We tested the use of HRM to discriminate the genotypes of E. granulosus and E. canadensis. One hundred forty-one hydatid cysts were collected from slaughtered animals in different parts of Isfahan-Iran in 2013. After DNA extraction, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene was amplified using PCR coupled with the HRM curve. The result of HRM analysis using partial the sequences of cox1 gene revealed that 93, 35, and 2 isolates were identified as G1, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was found in locus 9867 of the cox1 gene. This is a critical locus for the differentiation between the G6 and G7 genotypes. In the phylogenic tree, the sample with a SNP was located between the G6 and G7 genotypes, which suggest that this isolate has a G6/G7 genotype. The HRM analysis developed in the present study provides a powerful technique for molecular and epidemiological studies on echinococcosis in humans and animals.

  17. Emerging and Re-Emerging Zoonoses of Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno B. Chomel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the middle of the 20th century, pets are more frequently considered as “family members” within households. However, cats and dogs still can be a source of human infection by various zoonotic pathogens. Among emerging or re-emerging zoonoses, viral diseases, such as rabies (mainly from dog pet trade or travel abroad, but also feline cowpox and newly recognized noroviruses or rotaviruses or influenza viruses can sicken our pets and be transmitted to humans. Bacterial zoonoses include bacteria transmitted by bites or scratches, such as pasteurellosis or cat scratch disease, leading to severe clinical manifestations in people because of their age or immune status and also because of our closeness, not to say intimacy, with our pets. Cutaneous contamination with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Leptospira spp., and/or aerosolization of bacteria causing tuberculosis or kennel cough are also emerging/re-emerging pathogens that can be transmitted by our pets, as well as gastro-intestinal pathogens such as Salmonella or Campylobacter. Parasitic and fungal pathogens, such as echinococcosis, leishmaniasis, onchocercosis, or sporotrichosis, are also re-emerging or emerging pet related zoonoses. Common sense and good personal and pet hygiene are the key elements to prevent such a risk of zoonotic infection.

  18. Integrated health messaging for multiple neglected zoonoses: Approaches, challenges and opportunities in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducrotoy, M J; Yahyaoui Azami, H; El Berbri, I; Bouslikhane, M; Fassi Fihri, O; Boué, F; Petavy, A F; Dakkak, A; Welburn, S; Bardosh, K L

    2015-12-01

    Integrating the control of multiple neglected zoonoses at the community-level holds great potential, but critical data is missing to inform the design and implementation of different interventions. In this paper we present an evaluation of an integrated health messaging intervention, using powerpoint presentations, for five bacterial (brucellosis and bovine tuberculosis) and dog-associated (rabies, cystic echinococcosis and leishmaniasis) zoonotic diseases in Sidi Kacem Province, northwest Morocco. Conducted by veterinary and epidemiology students between 2013 and 2014, this followed a process-based approach that encouraged sequential adaptation of images, key messages, and delivery strategies using auto-evaluation and end-user feedback. We describe the challenges and opportunities of this approach, reflecting on who was targeted, how education was conducted, and what tools and approaches were used. Our results showed that: (1) replacing words with local pictures and using "hands-on" activities improved receptivity; (2) information "overload" easily occurred when disease transmission pathways did not overlap; (3) access and receptivity at schools was greater than at the community-level; and (4) piggy-backing on high-priority diseases like rabies offered an important avenue to increase knowledge of other zoonoses. We conclude by discussing the merits of incorporating our validated education approach into the school curriculum in order to influence long-term behaviour change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Traumatic rupture of a solitary splenic hydatid cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Lakis

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The rupture of an Echinococcus granulosus hydatid cyst in the spleen due to trauma is a rare event. In this case report we describe the case of a 39-year-old Lebanese male victim of a motor vehicle accident with a ruptured solitary splenic hydatid cyst discovered by CT scan and excised during exploratory laparotomy.Echinococcosis or hydatid disease is a parasitic infestation by the Echinococcus genus of tapeworm. The eggs of E. granulosus, a species of Echinococcus, are fecal-orally transmitted to human hosts, most often from dog feces, and manifest as cystic lesions termed hydatid. E. granulosus most commonly affects the liver (75%, lungs (15%, and rarely the spleen (2–5% [1,2]. E. granulosus is particularly endemic to cattle rearing areas of the Middle East. Infected patients most commonly present with vague abdominal pain, as a result of mass effect or spontaneous rupture of the cyst. Nevertheless, patient presentation may be due to traumatic rupture of a hydatid cyst; however, this is very rare. Herein we report a case of traumatic rupture of a solitary splenic hydatid cyst in a 39-year-old male following a motor vehicle crash, managed following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS protocol. Keywords: Echinococcus, Hydatid, Trauma, Splenectomy, Cysts, Surgery

  20. Seroprevalence survey of zoonoses in Extremadura, southwestern Spain, 2002-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asencio, Maria Angeles; Herraez, Oscar; Tenias, Jose Maria; Garduño, Eugenio; Huertas, Maria; Carranza, Rafael; Ramos, Julian Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Our aims were to determine the seroprevalence rates for the most common types of zoonosis among the population of Extremadura (southwestern Spain) and to identify the associated risk factors. We conducted a seroepidemiological survey to collect information on family background and the habits of people residing in Extremadura between 2002 and 2003. Antibodies to Brucella were determined by Rose Bengal staining and a standard tube agglutination test; a titer of 1/80 was considered to be positive. Antibody titers for spotted fever, leishmaniasis, echinococcosis, and toxoplasmosis were determined by enzyme-immunoassays. Independent risk factors identified were age (younger age for brucellosis), male gender (brucellosis, spotted fever, and toxoplasmosis), occupation and contact with animals (brucellosis and spotted fever for those in contact with goats, hydatidosis for those in contact with sheep, leishmaniasis for those in contact with dogs, and toxoplasmosis for those in contact with cats and pigs), and consuming contaminated food (brucellosis by eating fresh cheese, hydatidosis by eating homemade sausages, and toxoplasmosis by eating pork). Except for leishmaniasis, the other zoonoses were more prevalent in rural areas, and, with the exception of brucellosis, they were all more prevalent in Badajoz. The distribution of zoonoses in Extremadura was strongly influenced by keeping livestock and eating habits. Thus, brucellosis was more prevalent in Caceres (associated with cheese consumption), while toxoplasmosis (pork consumption) and spotted fever (from hunting) were more common in Badajoz.

  1. [Current situation of the most frequent zoonosis in the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Castro, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Zoonoses are at the present time more important than ever due to their magnitude and impact. The international trade in animals, products and sub products, as well as the intense travel of people around the world, represent risks of dissemination of infectious diseases, and are the reason for a new age of emerging and reemerging zoonotic diseases. Under these conditions, public health and animal health authorities are obliged to work together in order to get more efficient control programs. In this paper the actual situation of some important emerging and reemerging zoonoses is analyzed, including: anthrax, rabies, tuberculosis, brucellosis, cysticercosis, echinococcosis, hanta virus, Hendra and Nipah virus. Particular attention is given to leptospirosis, due to the fact that it is considered by WHO and OIE as the widest spread zoonotic disease in the world. Zoonoses caused by ingestion of animal food products are discussed. They are responsible for the death of almost 2.2 million people. Bacteria of genus salmonella and campylobacter are considered. Some recommendations are given for the control and prevention of zoonoses, emphasizing the "One Health" concept.

  2. [Globalization: challenges in abdominal surgery for migrants and refugees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, T J; Post, S

    2018-03-01

    The increasing number of refugees, migrants and international travelers influences the surgical spectrum of abdominal diseases. The aim of this review is to familiarize surgeons with specific diseases which are endemic in the patients' countries of origin and are likely to be diagnosed with increasing incidence in Germany. Low levels of hygiene in the countries of origin or refugee camps is associated with a high incidence of numerous infections, such as helminth infections, typhoid fever or amoebiasis, which if untreated can cause surgical emergencies. Historically, some of them were common in Germany but have been more or less eradicated because of the high socioeconomic standard. Echinococcosis and Chagas disease are frequently treated surgically while schistosomiasis can mimic intestinal cancer. Abdominal tuberculosis presents in a variety of abdominal pathologies and frequently causes diagnostic uncertainty. Sigmoid volvulus has a very low incidence among Europeans, but is one of the most common abdominal surgical conditions of adults in endemic countries. The number of patients who eventually undergo surgery for these conditions might be relatively low; however, surgeons must be aware of them and consider them as differential diagnoses in refugees and migrants with acute or chronic abdominal symptoms.

  3. Shared and non-shared antigens from three different extracts of the metacestode of Echinococcus granulosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Carmena

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst fluid (HCF, somatic antigens (S-Ag and excretory-secretory products (ES-Ag of Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces are used as the main antigenic sources for immunodiagnosis of human and dog echinococcosis. In order to determine their non-shared as well as their shared antigenic components, these extracts were studied by ELISA-inhibition and immunoblot-inhibition. Assays were carried out using homologous rabbit polyclonal antisera, human sera from individuals with surgically confirmed hydatidosis, and sera from dogs naturally infected with E. granulosus. High levels of cross-reactivity were observed for all antigenic extracts, but especially for ES-Ag and S-Ag. Canine antibodies evidenced lesser avidity for their specific antigens than antibodies from human origin. The major antigenic components shared by HCF, S-Ag, and ES-Ag have apparent molecular masses of 4-6, 20-24, 52, 80, and 100-104 kDa, including doublets of 41/45, 54/57, and 65/68 kDa. Non-shared polypeptides of each antigenic extract of E. granulosus were identified, having apparent masses of 108 and 78 kDa for HCF, of 124, 94, 83, and 75 kDa for S-Ag, and of 89, 66, 42, 39, 37, and 35 kDa for ES-Ag.

  4. Proteomic analysis of the excretory/secretory products and antigenic proteins of Echinococcus granulosus adult worms from infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Xiao, Di; Shen, Yujuan; Han, Xiuming; Zhao, Fei; Li, Xiaohong; Wu, Weiping; Zhou, Hejun; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cao, Jianping

    2015-05-21

    Cystic echinococcosis, which is caused by Echinococcus granulosus, is one of the most widespread zoonotic helminth diseases that affects humans and livestock. Dogs, which harbor adult worms in their small intestines, are a pivotal source of E. granulosus infection in humans and domestic animals. Therefore, novel molecular approaches for the prevention and diagnosis of this parasite infection in dogs need to be developed. In this study, we performed proteomic analysis to identify excretory/secretory products (ES) and antigenic proteins of E. granulosus adult worms using two-dimensional electrophoresis, tandem matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF), and Western blotting of sera from infected dogs. This study identified 33 ES product spots corresponding to 9 different proteins and 21 antigenic protein spots corresponding to 13 different proteins. Six antigenic proteins were identified for the first time. The present study extended the existing proteomic data of E. granulosus and provides further information regarding host-parasite interactions and survival mechanisms. The results of this study contribute to vaccination and immunodiagnoses for E. granulosus infections.

  5. Cholangiohydatidosis: an Infrequent Cause of Obstructive Jaundice and Acute Cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, Carlos; Otzen, Tamara

    One of the evolutionary complications of hepatic echinococcosis (HE) is cholangiohydatidosis, a rare cause of obstructive jaundice and cholangitis. The aim of this study was to describe the results of surgical treatment on a group of patients with cholangiohydatidosis and secondary cholangitis in terms of post-operative morbidity (POM). Case series of patients operated on for cholangiohydatidosis and cholangitis in the Department at Surgery of the Universidad de La Frontera and the Clínica Mayor in Temuco, Chile between 2004 and 2014. The minimum follow-up time was six months. The principal outcome variable was the development of POM. Other variables of interest were age, sex, cyst diameter, hematocrit, leukocytes, total bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and transaminases, type of surgery, existence of concomitant evolutionary complications in the cyst, length of hospital stay, need for surgical re-intervention and mortality. Descriptive statistics were calculated. A total of 20 patients were studied characterized by a median age of 53 years, 50.0% female and 20.0% having two or more cysts with a mean diameter of 13.3 ± 6.3 cm. A median hospital stay of six days and follow-up of 34 months was recorded. POM was 30.0%, re-intervention rate was 10.0% and mortality rate was 5.0%. Cholangiohydatidosis is a rare cause of obstructive jaundice and cholangitis associated with significant rates of POM and mortality.

  6. Cystic Echinococcal Liver Disease: New Insights into an Old Disease and an Algorithm for Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanes, Izzet; Gueven, Koray; Acunas, Buelent; Emre, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis (CE) continues to be a major health problem in developing countries. A review of current literature discloses four alternatives for the management of active CE, consisting of surgery, percutaneous treatment (PT), chemotherapy, and follow-up without intervention, but no clear guidelines for directing patients to the different management options. Palliation of symptoms or prevention of complications is the main rationale for the treatment of CE. Surgery has long been considered as the gold standard treatment. However, a meta-analysis comparing the clinical outcomes of patients treated with PT with those of a control group treated with surgery found PT to be more effective, safer, and cheaper. Medical therapy is considered to be ineffective when the criterion of success is defined as the disappearance of the lesion. However, medical therapy seems to be effective when the goal of therapy is defined as the prevention of complications in asymptomatic patients. We propose an algorithm for therapy planning in CE where the first line of therapy for patients with active lesions is PT. Patients with lesions unsuitable for PT are directed to surgery if they are symptomatic, have complicated lesions or have lesions that are prone to rupture. Asymptomatic patients with uncomplicated lesions are directed to medical therapy. Medical therapy failures are redirected to surgery

  7. Retrospective investigation of serological finding in diagnosis of parasite agents caused mass in liver

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    Safinaz Demirkaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Many of parasite agent cause diseases damaging the liver. The parasite infections settled the liver give rise to focal mass named as reactive hyperplasia or granulomatous reactions in this organ. Some of parasites caused focal mass in liver are cystic echinococ, Fasciola hepatica and Entamoeba histolytica. The diagnoses of these parasites which are localized to liver have been carried out with serological methods (Indirect hemagglutination (IHA, Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Technic (IFAT and ELISA (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay and radiological imaging. In this study, we was aimed to investigating of prevalence with serological methods of parasite diseases like cystic echinococcosis, fascioliasis and amebic liver abscess in patients determined preliminary diagnosis mass with radiological imaging Methods: For this study, One hundred patient’s sera were included to investigation. It were investigated E.histolytica antibody with IHA method, anti-echinococcus IgG antibody with IFAT method and anti-fasciolia hepatica IgG antibody with ELISA method in sera of patient’s determined mass preliminary diagnosis with radiological imaging. Results: It were encountered these parasite in 27% of patients who determined mass preliminary diagnosis. It was determined in 1% E.histolytica, 13% Cystic echinococcus and 13% Fasciola hepatica seropositive of patients. Conclusion: The patients detected mass preliminary in liver should be evaluated for these parasites. We believe that will not be enough only radiological imaging in identification of these parasitic infections and should definitely need to be supported with a serological test.

