WorldWideScience

Sample records for eccentric retrograde orbit

  1. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  2. The Eccentric Behavior of Nearly Frozen Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Theodore H.; Vincent, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen orbits are orbits which have only short-period changes in their mean eccentricity and argument of periapse, so that they basically keep a fixed orientation within their plane of motion. Nearly frozen orbits are those whose eccentricity and argument of periapse have values close to those of a frozen orbit. We call them "nearly" frozen because their eccentricity vector (a vector whose polar coordinates are eccentricity and argument of periapse) will stay within a bounded distance from the frozen orbit eccentricity vector, circulating around it over time. For highly inclined orbits around the Earth, this distance is effectively constant over time. Furthermore, frozen orbit eccentricity values are low enough that these orbits are essentially eccentric (i.e., off center) circles, so that nearly frozen orbits around Earth are bounded above and below by frozen orbits.

  3. A new kinematical definition of orbital eccentricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninković S.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of orbital eccentricity is given. The dimensionless quantities proposed in the present paper to serve as orbital eccentricities have a kinematical nature. The purpose is to use them in describing the motion for the case of three-dimensional orbits. A comparison done for nearly planar orbits shows that the values of the eccentricities proposed here do not differ significantly from those corresponding to the eccentricities of geometric nature usually applied.

  4. Results of Long-Duration Simulation of Distant Retrograde Orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Turner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Distant Retrograde Orbits in the Earth–Moon system are gaining in popularity as stable “parking” orbits for various conceptual missions. To investigate the stability of potential Distant Retrograde Orbits, simulations were executed, with propagation running over a thirty-year period. Initial conditions for the vehicle state were limited such that the position and velocity vectors were in the Earth–Moon orbital plane, with the velocity oriented such that it would produce retrograde motion about Moon. The resulting trajectories were investigated for stability in an environment that included the eccentric motion of Moon, non-spherical gravity of Earth and Moon, gravitational perturbations from Sun, Jupiter, and Venus, and the effects of radiation pressure. The results indicate that stability may be enhanced at certain resonant states within the Earth–Moon system.

  5. Introducing the Moon's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    I present a novel way to introduce the lunar orbital eccentricity in introductory astronomy courses. The Moon is perhaps the clearest illustration of the general orbital elements such as inclination, ascending node, eccentricity, perigee, and so on. Furthermore, I like the students to discover astronomical phenomena for themselves, by means of a guided exercise, rather than just telling them the facts.1 The inclination and nodes may be found by direct observation, monitoring carefully the position of the Moon among the stars. Even the regression of the nodes may be discovered in this way2 To find the eccentricity from students' observations is also possible,3 but that requires considerable time and effort. if a whole class should discover it in a short time, here is a method more suitable for a one-day class or home assignment. The level I aim at is, more or less, advanced high school or first-year college students. I assume them to be acquainted with celestial coordinates and the lunar phases, and to be able to use algebra and trigonometry.

  6. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  7. Orbital eccentricities in primordial black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholis, Ilias; Kovetz, Ely D.; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Bird, Simeon; Kamionkowski, Marc; Muñoz, Julian B.; Raccanelli, Alvise

    2016-10-01

    It was recently suggested that the merger of ˜30 M⊙ primordial black holes (PBHs) may provide a significant number of events in gravitational-wave observatories over the next decade, if they make up an appreciable fraction of the dark matter. Here we show that measurement of the eccentricities of the inspiralling binary black holes can be used to distinguish these binaries from those produced by more traditional astrophysical mechanisms. These PBH binaries are formed on highly eccentric orbits and can then merge on time scales that in some cases are years or less, retaining some eccentricity in the last seconds before the merger. This is to be contrasted with massive-stellar-binary, globular-cluster, or other astrophysical origins for binary black holes (BBHs) in which the orbits have very effectively circularized by the time the BBH enters the observable LIGO window. Here we discuss the features of the gravitational-wave signals that indicate this eccentricity and forecast the sensitivity of LIGO and the Einstein Telescope to such effects. We show that if PBHs make up the dark matter, then roughly one event should have a detectable eccentricity given LIGO's expected sensitivity and observing time of six years. The Einstein Telescope should see O (10 ) such events after ten years.

  8. Distant retrograde orbits and the asteroid hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozzi, Ettore; Ceccaroni, Marta; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Rossi, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    Distant Retrograde Orbits (DROs) gained a novel wave of fame in space mission design because of their numerous advantages within the framework of the US plans for bringing a large asteroid sample in the vicinity of the Earth as the next target for human exploration. DROs are stable solutions of the three-body problem that can be used whenever an object, whether of natural or artificial nature, is required to remain in the neighborhood of a celestial body without being gravitationally captured by it. As such, they represent an alternative option to Halo orbits around the collinear Lagrangian points L1 and L2. Also known under other names ( e.g., quasi-satellite orbits, cis-lunar orbits, family- f orbits) these orbital configurations found interesting applications in several mission profiles, like that of a spacecraft orbiting around the small irregularly shaped satellite of Mars Phobos or the large Jovian moon Europa. In this paper a basic explanation of the DRO dynamics is presented in order to clarify some geometrical properties that characterize them. Their accessibility is then discussed from the point of view of mission analysis under different assumptions. Finally, their relevance within the framework of the present asteroid hazard protection programs is shown, stressing the significant increase in warning time they would provide in the prediction of impactors coming from the direction of the Sun.

  9. Orbital eccentricities in primordial black holes binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Cholis, Ilias; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Bird, Simeon; Kamionkowski, Marc; Muñoz, Julian B; Raccanelli, Alvise

    2016-01-01

    It was recently suggested that the merger of $\\sim30\\,M_\\odot$ primordial black holes (PBHs) may provide a significant number of events in gravitational-wave observatories over the next decade, if they make up an appreciable fraction of the dark matter. Here we show that measurement of the eccentricities of the inspiralling binary black holes can be used to distinguish these binaries from those produced by more traditional astrophysical mechanisms. These PBH binaries are formed on highly eccentric orbits and can then merge on timescales that in some cases are years or less, retaining some eccentricity in the last seconds before the merger. This is to be contrasted with massive-stellar-binary, globular-cluster, or other astrophysical origins for binary black holes (BBHs) in which the orbits have very effectively circularized by the time the BBH enters the observable LIGO window. Here we discuss the features of the gravitational-wave signals that indicate this eccentricity and forecast the sensitivity of LIGO a...

  10. Introducing the Moon's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    I present a novel way to introduce the lunar orbital eccentricity in introductory astronomy courses. The Moon is perhaps the clearest illustration of the general orbital elements such as inclination, ascending node, eccentricity, perigee, and so on. Furthermore, I like the students to discover astronomical phenomena for themselves, by means of a…

  11. The formation of retrograde planetary orbits by close stellar encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford E. B.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the growing number of observations of the RossiterMcLaughlin effect in transiting planets, which seem to suggest that ~30% of transiting planets are in highly inclined or retrograde orbits. We consider the dense cluster environment in which stars are born and investigate whether perturbations from passing stars can drive planetary systems into retrograde configurations. We find that fly-bys can result in significantly more inclination excitation than might naively be expected from impulse approximations, leading to several percent of stellar systems possessing planets in retrograde orbits.

  12. Orbital evolution of eccentric planets in radiative discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsch, B.; Kley, W.

    2010-11-01

    Context. With an average eccentricity of about 0.29, the eccentricity distribution of extrasolar planets is markedly different from the solar system. Among other scenarios considered, it has been proposed that eccentricity may grow through planet-disc interaction. Recently, it has been noticed that the thermodynamical state of the disc can significantly influence the migration properties of growing protoplanets. However, the evolution of planetary eccentricity in radiative discs has not been considered yet. Aims: In this paper we study the evolution of planets on eccentric orbits that are embedded in a three-dimensional viscous disc and analyse the disc's effect on the orbital evolution of the planet. Methods: We use the three-dimensional hydrodynamical code NIRVANA that includes full tensor viscosity and implicit radiation transport in the flux-limited diffusion approximation. The code uses the FARGO-algorithm to speed up the simulations. First we measure the torque and power exerted on the planet by the disc for fixed orbits, and then we let the planet start with initial eccentricity and evolve it in the disc. Results: For locally isothermal discs we confirm previous results and find eccentricity damping and inward migration for planetary cores. For low eccentricity (e ⪉ 2 H/r) the damping is exponential, while for higher e it follows dot{e} ∝ e-2. In the case of radiative discs, the planets experience an inward migration as long as its eccentricity lies above a certain threshold. After the damping of eccentricity cores with masses below 33 MEarth begin to migrate outward in radiative discs, while higher mass cores always migrate inward. For all planetary masses studied (up to 200 MEarth) we find eccentricity damping. Conclusions: In viscous discs the orbital eccentricity of embedded planets is damped during the evolution independent of the mass. Hence, planet-disc interaction does not seem to be a viable mechanism to explain the observed high eccentricity of

  13. Characterizing Spinning Black Hole Binaries in Eccentric Orbits with LISA

    CERN Document Server

    Key, Joey Shapiro

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is designed to detect gravitational wave signals from astrophysical sources, including those from coalescing binary systems of compact objects such as black holes. Colliding galaxies have central black holes that sink to the center of the merged galaxy and begin to orbit one another and emit gravitational waves. Some galaxy evolution models predict that the binary black hole system will enter the LISA band with significant orbital eccentricity, while other models suggest that the orbits will already have circularized. Using a full seventeen parameter waveform model that includes the effects of orbital eccentricity, spin precession and higher harmonics, we investigate how well the source parameters can be inferred from simulated LISA data. Defining the reference eccentricity as the value one year before merger, we find that for typical LISA sources, it will be possible to measure the eccentricity to an accuracy of parts in a thousand. The accuracy with which the ec...

  14. Exoplanet Orbital Eccentricities Derived From LAMOST-Kepler Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, P; Fu, J N; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity ~0.06) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination ~3 deg) orbits of the Solar System planets motivated Kant and Laplace to put forth the hypothesis that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. Surprisingly, the first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the Radial Velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits ( ~ 0.3). This raises a fundamental question: Are the Solar System and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the LAMOST observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), while the other half are multiple-t...

  15. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST-Kepler analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-11

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity [Formula: see text]) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination [Formula: see text]) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits ([Formula: see text]). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with [Formula: see text] 0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular [Formula: see text] and coplanar [Formula: see text] degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [[Formula: see text](1-2)[Formula: see text

  16. Accurate and efficient waveforms for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, E A; McWilliams, Sean T; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Yunes, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Compact binaries that emit gravitational waves in the sensitivity band of ground-based detectors can have non-negligible eccentricities just prior to merger, depending on the formation scenario. We develop a purely analytic, frequency-domain model for gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries on orbits with small eccentricity, which reduces to the quasi-circular post-Newtonian approximant TaylorF2 at zero eccentricity and to the post-circular approximation of Yunes et al. (2009) at small eccentricity. Our model uses a spectral approximation to the (post-Newtonian) Kepler problem to model the orbital phase as a function of frequency, accounting for eccentricity effects up to ${\\cal{O}}(e^8)$ at each post-Newtonian order. Our approach accurately reproduces an alternative time-domain eccentric waveform model for eccentricities $e\\in [0, 0.4]$ and binaries with total mass less than 12 solar masses. As an application, we evaluate the signal amplitude that eccentric binaries produce in different networks of e...

  17. Exoplanet orbital eccentricities derived from LAMOST-Kepler analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ji-Wei; Dong, Subo; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Huber, Daniel; Zheng, Zheng; De Cat, Peter; Fu, Jianning; Liu, Hui-Gen; Luo, Ali; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Haotong; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Cao, Zihuang; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Zhang, Yong

    2016-10-01

    The nearly circular (mean eccentricity e¯≈0.06) and coplanar (mean mutual inclination i¯≈3°) orbits of the solar system planets motivated Kant and Laplace to hypothesize that planets are formed in disks, which has developed into the widely accepted theory of planet formation. The first several hundred extrasolar planets (mostly Jovian) discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique are commonly on eccentric orbits (e¯≈0.3). This raises a fundamental question: Are the solar system and its formation special? The Kepler mission has found thousands of transiting planets dominated by sub-Neptunes, but most of their orbital eccentricities remain unknown. By using the precise spectroscopic host star parameters from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) observations, we measure the eccentricity distributions for a large (698) and homogeneous Kepler planet sample with transit duration statistics. Nearly half of the planets are in systems with single transiting planets (singles), whereas the other half are multiple transiting planets (multiples). We find an eccentricity dichotomy: on average, Kepler singles are on eccentric orbits with e¯≈0.3, whereas the multiples are on nearly circular (e¯=0.04-0.04+0.03) and coplanar (i¯=1.4-1.1+0.8 degree) orbits similar to those of the solar system planets. Our results are consistent with previous studies of smaller samples and individual systems. We also show that Kepler multiples and solar system objects follow a common relation [×i¯] between mean eccentricities and mutual inclinations. The prevalence of circular orbits and the common relation may imply that the solar system is not so atypical in the galaxy after all.

  18. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-29

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  19. A retrograde co-orbital asteroid of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, Paul; Connors, Martin; Veillet, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical work in celestial mechanics has revealed that an asteroid may orbit stably in the same region as a planet, despite revolving around the Sun in the sense opposite to that of the planet itself. Asteroid 2015 BZ509 was discovered in 2015, but with too much uncertainty in its measured orbit to establish whether it was such a retrograde co-orbital body. Here we report observations and analysis that demonstrates that asteroid 2015 BZ509 is indeed a retrograde co-orbital asteroid of the planet Jupiter. We find that 2015 BZ509 has long-term stability, having been in its current, resonant state for around a million years. This is long enough to preclude precise calculation of the time or mechanism of its injection to its present state, but it may be a Halley-family comet that entered the resonance through an interaction with Saturn. Retrograde co-orbital asteroids of Jupiter and other planets may be more common than previously expected.

  20. The Solar System and the Exoplanet Orbital Eccentricity - Multiplicity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Limbach, Mary Anne

    2014-01-01

    The known population of exoplanets exhibits a much wider range of orbital eccentricities than Solar System planets and has a much higher average eccentricity. These facts have been widely interpreted to indicate that the Solar System is an atypical member of the overall population of planetary systems. We report here on a strong anti-correlation of orbital eccentricity with multiplicity (number of planets in the system) among catalogued RV systems. The mean, median and rough distribution of eccentricities of Solar System planets fits an extrapolation of this anti-correlation to the eight planet case rather precisely. Thus, the Solar System is not anomalous among known exoplanetary systems with respect to eccentricities when its multiplicity is taken into account. Specifically, as the multiplicity of a system increases the eccentricity decreases roughly as a power law of index -1.20. A simple and plausible but ad hoc model of this relationship implies that approximately 80% of the one planet and 25% of the two...

  1. Exoplanet orbital eccentricity: multiplicity relation and the Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin L

    2015-01-06

    The known population of exoplanets exhibits a much wider range of orbital eccentricities than Solar System planets and has a much higher average eccentricity. These facts have been widely interpreted to indicate that the Solar System is an atypical member of the overall population of planetary systems. We report here on a strong anticorrelation of orbital eccentricity with multiplicity (number of planets in the system) among cataloged radial velocity (RV) systems. The mean, median, and rough distribution of eccentricities of Solar System planets fits an extrapolation of this anticorrelation to the eight-planet case rather precisely despite the fact that no more than two Solar System planets would be detectable with RV data comparable to that in the exoplanet sample. Moreover, even if regarded as a single or double planetary system, the Solar System lies in a reasonably heavily populated region of eccentricity-multiplicity space. Thus, the Solar System is not anomalous among known exoplanetary systems with respect to eccentricities when its multiplicity is taken into account. Specifically, as the multiplicity of a system increases, the eccentricity decreases roughly as a power law of index -1.20. A simple and plausible but ad hoc and model-dependent interpretation of this relationship implies that ∼ 80% of the one-planet and 25% of the two-planet systems in our sample have additional, as yet undiscovered, members but that systems of higher observed multiplicity are largely complete (i.e., relatively rarely contain additional undiscovered planets). If low eccentricities indeed favor high multiplicities, habitability may be more common in systems with a larger number of planets.

  2. Tidal disruption flares from stars on eccentric orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeb A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study tidal disruption and subsequent mass fallback for stars approaching supermassive black holes on bound orbits, by performing three dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations with a pseudo-Newtonian potential. We find that the mass fallback rate decays with the expected -5/3 power of time for parabolic orbits, albeit with a slight deviation due to the self-gravity of the stellar debris. For eccentric orbits, however, there is a critical value of the orbital eccentricity, significantly below which all of the stellar debris is bound to the supermassive black hole. All the mass therefore falls back to the supermassive black hole in a much shorter time than in the standard, parabolic case. The resultant mass fallback rate considerably exceeds the Eddington accretion rate and substantially differs from the -5/3 power of time.

  3. The Orbital Evolution of 2007 VA85, an Amor-type Asteroid on a Retrograde Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankiewicz, P.; Włodarczyk, I.

    2010-06-01

    Among the known population of asteroids on retrograde orbits (i > 90°) we found an object classified as an Amor-type asteroid. During the analysis of the first results of astrometry, we found some possible Earth-impact solutions for this asteroid. After taking into account the latest observations, we excluded any significant impact solution. However, this asteroid is the first known example of potentially hazardous object on a retrograde orbit. We also investigated the orbital evolution of 2007 VA85 (1 My in the past), obtaining possible scenarios of its dynamical origin.

  4. Exoplanet orbital eccentricity: Multiplicity relation and the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Mary Anne; Turner, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    The known population of exoplanets exhibits a much wider range of orbital eccentricities than Solar System planets and has a much higher average eccentricity. These facts have been widely interpreted to indicate that the Solar System is an atypical member of the overall population of planetary systems. We report here on a strong anticorrelation of orbital eccentricity with multiplicity (number of planets in the system) among cataloged radial velocity (RV) systems. The mean, median, and rough distribution of eccentricities of Solar System planets fits an extrapolation of this anticorrelation to the eight-planet case rather precisely despite the fact that no more than two Solar System planets would be detectable with RV data comparable to that in the exoplanet sample. Moreover, even if regarded as a single or double planetary system, the Solar System lies in a reasonably heavily populated region of eccentricity−multiplicity space. Thus, the Solar System is not anomalous among known exoplanetary systems with respect to eccentricities when its multiplicity is taken into account. Specifically, as the multiplicity of a system increases, the eccentricity decreases roughly as a power law of index –1.20. A simple and plausible but ad hoc and model-dependent interpretation of this relationship implies that ∼80% of the one-planet and 25% of the two-planet systems in our sample have additional, as yet undiscovered, members but that systems of higher observed multiplicity are largely complete (i.e., relatively rarely contain additional undiscovered planets). If low eccentricities indeed favor high multiplicities, habitability may be more common in systems with a larger number of planets. PMID:25512527

  5. A halo blue straggler on a highly eccentric retrograde orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Tillich, A; Scholz, R -D; Heber, U

    2010-01-01

    Blue straggler, which are stars that appear to be younger than they should be, are an important population of unusual stars in both stellar clusters and the halo field of the Galaxy. Most formation scenarios evoke either stellar collisions or binary stars that transfer mass or merge. We investigate high-velocity stars in the Galactic halo and perform a spectral and kinematical analysis to shed light on their nature and origin. Here we report that SDSSJ130005.62+042201.6 (J1300+0422 for short) is an A-type star of unusually large radial velocity (504.6 $\\pm$ 5 \\kms). From a quantitative NLTE (and LTE) spectral analysis of medium-resolution optical spectra, the elemental composition is derived. Proper motion measurements combined with a spectroscopic distance estimate allow us to determine its present space velocity. Its kinematical properties are derived by integrating the equation of motion in the Galactic potential. We find J1300+0422 to be metal poor ([M/H]=$-1.2$) and exhibit an $\\alpha$-element enrichment...

  6. A complete waveform model for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Eliu; Agarwal, Bhanu; George, Daniel; Kumar, Prayush

    2016-03-01

    The detection of compact binaries with significant eccentricity in the sensitivity band of gravitational wave detectors will provide critical insights on the dynamics and formation channels of these events. In order to search for these systems and place constraints on their rates, we present an inspiral-merger-ringdown time domain waveform model that describes the GW emission from compact binaries on orbits with low to moderate values of eccentricity. We use this model to explore the detectability of these events in the context of advanced LIGO.

  7. Dynamics of Neptune's Trojans: II. Eccentric orbits and observed ones

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Li-Yong; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have presented a global view of the stability of Neptune Trojan (NT hereafter) on inclined orbit. We discuss in this paper the dependence of stability of NT orbits on the eccentricity. High-resolution dynamical maps are constructed using the results of extensive numerical integrations of orbits initialized on the fine grids of initial semimajor axis (a0) versus eccentricity (e0). The extensions of regions of stable orbits on the (a0, e0) plane at different inclinations are shown. The maximum eccentricities of stable orbits in three most stable regions at low (0, 12deg.), medium (22,36deg.) and high (51, 59deg.) inclination, are found to be 0.10, 0.12 and 0.04, respectively. The fine structures in the dynamical maps are described. Via the frequency analysis method, the mechanisms that portray the dynamical maps are revealed. The secondary resonances, concerning the frequency of the librating resonant angle and the frequency of the quasi 2:1 mean motion resonance between Neptune and Uran...

  8. Applying KAM Theory to Highly Eccentric Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Motivation In 2009, the Iridium 33 and Kosmos 2251 satellite collided in outer space. This was the first unintentional collision at high speeds between two...artificial satellites in the earth’s orbit [1]. Iridium 33 was an operational satellite, and Kosmos was out of service for 13 years. Besides completely

  9. Orbital Eccentricity and the Stability of Planets in the Alpha Centauri System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Planets on initially circular orbits are typically more dynamically stable than planets initially having nonzero eccentricities. However, the presence of a major perturber that forces periodic oscillations of planetary eccentricity can alter this situation. We investigate the dependance of system lifetime on initial eccentricity for planets orbiting one star within the alpha Centauri system. Our results show that initial conditions chosen to minimize free eccentricity can substantially increase stability compared to planets on circular orbits.

  10. Interacting Binaries with Eccentric Orbits II. Secular Orbital Evolution Due To Non-Conservative Mass Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F A

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the secular evolution of the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity due to mass transfer in eccentric binaries, allowing for both mass and angular momentum loss from the system. Adopting a delta function mass transfer rate at the periastron of the binary orbit, we find that, depending on the initial binary properties at the onset of mass transfer, the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity can either increase or decrease at a rate linearly proportional to the magnitude of the mass transfer rate at periastron. The range of initial binary mass ratios and eccentricities that leads to increasing orbital semi-major axes and eccentricities broadens with increasing degrees of mass loss from the system and narrows with increasing orbital angular momentum loss from the binary. Comparison with tidal evolution timescales shows that the usual assumption of rapid circularization at the onset of mass transfer in eccentric binaries is not justified, irrespective of the degree of systemic mass and angular ...

  11. Spectrum of 100-kyr glacial cycle: orbital inclination, not eccentricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, R A; MacDonald, G J

    1997-08-05

    Spectral analysis of climate data shows a strong narrow peak with period approximately 100 kyr, attributed by the Milankovitch theory to changes in the eccentricity of the earth's orbit. The narrowness of the peak does suggest an astronomical origin; however the shape of the peak is incompatible with both linear and nonlinear models that attribute the cycle to eccentricity or (equivalently) to the envelope of the precession. In contrast, the orbital inclination parameter gives a good match to both the spectrum and bispectrum of the climate data. Extraterrestrial accretion from meteoroids or interplanetary dust is proposed as a mechanism that could link inclination to climate, and experimental tests are described that could prove or disprove this hypothesis.

  12. Interacting Binaries with Eccentric Orbits. Secular Orbital Evolution Due To Conservative Mass Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F A

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the secular evolution of the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity due to mass transfer in eccentric binaries, assuming conservation of total system mass and orbital angular momentum. Assuming a delta function mass transfer rate centered at periastron, we find rates of secular change of the orbital semi-major axis and eccentricity which are linearly proportional to the magnitude of the mass transfer rate at periastron. The rates can be positive as well as negative, so that the semi-major axis and eccentricity can increase as well as decrease in time. Adopting a delta-function mass-transfer rate of $10^{-9} M_\\sun {\\rm yr}^{-1}$ at periastron yields orbital evolution timescales ranging from a few Myr to a Hubble time or more, depending on the binary mass ratio and orbital eccentricity. Comparison with orbital evolution timescales due to dissipative tides furthermore shows that tides cannot, in all cases, circularize the orbit rapidly enough to justify the often adopted assumption of instantan...

  13. Transition from inspiral to plunge for eccentric equatorial Kerr orbits

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shaughnessy, R

    2003-01-01

    Ori and Thorne have discussed the duration and observability (with LISA) of the transition from circular, equatorial inspiral to plunge for stellar-mass objects into supermassive ($10^{5}-10^{8}M_{\\odot}$) Kerr black holes. We extend their computation to eccentric Kerr equatorial orbits. Even with orbital parameters near-exactly determined, we find that there is no universal length for the transition; rather, the length of the transition depends sensitively -- essentially randomly -- on initial conditions. Still, Ori and Thorne's zero-eccentricity results are essentially an upper bound on the length of eccentric transitions involving similar bodies (e.g., $a$ fixed). Hence the implications for observations are no better: if the massive body is $M=10^{6}M_{\\odot}$, the captured body has mass $m$, and the process occurs at distance $d$ from LISA, then $S/N \\lesssim (m/10 M_{\\odot})(1\\text{Gpc}/d)\\times O(1)$, with the precise constant depending on the black hole spin. For low-mass bodies ($m \\lesssim 7 M_\\odot$...

  14. Orbital Eccentricity Distribution of Solar-Neighbour Halo Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hattori, Kohei

    2011-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations for the differential distribution of stellar orbital eccentricity for a sample of solar-neighbour halo stars. Two types of static, spherical gravitational potentials are adopted to define the eccentricity e for given energy E and angular momentum L, such as an isochrone potential and a Navarro-Frenk-White potential that can serve as two extreme ends covering in-between any realistic potential of the Milky Way halo. The solar-neighbour eccentricity distribution \\Delta N(e) is then formulated, based on a static distribution function of the form f(E,L) in which the velocity anisotropy parameter \\beta monotonically increases in the radial direction away from the galaxy center, such that beta is below unity (near isotropic velocity dispersion) in the central region and asymptotically approaches \\sim 1 (radially anisotropic velocity dispersion) in the far distant region of the halo. We find that \\Delta N(e) sensitively depends upon the radial profile of \\beta, and this sensitivit...

  15. Long-term orbital stability of exosolar planetary systems with highly eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, many extrasolar planetary systems possessing at least one planet on a highly eccentric orbit have been discovered. In this work, we study the possible long-term stability of such systems. We consider the general three body problem as our model. Highly eccentric orbits are out of the Hill stability regions. However, mean motion resonances can provide phase protection and orbits with long-term stability exist. We construct maps of dynamical stability based on the computation of chaotic indicators and we figure out regions in phase space, where the long-term stability is guaranteed. We focus on regions where at least one planet is highly eccentric and attempt to associate them with the existence of stable periodic orbits. The values of the orbital elements, which are derived from observational data, are often given with very large deviations. Generally, phase space regions of high eccentricities are narrow and thus, our dynamical analysis may restrict considerably the valid domain of the system's locat...

  16. Long-term orbital stability of exosolar planetary systems with highly eccentric orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I.; Voyatzis, George

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, many extrasolar planetary systems possessing at least one planet on a highly eccentric orbit have been discovered. In this work, we study the possible long-term stability of such systems. We consider the general three body problem as our model. Highly eccentric orbits are out of the Hill stability regions. However, mean motion resonances can provide phase protection and orbits with long-term stability exist. We construct maps of dynamical stability based on the computation of chaotic indicators and we figure out regions in phase space, where the long-term stability is guaranteed. We focus on regions where at least one planet is highly eccentric and attempt to associate them with the existence of stable periodic orbits. The values of the orbital elements, which are derived from observational data, are often given with very large deviations. Generally, phase space regions of high eccentricities are narrow and thus, our dynamical analysis may restrict considerably the valid domain of the system's location.

  17. A complete waveform model for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, E A; Agarwal, Bhanu; George, Daniel; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Pfeiffer, Harald P; Chu, Tony; Boyle, Michael; Hemberger, Daniel A; Kidder, Lawrence E; Scheel, Mark A; Szilagyi, Bela

    2016-01-01

    We present a time domain waveform model that describes the inspiral, merger and ringdown of compact binary systems whose components are non-spinning, and which evolve on orbits with low to moderate eccentricity. The inspiral evolution is described using third order post-Newtonian equations both for the equations of motion of the binary, and its far-zone radiation field. This latter component also includes instantaneous, tails and tails-of-tails contributions, and a contribution due to non-linear memory. This framework reduces to the post-Newtonian approximant $\\texttt{TaylorT4}$ at third post-Newtonian order in the zero eccentricity limit. To improve phase accuracy, we also incorporate higher-order post-Newtonian corrections for the energy flux of quasi-circular binaries and gravitational self-force corrections to the binding energy of compact binaries. This enhanced prescription for the inspiral evolution is combined with a fully analytical prescription for the merger-ringdown evolution constructed using a c...

  18. GBT Reveals Satellite of Milky Way in Retrograde Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    New observations with National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) suggest that what was once believed to be an intergalactic cloud of unknown distance and significance, is actually a previously unrecognized satellite galaxy of the Milky Way orbiting backward around the Galactic center. Path of Complex H Artist's rendition of the path of satellite galaxy Complex H (in red) in relation to the orbit of the Sun (in yellow) about the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The outer layers of Complex H are being stripped away by its interaction with the Milky Way. The hydrogen atmosphere (in blue) is shown surrounding the visible portion (in white) of the Galaxy. CREDIT: Lockman, Smiley, Saxton; NRAO/AUI Jay Lockman of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Green Bank, West Virginia, discovered that this object, known as "Complex H," is crashing through the outermost parts of the Milky Way from an inclined, retrograde orbit. Lockman's findings will be published in the July 1 issue of the Astrophysical Journal, Letters. "Many astronomers assumed that Complex H was probably a distant neighbor of the Milky Way with some unusual velocity that defied explanation," said Lockman. "Since its motion appeared completely unrelated to Galactic rotation, astronomers simply lumped it in with other high velocity clouds that had strange and unpredictable trajectories." High velocity clouds are essentially what their name implies, fast-moving clouds of predominately neutral atomic hydrogen. They are often found at great distances from the disk of the Milky Way, and may be left over material from the formation of our Galaxy and other galaxies in our Local Group. Over time, these objects can become incorporated into larger galaxies, just as small asteroids left over from the formation of the solar system sometimes collide with the Earth. Earlier studies of Complex H were hindered because the cloud currently is passing almost exactly behind the outer disk of

  19. Orbital stability zones about asteroids. II - The destabilizing effects of eccentric orbits and of solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-03-01

    Recently, Hamilton and Burns (1991) characterized the size and shape of a stability zone around an asteroid on a circular heliocentric orbit within which asteroid material could remain bound for an extended period of time. The present paper considers two additional effects: the asteroid's nonzero heliocentric eccentricity and solar radiation pressure. Results of numerical analyses show that, for an asteroid on an eccentric orbit, the stability zone scales roughly as the size of the Hill sphere calculated at the asteroid's pericenter. It was also found that solar radiation pressure is a very efficient mechanism for removing small (on the order of 0.1 mm) particles from circular asteroidal zone. Particles larger than a few centimeters are only slightly affected by radiation pressure. The results are applied to the Gaspra 951 asteroid.

  20. The Dynamics of Orbit-Clearing for Planets on Eccentric Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Danielle; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2016-10-01

    The third requirement in the 2006 International Astronomical Union (IAU) definition of a planet is that the object has cleared the neighborhood around its orbit. Margot (2015) proposed a metric that quantitatively determines if an object has enough mass to clear an orbital zone of a specific extent within a defined time interval. In this metric, the size of the zone to be cleared is given by CRH, where C is a constant and RH is the Hill Radius. Margot (2015) adopts C=2*31/2 to describe the minimum extent of orbital clearing on the basis of the planet's feeding zone. However, this value of C may only apply for eccentricities up to about 0.3 (Quillen & Faber 2006). Here, we explore the timescales and boundaries of orbital clearing for planets over a range of orbital eccentricities and planet-star mass ratios using the MERCURY integration package (Chambers 1999). The basic setup for the integrations includes a single planet orbiting a star and a uniform distribution of massless particles extending beyond CRH. The system is integrated for at least 106 revolutions and the massless particles are tracked in order to quantify the timescale and extent of the clearing.

  1. Interacting Binaries with Eccentric Orbits. III. Orbital Evolution due to Direct Impact and Self-Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V; Rasio, F A

    2010-01-01

    The rapid circularization and synchronization of the stellar components in an eccentric binary system at the onset of mass transfer is a fundamental assumption common to all binary stellar evolution and population synthesis codes, even though the validity of this assumption is questionable both theoretically and observationally. Here we calculate the evolution of the orbital elements of an eccentric binary through the direct three-body integration of a massive particle ejected through the inner Lagrangian point of the donor star at periastron. The trajectory of this particle leads to three possible outcomes: direct accretion onto the companion star within a single orbit, self-accretion back onto the donor star within a single orbit, or a quasi-periodic orbit around the companion star, possibly leading to the formation of a disk. We calculate the secular evolution of the binary orbit in the first two cases and conclude that direct impact accretion can increase as well as decrease the orbital semi-major axis an...

  2. Frequency and time domain inspiral templates for comparable mass compact binaries in eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Tanay, Sashwat; Gopakumar, Achamveedu

    2016-01-01

    Inspiraling compact binaries with non-negligible orbital eccentricities are plausible gravitational wave (GW) sources for the upcoming network of GW observatories. In this paper, we present two prescriptions to compute post-Newtonian (PN) accurate inspiral templates for such binaries. First, we adapt and extend the post-circular scheme of Yunes {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. D 80, 084001 (2009)] to obtain a Fourier-domain inspiral approximant that incorporates the effects of PN-accurate orbital eccentricity evolution. This results in a fully analytic frequency-domain inspiral waveform with Newtonian amplitude and 2PN order Fourier phase while incorporating eccentricity effects up to sixth order at each PN order. The importance of incorporating eccentricity evolution contributions to the Fourier phase in a PN consistent manner is also demonstrated. Second, we present an accurate and efficient prescription to incorporate orbital eccentricity into the quasi-circular time-domain {\\texttt{TaylorT4}} approximant at 2PN o...

  3. Habitability of planets on eccentric orbits: Limits of the mean flux approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmont, Emeline; Libert, Anne-Sophie; Leconte, Jeremy; Selsis, Franck

    2016-06-01

    Unlike the Earth, which has a small orbital eccentricity, some exoplanets discovered in the insolation habitable zone (HZ) have high orbital eccentricities (e.g., up to an eccentricity of ~0.97 for HD 20782 b). This raises the question of whether these planets have surface conditions favorable to liquid water. In order to assess the habitability of an eccentric planet, the mean flux approximation is often used. It states that a planet on an eccentric orbit is called habitable if it receives on average a flux compatible with the presence of surface liquid water. However, because the planets experience important insolation variations over one orbit and even spend some time outside the HZ for high eccentricities, the question of their habitability might not be as straightforward. We performed a set of simulations using the global climate model LMDZ to explore the limits of the mean flux approximation when varying the luminosity of the host star and the eccentricity of the planet. We computed the climate of tidally locked ocean covered planets with orbital eccentricity from 0 to 0.9 receiving a mean flux equal to Earth's. These planets are found around stars of luminosity ranging from 1 L⊙ to 10-4L⊙. We use a definition of habitability based on the presence of surface liquid water, and find that most of the planets considered can sustain surface liquid water on the dayside with an ice cap on the nightside. However, for high eccentricity and high luminosity, planets cannot sustain surface liquid water during the whole orbital period. They completely freeze at apoastron and when approaching periastron an ocean appears around the substellar point. We conclude that the higher the eccentricity and the higher the luminosity of the star, the less reliable the mean flux approximation.

  4. Determining the Eccentricity of the Moon's Orbit without a Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisciunas, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Greek astronomers knew that Moon's distance from the Earth was not constant. Ptolemy's model of the Moon's motion implied that the Moon ranged in distance from 33 to 64 Earth radii. This implied that its angular size ranged nearly a factor of two. Tycho Brahe's model of the Moon's motion implied a smaller distance range, some ±3 percent at syzygy. However, the ancient and Renaissance astronomers are notably silent on the subject of measuring the angular size of the Moon as a check on the implied range of distance from their models of the position of the Moon. Using a quarter-inch hole in a piece of cardboard that slides along a yardstick, we show that pre-telescopic astronomers could have measured an accurate mean value of the angular size of the Moon, and that they could have determined a reasonably accurate value of the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. The principal calibration for each observer is to measure the apparent angular diameter of a 91 mm disk viewed at a distance of 10 meters, giving a true angular size of 31.3 arcmin (the Moon's mean angular size). Because the sighting hole is not much bigger than the size of one's pupil, each observer obtains a personal correction factor with which to scale the raw measures. If one takes data over the course of 7 lunations (7.5 anomalistic months), any systematic errors which are a function of phase should even out over the course of the observations. We find that the random error of an individual observation of ±0.8 arcmin can be achieved.