  8. Zoonotic helminths affecting the human eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard Mark L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nowaday, zoonoses are an important cause of human parasitic diseases worldwide and a major threat to the socio-economic development, mainly in developing countries. Importantly, zoonotic helminths that affect human eyes (HIE may cause blindness with severe socio-economic consequences to human communities. These infections include nematodes, cestodes and trematodes, which may be transmitted by vectors (dirofilariasis, onchocerciasis, thelaziasis, food consumption (sparganosis, trichinellosis and those acquired indirectly from the environment (ascariasis, echinococcosis, fascioliasis. Adult and/or larval stages of HIE may localize into human ocular tissues externally (i.e., lachrymal glands, eyelids, conjunctival sacs or into the ocular globe (i.e., intravitreous retina, anterior and or posterior chamber causing symptoms due to the parasitic localization in the eyes or to the immune reaction they elicit in the host. Unfortunately, data on HIE are scant and mostly limited to case reports from different countries. The biology and epidemiology of the most frequently reported HIE are discussed as well as clinical description of the diseases, diagnostic considerations and video clips on their presentation and surgical treatment. Homines amplius oculis, quam auribus credunt Seneca Ep 6,5 Men believe their eyes more than their ears

  9. Ecological and biological factors involved in the transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis in the French Ardennes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guislain, Marie-Hélène; Raoul, Francis; Giraudoux, Patrick; Terrier, Marie-Eve; Froment, Guillaume; Ferté, Hubert; Poulle, Marie-Lazarine

    2008-06-01

    In order to identify the respective importance of the ecological and biological factors involved in the transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis, we estimated grassland vole intermediate host (Microtus sp. and Arvicola terrestris) population densities, in relation to the diet of the definitive host (red fox, Vulpes vulpes) and with the prevalence of E. multilocularis in the fox population. The study was conducted in the Ardennes, north-eastern France, which is an area with a high incidence of alveolar echinococcosis. Surface index methods showed that Microtus was the most abundant intermediate host in the area. Furthermore, Microtus was present in one-third of the 144 faeces and 98 stomach content samples examined and represented more than two-thirds of the rodent occurrences. Red fox predation on Microtus was significantly correlated with Microtus relative abundance. In contrast, the relative abundance of A. terrestris was very low. This species, as well as Clethrionomys glareolus and Apodemus sp., was little consumed. E. multilocularis prevalence in foxes was determined from carcasses and reached 53% (95% confidence interval 45-61%). Intensity of infection varied from 2 to 73,380 worms per fox, with 72% of the sampled worm burden harboured by 8% of the sampled foxes. The selected explanatory variables (sex, year, age class, health and nutritional condition, and season) failed to predict prevalence rate and worm burden. The high prevalence rate in foxes indicates the possibility of intense E. multilocularis transmission, apart from periods, or in landscapes, favourable to large population outbreaks of grassland rodents.

  10. Clinical epidemiology of human AE in Europe.

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    Vuitton, D A; Demonmerot, F; Knapp, J; Richou, C; Grenouillet, F; Chauchet, A; Vuitton, L; Bresson-Hadni, S; Millon, L

    2015-10-30

    This review gives a critical update of the situation regarding alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Europe in humans, based on existing publications and on findings of national and European surveillance systems. All sources point to an increase in human cases of AE in the "historic endemic areas" of Europe, namely Germany, Switzerland, Austria and France and to the emergence of human cases in countries where the disease had never been recognised until the end of the 20th century, especially in central-eastern and Baltic countries. Both increase and emergence could be only due to methodological biases; this point is discussed in the review. One explanation may be given by changes in the animal reservoir of the parasite, Echinococcus multilocularis (increase in the global population of foxes in Europe and its urbanisation, as well as a possible increased involvement of pet animals as definitive infectious hosts). The review also focuses onto 2 more original approaches: (1) how changes in therapeutic attitudes toward malignant and chronic inflammatory diseases may affect the epidemiology of AE in the future in Europe, since a recent survey of such cases in France showed the emergence of AE in patients with immune suppression since the beginning of the 21st century; (2) how setting a network of referral centres in Europe based on common studies on the care management of patients might contribute to a better knowledge of AE epidemiology in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Activities of fenbendazole in comparison with albendazole against Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes in vitro and in a murine infection model.

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    Küster, Tatiana; Stadelmann, Britta; Aeschbacher, Denise; Hemphill, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    The current chemotherapeutic treatment of alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in humans is based on albendazole and/or mebendazole. However, the costs of treatment, life-long consumption of drugs, parasitostatic rather than parasiticidal activity of chemotherapy, and high recurrence rates after treatment interruption warrant more efficient treatment options. Experimental treatment of mice infected with Echinococcus multilocularis metacestodes with fenbendazole revealed similar efficacy to albendazole. Inspection of parasite tissue from infected and benzimidazole-treated mice by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated drug-induced alterations within the germinal layer of the parasites, and most notably an almost complete absence of microtriches. On the other hand, upon in vitro exposure of metacestodes to benzimidazoles, no phosphoglucose isomerase activity could be detected in medium supernatants during treatment with any of these drugs, indicating that in vitro treatment did not severely affect the viability of metacestode tissue. Corresponding TEM analysis also revealed a dramatic shortening/retraction of microtriches as a hallmark of benzimidazole action, and as a consequence separation of the acellular laminated layer from the cellular germinal layer. Since TEM did not reveal any microtubule-based structures within Echinococcus microtriches, this effect cannot be explained by the previously described mechanism of action of benzimidazoles targeting β-tubulin, thus benzimidazoles must interact with additional targets that have not been yet identified. In addition, these results indicate the potential usefulness of fenbendazole for the chemotherapy of AE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. [Evaluation on application of China Disease Prevention and Control Information System of Hydatid Disease II System integration and simulation tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Yu; Shuai, Han; Qiang, Wang; Jing-Bo, Xue

    2017-06-08

    To report the integrated progress of the hydatid disease information management system, and to provide the reference for further system improvements by analysis of results on simulation test feedback. The work of institutional code matching by collecting fundamental and integrated information of the system in epidemic areas of hydatid disease was carried out, and professional control agencies were selected to carry out the simulation test. The results of agencies code matching at stage indicated the average completion rate was 94.30% on administrative agencies, 69.94% on registered professional agencies and 56.40% on professional institutions matching related to hydatid disease prevention and control implements in seven provinces (autonomous regions) and Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps. Meanwhile, the response rate of open-ended proposals was 93.33% on fifteen feedbacks, and the statistics showed 21.43% believed the system was low fluency, 64.29% considered the system was inconvenience for data inputs and 42.86% considered it would be improved on system statistics functions, of which 27.78% were provincial users, 22.22% were the city users and 50.00% were the county users. The hydatid disease prevention information management system meets the fundamental needs of the majority agencies in hyperendemic areas of echinococcosis, it needs to develop the further test with more agencies joining after the work of the institutional code matching completion and the system service improvement in the next stage.

  13. Effects of albendazole nanoparticles in mice with hepatic echinococosis: Portal vein cannulation versus intravenous administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Di-Wen; Zhang, Ming-Xing; Bao, Ying-Jun; Gu, Jun-Peng; Ji, Wei-Zheng; Zhang, Hai-Xiao; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2015-07-01

    To compare the ABZ and its metabolites concentration in cyst tissue of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis administered by different routes, forty male Wistar rats receiving albendazole nanoparticles from tail vein and portal vein were divided into two groups, the concentration of ABZ and its metabolites ABZSO, ABZSO2, in the cyst tissue, were analyzed by HPLC at 2, 4, 8, 24, 36 h after administration. The parent drug and its metabolites were detected in plasm and the cyst tissue after portal cannulation and intravenous administration. The last results were the concentration of ABZ in the portal cannulation group was higher than in the intravenous group at every time point (p < 0.05). Compared to the intravenous group, the portal cannulation administration of ABZ led to a lower plasm concentration of ABZ. The concentration of ABZ and the active ABZSO were significantly higher in the portal cannulation group than that of the intravenous group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of a cDNA microarray for profiling the gene expression of Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces treated with albendazole and artemisinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Guodong; Zhang, Wenbao; Wang, Jianhua; Xiao, Yunfeng; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Jianqin; Sun, Yimin; Zhang, Chuanshan; Wang, Junhua; Lin, Renyong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Fuchun; Wen, Hao

    2014-12-01

    Cystic echinoccocosis (CE) is a neglected zoonosis that is caused by the dog-tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. The disease is endemic worldwide. There is an urgent need for searching effective drug for the treatment of the disease. In this study, we sequenced a cDNA library constructed using RNA isolated from oncospheres, protoscoleces, cyst membrane and adult worms of E. granulosus. A total of 9065 non-redundant or unique sequences were obtained and spotted on chips as uniEST probes to profile the gene expression in protoscoleces of E. granulosus treated with the anthelmintic drugs albendazole and artemisinin, respectively. The results showed that 7 genes were up-regulated and 38 genes were down-regulated in the protoscoleces treated with albendazole. Gene analysis showed that these genes are responsible for energy metabolism, cell cycle and assembly of cell structure. We also identified 100 genes up-regulated and 6 genes down-regulated in the protoscoleces treated with artemisinin. These genes play roles in the transduction of environmental signals, and metabolism. Albendazole appeared its drug efficacy in damaging cell structure, while artemisinin was observed to increase the formation of the heterochromatin in protoscolex cells. Our results highlight the utility of using cDNA microarray methods to detect gene expression profiles of E. granulosus and, in particular, to understand the pharmacologic mechanism of anti-echinococcosis drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The first workshop towards the control of cestode zoonoses in Asia and Africa

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    Mekonnen Sissay M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first workshop towards the control of cestode zoonoses in Asia and Africa was held in Asahikawa Medical University, Japan on 15 and 16 Feb 2011. This meeting was fully supported by the Asian Science and Technology Strategic Cooperation Promotion Programs sponsored by the Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology, the Ministry of Education Japan (MEXT for 3 years from 2010 to Akira Ito. A total of 24 researchers from 9 countries joined together and discussed the present situation and problems towards the control of cestode zoonoses. As the meeting was simultaneously for the establishment of joint international, either bilateral or multilateral collaboration projects, the main purposes were directed to 1 how to detect taeniasis/cysticercosis infected patients, 2 how to differentiate Taenia solium from two other human Taenia species, T. saginata and T. asiatica, 3 how to evaluate T. asiatica based on the evidence of hybrid and hybrid-derived adult tapeworms from Thailand and China, 4 how to evaluate T. solium and T. hyaenae and other Taenia species from the wild animals in Ethiopia, and 5 how to detect echinococcosis patients and 6 how to differentiate Echinococcus species worldwide. Such important topics are summarized in this meeting report.

  16. Repurposing drugs for the treatment and control of helminth infections

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    Gordana Panic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are responsible for a considerable public health burden, yet the current drug armamentarium is small. Given the high cost of drug discovery and development, the high failure rates and the long duration to develop novel treatments, drug repurposing circumvents these obstacles by finding new uses for compounds other than those they were initially intended to treat. In the present review, we summarize in vivo and clinical trial findings testing clinical candidates and marketed drugs against schistosomes, food-borne trematodes, soil-transmitted helminths, Strongyloides stercoralis, the major human filariases lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, taeniasis, neurocysticercosis and echinococcosis. While expanding the applications of broad-spectrum or veterinary anthelmintics continues to fuel alternative treatment options, antimalarials, antibiotics, antiprotozoals and anticancer agents appear to be producing fruitful results as well. The trematodes and nematodes continue to be most investigated, while cestodal drug discovery will need to be accelerated. The most clinically advanced drug candidates include the artemisinins and mefloquine against schistosomiasis, tribendimidine against liver flukes, oxantel pamoate against trichuriasis, and doxycycline against filariasis. Preclinical studies indicate a handful of promising future candidates, and are beginning to elucidate the broad-spectrum activity of some currently used anthelmintics. Challenges and opportunities are further discussed.

  17. Feeding ecology informs parasite epidemiology: prey selection modulates encounter rate with Echinococcus multilocularis in urban coyotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccioli, Stefano; Bialowas, Carly; Ruckstuhl, Kathreen E; Massolo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of urban coyote feeding ecology in the transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of Alveolar Echinococcosis in humans. As coyotes can play a main role in the maintenance of this zoonotic parasite within North American urban settings, such study can ultimately aid disease risk management. Between June 2012 and June 2013, we collected 251 coyote feces and conducted trapping of small mammals (n = 971) in five parks in the city of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. We investigated E. multilocularis epidemiology by assessing seasonal variations of coyote diet and the selective consumption of different rodent intermediate host species. Furthermore, accounting for small mammal digestibility and coyote defecation rates we estimated the number of small mammal preys ingested by coyote and consequently, coyote encounter rates with the parasite. Dominant food items included small mammals, fruit and vegetation, although hare and deer were seasonally relevant. The lowest frequency of occurrence per scat of small mammals was recorded in winter (39.4%), when consumption of deer was highest (36.4%). However, highest encounter rates (number of infected hosts predated/season) with E. multilocularis (95% CI: 1.0-22.4), combined with the lack of predation on non-competent small mammal species, suggest that winter is the critical season for transmission and control of this parasite. Within the small mammal assemblage, voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus and Myodes gapperi) were the selected preys of urban coyotes and likely played a key role for the maintenance of the urban sylvatic life-cycle of E. multilocularis in Calgary.

  18. Pelvic hydatid cyst with uncommon sciatalgia manifestation: a case report

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    Ghodratolah Maddah

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydatid disease or echinococcosis is a common parasitic disease of human and bovine, caused by infection with larva of the cestode echinococcus. Liver is the most common organ that is involved in this disease. Pelvic involvement and neurological symptoms, due to mass effect of pelvic involvement, in lower extremities are very uncommon manifestations of the disease.Case presentation: A forty six year old man was referred to clinic of surgery at Ghaem Hospital, Medical University of Mashhad, Iran. The patient complained about weakness and motor impairment in right lower extremity accompanied by numbness and radicular pain over past two months. Physical examination demonstrated muscular atrophy and reduced muscular strength in right lower extremity. Computed tomography and ultrasonographic studies showed a cystic mass in right side of the pelvic cavity with extention to the sciatic notch and another cystic mass in right gluteal region. Surgical operation revealed a cystic mass deep in pelvic cavity with the extention to the right sciatic notch with compression of nerve roots. The cystic mass was contained of daughter cysts which confirmed the diagnosis of hydatid cyst disease. This diagnosis was confirmed by pathologic assessment.Conclusion: Although uncommon, but hydatid disease can involve the pelvic cavity and make a pelvic, usually cystic, mass; that can make compression on nerve roots and so making neurologic symptoms in lower extremities. So in endemic areas for hydatid disease, such as Iran, pelvic hydatid cysts should be considered as a possible differential diagnosis in patients presenting with the sciatic pain and neurological manifestations in whom a pelvic mass has been found too.

  19. Detection of Echinococcus multilocularis in carnivores in Razavi Khorasan province, Iran using mitochondrial DNA.

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    Molouk Beiromvand

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Echinococcus multilocularis is the source of alveolar echinococcosis, a potentially fatal zoonotic disease. This investigation assessed the presence of E. multilocularis infection in definitive hosts in the Chenaran region of Razavi Khorasan Province, northeastern Iran. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fecal samples from 77 domestic and stray dogs and 14 wild carnivores were examined using the flotation/sieving method followed by multiplex PCR of mitochondrial genes. The intestinal scraping technique (IST and the sedimentation and counting technique (SCT revealed adult Echinococcus in the intestines of five of 10 jackals and of the single wolf examined. Three jackals were infected only with E. multilocularis but two, and the wolf, were infected with both E. multilocularis and E. granulosus. Multiplex PCR revealed E. multilocularis, E. granulosus, and Taenia spp. in 19, 24, and 28 fecal samples, respectively. Echinococcus multilocularis infection was detected in the feces of all wild carnivores sampled including nine jackals, three foxes, one wolf, one hyena, and five dogs (6.5%. Echinococcus granulosus was found in the fecal samples of 16.9% of dogs, 66.7% of jackals, and all of the foxes, the wolf, and the hyena. The feces of 16 (21.8% dogs, 7 of 9 (77.8% jackals, and all three foxes, one wolf and one hyena were infected with Taenia spp. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The prevalence of E. multilocularis in wild carnivores of rural areas of the Chenaran region is high, indicating that the life cycle is being maintained in northeastern Iran with the red fox, jackal, wolf, hyena, and dog as definitive hosts.

  20. Genetic diversity of the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis in red foxes at a continental scale in Europe.

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    Jenny Knapp

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE is a severe helminth disease affecting humans, which is caused by the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. AE represents a serious public health issue in larger regions of China, Siberia, and other regions in Asia. In Europe, a significant increase in prevalence since the 1990s is not only affecting the historically documented endemic area north of the Alps but more recently also neighbouring regions previously not known to be endemic. The genetic diversity of the parasite population and respective distribution in Europe have now been investigated in view of generating a fine-tuned map of parasite variants occurring in Europe. This approach may serve as a model to study the parasite at a worldwide level.The genetic diversity of E. multilocularis was assessed based upon the tandemly repeated microsatellite marker EmsB in association with matching fox host geographical positions. Our study demonstrated a higher genetic diversity in the endemic areas north of the Alps when compared to other areas.The study of the spatial distribution of E. multilocularis in Europe, based on 32 genetic clusters, suggests that Europe can be considered as a unique global focus of E. multilocularis, which can be schematically drawn as a central core located in Switzerland and Jura Swabe flanked by neighbouring regions where the parasite exhibits a lower genetic diversity. The transmission of the parasite into peripheral regions is governed by a "mainland-island" system. Moreover, the presence of similar genetic profiles in both zones indicated a founder event.