  5. Habitability of planets on eccentric orbits: the limits of the mean flux approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Bolmont, Emeline; Leconte, Jérémy; Selsis, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to Earth, which has a small orbital eccentricity, some exoplanets discovered in the insolation habitable zone (HZ) have high orbital eccentricities (e.g., up to an eccentricity of $\\sim0.97$ for HD~20782~b). This raises the question of the capacity of these planets to host surface liquid water. In order to assess the habitability of an eccentric planet, the mean flux approximation is often used. It states that a planet on an eccentric orbit is called habitable if it receives on average a flux compatible with the presence of surface liquid water. However, as the planets do experience important insolation variations over one orbit and even spend some time outside the HZ for high eccentricities, the question of their habitability might not be as straightforward. We performed a set of simulations using the Global Climate Model LMDz, exploring the limits of the mean flux approximation when varying the luminosity of the host star and the eccentricity of the planet. We computed the climate of tidally locked...

  6. Impact of Orbital Eccentricity on the Detection of Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Christopher J

    2008-01-01

    For extrasolar planets with orbital periods, P>10 days, radial velocity surveys find non-circular orbital eccentricities are common, ~0.3. Future surveys for extrasolar planets using the transit technique will also have sensitivity to detect these longer period planets. Orbital eccentricity affects the detection of extrasolar planets using the transit technique in two opposing ways: an enhancement in the probability for the planet to transit near pericenter and a reduction in the detectability of the transit due to a shorter transit duration. For an eccentricity distribution matching the currently known extrasolar planets with P>10 day, the probability for the planet to transit is ~1.25 times higher than the equivalent circular orbit and the average transit duration is ~0.88 times shorter than the equivalent circular orbit. These two opposing effects nearly cancel for an idealized field transit survey with independent photometric measurements that are dominated by Poisson noise. The net effect is a modest ~4%...

  7. Orbit Control of Fly-around Satellite with Highly Eccentric Orbit Using Solar Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-gang, Hou; Chang-yin, Zhao; Ming-jiang, Zhang; Rong-yu, Sun

    2017-01-01

    The method of controlling highly eccentric accompanying flight orbit using the solar wing is proposed in this paper. The formation is maintained by controlling the orbit of the accompanying satellite (follower). The accompanying satellite rotates around its inertial principal axis with a constant angular velocity. The control on the accompanying satellite is divided into the in-plane control and out-of-plane control. The in-plane control is superior to the out-of-plane control. The out-of-plane control force is applied when the in-plane error is eliminated or the in-plane control force can not be supplied due to some geometrical factors. By the sliding mode control method, the magnitude and direction of the control force required by the in-plane orbit control are calculated. Then accordingly, the expression of the solar wing orientation with respect to the satellite body in the control process is derived, so that by adjusting the orientation of the solar wing, the required control force can be obtained. Finally, the verification on this method is performed by numerical simulations, including the orbit adjustment, error elimination, and the orbit maintenance. It is shown that this method can keep the error less than 5 m, and it is feasible for the space formation flight.

  8. Nonlinear hydrodynamical evolution of eccentric Keplerian discs in two dimensions: validation of secular theory

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Adrian J

    2016-01-01

    We perform global two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of Keplerian discs with free eccentricity over thousands of orbital periods. Our aim is to determine the validity of secular theory in describing the evolution of eccentric discs, and to explore their nonlinear evolution for moderate eccentricities. Linear secular theory is found to correctly predict the structure and precession rates of discs with small eccentricities. However, discs with larger eccentricities (and eccentricity gradients) are observed to precess faster (retrograde relative to the orbital motion), at a rate that depends on their eccentricities (and eccentricity gradients). We derive analytically a nonlinear secular theory for eccentric gas discs, which explains this result as a modification of the pressure forces whenever eccentric orbits in a disc nearly intersect. This effect could be particularly important for highly eccentric discs produced in tidal disruption events, or for narrow gaseous rings; it might also play a role in cau...

  9. The Transit Ingress and the Tilted Orbit of the Extraordinarily Eccentric Exoplanet HD 80606b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Gazak, J. Zachary; Starkey, Donn; Ford, Eric B.; Colon, Knicole D.; Reyes, Francisco; Nortmann, Lisa; Dreizler, Stefan; Odewahn, Stephen; Welsh, William F.; Kadakia, Shimonee; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Lockhart, Matthew; Crossfield, Ian J.; Valenti, Jeff A.; Dantowitz, Ronald; Carter, Joshua A.

    2009-01-01

    We reported the first detection of the transit ingress, revealing the transit duration to be 11.64 plus or minus 0.25 hr and allowing more robust determinations of the system parameters. Keck spectra obtained at midtransit exhibited an anomalous blueshift, giving definitive evidence that the stellar spin axis and planetary orbital axis are misaligned. Thus, the orbit of this planet is not only highly eccentric but is also tilted away from the equatorial plane of its parent star. A large tilt had been predicted, based on the idea that the planet's eccentric orbit was caused by the Kozai mechanism.

  10. A Class of Selenocentric Retrograde Orbits With Innovative Applications to Human Lunar Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Daniel R.; Lester, Daniel F.; Thronson, Harley A.; Barbee, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Selenocentric distant retrograde orbits with radii from approx. 12,500 km to approx. 25,000 km are assessed for stability and for suitability as crewed command and control infrastructure locations in support of telerobotic lunar surface operations and interplanetary human transport. Such orbits enable consistent transits to and from Earth at virtually any time if they are coplanar with the Moon's geocentric orbit. They possess multiple attributes and applications distinct from NASA's proposed destination orbit for a redirected asteroid about 70,000 km from the Moon.

  11. First order post-Newtonian gravitational waveforms of binaries on eccentric orbits with Hansen coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikóczi, Balázs; Forgács, Péter; Vasúth, Mátyás

    2015-08-01

    The inspiral and merger of supermassive black hole binary systems with high orbital eccentricity are among the promising sources of the advanced gravitational wave observatories. In this paper we compute gravitational waveforms in the frequency domain to the first post-Newtonian order, emitted by compact binary systems with arbitrary eccentricity. Our results are fully analytic, ready-to-use expressions of the waveforms in terms of a suitable generalization of Hansen coefficients known from celestial mechanics. Secular terms induced by the eccentricity are eliminated by introducing a suitable phase shift. The obtained waveforms have a rather simple structure, greatly facilitating their use in applications.

  12. Zoom & Whirl Eccentric equatorial orbits around spinning black holes and their evolution under gravitational radiation reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Glampedakis, K; Glampedakis, Kostas; Kennefick, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    We study eccentric equatorial orbits of a test-body around a Kerr black hole under the influence of gravitational radiation reaction. We have adopted a well established two-step approach: assuming that the particle is moving along a geodesic (justifiable as long as the orbital evolution is adiabatic) we calculate numerically the fluxes of energy and angular momentum radiated to infinity and to the black hole horizon, via the Teukolsky-Sasaki-Nakamura formalism. We can then infer the rate of change of orbital energy and angular momentum and thus the evolution of the orbit. The orbits are fully described by a semi-latus rectum $p$ and an eccentricity $e$. We find that while, during the inspiral, $e$ decreases until shortly before the orbit reaches the separatrix of stable bound orbits (which is defined by $p_{s}(e)$), in many astrophysically relevant cases the eccentricity will still be significant in the last stages of the inspiral. In addition, when a critical value $p_{crit}(e)$ is reached, the eccentricity ...

  13. High post-Newtonian order gravitational self-force analytical results for eccentric orbits around a Kerr black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Geralico, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We present the first analytic computation of the Detweiler-Barack-Sago gauge-invariant redshift function for a small mass in {\\it eccentric} orbit around a {\\it spinning} black hole. Our results give the redshift contributions that mix eccentricity and spin effects, through second order in eccentricity, second order in spin parameter, and the eight-and-a-half post-Newtonian order.

  14. The 2D surfaces that generate Newtonian and general relativistic orbits with small eccentricities

    CERN Document Server

    Middleton, Chad A

    2015-01-01

    Embedding diagrams prove to be quite useful when learning general relativity as they offer a way of visualizing spacetime curvature through warped two dimensional (2D) surfaces. In this manuscript we present a different 2D construct that also serves as a useful conceptual tool for gaining insight into gravitation, in particular, orbital dynamics - namely the cylindrically symmetric surfaces that generate Newtonian and general relativistic orbits with small eccentricities. Although we first show that no such surface exists that can exactly reproduce the arbitrary bound orbits of Newtonian gravitation or of general relativity (or, more generally, of any spherically symmetric potential), surfaces do exist that closely approximate the resulting orbital motion for small eccentricities; exactly the regime that describes the motion of the solar system planets. These surfaces help to illustrate the similarities, as well as the differences, between the two theories of gravitation (i.e. stationary elliptical orbits in ...

  15. Jupiter - Friend or Foe? IV: The influence of orbital eccentricity and inclination

    CERN Document Server

    Horner, J

    2011-01-01

    For many years, it was assumed that Jupiter prevented the Earth from being subject to a punishing impact regime that would greatly hinder the development of life. Here, we present the 4th in a series of studies investigating this hypothesis. Previously, we examined the effect of Jupiter's mass on the impact rate experienced by Earth. Here, we extend that approach to consider the influence of Jupiter's orbital eccentricity and inclination on the impact rate. We first consider scenarios in which Jupiter's orbital eccentricity was somewhat higher and somewhat lower than that in our Solar System. We find that Jupiter's orbital eccentricity plays a moderate role in determining the impact flux at Earth, with more eccentric orbits resulting in a higher impact rate of asteroids than for more circular orbits. This is particularly pronounced at high "Jupiter" masses. For short-period comets, the same effect is clearly apparent, albeit to a lesser degree. The flux of short-period comets impacting the Earth is slightly h...

  16. Controlling the Eccentricity of Polar Lunar Orbits with Low-Thrust Propulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. C. Winter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that lunar satellites in polar orbits suffer a high increase on the eccentricity due to the gravitational perturbation of the Earth. That effect is a natural consequence of the Lidov-Kozai resonance. The final fate of such satellites is the collision with the Moon. Therefore, the control of the orbital eccentricity leads to the control of the satellite's lifetime. In the present work we study this problem and introduce an approach in order to keep the orbital eccentricity of the satellite at low values. The whole work was made considering two systems: the 3-body problem, Moon-Earth-satellite, and the 4-body problem, Moon-Earth-Sun-satellite. First, we simulated the systems considering a satellite with initial eccentricity equals to 0.0001 and a range of initial altitudes between 100 km and 5000 km. In such simulations we followed the evolution of the satellite's eccentricity. We also obtained an empirical expression for the length of time needed to occur the collision with the Moon as a function of the initial altitude. The results found for the 3-body model were not significantly different from those found for the 4-body model. Secondly, using low-thrust propulsion, we introduced a correction of the eccentricity every time it reached the value 0.05. These simulations were made considering a set of different thrust values, from 0.1 N up to 0.4 N which can be obtained by using Hall Plasma Thrusters. In each run we measured the length of time, needed to correct the eccentricity value (from e=0.04 to e=0.05. From these results we obtained empirical expressions of this time as a function of the initial altitude and as a function of the thrust value.

  17. First Evidence of a Retrograde Orbit of Transiting Exoplanet HAT-P-7b

    CERN Document Server

    Narita, Norio; Hirano, Teruyuki; Tamura, Motohide

    2009-01-01

    We present the first evidence of a retrograde orbit of the transiting exoplanet HAT-P-7b. The discovery is based on a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect with the Subaru HDS during a transit of HAT-P-7b, occured on UT 2008 May 30. Our model shows that the spin-orbit alignment angle of this planet is $\\lambda = -132.6^{\\circ} (+12.6^{\\circ}, -21.5^{\\circ})$. The existence of such a retrograde planet had been predicted by recent planetary migration models considering planet-planet scattering processes or the Kozai migration. Our finding provides an important milestone that supports such dynamic migration theories.

  18. The Origin of Retrograde Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar; Farr, W.; Lithwick, Y.; Rasio, F.; Teyssandier, J.

    2011-09-01

    The search for extra-solar planets has led to the surprising discovery of many Jupiter-like planets in very close proximity to their host star, the so-called ``hot Jupiters'' (HJ). Even more surprisingly, many of these HJs have orbits that are eccentric or highly inclined with respect to the equator of the star, and some (about 25%) even orbiting counter to the spin direction of the star. This poses a unique challenge to all planet formation models. We show that secular interactions between Jupiter-like planet and another perturber in the system can easily produce retrograde HJ orbits. We show that in the frame of work of secular hierarchical triple system (the so-called Kozai mechanism) the inner orbit's angular momentum component parallel to the total angular momentum (i.e., the z-component of the inner orbit angular momentum) need not be constant. In fact, it can even change sign, leading to a retrograde orbit. A brief excursion to very high eccentricity during the chaotic evolution of the inner orbit allows planet-star tidal interactions to rapidly circularize that orbit, decoupling the planets and forming a retrograde hot Jupiter. We estimate the relative frequencies of retrograde orbits and counter to the stellar spin orbits using Monte Carlo simulations, and find that the they are consistent with the observations. The high observed incidence of planets orbiting counter to the stellar spin direction may suggest that planet--planet secular interactions are an important part of their dynamical history.

  19. Orbital stability of coplanar two-planet exosystems with high eccentricities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I.; Voyatzis, George

    2016-10-01

    The long-term stability of the evolution of two-planet systems is considered by using the general three body problem (GTBP). Our study is focused on the stability of systems with adjacent orbits when at least one of them is highly eccentric. In these cases, in order for close encounters, which destabilize the planetary systems, to be avoided, phase protection mechanisms should be considered. Additionally, since the GTBP is a non-integrable system, chaos may also cause the destabilization of the system after a long time interval. By computing dynamical maps, based on Fast Lyapunov Indicator, we reveal regions in phase space with stable orbits even for very high eccentricities (e > 0.5). Such regions are present in mean motion resonances (MMRs). We can determine the position of the exact MMR through the computation of families of periodic orbits in a rotating frame. Elliptic periodic orbits are associated with the presence of apsidal corotation resonances (ACRs). When such solutions are stable, they are associated with neighbouring domains of initial conditions that provide long-term stability. We apply our methodology so that the evolution of planetary systems of highly eccentric orbits is assigned to the existence of such stable domains. Particularly, we study the orbital evolution of the extrasolar systems HD 82943, HD 3651, HD 7449, HD 89744 and HD 102272 and discuss the consistency between the orbital elements provided by the observations and the dynamical stability.

  20. Orbital eccentricity as a probe of thick disc formation scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sales, Laura V.; Helmi, Amina; Abadi, Mario G.; Brook, Chris B.; Gomez, Facundo A.; Roskar, Rok; Debattista, Victor P.; House, Elisa; Steinmetz, Matthias; Villalobos, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    We study the orbital properties of stars in four (published) simulations of thick discs formed by (i) accretion from disrupted satellites, (ii) heating of a pre-existing thin disc by a minor merger, (iii) radial migration and (iv) gas-rich mergers. We find that the distribution of orbital eccentrici

  1. Orbital eccentricity as a probe of thick disc formation scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sales, Laura V.; Helmi, Amina; Abadi, Mario G.; Brook, Chris B.; Gomez, Facundo A.; Roskar, Rok; Debattista, Victor P.; House, Elisa; Steinmetz, Matthias; Villalobos, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    We study the orbital properties of stars in four (published) simulations of thick discs formed by (i) accretion from disrupted satellites, (ii) heating of a pre-existing thin disc by a minor merger, (iii) radial migration and (iv) gas-rich mergers. We find that the distribution of orbital

  2. Einstein@Home Discovery of a PALFA Millisecond Pulsar in an Eccentric Binary Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Stappers, B W; Freire, P C C; Lazarus, P; Allen, B; Aulbert, C; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Cardoso, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J S; Eggenstein, H -B; Fehrmann, H; Ferdman, R; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Karako-Argaman, C; Kaspi, V M; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Lynch, R; Machenschalk, B; Madsen, E; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Scholz, P; Siemens, X; Spitler, L G; Stairs, I H; Stovall, K; Swiggum, J K; Venkataraman, A; Wharton, R S; Zhu, W W

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 ($P=4.3$ ms) in a binary system with an eccentric ($e=0.08$) orbit in Pulsar ALFA survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 $M_\\odot$ and is most likely a white dwarf. Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities $e < 0.001$. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with larger eccentricities ($0.03 < e < 0.4$); PSR J1950+2414 is only the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for the the intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities of these systems are not compatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: som...

  3. Measuring the Eccentricity of the Earth's Orbit with a Nail and a Piece of Plywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    I describe how to obtain a rather good experimental determination of the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, as well as the obliquity of the Earth's rotation axis, by measuring, over the course of a year, the elevation of the Sun as a function of time during a day. With a very simple "instrument" consisting of an elementary sundial, first-year…

  4. Habitability of planets on eccentric orbits: limits of the mean flux approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmont, Emeline; Libert, Anne-Sophie; Leconte, Jérémy; Selsis, Franck; Turbet, Martin; Forget, François

    2016-04-01

    A few of the planets found in the insolation habitable zone (region in which a planet with an atmosphere can sustain surface liquid water, Kasting et al. 1993) are on eccentric orbits, such as GJ 667Cc (eccentricity of < 0.3, Anglada-Escude et al. 2012) or HD 16175 b (eccentricity of 0.6, Peek et al. 2009). This raises the question of the potential habitability of planets that only spend a fraction of their orbit in the habitable zone. Usually for a planet of semi-major axis a and eccentricity e, the averaged flux over one orbit received by the planet is considered. This averaged flux corresponds to the flux received by a planet on a circular orbit of radius r = a(1 -e2)1/4. If this orbital distance is within the habitable zone, the planet is said "habitable". However, for a hot star, for which the habitable zone is far from the star, the climate can be degraded when the planet is temporarily outside the habitable zone. We investigate here the limits of validity of the mean flux approximation used to assess the potential habitability of eccentric planets. For this study, we consider ocean planets in synchronized rotation and planets with a rotation period of 24 hr. We investigate the influence of the type of host star and the eccentricity of the orbit on the climate of a planet. We do so by scaling the duration of its orbital period and its apastron and periastron distance to ensure that it receives in average the same incoming flux as Earth's. We performed sets of 3D simulations using the Global Climate Model LMDz (Wordsworth et al. 2011, Forget et al. 2013, Leconte et al. 2013). The atmosphere is composed of N2, CO2 and H2O (gas, liquid, solid) in Earth-like proportions. First, we do not take into account the spectral difference between a low luminosity star and a Sun-like star. Second, the dependence of the albedo of ice and snow on the spectra of the host star is taken into account. This influences the positive ice-albedo feedback and can lead to a different

  5. The Transit Ingress and the Tilted Orbit of the Extraordinarily Eccentric Exoplanet HD 80606b

    CERN Document Server

    Winn, Joshua N; Johnson, John Asher; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Gazak, J Zachary; Starkey, Donn; Ford, Eric B; Colon, Knicole D; Reyes, Francisco; Nortmann, Lisa; Dreizler, Stefan; Odewahn, Stephen; Welsh, William F; Kadakia, Shimonee; Vanderbei, Robert J; Adams, Elisabeth R; Lockhart, Matthew; Crossfield, Ian J; Valenti, Jeff A; Dantowitz, Ronald; Carter, Joshua A

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a pan-American campaign to observe the 2009 June 5 transit of the exoplanet HD 80606b. We report the first detection of the transit ingress, revealing the transit duration to be 11.64 +/- 0.25 hr and allowing more robust determinations of the system parameters. Keck spectra obtained at midtransit exhibit an anomalous blueshift, giving definitive evidence that the stellar spin axis and planetary orbital axis are misaligned. The Keck data show that the projected spin-orbit angle is between 32-87 deg with 68.3% confidence and between 14-142 deg with 99.73% confidence. Thus the orbit of this planet is not only highly eccentric (e=0.93), but is also tilted away from the equatorial plane of its parent star. A large tilt had been predicted, based on the idea that the planet's eccentric orbit was caused by the Kozai mechanism. Independently of the theory, it is noteworthy that all 3 exoplanetary systems with known spin-orbit misalignments have massive planets on eccentric orbits, suggesting ...

  6. Distant Retrograde Orbits for space-based Near Earth Objects detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramacchia, Michele; Colombo, Camilla; Bernelli-Zazzera, Franco

    2016-09-01

    We analyse a concept for the detection of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) from a space-based network of telescopes on retrograde Distant Periodic Orbits. Planar periodic orbits are designed in the Sun-Earth circular restricted three-body problem, starting from initial conditions in the Hill's problem available from the literature. A family of retrograde orbits centred at the Earth is selected as baseline, based on their maximum distance from Earth, larger than the Earth-L2 distance. Indeed, spacecraft on such orbits can detect PHAs incoming from the Sun direction, which could not otherwise be monitored from current Earth-based systems. A trade-off on the orbit amplitude, asteroid diameter to be detected, and the constellation size is performed considering current visible sensor telescope technology. The Chelyabinsk meteor scenario is studied and the potential warning time that could be gained with a space-based survey system with respect to an Earth based-survey system is shown.

  7. Eccentricity generation in hierarchical triple systems with coplanar and initially circular orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    We develop a technique for estimating the inner eccentricity in hierarchical triple systems with well separated components. We investigate systems with initially circular and coplanar orbits and comparable masses. The technique is based on an expansion of the rate of change of the Runge-Lenz vector for calculating short period terms by using first order perturbation theory. The combination of the short period terms with terms arising from octupole level secular theory, results in the derivation of a rather simple formula for the eccentricity of the inner binary. The theoretical results are tested against numerical integrations of the full equations of motion. Comparison is also made with other results on the subject.

  8. Orbital Parameters of the Eclipsing Detached Kepler Binaries with Eccentric Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjurkchieva, Diana; Vasileva, Doroteya; Atanasova, Teodora

    2017-09-01

    We present precise values of the eccentricity and periastron angle of 529 detached, eccentric, eclipsing stars from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary catalog that were determined by modeling their long cadence data. The temperatures and relative radii of their components as well as their mass ratios were calculated based on approximate values of the empirical relations of MS stars. Around one-third of the secondary components were revealed to be very late dwarfs, some of them possible brown dwarf candidates. Most of our targets fall below the envelope P(1 - e 2)3/2 = 5 days. The (e, P) distribution of the known eccentric binaries exhibits a rough trend of increasing eccentricity with the period. The prolonged and continuous Kepler observations allowed us to identify 60 new highly eccentric targets with e > 0.5.

  9. Eccentricity generation in hierarchical triple systems with non-coplanar and initially circular orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    In a previous paper, we developed a technique for estimating the inner eccentricity in coplanar hierarchical triple systems on initially circular orbits, with comparable masses and with well separated components, based on an expansion of the rate of change of the Runge-Lenz vector. Now, the same technique is extended to non-coplanar orbits. However, it can only be applied to systems with ${I_{0}140.77^{\\circ}}$, where ${I}$ is the inclination of the two orbits, because of complications arising from the so-called 'Kozai effect'. The theoretical model is tested against results from numerical integrations of the full equations of motion.

  10. Topology of the Relative Motion: Circular and Eccentric Reference Orbit Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    FontdecabaiBaig, Jordi; Metris, Gilles; Exertier, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the topology of the relative trajectories in flight formations. The purpose is to study the different types of relative trajectories, their degrees of freedom, and to give an adapted parameterization. The paper also deals with the research of local circular motions. Even if they exist only when the reference orbit is circular, we extrapolate initial conditions to the eccentric reference orbit case.This alternative approach is complementary with traditional approaches in terms of cartesian coordinates or differences of orbital elements.

  11. An analysis of the expected eccentricity perturbations for the second Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical prediction of expected eccentricity perturbations for the RAE 2 lunar orbit shows that the eccentricity will grow linearly in time. Parametric inclination studies and analysis of perturbation equations establish a critical retrograde inclination of 116.565 at which the positive perturbation slope vanishes for a circular orbit about 1100 m above the lunar surface with an eccentricity constraint of less than 0.005 during a period of about one year.

  12. HAT-P-7: A Retrograde or Polar Orbit, and a Third Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Joshua N.; Johnson, John Asher; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Crossfield, Ian J.; Holman, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    We showed that the exoplanet HAT-P-7b has an extremely tilted orbit, with a true angle of at least 86 degrees with respect to its parent star's equatorial plane, and a strong possibility of retrograde motion. We also report evidence for an additional planet or companion star. The Rossiter-McLaughlin effect was found to be a blueshift during the first half of the transit and a redshift during the second half, an inversion of the usual pattern, implying that the angle between the sky-projected orbital and stellar angular momentum vectors is 182.5 plus or minus 9.4 degrees. The third body is implicated by excess RV variation of the host star over 2 yr. Some possible explanations for the tilted orbit of HAT-P-7b are a close encounter with another planet, the Kozai effect, and resonant capture by an inward-migrating outer planet.

  13. The Ratio of Retrograde to Prograde Orbits: A Unique Way to test Kuiper Belt Binary Formation Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting, Hilke E

    2008-01-01

    With the discovery of Kuiper Belt binaries that have wide separations and roughly equal masses new theories were proposed to explain their formation. Two formation scenarios were suggested by Goldreich and collaborators: In the first, dynamical friction that is generated by the sea of small bodies enables a transient binary to become bound ($L^2s$ mechanism); in the second, a transient binary gets bound by an encounter with a third body ($L^3$ mechanism). We show that these different binary formation scenarios leave their own unique signatures in the relative abundance of prograde to retrograde binary orbits. This signature is due to stable retrograde orbits that exist much further out in the Hill sphere than prograde orbits. It provides an excellent opportunity to distinguish between the different binary formation scenarios observationally. We predict that if binary formation proceeded while sub-Hill velocities prevailed, the vast majority of all comparable mass ratio binaries have retrograde orbits. This do...

  14. NEXT GENERATION OF TELESCOPES OR DYNAMICS REQUIRED TO DETERMINE IF EXO-MOONS HAVE PROGRADE OR RETROGRADE ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Karen M.; Fujii, Yuka [Earth-Life Science Institute (WPI-ELSI), Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro district, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-08-20

    We survey the methods proposed in the literature for detecting moons of extrasolar planets in terms of their ability to distinguish between prograde and retrograde moon orbits, an important tracer of the moon formation channel. We find that most moon detection methods, in particular, sensitive methods for detecting moons of transiting planets, cannot observationally distinguishing prograde and retrograde moon orbits. The prograde and retrograde cases can only be distinguished where the dynamical evolution of the orbit due to, e.g., three body effects is detectable, where one of the two cases is dynamically unstable, or where new observational facilities, which can implement a technique capable of differentiating the two cases, come online. In particular, directly imaged planets are promising targets because repeated spectral and photometric measurements, which are required to determine moon orbit direction, could also be conducted with the primary interest of characterizing the planet itself.

  15. Einstein@Home DISCOVERY OF A PALFA MILLISECOND PULSAR IN AN ECCENTRIC BINARY ORBIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B. [Leibniz Universität, Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Callinstr. 38, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Brazier, A.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cardoso, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Crawford, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA 17604-3003 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [National Research Council, resident at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ferdman, R. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Hessels, J. W. T., E-mail: benjamin.knispel@aei.mpg.de [ASTRON, Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); and others

    2015-06-10

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 (P = 4.3 ms) in a binary system with an eccentric (e = 0.08) 22 day orbit in Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 M{sub ⊙} and is most likely a white dwarf (WD). Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities e < 0.001. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with 0. 027 < e < 0.44; PSR J1950+2414 is the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for its intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities are incompatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: something unusual happened during their evolution. Proposed scenarios are (a) initial evolution of the pulsar in a triple system which became dynamically unstable, (b) origin in an exchange encounter in an environment with high stellar density, (c) rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a super-Chandrasekhar WD, and (d) dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. We compare the properties of all five known eccentric MSPs with the predictions of these formation channels. Future measurements of the masses and proper motion might allow us to firmly exclude some of the proposed formation scenarios.

  16. Einstein@Home Discovery of a PALFA Millisecond Pulsar in an Eccentric Binary Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferdman, R.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lynch, R.; Machenschalk, B.; Madsen, E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L. G.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; Venkataraman, A.; Wharton, R. S.; Zhu, W. W.

    2015-06-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 (P = 4.3 ms) in a binary system with an eccentric (e = 0.08) 22 day orbit in Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 M⊙ and is most likely a white dwarf (WD). Fully recycled MSPs like this one are thought to be old neutron stars spun-up by mass transfer from a companion star. This process should circularize the orbit, as is observed for the vast majority of binary MSPs, which predominantly have orbital eccentricities e < 0.001. However, four recently discovered binary MSPs have orbits with 0. 027 < e < 0.44; PSR J1950+2414 is the fifth such system to be discovered. The upper limits for its intrinsic spin period derivative and inferred surface magnetic field strength are comparable to those of the general MSP population. The large eccentricities are incompatible with the predictions of the standard recycling scenario: something unusual happened during their evolution. Proposed scenarios are (a) initial evolution of the pulsar in a triple system which became dynamically unstable, (b) origin in an exchange encounter in an environment with high stellar density, (c) rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a super-Chandrasekhar WD, and (d) dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. We compare the properties of all five known eccentric MSPs with the predictions of these formation channels. Future measurements of the masses and proper motion might allow us to firmly exclude some of the proposed formation scenarios.

  17. Einstein@Home Discovery of a PALFA Millisecond Pulsar in an Eccentric Binary Orbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knispel, B.; Lyne, A.G.; Stappers, B.W.; Freire, P.C.C.; Lazarus, P.; Allen, B.; Aulbert, C.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Cardoso, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J.M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.S.; Eggenstein, H.B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferdman, R.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Jenet, F.A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V.M.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D.R.; Lynch, R.; Machenschalk, B.; Madsen, E.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S.M.; Scholz, P.; Siemens, X.; Spitler, L.G.; Stairs, I.H.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.K.; Venkataraman, A.; Wharton, R.S.; Zhu, W.W.

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1950+2414 (P = 4.3 ms) in a binary system with an eccentric (e = 0.08) 22 day orbit in Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey observations with the Arecibo telescope. Its companion star has a median mass of 0.3 M⊙ and is most likely a whi

  18. An optical survey for space debris on highly eccentric and inclined MEO orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silha, J.; Schildknecht, T.; Hinze, A.; Flohrer, T.; Vananti, A.

    2017-01-01

    Optical surveys for space debris in high-altitude orbits have been conducted since more than ten years. Originally these efforts concentrated mainly on the geostationary region (GEO). Corresponding observation strategies, processing techniques and cataloguing approaches have been developed and successfully applied. The ESA GEO surveys, e.g., resulted in the detection of a significant population of small-size debris and later in the discovery of high area-to-mass ratio objects in GEO-like orbits. Comparably less experience (both, in terms of practical observation and strategy definition) is available for eccentric orbits that (at least partly) are in the MEO region, in particular for the Molniya-type orbits. Different survey and follow-up strategies for searching space debris objects in highly-eccentric MEO orbits, and to acquire orbits which are sufficiently accurate to catalog such objects and to maintain their orbits over longer time spans were developed. Simulations were performed to compare the performance of different survey and cataloguing strategies. Eventually, optical observations were conducted in the framework of an ESA study using ESA's Space Debris Telescope (ESASDT) the 1-m Zeiss telescope located at the Optical Ground Station (OGS) at the Teide Observatory at Tenerife, Spain. Thirteen nights of surveys of Molniya-type orbits were performed between January and August 2013. Eventually 255 surveys were performed during these thirteen nights corresponding to about 47 h of observations. In total 30 uncorrelated faint objects were discovered. On average one uncorrelated object was found every 100 min of observations. Some of these objects show a considerable brightness variation and have a high area-to-mass ratio as determined in the orbit estimation process.

  19. The evolution of a binary in a retrograde circular orbit embedded in an accretion disk

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, P B; Paardekooper, S -J; Polnarev, A G

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries may form as a consequence of galaxy mergers. Both prograde and retrograde orbits have been proposed. We study a binary of a small mass ratio, q, in a retrograde orbit immersed in and interacting with a gaseous accretion disk in order to estimate time scales for inward migration leading to coalescence and the accretion rate to the secondary component. We employ both semi-analytic methods and two dimensional numerical simulations, focusing on the case where the binary mass ratio is small but large enough to significantly perturb the disk. We develop the theory of type I migration for this case and determine conditions for gap formation finding that then inward migration occurs on a time scale equal to the time required for one half of the secondary mass to be accreted through the unperturbed disk, with accretion onto the secondary playing only a minor role. The semi-analytic and fully numerical approaches are in good agreement, the former being applicable over long time scales. ...

  20. The retrograde orbit of the HAT-P-6b exoplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébrard, G.; Ehrenreich, D.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Moutou, C.; Arnold, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Díaz, R. F.; Eggenberger, A.; Forveille, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz, D.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2011-03-01

    We observed the transit of the HAT-P-6b exoplanet across its host star with the SOPHIE spectrograph (OHP, France). The resulting stellar radial velocities display the Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly and reveal a retrograde orbit: the planetary orbital spin and the stellar rotational spin point in approximately opposite directions. A fit to the anomaly measures a sky-projected angle λ = 166° ± 10° between these two spin axes. All seven known retrograde planets are hot Jupiters with masses Mp 4 MJup) are prograde but misaligned. Different mechanisms may therefore be responsible for planetary obliquities above and below ~3.5 MJup. Based on observations collected with the SOPHIE spectrograph on the 1.93-m telescope at Observatoire de Haute-Provence (CNRS), France, by the SOPHIE Consortium (program 10A.PNP.CONS).SOPHIE radial velocities are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/527/L11

  1. Spin–orbit precession for eccentric black hole binaries at first order in the mass ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Sarp; Dempsey, David; Dolan, Sam R.

    2017-04-01

    We consider spin–orbit (‘geodetic’) precession for a compact binary in strong-field gravity. Specifically, we compute ψ, the ratio of the accumulated spin-precession and orbital angles over one radial period, for a spinning compact body of mass m 1 and spin s 1, with {{s}1}\\ll Gm12/c , orbiting a non-rotating black hole. We show that ψ can be computed for eccentric orbits in both the gravitational self-force and post-Newtonian frameworks, and that the results appear to be consistent. We present a post-Newtonian expansion for ψ at next-to-next-to-leading order, and a Lorenz-gauge gravitational self-force calculation for ψ at first order in the mass ratio. The latter provides new numerical data in the strong-field regime to inform the effective one-body model of the gravitational two-body problem. We conclude that ψ complements the Detweiler redshift z as a key invariant quantity characterizing eccentric orbits in the gravitational two-body problem.

  2. Spin-orbit precession for eccentric black hole binaries at first order in the mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Akcay, Sarp; Dolan, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We consider spin-orbit ("geodetic") precession for a compact binary in strong-field gravity. Specifically, we compute $\\psi$, the ratio of the accumulated spin-precession and orbital angles over one radial period, for a spinning compact body orbiting a non-rotating black hole. We show that $\\psi$ can be computed for eccentric orbits in both the gravitational self-force and post-Newtonian frameworks, and that the results appear to be consistent. We present a post-Newtonian expansion for $\\psi$ at next-to-next-to-leading order, and a Lorenz-gauge gravitational self-force calculation for $\\psi$ at first order in the mass ratio. The latter provides new numerical data in the strong-field regime to inform the Effective One-Body model of the gravitational two-body problem. We conclude that $\\psi$ complements the Detweiler redshift $z$ as a key invariant quantity characterizing eccentric orbits in the gravitational two-body problem.

  3. KOI-372: a young extrasolar system with two giant planets on wide and eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, L; Southworth, J; Borsato, L; Gandolfi, D; Ciceri, S; Barrado, D; Brahm, R; Henning, Th

    2015-01-01

    We confirm the planetary nature of KOI-372b (aka Kepler object of interest K00372.01), a giant transiting exoplanet orbiting a solar-analog G2V star. The mass of KOI-372b and the eccentricity of its orbit were accurately derived thanks to a series of precise radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph mounted on the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. A simultaneous fit of the radial-velocity data and Kepler photometry revealed that KOI-372b is a dense Jupiter-like planet with a mass of Mp=3.25 Mjup and a radius of Rp=0.882 Rjup. KOI-372b is moving on a quite eccentric orbit, e=0.172, making a complete revolution around its parent star in 125.6 days. The semi-major axis of the orbit is 0.4937 au, implying that the planet is close to its habitable zone (roughly 0.5 au from it). By analysing the mid-transit times of the 12 transit events of KOI-372b recorded by the Kepler spacecraft, we found a clear transit time variation, which is attributable to the presence of a planet c in a wider orbit. We estimate...

  4. HAT-P-7: A Retrograde or Polar Orbit, and a Second Planet

    CERN Document Server

    Winn, Joshua N; Albrecht, Simon; Howard, Andrew W; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Crossfield, Ian J; Holman, Matthew J

    2009-01-01

    We show that the exoplanet HAT-P-7b has an extremely tilted orbit, with a true angle of at least 86 degrees with respect to its parent star's equatorial plane, and a strong possibility of retrograde motion. We also report evidence for a second planet in a more distant orbit. The evidence for the unparalleled orbit and the additional planet is based on precise observations of the star's apparent radial velocity. The anomalous radial velocity due to rotation (the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect) was found to be a blueshift during the first half of the transit and a redshift during the second half, an inversion of the usual effect, implying that the angle between the sky-projected orbital and stellar angular momentum vectors is 182.5 +/- 9.4 deg. The second planet is implicated by excess radial-velocity variation of the host star over 2 yr. Possibly, the second planet tilted the orbit of the inner planet through a close encounter or the Kozai effect.

  5. Orbital stability of coplanar two-planet exosystems with high eccentricities

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, Kyriaki I

    2016-01-01

    The long-term stability of the evolution of two-planet systems is considered by using the general three body problem (GTBP). Our study is focused on the stability of systems with adjacent orbits when at least one of them is highly eccentric. In these cases, in order for close encounters, which destabilize the planetary systems, to be avoided, phase protection mechanisms should be considered. Additionally, since the GTBP is a non-integrable system, chaos may also cause the destabilization of the system after a long time interval. By computing dynamical maps, based on Fast Lyapunov Indicator, we reveal regions in phase space with stable orbits even for very high eccentricities (e>0.5). Such regions are present in mean motion resonances (MMR). We can determine the position of the exact MMR through the computation of families of periodic orbits in a rotating frame. Elliptic periodic orbits are associated with the presence of apsidal corotation resonances (ACR). When such solutions are stable, they are associated ...

  6. Mass and eccentricity constraints on the planetary debris orbiting the white dwarf WD 1145+017

    CERN Document Server

    Gurri, Pol; Gänsicke, Boris T

    2016-01-01

    Being the first of its kind, the white dwarf WD 1145+017 exhibits a complex system of disintegrating debris which offers a unique opportunity to study its disruption process in real time. Even with plenty of transit observations there are no clear constraints on the masses or eccentricities of such debris. Using $N$-body simulations we show that masses greater than approximately $10^{20}$ kg (a tenth of the mass of Ceres) or orbits that are not nearly circular ($\\mathrm{eccentricity}>10^{-3}$) dramatically increase the chances of the system becoming unstable within two years, which would contrast with the observational data over this timespan. We also provide a direct comparison between transit phase shifts detected in the observations and by our numerical simulations.

  7. Pacemaking the ice ages by frequency modulation of Earth's orbital eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial

    1999-07-23

    Evidence from power spectra of deep-sea oxygen isotope time series suggests that the climate system of Earth responds nonlinearly to astronomical forcing by frequency modulating eccentricity-related variations in insolation. With the help of a simple model, it is shown that frequency modulation of the approximate 100,000-year eccentricity cycles by the 413,000-year component accounts for the variable duration of the ice ages, the multiple-peak character of the time series spectra, and the notorious absence of significant spectral amplitude at the 413,000-year period. The observed spectra are consistent with the classic Milankovitch theories of insolation, so that climate forcing by 100,000-year variations in orbital inclination that cause periodic dust accretion appear unnecessary.

  8. Orbital fitting of imaged planetary companions with high eccentricities and unbound orbits -- Application to Fomalhaut b and PZ Telescopii B

    CERN Document Server

    Beust, Hervé; Maire, Anne-Lise; Ehrenreich, David; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Chauvin, Gael

    2015-01-01

    Imaging companions to main-sequence stars often allows to detect a projected orbital motion. MCMC has become very popular in for fitting their orbits. Some of these companions appear to move on very eccentric, possibly unbound orbits. This is the case for the exoplanet Fomalhaut b and the brown dwarf companion PZ Tel B. For such orbits, standard MCMC codes assuming only bound orbits may be inappropriate. We develop a new MCMC implementation able to handle bound and unbound orbits as well in a continuous manner, and we apply it to the cases of Fomalhaut b and PZ Tel B. This code is based on universal Keplerian variables and Stumpff functions formalism. We present two versions of this code, the second one using a different set of angular variables designed to avoid degeneracies arising when the projected orbital motion is quasi-radial, as it is the case for PZ Tel B. We also present additional observations of PZ Tel B. The code is applied to Fomalhaut b and PZ Tel B. Concerning Fomalhaut b, we confirm previous ...

  9. Direct N-body simulations of globular clusters - III. Palomar 4 on an eccentric orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonoozi, Akram Hasani; Haghi, Hosein; Kroupa, Pavel; Küpper, Andreas H. W.; Baumgardt, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Palomar 4 is a low-density globular cluster with a current mass ≈30000 M⊙in the outer halo of the Milky Way with a two-body relaxation time of the order of a Hubble time. Yet, it is strongly mass segregated and contains a stellar mass function depleted of low-mass stars. Pal 4 was either born this way or it is a result of extraordinary dynamical evolution. Since two-body relaxation cannot explain these signatures alone, enhanced mass loss through tidal shocking may have had a strong influence on Pal 4. Here, we compute a grid of direct N-body simulations to model Pal 4 on various eccentric orbits within the Milky Way potential to find likely initial conditions that reproduce its observed mass, half-light radius, stellar MF-slope and line-of-sight velocity dispersion. We find that Pal 4 is most likely orbiting on an eccentric orbit with an eccentricity of e ≈ 0.9 and pericentric distance of Rp ≈ 5 kpc. In this scenario, the required 3D half-mass radius at birth is similar to the average sizes of typical GCs (Rh ≈ 4 - 5 pc), while its birth mass is about M0 ≈ 105 M⊙. We also find a high degree of primordial mass segregation among the cluster stars, which seems to be necessary in every scenario we considered. Thus, using the tidal effect to constrain the perigalactic distance of the orbit of Pal 4, we predict that the proper motion of Pal 4 should be in the range -0.52 ≤ μδ ≤ -0.38 mas yr-1 and -0.30 ≤ μαcos δ ≤ -0.15 mas yr-1.

  10. Negating the Yearly Eccentricity Magnitude Variation of Super-synchronous Disposal Orbits due to Solar Radiation Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. L.

    Solar radiation pressure alters satellites' eccentricity by accelerating and decelerating them during each orbit. The accumulated perturbation cancels yearly for geostationary satellites, but meanwhile the perigee radius changes. Disposed satellites must be reorbited higher to compensate, using more fuel. The examined disposal orbit points toward the Sun and uses the satellite's natural eccentricity. This causes the eccentricity vector to only change direction, keeping the perigee radius constant. This thesis verifies this behavior over one year with an analytical derivation and MATLAB simulation, gaining useful insights into its cause. The traditional and proposed disposal orbits are then modeled using NASA's GMAT for more realistic simulations. The proposed orbit's sensitivity to satellite and initialization errors is also examined. Relationships are developed to show these errors' effect on the perigee radius. In conclusion, while this orbit can be used in the short term, margins are necessary to guarantee protection of the geostationary belt.

  11. The dynamics of Neptune Trojans - II. Eccentric orbits and observed objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Yong; Dvorak, Rudolf; Sun, Yi-Sui

    2011-01-01

    In a previous paper, we presented a global view of the stability of Neptune Trojans (NTs hereafter) on inclined orbits. As the continuation of the investigation, we discuss in this paper the dependence of the stability of NT orbits on the eccentricity. For this task, high-resolution dynamical maps are constructed using the results of extensive numerical integrations of orbits initialized on fine grids of initial semimajor axis (a0) versus eccentricity (e0). The extensions of regions of stable orbits on the (a0, e0) plane at different inclinations are shown. The maximum eccentricities of stable orbits in the three most stable regions at low (0°, 12°), medium (22°, 36°) and high (51°, 59°) inclination are found to be 0.10, 0.12 and 0.04, respectively. The fine structures in the dynamical maps are described. Via the frequency-analysis method, the mechanisms that portray the dynamical maps are revealed. The secondary resonances, at the frequency of the librating resonant angle λ-λ8 and the frequency of the quasi 2:1 mean-motion resonance (MMR hereafter) between Neptune and Uranus, are found to be deeply involved in the motion of NTs. Secular resonances are detected and they also contribute significantly to the triggering of chaos in the motion. In particular, the effects of the secular resonance ν8, ν18 are clarified. We also investigate the orbital stabilities of six observed NTs by checking the orbits of hundreds of clones generated within the observing error bars. We conclude that four of them are deeply inside the stable region, with 2001 QR322 and 2005 TO74 being the exceptions. 2001 QR322 is in the close vicinity of the most significant secondary resonance. 2005 TO74 is located close to the boundary separating stable orbits from unstable ones, and it may be influenced by a secular resonance. This article was published online on 2010 October 25. Some errors were subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online and print versions to indicate

  12. A paucity of proto-hot Jupiters on super-eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Rebekah I; Johnson, John Asher

    2012-01-01

    Gas giant planets orbiting within 0.1 AU of their host stars, unlikely to have formed in situ, are evidence for planetary migration. It is debated whether the typical hot Jupiter smoothly migrated inward from its formation location through the proto-planetary disk or was perturbed by another body onto a highly eccentric orbit, which tidal dissipation subsequently shrank and circularized during close stellar passages. Socrates and collaborators predicted that the latter class of model should produce a population of super-eccentric proto-hot Jupiters readily observable by Kepler. We find a paucity of such planets in the Kepler sample, disagreeing with the theoretical prediction with 98.7% confidence. Observational effects are unlikely to explain this discrepancy. We find that the fraction of hot Jupiters with orbital period P > 3 days produced by the stellar binary Kozai mechanism does not exceed 0.15 +0.29/-0.11. Our results may indicate that disk migration is the dominant channel for producing hot Jupiters wi...

  13. Long term evolution of distant retrograde orbits in the Earth-Moon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrouk, Collin; Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2017-09-01

    This work studies the evolution of several Distant Retrograde Orbits (DROs) of varying size in the Earth-Moon system over durations up to tens of millennia. This analysis is relevant for missions requiring a completely hands off, long duration quarantine orbit, such as a Mars Sample Return mission or the Asteroid Redirect Mission. Four DROs are selected from four stable size regions and are propagated for up to 30,000 years with an integrator that uses extended precision arithmetic techniques and a high fidelity dynamical model. The evolution of the orbit's size, shape, orientation, period, out-of-plane amplitude, and Jacobi constant are tracked. It has been found that small DROs, with minor axis amplitudes of approximately 45,000 km or less decay in size and period largely due to the Moon's solid tides. Larger DROs (62,000 km and up) are more influenced by the gravity of bodies external to the Earth-Moon system, and remain bound to the Moon for significantly less time.

  14. The large-scale nebular pattern of a superwind binary in an eccentric orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun; Trejo, Alfonso; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Sahai, Raghvendra; Taam, Ronald E.; Morris, Mark R.; Hirano, Naomi; Hsieh, I.-Ta

    2017-03-01

    Preplanetary nebulae and planetary nebulae are evolved, mass-losing stellar objects that show a wide variety of morphologies. Many of these nebulae consist of outer structures that are nearly spherical (spiral/shell/arc/halo) and inner structures that are highly asymmetric (bipolar/multipolar) 1,2 . The coexistence of such geometrically distinct structures is enigmatic because it hints at the simultaneous presence of both wide and close binary interactions, a phenomenon that has been attributed to stellar binary systems with eccentric orbits 3 . Here, we report high-resolution molecular line observations of the circumstellar spiral-shell pattern of AFGL 3068, an asymptotic giant branch star transitioning to the preplanetary nebula phase. The observations clearly reveal that the dynamics of the mass loss is influenced by the presence of an eccentric-orbit binary. This quintessential object opens a window on the nature of deeply embedded binary stars through the circumstellar spiral-shell patterns that reside at distances of several thousand au from the stars.

  15. Influence of Orbital Motion of Inner Cylinder on Eccentric Taylor Vortex Flow of Newtonian and Power-Law Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Shun-Xin; FU Song

    2007-01-01

    The effects of inner cylinder orbital motion on Taylor vortex flow of Newtonian and power-law fluid are studied numerically. The results demonstrate that when the eccentricity is not small, the orbital motion influences the stability of the flow in a non-monotonic manner. The variations of the flow-induced forces on the inner cylinder versus orbital motion are also different from the cases in which the flow is two-dimensional and laminar.

  16. Extreme secular excitation of eccentricity inside mean motion resonance. Small bodies driven into star-grazing orbits by planetary perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Gabriele; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Lai, Dong

    2017-09-01

    Context. It is well known that asteroids and comets fall into the Sun. Metal pollution of white dwarfs and transient spectroscopic signatures of young stars like β-Pic provide growing evidence that extra solar planetesimals can attain extreme orbital eccentricities and fall into their parent stars. Aims: We aim to develop a general, implementable, semi-analytical theory of secular eccentricity excitation of small bodies (planetesimals) in mean motion resonances with an eccentric planet valid for arbitrary values of the eccentricities and including the short-range force due to General Relativity. Methods: Our semi-analytic model for the restricted planar three-body problem does not make use of series expansion and therefore is valid for any eccentricity value and semi-major axis ratio. The model is based on the application of the adiabatic principle, which is valid when the precession period of the longitude of pericentre of the planetesimal is much longer than the libration period in the mean motion resonance. In resonances of order larger than 1 this is true except for vanishingly small eccentricities. We provide prospective users with a Mathematica notebook with implementation of the model allowing direct use. Results: We confirm that the 4:1 mean motion resonance with a moderately eccentric (e' ≲ 0.1) planet is the most powerful one to lift the eccentricity of planetesimals from nearly circular orbits to star-grazing ones. However, if the planet is too eccentric, we find that this resonance is unable to pump the planetesimal's eccentricity to a very high value. The inclusion of the General Relativity effect imposes a condition on the mass of the planet to drive the planetesimals into star-grazing orbits. For a planetesimal at 1 AU around a solar mass star (or white dwarf), we find a threshold planetary mass of about 17 Earth masses. We finally derive an analytical formula for this critical mass. Conclusions: Planetesimals can easily fall into the central star

  17. Frequency modulation reveals the phasing of orbital eccentricity during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event II and the Eocene hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Jiří; Meyers, Stephen R.; Galeotti, Simone; Lanci, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Major advances in our understanding of paleoclimate change derive from a precise reconstruction of the periods, amplitudes and phases of the 'Milankovitch cycles' of precession, obliquity and eccentricity. While numerous quantitative approaches exist for the identification of these astronomical cycles in stratigraphic data, limitations in radioisotopic dating, and instability of the theoretical astronomical solutions beyond ∼50 Myr ago, can challenge identification of the phase relationships needed to constrain climate response and anchor floating astrochronologies. Here we demonstrate that interference patterns accompanying frequency modulation (FM) of short eccentricity provide a robust basis for identifying the phase of long eccentricity forcing in stratigraphic data. One- and two-dimensional models of sedimentary distortion of the astronomical signal are used to evaluate the veracity of the FM method, and indicate that pristine eccentricity FM can be readily distinguished in paleo-records. Apart from paleoclimatic implications, the FM approach provides a quantitative technique for testing and calibrating theoretical astronomical solutions, and for refining chronologies for the deep past. We present two case studies that use the FM approach to evaluate major carbon-cycle perturbations of the Eocene and Late Cretaceous. Interference patterns in the short-eccentricity band reveal that Eocene hyperthermals ETM2 ('Elmo'), H2, I1 and ETM3 (X; ∼52-54 Myr ago) were associated with maxima in the 405-kyr cycle of orbital eccentricity. The same eccentricity configuration favored regional anoxic episodes in the Mediterranean during the Middle and Late Cenomanian (∼94.5-97 Myr ago). The initial phase of the global Oceanic Anoxic Event II (OAE II; ∼93.9-94.5 Myr ago) coincides with maximum and falling 405-kyr eccentricity, and the recovery phase occurs during minimum and rising 405-kyr eccentricity. On a Myr scale, the event overlaps with a node in eccentricity

  18. Possible Outcomes of Coplanar High-eccentricity Migration: Hot Jupiters, Close-in Super-Earths, and Counter-orbiting Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuxin; Masuda, Kento; Suto, Yasushi

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the formation of close-in planets in near-coplanar eccentric hierarchical triple systems via the secular interaction between an inner planet and an outer perturber (Coplanar High-eccentricity Migration; CHEM). We generalize the previous work on the analytical condition for successful CHEM for point masses interacting only through gravity by taking into account the finite mass effect of the inner planet. We find that efficient CHEM requires that the systems should have m1 ≪ m0 and m1 ≪ m2. In addition to the gravity for point masses, we examine the importance of the short-range forces, and provide an analytical estimate of the migration timescale. We perform a series of numerical simulations in CHEM for systems consisting of a Sun-like central star, giant gas inner planet, and planetary outer perturber, including the short-range forces and stellar and planetary dissipative tides. We find that most of such systems end up with a tidal disruption; a small fraction of the systems produce prograde hot Jupiters (HJs), but no retrograde HJ. In addition, we extend CHEM to super-Earth mass range, and show that the formation of close-in super-Earths in prograde orbits is also possible. Finally, we carry out CHEM simulation for the observed hierarchical triple and counter-orbiting HJ systems. We find that CHEM can explain a part of the former systems, but it is generally very difficult to reproduce counter-orbiting HJ systems.

  19. Retrograde near-circular periodic orbits near equatorial planes of small irregular bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lei; Yang, Hongwei; Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng

    2017-09-01

    Research on the stabilities of periodic orbits is useful for selection of parking orbits in asteroid and comet missions. In this paper, retrograde near-circular periodic orbits near equatorial planes (RNPOEP) of small irregular bodies are discussed, especially for their bifurcations and stabilities. RNPOEPs of six bodies are calculated based on a polyhedral method. The results reflect that two Period-Doubling Bifurcations (PDBs) cause the annular unstable regions, where RNPOEPs are all unstable, in the gravitational fields of some bodies. The unstable annular regions in the gravitational field of some bodies such as 243 Ida are wide, while those of some other bodies such as 216 Kleopatra are narrow. Based on the bodies' shapes, they are classified as two categories. Bodies of the first category have straight shapes which are approximately symmetric about the x-axis, such as 216 Kleopatra. Bodies of the second category have arched shapes which are approximately symmetric about the y-axis, such as 243 Ida. In order to provide insight of the dominating factors for the range of unstable annular regions, simplified models are proposed in the analysis. Specifically, a double-particle-linkage model is used for the first category while a triple-particle-linkage model is used for the second category. It is found that the distribution of the unstable annular regions in the gravitational field of simplified models is similar to those of the polyhedral models. Numerical results validate that the mass distribution dominates the range of the annular regions for both types of small bodies.

  20. Resonances in retrograde circumbinary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Nixon, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the interaction of an eccentric binary with a circular coplanar circumbinary disc that rotates in a retrograde sense with respect to the binary. In the circular binary case, no Lindblad resonances lie within the disc and no Lindblad resonant torques are produced, as was previously known. By analytic means, we show that when the binary orbit is eccentric, there exist components of the gravitational potential of the binary which rotate in a retrograde sense to the binary orbit and so rotate progradely with respect to this disc, allowing a resonant interaction to occur between the binary and the disc. The resulting resonant torques distinctly alter the disc response from the circular binary case. We describe results of three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to explore this effect and categorise the response of the disc in terms of modes whose strengths vary as a function of binary mass ratio and eccentricity. These mode strengths are weak compared to the largest mode strengths expected in the prog...

  1. ORBITAL PHASE VARIATIONS OF THE ECCENTRIC GIANT PLANET HAT-P-2b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Nikole K.; Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Knutson, Heather A.; Desert, Jean-Michel; Kao, Melodie [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Laughlin, Gregory; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Burrows, Adam; Bakos, Gaspar A.; Hartman, Joel D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fischer, Debra A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Hinkley, Sasha; Johnson, John Asher [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Howard, Andrew W., E-mail: nklewis@mit.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2013-04-01

    We present the first secondary eclipse and phase curve observations for the highly eccentric hot Jupiter HAT-P-2b in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m data sets span an entire orbital period of HAT-P-2b (P = 5.6334729 d), making them the longest continuous phase curve observations obtained to date and the first full-orbit observations of a planet with an eccentricity exceeding 0.2. We present an improved non-parametric method for removing the intrapixel sensitivity variations in Spitzer data at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m that robustly maps position-dependent flux variations. We find that the peak in planetary flux occurs at 4.39 {+-} 0.28, 5.84 {+-} 0.39, and 4.68 {+-} 0.37 hr after periapse passage with corresponding maxima in the planet/star flux ratio of 0.1138% {+-} 0.0089%, 0.1162% {+-} 0.0080%, and 0.1888% {+-} 0.0072% in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.0996% {+-} 0.0072%, 0.1031% {+-} 0.0061%, 0.071%{sub -0.013%}{sup +0.029,} and 0.1392% {+-} 0.0095% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bands, respectively, indicate that the planet cools significantly from its peak temperature before we measure the dayside flux during secondary eclipse. We compare our measured secondary eclipse depths to the predictions from a one-dimensional radiative transfer model, which suggests the possible presence of a transient day side inversion in HAT-P-2b's atmosphere near periapse. We also derive improved estimates for the system parameters, including its mass, radius, and orbital ephemeris. Our simultaneous fit to the transit, secondary eclipse, and radial velocity data allows us to determine the eccentricity (e = 0.50910 {+-} 0.00048) and argument of periapse ({omega} = 188. Degree-Sign 09 {+-} 0. Degree-Sign 39) of HAT-P-2b's orbit with a greater precision than has been achieved for any other eccentric extrasolar planet. We also find evidence for a long

  2. KOI-1299 b: a massive planet in a highly eccentric orbit transiting a red giant

    CERN Document Server

    Ciceri, Simona; Southworth, John; Mancini, Luigi; Henning, Thomas; Barrado, David

    2014-01-01

    We confirm the planetary nature of the Kepler object of interest KOI-1299 b. We accurately constrained its mass and eccentricity by high-precision radial velocity measurements obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the CAHA 2.2-m telescope. By a simultaneous fit of these new data and Kepler photometry, we found that KOI-1299 b is a dense transiting exoplanet, having a mass of Mp = 4.87 +/- 0.48 MJup and radius of Rp = 1.120 +/- 0.036 RJup. The planet revolves around a K giant star, ascending the red giant branch, every 52.5 d, moving on a highly eccentric orbit with e = 0.535 +/- 0.030. By analysing two NIR high-resolution images, we found that a star occurs at 1.1 from KOI-1299, but it is too faint to cause significant effects on the transit depth. Together with Kepler-56 and Kepler-91, KOI-1299 occupies an almost-desert region of parameter space, which is important to constrain the evolutionary processes of planetary systems.

  3. On the anomalous secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    A recent analysis of a Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) data record spanning 38.7 yr revealed an anomalous increase of the eccentricity of the lunar orbit amounting to de/dt_meas = (9 +/- 3) 10^-12 yr^-1. The present-day models of the dissipative phenomena occurring in the interiors of both the Earth and the Moon are not able to explain it. We examine several dynamical effects, not modeled in the data analysis, in the framework of long-range modified models of gravity and of the standard Newtonian/Einsteinian paradigm. It turns out that none of them can accommodate de/dt_meas. Many of them do not even induce long-term changes in e; other models do, instead, yield such an effect, but the resulting magnitudes are in disagreement with de/dt_meas. In particular, the general relativistic gravitomagnetic acceleration of the Moon due to the Earth's angular momentum has the right order of magnitude, but the resulting Lense-Thirring secular effect for the eccentricity vanishes. A potentially viable Newtonian candidate would ...

  4. WASP-14b: A 7.7 Mjup transiting exoplanet in an eccentric orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Y C; Cameron, A Collier; Skillen, I; Simpson, E; Steele, I; Street, R A; Stempels, H C; Bouchy, F; Christian, D J; Gibson, N P; Hebb, L; Hébrard, G; Keenan, F P; Loeillet, B; Meaburn, J; Moutou, C; Smalley, B; Todd, I; West, R G; Anderson, D; Bentley, S; Enoch, B; Haswell, C A; Hellier, C; Horne, K; Irwin, J; Lister, T A; McDonald, I; Maxted, P; Mayor, M; Norton, A J; Parley, N; Perrier, C; Pont, F; Queloz, D; Ryans, R; Smith, A M S; Udry, S; Wheatley, P J; Wilson, D M

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 7.7 Mjup exoplanet WASP-14b, one of the most massive transiting exoplanets observed to date. The planet orbits the tenth-magnitude F5V star USNO-B1 11118-0262485 with a period of 2.243756 days and orbital eccentricity e = 0.095. A simultaneous fit of the transit light curve and radial velocity measurements yields a planetary mass of 7.7(+0.4)(-0.7) Mjup and a radius of 1.26(+0.08)(-0.06) Rjup. This leads to a mean density of about 5.1 gcm^{-3} making it one of the densest transiting exoplanets yet found at an orbital period less than 3 days. We estimate this system to be at a distance of 160+/-20 pc. Spectral analysis of the host star reveals a temperature of 6475+/-100 K, log g = 4.33 cms$^{-2}$ and v sin i = 4.9+/-1.0 km s$^{-1}$, and also a high lithium abundance, log N(Li) = 2.84+/-0.05. The stellar density, effective temperature and rotation rate suggest an age for the system of about 0.5--1.0 Gyr.

  5. Eccentricity and Spin-Orbit Misalignment in Short-Period Stellar Binaries as a Signpost of Hidden Tertiary Companions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Kassandra R; Storch, Natalia I

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries are observed to have a range of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments (stellar obliquities). Whether such properties are primordial, or arise from post-formation dynamical interactions remains uncertain. This paper considers the scenario in which the binary is the inner component of a hierarchical triple stellar system, and derives the requirements that the tertiary companion must satisfy in order to raise the eccentricity and obliquity of the inner binary. Through numerical integrations of the secular octupole-order equations of motion of stellar triples, coupled with the spin precession of the oblate primary star due to the torque from the secondary, we obtain a simple, robust condition for producing spin-orbit misalignment in the inner binary: In order to excite appreciable obliquity, the precession rate of the stellar spin axis must be smaller than the orbital precession rate due to the tertiary companion. This yields quantitative requirements on the mass and orbit of the tertiary...

  6. WASP-117b: a 10-day-period Saturn in an eccentric and misaligned orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-VanMalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2014-08-01

    We report the discovery of WASP-117b, the first planet with a period beyond 10 days found by the WASP survey. The planet has a mass of Mp = 0.2755 ± 0.0089 MJ, a radius of Rp= 1.021_{-0.065+0.076 Rjup} and is in an eccentric (e = 0.302 ± 0.023), 10.02165 ± 0.00055 d orbit around a main-sequence F9 star. The host star's brightness (V = 10.15 mag) makes WASP-117 a good target for follow-up observations, and with a periastron planetary equilibrium temperature of Teq= 1225_{-39+36} K and a low planetary mean density (ρp= 0.259_{-0.048+0.054 ρjup}) it is one of the best targets for transmission spectroscopy among planets with periods around 10 days. From a measurement of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we infer a projected angle between the planetary orbit and stellar spin axes of β = -44 ± 11 deg, and we further derive an orbital obliquity of ψ = 69.6 +4.7-4.1 deg. Owing to the large orbital separation, tidal forces causing orbital circularization and realignment of the planetary orbit with the stellar plane are weak, having had little impact on the planetary orbit over the system lifetime. WASP-117b joins a small sample of transiting giant planets with well characterized orbits at periods above 8 days. Based on data obtained with WASP-South, CORALIE and EulerCam at the Euler-Swiss telescope, TRAPPIST, and HARPS at the ESO 3.6 m telescope (Prog. IDs 087.C-0649, 089.C-0151, 090.C-0540)Photometric and radial velocities are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A81

  7. Scalar self-force for highly eccentric equatorial orbits in Kerr spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Thornburg, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    If a small "particle" of mass $\\mu M$ (with $\\mu \\ll 1$) orbits a black hole of mass $M$, the leading-order radiation-reaction effect is an $\\mathcal{O}(\\mu^2)$ "self-force" acting on the particle, with a corresponding $\\mathcal{O}(\\mu)$ "self-acceleration" of the particle away from a geodesic. Such "extreme--mass-ratio inspiral" systems are likely to be important gravitational-wave sources for future space-based gravitational-wave detectors. Here we consider the "toy model" problem of computing the self-force for a scalar-field particle on a bound eccentric orbit in Kerr spacetime. We use the Barack-Golbourn-Vega-Detweiler effective-source regularization with a 4th order puncture field, followed by an $e^{im\\phi}$ ("m-mode") Fourier decomposition and a separate time-domain numerical evolution in $2+1$ dimensions for each $m$. We introduce a finite worldtube that surrounds the particle worldline and define our evolution equations in a piecewise manner so that the effective source is only used within the world...

  8. Tidal Interactions and Disruptions of Giant Planets on Highly Eccentric Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Faber, J A; Willems, B; Faber, Joshua A.; Rasio, Frederic A.; Willems, Bart

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the evolution of planets undergoing a strong tidal encounter using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), for a range of periastron separations. We find that outside the Roche limit, the evolution of the planet is well-described by the standard model of linear, non-radial, adiabatic oscillations. If the planet passes within the Roche limit at periastron, however, mass can be stripped from it, but in no case do we find enough energy transferred to the planet to lead to complete disruption. In light of the three new extrasolar planets discovered with periods shorter than two days, we argue that the shortest-period cases observed in the period-mass relation may be explained by a model whereby planets undergo strong tidal encounters with stars, after either being scattered by dynamical interactions into highly eccentric orbits, or tidally captured from nearly parabolic orbits. Although this scenario does provide a natural explanation for the edge found for planets at twice the Roche limit, it does no...

  9. Orbital Orientations of Exoplanets: HAT-P-4b is Prograde and HAT-P-14b is Retrograde

    CERN Document Server

    Winn, Joshua N; Johnson, John Asher; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Isaacson, Howard; Shporer, Avi; Bakos, Gaspar A; Hartman, Joel D; Holman, Matthew J; Albrecht, Simon

    2010-01-01

    We present observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for two exoplanetary systems, revealing the orientations of their orbits relative to the rotation axes of their parent stars. HAT-P-4b is prograde, with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of lambda = -4.9 +/- 11.9 degrees. In contrast, HAT-P-14b is retrograde, with lambda = 187.8 +/- 4.4 degrees. These results conform with a previously noted pattern among the stellar hosts of close-in giant planets: hotter stars have a wide range of obliquities and cooler stars have low obliquities. This, in turn, suggests that three-body dynamics and tidal dissipation are responsible for the short-period orbits of many exoplanets. In addition, our data revealed a third body in the HAT-P-4 system, which could be a second planet or a companion star.

  10. The eccentric short-period orbit of the supergiant fast X-ray transient HD 74194 (=LM Vel)

    CERN Document Server

    Gamen, R; Walborn, N R; Morrell, N I; Arias, J I; Apellániz, J Maíz; Sota, A; Alfaro, E J

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We present the first orbital solution for the O-type supergiant star HD 74194, which is the optical counterpart of the supergiant fast X-ray transient IGR J08408-4503. Methods. We measured the radial velocities in the optical spectrum of HD 74194, and we determined the orbital solution for the first time. We also analysed the complex H{\\alpha} profile. Results. HD 74194 is a binary system composed of an O-type supergiant and a compact object in a short-period ($P=9.5436\\pm0.0002$ d) and high-eccentricity ($e=0.63\\pm0.03$) orbit. The equivalent width of the H{\\alpha} line is not modulated entirely with the orbital period, but seems to vary in a superorbital period ($P=285\\pm10$ d) nearly 30 times longer than the orbital one.

  11. Hydrodynamic Simulations of the Interaction between an AGB Star and a Main Sequence Companion in Eccentric Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Staff, Jan E; Macdonald, Daniel; Galaviz, Pablo; Passy, Jean-Claude; Iaconi, Roberto; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Rotten Egg Nebula has at its core a binary composed of a Mira star and an A-type companion at a separation >10 au. It has been hypothesized to have formed by strong binary interactions between the Mira and a companion in an eccentric orbit during periastron passage ~800 years ago. We have performed hydrodynamic simulations of an asymptotic giant branch star interacting with companions with a range of masses in orbits with a range of initial eccentricities and periastron separations. For reasonable values of the eccentricity, we find that Roche lobe overflow can take place only if the periods are <<100 years. Moreover, mass transfer causes the system to enter a common envelope phase within several orbits. Since the central star of the Rotten Egg nebula is an AGB star, we conclude that such a common envelope phase must have lead to a merger, so the observed companion must have been a tertiary companion of a binary that merged at the time of nebula ejection. Based on the mass and timescale of the simul...

  12. Orbital evolution and search for eccentricity and apsidal motion in the eclipsing HMXB 4U 1700-37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-09-01

    In the absence of detectable pulsations in the eclipsing high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1700-37, the orbital period decay is necessarily determined from the eclipse timing measurements. We have used the earlier reported mid-eclipse time measurements of 4U 1700-37 together with the new measurements from long-term light curves obtained with the all sky monitors RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT and MAXI-GSC, as well as observations with RXTE-PCA, to measure the long-term orbital evolution of the binary. The orbital period decay rate of the system is estimated to be {dot{P}}/P = -(4.7 ± 1.9) × 10^{-7} yr-1, smaller compared to its previous estimates. We have also used the mid-eclipse times and the eclipse duration measurements obtained from 10-years-long X-ray light curve with Swift-BAT to separately put constraints on the eccentricity of the binary system and attempted to measure any apsidal motion. For an apsidal motion rate greater than 5 deg yr-1, the eccentricity is found to be less than 0.008, which limits our ability to determine the apsidal motion rate from the current data. We discuss the discrepancy of the current limit of eccentricity with the earlier reported values from radial velocity measurements of the companion star.

  13. CoRoT-10b: a giant planet in a 13.24 day eccentric orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Bonomo, A S; Alonso, R; Gazzano, J -C; Havel, M; Aigrain, S; Auvergne, M; Baglin, A; Barbieri, M; Barge, P; Benz, W; Bordé, P; Bouchy, F; Bruntt, H; Cabrera, J; Cameron, A C; Carone, L; Carpano, S; Csizmadia, Sz; Deleuil, M; Deeg, H J; Dvorak, R; Erikson, A; Ferraz-Mello, S; Fridlund, M; Gandolfi, D; Gillon, M; Guenther, E; Guillot, T; Hatzes, A; Hébrard, G; Jorda, L; Lammer, H; Lanza, A F; Léger, A; Llebaria, A; Mayor, M; Mazeh, T; Moutou, C; Ollivier, M; Pätzold, M; Pepe, F; Queloz, D; Rauer, H; Rouan, D; Samuel, B; Schneider, J; Tingley, B; Udry, S; Wuchterl, G

    2010-01-01

    The space telescope CoRoT searches for transiting extrasolar planets by continuously monitoring the optical flux of thousands of stars in several fields of view. We report the discovery of CoRoT-10b, a giant planet on a highly eccentric orbit (e=0.53 +/- 0.04) revolving in 13.24 days around a faint (V=15.22) metal-rich K1V star. We use CoRoT photometry, radial velocity observations taken with the HARPS spectrograph, and UVES spectra of the parent star to derive the orbital, stellar and planetary parameters. We derive a radius of the planet of 0.97 +/- 0.07 R_Jup and a mass of 2.75 +/- 0.16 M_Jup. The bulk density, rho_pl=3.70 +/- 0.83 g/cm^3, is ~2.8 that of Jupiter. The core of CoRoT-10b could contain up to 240 M_Earth of heavy elements. Moving along its eccentric orbit, the planet experiences a 10.6-fold variation in insolation. Owing to the long circularisation time, tau_circ > 7 Gyr, a resonant perturber is not required to excite and maintain the high eccentricity of CoRoT-10b.