  1. Rapid urbanization of red foxes in Estonia: distribution, behaviour, attacks on domestic animals, and health-risks related to zoonotic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumer, Liivi; Davison, John; Saarma, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    Urban areas are becoming increasingly important for wildlife as diminishing natural habitats no longer represent a suitable environment for many species. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) are nowadays common in many cities worldwide, and in recent years they have colonized urban areas in Estonia. We used a public web-based questionnaire approach to evaluate the distribution and behaviour of Estonian urban foxes, to detect related problems and to assess health risks to humans and domestic animals. In total, 1205 responses were collected throughout the country. Foxes have colonized the majority of Estonian towns (33 out of 47) in a relatively short period of time, and have already established breeding dens in several towns. Despite their recent arrival, the behaviour of Estonian urban foxes is similar to that reported in longer-established urban fox populations: they are mostly active during night-time, often visit city centres and some also have dens in such locations. Certain characteristics of urban foxes serve as a basis for conflict with humans: foxes have entered houses and attacked domestic animals, killing cats and poultry. About 8% of reported foxes exhibited symptoms of sarcoptic mange, a disease that also infects domestic animals, especially dogs. The proportion of mange-infected foxes was higher in large urban areas. In addition to mange, a substantial fraction of red foxes in Estonia are known to be infected with the life-threatening tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis. Therefore, urban foxes may represent a source of serious infectious disease for pets and humans.

  2. An invasive vector of zoonotic disease sustained by anthropogenic resources: the raccoon dog in northern Europe.

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    Karmen Süld

    Full Text Available The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides is an introduced species in Europe with a continually expanding range. Since the species is capable of affecting local ecosystems and is a vector for a number of severe zoonotic diseases, it is important to understand its food habits. Raccoon dog diet was studied in Estonia by examining the contents of 223 stomach samples collected during the coldest period of the year, August to March, in 2010-2012. The most frequently consumed food categories were anthropogenic plants (e.g. cereals, fruits; FO = 56.1% and carrion (e.g. carcasses of artiodactyls and carnivores; FO = 48.4%. Carrion was also the only food category that was consumed significantly more frequently by raccoon dogs exhibiting symptoms of sarcoptic mange than by uninfected animals. Small mammals, which represent intermediate hosts for the zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, were more commonly recorded in samples also containing anthropogenic plants than expected by chance. Comparison of raccoon dog and red fox (Vulpes vulpes diet in Estonia revealed higher overlap than found elsewhere in Europe, with 'carrion' and 'anthropogenic plants' making up the bulk of both species' diet; however, raccoon dogs were more omnivorous than red foxes. Our results suggest that while the use of most food categories reflects the phenology of natural food sources, 'anthropogenic plants' and 'carrion' provide an essential resource for raccoon dogs during the coldest period of the year, with the latter resource especially important for individuals infected with sarcoptic mange. Since both of these food categories and small mammals are often found at supplementary feeding sites for wild boar (Sus scrofa, this game management practice may facilitate high densities of mesocarnivores and promote the spread of some severe zoonotic diseases, including alveolar echinococcosis, trichinellosis, rabies and sarcoptic mange.

  3. An invasive vector of zoonotic disease sustained by anthropogenic resources: the raccoon dog in northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süld, Karmen; Valdmann, Harri; Laurimaa, Leidi; Soe, Egle; Davison, John; Saarma, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    The raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides) is an introduced species in Europe with a continually expanding range. Since the species is capable of affecting local ecosystems and is a vector for a number of severe zoonotic diseases, it is important to understand its food habits. Raccoon dog diet was studied in Estonia by examining the contents of 223 stomach samples collected during the coldest period of the year, August to March, in 2010-2012. The most frequently consumed food categories were anthropogenic plants (e.g. cereals, fruits; FO = 56.1%) and carrion (e.g. carcasses of artiodactyls and carnivores; FO = 48.4%). Carrion was also the only food category that was consumed significantly more frequently by raccoon dogs exhibiting symptoms of sarcoptic mange than by uninfected animals. Small mammals, which represent intermediate hosts for the zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, were more commonly recorded in samples also containing anthropogenic plants than expected by chance. Comparison of raccoon dog and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) diet in Estonia revealed higher overlap than found elsewhere in Europe, with 'carrion' and 'anthropogenic plants' making up the bulk of both species' diet; however, raccoon dogs were more omnivorous than red foxes. Our results suggest that while the use of most food categories reflects the phenology of natural food sources, 'anthropogenic plants' and 'carrion' provide an essential resource for raccoon dogs during the coldest period of the year, with the latter resource especially important for individuals infected with sarcoptic mange. Since both of these food categories and small mammals are often found at supplementary feeding sites for wild boar (Sus scrofa), this game management practice may facilitate high densities of mesocarnivores and promote the spread of some severe zoonotic diseases, including alveolar echinococcosis, trichinellosis, rabies and sarcoptic mange.

  4. Molecular characterization of Echinococcus isolates indicates goats as reservoir for Echinococcus canadensis G6 genotype in Neuquén, Patagonia Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, S V; Pierangeli, N B; Pianciola, L; Mazzeo, M; Lazzarini, L E; Saiz, M S; Kossman, A V; Bergagna, H F J; Chartier, K; Basualdo, J A

    2010-12-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis is a highly endemic zoonotic disease in the province of Neuquén, Patagonia Argentina, although a hydatid control programme has been carried out since 1970. Human infection due to Echinococcus canadensis (G6 genotype) is frequent in Neuquén. However, the reservoir for this species remains undetermined in a region where camels are absent. We investigated the fertility, viability and molecular epidemiology of hydatid cysts obtained from local goats, pigs and sheep in order to identify the possible reservoirs of E. canadensis (G6). We also analyzed isolates from infected dogs. A total of 67 isolates were identified by the DNA sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene. Cysts from sheep (n=16), goats (n=23) and pigs (n=18) and adult worms from 10 infected dogs were analyzed. The fertility of the hydatid cysts was 78.6%; 90.4% and 94.4% for sheep, goats and pigs, respectively. We detected E. canadensis (G6) in 21 of 23 goat samples and in 1 dog isolate, E. canadensis (G7) in all the pig isolates, E. granulosus sensu stricto (G3) in 1 sheep and the G1 genotype in 15 sheep, 2 goats and 9 dog samples. The G1 haplotypes included the common sheep strain sequence and 2 microvariants of this sequence. E. granulosus sensu stricto (G3) is described for the first time in South America. We conclude that goats act as reservoir for E. canadensis (G6) in Neuquén, and that control strategies may have to be adapted to local molecular epidemiology to improve the control of parasite transmission. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. First report on circulation of Echinococcus ortleppi in the one humped camel (Camelus dromedaries), Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed E; Eltom, Kamal H; Musa, Nasreen O; Ali, Ibtisam A; Elamin, Fatima M; Grobusch, Martin P; Aradaib, Imadeldin E

    2013-06-25

    Echinococcus granulosus (EG) complex, the cause of cystic echinococcosis (CE), infects humans and several other animal species worldwide and hence the disease is of public health importance. Ten genetic variants, or genotypes designated as (G1-G10), are distributed worldwide based on genetic diversity. The objective of this study was to provide some sequence data and phylogeny of EG isolates recovered from the Sudanese one-humped camel (Camelus dromedaries). Fifty samples of hydatid cysts were collected from the one- humped camels (Camelus dromedaries) at Taboul slaughter house, central Sudan. DNAs were extracted from protoscolices and/or associated germinal layers of hydatid cysts using a commercial kit. The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NADH1) gene and the cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene were used as targets for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The PCR products were purified and partial sequences were generated. Sequences were further examined by sequence analysis and subsequent phylogeny to compare these sequences to those from known strains of EG circulating globally. The identity of the PCR products were confirmed as NADH1 and cox1 nucleotide sequences using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) of NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD). The phylogenetic analysis showed that 98% (n = 49) of the isolates clustered with Echinococcus canadensis genotype 6 (G6), whereas only one isolate (2%) clustered with Echinococcus ortleppi (G5). This investigation expands on the existing sequence data generated from EG isolates recovered from camel in the Sudan. The circulation of the cattle genotype (G5) in the one-humped camel is reported here for the first time.

  6. Could the domestic cat play a significant role in the transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis? A study based on qPCR analysis of cat feces in a rural area in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jenny; Combes, Benoît; Umhang, Gérald; Aknouche, Soufiane; Millon, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis, a cestode parasite responsible for alveolar echinococcosis in humans, is often reported in Europe. It involves red foxes, domestic dogs, and domestic and wild cats as definitive hosts. The parasite infects small mammals and accidentally humans as intermediate hosts and develops in a similar way to a tumor, usually in the liver. Domestic animals are suspected of playing a role in parasite transmission, but this is rarely proven. Moreover, the role of domestic cats is thought to be small, because of experimental studies showing incomplete development of the parasite observed in their intestines. In the present study, we investigated copro-sampling performed in a rural and highly endemic area in Eastern France, on carnivore feces (n = 150). From these samples, the parasite was detected and identified by DNA analysis using quantitative PCR targeting part of a mitochondrial gene (Em-qPCR). Taeniid eggs were isolated from positive-Em-qPCR samples by flotation, and species identification was confirmed by sequencing on DNA extracts. From a total of 43 copro-samples from cats, four tested positive for E. multilocularis by the Em-qPCR. In two of these, we found parasite eggs that were identified as E. multilocularis. This finding was confirmed by sequencing, while one dog stool out of 61 collected was found to be positive, no egg was detectable. At the same time, 34% of fox stools tested positive for the parasite. The present study challenges the current idea that cats are only of minor significance in the E. multilocularis life cycle. PMID:27739398

  7. Echinococcus-Host Interactions at Cellular and Molecular Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, K; Koziol, U

    2017-01-01

    The potentially lethal zoonotic diseases alveolar and cystic echinococcosis are caused by the metacestode larval stages of the tapeworms Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus, respectively. In both cases, metacestode growth and proliferation occurs within the inner organs of mammalian hosts, which is associated with complex molecular host-parasite interactions that regulate nutrient uptake by the parasite as well as metacestode persistence and development. Using in vitro cultivation systems for parasite larvae, and informed by recently released, comprehensive genome and transcriptome data for both parasites, these molecular host-parasite interactions have been subject to significant research during recent years. In this review, we discuss progress in this field, with emphasis on parasite development and proliferation. We review host-parasite interaction mechanisms that occur early during an infection, when the invading oncosphere stage undergoes a metamorphosis towards the metacestode, and outline the decisive role of parasite stem cells during this process. We also discuss special features of metacestode morphology, and how this parasite stage takes up nutrients from the host, utilizing newly evolved or expanded gene families. We comprehensively review mechanisms of host-parasite cross-communication via evolutionarily conserved signalling systems and how the parasite signalling systems might be exploited for the development of novel chemotherapeutics. Finally, we point to an urgent need for the development of functional genomic techniques in this parasite, which will be imperative for hypothesis-driven analyses into Echinococcus stem cell biology, developmental mechanisms and immunomodulatory activities, which are all highly relevant for the development of anti-infective measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic variability and haplotypes of Echinococcus isolates from Tunisia.

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    Boufana, Belgees; Lahmar, Samia; Rebaï, Waël; Ben Safta, Zoubeir; Jebabli, Leïla; Ammar, Adel; Kachti, Mahmoud; Aouadi, Soufia; Craig, Philip S

    2014-11-01

    The species/genotypes of Echinococcus infecting a range of intermediate, canid and human hosts were examined as well as the intraspecific variation and population structure of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) within these hosts. A total of 174 Echinococcus isolates from humans and ungulate intermediate hosts and adult tapeworms from dogs and jackals were used. Genomic DNA was used to amplify a fragment within a mitochondrial gene and a nuclear gene, coding for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1; 828 bp) and elongation factor 1-alpha (ef1a; 656 bp), respectively. E. granulosus sensu stricto was identified from all host species examined, E. canadensis (G6) in a camel and, for the first time, fertile cysts of E. granulosus (s.s.) and E. equinus in equids (donkeys) and E. granulosus (s.s.) from wild boars and goats. Considerable genetic variation was seen only for the cox1 sequences of E. granulosus (s.s.). The pairwise fixation index (Fst) for cox1 E. granulosus (s.s.) sequences from donkeys was high and was statistically significant compared with that of E. granulosus populations from other intermediate hosts. A single haplotype (EqTu01) was identified for the cox1 nucleotide sequences of E. equinus. The role of donkeys in the epidemiology of echinococcosis in Tunisia requires further investigation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The first report of human-derived G10 genotype of Echinococcus canadensis in China and possible sources and routes of transmission.

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    Yang, Dong; Zhang, Tiemin; Zeng, Zhaolin; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Weizhe; Liu, Aiqin

    2015-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is one of the most important parasitic zoonoses. 10 distinct genotypes, designated G1-G10 genotypes of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.), have been split into 4 species: Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) (G1-G3), Echinococcus equinus (G4), Echinococcus ortleppi (G5) and Echinococcus canadensis (G6-G10); Echinococcus felidis has also been suggested as a sister taxon of E. granulosus s.s. recently. Four genotypes belonging to two species (G1 and G3 genotypes of E. granulosus s.s., and G6 and G7 genotypes of E. canadensis) have been identified in humans and animals in China. In the present study, a human-derived hydatid cyst from a patient in northeastern China's Heilongjiang Province was identified as G10 genotype of E. canadensis based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1), cytochrome b (cytb) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) genes. Homology analysis showed the cox1 gene sequence of G10 genotype of E. canadensis had 100% homology with those from wolves in Mongolia and from a moose in Russia. The cytb and nad1 gene sequences of G10 genotype of E. canadensis had 100% homology with the complete sequence from a moose in Finland at an amino acid level. The infection source of the CE patient here might be primarily attributable to wolves. This is the first report of G10 genotype of E. canadensis in a human in China. The finding of G10 genotype of E. canadensis in China shows that this genotype possibly has a more wide geographical distribution than previously considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Echinococcus canadensis transmission in the North.

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    Oksanen, Antti; Lavikainen, Antti

    2015-10-30

    The Echinococcus granulosus complex (EG) is the causative agent of cystic echinococcosis (CE). Northern cervid Echinococcus was previously suggested to be the ancestor of the entire EG. During the last century, it was regarded to have three (or four) different, but often overlapping, transmission cycles in the circumpolar North: the original wolf-wild cervid (reindeer or elk)-cycle; the semi-synanthropic cycle involving sled and hunting dogs and wild cervids; and the synanthropic cycle involving herding dogs and semi-domesticated reindeer. Human infections mainly derived from the latter two cycles. In Fennoscandia, the synanthropic cycle has been eliminated during the last 50 years due to changes in reindeer husbandry methods; machinery making herding dogs largely redundant. Typical to human CE in the North has been the relatively benign nature of the disease compared with CE caused by E. granulosus sensu stricto. The metacestodes in humans and in the natural cervid hosts predominantly appear in the lungs. The causative agents have been identified as EG mitochondrial genotypes G8 and G10, now together with G6 (camel), G7 (pig) and G9 genotypes constituting the Echinococcus canadensis species. Based on recent findings in reindeer in Yakutia, G6 might also be recognised among cervid genotypes. The geographical distribution of both G8 and G10 is circumpolar, with G10 currently apparently more prevalent both in the Palearctic and Nearctic. Because of the disappearance of the working dog, E. canadensis in Fennoscandia is again highly dependent on the wolf, as it was before domestication of the dog. Pet and sled dogs, if their number further increases, may to a minor part participate in the life cycle. Human CE in the North was mostly diagnosed by mass chest tuberculosis radiography campaigns, which have been discontinued. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of reactivity to Echinococcus spp. among rural inhabitants in Poland.

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    Cisak, Ewa; Sroka, Jacek; Wójcik-Fatla, Angelina; Zając, Violetta; Dutkiewicz, Jacek

    2015-09-01

    A group of 172 rural inhabitants from eastern Poland (68 males and 104 females, mean age 49.0 ± 12.0 years) was examined for the presence of antibodies against Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis. A population of 38 healthy urban dwellers from the city of Lublin (17 males and 21 females, mean age 36.2 ± 9.6 years) were examined as a control group. Sera of 22 rural inhabitants (12.8%) reacted positively to Echinococcus granulosus hydatid fluid antigen in the screening test. A cross-reactivity was observed with two serum samples that tested positive in ELISA for E. granulosus. Three serum samples were tested positive for E. multilocularis using the Em2plus ELISA assay and also positive for Western blot. None of the members of control group showed the presence of a seropositive reaction to Echinococcus spp. The reactivity to Echinococcus spp. among rural inhabitants decreased with age and this correlation was statistically significant (R = -0.197151, p = 0.009535). The percentage of positive findings was the highest (50.0%) in the youngest age group (14-20). No significant correlations were found between responses to interview questions (possession of domestic and farm animals, contact with wild animals, eating unwashed berries, drinking unboiled water) and the presence of seropositive reactions to Echinococcus spp. The presented results seem to indicate that echinococcosis is still a current problem in Poland that should not be neglected and, moreover, indicates the need for improvement in the routine laboratory diagnostics of Echinococcus spp. by standardizing the ELISA and Western blot tests.

  12. High-throughput characterization of Echinococcus spp. metacestode miRNomes.

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    Cucher, Marcela; Macchiaroli, Natalia; Kamenetzky, Laura; Maldonado, Lucas; Brehm, Klaus; Rosenzvit, Mara Cecilia

    2015-03-01

    Echinococcosis is a worldwide zoonosis of great public health concern, considered a neglected disease by the World Health Organisation. The cestode parasites Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.) and Echinococcus multilocularis are the main aetiological agents. In the intermediate host, these parasites display particular developmental traits that lead to different patterns of disease progression. In an attempt to understand the causes of these differences, we focused on the analysis of microRNAs (miRNAs), small non-coding regulatory RNAs with major roles in development of animals and plants. In this work, we analysed the small RNA expression pattern of the metacestode, the stage of sanitary relevance, and provide a detailed description of Echinococcus miRNAs. Using high-throughput small RNA sequencing, we believe that we have carried out the first experimental identification of miRNAs in E. multilocularis and have expanded the Echinococcus miRNA catalogue to 38 miRNA genes, including one miRNA only present in E. granulosus s. l. Our findings show that although both species share the top five highest expressed miRNAs, 13 are differentially expressed, which could be related to developmental differences. We also provide evidence that uridylation is the main miRNA processing mechanism in Echinococcus spp. These results provide detailed information on Echinococcus miRNAs, which is the first step in understanding their role in parasite biology and disease establishment and/or progression, and their future potential use as drug or diagnostic targets. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biochemical Characterization of Echinococcus multilocularis Antigen B3 Reveals Insight into Adaptation and Maintenance of Parasitic Homeostasis at the Host-Parasite Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chun-Seob; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Han, Xiumin; Bae, Young-An; Park, Woo-Jae; Kang, Insug; Wang, Hu; Kong, Yoon

    2017-02-03

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by Echinococcus multilocularis metacestode is frequently associated with deleterious zoonotic helminthiasis. The growth patterns and morphological features of AE, such as invasion of the liver parenchyme and multiplication into multivesiculated masses, are similar to those of malignant tumors. AE has been increasingly detected in several regions of Europe, North America, Central Asia, and northwestern China. An isoform of E. multilocularis antigen B3 (EmAgB3) shows a specific immunoreactivity against patient sera of active-stage AE, suggesting that EmAgB3 might play important roles during adaptation of the parasite to hosts. However, expression patterns and biochemical properties of EmAgB3 remained elusive. The protein profile and nature of component proteins of E. multilocularis hydatid fluid (EmHF) have never been addressed. In this study, we conducted proteome analysis of EmHF of AE cysts harvested from immunocompetent mice. We observed the molecular and biochemical properties of EmAgB3, including differential transcription patterns of paralogous genes, macromolecular protein status by self-assembly, distinct oligomeric states according to individual anatomical compartments of the worm, and hydrophobic ligand-binding protein activity. We also demonstrated tissue expression patterns of EmAgB3 transcript and protein. EmAgB3 might participate in immune response and recruitment of essential host lipids at the host-parasite interface. Our results might contribute to an in depth understanding of the biophysical and biological features of EmAgB3, thus providing insights into the design of novel targets to control AE.

  14. Real time PCR to detect the environmental faecal contamination by Echinococcus multilocularis from red fox stools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Jenny; Millon, Laurence; Mouzon, Lorane; Umhang, Gérald; Raoul, Francis; Ali, Zeinaba Said; Combes, Benoît; Comte, Sébastien; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Giraudoux, Patrick

    2014-03-17

    The oncosphere stage of Echinococcus multilocularis in red fox stools can lead, after ingestion, to the development of alveolar echinococcosis in the intermediate hosts, commonly small mammals and occasionally humans. Monitoring animal infection and environmental contamination is a key issue in public health surveillance. We developed a quantitative real-time PCR technique (qPCR) to detect and quantify E. multilocularis DNA released in fox faeces. A qPCR technique using a hydrolysis probe targeting part of the mitochondrial gene rrnL was assessed on (i) a reference collection of stools from 57 necropsied foxes simultaneously investigated using the segmental sedimentation and counting technique (SSCT) (29 positive for E. multilocularis worms and 28 negative animals for the parasite); (ii) a collection of 114 fox stools sampled in the field: two sets of 50 samples from contrasted endemic regions in France and 14 from an E. multilocularis-free area (Greenland). Of the negative SSCT controls, 26/28 were qPCR-negative and two were weakly positive. Of the positive SSCT foxes, 25/29 samples were found to be positive by qPCR. Of the field samples, qPCR was positive in 21/50 (42%) and 5/48 (10.4%) stools (2 samples inhibited), originating respectively from high and low endemic areas. In faeces, averages of 0.1 pg/μl of DNA in the Jura area and 0.7 pg/μl in the Saône-et-Loire area were detected. All qPCR-positive samples were confirmed by sequencing. The qPCR technique developed here allowed us to quantify environmental E. multilocularis contamination by fox faeces by studying the infectious agent directly. No previous study had performed this test in a one-step reaction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Contemporary models and prospects of control of parasitic diseases

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    Petričević Saša M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic, social and expert-scientific factors determine activities in connection with the development of the control of parasitic infections in the upcoming period of the 21st century. The primary research activities are directed at studies of the physiological functions of parasites and the ecological relations between the parasite and the host, and all that is undertaken with the objective of securing adequate pharmacotherapy/pharmacoprophylaxis and immunoprophilaxis. As there is a huge expansion in the synthesis of chemical compounds, there is a great number of potential substances for use in the form of a medicine. Along these lines, activities concerning the development of new antiparasitics and/or modification of existing ones are primarily based on securing a quality target spot for its action. Another possibility in the area of research is connected to the problem of resistance of parasites and intensive studies of the biochemical-physiological characteristics of parasites, as well as the development of an active epidemiological-episootiological network for monitoring resistance. In parallel with the development of medicines, the results of investigations of physiological functions of parasites and their mutual relations with their host, are intensely used for the development of immunological control, and the development of vaccines (for example, the development of vaccines for the control of coccidiosis, babesiosis, echinococcosis. The second important approach is related to studies of parasitic zoonoses, the effect of global warming on the epidemiological-episootiological characteristics of parasitic diseases and the selection of resistant animal breeds/hybrids. Animal welfare is also of importance, the perfecting of reliable, rapid and less-costly methods for diagnosing parasitic diseases and the development of in vitro methods for the examination of resistance to antiparasitics.

  16. Rapid urbanization of red foxes in Estonia: distribution, behaviour, attacks on domestic animals, and health-risks related to zoonotic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liivi Plumer

    Full Text Available Urban areas are becoming increasingly important for wildlife as diminishing natural habitats no longer represent a suitable environment for many species. Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes are nowadays common in many cities worldwide, and in recent years they have colonized urban areas in Estonia. We used a public web-based questionnaire approach to evaluate the distribution and behaviour of Estonian urban foxes, to detect related problems and to assess health risks to humans and domestic animals. In total, 1205 responses were collected throughout the country. Foxes have colonized the majority of Estonian towns (33 out of 47 in a relatively short period of time, and have already established breeding dens in several towns. Despite their recent arrival, the behaviour of Estonian urban foxes is similar to that reported in longer-established urban fox populations: they are mostly active during night-time, often visit city centres and some also have dens in such locations. Certain characteristics of urban foxes serve as a basis for conflict with humans: foxes have entered houses and attacked domestic animals, killing cats and poultry. About 8% of reported foxes exhibited symptoms of sarcoptic mange, a disease that also infects domestic animals, especially dogs. The proportion of mange-infected foxes was higher in large urban areas. In addition to mange, a substantial fraction of red foxes in Estonia are known to be infected with the life-threatening tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of alveolar echinococcosis. Therefore, urban foxes may represent a source of serious infectious disease for pets and humans.

  17. Environmental determinants of the spatial distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolnai, Z; Széll, Z; Sréter, T

    2013-12-06

    Human alveolar echinococcosis, caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis, is one of the most pathogenic zoonoses in the temperate and arctic region of the Northern Hemisphere. To investigate the spatial distribution of E. multilocularis and the factors influencing this distribution in the recently identified endemic area of Hungary, 1612 red fox (Vulpes vulpes) carcasses were randomly collected from the whole Hungarian territory from November 2008 to February 2009 and from November 2012 to February 2013. The topographic positions of foxes were recorded in geographic information system database. The digitized home ranges and the vector data were used to calculate the altitude, mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, soil water retention, soil permeability, areas of land cover types and the presence and buffer zone of permanent water bodies within the fox territories. The intestinal mucosa from all the foxes was tested by sedimentation and counting technique. Multiple regression analysis was performed with environmental parameter values and E. multilocularis counts. The spatial distribution of the parasite was clumped. Based on statistical analysis, mean annual temperature and annual precipitation were the major determinants of the spatial distribution of E. multilocularis in Hungary. It can be attributed to the sensitivity of E. multilocularis eggs to high temperatures and desiccation. Although spreading and emergence of the parasite was observed in Hungary before 2009, the prevalence and intensity of infection did not change significantly between the two collection periods. It can be explained by the considerably lower annual precipitation before the second collection period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Parasitic Diseases in Bulgaria in Between 2013-2014

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    Rainova, Iskra; Harizanov, Rumen; Kaftandjiev, Iskren; Tsvetkova, Nina; Mikov, Ognyan; Kaneva, Eleonora

    2018-01-01

    Background: In Bulgaria, more than 20 autochthonous human parasitic infections have been described and some of them are widespread. Over 50 imported protozoan and helminthic infections represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges and pose epidemiological risks due to the possibility of local transmission. Aims: To establish the distribution of autochthonous and imported parasitic diseases among the population of the country over a 2-year period (2013-2014) and to evaluate their significance in the public health system. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Methods: We used the annual reports by regional health inspectorates and data from the National Reference Laboratory at the National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases on all individuals infected with parasitic diseases in the country. Prevalence was calculated for parasitic diseases with few or absent clinical manifestations (oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic infections). Incidence per 100.000 was calculated for diseases with an overt clinical picture or those that required hospitalisation and specialised medical interventions (e.g. surgery). Results: During the research period, parasitological studies were conducted on 1441.244 persons, and parasitic infections were diagnosed in 22.039 individuals. Distribution of various parasitic pathogens among the population displayed statistically significant differences in prevalence for some intestinal parasites (enterobiasis 0.81%, giardiasis 0.34% and blastocystosis 0.22%). For certain zoonotic diseases such as cystic echinococcosis (average incidence of 3.99 per 100.000) and trichinellosis (average incidence of 0.8 per 100.000), the incidence exceeds several times the annual incidence recorded in the European Union. Conclusion: Parasitic diseases still pose a substantial problem with social and medical impacts on the residents of our country. Improved efficiency regarding autochthonous and imported parasitic diseases is essential in providing the public

  19. A systematic review of zoonotic enteric parasitic diseases among nomadic and pastoral people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Barnes

    Full Text Available Zoonotic enteric parasites are ubiquitous and remain a public health threat to humans due to our close relationship with domestic animals and wildlife, inadequate water, sanitation, and hygiene practices and diet. While most communities are now sedentary, nomadic and pastoral populations still exist and experience unique exposure risks for acquiring zoonotic enteric parasites. Through this systematic review we sought to summarize published research regarding pathogens present in nomadic populations and to identify the risk factors for their infection.Using systematic review guidelines set forth by PRISMA, research articles were identified, screened and summarized based on exclusion criteria for the documented presence of zoonotic enteric parasites within nomadic or pastoral human populations. A total of 54 articles published between 1956 and 2016 were reviewed to determine the pathogens and exposure risks associated with the global transhumance lifestyle.The included articles reported more than twenty different zoonotic enteric parasite species and illustrated several risk factors for nomadic and pastoralist populations to acquire infection including; a animal contact, b food preparation and diet, and c household characteristics. The most common parasite studied was Echinococcosis spp. and contact with dogs was recognized as a leading risk factor for zoonotic enteric parasites followed by contact with livestock and/or wildlife, water, sanitation, and hygiene barriers, home slaughter of animals, environmental water exposures, household member age and sex, and consumption of unwashed produce or raw, unprocessed, or undercooked milk or meat.Nomadic and pastoral communities are at risk of infection with a variety of zoonotic enteric parasites due to their living environment, cultural and dietary traditions, and close relationship to animals. Global health efforts aimed at reducing the transmission of these animal-to-human pathogens must incorporate

  20. Genetic characterization of human hydatid cysts shows coinfection by Echinococcus canadensis G7 and Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto G1 in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debiaggi, María Florencia; Soriano, Silvia Viviana; Pierangeli, Nora Beatriz; Lazzarini, Lorena Evelina; Pianciola, Luis Alfredo; Mazzeo, Melina Leonor; Moguillansky, Sergio; Farjat, Juan Angel Basualdo

    2017-09-01

    Human cystic echinococcosis caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) is a highly endemic disease in the province of Neuquén, Patagonia, Argentina. Human infections with E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) G1 and Echinococcus canadensis G6 were reported in Neuquén in previous studies, whereas four genotypes were identified in livestock: G1, G3, G6, and G7. The aim of this study was to identify the genotypes of E. granulosus s.l. isolates from humans of Neuquén province, Patagonia, Argentina, through the 2005-2014 period. Twenty six hydatid cysts were obtained from 21 patients. The most frequent locations were the liver and lungs. Single cysts were observed in 81.0% of patients, and combined infection of liver and lungs was detected in 9.5% of cases. Partial sequencing of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) genes identified the presence of E. granulosus s.s. G1 (n = 11; 42.3%) including three different partial sequences; E. canadensis G6 (n = 14; 53.8%) and E. canadensis G7 (n = 1; 3.9%). Coinfection with G1 and G7 genotypes was detected in one patient who harbored three liver cysts. Most of the liver cysts corresponded to G1 and G6 genotypes. This study presents the first report in the Americas of a human infection with E. canadensis G7 and the second worldwide report of a coinfection with two different species and genotypes of E. granulosus s.l in humans. The molecular diversity of this parasite should be considered to redesign or improve the control program strategies in endemic regions.

  1. Immunodiagnostic Value of Echinococcus Granulosus Recombinant B8/1 Subunit of Antigen B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savardashtaki, Amir; Sarkari, Bahador; Arianfar, Farzane; Mostafavi-Pour, Zohreh

    2017-06-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), as a chronic parasitic disease, is a major health problem in many countries. The performance of the currently available serodiagnostic tests for the diagnosis of CE is unsatisfactory. The current study aimed at sub-cloning a gene, encoding the B8/1 subunit of antigen B (AgB) from Echinococcus granulosus, using gene optimization for the immunodiagnosis of human CE. The coding sequence for AgB8/1 subunit of Echinococcus granulosus was selected from GenBank and was gene-optimized. The sequence was synthesized and inserted into pGEX-4T-1 vector. Purification was performed with GST tag affinity column. Diagnostic performance of the produced recombinant antigen, native antigen B and a commercial ELISA kit were further evaluated in an ELISA system, using a panel of sera from CE patients and controls. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the protein of interest had a high expression level and purity after GST tag affinity purification. Western blotting verified the immunoreactivity of the produced recombinant antigen with the sera of CE patients. In an ELISA system, the sensitivity and specificity (for human CE diagnosis) of the recombinant antigen, native antigen B and commercial kit were respectively 93% and 92%, 87% and 90% and 97% and 95%. The produced recombinant antigen showed a high diagnostic value which can be recommended for serodiagnosis of CE in Iran and other CE-endemic areas. Utilizing the combination of other subunits of AgB8 would improve the performance value of the introduced ELISA system.