  14. Osculating Relative Orbit Elements Resulting from Chief Eccentricity and J2 Perturbing Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    eccentricity as a perturbation to the linearized HCW model using Hamiltonian mechanics . Another non-traditional solution is that of Vadali [25] and Sengupta...numerous partial deriva- tives and extensive use of Lagrangian mechanics will yield Lagrange’s planetary equa- tions, presented in Eq. 2.66 using... Hamiltonian Ap- proach to Eccentricity Perturbations,” AAS/AIAA Spacecraft Mechanics Meet- ing , Vol. 119, 2004, pp. 3075–3086. 25. Vadali, S. R., “An

  15. Satellite formation design in orbits of high eccentricity for missions with performance criteria specified over a region of interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Christopher William Thomas

    Several methods are presented for the design of satellite formations for science missions in high-eccentricity reference orbits with quantifiable performance criteria specified throughout only a portion the orbit, called the Region of Interest (RoI). A modified form of the traditional average along-track drift minimization condition is introduced to account for the fact that performance criteria are only specified within the RoI, and a robust formation design algorithm (FDA) is defined to improve performance in the presence of formation initialization errors. Initial differential mean orbital elements are taken as the design variables and the Gim-Alfriend state transition matrix (G-A STM) is used for relative motion propagation. Using mean elements and the G-A STM allows for explicit inclusion of J2 perturbation effects in the design process. The methods are applied to the complete formation design problem of the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission and results are verified using the NASA General Mission Analysis Tool (GMAT). Since satellite formations in high-eccentricity orbits will spend long times at high altitude, third-body perturbations are an important design consideration as well. A detailed analytical analysis of third-body perturbation effects on satellite formations is also performed and averaged dynamics are derived for the particular case of the lunar perturbation. Numerical results of the lunar perturbation analysis are obtained for the example application of the MMS mission and verified in GMAT.

  16. HAT-P-2b: A Super-Massive Planet in an Eccentric Orbit Transiting a Bright Star

    CERN Document Server

    Bakos, G A; Torres, G; Fischer, D A; Latham, D W; Noyes, R W; Sasselov, D D; Mazeh, T; Shporer, A; Butler, R P; Stefanik, R P; Fernández, J M; Sozzetti, A; Pal, A; Johnson, J; Marcy, G W; Sipocz, B; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sari, P

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-2b, a massive (Mp=8.17+/-0.72 M_Jup) planet transiting the bright (V=8.7) F8 star HD 147506, with an orbital period of 5.63 days and an eccentricity of e=0.5. From the transit light curve we determine that the radius of the planet is Rp = 1.18+/-0.16 R_Jup. HAT-P-2b has a mass about 9 times the average mass of previously-known transiting exoplanets, and a density of rho = 6.6gcm^-3, similar to that of rocky planets like the Earth. Nevertheless, its mass and radius are in accord with theories of structure of massive giant planets composed of pure H and He. The high eccentricity causes a 9-fold variation of insolation of the planet between peri- and apastron.

  17. Orbital evolution and search for eccentricity and apsidal motion in the eclipsing HMXB 4U 1700-37

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Nazma

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of detectable pulsations in the eclipsing High Mass X-ray binary 4U 1700-37, the orbital period decay is necessarily determined from the eclipse timing measurements. We have used the earlier reported mid-eclipse time measurements of 4U 1700-37 together with the new measurements from long term light curves obtained with the all sky monitors RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT and MAXI-GSC, as well as observations with RXTE-PCA, to measure the long term orbital evolution of the binary. The orbital period decay rate of the system is estimated to be ${\\dot{P}}/P = -(4.7 \\pm 1.9) \\times 10^{-7}$ yr$^{-1}$, smaller compared to its previous estimates. We have also used the mid-eclipse times and the eclipse duration measurements obtained from 10 years long X-ray light-curve with Swift-BAT to separately put constraints on the eccentricity of the binary system and attempted to measure any apsidal motion. For an apsidal motion rate greater than 5 degrees per year, the eccentricity is found to be less than 0.008, which li...

  18. Test of the gravitational redshift with stable clocks in eccentric orbits: application to Galileo satellites 5 and 6

    CERN Document Server

    Delva, P; Bertone, S; Richard, E; Wolf, P

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose to use satellites Galileo~5 and~6 to perform a test of the gravitational redshift. The best test to date was performed with the Gravity Probe A experiment (1976) with an accuracy of $1.4\\times 10^{-4}$. Here we show that considering realistic noise and systematic effects, and thanks to a highly eccentric orbit, it is possible to improve the GP-A limit to an accuracy around $(3-4)\\times 10^{-5}$ after one year of integration of Galileo~5 and~6 data.

  19. Effect of pulse profile variations on measurement of eccentricity in orbits of Cen X-3 and SMC X-1

    CERN Document Server

    Raichur, Harsha

    2009-01-01

    It has long been argued that better timing precision allowed by satelites like Rossi X-ray Timing Experiments (RXTE) will allow us to measure the orbital eccentricity and the angle of periastron of some of the bright persistent high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and hence a possible measurement of apsidal motion in these system. Measuring the rate of apsidal motion allows one to estimate the apsidal motion constant of the mass losing companion star and hence allows for the direct testing of the stellar structure models for these giant stars present in the HMXBs. In the present paper we use the archival RXTE data of two bright persistent sources, namely Cen X-3 and SMC X-1, to measure the very small orbital eccentricity and the angle of periastron. We find that the small variations in the pulse profiles of these sources rather than the intrinsic timing accuracy provided by RXTE, limit the accuracy with which we can measure arrival time of the pulses from these sources. This influences the accuracy with which one...

  20. Low-Thrust Transfers from Distant Retrograde Orbits to L2 Halo Orbits in the Earth-Moon System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Nathan L.; Parker, Jeffrey S.; Hughes, Steven P.; Heiligers, Jennette

    2016-01-01

    Enable future missions Any mission to a DRO or halo orbit could benefit from the capability to transfer between these orbits Chemical propulsion could be used for these transfers, but at high propellant cost Fill gaps in knowledge A variety of transfers using SEP or solar sails have been studied for the Earth-Moon system Most results in literature study a single transfer This is a step toward understanding the wide array of types of transfers available in an N-body force model.

  1. Eccentric-orbit EMRI gravitational wave energy fluxes to 7PN order

    CERN Document Server

    Forseth, Erik; Hopper, Seth

    2015-01-01

    We present new results through 7PN order on the energy flux from eccentric extreme-mass-ratio binaries. The black hole perturbation calculations are made at very high accuracy (200 decimal places) using a Mathematica code based on the Mano-Suzuki-Takasugi (MST) analytic function expansion formalism. All published coefficients in the expansion through 3PN order are confirmed and new analytic and numeric terms are found to high order in $e^2$ at orders between 3.5PN and 7PN. We also show original work in finding (nearly) arbitrarily accurate expansions for hereditary terms at 1.5PN, 2.5PN, and 3PN orders. We fit to a model where at each PN order an eccentricity singular function is factored out, improving substantially the fit even as $e \\to 1$.

  2. An Evaluation of Semianalytical Satellite Theory against Long Arcs of Real Data for Highly Eccentric Orbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    made several valuable sugges- tions that were helpful in interpreting the semimajor axis comparisons. Mr. Leo Early was a saving source of information...orbit types: (1) low Earth orbits, ( LEO ) below 5000 km; (2) geosynchronous orbits (GEO), at 35,700 km altitude; (3) Molniya orbits, about 500 km by 40,000...of the more extensive analytical theory of Lane and Cranford which used the solution of Brouwer for its gravitational model and a power density

  3. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. III. A PAUCITY OF PROTO-HOT JUPITERS ON SUPER-ECCENTRIC ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Rebekah I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Johnson, John Asher, E-mail: rdawson@berkeley.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-10, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    Gas giant planets orbiting within 0.1 AU of their host stars are unlikely to have formed in situ and are evidence for planetary migration. It is debated whether the typical hot Jupiter smoothly migrated inward from its formation location through the proto-planetary disk, or was perturbed by another body onto a highly eccentric orbit, which tidal dissipation subsequently shrank and circularized during close stellar passages. Socrates and collaborators predicted that the latter model should produce a population of super-eccentric proto-hot Jupiters readily observable by Kepler. We find a paucity of such planets in the Kepler sample, which is inconsistent with the theoretical prediction with 96.9% confidence. Observational effects are unlikely to explain this discrepancy. We find that the fraction of hot Jupiters with an orbital period P > 3 days produced by the star-planet Kozai mechanism does not exceed (at two-sigma) 44%. Our results may indicate that disk migration is the dominant channel for producing hot Jupiters with P > 3 days. Alternatively, the typical hot Jupiter may have been perturbed to a high eccentricity by interactions with a planetary rather than stellar companion, and began tidal circularization much interior to 1 AU after multiple scatterings. A final alternative is that early in the tidal circularization process at high eccentricities tidal circularization occurs much more rapidly than later in the process at low eccentricities, although this is contrary to current tidal theories.

  4. Analytic self-force calculations in the post-Newtonian regime: Eccentric orbits on a Schwarzschild background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Seth; Kavanagh, Chris; Ottewill, Adrian C.

    2016-02-01

    We present a method for solving the first-order Einstein field equations in a post-Newtonian (PN) expansion. Our calculations generalize the work of Bini and Damour and subsequently Kavanagh et al. to consider eccentric orbits on a Schwarzschild background. We derive expressions for the retarded metric perturbation at the location of the particle for all ℓ-modes. We find that, despite first appearances, the Regge-Wheeler gauge metric perturbation is C0 at the particle for all ℓ. As a first use of our solutions, we compute the gauge-invariant quantity ⟨U ⟩ through 4PN while simultaneously expanding in eccentricity through e10. By anticipating the e →1 singular behavior at each PN order, we greatly improve the accuracy of our results for large e . We use ⟨U ⟩ to find 4PN contributions to the effective one body potential Q ^ through e10 and at linear order in the mass ratio.

  5. Analytic self-force calculations in the post-Newtonian regime: eccentric orbits on a Schwarzschild background

    CERN Document Server

    Hopper, Seth; Ottewill, Adrian C

    2015-01-01

    We present a method for solving the first-order field equations in a post-Newtonian (PN) expansion. Our calculations generalize work of Bini and Damour~\\cite{BiniDamo13} and subsequently Kavanagh et al.~\\cite{KavaOtteWard15}, to consider eccentric orbits on a Schwarzschild background. We derive expressions for the retarded metric perturbation at the location of the particle for all $\\ell$-modes. We find that, despite first appearances, the Regge-Wheeler gauge metric perturbation is $C^0$ at the particle for all $\\ell$. As a first use of our solutions, we compute the gauge-invariant quantity $\\langle U \\rangle$ through 4PN while simultaneously expanding in eccentricity through $e^{10}$. By anticipating the $e\\to 1$ singular behavior at each PN order, we greatly improve the accuracy of our results for large $e$. We use $\\langle U \\rangle$ to find 4PN contributions to the effective one body potential $q(u)$ through $e^{10}$ and at linear order in the mass-ratio.

  6. Inferring the eccentricity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hogg, David W; Bovy, Jo

    2010-01-01

    Standard maximum-likelihood estimators for binary-star and exoplanet eccentricities are biased high, in the sense that the estimated eccentricity tends to be larger than the true eccentricity. As with most non-trivial observables, a simple histogram of estimated eccentricities is not a good estimate of the true eccentricity distribution. Here we develop and test a hierarchical probabilistic method for performing the relevant meta-analysis, that is, inferring the true eccentricity distribution, taking as input the likelihood functions for the individual-star eccentricities, or samplings of the posterior probability distributions for the eccentricities (under a given, uninformative prior). The method is a simple implementation of a hierarchical Bayesian model; it can also be seen as a kind of heteroscedastic deconvolution. It can be applied to any quantity measured with finite precision--other orbital parameters, or indeed any astronomical measurements of any kind, including magnitudes, parallaxes, or photometr...

  7. The long-period eccentric orbit of the particle accelerator HD 167971 revealed by long baseline interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, M.; Sana, H.; Absil, O.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Blomme, R.

    2012-07-01

    Using optical long baseline interferometry, we resolved for the first time the two wide components of HD 167971, a candidate hierarchical triple system known to efficiently accelerate particles. Our multi-epoch Very Large Telescope Interferometer observations provide direct evidence for a gravitational link between the O8 supergiant and the close eclipsing O + O binary. The separation varies from 8 to 15 mas over the 3-year baseline of our observations, suggesting that the components evolve on a wide and very eccentric orbit (most probably e > 0.5). These results provide evidence that the wide orbit revealed by our study is not coplanar with the orbit of the inner eclipsing binary. From our measurements of the near-infrared luminosity ratio, we constrain the spectral classification of the components in the close binary to be O6-O7, and confirm that these stars are likely main-sequence objects. Our results are discussed in the context of the bright non-thermal radio emission already reported for this system, and we provide arguments in favour of a maximum radio emission coincident with periastron passage. HD 167971 turns out to be an efficient O-type particle accelerator that constitutes a valuable target for future high angular resolution radio imaging using Very Long Baseline Interferometry facilities. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, under the programme IDs 381.D-0095, 086.D-0586 and 087.D-0264.

  8. Spectroscopic confirmation of KOI-1299b: a massive warm Jupiter in a 52-day eccentric orbit transiting a giant star

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Mauricio; Reffert, Sabine; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Deeg, Hans J; Karjalainen, Raine; Montañes-Rodríguez, Pilar; Nespral, Davide; Nowak, Grzegorz; Osorio, Yeisson; Palle, Enric

    2014-01-01

    Context: Planets around evolved stars exhibit different properties than those orbiting main-sequence stars. One of the most notable differences is the paucity of planets orbiting at short distance from giant stars (a < 0.5 AU). Detecting these rare close-in planets can shed light on planetary system formation and evolution mechanisms. Aims: We study the Kepler object KOI-1299, an evolved star ascending the red giant branch. We aim at confirming the planetary nature of the Jupiter-like transit signal recurring every ~52.5 days, and characterizing the orbital elements of the system. Methods: We derive radial velocities from multi-epoch high-resolution spectra of KOI-1299 acquired with CAFE at the 2.2m telescope of Calar Alto Observatory and FIES at the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope of Roque de los Muchachos Observatory. Results: We confirm the planetary nature of the transiting object KOI-1299b. We find a planetary mass of Mp=5.86 +\\- 0.05 Mjup and an eccentricity of e=0.479 +\\- 0.004. With a semi-major axi...

  9. High space velocities of single radio pulsars versus low orbital eccentricities and masses of double neutron stars: Evidence for two different neutron star formation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio pulsars tend to be high-velocity objects, which implies that the majority of them received a velocity kick of several hundreds of km s(-1) at birth. However, six of the eight known double neutron stars in the galactic disk have quite low orbital eccentricities (0.085-0.27), indicating - taking

  10. High space velocities of single radio pulsars versus low orbital eccentricities and masses of double neutron stars: Evidence for two different neutron star formation mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio pulsars tend to be high-velocity objects, which implies that the majority of them received a velocity kick of several hundreds of km s(-1) at birth. However, six of the eight known double neutron stars in the galactic disk have quite low orbital eccentricities (0.085-0.27), indicating - taking

  11. EPIC 212803289: a subgiant hosting a transiting warm Jupiter in an eccentric orbit and a long-period companion

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A M S; Barragán, O; Bowler, B; Csizmadia, Sz; Endl, M; Fridlund, M C V; Grziwa, S; Guenther, E; Hatzes, A P; Nowak, G; Albrecht, S; Alonso, R; Cabrera, J; Cochran, W D; Deeg, H J; Eigmüller, Ph; Erikson, A; Hidalgo, D; Hirano, T; Johnson, M C; Korth, J; Mann, A; Narita, N; Nespral, D; Palle, E; Pätzold, M; Prieto-Arranz, J; Rauer, H; Ribas, I; Tingley, B; Wolthoff, V

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery from K2 of a transiting planet in an 18.25-d, eccentric (0.19$\\pm$ 0.04) orbit around EPIC 212803289, an 11th magnitude subgiant in Virgo. We confirm the planetary nature of the companion with radial velocities, and determine that the star is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.20$\\pm$0.05) subgiant, with mass $1.60^{+0.14}_{-0.10}~M_\\odot$ and radius $3.1\\pm 0.1~R_\\odot$. The planet has a mass of $0.97\\pm0.09~M_{\\rm Jup}$ and a radius $1.29\\pm0.05~R_{\\rm Jup}$. A measured systemic radial acceleration of $-2.12\\pm0.04~{\\rm m s^{-1} d^{-1}}$ offers compelling evidence for the existence of a third body in the system, perhaps a brown dwarf orbiting with a period of several hundred days.

  12. Gravitational self-force on a particle in eccentric orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Barack, Leor

    2010-01-01

    We present a numerical code for calculating the local gravitational self-force acting on a pointlike particle in a generic (bound) geodesic orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole. The calculation is carried out in the Lorenz gauge: For a given geodesic orbit, we decompose the Lorenz-gauge metric perturbation equations (sourced by the delta-function particle) into tensorial harmonics, and solve for each harmonic using numerical evolution in the time domain (in 1+1 dimensions). The physical self-force along the orbit is then obtained via mode-sum regularization. The total self-force contains a dissipative piece as well as a conservative piece, and we describe a simple method for disentangling these two pieces in a time-domain framework. The dissipative component is responsible for the loss of orbital energy and angular momentum through gravitational radiation; as a test of our code we demonstrate that the work done by the dissipative component of the computed force is precisely balanced by the asymptotic fluxe...

  13. A New Secular Instability of Eccentric Stellar Disks Around Supermassive Black Holes, With Application to the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Madigan, Ann-Marie; Hopman, Clovis

    2008-01-01

    We identify a new secular instability of eccentric stellar disks around supermassive black holes. We show that retrograde precession of the stellar orbits, due to the presence of a stellar cusp, induces coherent torques that amplify deviations of individual orbital eccentricities from the average, and thus drive all eccentricities away from their initial value. We investigate the instability using N-body simulations, and show that it can drive individual orbital eccentricities to significantly higher or lower values on the order of a precession time-scale. This physics is relevant for the Galactic center, where massive stars are likely to form in eccentric disks around the SgrA* black hole. We show that the dynamical evolution of such a disk results in several of its stars acquiring high (1-e << 0.1) orbital eccentricity. Binary stars on such highly eccentric orbits would get tidally disrupted by the SgrA* black hole, possibly producing both S-stars near the black hole and high-velocity stars in the Gal...

  14. Discovery of A New Retrograde Trans-Neptunian Object: Hint of A Common Orbital Plane for Low Semi-Major Axis, High Inclination TNOs and Centaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Tung; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Holman, Matthew J.; Payne, Matthew John; Fraser, Wesley Cristopher; Lacerda, Pedro; Ip, Wing-Huen; Pan-STARRS 1 Builders

    2016-10-01

    The origin of high inclination objects beyond Jupiter, including trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs, remains uncertain. We report the discovery of a retrograde TNO, which we nickname "Niku", detected by the Pan-STARRS 1 Outer Solar System Survey. The numerical integrations show that the orbital dynamics of Niku are very similar to those of 2008 KV42 (Drac), with a half-life of ~ 500 Myr and analogous orbital evolution. Comparing similar high inclination members announced by the Minor-Planet Center (q > 10 AU, a 60), we find these objects exhibit a surprising clustering of ascending node, populating a common orbital plane. The statistical significance of 3.8-sigma suggests it is unlikely to be coincidental. An unknown mechanism is required to explain the observed clustering. This discovery may provide a pathway to investigating a possible reservoir of high-inclination objects.

  15. Discovery of A New Retrograde Trans-Neptunian Object: Hint of A Common Orbital Plane for Low Semi-Major Axis, High Inclination TNOs and Centaurs

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ying-Tung; Holman, Matthew J; Payne, Matthew J; Fraser, Wesley C; Lacerda, Pedro; Ip, Wing-Huen; Chen, Wen-Ping; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Wainscoat, Richard J; Tonry, John L; Magnier, Eugene A; Waters, Christopher; Kaiser, Nick; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Lehner, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Although the majority of Centaurs are thought to have originated in the scattered disk, with the high-inclination members coming from the Oort cloud, the origin of the high inclination component of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) remains uncertain. We report the discovery of a retrograde TNO, which we nickname "Niku", detected by the Pan-STARRS 1 Outer Solar System Survey. Our numerical integrations show that the orbital dynamics of Niku are very similar to that of 2008 KV$_{42}$ (Drac), with a half-life of $\\sim 500$ Myr. Comparing similar high inclination TNOs and Centaurs ($q > 10$ AU, $a 60^\\circ$), we find that these objects exhibit a surprising clustering of ascending node, and occupy a common orbital plane. This orbital configuration has high statistical significance: 3.8-$\\sigma$. An unknown mechanism is required to explain the observed clustering. This discovery may provide a pathway to investigate a possible reservoir of high-inclination objects.

  16. Chaos in the Test Particle Eccentric Kozai-Lidov Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Gongjie; Holman, Matt; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    The Kozai-Lidov mechanism can be applied to a vast variety of astrophysical systems involving hierarchical three-body systems. Here, we study the Kozai-Lidov mechanism systematically in the test particle limit at the octupole level of approximation. We investigate the chaotic and quasiperiodic orbital evolution by studying surfaces of section and the Lyapunov exponents. We find that the resonances introduced by the octupole level of approximation cause orbits to flip from prograde to retrograde and back as well as cause significant eccentricity excitation, and the chaotic behaviors occur when the mutual inclination between the inner and the outer binary is high. We characterize the parameter space that allows large amplitude oscillations in eccentricity and inclination.

  17. Chaos in the test particle eccentric Kozai-Lidov mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gongjie; Naoz, Smadar; Holman, Matt; Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: gli@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, The Institute for Theory and Computation, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    The Kozai-Lidov mechanism can be applied to a vast variety of astrophysical systems involving hierarchical three-body systems. Here, we study the Kozai-Lidov mechanism systematically in the test particle limit at the octupole level of approximation. We investigate the chaotic and quasi-periodic orbital evolution by studying the surfaces of section and the Lyapunov exponents. We find that the resonances introduced by the octupole level of approximation cause orbits to flip from prograde to retrograde and back as well as cause significant eccentricity excitation, and chaotic behavior occurs when the mutual inclination between the inner and the outer binary is high. We characterize the parameter space that allows large amplitude oscillations in eccentricity and inclination.

  18. The circumstellar envelope around the S-type AGB star W Aql. Effects of an eccentric binary orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstedt, S.; Mohamed, S.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Danilovich, T.; Brunner, M.; De Beck, E.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Lindqvist, M.; Maercker, M.; Olofsson, H.; Kerschbaum, F.; Quintana-Lacaci, G.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Recent observations at subarcsecond resolution, now possible also at submillimeter wavelengths, have shown intricate circumstellar structures around asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, mostly attributed to binary interaction. The results presented here are part of a larger project aimed at investigating the effects of a binary companion on the morphology of circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of AGB stars. Aims: AGB stars are characterized by intense stellar winds that build CSEs around the stars. Here, the CO(J = 3 → 2) emission from the CSE of the binary S-type AGB star W Aql has been observed at subarcsecond resolution using ALMA. The aim of this paper is to investigate the wind properties of the AGB star and to analyse how the known companion has shaped the CSE. Methods: The average mass-loss rate during the creation of the detected CSE is estimated through modelling, using the ALMA brightness distribution and previously published single-dish measurements as observational constraints. The ALMA observations are presented and compared to the results from a 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) binary interaction model with the same properties as the W Aql system and with two different orbital eccentricities. Three-dimensional radiative transfer modelling is performed and the response of the interferometer is modelled and discussed. Results: The estimated average mass-loss rate of W Aql is Ṁ = 3.0 × 10-6M⊙ yr-1 and agrees with previous results based on single-dish CO line emission observations. The size of the emitting region is consistent with photodissociation models. The inner 10'' of the CSE is asymmetric with arc-like structures at separations of 2-3'' scattered across the denser sections. Further out, weaker spiral structures at greater separations are found, but this is at the limit of the sensitivity and field of view of the ALMA observations. Conclusions: The CO(J = 3 → 2) emission is dominated by a smooth component overlayed with two

  19. Fast numerics for the spin orbit equation with realistic tidal dissipation and constant eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuccelli, Michele; Deane, Jonathan; Gentile, Guido

    2017-08-01

    We present an algorithm for the rapid numerical integration of a time-periodic ODE with a small dissipation term that is C^1 in the velocity. Such an ODE arises as a model of spin-orbit coupling in a star/planet system, and the motivation for devising a fast algorithm for its solution comes from the desire to estimate probability of capture in various solutions, via Monte Carlo simulation: the integration times are very long, since we are interested in phenomena occurring on timescales of the order of 10^6-10^7 years. The proposed algorithm is based on the high-order Euler method which was described in Bartuccelli et al. (Celest Mech Dyn Astron 121(3):233-260, 2015), and it requires computer algebra to set up the code for its implementation. The payoff is an overall increase in speed by a factor of about 7.5 compared to standard numerical methods. Means for accelerating the purely numerical computation are also discussed.

  20. Fast numerics for the spin orbit equation with realistic tidal dissipation and constant eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuccelli, Michele; Deane, Jonathan; Gentile, Guido

    2017-03-01

    We present an algorithm for the rapid numerical integration of a time-periodic ODE with a small dissipation term that is C^1 in the velocity. Such an ODE arises as a model of spin-orbit coupling in a star/planet system, and the motivation for devising a fast algorithm for its solution comes from the desire to estimate probability of capture in various solutions, via Monte Carlo simulation: the integration times are very long, since we are interested in phenomena occurring on timescales of the order of 10^6 -10^7 years. The proposed algorithm is based on the high-order Euler method which was described in Bartuccelli et al. (Celest Mech Dyn Astron 121(3):233-260, 2015), and it requires computer algebra to set up the code for its implementation. The payoff is an overall increase in speed by a factor of about 7.5 compared to standard numerical methods. Means for accelerating the purely numerical computation are also discussed.

  1. Detection and Characterization of Extrasolar Planets through Mean-motion Resonances. II. The Effect of the Planet’s Orbital Eccentricity on Debris Disk Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabeshian, Maryam; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2017-09-01

    Structures observed in debris disks may be caused by gravitational interaction with planetary or stellar companions. These perturbed disks are often thought to indicate the presence of planets and offer insights into the properties of both the disk and the perturbing planets. Gaps in debris disks may indicate a planet physically present within the gap, but such gaps can also occur away from the planet’s orbit at mean-motion resonances (MMRs), and this is the focus of our interest here. We extend our study of planet–disk interaction through MMRs, presented in an earlier paper, to systems in which the perturbing planet has moderate orbital eccentricity, a common occurrence in exoplanetary systems. In particular, a new result is that the 3:1 MMR becomes distinct at higher eccentricity, while its effects are absent for circular planetary orbits. We also only consider gravitational interaction with a planetary body of at least 1 M J. Our earlier work shows that even a 1 Earth mass planet can theoretically open an MMR gap; however, given the narrow gap that can be opened by a low-mass planet, its observability would be questionable. We find that the widths, locations, and shapes of two prominent structures, the 2:1 and 3:1 MMRs, could be used to determine the mass, semimajor axis, and eccentricity of the planetary perturber and present an algorithm for doing so. These MMR structures can be used to narrow the position and even determine the planetary properties (such as mass) of any inferred but as-yet-unseen planets within a debris disk. We also briefly discuss the implications of eccentric disks on brightness asymmetries and their dependence on the wavelengths with which these disks are observed.

  2. Migration of massive black hole binaries in self--gravitating accretion discs: Retrograde versus prograde

    CERN Document Server

    Roedig, Constanze

    2013-01-01

    We study the interplay between mass transfer, accretion and gravitational torques onto a black hole binary migrating in a self-gravitating, retrograde circumbinary disc. A direct comparison with an identical prograde disc shows that: (i) because of the absence of resonances, the cavity size is a factor a(1+e) smaller for retrograde discs; (ii) nonetheless the shrinkage of a circular binary semi--major axis, a, is identical in both cases; (iii) a circular binary in a retrograde disc remains circular while eccentric binaries grow more eccentric. For non-circular binaries, we measure the orbital decay rates and the eccentricity growth rates to be exponential as long as the binary orbits in the plane of its disc. Additionally, for these co-planar systems, we find that interaction (~ non--zero torque) stems only from the cavity edge plus a(1+e) in the disc, i.e. for dynamical purposes, the disc can be treated as a annulus of small radial extent. We find that simple 'dust' models in which the binary- disc interacti...

  3. HAT-P-16b: A 4 M J Planet Transiting a Bright Star on an Eccentric Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhave, L. A.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Torres, G.; Kovács, G.; Latham, D. W.; Noyes, R. W.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Everett, M.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Fischer, D. A.; Johnson, J. A.; Andersen, J.; Fűrész, G.; Perumpilly, G.; Sasselov, D. D.; Stefanik, R. P.; Béky, B.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2010-09-01

    We report the discovery of HAT-P-16b, a transiting extrasolar planet orbiting the V = 10.8 mag F8 dwarf GSC 2792-01700, with a period P = 2.775960 ± 0.000003 days, transit epoch Tc = 2455027.59293 ± 0.00031 (BJD10), and transit duration 0.1276 ± 0.0013 days. The host star has a mass of 1.22 ± 0.04 M sun, radius of 1.24 ± 0.05 R sun, effective temperature 6158 ± 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.17 ± 0.08. The planetary companion has a mass of 4.193 ± 0.094 M J and radius of 1.289 ± 0.066 R J, yielding a mean density of 2.42 ± 0.35 g cm-3. Comparing these observed characteristics with recent theoretical models, we find that HAT-P-16b is consistent with a 1 Gyr H/He-dominated gas giant planet. HAT-P-16b resides in a sparsely populated region of the mass-radius diagram and has a non-zero eccentricity of e = 0.036 with a significance of 10σ. Based in part on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. Based in part on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NASA (N018Hr).

  4. PCW/PHEOS-WCA: quasi-geostationary Arctic measurements for weather, climate, and air quality from highly eccentric orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachance, Richard L.; McConnell, John C.; McElroy, C. Tom; O'Neill, Norm; Nassar, Ray; Buijs, Henry; Rahnama, Peyman; Walker, Kaley; Martin, Randall; Sioris, Chris; Garand, Louis; Trichtchenko, Alexander; Bergeron, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The PCW (Polar Communications and Weather) mission is a dual satellite mission with each satellite in a highly eccentric orbit with apogee ~42,000 km and a period (to be decided) in the 12-24 hour range to deliver continuous communications and meteorological data over the Arctic and environs. Such as satellite duo can give 24×7 coverage over the Arctic. The operational meteorological instrument is a 21-channel spectral imager similar to the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). The PHEOS-WCA (weather, climate and air quality) mission is intended as an atmospheric science complement to the operational PCW mission. The target PHEOS-WCA instrument package considered optimal to meet the full suite of science team objectives consists of FTS and UVS imaging sounders with viewing range of ~4.5° or a Field of Regard (FoR) ~ 3400×3400 km2 from near apogee. The goal for the spatial resolution at apogee of each imaging sounder is 10×10 km2 or better and the goal for the image repeat time is targeted at ~2 hours or better. The FTS has 4 bands that span the MIR and NIR with a spectral resolution of 0.25 cm-1. They should provide vertical tropospheric profiles of temperature and water vapour in addition to partial columns of many other gases of interest for air quality. The two NIR bands target columns of CO2, CH4 and aerosol optical depth (OD). The UVS is an imaging spectrometer that covers the spectral range of 280-650 nm with 0.9 nm resolution and targets the tropospheric column densities of O3 and NO2 and several other Air Quality (AQ) gases as well the Aerosol Index (AI).

  5. The effect of orbital damping during planet migration on the Inclination and Eccentricity Distributions of Neptune Trojans

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Jiaqing

    2016-01-01

    We explore planetary migration scenarios for formation of high inclination Neptune Trojans (NTs) and how they are affected by the planetary migration of Neptune and Uranus. If Neptune and Uranus's eccentricity and inclination were damped during planetary migration, then their eccentricities and inclinations were higher prior and during migration than their current values. Using test particle integrations we study the stability of primordial NTs, objects that were initially Trojans with Neptune prior to migration. We also study Trans-Neptunian objects captured into resonance with Neptune and becoming NTs during planet migration. We find that most primordial NTs were unstable and lost if eccentricity and inclination damping took place during planetary migration. With damping, secular resonances with Neptune can increase a low eccentricity and inclination population of Trans-Neptunian objects increasing the probability that they are captured into 1:1 resonance with Neptune, becoming high inclination NTs. We sugg...

  6. The effect of orbital damping during planet migration on the Inclination and Eccentricity Distributions of Neptune Trojans

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Yuehua; Zheng, Jiaqing

    2016-01-01

    We explore planetary migration scenarios for formation of high inclination Neptune Trojans (NTs) and how they are affected by the planetary migration of Neptune and Uranus. If Neptune and Uranus's eccentricity and inclination were damped during planetary migration, then their eccentricities and inclinations were higher prior and during migration than their current values. Using test particle integrations we study the stability of primordial NTs, objects that were initially Trojans with Neptun...

  7. The lingering anomalous secular increase of the eccentricity of the orbit of the Moon: further attempts of explanation of cosmological origin

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    A new analysis of extended data records collected with the Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) technique performed with improved tidal models was not able to resolve the issue of the anomalous rate $\\dot e$ of the eccentricity $e$ of the orbit of the Moon, which is still in place with a magnitude of $\\dot e=(5\\pm 2)\\times 10^{-12}$ yr$^{-1}$. Some possible cosmological explanations are offered in terms of the post-Newtonian effects of the cosmological expansion, and of the slow temporal variation of the relative acceleration rate $\\ddot{S} S^{-1}$ of the cosmic scale factor $S$. None of them is successful since their predicted secular rates of the lunar eccentricity are too small by several orders of magnitude.

  8. What asteroseismology can do for exoplanets: Kepler-410A b is a Small Neptune around a bright star, in an eccentric orbit consistent with low obliquity

    CERN Document Server

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Aguirre, Victor Silva; Arentoft, Torben; Kjeldsen, Hans; Albrecht, Simon; Chaplin, William J; Isaacson, Howard; Pedersen, May G; Jessen-Hansen, Jens; Tingley, Brandon W; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Aerts, Conny; Campante, Tiago L; Bryson, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    We confirm the Kepler planet candidate Kepler-410b (KOI-42b) as a Neptune sized exoplanet on a 17.8 day, eccentric orbit around the bright (Kp = 9.4) star Kepler-410A. This is the third brightest confirmed planet host star in the Kepler field and one of the brightest hosts of all currently known transiting exoplanets. Kepler-410 consists of a blend between the fast rotating planet host star (Kepler-410A) and a fainter star (Kepler-410B), which has complicated the confirmation of the planetary candidate. Employing asteroseismology, using constraints from the transit light curve, adaptive optics and speckle images, and Spitzer transit observations, we demonstrate that the candidate can only be an exoplanet orbiting Kepler-410A. Via asteroseismology we determine the following stellar and planetary parameters with high precision; M$_\\star = 1.214 \\pm 0.033$ M$_\\odot$, R$_\\star = 1.352 \\pm 0.010$ R$_\\odot$, Age = $2.76 \\pm 0.54$ Gyr, planetary radius ($2.838 \\pm 0.054$ R$_\\oplus$), and orbital eccentricity ($0.17^...

  9. Global fuel consumption optimization of an open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with large-eccentricity elliptic-orbit by the method of interval analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongliang; Xu, Shijie

    2016-11-01

    By defining two open-time impulse points, the optimization of a two-impulse, open-time terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit is proposed in this paper. The purpose of optimization is to minimize the velocity increment for a terminal elliptic-reference-orbit rendezvous and docking. Current methods for solving this type of optimization problem include for example genetic algorithms and gradient based optimization. Unlike these methods, interval methods can guarantee that the globally best solution is found for a given parameterization of the input. The non-linear Tschauner- Hempel(TH) equations of the state transitions for a terminal elliptic target orbit are transformed form time domain to target orbital true anomaly domain. Their homogenous solutions and approximate state transition matrix for the control with a short true anomaly interval can be used to avoid interval integration. The interval branch and bound optimization algorithm is introduced for solving the presented rendezvous and docking optimization problem and optimizing two open-time impulse points and thruster pulse amplitudes, which systematically eliminates parts of the control and open-time input spaces that do not satisfy the path and final time state constraints. Several numerical examples are undertaken to validate the interval optimization algorithm. The results indicate that the sufficiently narrow spaces containing the global optimization solution for the open-time two-impulse terminal rendezvous and docking with target spacecraft on large-eccentricity elliptical orbit can be obtained by the interval algorithm (IA). Combining the gradient-based method, the global optimization solution for the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem in the specifically remained search space can be found. Interval analysis is shown to be a useful tool and preponderant in the discontinuous nonconvex optimization problem of the terminal rendezvous and

  10. K2-99: a subgiant hosting a transiting warm Jupiter in an eccentric orbit and a long-period companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M. S.; Gandolfi, D.; Barragán, O.; Bowler, B.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Endl, M.; Fridlund, M. C. V.; Grziwa, S.; Guenther, E.; Hatzes, A. P.; Nowak, G.; Albrecht, S.; Alonso, R.; Cabrera, J.; Cochran, W. D.; Deeg, H. J.; Cusano, F.; Eigmüller, Ph.; Erikson, A.; Hidalgo, D.; Hirano, T.; Johnson, M. C.; Korth, J.; Mann, A.; Narita, N.; Nespral, D.; Palle, E.; Pätzold, M.; Prieto-Arranz, J.; Rauer, H.; Ribas, I.; Tingley, B.; Wolthoff, V.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery from K2 of a transiting planet in an 18.25-d, eccentric (0.19 ± 0.04) orbit around K2-99, an 11th magnitude subgiant in Virgo. We confirm the planetary nature of the companion with radial velocities, and determine that the star is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = 0.20 ± 0.05) subgiant, with mass 1.60^{+0.14}_{-0.10} M⊙ and radius 3.1 ± 0.1 R⊙. The planet has a mass of 0.97 ± 0.09 MJup and a radius 1.29 ± 0.05 RJup. A measured systemic radial acceleration of -2.12 ± 0.04 ms-1 d-1 offers compelling evidence for the existence of a third body in the system, perhaps a brown dwarf orbiting with a period of several hundred days.