  2. First insights into the genetic diversity of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeljak, Zoran; Boufana, Belgees; Interisano, Maria; Vidanovic, Dejan; Kulisic, Zoran; Casulli, Adriano

    2016-06-15

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) is a cosmopolitan zoonotic infection which is endemic in Serbia where it is subject to mandatory reporting. However, information on the incidence of the disease in humans and prevalence of hydatid infection in livestock remains limited. We used sequenced data of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox 1) mitochondrial gene to examine the genetic diversity and population structure of E. granulosus (s.s.) from intermediate hosts from Serbia. We also compared our generated nucleotide sequences with those reported for neighbouring European countries. Echinococcus canadensis was molecularly confirmed from pig and human hydatid isolates. E. granulosus (G1) was confirmed from sheep and cattle hydatid isolates as well as the first molecular confirmation in Serbia of E. granulosus G2 in sheep and E. granulosus G3 in sheep and cattle hydatid isolates. The Serbian E. granulosus (s.s.) parsimony network displayed 2 main haplotypes (SB02 and SB05) which together with the neutrality indices were suggestive of bottleneck and/or balancing selection. Haplotype analysis showed the presence of the common E. granulosus haplotype described from other worldwide regions. Investigation of the pairwise fixation (Fst) index suggested that Serbian populations of E. granulosus (s.s.) from sheep and cattle hosts showed moderate genetic differentiation. Six of the Serbian haplotypes (SB02-SB07) were shared with haplotypes from Bulgaria, Hungary and/or Romania. Further studies using a larger number of hydatid isolates from various locations across Serbia will provide more information on the genetic structure of E. granulosus (s.s.) within this region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular characterization of Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto and Echinococcus canadensis in humans and livestock from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zait, Houria; Kouidri, Mokhtaria; Grenouillet, Florence Elisabeth; Umhang, Gérald; Millon, Laurence; Hamrioui, Boussad; Grenouillet, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In Algeria, previous studies investigated genotypes of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in animals and identified E. granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) genotypes G1 and G3 whereas Echinococcus canadensis genotype G6 was only reported from dromedary cysts. Molecular data on human cystic echinococcosis (CE) were limited. We implemented a large genotyping study of hydatid cysts from humans and livestock animals to specify CE's molecular epidemiology and the genetic diversity in Algeria. Fifty-four human CE cysts from patients predominantly admitted in surgical units from Mustapha Hospital, Algiers, and 16 cysts from livestock animals gathered in two geographically distinct slaughterhouses, Tiaret and Tamanrasset, were collected. Molecular characterization was performed using sequencing of two mitochondrial genes, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (NDI). In humans, G1 of E. granulosus s.s. was the main genotype (90.7 %); four samples (7.4 %) were characterized as E. granulosus s.s. G3 and one cyst as E. canadensis G6 (1.8 %). This molecular confirmation of E. canadensis G6 human infection in Algeria was observed in a Tuareg female living in a desertic area in Tamanrasset. All cysts from sheep, cattle, and goat were identified as E. granulosus s.s. G1 and the two cysts originating from dromedary as E. canadensis G6. Twenty concatenated haplotypes (COI + NDI) were characterized. Among E. granulosus s.s., one haplotype (HL1) was highly predominant in both humans and animals cysts (71.6 %). This study revealed main occurrence of E. granulosus s.s. in humans and livestock animals, with description of a predominant shared haplotype corresponding to the main worldwide observed haplotype E.granulosus s.s. G1. E. canadensis G6 was limited to South Algeria, in dromedary as well as in human.

  4. Genetic Characterization of Human-Derived Hydatid Cysts of Echinococcus granulosus Sensu Lato in Heilongjiang Province and the First Report of G7 Genotype of E. canadensis in Humans in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhaolin; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Aiqin; Piao, Daxun; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jianping; Shen, Yujuan; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Weizhe

    2014-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) is one of the most important zoonotic parasitic diseases worldwide and 10 genotypes (G1–G10) have been reported. In China, almost all the epidemiological and genotyping studies of E. granulosus s.l. are from the west and northwest pasturing areas. However, in Heilongjiang Province of northeastern China, no molecular information is available on E. granulosus s.l. To understand and to speculate on possible transmission patterns of E. granulosus s.l., we molecularly identified and genotyped 10 hydatid cysts from hepatic CE patients in Heilongjiang Province based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1), cytochrome b (cytb) and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) genes. Two genotypes were identified, G1 genotype (n = 6) and G7 genotype (n = 4). All the six G1 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1 locus; three and two different sequences were obtained at the cytb and nad1 loci, respectively, with two cytb gene sequences not being described previously. G7 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1, cytb and nad1 loci; however, the cytb gene sequence was not described previously. This is the first report of G7 genotype in humans in China. Three new cytb gene sequences from G1 and G7 genotypes might reflect endemic genetic characterizations. Pigs might be the main intermediate hosts of G7 genotype in our investigated area by homology analysis. The results will aid in making more effective control strategies for the prevention of transmission of E. granulosus s.l. PMID:25329820

  5. Environmental Contamination by Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato Eggs in Relation to Slaughterhouses in Urban and Rural Areas in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaâbane-Banaoues, Raja; Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; M'rad, Selim; Mezhoud, Habib; Babba, Hamouda

    2016-02-01

    Hydatidosis has become a real concern for health care institutions and animal rearers in Tunisia. The Tunisian endemicity is aggravated by the growing number of dogs and the difficulty of getting rid of contaminated viscera because of the lack of equipment in most slaughterhouses. Therefore, microscopic and molecular tools were applied to evaluate the role of slaughterhouses in canine infection and Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.) egg dissemination. Exposure risk to E. granulosus s. l. eggs in urban and rural areas was explored in order to implant preventive and adapted control strategies. Microscopic examinations detected taeniid eggs in 152 amongst 553 fecal samples. The copro-PCR demonstrated that 138 of 152 taeniid samples analyzed were positive for E. granulosus s. l. DNA. PCR-RFLP demonstrated that all isolated samples belonged to E. granulosus sensu stricto (s. s.). An important environmental contamination index (25.0%) by E. granulosus s. l. eggs was demonstrated. The average contamination index from the regions around slaughterhouses (23.3%; 95% CI: 17.7-28.9%) was in the same range as detected in areas located far from slaughterhouses (26.0%, 95% CI: 21.3-30.8%). Echinococcosis endemic areas were extended in both rural (29.9%, 95% CI: 24.8-34.9%) and urban locations (18.1%, 95% CI: 13.0-22.9%). The pathogen dissemination is related neither to the presence/absence of slaughterhouses nor to the location in urban or rural areas, but is probably influenced by human activities (home slaughtering) and behavior towards the infected viscera.

  6. Bortezomib initiates endoplasmic reticulum stress, elicits autophagy and death in Echinococcus granulosus larval stage.

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    María Celeste Nicolao

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a worldwide distributed helminthic zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Benzimidazole derivatives are currently the only drugs for chemotherapeutic treatment of CE. However, their low efficacy and the adverse effects encourage the search for new therapeutic targets. We evaluated the in vitro efficacy of Bortezomib (Bz, a proteasome inhibitor, in the larval stage of the parasite. After 96 h, Bz showed potent deleterious effects at a concentration of 5 μM and 0.5 μM in protoscoleces and metacestodes, respectively (P < 0.05. After 48 h of exposure to this drug, it was triggered a mRNA overexpression of chaperones (Eg-grp78 and Eg-calnexin and of Eg-ire2/Eg-xbp1 (the conserved UPR pathway branch in protoscoleces. No changes were detected in the transcriptional expression of chaperones in Bz-treated metacestodes, thus allowing ER stress to be evident and viability to highly decrease in comparison with protoscoleces. We also found that Bz treatment activated the autophagic process in both larval forms. These facts were evidenced by the increase in the amount of transcripts of the autophagy related genes (Eg-atg6, Eg-atg8, Eg-atg12, Eg-atg16 together with the increase in Eg-Atg8-II detected by western blot and by in toto immunofluorescence labeling. It was further confirmed by direct observation of autophagic structures by electronic microscopy. Finally, in order to determine the impact of autophagy induction on Echinococcus cell viability, we evaluated the efficacy of Bz in combination with rapamycin and a synergistic cytotoxic effect on protoscolex viability was observed when both drugs were used together. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that Bz induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and subsequent death allowing to identify unstudied parasite-host pathways that could provide a new insight for control of parasitic diseases.

  7. Genetic diversity and phylogeography of highly zoonotic Echinococcus granulosus genotype G1 in the Americas (Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico) based on 8279bp of mtDNA.

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    Laurimäe, Teivi; Kinkar, Liina; Andresiuk, Vanessa; Haag, Karen Luisa; Ponce-Gordo, Francisco; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Garate, Teresa; Gonzàlez, Luis Miguel; Saarma, Urmas

    2016-11-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is a taeniid cestode and the etiological agent of an infectious zoonotic disease known as cystic echinococcosis (CE) or hydatid disease. CE is a serious public health concern in many parts of the world, including the Americas, where it is highly endemic in many regions. Echinococcus granulosus displays high intraspecific genetic variability and is divided into multiple genotypes (G1-G8, G10) with differences in their biology and etiology. Of these, genotype G1 is responsible for the majority of human and livestock infections and has the broadest host spectrum. However, despite the high significance to the public and livestock health, the data on genetic variability and regional genetic differences of genotype G1 in America are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability and phylogeography of G1 in several countries in America by sequencing a large portion of the mitochondrial genome. We analysed 8279bp of mtDNA for 52 E. granulosus G1 samples from sheep, cattle and pigs collected in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico, covering majority of countries in the Americas where G1 has been reported. The phylogenetic network revealed 29 haplotypes and a high haplotype diversity (Hd=0.903). The absence of phylogeographic segregation between different regions in America suggests the importance of animal transportation in shaping the genetic structure of E. granulosus G1. In addition, our study revealed many highly divergent haplotypes, indicating a long and complex evolutionary history of E. granulosus G1 in the Americas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro effect of sodium arsenite on Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guoqiang; Wang, Bo; Lei, Ying; Liu, Chunli; Wang, Zhuo; Shi, Hongjuan; Yang, Rentan; Qin, Wenjuan; Jiang, Yufeng; Lv, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by the metacestodes of Echinococcus granulosus is an important cosmopolitan zoonosis. Surgery is the main treatment option for CE. Meanwhile, chemotherapy is used as an significant adjunct to surgery. However, the benzimidazole carbamate group and the existing scolicidal agents may not be as effective as hoped. In this study, we aimed to explore the in vitro effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) on Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces, the causative agents of CE. Protoscoleces of E. granulosus were incubated in vitro with 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20μM NaAsO2. Viability and changes in morphology were investigated by 0.1% eosin staining. The ultrastructural alterations were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Additionally, caspase-3 activity was measured by colorimetric assay. Obvious protoscolicidal effect was seen with NaAsO2 at concentrations of 16μM and 20μM. Protoscolex mortality was 83.24% (16μM) and 100% (20μM) after 6 days post-incubation. SEM showed that the primary site of drug damage was the tegument of the protoscoleces. TEM analysis demonstrated that the internal tissues were severely affected and revealed an increase in the number of lipid droplets and vacuoles after treatment with 16μM NaAsO2. Meanwhile, the caspase-3 activity significantly increased in protoscoleces after 24h of NaAsO2 incubation compared to the untreated controls. Our study demonstrated the clear in vitro scolicidal effect of NaAsO2 against E. granulosus protoscoleces. However, the in vivo efficacy, specific mechanism, and any possible side effects of NaAsO2 remain to be investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genetic characterization of human-derived hydatid cysts of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato in Heilongjiang Province and the first report of G7 genotype of E. canadensis in humans in China.

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    Tiemin Zhang

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l. is one of the most important zoonotic parasitic diseases worldwide and 10 genotypes (G1-G10 have been reported. In China, almost all the epidemiological and genotyping studies of E. granulosus s.l. are from the west and northwest pasturing areas. However, in Heilongjiang Province of northeastern China, no molecular information is available on E. granulosus s.l. To understand and to speculate on possible transmission patterns of E. granulosus s.l., we molecularly identified and genotyped 10 hydatid cysts from hepatic CE patients in Heilongjiang Province based on mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cox1, cytochrome b (cytb and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1 genes. Two genotypes were identified, G1 genotype (n = 6 and G7 genotype (n = 4. All the six G1 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1 locus; three and two different sequences were obtained at the cytb and nad1 loci, respectively, with two cytb gene sequences not being described previously. G7 genotype isolates were identical to each other at the cox1, cytb and nad1 loci; however, the cytb gene sequence was not described previously. This is the first report of G7 genotype in humans in China. Three new cytb gene sequences from G1 and G7 genotypes might reflect endemic genetic characterizations. Pigs might be the main intermediate hosts of G7 genotype in our investigated area by homology analysis. The results will aid in making more effective control strategies for the prevention of transmission of E. granulosus s.l.

  10. Evaluation of Immunogenicity of Novel Isoform of EG95 (EG95-5G1 From Echinococcus granulosus in BALB/C Mice.

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    Majid Pirestani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a zoonotic parasitic disease of humans and various herbivorous domestic animals transmitted by the contact with domestic and wild carnivores, mainly dogs and foxes. The aim of this study is the production, purification and evaluation immunogenicity of new construction of EG95 protein.The recombinant plasmid pET32-a+ used for Eg95 expression was constructed with the EG95 gene of Echinococcus granulosus fused with the thioredoxin tag. This recombinant clone was over expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21 (DE-3. The expressed fusion protein was found almost entirely in the insoluble form (inclusion bodies in cell lysate. The purification was performed under denaturing conditions in the presence of 8M urea by Ni-NTA column and dialysis. The purified recombinant proteins were confirmed with western blot analysis using polyclonal antiserum. To find out the immunogenicity of the purified protein, the BALB/c mice (10 mice/group were immunized by injecting 20 μg rEG95 protein formulated in Freund's and alum adjuvant.Immunization of mice with rEG95 using CFA/IFA and alum adjuvant generated high level of total antibody. In proliferation assay, the lymphocytes were able to mount a strong proliferative response with related production of IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α but with low secretion of either IL-4 or IL-10. The humoral and cellular immune responses against rEG95 suggested a mixed Th1/Th2 response with high intensity toward Th1.Our findings suggest that new construct of rEG95 formulated with CFA/IFA and alum adjuvant elicited strong cellular and humoral responses supporting further development of this vaccine candidate.