  11. Eccentricity from transit photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Albrecht, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Solar system planets move on almost circular orbits. In strong contrast, many massive gas giant exoplanets travel on highly elliptical orbits, whereas the shape of the orbits of smaller, more terrestrial, exoplanets remained largely elusive. Knowing the eccentricity distribution in systems of small...... and can be described by a Rayleigh distribution with $\\sigma$ = 0.049 $\\pm$ 0.013. This is in full agreement with solar system eccentricities, but in contrast to the eccentricity distributions previously derived for exoplanets from radial velocity studies. Our findings are helpful in identifying which...... (TTVs), and we present some previously unreported TTVs. Finally transit durations help distinguish between false positives and true planets and we use our measurements to confirm six new exoplanets....

  12. What asteroseismology can do for exoplanets: Kepler-410A b is a small Neptune around a bright star, in an eccentric orbit consistent with low obliquity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Eylen, V.; Lund, M. N.; Aguirre, V. Silva; Arentoft, T.; Kjeldsen, H.; Pedersen, M. G.; Jessen-Hansen, J.; Tingley, B.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J. [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Albrecht, S. [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chaplin, W. J.; Campante, T. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Isaacson, H. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94820 (United States); Aerts, C. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200 B, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Bryson, S. T., E-mail: vincent@phys.au.dk [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We confirm the Kepler planet candidate Kepler-410A b (KOI-42b) as a Neptune-sized exoplanet on a 17.8 day, eccentric orbit around the bright (K {sub p} = 9.4) star Kepler-410A (KOI-42A). This is the third brightest confirmed planet host star in the Kepler field and one of the brightest hosts of all currently known transiting exoplanets. Kepler-410 consists of a blend between the fast rotating planet host star (Kepler-410A) and a fainter star (Kepler-410B), which has complicated the confirmation of the planetary candidate. Employing asteroseismology, using constraints from the transit light curve, adaptive optics and speckle images, and Spitzer transit observations, we demonstrate that the candidate can only be an exoplanet orbiting Kepler-410A. We determine via asteroseismology the following stellar and planetary parameters with high precision; M {sub *} = 1.214 ± 0.033 M {sub ☉}, R {sub *} = 1.352 ± 0.010 R {sub ☉}, age =2.76 ± 0.54 Gyr, planetary radius (2.838 ± 0.054 R {sub ⊕}), and orbital eccentricity (0.17{sub −0.06}{sup +0.07}). In addition, rotational splitting of the pulsation modes allows for a measurement of Kepler-410A's inclination and rotation rate. Our measurement of an inclination of 82.5{sub −2.5}{sup +7.5} [°] indicates a low obliquity in this system. Transit timing variations indicate the presence of at least one additional (non-transiting) planet (Kepler-410A c) in the system.

  13. ECCENTRIC JUPITERS VIA DISK–PLANET INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffell, Paul C.; Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: duffell@berkeley.edu, E-mail: echiang@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Numerical hydrodynamics calculations are performed to determine the conditions under which giant planet eccentricities can be excited by parent gas disks. Unlike in other studies, Jupiter-mass planets are found to have their eccentricities amplified—provided their orbits start off as eccentric. We disentangle the web of co-rotation, co-orbital, and external resonances to show that this finite-amplitude instability is consistent with that predicted analytically. Ellipticities can grow until they reach of order of the disk's aspect ratio, beyond which the external Lindblad resonances that excite eccentricity are weakened by the planet's increasingly supersonic epicyclic motion. Forcing the planet to still larger eccentricities causes catastrophic eccentricity damping as the planet collides into gap walls. For standard parameters, the range of eccentricities for instability is modest; the threshold eccentricity for growth (∼0.04) is not much smaller than the final eccentricity to which orbits grow (∼0.07). If this threshold eccentricity can be lowered (perhaps by non-barotropic effects), and if the eccentricity driving documented here survives in 3D, it may robustly explain the low-to-moderate eccentricities ≲0.1 exhibited by many giant planets (including Jupiter and Saturn), especially those without planetary or stellar companions.

  14. Five New Exoplanets Orbiting Three Metal-Rich, Massive Stars: Two-Planet Systems Including Long-Period Planets, and an Eccentric Planet

    CERN Document Server

    Harakawa, Hiroki; Omiya, Masashi; Fischer, Debra A; Hori, Yasunori; Ida, Shigeru; Kambe, Eiji; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Koyano, Hisashi; Nagayama, Shogo; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Okada, Norio; Okita, Kiichi; Sakamoto, Akihiro; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report detections of new exoplanets from a radial velocity (RV) survey of metal-rich FGK stars by using three telescopes. By optimizing our RV analysis method to long time-baseline observations, we have succeeded in detecting five new Jovian-planets around three metal-rich stars HD 1605, HD 1666, and HD 67087 with the masses of $1.3 M_{\\odot}$, $1.5 M_{\\odot}$, and $1.4 M_{\\odot}$, respectively. A K1 subgiant star HD 1605 hosts two planetary companions with the minimum masses of $ M_p \\sin i = 0.96 M_{\\mathrm{JUP}}$ and $3.5 M_{\\mathrm{JUP}}$ in circular orbits with the planets' periods $P = 577.9$ days and $2111$ days, respectively. HD 1605 shows a significant linear trend in RVs. Such a system consisting of Jovian planets in circular orbits has rarely been found and thus HD 1605 should be an important example of a multi-planetary system that is likely unperturbed by planet-planet interactions. HD 1666 is a F7 main sequence star which hosts an eccentric and massive planet of $ M_p \\sin i = 6.4 M_{\\mathrm{...

  15. The Retrogressive movement of eccentric vortex in the Column Vessel

    OpenAIRE

    赤澤, 孝; Akazawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Our experiment found that the center of an eccentric vortex retrogrades and move nutationally when modeled using an eccentric vortex of water in the column vessel. This paper reports that this retrogressive movement is established and caused by the propagation of only one wave. This result is in line with the findings of previous experiments.

  16. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. IX. HD 59686 Ab: a massive circumstellar planet orbiting a giant star in a 13.6 au eccentric binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Mauricio; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Mitchell, David S.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Buenzli, Esther; Zimmerman, Neil; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Skemer, Andy; Defrère, Denis; Lee, Man Hoi; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. For over 12 yr, we have carried out a precise radial velocity (RV) survey of a sample of 373 G- and K-giant stars using the Hamilton Échelle Spectrograph at the Lick Observatory. There are, among others, a number of multiple planetary systems in our sample as well as several planetary candidates in stellar binaries. Aims: We aim at detecting and characterizing substellar and stellar companions to the giant star HD 59686 A (HR 2877, HIP 36616). Methods: We obtained high-precision RV measurements of the star HD 59686 A. By fitting a Keplerian model to the periodic changes in the RVs, we can assess the nature of companions in the system. To distinguish between RV variations that are due to non-radial pulsation or stellar spots, we used infrared RVs taken with the CRIRES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Additionally, to characterize the system in more detail, we obtained high-resolution images with LMIRCam at the Large Binocular Telescope. Results: We report the probable discovery of a giant planet with a mass of mp sin i = 6.92-0.24+0.18 MJup orbiting at ap = 1.0860-0.0007+0.0006 au from the giant star HD 59686 A. In addition to the planetary signal, we discovered an eccentric (eB = 0.729-0.003+0.004) binary companion with a mass of mB sin i = 0.5296-0.0008+0.0011 M⊙ orbiting at a close separation from the giant primary with a semi-major axis of aB = 13.56-0.14+0.18 au. Conclusions: The existence of the planet HD 59686 Ab in a tight eccentric binary system severely challenges standard giant planet formation theories and requires substantial improvements to such theories in tight binaries. Otherwise, alternative planet formation scenarios such as second-generation planets or dynamical interactions in an early phase of the system's lifetime need to be seriously considered to better understand the origin of this enigmatic planet. Based on observations collected at the Lick Observatory, University of California.Based on observations collected at the

  17. On the co-orbital motion in the planar restricted three-body problem: the quasi-satellite motion revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pousse, Alexandre; Robutel, Philippe; Vienne, Alain

    2017-08-01

    In the framework of the planar and circular restricted three-body problem, we consider an asteroid that orbits the Sun in quasi-satellite motion with a planet. A quasi-satellite trajectory is a heliocentric orbit in co-orbital resonance with the planet, characterized by a nonzero eccentricity and a resonant angle that librates around zero. Likewise, in the rotating frame with the planet, it describes the same trajectory as the one of a retrograde satellite even though the planet acts as a perturbator. In the last few years, the discoveries of asteroids in this type of motion made the term "quasi-satellite" more and more present in the literature. However, some authors rather use the term "retrograde satellite" when referring to this kind of motion in the studies of the restricted problem in the rotating frame. In this paper, we intend to clarify the terminology to use, in order to bridge the gap between the perturbative co-orbital point of view and the more general approach in the rotating frame. Through a numerical exploration of the co-orbital phase space, we describe the quasi-satellite domain and highlight that it is not reachable by low eccentricities by averaging process. We will show that the quasi-satellite domain is effectively included in the domain of the retrograde satellites and neatly defined in terms of frequencies. Eventually, we highlight a remarkable high eccentric quasi-satellite orbit corresponding to a frozen ellipse in the heliocentric frame. We extend this result to the eccentric case (planet on an eccentric motion) and show that two families of frozen ellipses originate from this remarkable orbit.

  18. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission - XIX. CoRoT-23b: a dense hot Jupiter on an eccentric orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Rouan, D; Moutou, C; Deleuil, M; Fridlund, M; Ofir, A; Havel, M; Aigrain, S; Alonso, R; Auvergne, M; Baglin, A; Barge, P; Bonomo, A; Bordé, P; Bouchy, F; Cabrera, J; Cavarroc, C; Csizmadia, Sz; Deeg, H; Diaz, R F; Dvorak, R; Erikson, A; Ferraz-Mello, S; Gandolfi, D; Gillon, M; Guillot, T; Hatzes, A; Hébrard, G; Jorda, L; Léger, A; Llebaria, A; Lammer, H; Lovis, C; Mazeh, T; Ollivier, M; Pätzold, M; Queloz, D; Rauer, H; Samuel, B; Santerne, A; Schneider, J; Tingley, B; Wuchterl, G

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of CoRoT-23b, a hot Jupiter transiting in front of its host star with a period of 3.6314 \\pm 0.0001 days. This planet was discovered thanks to photometric data secured with the CoRoT satellite, combined with spectroscopic radial velocity (RV) measurements. A photometric search for possible background eclipsing binaries conducted at CFHT and OGS concluded with a very low risk of false positives. The usual techniques of combining RV and transit data simultaneously were used to derive stellar and planetary parameters. The planet has a mass of Mp = 2.8 \\pm 0.3 MJup, a radius of Rpl = 1.05 \\pm 0.13 RJup, a density of \\approx 3 g cm-3. RV data also clearly reveal a non zero eccentricity of e = 0.16 \\pm 0.02. The planet orbits a mature G0 main sequence star of V =15.5 mag, with a mass M\\star = 1.14 \\pm 0.08 M\\odot, a radius R\\star = 1. 61 \\pm 0.18 R\\odot and quasi-solar abundances. The age of the system is evaluated to be 7 Gyr, not far from the transition to subgiant, in agreement with the r...

  19. Eccentricity distribution of wide binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    A sample of 477 solar-type binaries within 67pc with projected separations larger than 50AU is studied by a new statistical method. Speed and direction of the relative motion are determined from the short observed arcs or known orbits, and their joint distribution is compared to the numerical simulations. By inverting the observed distribution with the help of simulations, we find that average eccentricity of wide binaries is 0.59+-0.02 and the eccentricity distribution can be modeled as f(e) ~= 1.2 e + 0.4. However, wide binaries containing inner subsystems, i.e. triple or higher-order multiples, have significantly smaller eccentricities with the average e = 0.52+-0.05 and the peak at e ~ 0.5. We find that the catalog of visual orbits is strongly biased against large eccentricities. A marginal evidence of eccentricity increasing with separation (or period) is found for this sample. Comparison with spectroscopic binaries proves the reality of the controversial period-eccentricity relation. The average eccentr...

  20. On the Possibility of Habitable Moons in the System of HD 23079: Results from Orbital Stability Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Cuntz, M; Eberle, J; Shukayr, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the possibility of habitable moons orbiting the giant planet HD 23079b, a Jupiter-mass planet, which follows a low-eccentricity orbit in the outer region of HD 23079's habitable zone. We show that HD 23079b is able to host habitable moons in prograde and retrograde orbits, as expected, noting that the outer stability limit for retrograde orbits is increased by nearly 90% compared to that of prograde orbits, a result consistent with previous generalized studies. For the targeted parameter space it was found that the outer stability limit for habitable moons varies between 0.05236 and 0.06955 AU (prograde orbits) and between 0.1023 and 0.1190 AU (retrograde orbits) depending on the orbital parameters of the Jupiter-type planet if a minimum mass is assumed. These intervals correspond to 0.306 and 0.345 (prograde orbits) and 0.583 and 0.611 (retrograde orbits) of the planet's Hill radius. Larger stability limits are obtained if an increased value for the planetary mass m_p i...

  1. Super-Eccentric Migrating Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Socrates, Aristotle; Dong, Subo; Tremaine, Scott

    2011-01-01

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e=0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e>0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is \\dot a \\propto a^0.5 and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/dlog a\\propto a^0.5. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  2. SUPER-ECCENTRIC MIGRATING JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socrates, Aristotle; Katz, Boaz; Dong Subo; Tremaine, Scott [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-10

    An important class of formation theories for hot Jupiters involves the excitation of extreme orbital eccentricity (e = 0.99 or even larger) followed by tidal dissipation at periastron passage that eventually circularizes the planetary orbit at a period less than 10 days. In a steady state, this mechanism requires the existence of a significant population of super-eccentric (e > 0.9) migrating Jupiters with long orbital periods and periastron distances of only a few stellar radii. For these super-eccentric planets, the periastron is fixed due to conservation of orbital angular momentum and the energy dissipated per orbit is constant, implying that the rate of change in semi-major axis a is a-dot {proportional_to}a{sup 1/2} and consequently the number distribution satisfies dN/d log a{proportional_to}a{sup 1/2}. If this formation process produces most hot Jupiters, Kepler should detect several super-eccentric migrating progenitors of hot Jupiters, allowing for a test of high-eccentricity migration scenarios.

  3. Are retrograde resonances possible in multi-planet systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Gayon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Most of multi-planetary systems detected until now are characterized by hot-Jupiters close to their central star and moving on eccentric orbits. Hence, from a dynamical point of view, compact multi-planetary systems form a particular class of the general N-body problem (with N >3). Moreover, extrasolar planets are up to now found in prograde orbital motions about their host star and often in mean motion resonances (MMR). In the present paper, we investigate theoretically in a first step a new stabilizing mechanism particularly suitable for compact two-planet systems. Such a mechanism involves counter-revolving orbits forming a retrograde MMR. In a second step, we study the feasibility of planetary systems to host counter-revolving planets. In order to characterize dynamical behaviors of multi-dimensional planetary systems in the vicinity of observations, we apply our technique of global dynamics analysis based on the MEGNO indicator (Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits) that provides the fine stru...

  4. The eccentric massive binary V380 Cyg: revised orbital elements and interpretation of the intrinsic variability of the primary component

    CERN Document Server

    Tkachenko, A; Aerts, C; Pavlovski, K; Southworth, J; Papics, P I; Moravveji, E; Kolbas, V; Tsymbal, V; Debosscher, J; Clemer, K

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis and interpretation of the high-mass binary V380 Cyg, based on high-precision space photometry gathered with the Kepler space mission as well as high-resolution ground-based spectroscopy obtained with the HERMES spectrograph attached to the 1.2m Mercator telescope. We derive a precise orbital solution and the full physical properties of the system, including dynamical component mass estimates of 11.43+/-0.19 and 7.00+/-0.14 solar masses for the primary and secondary, respectively. Our frequency analysis reveals the rotation frequency of the primary in both the photometric and spectroscopic data and additional low-amplitude stochastic variability at low frequency in the space photometry with characteristics that are compatible with recent theoretical predictions for gravity-mode oscillations excited either by the convective core or by sub-surface convective layers. Doppler Imaging analysis of the silicon lines of the primary suggests the presence of two high-contrast stellar surfa...

  5. Retrograde resonances in compact multi-planetary systems: a feasible stabilizing mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Gayon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Multi-planet systems detected until now are in most cases characterized by hot-Jupiters close to their central star as well as high eccentricities. As a consequence, from a dynamical point of view, compact multi-planetary systems form a variety of the general N-body problem (with N >= 3), whose solutions are not necessarily known. Extrasolar planets are up to now found in prograde (i.e. direct) orbital motions about their host star and often in mean-motion resonances (MMR). In the present paper, we investigate a theoretical alternative suitable for the stability of compact multi-planetary systems. When the outer planet moves on a retrograde orbit in MMR with respect to the inner planet, we find that the so-called retrograde resonances present fine and characteristic structures particularly relevant for dynamical stability. We show that retrograde resonances and their resources open a family of stabilizing mechanisms involving specific behaviors of apsidal precessions. We also point up that for particular orbi...

  6. Eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Michael; Heinemeier, Katja Maria

    2014-01-01

    Eccentric exercise can influence tendon mechanical properties and matrix protein synthesis. mRNA for collagen and regulatory factors thereof are upregulated in animal tendons, independent of muscular contraction type, supporting the view that tendon, compared with skeletal muscle, is less sensitive...

  7. Origin of Prometheus Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, N. J.; Longaretti, P.

    2006-12-01

    A number of Saturn's small satellites, from Atlas to the coorbital satellites Janus and Epimetheus, move on orbits just outside the main rings of the planet. These satellites undergo extremely rapid resonant interaction with the rings and outward motion, strongly suggesting that they originated in Saturn's A ring. However, their eccentricities, of the order of 1/1000 are several orders of magnitude larger than what could be expected if the small satellites formed in the ring. This paper represents a first step to providing an explanation for this phenomenon, by focusing on the dynamical processes that have affected the eccentricity of Prometheus. The explanation invokes past resonances with the coorbital satellites combined with chaos due to overlapping of these resonances.

  8. Eccentricity evolution in hierarchical triple systems with eccentric outer binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    We develop a technique for estimating the inner eccentricity in hierarchical triple systems, with the inner orbit being initially circular, while the outer one is eccentric. We consider coplanar systems with well separated components and comparable masses. The derivation of short period terms is based on an expansion of the rate of change of the Runge-Lenz vector. Then, the short period terms are combined with secular terms, obtained by means of canonical perturbation theory. The validity of the theoretical equations is tested by numerical integrations of the full equations of motion.

  9. Surface composition and dynamical evolution of two retrograde objects in the outer solar system: 2008 YB3 and 2005 VD

    CERN Document Server

    Pinilla-Alonso, N; Melita, M D; Lorenzi, V; Licandro, J; Carvano, J; Lazzaro, D; Carraro, G; Ali-Lagoa, V; Costa, E; Hasselmann, P H; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220030

    2013-01-01

    Most of the objects in the trans-Neptunian belt (TNb) and related populations move in prograde orbits with low eccentricity and inclination. However, the list of icy minor bodies moving in orbits with an inclination above 40 deg. has increased in recent years. The origin of these bodies, and in particular of those objects in retrograde orbits, is not well determined, and different scenarios are considered. In this paper, we present new observational and dynamical data of two objects in retrograde orbits, 2008 YB3 and 2005 VD. We find that the surface of these extreme objects is depleted of ices and does not contain the 'ultra-red' matter typical of some Centaurs. Despite small differences, these objects share common colors and spectral characteristics with the Trojans, comet nuclei, and the group of grey Centaurs. All of these populations are supposed to be covered by a mantle of dust responsible for their reddish- to neutral-color. To investigate if the surface properties and dynamical evolution of these bod...

  10. Eccentricity Pumping Through Circumbinary Disks in Hot Subdwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, J.

    2015-12-01

    Hot subdwarf-B stars in long-period binaries are found to be on eccentric orbits, even though current binary-evolution theory predicts these objects to be circularized before the onset of Roche-lobe overflow (RLOF). We have tested three different eccentricity pumping processes on their viability to reproduce the observed wide sdB population; tidally-enhanced wind mass-loss, phase-dependent RLOF on eccentric orbits and the interaction between a circumbinary (CB) disk and the binary. The binary module of the stellar-evolution code Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is extended to include the eccentricity-pumping processes, and a parameter study is carried out. We find that models including phase-dependent RLOF or a CB disk can reach the observed periods and eccentricities. However, the models cannot explain the observed correlation between period and eccentricity. Nor can circular short period systems be formed when eccentricity pumping mechanisms are active.

  11. Retrograde peri-implantitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Jumshad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation.

  12. Demonstrating the Elliptical Orbit of Mars using Naked Eye Data

    CERN Document Server

    Krisciunas, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of eleven months we determined the position of Mars on 45 occasions using a handheld cross staff and two to five bright reference stars of known right ascension and declination on each occasion. On average the observed positions are within 12 arc minutes of the true positions. Given that we took data prior to the start of retrograde motion and well past the end of retrograde motion, we can easily derive the date of opposition to the Sun. We were able to derive the date of perihelion, the orbital eccentricity, and the semi-major axis size of Mars' orbit. We obtain a value of the eccentricity of 0.086 +/- 0.010, which is to be compared to the modern value of 0.0934. Values as low as 0.053 or as high as 0.123 can be rejected at a high confidence level. A simple dataset can be obtained with cardboard and a ruler that demonstrates the elliptical shape of Mars' orbit.

  13. Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Guochang

    2008-01-01

    This is the first book of the satellite era which describes orbit theory with analytical solutions of the second order with respect to all possible disturbances. Based on such theory, the algorithms of orbits determination are completely revolutionized.

  14. Retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, S; Barkin, J S

    1992-01-01

    This is an initial report of spontaneous retrograde gastroesophageal intussusception in an adult. The patient is a 72-yr-old women with a history of ovarian cancer and hiatal hernia, who presented with symptoms of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. Retrograde intussusception was diagnosed endoscopically and confirmed radiographically with an upper gastrointestinal series. Heightened awareness of this entity may lead to its more frequent diagnosis.

  15. Local and global dynamics of eccentric astrophysical discs

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, Gordon I

    2014-01-01

    We formulate a local dynamical model of an eccentric disc in which the dominant motion consists of elliptical Keplerian orbits. The model is a generalization of the well known shearing sheet, and is suitable for both analytical and computational studies of the local dynamics of eccentric discs. It is spatially homogeneous in the horizontal dimensions but has a time-dependent geometry that oscillates at the orbital frequency. We show how certain averages of the stress tensor in the local model determine the large-scale evolution of the shape and mass distribution of the disc. The simplest solutions of the local model are laminar flows consisting of a (generally nonlinear) vertical oscillation of the disc. Eccentric discs lack vertical hydrostatic equilibrium because of the variation of the vertical gravitational acceleration around the eccentric orbit, and in some cases because of the divergence of the orbital velocity field associated with an eccentricity gradient. We discuss the properties of the laminar sol...

  16. Testing eccentricity pumping mechanisms to model eccentric long period sdB binaries with MESA

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, Joris; Marchant, Pablo; Van Winckel, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Hot subdwarf-B stars in long-period binaries are found to be on eccentric orbits, even though current binary-evolution theory predicts those objects to be circularised before the onset of Roche-lobe overflow (RLOF). We aim to find binary-evolution mechanisms that can explain these eccentric long-period orbits, and reproduce the currently observed period-eccentricity diagram. Three different processes are considered; tidally-enhanced wind mass-loss, phase-dependent RLOF on eccentric orbits and the interaction between a circumbinary disk and the binary. The binary module of the stellar-evolution code MESA (Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics) is extended to include the eccentricity-pumping processes. The effects of different input parameters on the final period and eccentricity of a binary-evolution model are tested with MESA. The end products of models with only tidally-enhanced wind mass-loss can indeed be eccentric, but these models need to lose too much mass, and invariably end up with a helium ...

  17. Gravitational waves from spinning eccentric binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Csizmadia, Péter; Rácz, István; Vasúth, Mátyás

    2012-01-01

    This paper is to introduce a new software called CBwaves which provides a fast and accurate computational tool to determine the gravitational waveforms yielded by generic spinning binaries of neutron stars and/or black holes on eccentric orbits. This is done within the post-Newtonian (PN) framework by integrating the equations of motion and the spin precession equations while the radiation field is determined by a simultaneous evaluation of the analytic waveforms. In applying CBwaves various physically interesting scenarios have been investigated. In particular, we have studied the appropriateness of the adiabatic approximation, and justified that the energy balance relation is indeed insensitive to the specific form of the applied radiation reaction term. By studying eccentric binary systems it is demonstrated that circular template banks are very ineffective in identifying binaries even if they possess tiny residual orbital eccentricity. In addition, by investigating the validity of the energy balance relat...

  18. BD Andromedae: A new short-period RS CVn eclipsing binary star with a distant tertiary body in a highly eccentric orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun-Hwey; Song, Mi-Hwa; Yoon, Jo-Na; Jeong, Min-Ji [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonyong, E-mail: kimch@chungbuk.ac.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-20

    A photometric study of BD And was made through the analysis of two sets of new BVR light curves. The light curves with migrating photometric waves outside eclipse show that BD And is a short-period RS CVn-type binary star. The analysis of all available timings reveals that the orbital period has varied in a strictly cyclical way with a period of 9.2 yr. The periodic variation most likely arises from the light-time effect due to a tertiary moving in a highly elliptical orbit (e {sub 3} = 0.76). The Applegate mechanism could not operate properly in the eclipsing pair. The light curves were modeled with two large spots on the hotter star and a large third light amounting to about 14% of the total systemic light. BD And is a triple system: a detached binary system consisting of two nearly equal solar-type stars with an active primary star and a G6-G7 tertiary dwarf. The absolute dimensions of the eclipsing pair and tertiary components were determined. The three components with a mean age of about 5.8 Gyr are located at midpositions in main-sequence bands. The radius of the secondary is about 17% larger than that deduced from stellar models. The orbital and radiometric characteristics of the tertiary are intensively investigated. One important feature is that the mutual inclination between two orbits is larger than 60°, implying that Kozai cycles had occurred very efficiently in the past. The possible past and future evolutions of the BD And system, driven by KCTF and MBTF, are also discussed.

  19. The orbits of subdwarf-B + main-sequence binaries. II. Three eccentric systems; BD+29 3070, BD +34 1543 and Feige 87

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, J; Nemeth, P; Green, E M; Heber, U; Van Winckel, H

    2013-01-01

    The predicted orbital-period distribution of the subdwarf-B (sdB) population is bi-modal with a peak at short ( 250 days) periods. Observationally, many short-period sdB systems are known, but the predicted long period peak is missing as orbits have only been determined for a few long-period systems. As these predictions are based on poorly understood binary-interaction processes, it is of prime importance to confront the predictions with reliable observational data. We therefore initiated a monitoring program to find and characterize long-period sdB stars. In this paper we aim to determine the orbital parameters of the three long-period sdB+MS binaries BD+29 3070, BD+34 1543 and Feige 87, to constrain their absolute dimensions and the physical parameters of the components. High-resolution spectroscopic time series were obtained with HERMES at the Mercator telescope on La Palma, and analyzed to determine the radial velocities of both the sdB and MS components. Photometry from the literature was used to constr...

  20. Eccentric connectivity index

    CERN Document Server

    Ilić, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    The eccentric connectivity index $\\xi^c$ is a novel distance--based molecular structure descriptor that was recently used for mathematical modeling of biological activities of diverse nature. It is defined as $\\xi^c (G) = \\sum_{v \\in V (G)} deg (v) \\cdot \\epsilon (v)$\\,, where $deg (v)$ and $\\epsilon (v)$ denote the vertex degree and eccentricity of $v$\\,, respectively. We survey some mathematical properties of this index and furthermore support the use of eccentric connectivity index as topological structure descriptor. We present the extremal trees and unicyclic graphs with maximum and minimum eccentric connectivity index subject to the certain graph constraints. Sharp lower and asymptotic upper bound for all graphs are given and various connections with other important graph invariants are established. In addition, we present explicit formulae for the values of eccentric connectivity index for several families of composite graphs and designed a linear algorithm for calculating the eccentric connectivity in...

  1. On eccentric connectivity index

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Bo

    2010-01-01

    The eccentric connectivity index, proposed by Sharma, Goswami and Madan, has been employed successfully for the development of numerous mathematical models for the prediction of biological activities of diverse nature. We now report mathematical properties of the eccentric connectivity index. We establish various lower and upper bounds for the eccentric connectivity index in terms of other graph invariants including the number of vertices, the number of edges, the degree distance and the first Zagreb index. We determine the n-vertex trees of diameter with the minimum eccentric connectivity index, and the n-vertex trees of pendent vertices, with the maximum eccentric connectivity index. We also determine the n-vertex trees with respectively the minimum, second-minimum and third-minimum, and the maximum, second-maximum and third-maximum eccentric connectivity indices for

  2. Oscillations of Eccentric Pulsons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Groenbech-Jensen, Niels; Lomdahl, Peter;

    1997-01-01

    Perturbation theory for elliptic pulsons is developed and predicts pulson and eccentricity oscillations. The pulson oscillation period is predicted qualitatively correct.......Perturbation theory for elliptic pulsons is developed and predicts pulson and eccentricity oscillations. The pulson oscillation period is predicted qualitatively correct....

  3. Ureteral retrograde brush biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003906.htm Ureteral retrograde brush biopsy To use ... minutes. A cystoscope is first placed through the urethra into the bladder. Cystoscope is a tube with a ... results may show cancer cells ( carcinoma ). This test is often used to ...

  4. FOREVER ALONE? TESTING SINGLE ECCENTRIC PLANETARY SYSTEMS FOR MULTIPLE COMPANIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C. G.; Bailey, J.; Salter, G. S.; Wright, D. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Wang Songhu; Zhou Jilin [Department of Astronomy and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Butler, R. P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States); Jones, H. R. A. [University of Hertfordshire, Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, College Lane, AL10 9AB Hatfield (United Kingdom); O' Toole, S. J. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Carter, B. D., E-mail: rob@phys.unsw.edu.au [Faculty of Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland 4350 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Determining the orbital eccentricity of an extrasolar planet is critically important for understanding the system's dynamical environment and history. However, eccentricity is often poorly determined or entirely mischaracterized due to poor observational sampling, low signal-to-noise, and/or degeneracies with other planetary signals. Some systems previously thought to contain a single, moderate-eccentricity planet have been shown, after further monitoring, to host two planets on nearly circular orbits. We investigate published apparent single-planet systems to see if the available data can be better fit by two lower-eccentricity planets. We identify nine promising candidate systems and perform detailed dynamical tests to confirm the stability of the potential new multiple-planet systems. Finally, we compare the expected orbits of the single- and double-planet scenarios to better inform future observations of these interesting systems.

  5. Forever alone? Testing single eccentric planetary systems for multiple companions

    CERN Document Server

    Wittenmyer, Robert A; Horner, Jonathan; Tinney, C G; Butler, R P; Jones, H R A; O'Toole, S J; Bailey, J; Carter, B D; Salter, G S; Wright, D

    2013-01-01

    Determining the orbital eccentricity of an extrasolar planet is critically important for understanding the system's dynamical environment and history. However, eccentricity is often poorly determined or entirely mischaracterized due to poor observational sampling, low signal-to-noise, and/or degeneracies with other planetary signals. Some systems previously thought to contain a single, moderate-eccentricity planet have been shown, after further monitoring, to host two planets on nearly-circular orbits. We investigate published apparent single-planet systems to see if the available data can be better fit by two lower-eccentricity planets. We identify nine promising candidate systems and perform detailed dynamical tests to confirm the stability of the potential new multiple-planet systems. Finally, we compare the expected orbits of the single- and double-planet scenarios to better inform future observations of these interesting systems.

  6. Secular dynamics of multiplanet systems: implications for the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via high-eccentricity migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Adrian S.; Antonini, Fabio; Lithwick, Yoram; Perets, Hagai B.; Portegies Zwart, Simon F.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets that reside very closely to their host star, within ˜0.1 au. Their formation is not well understood. It is generally believed that they cannot have formed in situ, implying that some form of migration must have occurred after their initial formation. We study the production of HJs through secular evolution in multiplanet systems with three to five planets. In this variant of high-e migration, the eccentricity of the orbit of the innermost planet is excited on secular time-scales, triggering orbital migration due to tidal dissipation. We use a secular dynamics code and carry out a population synthesis study. We find that HJs are only produced if the viscous time-scale is short (≈0.014 yr). In contrast, in up to ≈0.3 of systems, the innermost planet is tidally disrupted. The orbital period distribution is peaked around 5 d, consistent with observations. The median HJ mass is 1 MJ with a maximum of ≈2 MJ, similar to observed HJs. Approximately 0.1 of the HJs have retrograde orbits with respect to the stellar spin. We do not find a significant population of warm Jupiters in our simulations, i.e. planets with semimajor axes between 0.1 and 1 au.

  7. Titan's Eccentricity Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iess, L.; Jacobson, R.; Ducci, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.

    2011-12-01

    The large eccentricity (e=0.03) of Titan's orbit causes significant variations in the tidal field from Saturn and induces periodic stresses in the satellite body at the orbital period (about 16 days). Peak-to-peak variations of the tidal field (from pericenter to apocenter) are about 18% (6e). If Titan hosts a liquid layer (such as an internal ocean), the gravity field would exhibit significant periodic variations. The response of the body to fast variations of the external, perturbing field is controlled by the Love numbers, defined for each spherical harmonic as the ratio between the perturbed and perturbing potential. For Titan the largest effect is by far on the quadrupole field, and the corresponding Love number is indicated by k2 (assumed to be identical for all degree 2 harmonics). Models of Titan's interior generally envisage a core made up of silicates, surrounded by a layer of high pressure ice, possibly a liquid water or water-ammonia ocean, and an ice-I outer shell, with variations associated with the dehydration state of the core or the presence of mixed rock-ice layers. Previous analysis of Titan's tidal response [1] shows that k2 depends crucially on the presence or absence of an internal ocean. k2 was found to vary from about 0.03 for a purely rocky interior to 0.48 for a rigid rocky core surrounded by an ocean and a thin (20 km) ice shell. A large k2 entails changes in the satellite's quadrupole coefficients by a few percent, enough to be detected by accurate range rate measurements of the Cassini spacecraft. So far, of the many Cassini's flybys of Titan, six were used for gravity measurements. During gravity flybys the spacecraft is tracked from the antennas of NASA's Deep Space Network using microwave links at X- and Ka-band frequencies. A state-of-the-art instrumentation enables range rate measurements accurate to 10-50 micron/s at integration times of 60 s. The first four flybys provided the static gravity field and the moment of inertia factor

  8. Retrogradation of rye starch pastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Nowotna

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The retrogradation susceptibility of starch determines consumer suitability of food products rich in this polymer. Starch isolated from flour obtained from rye variety ‘Amilo’, which displays very low amylolytic activity, contains highest amounts of amylose and exhibits strong retrogradation susceptibility. Flour from rye ‘Dańkowskie Złote’ and commercial rye flour type 720, that have higher amylolytic activity in comparison to ‘Amilo’, contain starch with lower amounts of amylose and reduced retrogradation susceptibility. Wheat starch displays lower degree of retrogradation in comparison to rye, because of larger amounts of phosphorus (phospholipids.

  9. TTVFaster: First order eccentricity transit timing variations (TTVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agol, Eric; Deck, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    TTVFaster implements analytic formulae for transit time variations (TTVs) that are accurate to first order in the planet-star mass ratios and in the orbital eccentricities; the implementations are available in several languages, including IDL, Julia, Python and C. These formulae compare well with more computationally expensive N-body integrations in the low-eccentricity, low mass-ratio regime when applied to simulated and to actual multi-transiting Kepler planet systems.

  10. Habitable Climates: The Influence of Eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Dressing, Courtney D; Scharf, Caleb A; Raymond, Sean N

    2010-01-01

    Radiative equilibrium studies that place Earth-like exoplanets on different circular orbits from the parent star do not fully sample the range of plausible habitability conditions in planetary systems. In the outer regions of the habitable zone, the risk of transitioning into a globally frozen "snowball" state poses a threat to the habitability. Here, we use a one-dimensional energy balance climate model (EBM) to examine how obliquity, spin rate, orbital eccentricity, and the fraction of the surface covered by ocean might influence the onset of such a snowball state. Since, for constant semimajor axis, the annual mean stellar irradiation scales with (1-e^2)^(-1/2), one might expect the greatest habitable semimajor axis to scale as (1-e^2)^(-1/4). We find that this standard simple ansatz provides a reasonable lower bound on the outer boundary of the habitable zone, but the influence of both obliquity and ocean fraction can be profound in the context of planets on eccentric orbits. For planets with eccentricity...

  11. Resonant relaxation near a massive black hole: the dependence on eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Gürkan, M Atakan

    2007-01-01

    The orbits of stars close to a massive black hole are nearly Keplerian ellipses. Such orbits exert long term torques on each other, which lead to an enhanced angular momentum relaxation known as resonant relaxation. Under certain conditions, this process can modify the angular momentum distribution and affect the interaction rates of the stars with the massive black hole more efficiently than non-resonant relaxation. The torque on an orbit exerted by the cluster depends on the eccentricity of the orbit. In this paper, we calculate this dependence and determine the resonant relaxation timescale as a function of eccentricity. In particular, we show that the component of the torque that changes the magnitude of the angular momentum is linearly proportional to eccentricity, so resonant relaxation is much more efficient on eccentric orbits than on circular orbits.

  12. Temporary Capture of Asteroids by an Eccentric Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, A.; Ida, S.

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated the probability of temporary capture of asteroids in eccentric orbits by a planet in a circular or eccentric orbit through analytical and numerical calculations. We found that, in the limit of the circular orbit, the capture probability is ∼0.1% of encounters to the planet’s Hill sphere, independent of planetary mass and semimajor axis. In general, temporary capture becomes more difficult as the planet’s eccentricity ({e}{{p}}) increases. We found that the capture probability is almost independent of {e}{{p}} until a critical value ({e}{{p}}{{c}}) that is given by ≃5 times the Hill radius scaled by the planet’s semimajor axis. For {e}{{p}}> {e}{{p}}{{c}}, the probability decreases approximately in proportion to {e}{{p}}-1. The current orbital eccentricity of Mars is several times larger than {e}{{p}}{{c}}. However, since the range of secular change in Martian eccentricity overlaps {e}{{p}}{{c}}, the capture of minor bodies by Mars in the past is not ruled out.

  13. Origin and Implications of high eccentricities in massive black hole binaries at sub-pc scales

    CERN Document Server

    Roedig, Constanze

    2011-01-01

    We outline the eccentricity evolution of sub-parsec massive black hole binaries (MBHBs) forming in galaxy mergers. In both stellar and gaseous environments, MBHBs are expected to grow large orbital eccentricities before they enter the gravitational wave (GW) observational domain. We re--visit the predicted eccentricities detectable by space based laser interferometers (as the proposed ELISA/NGO) for both environments. Close to coalescence, many MBHBs will still maintain detectable eccentricities, spanning a broad range from <10^{-5} up to <~ 0.5. Stellar and gas driven dynamics lead to distinct distributions, with the latter favoring larger eccentricities. At larger binary separations, when emitted GWs will be observed by pulsar timing arrays (PTAs), the expected eccentricities are usually quite large, in the range 0.01-0.7, which poses an important issue for signal modelling and detection algorithms. In this window, large eccentricities also have implications on proposed electromagnetic counterparts to...

  14. Growth of eccentric modes in disc-planet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Teyssandier, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We formulate a set of linear equations that describe the behaviour of small eccentricities in a protoplanetary system consisting of a gaseous disc and a planet. Eccentricity propagates through the disc by means of pressure and self-gravity, and is exchanged with the planet via secular interactions. Excitation and damping of eccentricity can occur through Lindblad and corotation resonances, as well as viscosity. We compute normal modes of the coupled disc-planet system in the case of short-period giant planets orbiting inside an inner cavity, possibly carved by the stellar magnetosphere. Three-dimensional effects allow for a mode to be trapped in the inner parts of the disc. This mode can easily grow within the disc's lifetime. An eccentric mode dominated by the planet can also grow, although less rapidly. We compute the structure and growth rates of these modes and their dependence on the assumed properties of the disc.

  15. Eccentric binaries of compact objects in strong-field gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Roman

    2011-09-27

    In this thesis we study the dynamics as well as the resulting gravitational radiation from eccentric binaries of compact objects in the non-linear regime of General Relativity. For this purpose we solve Einstein's field equation numerically in a 3+1 decomposition using the moving-puncture technique. We focus our study on very particular orbits, arising as a purely relativistic phenomenon of the two-body problem in General Relativity, which are associated with unstable circular orbits. They are governed by a fast, nearly circular revolution at a short distance followed by a slow, radial motion on a nearly elliptic trajectory. Due to the unique features of their orbital trajectories they are called zoom-whirl orbits. We analyze how the peculiar dynamics manifests itself in the emitted gravitational radiation and to which extent one can infer the orbital properties from observations of the gravitational waves. In the first part, we consider black hole binaries. We perform a comprehensive parameter study by varying the initial eccentricity, computing and characterizing the resulting gravitational waveforms. We address aspects, which can only be obtained from non-perturbative methods, and which are crucial to the astrophysical relevance of these orbits. In particular, our results imply a fairly low amount of fine-tuning necessary to spot zoom-whirl effects. We find whirl orbits for values of the eccentricities, which fall in disjunct intervals extending to rather low values. Furthermore, we show that whirl effects just before merger cause a signal with significant amplitude. In the second part, we investigate neutron star binaries on eccentric orbits in full General Relativity, which has not been studied so far. We explore their phenomenology and study the consequences for the matter after the neutron stars have merged. In these evolutions the merged neutron stars sooner or later collapse to form a black hole. During the collapse most of the matter is accreted on

  16. Retrogradation of rye starch pastes

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The retrogradation susceptibility of starch determines consumer suitability of food products rich in this polymer. Starch isolated from flour obtained from rye variety ‘Amilo’, which displays very low amylolytic activity, contains highest amounts of amylose and exhibits strong retrogradation susceptibility. Flour from rye ‘Dańkowskie Złote’ and commercial rye flour type 720, that have higher amylolytic activity in comparison to ‘Am...

  17. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels; Evans, Charles R.

    2016-03-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive nonrotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as e ˜0.8 and initial separations as large as p ˜50 to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within ˜0.1 radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  18. On the co-orbital motion in the Planar Restricted Three-Body Problem: the Quasi-satellite motion revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Pousse, Alexandre; Vienne, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the planar and circular Restricted Three-Body Problem, we consider an asteroid that orbits the Sun in quasi-satellite motion with a planet. A quasi-satellite trajectory is a heliocentric orbit in co-orbital resonance with the planet, characterized by a non zero eccentricity and a resonant angle that librates around zero. Likewise, in the rotating frame with the planet it describes the same trajectory as the one of a retrograde satellite even though the planet acts as a perturbator. In the last few years, the discoveries of asteroids in this type of motion made the term "quasi-satellite" more and more present in the literature. However, some authors rather use the term "retrograde satellite" when referring to this kind of motion in the studies of the restricted problem in the rotating frame. In this paper we intend to clarify the terminology to use, in order to bridge the gap between the perturbative co-orbital point of view and the more general approach in the rotating frame. Through a num...

  19. An Orbit Fit for the Grillmair Dionatos Cold Stellar Stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willett, Benjamin A.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Zhang, Haotong; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.

    2009-01-01

    We use velocity and metallicity information from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration stellar spectroscopy to fit an orbit to the narrow 63{sup o} stellar stream of Grillmair and Dionatos. The stars in the stream have a retrograde orbit with eccentricity e = 0.33 (perigalacticon of 14.4 kpc and apogalacticon of 28.7 kpc) and inclination approximately i {approx} 35{sup o}. In the region of the orbit which is detected, it has a distance of about 7-11 kpc from the Sun. Assuming a standard disk plus bulge and logarithmic halo potential for the Milky Way stars plus dark matter, the stream stars are moving with a large space velocity of approximately 276 km s{sup -1} at perigalacticon. Using this stream alone, we are unable to determine if the dark matter halo is oblate or prolate. The metallicity of the stream is [Fe/H] = -2.1 {+-} 0.1. Observed proper motions for individual stream members above the main sequence turnoff are consistent with the derived orbit. None of the known globular clusters in the Milky Way have positions, radial velocities, and metallicities that are consistent with being the progenitor of the GD-1 stream.

  20. An Orbit Fit for the Grillmair Dionatos Cold Stellar Stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willett, Benjamin A.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Zhang, Haotong; Yanny, Brian; Beers, Timothy C.

    2009-01-01

    We use velocity and metallicity information from Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration stellar spectroscopy to fit an orbit to the narrow 63{sup o} stellar stream of Grillmair and Dionatos. The stars in the stream have a retrograde orbit with eccentricity e = 0.33 (perigalacticon of 14.4 kpc and apogalacticon of 28.7 kpc) and inclination approximately i {approx} 35{sup o}. In the region of the orbit which is detected, it has a distance of about 7-11 kpc from the Sun. Assuming a standard disk plus bulge and logarithmic halo potential for the Milky Way stars plus dark matter, the stream stars are moving with a large space velocity of approximately 276 km s{sup -1} at perigalacticon. Using this stream alone, we are unable to determine if the dark matter halo is oblate or prolate. The metallicity of the stream is [Fe/H] = -2.1 {+-} 0.1. Observed proper motions for individual stream members above the main sequence turnoff are consistent with the derived orbit. None of the known globular clusters in the Milky Way have positions, radial velocities, and metallicities that are consistent with being the progenitor of the GD-1 stream.

  1. Eccentric exercise testing and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    1994-01-01

    Some researchers and practitioners have touted the benefits of including eccentric exercise in strength training programs. However, others have challenged its use because they believe that eccentric actions are dangerous and lead to injuries. Much of the controversy may be based on a lack of understanding of the physiology of eccentric actions. This review will present data concerning eccentric exercise in strength training, the physiological characteristics of eccentric exercise, and the possible stimulus for strength development. Also a discussion of strength needs for extended exposure to microgravity will be presented. Not only is the use of eccentric exercise controversial, but the name itself is fraught with problems. The correct pronunciation is with a hard 'c' so that the word sounds like ekscentric. The confusion in pronunciation may have been prevented if the spelling that Asmussen used in 1953, excentric, had been adopted. Another problem concerns the expressions used to describe eccentric exercise. Commonly used expressions are negatives, eccentric contractions, lengthening contractions, resisted muscle lengthenings, muscle lengthening actions, and eccentric actions. Some of these terms are cumbersome (i.e., resisted muscle lengthenings), one is slang (negatives), and another is an oxymoron (lengthening contractions). Only eccentric action is appropriate and adoption of this term has been recommended by Cavanagh. Despite the controversy that surrounds eccentric exercise, it is important to note that these types of actions play an integral role in normal daily activities. Eccentric actions are used during most forms of movement, for example, in walking when the foot touches the ground and the center of mass is decelerated and in lowering objects, such as placing a bag of groceries in the car.

  2. Evidence for Reflected Light from the Most Eccentric Exoplanet Known

    CERN Document Server

    Kane, Stephen R; Hinkel, Natalie R; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M; Henry, Gregory W; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Boyajian, Tabetha S; Wright, Jason T; Ciardi, David R; Fischer, Debra A; Butler, R Paul; Tinney, C G; Carter, Brad D; Jones, Hugh R A; Bailey, Jeremy; O'Toole, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Planets in highly eccentric orbits form a class of objects not seen within our Solar System. The most extreme case known amongst these objects is the planet orbiting HD 20782, with an orbital period of 597 days and an eccentricity of 0.96. Here we present new data and analysis for this system as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey (TERMS). We obtained CHIRON spectra to perform an independent estimation of the fundamental stellar parameters. New radial velocities from AAT and PARAS observations during periastron passage greatly improve the our knowledge of the eccentric nature of the orbit. The combined analysis of our Keplerian orbital and Hipparcos astrometry show that the inclination of the planetary orbit is > 1.25 degrees, ruling out stellar masses for the companion. Our long-term robotic photometry show that the star is extremely stable over long timescales. Photometric monitoring of the star during predicted transit and periastron times using MOST rule out a transit of the pla...

  3. Evidence for Reflected Light from the Most Eccentric Exoplanet Known

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Stephen R.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Henry, Gregory W.; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Wright, Jason T.; Ciardi, David R.; Fischer, Debra A.; Butler, R. Paul; Tinney, C. G.; Carter, Brad D.; Jones, Hugh R. A.; Bailey, Jeremy; O'Toole, Simon J.

    2016-04-01

    Planets in highly eccentric orbits form a class of objects not seen within our solar system. The most extreme case known among these objects is the planet orbiting HD 20782, with an orbital period of 597 days and an eccentricity of 0.96. Here we present new data and analysis for this system as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey. We obtained CHIRON spectra to perform an independent estimation of the fundamental stellar parameters. New radial velocities from Anglo-Australian Telescope and PARAS observations during periastron passage greatly improve our knowledge of the eccentric nature of the orbit. The combined analysis of our Keplerian orbital and Hipparcos astrometry show that the inclination of the planetary orbit is \\gt 1\\_\\_AMP\\_\\_fdg;22, ruling out stellar masses for the companion. Our long-term robotic photometry show that the star is extremely stable over long timescales. Photometric monitoring of the star during predicted transit and periastron times using Microvariability and Oscillations of STars rule out a transit of the planet and reveal evidence of phase variations during periastron. These possible photometric phase variations may be caused by reflected light from the planet’s atmosphere and the dramatic change in star-planet separation surrounding the periastron passage.

  4. The origin of the eccentricity of the hot Jupiter in CI Tau

    CERN Document Server

    Rosotti, Giovanni P; Clarke, Cathie J; Teyssandier, Jean; Facchini, Stefano; Mustill, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    Following the recent discovery of the first radial velocity planet in a star still possessing a protoplanetary disc (CI Tau), we examine the origin of the planet's eccentricity (e $\\sim 0.3$). We show through long timescale ($10^5$ orbits) simulations that the planetary eccentricity can be pumped by the disc, even when its local surface density is well below the threshold previously derived from short timescale integrations. We show that the disc may be able to excite the planet's orbital eccentricity in $<$ a Myr for the system parameters of CI Tau. We also perform two planet scattering experiments and show that alternatively the observed planet may plausibly have acquired its eccentricity through dynamical scattering of a migrating lower mass planet, which has either been ejected from the system or swallowed by the central star. In the latter case the present location and eccentricity of the observed planet can be recovered if it was previously stalled within the disc's magnetospheric cavity.

  5. The detectability of eccentric compact binary coalescences with advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Michael; Thrane, Eric; Luo, Jialun; Christensen, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. While most binaries are expected to possess circular orbits, some may be eccentric, for example, if they are formed through dynamical capture. Eccentric orbits can create difficulty for matched filtering searches due to the challenges of creating effective template banks to detect these signals. In previous work, we showed how seedless clustering can be used to detect low-mass ($M_\\text{total}\\leq10M_\\odot$) compact binary coalescences for both spinning and eccentric systems, assuming a circular post-Newtonian expansion. Here, we describe a parameterization that is designed to maximize sensitivity to low-eccentricity ($0\\leq\\epsilon\\leq0.6$) systems, derived from the analytic equations. We show that this parameterization provides a robust and computationally efficient method for detecting eccentric low-mass compact binaries. Base...

  6. The Photoeccentric Effect and Proto-Hot-Jupiters I. Measuring photometric eccentricities of individual transiting planets

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Rebekah I

    2012-01-01

    Exoplanet orbital eccentricities offer valuable clues about the origins and orbital evolution of planetary systems. Eccentric, Jupiter-sized planets are particularly interesting: they may link the "cold" Jupiters beyond the ice line to hot Jupiters at a fraction of an AU, where they are unlikely to have formed in situ. To date, all eccentricities of individual planets come from radial velocity measurements. Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting Jupiters spanning a range of periods, but the faintness of the host stars precludes radial velocity follow-up of most. Here we demonstrate a Bayesian method of measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its transit light curve using prior knowledge of its host star's density. We show that eccentric Jupiters are readily identified by their short ingress/egress/total transit durations --- the "photoeccentric effect" --- even with long-cadence Kepler photometry and loosely-constrained stellar parameters. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploration of para...

  7. Temporary Capture of Asteroids by a Planet: Dependence of Prograde/Retrograde Capture on Asteroids' Semimajor Axes

    CERN Document Server

    Higuchi, Arika

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of the prograde/retrograde temporary capture of asteroids by a planet on their original heliocentric semimajor axes through analytical arguments and numerical orbital integrations in order to discuss the origins of irregular satellites of giant planets. We found that capture is mostly retrograde for the asteroids near the planetary orbit and is prograde for those from further orbits. An analytical investigation reveals the intrinsic dynamics of these dependences and gives boundary semimajor axes for the change in prograde/retrograde capture. The numerical calculations support the idea of deriving the analytical formulae and confirm their dependence. Our numerical results show that the capture probability is much higher for bodies from the inner region than for outer ones. These results imply that retrograde irregular satellites of Jupiter are most likely to be captured bodies from the nearby orbits of Jupiter that may have the same origin as Trojan asteroids, while prograde...

  8. Hot Jupiters from Coplanar High-eccentricity Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Cristobal

    2015-05-01

    We study the possibility that hot Jupiters (HJs) are formed through the secular gravitational interactions between two planets in eccentric orbits with relatively low mutual inclinations (≲ 20{}^\\circ ) and friction due to tides raised on the planet by the host star. We term this migration mechanism Coplanar High-eccentricity Migration (CHEM) because, like disk migration, it allows for migration to occur on the same plane in which the planets formed. CHEM can operate from the following typical initial configurations: (i) the inner planet in a circular orbit and the outer planet with an eccentricity ≳ 0.67 for {{m}in}/{{m}out}{{({{a}in}/{{a}out})}1/2}≲ 0.3; (ii) two eccentric (≳ 0.5) orbits for {{m}in}/{{m}out}{{({{a}in}/{{a}out})}1/2}≲ 0.16. A population synthesis study of hierarchical systems of two giant planets using the observed eccentricity distribution of giant planets shows that CHEM produces HJs with low stellar obliquities (≲ 30{}^\\circ ), with a semi-major axis distribution that matches the observations, and at a rate that can account for their observed occurrence. A different mechanism is needed to create large obliquity HJs, either a different migration channel or a mechanism that tilts the star or the protoplanetary disk. CHEM predicts that HJs should have distant (a≳ 5 AU) and massive (most likely ˜1-3 times more massive than the HJ) companions with relatively low mutual inclinations (≲ 20{}^\\circ ) and moderately high eccentricities (e˜ 0.2-0.5).

  9. Spacecraft orbit lifetime within two binary near-Earth asteroid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damme, Friedrich; Hussmann, Hauke; Oberst, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    We studied the motion of medium-sized and small spacecraft orbiting within the binary asteroid systems 175,706 (1996 FG3) and 65,803 Didymos (1996 GT). We have considered spacecraft motion within the binary systems distance regimes between 0.4 and 2.5 km for Didymos and 0.8-4 km for 1996 FG3. Orbital motion of spacecraft, beginning from 20,000 initial conditions lying in the orbital planes of the secondary, were simulated and evaluated for lifespan. The simulations include the effects of (1) the asteroid's mass, shape, and rotational parameters, (2) the secondary's mass and orbit parameters, (3) the spacecraft mass, surface area, and reflectivity (representing large box-wing-shaped medium-sized spacecraft as well as small satellites), and (4) the time of the mission, and therefore the relative position of the system to the sun. Stable orbital motion (i.e., not requiring thrusting maneuvers) was achieved using the Lagrange points L4/L5 and orbital resonances. This allows for long motion arcs, e.g. of 90 days (L4) and 35 days (resonance) in the Didymos system. The accuracy necessary to deploy a probe into L4, so it can remain there for 35 day, is evaluated by comparisons. Retrograde orbits were found assuring 90 days of low eccentric orbiting for a compact small satellite for a great variety of initial conditions. The comparison of simulations at aphelion and perihelion as well as the different spacecraft show the critical impact of solar radiation pressure on orbital stability. 65,803 Didymos (1996 GT) is shown to be more suitable for orbit phases at the close distances we studied compared to 175,706 (1996 FG3). Two possible obliquities of the Didymos system were considered to study the effects of the inclination on perturbing forces at equinox and solstice, showing that cases of low obliquity or times of equinox are beneficial for spacecraft orbiting.

  10. A massive millisecond pulsar in an eccentric binary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, E. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kramer, M.; Champion, D. J.; Berezina, M.; Bassa, C. G.; Lyne, A. G.; Stappers, B. W.

    2017-02-01

    The recent discovery of a population of eccentric (e ˜ 0.1) millisecond pulsar (MSP) binaries with low-mass white dwarf companions in the Galactic field represents a challenge to evolutionary models that explain MSP formation as recycling: All such models predict that the orbits become highly circularized during a long period of accretion. The members of this new population exhibit remarkably similar properties (orbital periods, eccentricities, companion masses, spin periods), and several models have been put forward that suggest a common formation channel. In this work, we present the results of an extensive timing campaign focusing on one member of this new population, PSR J1946+3417. Through the measurement of both the advance of periastron and the Shapiro delay for this system, we determine the mass of the pulsar, mass of the companion and the inclination of the orbit to be 1.828(22) M⊙, 0.2656(19) M⊙ and 76.4 ± 0.6 degrees, respectively, under the assumption that general relativity is the true description of gravity. Notably, this is the third highest mass measured for any pulsar. Using these masses and the astrometric properties of PSR J1946+3417, we examine three proposed formation channels for eccentric MSP binaries. While our results are consistent with circumbinary disc-driven eccentricity growth or neutron star to strange star phase transition, we rule out rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse as the mechanism responsible for the configuration of the PSR J1946+3417 system.

  11. Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, Paulo C C

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent discovery of several millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in eccentric binary systems. Timing these MSPs we were able to estimate (and in one case precisely measure) their masses. These results suggest that, as a class, MSPs have a much wider range of masses (1.3 to > 2 solar masses) than the normal and mildly recycled pulsars found in double neutron star (DNS) systems (1.25 < Mp < 1.44 solar masses). This is very likely to be due to the prolonged accretion episode that is thought to be required to form a MSP. The likely existence of massive MSPs makes them a powerful probe for understanding the behavior of matter at densities larger than that of the atomic nucleus; in particular, the precise measurement of the mass of PSR J1903+0327 ($1.67 +/- 0.01 solar masses) excludes several "soft" equations of state for dense matter.

  12. Gravitational-wave phasing for low-eccentricity inspiralling compact binaries to 3PN order

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Blake; Arun, K G; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2016-01-01

    [abridged] Although gravitational radiation causes inspiralling compact binaries to circularize, a variety of astrophysical scenarios suggest that binaries might have small but nonnegligible orbital eccentricities when they enter the low-frequency bands of ground and space-based gravitational-wave detectors. If not accounted for, even a small orbital eccentricity can cause a potentially significant systematic error in the mass parameters of an inspiralling binary. Gravitational-wave search templates typically rely on the quasi-circular approximation, which provides relatively simple expressions for the gravitational-wave phase to 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order. The quasi-Keplerian formalism provides an elegant but complex description of the post-Newtonian corrections to the orbits and waveforms of inspiralling binaries with any eccentricity. Here we specialize the quasi-Keplerian formalism to binaries with low eccentricity. In this limit the non-periodic contribution to the gravitational-wave phasing can be ex...

  13. Laparoscopic retrograde (fundus first cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Michael D

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrograde ("fundus first" dissection is frequently used in open cholecystectomy and although feasible in laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC it has not been widely practiced. LC is most simply carried out using antegrade dissection with a grasper to provide cephalad fundic traction. A series is presented to investigate the place of retrograde dissection in the hands of an experienced laparoscopic surgeon using modern instrumentation. Methods A prospective record of all LCs carried out by an experienced laparoscopic surgeon following his appointment in Bristol in 2004 was examined. Retrograde dissection was resorted to when difficulties were encountered with exposure and/or dissection of Calot's triangle. Results 1041 LCs were carried out including 148 (14% emergency operations and 131 (13% associated bile duct explorations. There were no bile duct injuries although conversion to open operation was required in six patients (0.6%. Retrograde LC was attempted successfully in 11 patients (1.1%. The age ranged from 28 to 80 years (mean 61 and there were 7 males. Indications were; fibrous, contracted gallbladder 7, Mirizzi syndrome 2 and severe kyphosis 2. Operative photographs are included to show the type of case where it was needed and the technique used. Postoperative stay was 1/2 to 5 days (mean 2.2 with no delayed sequelae on followup. Histopathology showed; chronic cholecystitis 7, xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis 3 and acute necrotising cholecystitis 1. Conclusions In this series, retrograde laparoscopic dissection was necessary in 1.1% of LCs and a liver retractor was needed in 9 of the 11 cases. This technique does have a place and should be in the armamentarium of the laparoscopic surgeon.

  14. Levy Flights of Binary Orbits due to Impulsive Encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Benjamin F

    2008-01-01

    We examine the evolution of an almost circular Keplerian orbit interacting with unbound perturbers. We calculate the change in eccentricity and angular momentum that results from a single encounter, assuming the timescale for the interaction is shorter than the orbital period. The orbital perturbations are incorporated into a Boltzmann equation that allows for eccentricity dissipation. We present an analytic solution to the Boltzmann equation that describes the distribution of orbital eccentricity and relative inclination as a function of time. The eccentricity and inclination of the binary do not evolve according to a normal random walk but perform a Levy flight. The slope of the mass spectrum of perturbers dictates whether close gravitational scatterings are more important than distant tidal ones. When close scatterings are important, the mass spectrum sets the slope of the eccentricity and inclination distribution functions. We use this general framework to understand the eccentricities of several Kuiper b...

  15. Evolution of eccentricity and inclination of hot protoplanets embedded in radiative discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Henrik; Masset, Frédéric S.

    2017-07-01

    We study the evolution of the eccentricity and inclination of protoplanetary embryos and low-mass protoplanets (from a fraction of an Earth mass to a few Earth masses) embedded in a protoplanetary disc, by means of three-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations with radiative transfer in the diffusion limit. When the protoplanets radiate in the surrounding disc the energy released by the accretion of solids, their eccentricity and inclination experience a growth towards values that depend on the luminosity-to-mass ratio of the planet, which are comparable to the disc's aspect ratio and which are reached over time-scales of a few thousand years. This growth is triggered by the appearance of a hot, underdense region in the vicinity of the planet. The growth rate of the eccentricity is typically three times larger than that of the inclination. In long-term calculations, we find that the excitation of eccentricity and the excitation of inclination are not independent. In the particular case in which a planet has initially a very small eccentricity and inclination, the eccentricity largely overruns the inclination. When the eccentricity reaches its asymptotic value, the growth of inclination is quenched, yielding an eccentric orbit with a very low inclination. As a side result, we find that the eccentricity and inclination of non-luminous planets are damped more vigorously in radiative discs than in isothermal discs.

  16. Gravitational-wave phasing for low-eccentricity inspiralling compact binaries to 3PN order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Blake; Favata, Marc; Arun, K. G.; Mishra, Chandra Kant

    2016-06-01

    Although gravitational radiation causes inspiralling compact binaries to circularize, a variety of astrophysical scenarios suggest that binaries might have small but non-negligible orbital eccentricities when they enter the low-frequency bands of ground- and space-based gravitational-wave detectors. If not accounted for, even a small orbital eccentricity can cause a potentially significant systematic error in the mass parameters of an inspiralling binary [M. Favata, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 101101 (2014)]. Gravitational-wave search templates typically rely on the quasicircular approximation, which provides relatively simple expressions for the gravitational-wave phase to 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order. Damour, Gopakumar, Iyer, and others have developed an elegant but complex quasi-Keplerian formalism for describing the post-Newtonian corrections to the orbits and waveforms of inspiralling binaries with any eccentricity. Here, we specialize the quasi-Keplerian formalism to binaries with low eccentricity. In this limit, the nonperiodic contribution to the gravitational-wave phasing can be expressed explicitly as simple functions of frequency or time, with little additional complexity beyond the well-known formulas for circular binaries. These eccentric phase corrections are computed to 3PN order and to leading order in the eccentricity for the standard PN approximants. For a variety of systems, these eccentricity corrections cause significant corrections to the number of gravitational-wave cycles that sweep through a detector's frequency band. This is evaluated using several measures, including a modification of the useful cycles. By comparing to numerical solutions valid for any eccentricity, we find that our analytic solutions are valid up to e0≲0.1 for comparable-mass systems, where e0 is the eccentricity when the source enters the detector band. We also evaluate the role of periodic terms that enter the phasing and discuss how they can be incorporated into some of

  17. Transit Timing Variations for Eccentric and Inclined Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David

    2009-08-01

    The Transit Timing Variation (TTV) method relies on monitoring changes in timing of transits of known exoplanets. Nontransiting planets in the system can be inferred from TTVs by their gravitational interactions with the transiting planet. The TTV method is sensitive to low-mass planets that cannot be detected by other means. Inferring the orbital elements and mass of the nontransiting planets from TTVs, however, is more challenging than for other planet detection schemes. It is a difficult inverse problem. Here, we extended the new inversion method proposed by Nesvorný & Morbidelli to eccentric transiting planets and inclined orbits. We found that the TTV signal can be significantly amplified for hierarchical planetary systems with substantial orbital inclinations and/or for an eccentric transiting planet with anti-aligned orbit of the planetary companion. Thus, a fortuitous orbital setup of an exoplanetary system may significantly enhance our chances of TTV detection. We also showed that the detailed shape of the TTV signal is sensitive to the orbital inclination of the nontransiting planetary companion. The TTV detection method may thus provide important constraints on the orbital inclination of exoplanets and be used to test theories of planetary formation and evolution.

  18. How planet-planet scattering can create high-inclination as well as long-period orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Rasio, Frederic A

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed two new classes of planetary orbits. Rossiter- Mclaughlin (RM) measurements have revealed hot Jupiters in high-obliquity orbits. In addition, direct-imaging has discovered giant planets at large (~ 100 AU) separations via direct-imaging technique. Simple-minded disk-migration scenarios are inconsistent with the high-inclination (and even retrograde) orbits as seen in recent RM measurements. Furthermore, forming giant planets at large semi-major axis (a) may be challenging in the core-accretion paradigm. We perform many N-body simulations to explore the two above-mentioned orbital architectures. Planet-planet scattering in a multi-planet system can naturally excite orbital inclinations. Planets can also get scattered to large distances. Large-a planetary orbits created from planet-planet scattering are expected to have high eccentricities (e). Theoretical models predict that the observed long-period planets, such as Fomalhaut-b have moderate e \\approx 0.3. Interestingly, these...

  19. Eccentricity Excitation and Apsidal Resonance Capture in the Planetary System Upsilon Andromedae

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, E I

    2002-01-01

    The orbits of the outer two known planets orbiting Upsilon Andromedae are remarkably eccentric. Planet C possesses an orbital eccentricity of e1 = 0.253. For the more distant planet D, e2 = 0.308. Previous dynamical analyses strongly suggest that the two orbits are nearly co-planar and are trapped in an apsidal resonance in which the difference between their longitudes of periastron undergoes a bounded oscillation about 0 degrees. Here we elucidate the origin of these large eccentricities and of the apsidal alignment. Resonant interactions between a remnant circumstellar disk of gas lying exterior to the orbits of both planets can smoothly grow e2. Secular interactions between planets D and C can siphon off the eccentricity of the former to grow that of the latter. Externally amplifying e2 during the phase of the apsidal oscillation when e2/e1 is smallest drives the oscillation amplitude towards zero. Thus, the substantial eccentricity of planet C and the locking of orbital apsides are both consequences of ex...

  20. Retrograde Jejuno-gastric Intussusception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitoj Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde jejuno-gastric intussusception is a rare complication following gastric surgery. We present a case of retrograde jejuno-gastric intussusception in a 42-year-old female who presented with upper abdominal pain, vomiting and swelling in left hypochondruim. Intussusception was suspected on ultrasound of the abdomen and later confirmed with computed tomography scan. At laparotomy, efferent loop was intussuscepting into stomach. This was reduced and fixed to the abdominal wall and transverse mesocolon. It should be suspected in a patient with the previous history of gastric surgery as it is a rare complication. Early diagnosis and management can prevent further complications like bowel gangrene and its associated morbidity and mortality.

  1. Retrograde binaries of massive black holes in circumbinary accretion discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Maureira-Fredes, Cristián; Dotti, Massimo; Colpi, Monica

    2016-06-01

    accretion only explores the late evolution stages of the binary in an otherwise unperturbed retrograde disc to illustrate how eccentricity evolves with time in relation to the shape of the underlying surface density distribution.

  2. Hereditary Effects in Eccentric Compact Binary Inspirals to Third Post-Newtonian Order

    CERN Document Server

    Loutrel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    While there has been much success in understanding the orbital dynamics and gravitational wave emission of eccentric compact binaries in the post-Newtonian formalism, some problems still remain. The largest of these concerns hereditary effects: non-linear phenomena related to the scattering off of the background curved spacetime (tails) and to the generation of gravitational waves by gravitational waves (memory). Currently, these hereditary effects are only known numerically for arbitrary eccentricity through infinite sums of Bessel functions, with closed-form, analytic results only available in the small eccentricity limit. We here calculate, for the first time, closed-form, analytic expressions for all hereditary effects to third post-Newtonian order in binaries with arbitrary eccentricity. For the tails, we first asymptotically expand all Bessel functions in high eccentricity and find a superasymptotic series for each enhancement factor, accurate to better than $10^{-3}$ relative to post-Newtonian numerica...

  3. On the Eccentricity Distribution of Short-Period Single-Planet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ji

    2011-01-01

    We apply standard Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis techniques for 50 short- period, single-planet systems discovered with radial velocity technique. We develop a new method for accessing the significance of a non-zero orbital eccentricity, namely {\\Gamma} analysis, which combines frequentist bootstrap approach with Bayesian analysis of each simulated data set. We find the eccentricity estimations from {\\Gamma} analysis are generally consistent with results from both standard MCMC analysis and previous references. The {\\Gamma} method is particular useful for assessing the significance of small eccentricities. Our results suggest that the current sample size is insufficient to draw robust conclusions about the roles of tidal interaction and perturbations in shaping the eccentricity distribution of short-period single-planet systems. We use a Bayesian population analysis to show that a mixture of analytical distributions is a good approximation of the underlying eccentricity distribution. For short-perio...

  4. Shedding Light on the Eccentricity Valley: Gap Heating and Eccentricity Excitation of Giant Planets in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, David; Cumming, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We show that the first order (non co-orbital) corotation torques are significantly modified by entropy gradients in a non-barotropic protoplanetary disk. Such non-barotropic torques can dramatically alter the balance that, for barotropic cases, results in the net eccentricity damping for giant gap-clearing planets embedded in the disk. We demonstrate that stellar illumination can heat the gap enough for the planet's orbital eccentricity to instead be excited. We also discuss the "Eccentricity Valley" noted in the known exoplanet population, where low-metallicity stars have a deficit of eccentric planets between $\\sim 0.1$ and $\\sim 1$ AU compared to metal-rich systems (Dawson & Murray-Clay 2013). We show that this feature in the planet distribution may be due to the self-shadowing of the disk by a rim located at the dust sublimation radius $\\sim 0.1$ AU, which is known to exist for several T Tauri systems. In the shadowed region between $\\sim 0.1$ and $\\sim 1$ AU lack of gap insolation allows disk interac...

  5. Dynamics of stellar spin driven by planets undergoing Lidov-Kozai migration: paths to spin-orbit misalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, Natalia I.; Lai, Dong; Anderson, Kassandra R.

    2017-03-01

    Many exoplanetary systems containing hot Jupiters (HJs) exhibit significant misalignment between the spin axes of the host stars and the orbital angular momentum axes of the planets ('spin-orbit misalignment'). High-eccentricity migration involving Lidov-Kozai oscillations of the planet's orbit induced by a distant perturber is a possible channel for producing such misaligned HJ systems. Previous works have shown that the dynamical evolution of the stellar spin axis during the high-e migration plays a dominant role in generating the observed spin-orbit misalignment. Numerical studies have also revealed various patterns of the evolution of the stellar spin axis leading to the final misalignment. Here, we develop an analytic theory to elucidate the evolution of spin-orbit misalignment during the Lidov-Kozai migration of planets in stellar binaries. Secular spin-orbit resonances play a key role in the misalignment evolution. We include the effects of short-range forces and tidal dissipation, and categorize the different possible paths to spin-orbit misalignment as a function of various physical parameters (e.g. planet mass and stellar rotation period). We identify five distinct spin-orbit evolution paths and outcomes, only two of which are capable of producing retrograde orbits. We show that these paths to misalignment and the outcomes depend only on two dimensionless parameters, which compare the stellar spin precession frequency with the rate of change of the planet's orbital axis, and the Lidov-Kozai oscillation frequency. Our analysis reveals a number of novel phenomena for the stellar spin evolution, ranging from bifurcation, adiabatic advection, to fully chaotic evolution of spin-orbit angles.