  11. Multilocus sequence analysis of Echinococcus granulosus strains isolated from humans and animals in Iran.

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    Nikmanesh, Bahram; Mirhendi, Hossein; Mahmoudi, Shahram; Rokni, Mohammad Bagher

    2017-12-01

    Echinococcus granulosus is now considered a complex consisting of at least four species and ten genotypes. Different molecular targets have been described for molecular characterization of E. granulosus; however, in almost all studies only one or two of the targets have been used, and only limited data is available on the utilization of multiple loci. Therefore, we investigated the genetic diversity among 64 strains isolated from 138 cyst specimens of human and animal isolates, using a set of nuclear and mitochondrial genes; i.e., cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1), ATPase subunit 6 (atp6), 12S rRNA (12S), and Actin II (act II). In comparison to the use of molecular reference targets (nad1 + cox1), using singular target (act II or 12S or atp6) yielded lower discriminatory power. Act II and 12S genes could accurately discriminate the G6 genotype, but they were not able to differentiate between G1 and G3 genotypes. As the G1 and G3 genotypes belong to the E. granulosus sensu stricto, low intra-species variation was observed for act II and 12S. The atp6 gene could identify the G3 genotype but could not differentiate G6 and G1 genotypes. Using concatenated sequence of five genes (cox1 + nad1 + atp6 + 12S + act II), genotypes were identified accurately, and markedly higher resolution was obtained in comparison with the use of reference markers (nad1 + cox1) only. Application of multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) to large-scale studies could provide valuable epidemiological data to make efficient control and management measures for cystic echinococcosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genotypic characteristics of hydatid cysts isolated from humans in East Azerbaijan Province (2011-2013

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    Amir Vahedi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cystic echinococcosis (CE is one of the important helminthic diseases of human and animals, which causes by Echinococcus granulosus. Canids are its definite and grazers especially sheep, and cattle, and also wild herbivores are its intermediate hosts. Human can also be accidentally infected by a parasite. This study aimed to investigate genotypes of the hydatid cysts isolated from hydatidosis patients in order to confine the source of the infection, 2013. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 55 paraffin blocks of identified hydatid cysts have been undergone genotyping using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. The ITS1 region of rDNA has been amplified using BD1 forward and 4s reverse primers. PCR products have been digested using HpaII and RsaI restriction endonucleases. RFLP products studied using gel electrophoresis. Data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows using the chi-square test. Results: About 29 (52.72%, 16 (29.1%, 3 (5.45%, 3 (5.45%, 1 (1.81%, 1 (1.81%, 1 (1.81% and 1 (1.81% out of 55 hydatid cysts were located in lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, pancreas, brain, and femore, respectively. The frequency of hydatidosis observed higher in patients from rural areas (P = 0.013; odds ratio = 0.599; 95% confidence interval: 0.28, 1.27. Based on RFLP results, the entire studied hydatid cysts identified as sheep strain (G1. Conclusion: According to the results of the present observation, it can be concluded that the majority of cases of human hydatidosis in East Azerbaijan Province are caused by sheep strain (G1 of E. granulosus, which indicates the sheep-doge cycle in the studied area.

  13. Our experience in eight cases with urinary hydatid disease: A series of 372 cases held in nine different clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Y.; Koesem, M; Ceylan, K.; Koeseoglu, B.; Yalcinkaya, I.; Arslan, H.; Guenes, M.; Soeylemez, Oe

    2006-01-01

    Hydatid disease, a parasitic infestation caused by the larval stage of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus, is diagnosed commonly in the east and south-east regions of Turkey. The aim of this study is to emphasize the relatively frequent occurrences of echinococcosis in our region, and to discuss therapeutic options and treatment results according to current literature. A retrospective 10-year review of nine different clinics' records of the Research Hospital of the Medical School of Yuezuencue Y 1 l University revealed 372 hydatid disease cases that were localized in various organs and treated surgically (271 cases) or drained percutaneously (99 cases). Hydatid disease was diagnosed by ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography scans (CT) and confirmed histopathologically. The involved organ was lung in 203 cases (131 adults, 72 children), liver in 150, spleen in 9, brain in 2, kidneys in 7 cases and the retrovesical area in 1 case. The urogenital system is involved at a rate of 2.15%. Two hundred and seventy-one cases were treated surgically and 99 percutaneously. Two cases with renal hydatid cyst refused the surgical procedure (one had a solitary kidney with hydatid cyst). Albendazole was administered to 192 patients; 93 patients had open surgical procedure and 99 patients underwent percutaneous procedure. Cysts were excised totally in the open surgical procedure; however, involved kidneys were removed totally (four cases) except one. Cystectomy and omentoplasty was performed in one case. Complications were as follows: in six cases, cystic material was spilled into the bronchial cavity during the dissection and a renal hydatid cyst ruptured and spilled retroperitoneally. Hydatid disease is a serious health problem in Turkey. The mainly affected organs are liver and lung. It can be treated surgical or by percutaneous aspiration. (author)

  14. Global phylogeography and genetic diversity of the zoonotic tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto genotype G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkar, Liina; Laurimäe, Teivi; Acosta-Jamett, Gerardo; Andresiuk, Vanessa; Balkaya, Ibrahim; Casulli, Adriano; Gasser, Robin B; van der Giessen, Joke; González, Luis Miguel; Haag, Karen L; Zait, Houria; Irshadullah, Malik; Jabbar, Abdul; Jenkins, David J; Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Manfredi, Maria Teresa; Mirhendi, Hossein; M'rad, Selim; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Oudni-M'rad, Myriam; Pierangeli, Nora Beatriz; Ponce-Gordo, Francisco; Rehbein, Steffen; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Simsek, Sami; Soriano, Silvia Viviana; Sprong, Hein; Šnábel, Viliam; Umhang, Gérald; Varcasia, Antonio; Saarma, Urmas

    2018-05-19

    Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (s.s.) is the major cause of human cystic echinococcosis worldwide and is listed among the most severe parasitic diseases of humans. To date, numerous studies have investigated the genetic diversity and population structure of E. granulosus s.s. in various geographic regions. However, there has been no global study. Recently, using mitochondrial DNA, it was shown that E. granulosus s.s. G1 and G3 are distinct genotypes, but a larger dataset is required to confirm the distinction of these genotypes. The objectives of this study were to: (i) investigate the distinction of genotypes G1 and G3 using a large global dataset; and (ii) analyse the genetic diversity and phylogeography of genotype G1 on a global scale using near-complete mitogenome sequences. For this study, 222 globally distributed E. granulosus s.s. samples were used, of which 212 belonged to genotype G1 and 10 to G3. Using a total sequence length of 11,682 bp, we inferred phylogenetic networks for three datasets: E. granulosus s.s. (n = 222), G1 (n = 212) and human G1 samples (n = 41). In addition, the Bayesian phylogenetic and phylogeographic analyses were performed. The latter yielded several strongly supported diffusion routes of genotype G1 originating from Turkey, Tunisia and Argentina. We conclude that: (i) using a considerably larger dataset than employed previously, E. granulosus s.s. G1 and G3 are indeed distinct mitochondrial genotypes; (ii) the genetic diversity of E. granulosus s.s. G1 is high globally, with lower values in South America; and (iii) the complex phylogeographic patterns emerging from the phylogenetic and geographic analyses suggest that the current distribution of genotype G1 has been shaped by intensive animal trade. Copyright © 2018 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomic characterization of larval and adult developmental stages in Echinococcus granulosus reveals novel insight into host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shu-Jian; Xu, Lei-Lei; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Ming; Yao, Jun; Fang, Cai-Yun; Feng, Zheng; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Hu, Wei; Liu, Feng

    2013-06-12

    Cystic hydatid disease is an important zoonosis caused by Echinococcus granulosus infection. The expression profiles of its parasitic life stages and host-Echinococcus interactions remain to be elucidated. Here, we identified 157 adult and 1588 protoscolex proteins (1610 in all), including 1290 novel identifications. Paramyosins and an antigen B (AgB) were the dominant adult proteins. Dog proteins (30) identified in adults indicated diminished local inflammation caused by adult infection. The protoscolex expresses proteins that have been reported to be antigens in other parasites, such as 6-phosphofructokinase and calcineurin B. Pathway analyses suggested that E. granulosus uses both aerobic and anaerobic carbohydrate metabolisms to generate ATP. E. granulosus expresses proteins involved in synthesis and metabolism of lipids or steroids. At least 339 of 390 sheep proteins identified in protoscolex were novel identifications not seen in previous analyses. IgGs and lambda light chains were the most abundant antibody species. Sheep proteins were enriched for detoxification pathways, implying that host detoxification effects play a central role during host-parasite interactions. Our study provides valuable data on E. granulosus expression characteristics, allowing novel insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in host-parasite interactions. In this study, the Echinococcus granulosus adult worm proteome was analyzed for the first time. The protein identification of E. granulosus protoscoleces was extended dramatically. We also identified the most abundant host proteins co-purified with Echinococcus. The results provide useful information pertaining to the molecular mechanisms behind host-Echinococcus interaction and Echinococcus biology. This data also increases the potential for identifying vaccine candidates and new therapeutic targets, and may aid in the development of protein probes for selective and sensitive diagnosis of echinococcosis infection. In

  16. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Extensive Alternative Splicing Events in the Protoscoleces of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Zhou, Xiaosu; Hao, Lili; Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Chen, Qijun

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS), as one of the most important topics in the post-genomic era, has been extensively studied in numerous organisms. However, little is known about the prevalence and characteristics of AS in Echinococcus species, which can cause significant health problems to humans and domestic animals. Based on high-throughput RNA-sequencing data, we performed a genome-wide survey of AS in two major pathogens of echinococcosis-Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis. Our study revealed that the prevalence and characteristics of AS in protoscoleces of the two parasites were generally consistent with each other. A total of 6,826 AS events from 3,774 E. granulosus genes and 6,644 AS events from 3,611 E. multilocularis genes were identified in protoscolex transcriptomes, indicating that 33–36% of genes were subject to AS in the two parasites. Strikingly, intron retention instead of exon skipping was the predominant type of AS in Echinococcus species. Moreover, analysis of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway indicated that genes that underwent AS events were significantly enriched in multiple pathways mainly related to metabolism (e.g., purine, fatty acid, galactose, and glycerolipid metabolism), signal transduction (e.g., Jak-STAT, VEGF, Notch, and GnRH signaling pathways), and genetic information processing (e.g., RNA transport and mRNA surveillance pathways). The landscape of AS obtained in this study will not only facilitate future investigations on transcriptome complexity and AS regulation during the life cycle of Echinococcus species, but also provide an invaluable resource for future functional and evolutionary studies of AS in platyhelminth parasites. PMID:28588571

  17. Food and water security issues in Russia III: food- and waterborne diseases in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, Alexey A; Dorofeyev, Vitaliy M; Dushkina, Eugenia V; Alloyarov, Pavel R; Chupakhin, Valery S; Sladkova, Yuliya N; Kolesnikova, Tatjana A; Fridman, Kirill B; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Evengard, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    The food- and waterborne disease situation in Russia requires special attention. Poor quality of centralized water supplies and sewage systems, biological and chemical contamination of drinking water, as well as contamination of food products, promote widespread infectious diseases, significantly exceeding nationwide rates in the population living in the two-thirds of Russian northern territories. The general aim was to assess the levels of food- and waterborne diseases in selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (for the period 2000-2011), and to compare disease levels among regions and with national levels in Russia. This study is the first comparative assessment of the morbidity in these fields of the population of 18 selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, using official statistical sources. The incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases among the general population (including indigenous peoples) have been analyzed in selected regions (per 100,000 of population, averaged for 2000-2011). Among compulsory registered infectious and parasitic diseases, there were high rates and widespread incidences in selected regions of shigellosis, yersiniosis, hepatitis A, tularaemia, giardiasis, enterobiasis, ascariasis, diphyllobothriasis, opistorchiasis, echinococcosis and trichinellosis. Incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases in the general population of selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (2000-2011) are alarmingly high. Parallel solutions must be on the agenda, including improvement of sanitary conditions of cities and settlements in the regions, modernization of the water supply and of the sewage system. Provision and monitoring of the quality of the drinking water, a reform of the general healthcare system and the epidemiological surveillance (including gender-divided statistics), enhancement of laboratory diagnostics and the introduction of

  18. A family of diverse Kunitz inhibitors from Echinococcus granulosus potentially involved in host-parasite cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Silvia; Fló, Martín; Margenat, Mariana; Durán, Rosario; González-Sapienza, Gualberto; Graña, Martín; Parkinson, John; Maizels, Rick M; Salinas, Gustavo; Alvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Cecilia

    2009-09-17

    The cestode Echinococcus granulosus, the agent of hydatidosis/echinococcosis, is remarkably well adapted to its definitive host. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the successful establishment of larval worms (protoscoleces) in the dog duodenum are unknown. With the aim of identifying molecules participating in the E. granulosus-dog cross-talk, we surveyed the transcriptomes of protoscoleces and protoscoleces treated with pepsin at pH 2. This analysis identified a multigene family of secreted monodomain Kunitz proteins associated mostly with pepsin/H(+)-treated worms, suggesting that they play a role at the onset of infection. We present the relevant molecular features of eight members of the E. granulosus Kunitz family (EgKU-1 - EgKU-8). Although diverse, the family includes three pairs of close paralogs (EgKU-1/EgKU-4; EgKU-3/EgKU-8; EgKU-6/EgKU-7), which would be the products of recent gene duplications. In addition, we describe the purification of EgKU-1 and EgKU-8 from larval worms, and provide data indicating that some members of the family (notably, EgKU-3 and EgKU-8) are secreted by protoscoleces. Detailed kinetic studies with native EgKU-1 and EgKU-8 highlighted their functional diversity. Like most monodomain Kunitz proteins, EgKU-8 behaved as a slow, tight-binding inhibitor of serine proteases, with global inhibition constants (K(I) (*)) versus trypsins in the picomolar range. In sharp contrast, EgKU-1 did not inhibit any of the assayed peptidases. Interestingly, molecular modeling revealed structural elements associated with activity in Kunitz cation-channel blockers. We propose that this family of inhibitors has the potential to act at the E. granulosus-dog interface and interfere with host physiological processes at the initial stages of infection.

  19. [Hydatidosis simulating a cardiac tumour with pulmonary metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Izquierdo, Marta; Martín-Trenor, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple symptomatic pulmonary nodules and one cardiac tumour in a child requires urgent diagnosis and treatment. Until a few decades ago, the diagnosis of a cardiac tumour was difficult and was based on a high index of suspicion from indirect signs, and required angiocardiography for confirmation. Echocardiography and other imaging techniques have also helped in the detection of cardiac neoplasms. However, it is not always easy to make the correct diagnosis. The case is presented of a 12 year-old boy with pulmonary symptoms, and diagnosed with a cardiac tumour with lung metastases. The presence of numerous pulmonary nodules was confirmed in our hospital. The echocardiogram detected a solid cardiac nodule in the right ventricle. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the findings and the diagnosis. Puncture-aspiration of a lung nodule gave the diagnosis of hydatidosis. He underwent open-heart surgery with cardiac cyst resection and treated with anthelmintics. The lung cysts were then excised, and he recovered uneventfully. This child had multiple pulmonary nodules and a solid cardiac nodule, and was suspected of having a cardiac tumour with pulmonary metastases. However, given the clinical history, background and morphology of pulmonary nodules, another possible aetiology for consideration is echinococcosis. The clinical picture of cardiac hydatidosis and its complications is highly variable. The clinical history is essential in these cases, as well as having a high index of suspicion. Hydatidosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a solid, echogenic, cardiac nodule. The treatment for cardiopulmonary hydatid cysts is surgical, followed by anthelmintics. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. High density of fox and cat faeces in kitchen gardens and resulting rodent exposure to Echinococcus multilocularis and Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, Matthieu; Vaniscotte, Amelie; Combes, Benoit; Umhang, Gerald; Germain, Estelle; Gouley, Valentin; Pierlet, Alice; Quintaine, Thomas; Forin-Wiart, Marie-Amelie; Villena, Isabelle; Aubert, Dominique; Boue, Franck; Poulle, Marie-Lazarine

    2018-03-08

    The faeces of the red fox, Vulpes vulpes (Linnaeus), and the domestic cat, Felis catus (Linnaeus), can be responsible for spreading eggs of Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 and oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii (Nicolle et Manceaux, 1908) into the environment. The accidental ingestion of these eggs or oocysts, through consumption of raw fruits or vegetables grown in or in contact with contaminated soil, can lead to alveolar echinococcosis (AE) or toxoplasmosis in humans. The present study provides a quantitative assessment of the faecal deposition by foxes and cats in kitchen gardens where fruits and vegetables are grown and its consequences for zoonosis transmission. The density of definitive host faeces is considered as one of the main factors in infection risk for intermediate hosts. The density of fox and cat faeces, as well as the prevalence of both AE and toxoplasmosis in rodent populations (contaminated by ingestion of eggs or oocysts), were compared within and outside kitchen gardens. Our results showed that the mean density of fox faeces did not significantly differ between kitchen gardens and habitat edges (0.29 ± 0.04 faeces/m 2 vs 0.22 ± 0.02 faeces/m 2 ), the latter being known as an area of high fox faeceal densities. The density of cat faeces was significantly higher within the kitchen garden than outside (0.86 ± 0.22 faeces/m 2 vs 0.04 ± 0.02 faeces/m 2 ). The sampled kitchen gardens might therefore be considered as possible hotspots for both fox and cat defecation. Of the 130 rodents trapped, 14% were infected by at least one species of fox or cat intestinal parasite. These rodents were significantly more often infected when they were exposed to a kitchen garden. These results suggest that the deposit of fox and cat faeces in kitchen gardens would significantly impact the risk of human exposure to E. multilocularis and T. gondii. and should be prevented using effective means.