  6. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in the Galactic Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, David J.; Ransom, Scott M.; Lazarus, Patrick; Camilo, Fernando; Bassa, Cess; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Nice, David J.; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; vanLeeuwen, Joeri; Stappers, Ben W.; Cordes, James M.; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Lorimer, Duncan R.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Backer, Don C.; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Chatterjee, Shami; Cognard, Ismael; Deneva, Julia S.; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Han, JinLin; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Kasian, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 milliseconds in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass (M.) companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster, then ejecting it into the Galactic disk, or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74 +/- 0.04 Solar Mass, an unusually high value.

  7. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Champion, D J; Lazarus, P; Camilo, F; Bassa, C; Kaspi, V M; Nice, D J; Freire, P C C; Stairs, I H; Van Leeuwen, J; Stappers, B W; Cordes, J M; Hessels, J W T; Lorimer, D R; Arzoumanian, Z; Backer, D C; Bhat, N D R; Chatterjee, S; Cognard, I; Deneva, J S; Faucher-Giguere, C -A; Gaensler, B M; Han, J L; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kondratiev, V I; Krämer, M; Lazio, J; McLaughlin, M A; Venkataraman, A; Vlemmings, W

    2008-01-01

    Binary pulsar systems are superb probes of stellar and binary evolution and the physics of extreme environments. In a survey with the Arecibo telescope, we have found PSR J1903+0327, a radio pulsar with a rotational period of 2.15 ms in a highly eccentric (e = 0.44) 95-day orbit around a solar mass companion. Infrared observations identify a possible main-sequence companion star. Conventional binary stellar evolution models predict neither large orbital eccentricities nor main-sequence companions around millisecond pulsars. Alternative formation scenarios involve recycling a neutron star in a globular cluster then ejecting it into the Galactic disk or membership in a hierarchical triple system. A relativistic analysis of timing observations of the pulsar finds its mass to be 1.74+/-0.04 Msun, an unusually high value.

  8. A Proposed Search for the Detection of Gravitational Waves from Eccentric Binary Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Christensen, Nelson; Huerta, Eliu; Mohapatra, Satya; Gopakumar, Achamveedu; Haney, Maria; Parameswaran, Ajith; McWilliams, Sean; Vedovato, Gabriele; Drago, Marco; Salemi, Francesco; Prodi, Giovanni; Lazzaro, Claudia; Tiwari, Shubhanshu; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Da Silva, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Most of compact binary systems are expected to circularize before the frequency of emitted gravitational waves (GWs) enters the sensitivity band of the ground based interferometric detectors. However, several mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of binary systems, which retain eccentricity throughout their lifetimes. Since no matched-filtering algorithm has been developed to extract continuous GW signals from compact binaries on orbits with low to moderate values of eccentricity, and available algorithms to detect binaries on quasi-circular orbits are sub-optimal to recover these events, in this paper we propose a search method for detection of gravitational waves produced from the coalescences of eccentric binary black holes (eBBH). We study the search sensitivity and the false alarm rates on a segment of data from the second joint science run of LIGO and Virgo detectors, and discuss the implications of the eccentric binary search for the advanced GW detectors.

  9. Eccentricity distribution in the main asteroid belt

    CERN Document Server

    Malhotra, Renu

    2016-01-01

    The observationally complete sample of the main belt asteroids now spans more than two orders of magnitude in size and numbers more than 64,000 (excluding collisional family members). We undertook an analysis of asteroids' eccentricities and their interpretation with simple physical models. We find that Plummer's (1916) conclusion that the asteroids' eccentricities follow a Rayleigh distribution holds for the osculating eccentricities of large asteroids, but the proper eccentricities deviate from a Rayleigh distribution: there is a deficit of eccentricities smaller than $\\sim0.1$ and an excess of larger eccentricities. We further find that the proper eccentricities do not depend significantly on asteroid size but have strong dependence on heliocentric distance: the outer asteroid belt follows a Rayleigh distribution, but the inner belt is strikingly different. Eccentricities in the inner belt can be modeled as a vector sum of a primordial eccentricity vector of random orientation and magnitude drawn from a Ra...

  10. Detectability of eccentric compact binary coalescences with advanced gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, M.; Meyers, P.; Thrane, E.; Luo, J.; Christensen, N.

    2015-03-01

    Compact binary coalescences are a promising source of gravitational waves for second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors such as advanced LIGO and advanced Virgo. While most binaries are expected to possess circular orbits, some may be eccentric, for example, if they are formed through dynamical capture. Eccentric orbits can create difficulty for matched filtering searches due to the challenges of creating effective template banks to detect these signals. In previous work, we showed how seedless clustering can be used to detect low-mass (Mtotal≤10 M⊙) compact binary coalescences for both spinning and eccentric systems, assuming a circular post-Newtonian expansion. Here, we describe a parametrization that is designed to maximize sensitivity to low-eccentricity (0 ≤ɛ ≤0.6 ) systems, derived from the analytic equations. We show that this parametrization provides a robust and computationally efficient method for detecting eccentric low-mass compact binaries. Based on these results, we conclude that advanced detectors will have a chance of detecting eccentric binaries if optimistic models prove true. However, a null observation is unlikely to firmly rule out models of eccentric binary populations.

  11. Eccentricity modulation of a close-in planet by a companion: Application to GJ 436 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Xiao; ZHOU JiLin

    2009-01-01

    GJ 436b is a Neptune-size planet with 23.2 Earth masses in an elliptical orbit of period 2.64 days and eccentricity 0.16. With a typical tidal dissipation factor (Q'~106) as that of a giant planet with convective envelope, its orbital circularization timescale under internal tidal dissipation is around 1 Ga, at least two times less than the stellar age (> 3 Ga). A plausible mechanism is that the eccentricity of GJ 436b is modulated by a planetary companion due to their mutual perturbation. Here we investigate this possi-bility from the dynamical viewpoint. A general method is given to predict the possible locations of the dynamically coupled companions, including nearby/distance non-resonant or mean motion resonance orbits with the first planet. Applying the method to GJ 436 system, we find it is very unlikely that the eccentricity of GJ 436b is maintained at the present location by a nearby/distance companion through secular perturbation or mean motion resonance. In fact, in all these simulated cases, GJ 436b will un-dergo eccentricity damp and orbital decay, leaving the present location within the stellar age. However, these results do not rule out the possible existence of planet companions in nearby/distance orbits, although they are not able to maintain the eccentricity of GJ 436b.

  12. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Osburn, Thomas; Evans, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive non-rotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as $e\\sim0.8$ and initial separations as large as $\\sim 100M$ to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within $\\sim0.1$ radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  13. Climate of an Earth-Like World with Changing Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Having a giant planet like Jupiter next door can really wreak havoc on your orbit! A new study examines what such a bad neighbor might mean for the long-term climate of an Earth-like planet.Influence of a Bad NeighborThe presence of a Jupiter-like giant planet in a nearby orbit can significantly affect how terrestrial planets evolve dynamically, causing elements like the planets orbital eccentricities and axial tilts to change over time. Earth is saved this inconvenience Jupiter isnt close enough to significantly influence us, and our large moon stabilizes our orbit against Jupiters tugs.Top panels: Authors simulationoutcomes for Case1, in which the planets eccentricity varies from 0 to 0.283 over 6500 years. Bottom panels: Outcomes for Case 2, in which the planets eccentricity varies from 0 to 0.066 over 4500 years. The highereccentricities reached in Case 1 causes the climate parameters to vary more widely. Click for a better look! [Way Georgakarakos 2017]Mars, on the other hand, isnt as lucky: its possible that Jupiters gravitational pull causes Marss axial tilt, for instance, to evolve through a range as large as 0 to 60 degrees on timescales of millions of years! Marss orbital eccentricity is similarly thought to vary due to Jupiters influence, and both of these factors play a major role in determining Marss climate.As exoplanet missions discover more planets many of which are Earth-like we must carefully consider which among these are most likely to be capable of sustaining life. If having a nearby neighbor like a Jupiter can tug an Earth-like world into an orbit with varying eccentricity, how does this affect the planets climate? Will the planet remain temperate? Or will it develop a runaway heating or cooling effect as it orbits, rendering it uninhabitable?Oceans and OrbitsTo examine these questions, two scientists have built the first ever 3D global climate model simulations of an Earth-like world using a fully coupled ocean (necessary for understanding

  14. Retrograde entry portal for femoral interlocking nailing in femoral nonunion after plate failure: a prospective comparative study with antergrade portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaghir, Yasser

    2017-03-01

    The piriformis fossa is the ideal portal of entry for antegrade interlocking nailing. Localizing this portal can be difficult and its eccentricity leads to complications. This prospective comparative study was designed to compare an innovative way to obtain the ideal portal from inside the medullary canal in cases of plate failure and compare it to the classic antegrade portal. It included 41 cases (19 antegrade and 22 retrograde). The retrograde portal was significantly better in terms of entry time, radiation time, blood-loss, and wound length. The proper portal was rapidly and easily achieved in all retrograde cases without complications; while four in antegrade cases had complications. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Level of evidence III.

  15. An objective statistical test for eccentricity forcing of Oligo-Miocene climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proistosescu, C.; Huybers, P.; Maloof, A. C.

    2008-12-01

    We seek a maximally objective test for the presence of orbital features in Oligocene and Miocene δ18O records from marine sediments. Changes in Earth's orbital eccentricity are thought to be an important control on the long term variability of climate during the Oligocene and Miocene Epochs. However, such an important control from eccentricity is surprising because eccentricity has relatively little influence on Earth's annual average insolation budget. Nevertheless, if significant eccentricity variability is present, it would provide important insight into the operation of the climate system at long timescales. Here we use previously published data, but using a chronology which is initially independent of orbital assumptions, to test for the presence of eccentricity period variability in the Oligocene/Miocene sediment records. In contrast to the sawtooth climate record of the Pleistocene, the Oligocene and Miocene climate record appears smooth and symmetric and does not reset itself every hundred thousand years. This smooth variation, as well as the time interval spanning many eccentricity periods makes Oligocene and Miocene paleorecords very suitable for evaluating the importance of eccentricity forcing. First, we construct time scales depending only upon the ages of geomagnetic reversals with intervening ages linearly interpolated with depth. Such a single age-depth relationship is, however, too uncertain to assess whether orbital features are present. Thus, we construct a second depth-derived age-model by averaging ages across multiple sediment cores which have, at least partly, independent accumulation rate histories. But ages are still too uncertain to permit unambiguous detection of orbital variability. Thus we employ limited tuning assumptions and measure the degree by orbital period variability increases using spectral power estimates. By tuning we know that we are biasing the record toward showing orbital variations, but we account for this bias in our

  16. Mean Motion Resonances at High Eccentricities: The 2:1 and the 3:2 Interior Resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianyu; Malhotra, Renu

    2017-07-01

    Mean motion resonances (MMRs) play an important role in the formation and evolution of planetary systems and have significantly influenced the orbital properties and distribution of planets and minor planets in the solar system and in exoplanetary systems. Most previous theoretical analyses have focused on the low- to moderate-eccentricity regime, but with new discoveries of high-eccentricity resonant minor planets and even exoplanets, there is increasing motivation to examine MMRs in the high-eccentricity regime. Here we report on a study of the high-eccentricity regime of MMRs in the circular planar restricted three-body problem. Numerical analyses of the 2:1 and the 3:2 interior resonances are carried out for a wide range of planet-to-star mass ratio μ, and for a wide range of eccentricity of the test particle. The surface-of-section technique is used to study the phase space structure near resonances. We find that new stable libration zones appear at higher eccentricity at libration centers that are shifted from those at low eccentricities. We provide physically intuitive explanations for these transitions in phase space, and we present novel results on the mass and eccentricity dependence of the resonance widths. Our results show that MMRs have sizable libration zones at high eccentricities, comparable to those at lower eccentricities.

  17. Can Eccentric Debris Disks Be Long-lived? A First Numerical Investigation and Application to Zeta(exp 2) Reticuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramaz, V.; Beust, H.; Thebault, P.; Augereau, J.-C.; Bonsor, A.; delBurgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Marshall, J. P.; Milli, J.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, William C.; Eiroa, C.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Imaging of debris disks has found evidence for both eccentric and offset disks. One hypothesis is that they provide evidence for massive perturbers, for example, planets or binary companions, which sculpt the observed structures. One such disk was recently observed in the far-IR by the Herschel Space Observatory around Zeta2 Reticuli. In contrast with previously reported systems, the disk is significantly eccentric, and the system is several Gyr old. Aims. We aim to investigate the long-term evolution of eccentric structures in debris disks caused by a perturber on an eccentric orbit around the star. We hypothesise that the observed eccentric disk around Zeta2 Reticuli might be evidence of such a scenario. If so, we are able to constrain the mass and orbit of a potential perturber, either a giant planet or a binary companion. Methods. Analytical techniques were used to predict the effects of a perturber on a debris disk. Numerical N-body simulations were used to verify these results and further investigate the observable structures that may be produced by eccentric perturbers. The long-term evolution of the disk geometry was examined, with particular application to the Zeta2 Reticuli system. In addition, synthetic images of the disk were produced for direct comparison with Herschel observations. Results. We show that an eccentric companion can produce both the observed offsets and eccentric disks. These effects are not immediate, and we characterise the timescale required for the disk to develop to an eccentric state (and any spirals to vanish). For Zeta2 Reticuli, we derive limits on the mass and orbit of the companion required to produce the observations. Synthetic images show that the pattern observed around Zeta2 Reticuli can be produced by an eccentric disk seen close to edge-on, and allow us to bring additional constraints on the disk parameters of our model (disk flux and extent). Conclusions. We conclude that eccentric planets or stellar companions

  18. Compact planetary systems perturbed by an inclined companion. II. Stellar spin-orbit evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C., E-mail: boue@imcce.fr [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The stellar spin orientation relative to the orbital planes of multiplanet systems is becoming accessible to observations. Here, we analyze and classify different types of spin-orbit evolution in compact multiplanet systems perturbed by an inclined outer companion. Our study is based on classical secular theory, using a vectorial approach developed in a separate paper. When planet-planet perturbations are truncated at the second order in eccentricity and mutual inclination, and the planet-companion perturbations are developed at the quadrupole order, the problem becomes integrable. The motion is composed of a uniform precession of the whole system around the total angular momentum, and in the rotating frame, the evolution is periodic. Here, we focus on the relative motion associated with the oscillations of the inclination between the planet system and the outer orbit and of the obliquities of the star with respect to the two orbital planes. The solution is obtained using a powerful geometric method. With this technique, we identify four different regimes characterized by the nutation amplitude of the stellar spin axis relative to the orbital plane of the planets. In particular, the obliquity of the star reaches its maximum when the system is in the Cassini regime where planets have more angular momentum than the star and where the precession rate of the star is similar to that of the planets induced by the companion. In that case, spin-orbit oscillations exceed twice the inclination between the planets and the companion. Even if the mutual inclination is only ≅ 20°, this resonant case can cause the spin-orbit angle to oscillate between perfectly aligned and retrograde values.

  19. Dietary fiber and retrograde starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivković, R

    1998-01-01

    The history of the recognition of the importance of dietary fiber, their current classification into water-soluble and water-insoluble fiber, and lignin, a single non-carbohydrate fiber, and the physiologic role of dietary fiber, with particular reference to retrograde starch resistance to small intestine digestion, are briefly presented. Dietary fiber are highly hygroscopic, thus they greatly contribute to stool voluminosity by binding water, decrease the glycemic index, and exert a protective action, via an as yet unknown mechanism, against the occurrence of colon cancer. It should be added that some dietary fiber decrease the concentration of cholesterol in the blood, i.e. in the human body. The importance of the methodology used for NSP determination is underlined, since some methods determine only some of the polysaccharides, other also measure some other substances, whereas Englyst's method determines NSP only.

  20. Eccentric Inspirals with Self-Force and Spin-Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Charles; Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Eccentric inspirals of a small mass about a more massive Schwarzschild black hole (EMRIs or IMRIs) are calculated using the gravitational self-force and the Mathisson-Papapetrou spin-force. These calculations include all dissipative and conservative effects that are first order in the mass ratio. We compute systems with initial eccentricities as high as e = 0.8, initial separations as large as 50 M, and arbitrary spin orientations. Including the spin-force causes the orbital plane to precess. Inspirals are calculated using an osculating-orbits scheme that is driven by self-force data from a hybrid self-force code and time-domain spin-force calculations. The hybrid approach uses both self-force data from a Lorenz gauge code and highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code, allowing the hybrid model to track orbital phase of inspirals to within 0.1 radians or better over hundreds or thousands of orbits. NSF PHY15-06182.

  1. Screening of seeds prepared from retrograded potato starch to increase retrogradation rate of maize starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xijun; Liu, Lizeng; Guo, Junjie; Li, Lin; Wu, Changyan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, retrograded potato starches treated by oxalic, hydrochloric and citric acids and/with amylase respectively, as seed crystals, are added into maize starch paste to increase maize starch retrogradation rate. The results show that addition of seed accelerates maize starch retrogradation greatly. Seed prepared from retrograded potato starch treated by oxalic acid increases maize starch retrogradation rate most, from 1.5% to 49%. The results of IR spectra of retrograded maize starch derived from different seeds show that double helix, not hydrogen bond, probably forms at stage of seed growth during retrogradation. The results of IR spectra, X-ray and SEM indicate that treatment of retrograded potato starch with oxalic acid leads to formation of more hydrogen bonds and an increase of seed crystal planes, which markedly promotes the growth of the seed. Retrogradation of maize starch by seeding method surely includes a stage of crystal growth through double helix in a way different from normal maize starch retrogradation.

  2. Equipotential Surfaces and Lagrangian points in Non-synchronous, Eccentric Binary and Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sepinsky, J F; Kalogera, V

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the existence and properties of equipotential surfaces and Lagrangian points in non-synchronous, eccentric binary star and planetary systems under the assumption of quasi-static equilibrium. We adopt a binary potential that accounts for non-synchronous rotation and eccentric orbits, and calculate the positions of the Lagrangian points as functions of the mass ratio, the degree of asynchronism, the orbital eccentricity, and the position of the stars or planets in their relative orbit. We find that the geometry of the equipotential surfaces may facilitate non-conservative mass transfer in non-synchronous, eccentric binary star and planetary systems, especially if the component stars or planets are rotating super-synchronously at the periastron of their relative orbit. We also calculate the volume-equivalent radius of the Roche lobe as a function of the four parameters mentioned above. Contrary to common practice, we find that replacing the radius of a circular orbit in the fitting formula of Eggl...

  3. Planet-induced Stellar Pulsations in HAT-P-2's Eccentric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Julien; Lewis, Nikole K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Fuller, Jim; Antoci, Victoria; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Laughlin, Gregory; Deming, Drake; Shporer, Avi; Batygin, Konstantin; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Agol, Eric; Burrows, Adam S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Langton, Jonathan; Showman, Adam P.

    2017-02-01

    Extrasolar planets on eccentric short-period orbits provide a laboratory in which to study radiative and tidal interactions between a planet and its host star under extreme forcing conditions. Studying such systems probes how the planet’s atmosphere redistributes the time-varying heat flux from its host and how the host star responds to transient tidal distortion. Here, we report the insights into the planet–star interactions in HAT-P-2's eccentric planetary system gained from the analysis of ∼350 hr of 4.5 μm observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope. The observations show no sign of orbit-to-orbit variability nor of orbital evolution of the eccentric planetary companion, HAT-P-2 b. The extensive coverage allows us to better differentiate instrumental systematics from the transient heating of HAT-P-2 b’s 4.5 μm photosphere and yields the detection of stellar pulsations with an amplitude of approximately 40 ppm. These pulsation modes correspond to exact harmonics of the planet’s orbital frequency, indicative of a tidal origin. Transient tidal effects can excite pulsation modes in the envelope of a star, but, to date, such pulsations had only been detected in highly eccentric stellar binaries. Current stellar models are unable to reproduce HAT-P-2's pulsations, suggesting that our understanding of the interactions at play in this system is incomplete.

  4. ON THE FORMATION OF ECCENTRIC MILLISECOND PULSARS WITH HELIUM WHITE-DWARF COMPANIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniadis, John, E-mail: antoniadis@dunlap.utoronto.ca [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2014-12-20

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white dwarfs (WDs) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire and Tauris recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. However, their hypothesis predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities—in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} yr) disk can result in eccentricities of e ≅ 0.01-0.15 for orbital periods between 15 and 50 days. Finally, I propose that, more generally, the disk hypothesis may explain the lack of circular binary pulsars for the aforementioned orbital-period range.

  5. On the Formation of Eccentric Millisecond Pulsars with Helium White-dwarf Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-12-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white dwarfs (WDs) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire & Tauris recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. However, their hypothesis predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities—in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (104-105 yr) disk can result in eccentricities of e ~= 0.01-0.15 for orbital periods between 15 and 50 days. Finally, I propose that, more generally, the disk hypothesis may explain the lack of circular binary pulsars for the aforementioned orbital-period range.

  6. THE PHOTOECCENTRIC EFFECT AND PROTO-HOT JUPITERS. I. MEASURING PHOTOMETRIC ECCENTRICITIES OF INDIVIDUAL TRANSITING PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Rebekah I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-10, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Johnson, John Asher, E-mail: rdawson@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Exoplanet orbital eccentricities offer valuable clues about the history of planetary systems. Eccentric, Jupiter-sized planets are particularly interesting: they may link the 'cold' Jupiters beyond the ice line to close-in hot Jupiters, which are unlikely to have formed in situ. To date, eccentricities of individual transiting planets primarily come from radial-velocity measurements. Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting Jupiters spanning a range of periods, but the faintness of the host stars precludes radial-velocity follow-up of most. Here, we demonstrate a Bayesian method of measuring an individual planet's eccentricity solely from its transit light curve using prior knowledge of its host star's density. We show that eccentric Jupiters are readily identified by their short ingress/egress/total transit durations-part of the 'photoeccentric' light curve signature of a planet's eccentricity-even with long-cadence Kepler photometry and loosely constrained stellar parameters. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo exploration of parameter posteriors naturally marginalizes over the periapse angle and automatically accounts for the transit probability. To demonstrate, we use three published transit light curves of HD 17156 b to measure an eccentricity of e = 0.71{sup +0.16}{sub -0.09}, in good agreement with the discovery value e = 0.67 {+-} 0.08 based on 33 radial-velocity measurements. We present two additional tests using Kepler data. In each case, the technique proves to be a viable method of measuring exoplanet eccentricities and their confidence intervals. Finally, we argue that this method is the most efficient, effective means of identifying the extremely eccentric, proto-hot Jupiters predicted by Socrates et al.

  7. Chronic Eccentric Exercise and the Older Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluchowski, Ashley; Harris, Nigel; Dulson, Deborah; Cronin, John

    2015-10-01

    Eccentric exercise has gained increasing attention as a suitable and promising intervention to delay or mitigate the known physical and physiological declines associated with aging. Determining the relative efficacy of eccentric exercise when compared with the more conventionally prescribed traditional resistance exercise will support evidence-based prescribing for the aging population. Thus, original research studies incorporating chronic eccentric exercise interventions in the older adult population were included in this review. The effects of a range of eccentric exercise modalities on muscular strength, functional capacity, body composition, muscle architecture, markers of muscle damage, the immune system, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, and rating of perceived exertion were all reviewed as outcomes of particular interest in the older adult. Muscular strength was found to increase most consistently compared with results from traditional resistance exercise. Functional capacity and body composition showed significant improvements with eccentric endurance protocols, especially in older, frail or sedentary cohorts. Muscle damage was avoided with the gradual progression of novel eccentric exercise, while muscle damage from intense acute bouts was significantly attenuated with repeated sessions. Eccentric exercise causes little cardiovascular stress; thus, it may not generate the overload required to elicit cardiovascular adaptations. An anabolic state may be achievable following eccentric exercise, while improvements to insulin sensitivity have not been found. Finally, rating of perceived exertion during eccentric exercise was often significantly lower than during traditional resistance exercise. Overall, evidence supports the prescription of eccentric exercise for the majority of outcomes of interest in the diverse cohorts of the older adult population.

  8. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed ...

  9. The Photoeccentric Effect and Proto Hot Jupiters II. KOI-1474.01, an eccentric planet perturbed by an unseen companion

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Rebekah I; Morton, Timothy D; Crepp, Justin R; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Murray-Clay, Ruth A; Howard, Andrew W

    2012-01-01

    The exoplanets known as hot Jupiters---Jupiter-sized planets with periods less than 10 days---likely are relics of dynamical processes that shape all planetary system architectures. Socrates et al. (2012) argued that high eccentricity migration (HEM) mechanisms proposed for situating these close-in planets should produce an observable population of highly eccentric proto hot Jupiters that have not yet tidally circularized. HEM should also create failed hot Jupiters, with periapses just beyond the influence of fast circularization. Using the technique we previously presented for measuring eccentricities from photometry (the "photoeccentric effect"), we are distilling a collection of eccentric proto and failed hot Jupiters from the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI). Here we present the first, KOI-1474.01, which has a long orbital period (69.7340 days) and a large eccentricity e = 0.81 +0.10/-0.07, skirting the proto hot Jupiter boundary. Combining Keplerphotometry, ground-based spectroscopy, and stellar evolutio...

  10. 1D accretion discs around eccentric planets: observable near-infrared variability

    CERN Document Server

    Dunhill, Alex

    2014-01-01

    I present the results of 1D models of circumplanetary discs around planets on eccentric orbits. I use a classical viscous heating model to calculate emission fluxes at the wavelengths targeted by the NIRCam instrument on JWST, and compare the variability of this signal with the published NIRCam sensitivity specifications. This variability is theoretically detectable by JWST for a sufficiently viscous disc ($\\alpha \\sim 10^{-2}$) around a sufficiently eccentric planet ($e \\sim 0.1-0.2$) and if the circumplanetary disc accretes material from its parent disc at a rate $\\dot{M} \\gtrsim 10^{-7}\\, \\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}\\,\\mathrm{yr}^{-1}$. I discuss the limitations of the models used, and the implications of the result for probing the effectiveness of disc interactions for growing a planet's orbital eccentricity.

  11. Extreme Climate Variations from Milankovitch-like Eccentricity Oscillations in Extrasolar Planetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Spiegel, David S

    2010-01-01

    Although our solar system features predominantly circular orbits, the exoplanets discovered so far indicate that this is the exception rather than the rule. This could have crucial consequences for exoplanet climates, both because eccentric terrestrial exoplanets could have extreme seasonal variation, and because giant planets on eccentric orbits could excite Milankovitch-like variations of a potentially habitable terrestrial planet,\\"A\\^os eccentricity, on timescales of thousands-to-millions of years. A particularly interesting implication concerns the fact that the Earth is thought to have gone through at least one globally frozen, "snowball" state in the last billion years that it presumably exited after several million years of buildup of greenhouse gases when the ice-cover shut off the carbonate-silicate cycle. Water-rich extrasolar terrestrial planets with the capacity to host life might be at risk of falling into similar snowball states. Here we show that if a terrestrial planet has a giant companion o...

  12. Eccentric first post-Newtonian waveforms for compact binaries in frequency domain with Hansen coefficients

    CERN Document Server

    Mikóczi, Balázs; Vasúth, Mátyás

    2015-01-01

    The inspiral and merger of supermassive black hole binary systems with high orbital eccentricity are among the promising sources of the advanced gravitational wave observatories. In this paper we derive analytic ready-to-use first post-Newtonian eccentric waveform in Fourier domain with the use of Hansen coefficients. Introducing generic perturbations of celestial mechanics we have generalized the Hansen expansion to the first post-Newtonian order which are then used to express the waveforms. Taking into account the high eccentricity of the orbit leads to the appearance of secular terms in the waveform which are eliminated with the introduction of a phase shift. The waveforms have a systematic structure and as our main result these are expressed in a tabular form.

  13. Eccentric black hole mergers and zoom-whirl behavior from elliptic inspirals to hyperbolic encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, Roman

    2012-01-01

    We perform a parameter study of non-spinning, equal and unequal mass black hole binaries on generic, eccentric orbits in numerical relativity. The linear momentum considered ranges from that of a circular orbit to ten times that value. We discuss the different manifestations of zoom-whirl behavior in the hyperbolic and the elliptic regime. The hyperbolic data set applies to dynamical capture scenarios (e.g. in globular clusters). Evolutions in the elliptic regime correspond to possible end states of supermassive black hole binaries. We spot zoom-whirl behavior for eccentricities as low as $e\\sim0.5$, i.e. within the expected range of eccentricities in massive black hole binaries from galaxy mergers and binaries near galactic centers. The resulting gravitational waveforms reveal a rich structure, which will effectively break degeneracies in parameter space improving parameter estimation.

  14. Jumping Jupiter can explain Mercury's orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Fernando; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury's orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury's eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury's perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity), and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  15. Ground Target Overflight and Orbital Maneuvering via Atmospheric Maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    al., 2002:228-230). Prior to the commencement of any research into aeroassisted maneuvers, a firm foundation in the understanding of atmospheric...cosine term is used for prograde orbits while the negative term is used for retrograde orbits. The r(1), r(2), and r(3) terms rerpresent the 1st... retrograde ) only target longitude crossings which occur in the same hemisphere as the 44 target are possible to overfly without changing the inclination

  16. A Massive Millisecond Pulsar in an Eccentric Binary

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, E D; Kramer, M; Champion, D J; Berezina, M; Bassa, C G; Lyne, A G; Stappers, B W

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of a population of eccentric (e ~ 0.1) millisecond pulsar (MSP) binaries with low-mass white dwarf companions in the Galactic field represents a challenge to evolutionary models that explain MSP formation as recycling: all such models predict that the orbits become highly circularised during a long period of accretion. The members of this new population exhibit remarkably similar properties (orbital periods, eccentricities, companion masses, spin periods) and several models have been put forward that suggest a common formation channel. In this work we present the results of an extensive timing campaign focusing on one member of this new population, PSR J1946+3417. Through measurement of the both the advance of periastron and Shapiro delay for this system, we determine the mass of the pulsar, companion and the inclination of the orbit to be 1.828(22) Msun, 0.2656(19) Msun and 76.4(6) , under the assumption that general relativity is the true description of gravity. Notably, this is the thi...

  17. A Quasi-Stationary Solution to Gliese 436b's Eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Batygin, Konstantin; Meschiari, Stefano; Rivera, Eugenio; Vogt, Steve; Butler, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that the large orbital eccentricity of the transiting Neptune-mass planet Gliese 436b is maintained in the face of tidal dissipation by a second planet in the system. We find that the currently observed configuration can be understood if Gliese 436b and a putative companion have evolved to a quasi-stationary fixed point in which the planets' orbital apses are co-linear and in which secular variations in the orbital eccentricities of the two planets have been almost entirely damped out. We adopt an octopole-order secular theory based on a Legendre expansion in the semi-major axis ratio to delineate well-defined regions of (P_c, M_c, e_c) space that can be occupied by a perturbing companion. We incorporate the evolutionary effect of tidal dissipation into our secular model of the system, and solve the resulting initial value problems for a large sample of the allowed configurations. We then polish the stationary configurations derived from secular theory with full numerical integr...

  18. Empirical explanation of the anomalous increases of the astronomical unit and of the lunar eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2011-01-01

    Both the recently reported anomalous secular increase of the astronomical unit, of the order of a few cm yr^-1, and of the eccentricity of the lunar orbit e_ = (9+/-3) 10^-12 yr^-1 can be phenomenologically explained by postulating that the acceleration of a test particle orbiting a central body, in addition to usual Newtonian component, contains a small additional radial term proportional to the radial projection vr of the velocity of the particle's orbital motion. Indeed, it induces secular variations of both the semi-major axis a and the eccentricity e of the test particle's orbit. In the case of the Earth and the Moon, they numerically agree rather well with the measured anomalies if one takes the numerical value of the coefficient of proportionality of the extra-acceleration approximately equal to that of the Hubble parameter H0 = 7.3 10^-11 yr^-1.

  19. Formation of terrestrial planets in eccentric and inclined giant-planet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriadis, Sotiris; Libert, Anne-Sophie; Raymond, Sean

    2016-10-01

    The orbits of extrasolar planets are more various than the circular and coplanar ones of the Solar system. We study the impact of inclined and eccentric massive giant planets on the terrestrial planet formation process. The physical and orbital parameters of the giant planets considered in this study arise from n-body simulations of three giant planets in the late stage of the gas disc, under the combined action of Type II migration and planet-planet scattering. At the dispersal of the gas disc, the two- and three-planet systems interact then with an inner disc of planetesimals and planetary embryos. We discuss the mass and orbital parameters of the terrestrial planets formed by our simulations, as well as their water content. We also investigate how the disc of planetesimals and planetary embryos modifies the eccentric and inclined orbits of the giant planets.

  20. Decline eccentric squats increases patellar tendon loading compared to standard eccentric squats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Aagaard, P; Roikjaer, S

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have shown excellent clinical results using eccentric squat training on a 25 degrees decline board to treat patellar tendinopathy. It remains unknown why therapeutic management of patellar tendinopathy using decline eccentric squats offer superior clinical efficacy compared...

  1. On the formation of eccentric millisecond pulsars with helium white-dwarf companions

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John

    2014-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) orbiting helium white-dwarfs (WD) in eccentric orbits challenge the established binary-evolution paradigm that predicts efficient orbital circularization during the mass-transfer episode that spins up the pulsar. Freire and Tauris (2014) recently proposed that these binary MSPs may instead form from the rotationally-delayed accretion-induced collapse of a massive WD. This scenario predicts that eccentric systems preferably host low-mass pulsars and travel with small systemic velocities -- in tension with new observational constraints. Here, I show that a substantial growth in eccentricity may alternatively arise from the dynamical interaction of the binary with a circumbinary disk. Such a disk may form from ejected donor material during hydrogen flash episodes, when the neutron star is already an active radio pulsar and tidal forces can no longer circularize the binary. I demonstrate that a short-lived (10^4-10^5 yrs disk can result to eccentricities of e ~ 0.01-0.15 for orbital per...

  2. Eccentricity modulation of a close-in planet by a companion:Application to GJ 436 system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    GJ 436b is a Neptune-size planet with 23.2 Earth masses in an elliptical orbit of period 2.64 days and eccentricity 0.16. With a typical tidal dissipation factor(Q′~106) as that of a giant planet with convective envelope,its orbital circularization timescale under internal tidal dissipation is around 1 Ga,at least two times less than the stellar age(> 3 Ga). A plausible mechanism is that the eccentricity of GJ 436b is modulated by a planetary companion due to their mutual perturbation. Here we investigate this possibility from the dynamical viewpoint. A general method is given to predict the possible locations of the dynamically coupled companions,including nearby/distance non-resonant or mean motion resonance orbits with the first planet. Applying the method to GJ 436 system,we find it is very unlikely that the eccentricity of GJ 436b is maintained at the present location by a nearby/distance companion through secular perturbation or mean motion resonance. In fact,in all these simulated cases,GJ 436b will undergo eccentricity damp and orbital decay,leaving the present location within the stellar age. However,these results do not rule out the possible existence of planet companions in nearby/distance orbits,although they are not able to maintain the eccentricity of GJ 436b.

  3. Heartbeat Stars: A Class Of Tidally Excited Eccentric Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Thomas; Thompson, S. E.; Mullally, F.; Everett, M.; Howell, S. B.; Still, M.; Christiansen, J. L.; Rowe, J.; Kurtz, D. W.; Hambleton, K.

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered a class of eccentric binary systems undergoing dynamic tidal distortions and tidally induced pulsations in the Kepler data. Each has a uniquely shaped light curve that is characterized by periodic brightening or variability at time scales of 4-20 days which is frequently accompanied by shorter period oscillations. We can explain the dominant features of the entire class with changing tidal forces that occur in close, eccentric binary systems. In this case the large variety of light curve shapes arises from viewing systems at different angles. A hypothesis that is confirmed with radial velocity measurements that show an eccentric orbit. Prior to the discovery of these 17 new systems, KOI-54 was the only system with direct detection of these dynamic tides and tidally induced oscillations. While significant work remains to include all the physics required to accurately model these systems and begin to understand how tidal effects influence the system, in this presentation we present preliminary fits to the light curves and describe the properties of this class of stars as a whole.