  1. Detection of taeniid (Taenia spp., Echinococcus spp. eggs contaminating vegetables and fruits sold in European markets and the risk for metacestode infections in captive primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Federer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to frequent cases of alveolar echinococcosis (AE in captive primates in Europe, 141 samples of food, which consisting of vegetables and fruits, were investigated for contamination with egg-DNA of taeniids. Each sample consisted of at least 40 heads of lettuce as well as various vegetables and fruits. The samples were purchased at different times of the year: either from September to November (autumn, originating from greenhouses or fields in the Basel region in the North of Switzerland, or in April and May (spring when fruit and vegetables are sourced from throughout Europe from various wholesalers. Each sample was washed, and the washing water sieved through mesh apertures of 50 μm and 21 μm, respectively. The debris, including taeniid eggs, collected on the 21 μm sieve were investigated by a multiplex PCR-analysis followed by direct sequencing. In 17 (18% of the 95 samples collected in autumn, taeniid-DNA was detected (Taenia hydatigena in four, Taenia ovis in three, Taenia polyacantha in two and Hydatigera (Taenia taeniaeformis in five cases. Similarly, in 13 (28% of the 46 samples collected during spring taeniid-DNA was detected (Echinococcus granulosus s.l. in two, Taenia crassiceps in one, T. hydatigena in two, Taenia multiceps/Taenia serialis in two, Taenia saginata in one and H. taeniaeformis in five cases. Although DNA of Echinococcus multilocularis was not found specifically in this study, the detection of other fox taeniids reveals that vegetables and fruit fed to the primates at the Zoo Basel at different times of the year and from different origin are contaminated with carnivore's faeces and therefore act as a potential source of AE infections.

  2. Echinococcus multilocularis vesicular fluid inhibits activation and proliferation of natural killer cells.

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    Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Mougey, Valentine; Pallandre, Jean-Rene; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Godet, Yann; Millon, Laurence

    2017-08-25

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a severe chronic helminthic disease that mimics slow-growing liver cancer. The immune evasion strategy of Echinococcus multilocularis Leuckart, 1863 remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the impact of E. multilocularis vesicular fluid (Em-VF) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and on natural killer (NK) cells. PBMC and NK cells were exposed to Em-VF (1 µg/ml) during six days. The effect of Em-VF was assessed on CD69, viability and proliferation, and on and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interleukin 10, using flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Exposure to Em-VF had no bearing on PBMC's viability, proliferation and expression of CD69. In contrast, higher levels of IL-17 at day three and of TGF-β at day six were observed in PBMC supernatant after exposure to Em-VF (p Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Exposure to Em-VF induced a significant decrease of CD69 expression of NK cells at day three and a significant decrease of proliferation of NK cells at day six (p Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In contrast, NK cells viability and levels of cytokines did not vary significantly over Em-VF stimulation. Exposure to Em-VF had a significant bearing on activation and proliferation of NK cells. NK cells may play an important role in the immune response of the host against E. multilocularis.

  3. Genetic variations among Echinococcus granulosus isolates in Egypt using RAPD-PCR.

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    Taha, Hoda A

    2012-11-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by hydatid cysts, is a widespread and hazardous disease in humans and animals worldwide. The aim of the current study was to investigate the genetic variations among Echinococcus granulosus cyst strains isolated from sheep, camel, pig, and donkey using RAPD-PCR analysis. Seven primers of arbitrary sequences were used in the PCR reactions. The screened primers gave total patterns ranging from 27 to 39 reproducible bands for each isolate. Each population isolate gave its specific pattern. Although distinct polymorphic patterns were obtained among the four isolates, there were several shared bands among them in each primer used. A comparison of the different RAPD-PCR patterns showed that primers P1, P3, and OPH 04 yielded band patterns that revealed a high degree of divergence among the four isolates of E. granulosus that allowed easy distinction between them. The remaining primers (P2, P4, P5, and OPH14) amplified DNA fragments that were common to two or more isolates but diversified in the other two or three isolates. The study revealed that the most closely related isolates were of donkey and camel where the similarity coefficent between them ranging from 53 % to 78 %, followed by isolates of pig and sheep (sc = 40 % to 68 %), while the similarity coefficent between isolates of camel and sheep was 33-45 %, between camel and pig was 36 to 57 %, between donkey and pig was 37 to 52 %, and between donkey and sheep was 35 to 54 % which means that they more or distant from each other. In conclusion, hydatid cysts isolated from camel may have the genotypic characters of donkey strain.

  4. Neglected tropical diseases of the Middle East and North Africa: review of their prevalence, distribution, and opportunities for control.

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    Peter J Hotez

    Full Text Available The neglected tropical diseases (NTDs are highly endemic but patchily distributed among the 20 countries and almost 400 million people of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA region, and disproportionately affect an estimated 65 million people living on less than US$2 per day. Egypt has the largest number of people living in poverty of any MENA nation, while Yemen has the highest prevalence of people living in poverty. These two nations stand out for having suffered the highest rates of many NTDs, including the soil-transmitted nematode infections, filarial infections, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, leprosy, and trachoma, although they should be recognized for recent measures aimed at NTD control. Leishmaniasis, especially cutaneous leishmaniasis, is endemic in Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Morocco, and elsewhere in the region. Both zoonotic (Leishmania major and anthroponotic (Leishmania tropica forms are endemic in MENA in rural arid regions and urban regions, respectively. Other endemic zoonotic NTDs include cystic echinococcosis, fascioliasis, and brucellosis. Dengue is endemic in Saudi Arabia, where Rift Valley fever and Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever have also emerged. Great strides have been made towards elimination of several endemic NTDs, including lymphatic filariasis in Egypt and Yemen; schistosomiasis in Iran, Morocco, and Oman; and trachoma in Morocco, Algeria, Iran, Libya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and the United Arab Emirates. A particularly noteworthy achievement is the long battle waged against schistosomiasis in Egypt, where prevalence has been brought down by regular praziquantel treatment. Conflict and human and animal migrations are key social determinants in preventing the control or elimination of NTDs in the MENA, while local political will, strengthened international and intersectoral cooperative efforts for surveillance, mass drug administration, and vaccination are essential for elimination.

  5. Radical vs. Conservative Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydatid Cyst: A 10- Year Experience

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    M Ghaemi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepatic hydatid cyst is caused by echinococcosis granulosis. It is a major health problem in endemic areas. The modern treatment of hydatid cysts of the liver varies from surgical intervention to percutaneous drainage or medical therapy. A high rate of complications following percutaneous drainage, and ineffectiveness of medical therapy have shown not to be the definitive treatments for the disease. Thus, surgery is still the best choice for the treatment of hydatid cyst of the liver. Surgical treatment methods can be divided into radical and conservative approaches. There is controversy regarding efficacy of the two surgical methods. In this study, we aimed to present a retrospective evaluation of the two surgical methods in patients treated for the hepatic hydatid cyst. Methods: This retrospective study reviewed medical records of 135 patients who underwent surgery for hepatic hydatid cyst from 1997 to 2007. Surgery comprised conservative methods (evacuation of the cyst content and excision of the inner cyst layers and radical methods (total excision of the cyst and removal of its outer layer. Results: One hundred thirty five patients underwent liver surgery. Conservative surgery was performed for 71 (53%, whereas, the remaining 64 patients (47% underwent radical surgery. Postoperative complications were 28% and 19%, respectively. Recurrence of the cyst in the conservative and radical surgery groups was noted to be 12.5 and 1.5%, respectively. The mean length of hospital stay was shorter in the radical surgery group (5 vs. 15 days. Conclusion: Radical surgery may be the preferred treatment for the hepatic hydatid cyst because of its low rate of postoperative complications and recurrence, as well as short hospital stay. Selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on the size, number, and location of the cyst(s, and presence of cystobiliary communications, and the availability of an experienced surgeon.

  6. Epidemiological, Clinical and Paraclinical Study of Hydatid Cysts in Three Educational Medical Centers in 10 Years

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    Simindokht Shoaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echinococcosis or hydatidosis, caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus (E. granulosus, is an important public health problem in many areas of the world  and  Iran is a country of endemic situation for hydatidosis In the present study, we evaluated epidemiological, complications and clinical characteristics of hydatidosis at three University Medical Centers in Tehran over a 10-year period.Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study performed in patients with hydatid cysts. Information about age, gender, number of cysts, organ involvement, morbidity and mortality and relapse were collected from medical records of hydatid patients. Paraclinic information such as CT Scan, MRI, ultrasound, complete blood count, pathological diagnosis and complication of disease were collected.Results: Overall, 81 patients, 35 (43.2% male and 46 (56.8% female, who were diagnosed as having hydatid cyst by clinical and radiological findings, with pathologic documentation were studied in three university medical center registries over a 10-year period (2003- 2012 in Tehran. Fourteen patients (17% of cases had complications resulting from this disease. Patients' age ranged from 5 to 86 years, and the peak prevalence of the disease was between 20 and 40 (34% of cases.Conclusion: Iran  is a country of endemic situation for hydatidosis. Prevalence rate of hydatidosis in Iran was reported to be 0.61-2 in 100000 populations. The highest  rate of infection and complications were in patients of 20-40 years age. Clinical examination revealed that abdominal pain was the most common complaint and was present in 51.7% of the cases. Other most common complain were cough, abdominal mass, dyspnea, icterus, chest pain, dyspepsia, back pain and seizure; and it was result of occupying effect of cysts in organs. This is similar with previous studies in Iran

  7. Genetic diversity of Echinococcus multilocularis on a local scale.

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    Knapp, J; Guislain, M-H; Bart, J M; Raoul, F; Gottstein, B; Giraudoux, P; Piarroux, R

    2008-05-01

    Echinococcusmultilocularis is the causative agent of human Alveolar Echinococcosis (AE), and it is one of the most lethal zoonotic infections in the Northern Hemisphere. In France, the eastern and central regions are endemic areas; Franche-Comté, Lorraine and Auvergne are particularly contaminated. Recently, several human cases were recorded in the French Ardennes area, a region adjacent to the western border of the E. multilocularis range in France. A previous study in this focus described a prevalence of over 50% of the parasite in red foxes. The present study investigated the genetic diversity of adult worms collected from foxes in a 900km(2) area in the Ardennes. Instead of a conventional mitochondrial target (ATP6), two microsatellite targets (EmsB and NAK1) were used. A total of 140 adult worms isolated from 25 red foxes were genotyped. After hierarchical clustering analyses, the EmsB target enabled us to distinguish two main assemblages, each divided into sub-groups, yielding the differentiation of six clusters or assemblage profiles. Thirteen foxes (52% of the foxes) each harbored worms from at least two different assemblage profiles, suggesting they had become infected by several sources. Using the NAK1 target, we identified 3 alleles, two found in association with the two EmsB assemblages. With the NAK1 target, we investigated the parasite breeding system and the possible causes of genetic diversification. Only one fox harbored hybrid worms, indicative of a possible (and rare) occurrence of recombination, although multiple infections have been observed in foxes. These results confirm the usefulness of microsatellite targets for assessing genetic polymorphism in a geographically restricted local range.

  8. Targeting Echinococcus multilocularis stem cells by inhibition of the Polo-like kinase EmPlk1.

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    Andreas Schubert

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alveolar echinococcosis (AE is a life-threatening disease caused by larvae of the fox-tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. Crucial to AE pathology is continuous infiltrative growth of the parasite's metacestode stage, which is driven by a population of somatic stem cells, called germinative cells. Current anti-AE chemotherapy using benzimidazoles is ineffective in eliminating the germinative cell population, thus leading to remission of parasite growth upon therapy discontinuation.We herein describe the characterization of EmPlk1, encoded by the gene emplk1, which displays significant homologies to members of the Plk1 sub-family of Polo-like kinases that regulate mitosis in eukaryotic cells. We demonstrate germinative cell-specific expression of emplk1 by RT-PCR, transcriptomics, and in situ hybridization. We also show that EmPlk1 can induce germinal vesicle breakdown when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, indicating that it is an active kinase. This activity was significantly suppressed in presence of BI 2536, a Plk1 inhibitor that has been tested in clinical trials against cancer. Addition of BI 2536 at concentrations as low as 20 nM significantly blocked the formation of metacestode vesicles from cultivated Echinococcus germinative cells. Furthermore, low concentrations of BI 2536 eliminated the germinative cell population from mature metacestode vesicles in vitro, yielding parasite tissue that was no longer capable of proliferation.We conclude that BI 2536 effectively inactivates E. multilocularis germinative cells in parasite larvae in vitro by direct inhibition of EmPlk1, thus inducing mitotic arrest and germinative cell killing. Since germinative cells are decisive for parasite proliferation and metastasis formation within the host, BI 2536 and related compounds are very promising compounds to complement benzimidazoles in AE chemotherapy.

  9. Transcriptional profiles of cytokine/chemokine factors of immune cell-homing to the parasitic lesions: a comprehensive one-year course study in the liver of E. multilocularis-infected mice.

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    Junhua Wang

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of chronically developing alveolar echinococcosis (AE is characterized by a continuous, granulomatous, periparasitic infiltration of immune cells surrounding the metacestode of Echinococcus multilocularis (E.multilocularis in the affected liver. A detailed cytokine and chemokine profile analysis of the periparasitic infiltrate in the liver has, however, not yet been carried out in a comprehensive way all along the whole course of infection in E. multilocularis intermediate hosts. We thus assessed the hepatic gene expression profiles of 18 selected cytokine and chemokine genes using qRT-PCR in the periparasitic immune reaction and the subsequent adjacent, not directly affected, liver tissue of mice from day 2 to day 360 post intra-hepatic injection of metacestode. DNA microarray analysis was also used to get a more complete picture of the transcriptional changes occurring in the liver surrounding the parasitic lesions. Profiles of mRNA expression levels in the hepatic parasitic lesions showed that a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response, characterized by the concomitant presence of IL-12α, IFN-γ and IL-4, was established very early in the development of E. multilocularis. Subsequently, the profile extended to a combined tolerogenic profile associating IL-5, IL-10 and TGF-β. IL-17 was permanently expressed in the liver, mostly in the periparasitic infiltrate; this was confirmed by the increased mRNA expression of both IL-17A and IL-17F from a very early stage, with a subsequent decrease of IL-17A after this first initial rise. All measured chemokines were significantly expressed at a given stage of infection; their expression paralleled that of the corresponding Th1, Th2 or Th17 cytokines. In addition to giving a comprehensive insight in the time course of cytokines and chemokines in E. multilocularis lesion, this study contributes to identify new targets for possible immune therapy to minimize E. multilocularis-related pathology and to

  10. Feeding ecology informs parasite epidemiology: prey selection modulates encounter rate with Echinococcus multilocularis in urban coyotes.

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    Stefano Liccioli

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of urban coyote feeding ecology in the transmission of Echinococcus multilocularis, the causative agent of Alveolar Echinococcosis in humans. As coyotes can play a main role in the maintenance of this zoonotic parasite within North American urban settings, such study can ultimately aid disease risk management. Between June 2012 and June 2013, we collected 251 coyote feces and conducted trapping of small mammals (n = 971 in five parks in the city of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. We investigated E. multilocularis epidemiology by assessing seasonal variations of coyote diet and the selective consumption of different rodent intermediate host species. Furthermore, accounting for small mammal digestibility and coyote defecation rates we estimated the number of small mammal preys ingested by coyote and consequently, coyote encounter rates with the parasite. Dominant food items included small mammals, fruit and vegetation, although hare and deer were seasonally relevant. The lowest frequency of occurrence per scat of small mammals was recorded in winter (39.4%, when consumption of deer was highest (36.4%. However, highest encounter rates (number of infected hosts predated/season with E. multilocularis (95% CI: 1.0-22.4, combined with the lack of predation on non-competent small mammal species, suggest that winter is the critical season for transmission and control of this parasite. Within the small mammal assemblage, voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus and Myodes gapperi were the selected preys of urban coyotes and likely played a key role for the maintenance of the urban sylvatic life-cycle of E. multilocularis in Calgary.

  11. A new diagnostic approach for bilious pleural effusion.

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    Saraya, Takeshi; Light, Richard W; Sakuma, Sho; Nakamoto, Yasuo; Wada, Shoko; Ishida, Manabu; Inui, Toshiya; Koide, Takashi; Ishii, Haruyuki; Takizawa, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    Bilious pleural effusion is an extremely rare condition associated with liver diseases, subphrenic or subhepatic abscess formation, biliary peritonitis, and invasive procedures (i.e., percutaneous biliary drainage or liver biopsy). The current diagnostic test is based on the measurement of the ratio of pleural total bilirubin to serum total bilirubin, which is greater than 1 in patients with bilious pleural effusion. Given the low incidence of bilious pleural effusion, the precise diagnostic yield of this ratio based test has not been evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of our institution and searched the PubMed database for reports of bilious pleural effusion. We identified a total of 12 cases of bilious pleural effusion (9 from 8 Pubmed reports and 3 from our institutional records). The factors causing this condition were broadly classified into three categories based on the pathophysiology: 1) liver diseases (echinococcosis, tuberculosis and amebiasis); 2) subhepatic/subphrenic abscess or biliary peritonitis, with or without biliary tract obstruction; and 3) iatrogenic disease after percutaneous biliary drainage and/or liver biopsy. The sensitivity of detection was 76.9% when the ratio of pleural total bilirubin to serum total bilirubin was greater than 1. The sensitivity increased to 100% when a combination test including pleural glycoholic acid was adopted. This study demonstrates the high diagnostic yield for bilious pleural effusion using a combination of two test criteria; a ratio of pleural total bilirubin to serum total bilirubin greater than 1 and the presence of pleural glycoholic acid. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Granulomatous Mastitis: A Ten-Year Experience at a University Hospital.

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    Korkut, Ercan; Akcay, Mufide Nuran; Karadeniz, Erdem; Subasi, Irmak Durur; Gursan, Nesrin

    2015-10-01

    In this study we aimed to define clinical, radiologic and pathological specialties of patients who applied to General Surgery Department of Atatürk University Medical Faculty with granulomatous mastitis and show medical and surgical treatment results. With the help of this study we will be able to make our own clinical algorithm for diagnosis and treatment. We searched retrospectively addresses, phone numbers and clinical files of 93 patients whom diagnosed granulomatous mastitis between a decade of January 2001 - December 2010. We noted demographic specialties, ages, gender, medical family history, main complaints, physical findings, radiological and laboratory findings, medical treatments, postoperative complications and surgical procedures if they were operated; morbidity, recurrence and success ratios, complications after treatment for patients discussed above. In this study we evaluated 93 patients, 91 females and 2 males, with granulomatous mastitis retrospectively who applied to General Surgery Department of Atatürk University Medical Faculty between January 2001 and December 2010. Mean age was 34.4 years. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathologic examination of the lesions. Seventy three patients had idiopathic granulomatous lobular mastitis and 20 patients had specific granulomatous mastitis IGM (18 tuberculosis mastitis, 1 alveolar echinococcosis and 1 silk reaction). All the patients had surgical debridement or antibiotic, and anti-inflammatory treatment with results bad clinical response before applied our clinic. Empiric antibiotic therapy and drainage of the breast lesions are not enough for complete remission of idiopathic granulomatous mastitis. The lesion must be excised completely. In selected patients, corticosteroid therapy can be useful. In the patients with tuberculous mastitis, abscess drainage and antituberculous therapy can be useful, but wide excision must be chosen for the patients with recurrent disease.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of combined treatment with praziquantel and albendazole in neurocysticercosis

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    Garcia, Hector H; Lescano, Andres G; Lanchote, Vera L; Pretell, E Javier; Gonzales, Isidro; Bustos, Javier A; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Bonato, Pierina S; Horton, John; Saavedra, Herbert; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    AIMS Neurocysticercosis is the most common cause of acquired epilepsy in the world. Antiparasitic treatment of viable brain cysts is of clinical benefit, but current antiparasitic regimes provide incomplete parasiticidal efficacy. Combined use of two antiparasitic drugs may improve clearance of brain parasites. Albendazole (ABZ) has been used together with praziquantel (PZQ) before for geohelminths, echinococcosis and cysticercosis, but their combined use is not yet formally recommended and only scarce, discrepant data exist on their pharmacokinetics when given together. We assessed the pharmacokinetics of their combined use for the treatment of neurocysticercosis. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of ABZ and PZQ in 32 patients with neurocysticercosis was carried out. Patients received their usual concomitant medications including an antiepileptic drug, dexamethasone, and ranitidine. Randomization was stratified by antiepileptic drug (phenytoin or carbamazepine). Subjects had sequential blood samples taken after the first dose of antiparasitic drugs and again after 9 days of treatment, and were followed for 3 months after dosing. RESULTS Twenty-one men and 11 women, aged 16 to 55 (mean age 28) years were included. Albendazole sulfoxide concentrations were increased in the combination group compared with the ABZ alone group, both in patients taking phenytoin and patients taking carbamazepine. PZQ concentrations were also increased by the end of therapy. There were no significant side effects in this study group. CONCLUSIONS Combined ABZ + PZQ is associated with increased albendazole sulfoxide plasma concentrations. These increased concentrations could independently contribute to increased cysticidal efficacy by themselves or in addition to a possible synergistic effect. PMID:21332573

  14. In vivo evaluation of the efficacy of albendazole sulfoxide and albendazole sulfoxide loaded solid lipid nanoparticles against hydatid cyst.

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    Ahmadnia, Sara; Moazeni, Mohammad; Mohammadi-Samani, Soliman; Oryan, Ahmad

    2013-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, which in this disease the metacestode develop in visceral organs especially liver and lungs. The disease is present worldwide and affects humans as well as herbivores including cattle, sheep, camels, horses and others. Benzimidazole carbamate derivatives, such as mebendazole and albendazole, are currently used for chemotherapeutic treatment of CE in inoperable patients and have to be applied in high doses for extended periods of time, and therefore adverse side effects are frequently observed. This study was designed to evaluate and compare the in vivo effects of 0.5 mg/kg, BID, albendazole sulfoxide (ricobendazole) and two different therapeutic regimens of 0.5 mg/kg BID and 2 mg/kg every 48 h of albendazole sulfoxide loaded solid lipid nanoparticles. Albendazole sulfoxide loaded solid lipid nanoparticles was prepared by solvent diffusion-evaporation method. Fifty Balb/c mice were infected by intraperitoneal injection of protoscoleces and 8 months post infection, the infected mice were treated for 15 days with the above mentioned regimens. They were then euthanized and the size and weight of the cysts as well as their ultrastructural changes were investigated. Although the cysts showed reduced size and weight in the treated animals but these reductions were not statistically significant. The cysts in the animals which received albendazole sulfoxide loaded SLN every 48 h showed more ultrastructural modification. However, these ultrastructural changes should be supported by further biochemical and molecular studies before introducing it as an efficient therapeutic regimen for treatment of human and animal hydatid disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Scolicidal and apoptotic activities of albendazole sulfoxide and albendazole sulfoxide-loaded PLGA-PEG as a novel nanopolymeric particle against Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces.

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    Naseri, Marziyeh; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Spotin, Adel; Akbari, Nagibeh Asl Rahnemaii; Mahami-Oskouei, Mahmoud; Ahmadpour, Ehsan

    2016-12-01

    Treatment failures of human cystic echinococcosis (CE) with albendazole (ABZ) have attributed to its low solubility and poor drug absorption rate, resulting in low drug level in plasma. The scolicidal effects of ABZ-loaded liposome nanoparticles have recently evaluated; however, these particles have several challenges due to their low encapsulated load. This investigation was designed to evaluate and compare in vitro apoptotic activities of ABZ sulfoxide (ABZs) and ABZs-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-PEG against protoscoleces (PSCs). ABZs-loaded PLGA-PEG was prepared by a double-emulsion method (W1/O/W2). Various concentrations of ABZs and ABZs-loaded PLGA-PEG (50, 100, 150, and 200 μg/ml) were experimentally tested against PSC of CE at different exposure times (5, 10, 20, 30, and 60 min). ABZs-loaded PLGA-PEG at concentrations of 150 and 200 μg/ml was able to act at a 100 % scolicidal rate in all exposure times (5 to 60 min), while ABZs at a concentration of 200 μg/ml demonstrated 94, 100, and 100 % mortality rates following 20, 30, and 60 min of exposure times, respectively. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of caspase-3 was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR after 15 h of exposure. Caspase-3 mRNA expression was higher in both PSC treated with ABZs and PSC treated with ABZs-loaded PLGA-PEG than that in control groups (P  0.05). DNA fragmentation assay and ultrastructural changes revealed that ABZs and ABZs-loaded PLGA-PEG induced the apoptosis of PSC by activation of caspase-3. The higher permeability and scolicidal rate of ABZs-loaded PLGA-PEG can be addressed as an effectual alternative strategy to improve the treatment of human CE.

  16. Disease Risk Assessments Involving Companion Animals: an Overview for 15 Selected Pathogens Taking a European Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijks, J M; Cito, F; Cunningham, A A; Rantsios, A T; Giovannini, A

    2016-07-01

    Prioritization of companion animal transmissible diseases was performed by the Companion Animals multisectoriaL interprofessionaL Interdisciplinary Strategic Think tank On zoonoses (CALLISTO) project. The project considered diseases occurring in domesticated species commonly kept as pets, such as dogs and cats, but also included diseases occurring in captive wild animals and production animal species. The prioritization process led to the selection of 15 diseases of prime public health relevance, agricultural economic importance, or both. An analysis was made of the current knowledge on the risk of occurrence and transmission of these diseases among companion animals, and from companion animals to man (zoonoses) or to livestock. The literature was scanned for risk assessments for these diseases. Studies were classified as import risk assessments (IRAs) or risk factor analyses (RFAs) in endemic areas. For those pathogens that are absent from Europe, only IRAs were considered; for pathogens present throughout Europe, only RFAs were considered. IRAs were identified for seven of the eight diseases totally or partially absent from Europe. IRAs for classical rabies and alveolar echinococcosis found an increased risk for introduction of the pathogen into officially disease-free areas as a consequence of abandoning national rules and adopting the harmonized EU rules for pet travel. IRAs for leishmaniosis focused on risk associated with the presence of persistently infected dogs in new geographical areas, taking into consideration the risk of disease establishment should a competent vector arise. IRAs for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and West Nile fever indicated that the likelihood of introduction via companion animals was low. IRAs for bluetongue paid no attention to the risk of introduction via companion animals, which was also the case for IRAs for foot-and-mouth disease, the only disease considered to be absent from Europe. RFAs dealing with the risk factors for

  17. Echinococcus spp. in central Kenya: a different story.

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    Mbaya, H; Magambo, J; Njenga, S; Zeyhle, E; Mbae, C; Mulinge, E; Wassermann, M; Kern, P; Romig, T

    2014-10-01

    Research on cystic echinococcosis (CE) has a long history in Kenya, but has mainly concentrated on two discrete areas, Turkana and Maasailand, which are known to be foci of human CE in Africa. Here, we report on a survey for CE in livestock from central to northeastern Kenya, from where no previous data are available. A total of 7,831 livestock carcasses were surveyed. CE prevalence was 1.92% in cattle (n = 4,595), 6.94% in camels (n = 216), 0.37% in goats (n = 2,955) and 4.62% in sheep (n = 65). Identification of the parasite was done using an RFLP-PCR of the mitochondrial nad1 gene, which had been validated before against the various Echinococcus taxa currently recognized as distinct species. From a total of 284 recovered cysts, 258 could be identified as Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto (n = 160), E. ortleppi (n = 51) and E. canadensis (n = 47) by RFLP-PCR of nad1. In cattle, fertile cysts occurred mostly in the lungs and belonged to E. ortleppi (31 of 54), while the vast majority were sterile or calcified cysts of E. granulosus s.s.. Most fertile cysts in camels belonged to E. canadensis (33 of 37); sterile or calcified cysts were rare. Goats harboured fertile cysts of E. ortleppi (n = 3)--which is the first record in that host species--and E. canadensis (n = 1), while all cysts of E. granulosus were sterile. Only sterile cysts were found in the three examined sheep. Typically, all cysts in animals with multiple infections belonged to the same species, while mixed infections were rare. Our data indicate that the epidemiological situation in central to northeastern Kenya is clearly different from the well-studied pastoral regions of Turkana and Maasailand, and the apparently low number of human CE cases correlates with the infrequent occurrence of E. granulosus s.s.

  18. A survey for Echinococcus spp. of carnivores in six wildlife conservation areas in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagendo, D; Magambo, J; Agola, E L; Njenga, S M; Zeyhle, E; Mulinge, E; Gitonga, P; Mbae, C; Muchiri, E; Wassermann, M; Kern, P; Romig, T

    2014-08-01

    further studies on the lifecycles and the possible link between wild and domestic cycles of cystic echinococcosis in eastern Africa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Echinococcus P29 Antigen: Molecular Characterization and Implication on Post-Surgery Follow-Up of CE Patients Infected with Different Species of the Echinococcus granulosus Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubaker, Ghalia; Gottstein, Bruno; Hemphill, Andrew; Babba, Hamouda; Spiliotis, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The protein P29 is a potential serological marker for post-treatment monitoring of cystic echinococcosis (CE) especially in young patients. We now have demonstrated that P29 is encoded in the Echinococcus genus by a single gene consisting of 7 exons spanning 1.2 kb of DNA. Variability of the p29 gene at inter- and intra-species level was assessed with 50 cDNA and 280 genomic DNA clones isolated from different E. granulosus s.l. isolates (E. granulosus sensu stricto (G1), E. equinus (G4), E. ortleppi (G5), E. canadensis (G6), E. canadensis (G7) and E. canadensis (G10)) as well as four E. multilocularis isolates. Scarce interspecies polymorphism at the p29 locus was observed and affected predominantly E. granulosus s.s. (G1), where we identified two alleles (A1 and A2) coding for identical P29 proteins and yielding in three genotypes (A1/A1, A2/A2 and A1/A2). Genotypic frequencies expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium revealed a high rate of heterozygosity (47%) that strongly supports the hypothesis that E. granulosus s.s. (G1) is predominantly outbreeding. Comparative sequence analyses of the complete p29 gene showed that phylogenetic relationships within the genus Echinococcus were in agreement with those of previous nuclear gene studies. At the protein level, the deduced P29 amino acid (AA) sequences exhibited a high level of conservation, ranging from 97.9% AA sequence identity among the whole E. granulosus s.l. group to 99.58% identity among E. multilocularis isolates. We showed that P29 proteins of these two species differ by three AA substitutions without implication for antigenicity. In Western-blot analyses, serum antibodies from a human CE patient infected with E. canadensis (G6) strongly reacted with recombinant P29 from E. granulosus s.s. (G1) (recEg(G1)P29). In the same line, human anti-Eg(G1)P29 antibodies bound to recEcnd(G6)P29. Thus, minor AA sequence variations appear not to impair the prognostic serological use of P29. PMID:24851904

  20. Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohammad Falah

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Falah M1, Kavand A2, Yousefi Mashouf R3 1. Professor, Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran 2. MSc in Parasitology, Boroujerd Social Security Organization, Boroujerd, Iran 3. Associate Professor, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran Abstract Background: Hydatid cyst, the larval stage or metacestode of Echinococcosis, is an infection caused by cestode species of the genus Echinococcus and often localized in viscera of animals and humans. Hydatid cyst is typically filled with a clear fluid (hydatid fluid that is sterile bacteriologically. Bacterial infection of hydatid fluid is sometimes present, but not always, and this leads to sterilizing the cyst and prevents producing protoscoleces. In this study the bacterial infection rate of animals hydatid cyst in Hamadan and Boroujerd slaughterhouses were compared. Materials and methods: Referring to Hamadan and Boroujerd slaughterhouses a total of 5709 livestock were inspected for the presence of hydatid cysts. In infected livestock, cyst number, size (diameter, type, and fertility or infertility on th