  4. A simple model of the chaotic eccentricity of Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Boué, Gwenaël; Farago, François

    2012-01-01

    Mercury's eccentricity is chaotic and can increase so much that collisions with Venus or the Sun become possible (Laskar, 1989, 1990, 1994, 2008, Batygin & Laughlin, 2008, Laskar & Gastineau, 2009). This chaotic behavior results from an intricate network of secular resonances, but in this paper, we show that a simple integrable model with only one degree of freedom is actually able to reproduce the large variations in Mercury's eccentricity, with the correct amplitude and timescale. We show that this behavior occurs in the vicinity of the separatrices of the resonance g1-g5 between the precession frequencies of Mercury and Jupiter. However, the main contribution does not come from the direct interaction between these two planets. It is due to the excitation of Venus' orbit at Jupiter's precession frequency g5. We use a multipolar model that is not expanded with respect to Mercury's eccentricity, but because of the proximity of Mercury and Venus, the Hamiltonian is expanded up to order 20 and more in t...

  5. Exploring a Stream of Highly-Eccentric Binaries with Kepler

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Subo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2012-01-01

    With 16-month Kepler data, 14 long-period (40 d - 265 d) eclipsing binaries on highly eccentric orbits (minimum e between 0.5 and 0.85) are recognized from their closely separated primary and secondary eclipses (\\Delta t_I,II = 3 d - 10 d). These systems confirm the existence of a previously hinted binary population situated near a constant angular momentum track at P(1-e^2)^(3/2) ~ 15 d, close to the tidal circularization period P_circ. They may be presently migrating due to tidal dissipation and form a steady-state stream (~1% of stars) feeding the close-binary population (few percent of stars). If so, future Kepler data releases will reveal a growing number (dozens) of systems at longer periods, following dN/dlgP \\propto P^(1/3) with increasing eccentricities reaching e -> 0.98 for P -> 1000d. Radial-velocity follow up of long-period eclipsing binaries with no secondary eclipses could offer a significantly larger sample. Orders of magnitude more (hundreds) may reveal their presence from periodic "eccentric...

  6. Dynamics of prolate spheroidal mass distributions with varying eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Rathulnath, R

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the potential for a prolate spheroidal distribution as in a dark matter halo with a radially varying eccentricity. This is obtained by summing up the shell-by-shell contributions of isodensity surfaces, which are taken to be concentric and with a common polar axis and with an axis ratio that varies with radius. Interestingly, the constancy of potential inside a shell is shown to be a good approximation even when the isodensity contours are dissimilar spheroids, as long as the radial variation in eccentricity is small as seen in realistic systems. We consider three cases where the isodensity contours are more prolate at large radii, or are less prolate, or have a constant eccentricity. Other relevant physical quantities like the rotation velocity, the net orbital and vertical frequency due to the halo and an exponential disc of finite thickness embedded in it are obtained. We apply this to the kinematical origin of Galactic warp, and show that a prolate shaped halo is not conducive t...

  7. A Simple Family of Models for Eccentric Keplerian Fluid Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Statler, T S

    2001-01-01

    In order to be in a long-lived configuration, the density in a fluid disk should be constant along streamlines to prevent compressional (PdV) work from being done cyclically around every orbit. In a pure Kepler potential, flow along aligned, elliptical streamlines of constant eccentricity will satisfy this condition. For most density profiles, differential precession driven by the pressure gradient will destroy the alignment; however, in the razor-thin approximation there is a family of simple equilibria in which the precession frequency is the same at all radii. These disks may therefore be long-lived at significant eccentricities. The density can be made axisymmetric as r goes to 0, while maintaining the precession rate, by relaxing the requirement of constancy along streamlines in an arbitrarily small transition region near the center. In the limit of small eccentricity, the models can be seen as acoustically perturbed axisymmetric disks, and the precession rate is shown to agree with linear theory. The pe...

  8. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-02-10

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation.

  9. Retrogradation enthalpy does not always reflect the retrogradation behavior of gelatinized starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujun; Li, Caili; Zhang, Xiu; Copeland, Les; Wang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    Starch retrogradation is a term used to define the process in which gelatinized starch undergoes a disorder-to-order transition. A thorough understanding of starch retrogradation behavior plays an important role in maintaining the quality of starchy foods during storage. By means of DSC, we have demonstrated for the first time that at low water contents, the enthalpy change of retrograded starch is higher than that of native starch. In terms of FTIR and Raman spectroscopic results, we showed that the molecular order of reheated retrograded starch samples is lower than that of DSC gelatinized starch. These findings have led us to conclude that enthalpy change of retrograded starch at low water contents involves the melting of recrystallized starch during storage and residual starch crystallites after DSC gelatinization, and that the endothermic transition of retrograded starch gels at low water contents does not fully represent the retrogradation behavior of starch. Very low or high water contents do not favor the occurrence of starch retrogradation. PMID:26860788

  10. Natural orbit approximations in single power-law potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Struck, Curtis

    2014-01-01

    In a previous paper, I demonstrated the accuracy of simple, precessing, power ellipse (p-ellipse) approximations to orbits of low-to-moderate eccentricity in power-law potentials. Here I explore several extensions of these approximations to improve accuracy, especially for nearly radial orbits. 1) It is found that moderately improved orbital fits can be achieved with higher order perturbation expansions (in eccentricity), with the addition of `harmonic' terms to the solution. 2) Alternately, a matching of the extreme radial excursions of an orbit can be imposed, and a more accurate estimate of the eccentricity parameter is obtained. However, the error in the precession frequency is usually increased. 3) A correction function of small magnitude corrects the frequency problem. With this correction, even first order approximations yield excellent fits at quite high eccentricity over a range of potential indices that includes flat and falling rotation curve cases. 4) Adding a first harmonic term to fit the breadt...

  11. The origin of the eccentricity of the hot Jupiter in CI Tau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosotti, G. P.; Booth, R. A.; Clarke, C. J.; Teyssandier, J.; Facchini, S.; Mustill, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Following the recent discovery of the first radial velocity planet in a star still possessing a protoplanetary disc (CI Tau), we examine the origin of the planet's eccentricity (e ˜0.3). We show through long time-scale (105 orbits) simulations that the planetary eccentricity can be pumped by the disc, even when its local surface density is well below the threshold previously derived from short time-scale integrations. We show that the disc may be able to excite the planet's orbital eccentricity in <1 Myr for the system parameters of CI Tau. We also perform two-planet scattering experiments and show that alternatively the observed planet may plausibly have acquired its eccentricity through dynamical scattering of a migrating lower mass planet, which has either been ejected from the system or swallowed by the central star. In the latter case the present location and eccentricity of the observed planet can be recovered if it was previously stalled within the disc's magnetospheric cavity.

  12. Observational constraints on the orbit and location of Planet Nine in the outer solar system

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    We use an extensive suite of numerical simulations to constrain the mass and orbit of Planet Nine, the recently proposed perturber in a distant eccentric orbit in the outer solar system. We compare our simulations to the observed population of aligned eccentric high semimajor axis Kuiper belt objects and determine which simulation parameters are statistically compatible with the observations. We find that only a narrow range of orbital elements can reproduce the observations. In particular, the combination of semimajor axis, eccentricity, and mass of Planet Nine strongly dictates the semimajor axis range of the orbital confinement of the distant eccentric Kuiper belt objects. Allowed orbits, which confine Kuiper belt objects with semimajor axis beyond 230 AU, have perihelia roughly between 200 and 350 AU, semimajor axes between 300 and 900 AU, and masses of approximately 10 Earth masses. Orbitally confined objects also generally have orbital planes similar to that of the planet, suggesting that the planet is ...

  13. Beat relationships between orbital periodicities in insolation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    Variations in insolation are examined in terms of beat relationships. The relations between eccentricity periods, precessional parameters, and obliquity periods are analyzed. Beat periods are calculated and compared with orbital periodicities from Berger's (1978) series expansions. It is noted that the data, which correlate eccentricity, obliquity, and precessional-parameter periods, are applicable to the study of orbital periodicities in time-series analyses of long-term climatic records.

  14. Tropical sea surface temperatures and the earth's orbital eccentricity cycles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.; Fernandes, A.A.; Mohan, R.

    The tropical oceanic warm pools are climatologically important regions because their sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are positively related to atmospheric greenhouse effect and the cumulonimbus-cirrus cloud anvil. Such a warm pool is also present...

  15. Eccentric Exercise: Physiological Characteristics and Acute Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jamie; Pearson, Simon; Ross, Angus; McGuigan, Mike

    2017-04-01

    An eccentric contraction involves the active lengthening of muscle under an external load. The molecular and neural mechanisms underpinning eccentric contractions differ from those of concentric and isometric contractions and remain less understood. A number of molecular theories have been put forth to explain the unexplained observations during eccentric contractions that deviate from the predictions of the established theories of muscle contraction. Postulated mechanisms include a strain-induced modulation of actin-myosin interactions at the level of the cross-bridge, the activation of the structural protein titin, and the winding of titin on actin. Accordingly, neural strategies controlling eccentric contractions also differ with a greater, and possibly distinct, cortical activation observed despite an apparently lower activation at the level of the motor unit. The characteristics of eccentric contractions are associated with several acute physiological responses to eccentrically-emphasised exercise. Differences in neuromuscular, metabolic, hormonal and anabolic signalling responses during, and following, an eccentric exercise bout have frequently been observed in comparison to concentric exercise. Subsequently, the high levels of muscular strain with such exercise can induce muscle damage which is rarely observed with other contraction types. The net result of these eccentric contraction characteristics and responses appears to be a novel adaptive signal within the neuromuscular system.

  16. Eccentricity distribution in the main asteroid belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Renu; Wang, Xianyu

    2017-03-01

    The observationally complete sample of the main belt asteroids now spans more than two orders of magnitude in size and numbers more than 64 000 (excluding collisional family members). We undertook an analysis of asteroids' eccentricities and their interpretation with simple physical models. We find that a century old conclusion that the asteroids' eccentricities follow a Rayleigh distribution holds for the osculating eccentricities of large asteroids, but the proper eccentricities deviate from a Rayleigh distribution; there is a deficit of eccentricities smaller than ∼0.1 and an excess of larger eccentricities. We further find that the proper eccentricities do not depend significantly on asteroid size but have strong dependence on heliocentric distance; the outer asteroid belt follows a Rayleigh distribution, but the inner belt is strikingly different. Eccentricities in the inner belt can be modelled as a vector sum of a primordial eccentricity vector of random orientation and magnitude drawn from a Rayleigh distribution of parameter ∼0.06, and an excitation of random phase and magnitude ∼0.13. These results imply that when a late dynamical excitation of the asteroids occurred, it was independent of asteroid size and was stronger in the inner belt than in the outer belt. We discuss implications for the primordial asteroid belt and suggest that the observationally complete sample size of main belt asteroids is large enough that more sophisticated model-fitting of the eccentricities is warranted and could serve to test alternative theoretical models of the dynamical excitation history of asteroids and its links to the migration history of the giant planets.

  17. Highly eccentric exoplanets trapped in mean-motion resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadou, K I

    2015-01-01

    We herein utilize the general three-body problem (GTBP) as a model, in order to simulate resonant systems consisting of a star and two planets, where at least one of them is highly eccentric. We study them in terms of their long-term stability, via the construction of maps of dynamical stability and the computation of the corresponding families of periodic orbits. We identify the way their survival is connected with the regions of regular motion in phase space, which, in turn, were created by stable resonant periodic orbits in their vicinity. Consequently, a phase protection mechanism is provided and the planets avoid close encounters and collisions even on long timescales. We apply our methodology to the extrasolar system HD 82943.

  18. Effects of the eccentricity of the primaries in powered Swing-By maneuvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Alessandra F. S.; Prado, Antônio F. B. A.; Winter, Othon C.; Santos, Denilson P. S.

    2017-04-01

    The present paper studies the powered Swing-By maneuver when performed in an elliptical system of primaries. It means that there is a spacecraft travelling in a system governed by the gravity fields of two bodies that are in elliptical orbits around their center of mass. The paper particularly analyzes the effects of the parameters relative to the Swing-By (Vinf-,rp, ψ), the orbit of the secondary body around the primary one (e, ν) and the elements that specify the impulse applied (δV, α) to the spacecraft. The impulse is applied when the spacecraft passes by the periapsis of its orbit around the body, where it performs the Swing-By, with different magnitudes and directions. The inclusion of the orbital eccentricity of the primaries in this problem makes it closer to reality, considering that there are many known systems with eccentricities different from zero. In particular, there are several moons in the Solar System which orbits are not circular, as well as some smaller bodies, like the dwarf planet Haumea and its moons, which have eccentricities of 0.25 or even larger. The behavior of the energy variation of the spacecraft is shown in details, as well as the cases where captures and collisions occur. The results show the conditions that optimize this maneuver, according to some given parameters, and how much can be obtained in terms of gains or losses of energy using the best conditions found by the algorithm developed here.

  19. A Healthy Live Birth Following ICSI with Retrograde Ejaculated Sperm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    This case report describes the identification and successful treatment of a couple ... Keywords: Retrograde ejaculation, ICSI, infertility, Africa ... Diagnostic clues to retrograde ejaculation ... normal hormone profile and patent fallopian tubes.

  20. The Highly-Eccentric Detached Eclipsing Binaries in ACVS and MACC

    CERN Document Server

    Shivvers, Isaac; Richards, Joseph W

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation synoptic photometric surveys will yield unprecedented (for the astronomical community) volumes of data and the processes of discovery and rare-object identification are, by necessity, becoming more autonomous. Such autonomous searches can be used to find objects of interest applicable to a wide range of outstanding problems in astronomy, and in this paper we present the methods and results of a largely autonomous search for highly eccentric detached eclipsing binary systems in the Machine-learned ASAS Classification Catalog. 106 detached eclipsing binaries with eccentricities greater than 0.1 are presented, most of which are identified here for the first time. We also present new radial-velocity curves and absolute parameters for 6 of those systems with the long-term goal of increasing the number of highly eccentric systems with orbital solutions, thereby facilitating further studies of the tidal circularization process in binary stars.

  1. Pulsating red giant stars in eccentric binary systems discovered from Kepler space-based photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, P G; Vos, J; Kallinger, T; Bloemen, S; Tkachenko, A; García, R A; Østensen, R H; Aerts, C; Kurtz, D W; De Ridder, J; Hekker, S; Pavlovski, K; Mathur, S; De Smedt, K; Derekas, A; Corsaro, E; Mosser, B; Van Winckel, H; Huber, D; Degroote, P; Davies, G R; Prša, A; Debosscher, J; Elsworth, Y; Nemeth, P; Siess, L; Schmid, V S; Pápics, P I; de Vries, B L; van Marle, A J; Marcos-Arenal, P; Lobel, A

    2013-01-01

    The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA's Kepler space telescope led to an improved understanding of red giant stars and binary stars. Seismology allows us to constrain the properties of red giants. In addition to eclipsing binaries, eccentric non-eclipsing binaries, exhibiting ellipsoidal modulations, have been detected with Kepler. We aim to study the properties of eccentric binary systems containing a red giant star and derive the parameters of the primary giant component. We apply asteroseismic techniques to determine masses and radii of the primary component of each system. For a selected target, light and radial velocity curve modelling techniques are applied to extract the parameters of the system. The effects of stellar on the binary system are studied. The paper presents the asteroseismic analysis of 18 pulsating red giants in eccentric binary systems, for which masses and radii were constrained. The orbital periods of these systems range from 20 to 440days. From radial velocity measuremen...

  2. Polar kicks and the spin period - eccentricity relation in double neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Willems, B; Kalogera, V; Belczynski, K

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a population synthesis study aimed at examining the role of spin-kick alignment in producing a correlation between the spin period of the first-born neutron star and the orbital eccentricity of observed double neutron star binaries in the Galactic disk. We find spin-kick alignment to be compatible with the observed correlation, but not to alleviate the requirements for low kick velocities suggested in previous population synthesis studies. Our results furthermore suggest low- and high-eccentricity systems may form through two distinct formation channels distinguished by the presence or absence of a stable mass transfer phase before the formation of the second neutron star. The presence of highly eccentric systems in the observed sample of double neutron stars may furthermore support the notion that neutron stars accrete matter when moving through the envelope of a giant companion.

  3. Highly eccentric Kozai mechanism and gravitational-wave observation for neutron-star binaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Naoki

    2013-08-09

    The Kozai mechanism for a hierarchical triple system could reduce the merger time of inner eccentric binary emitting gravitational waves (GWs) and has been qualitatively explained with the secular theory that is derived by averaging short-term orbital revolutions. However, with the secular theory, the minimum value of the inner pericenter distance could be excessively limited by the averaging operation. Compared with traditional predictions, the actual evolution of an eccentric inner binary could be accompanied by (i) a higher characteristic frequency of the pulselike GWs around its pericenter passages and (ii) a larger residual eccentricity at its final inspiral phase. These findings would be important for GW astronomy with the forthcoming advanced detectors.

  4. The statistical mechanics of planet orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Tremaine, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The final "giant-impact" phase of terrestrial planet formation is believed to begin with a large number of planetary "embryos" on nearly circular, coplanar orbits. Mutual gravitational interactions gradually excite their eccentricities until their orbits cross and they collide and merge; through this process the number of surviving bodies declines until the system contains a small number of planets on well-separated, stable orbits. In this paper we explore a simple statistical model for the orbit distribution of planets formed by this process, based on the sheared-sheet approximation and the ansatz that the planets explore uniformly all of the stable region of phase space. The model provides analytic predictions for the distribution of eccentricities and semimajor axis differences, correlations between orbital elements of nearby planets, and the complete N-planet distribution function, in terms of a single parameter that is determined by the planetary masses. The predicted properties are generally consistent ...

  5. Recovery from retrograde amnesia: a learning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A M; Tyler, J; Jinich, D

    1974-04-01

    Retrograde amnesia was produced in rats by electroconvulsive shock. Memory recovered if the animals were given repeated test trials. Memory did not recover if steps were taken to reduce the conditioning properties of the test trials; the manipulations included eliminating the response, altering the apparatus cues, or extinguishing conditioned "fear" by confining animals to the apparatus during the first test trial.

  6. Retrograde Renal Cooling to Minimize Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Colli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: During partial nephrectomy, renal hypothermia has been shown to decrease ischemia induced renal damage which occurs from renal hilar clamping. In this study we investigate the infusion rate required to safely cool the entire renal unit in a porcine model using retrograde irrigation of iced saline via dual-lumen ureteral catheter. Materials and Methods: Renal cortical, renal medullary, bowel and rectal temperatures during retrograde cooling in a laparoscopic porcine model were monitored in six renal units. Iced normal saline was infused at 300 cc/hour, 600 cc/hour, 1000 cc/hour and gravity (800 cc/hour for 600 seconds with and without hilar clamping. Results: Retrograde cooling with hilar clamping provided rapid medullary renal cooling and significant hypothermia of the medulla and cortex at infusion rates ≥ 600 cc/hour. With hilar clamping, cortical temperatures decreased at -0.9° C/min. reaching a threshold temperature of 26.9° C, and medullary temperatures decreased at -0.90 C/min. reaching a temperature of 26.1° C over 600 seconds on average for combined data at infusion rates ≥ 600 cc/hour. The lowest renal temperatures were achieved with gravity infusion. Without renal hilum clamping, retrograde cooling was minimal at all infusion rates. Conclusions: Significant renal cooling by gravity infusion of iced cold saline via a duel lumen catheter with a clamped renal hilum was achieved in a porcine model. Continuous retrograde irrigation with iced saline via a two way ureteral catheter may be an effective method to induce renal hypothermia in patients undergoing robotic assisted and/or laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

  7. Eccentric exercise in treatment of Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Larsen, C C; Bieler, T

    2007-01-01

    Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia.......Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia....

  8. Retrograde Ender nailing for humerus shaft fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Ashish; Pendse, Anirudha; Modi, Hitesh; Diwanji, Sanket; Mathur, Hemant; Daveshwar, Rajiv

    2009-10-01

    Humerus fractures are common; their management remains controversial. Infection, neurovascular injury, joint problems and non-union are recognised complications of surgical treatment. These complications can be decreased by opting for a surgical treatment that is less invasive and safe. We present a series of 59 patients treated with retrograde Ender nailing; 56 healed in an average of 9.1 weeks, 2 had delayed union (> 15 weeks) and one went on to non-union, which healed after secondary plate fixation. Nail back out occurred in 8 cases, of which only 3 required nails repositioning. The mean Constant score at final follow-up (mean 19 months) was 91; it was significantly lower in patients over 50 years of age and in those with segmental fractures. In this series, Ender retrograde nailing gave overall satisfactory results and appeared as a safe and efficient technique.

  9. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Parnham, Arie; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-01-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions sy...

  10. An unusual experience with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjun Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is known for its varied diagnostic and therapeutic utility for a variety of disorders. However it has greater likelihood of procedure related complications among the endoscopic procedures of gastrointestinal tract. The extraluminal hemorrhagic complications following ERCP are potentially life threatening though relatively rare. We present a 50 year patient with choledocholithiasis and cholelithiasis developing rare complication of subcapsular hepatic hematoma, following ERCP due to guide wire injury.

  11. Retrograde weight implantation for correction of lagophthalmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Moe, Kris S

    2004-09-01

    Gold weight implantation is the most commonly used method for surgical correction of paralytic lagophthalmos. Numerous techniques for placement of the weight have been described, yet complications with these methods continue to occur (implant migration or extrusion, wound infection, failure to correct the lagophthalmos, and excessive postoperative ptosis). We developed a retrograde, postlevator aponeurosis method for implantation to improve the placement and fixation of the weight. This study describes the rationale, technique, and surgical outcome of the retrograde approach. Retrospective analysis. Data maintained and collected on 25 consecutive cases of retrograde upper lid weight implantation for paralytic lagophthalmos. Pre- and postoperative photographs were obtained, and patients were followed for at least 6 months. All procedures were performed by or under the direction of a single surgeon at tertiary academic medical centers (University of California, San Diego and University of Zurich, Switzerland). Twenty-five consecutive patients were evaluated, 16 male and 9 female, ranging in age from 27 to 86 years. There were no surgical failures or perioperative complications and no instances of implant migration or extrusion. One patient developed a delayed infection requiring removal of the implant, and one patient required replacement of the gold weight with a platinum chain implant to better fit the contour of her eyelid. Retrograde implantation allows more accurate placement of the weight while creating a permanent circumferential seal for fixation. The procedure is minimally invasive, less traumatic than previous methods, and produces an excellent cosmetic result. The efficacy has been demonstrated in the outcome of the 25 cases described in this study.

  12. Eccentric gravitational wave bursts in the post-Newtonian formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutrel, Nicholas; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-07-01

    The detection of GW150914 by ground based gravitational wave observatories has brought about a new era in astrophysics. At optimal sensitivity, these observatories are expected to detect several events each year, with one or two of these occurring with non-negligible eccentricity. Such eccentric binaries will emit bursts of gravitational radiation during every pericenter passage, where orbital velocities can reach greater than ten percent the speed of light. As a result, such binaries may prove to be powerful probes of extreme gravitational physics and astrophysics. A promising method of achieving detection of such binaries is through power stacking, where the power in each burst is added up in time-frequency space. This detection strategy requires a theoretical prior of where the bursts will occur in time and frequency so that one knows where to search for successive bursts. We here present a generic post-Newtonian formalism for constructing such time-frequency model priors at generic post-Newtonian order. We apply our formalism to generate a burst model at third post-Newtonian order, making it potentially the most accurate, fully analytic model to date.

  13. Pseudotumor of the distal common bile duct at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Justin H.; Coakley, Fergus V; Wang, Zhen J.; Poder, Liina; Webb, Emily; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Prior studies have described a pseudocalculus appearance in the distal common bile duct as a normal variant at cholangiography. The objective of this study is to describe the occurrence of pseudotumor in the distal common bile duct at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Methods Nine patients who underwent ERCP between May 2004 and July 2008 were identified as having a transient eccentric mural-based filling defect in the distal common bile duct. A single reader systematically reviewed all studies and recorded the imaging findings. Results The mean diameter of the filling defect was 9 mm (range, 5 to 11). Eight patients had resolution of the filling defect during the same ERCP or on a subsequent ERCP, and in 2 of these patients the inferior border of the filling defect was not well visualized. The other patient underwent surgical resection of a presumed tumor with no evidence of malignancy on surgical pathology. Conclusion An eccentric mural-based filling defect in the distal common bile duct can be artifactual in nature and may reflect transient contraction of the sphincter of Oddi. Recognition of this pseudotumor may help avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:21724120

  14. SECRETLY ECCENTRIC: THE GIANT PLANET AND ACTIVITY CYCLE OF GJ 328

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J. [Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Boss, Alan P., E-mail: paul@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington DC 20015-1305 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We announce the discovery of a {approx}2 Jupiter-mass planet in an eccentric 11 yr orbit around the K7/M0 dwarf GJ 328. Our result is based on 10 years of radial velocity (RV) data from the Hobby-Eberly and Harlan J. Smith telescopes at McDonald Observatory, and from the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea. Our analysis of GJ 328's magnetic activity via the Na I D features reveals a long-period stellar activity cycle, which creates an additional signal in the star's RV curve with amplitude 6-10 m s{sup -1}. After correcting for this stellar RV contribution, we see that the orbit of the planet is more eccentric than suggested by the raw RV data. GJ 328b is currently the most massive, longest-period planet discovered around a low-mass dwarf.

  15. Secretly Eccentric: The Giant Planet and Activity Cycle of GJ 328

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Paul; Cochran, William D; MacQueen, Phillip J; Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    We announce the discovery of a ~2 Jupiter-mass planet in an eccentric 11-year orbit around the K7/M0 dwarf GJ 328. Our result is based on 10 years' worth of radial velocity (RV) data from the Hobby-Eberly and Harlan J. Smith telescopes at McDonald Observatory, and from the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea. Our analysis of GJ 328's magnetic activity via the Na I D features reveals a long-period stellar activity cycle, which creates an additional signal in the star's RV curve with amplitude 6-10 m/s. After correcting for this stellar RV contribution, we see that the orbit of the planet is more eccentric than suggested by the raw RV data. GJ 328b is currently the most massive, longest-period planet discovered around a low-mass dwarf.

  16. Is tidal heating sufficient to explain bloated exoplanets? Consistent calculations accounting for finite initial eccentricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leconte, Jérémy; Baraffe, Isabelle; Levrard, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the consistent evolution of short-period exoplanets coupling the tidal and gravothermal evolution of the planet. Contrarily to previous similar studies, our calculations are based on the complete tidal evolution equations of the Hut model, valid at any order in eccentricity, obliquity and spin. We demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that, except if the system was formed with a nearly circular orbit (e<0.2), solving consistently the complete tidal equations is mandatory to derive correct tidal evolution histories. We show that calculations based on tidal models truncated at second order in eccentricity, as done in all previous studies, lead to erroneous tidal evolutions. As a consequence, tidal energy dissipation rates are severely underestimated in all these calculations and the characteristic timescales for the various orbital parameters evolutions can be wrong by up to three orders in magnitude. Based on these complete, consistent calculations, we revisit the viabili...

  17. Numerical Simulations of Naturally Tilted, Retrogradely Precessing, Nodal Superhumping Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, M M

    2012-01-01

    Accretion disks around black hole, neutron star, and white dwarf systems are thought to sometimes tilt, retrogradely precess, and produce hump-shaped modulations in light curves that have a period shorter than the orbital period. Although artificially rotating numerically simulated accretion disks out of the orbital plane and around the line of nodes generates these short-period superhumps and retrograde precession of the disk, no numerical code to date has been shown to produce a disk tilt naturally. In this work, we report the first naturally tilted disk in non-magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) using 3D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Our simulations show that after many hundreds of orbital periods, the disk has tilted on its own and this disk tilt is without the aid of radiation sources or magnetic fields. As the system orbits, the accretion stream strikes the bright spot (which is on the rim of the tilted disk) and flows over and under the disk on different flow paths. These different flow paths...

  18. Partial beta-amylolysis retards starch retrogradation in rice products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Zhang, Jingmin; Ding, Xiaolin

    2003-07-02

    Starch retrogradation is the main cause of quality deterioration of starch-containing foods during storage. The current work investigated the effect of partial beta-amylolysis on the retrogradation of rice starch and the potential of beta-amylase in preparing rice products with extended shelf life. Isolated amylopectin, whole rice starch, and rice flour from a regular rice cultivar were partially hydrolyzed by either reagent-grade or food-grade beta-amylase. The degree of beta-amylolysis was expressed as average external chain length () for isolated amylopectin or the degree of hydrolysis (%) for other starch systems. Pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance was used to monitor starch retrogradation during storage at 4 degrees C. The results indicated that partial beta-amylolysis using reagent-grade beta-amylase retarded amylopectin retrogradation by shortening the of amylopectin. When was below DP 11.6, the amylopectin retrogradation was essentially inhibited. Partial beta-amylolysis had a similar effect on the amylopectin retrogradation in the whole starch system. The maltose produced in beta-amylolysis might slightly attenuate the retrogradation-retarding effect of partial beta-amylolysis. The effect of food-grade beta-amylase on starch retrogradation was also evident, although less effective than that of reagent-grade beta-amylase. The retrogradation-retarding effect of food-grade beta-amylase was also demonstrated in rice flour system, indicating a potential method for controlling the starch retrogradation of rice products.

  19. Projectile Motion in the "Language" of Orbital Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    We consider the orbit of projectiles launched with arbitrary speeds from the Earth's surface. This is a generalization of Newton's discussion about the transition from parabolic to circular orbits, when the launch speed approaches the value [image omitted]. We find the range for arbitrary launch speeds and angles, and calculate the eccentricity of…

  20. Aging, Functional Capacity and Eccentric Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, Mandy L.; Willems, Mark E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that ultimately induces a decline in our physiological functioning, causing a decreased health-span, quality of life and independence for older adults. Exercise participation is seen as a way to reduce the impact of aging through maintenance of physiological parameters. Eccentric exercise is a model that can be employed with older adults, due to the muscle’s ability to combine high muscle force production with a low energy cost. There may however be a risk of muscle damage before the muscle is able to adapt. The first part of this review describes the process of aging and how it reduces aerobic capacity, muscle strength and therefore functional mobility. The second part highlights eccentric exercise and the associated muscle damage, in addition to the repeated bout effect. The final section reviews eccentric exercise interventions that have been completed by older adults with a focus on the changes in functional mobility. In conclusion, eccentric endurance exercise is a potential training modality that can be applied to older adults for improving muscle strength, aerobic capacity and functional ability. However, further research is needed to assess the effects on aerobic capacity and the ideal prescription for eccentric endurance exercise. PMID:24307968

  1. Eccentric Exercise to Enhance Neuromuscular Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K; Lepley, Adam S; Onate, James A; Grooms, Dustin R

    Neuromuscular alterations are a major causal factor of primary and secondary injuries. Though injury prevention programs have experienced some success, rates of injuries have not declined, and after injury, individuals often return to activity with functionality below clinical recommendations. Considering alternative therapies to the conventional concentric exercise approach, such as one that can target neuromuscular injury risk and postinjury alterations, may provide for more effective injury prevention and rehabilitation protocols. Peer-reviewed sources available on the Web of Science and MEDLINE databases from 2000 through 2016 were gathered using searches associated with the keywords eccentric exercise, injury prevention, and neuromuscular control. Eccentric exercise will reduce injury risk by targeting specific neural and morphologic alterations that precipitate neuromuscular dysfunction. Clinical review. Level 4. Neuromuscular control is influenced by alterations in muscle morphology and neural activity. Eccentric exercise beneficially modifies several underlying factors of muscle morphology (fiber typing, cross-sectional area, working range, and pennation angle), and emerging evidence indicates that eccentric exercise is also beneficial to peripheral and central neural activity (alpha motorneuron recruitment/firing, sarcolemma activity, corticospinal excitability, and brain activation). There is mounting evidence that eccentric exercise is not only a therapeutic intervention influencing muscle morphology but also targets unique alterations in neuromuscular control, influencing injury risk.

  2. Collisional evolution of eccentric planetesimal swarms

    CERN Document Server

    Wyatt, M C; Payne, M J; Churcher, L J

    2009-01-01

    Models for the steady state collisional evolution of low eccentricity planetesimal belts identify debris disks with hot dust at 1AU, like eta Corvi and HD69830, as anomalous since collisional processing should have removed most of the planetesimal mass over their >1 Gyr lifetimes. This paper looks at the effect of large planetesimal eccentricities (e>>0.3) on their collisional lifetime and the amount of mass that can remain at late times M_{late}. For an axisymmetric planetesimal disk with common pericentres and eccentricities e, we find that M_{late} \\propto e^{-5/3}(1+e)^{4/3}(1-e)^{-3}. For a scattered disk-like population (i.e., common pericentres), in the absence of dynamical evolution, the mass evolution at late times would be as if only planetesimals with the largest eccentricity were present. Despite the increased remaining mass, higher eccentricities do not increase the hot emission from the collisional cascade until e>0.99, partly because most collisions occur near pericentre thus increasing the dus...

  3. Investigating Dynamics of Eccentricity in Turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baun, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A methodology (and hardware and software to implement the methodology) has been developed as a means of investigating coupling between certain rotordynamic and hydrodynamic phenomena in turbomachines. Originally, the methodology was intended for application in an investigation of coupled rotordynamic and hydrodynamic effects postulated to have caused high synchronous vibration in the space shuttle s high-pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). The methodology can also be applied in investigating (for the purpose of developing means of suppressing) undesired hydrodynamic rotor/stator interactions in turbomachines in general. The methodology and the types of phenomena that can be investigated by use of the methodology are best summarized by citing the original application as an example. In that application, in consideration of the high synchronous vibration in the space-shuttle main engine (SSME) HPOTP, it was determined to be necessary to perform tests to investigate the influence of inducer eccentricity and/or synchronous whirl motion on inducer hydrodynamic forces under prescribed flow and cavitation conditions. It was believed that manufacturing tolerances of the turbopump resulted in some induced runout of the pump rotor. Such runout, if oriented with an inducer blade, would cause that blade to run with tip clearance smaller than the tip clearances of the other inducer blades. It was hypothesized that the resulting hydraulic asymmetry, coupled with alternating blade cavitation, could give rise to the observed high synchronous vibration. In tests performed to investigate this hypothesis, prescribed rotor whirl motions have been imposed on a 1/3-scale water-rig version of the SSME LPOTP inducer (which is also a 4-biased inducer having similar cavitation dynamics as the HPOTP) in a magnetic-bearing test facility. The particular magnetic-bearing test facility, through active vibration control, affords a capability to impose, on the rotor, whirl orbits having shapes and

  4. A Strange Star Scenario for the Formation of Eccentric Millisecond Pulsar/Helium White Dwarf Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Long; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2015-01-01

    According to the recycling scenario, millisecond pulsars (MSPs) have evolved from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Their orbits are expected to be circular due to tidal interactions during the binary evolution, as observed in most of the binary MSPs. There are some peculiar systems that do not fit this picture. Three recent examples are PSRs J2234$+$06, J1946$+$3417 and J1950$+$2414, all of which are MSPs in eccentric orbits but with mass functions compatible with expected He white dwarf companions. It has been suggested these MSPs may have formed from delayed accretion-induced collapse of massive white dwarfs, or the eccentricity may be induced by dynamical interaction between the binary and a circumbinary disk. Assuming that the core density of accreting neutron stars in LMXBs may reach the density of quark deconfinement, which can lead to phase transition from neutron stars to strange quark stars, we show that the resultant MSPs are likely to have an eccentric orbit, due to the sudden loss of the gravitati...

  5. Mass transfer in eccentric binary systems using the binary evolution code BINSTAR

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, P J; Deschamps, R

    2013-01-01

    We present the first calculations of mass transfer via RLOF for a binary system with a significant eccentricity using our new binary stellar evolution code. The study focuses on a 1.50+1.40 Msun main sequence binary with an eccentricity of 0.25, and an orbital period of about 0.7 d. The reaction of the stellar components due to mass transfer is analyzed, and the evolution of mass transfer during the periastron passage is compared to recent smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. The impact of asynchronism and non-zero eccentricity on the Roche lobe radius, and the effects of tidal and rotational deformation on the stars' structures, are also investigated. Calculations were performed using the state-of-the-art binary evolution code BINSTAR, which calculates simultaneously the structure of the two stars and the evolution of the orbital parameters. The evolution of the mass transfer rate during an orbit has a Gaussian-like shape, with a maximum at periastron, in qualitative agreement with SPH simulation...

  6. The formation of long-period eccentric binaries with a helium white dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Siess, L; Jorissen, A

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of long-period eccentric binaries hosting a He-WD or a sdB star has been challenging binary-star modelling. Based on accurate determinations of the stellar and orbital parameters for IP Eri, a K0 + He-WD system, we propose an evolutionary path that is able to explain the observational properties of this system and, in particular, to account for its high eccentricity (0.25). Our scenario invokes an enhanced-wind mass loss on the first red giant branch (RGB) in order to avoid mass transfer by Roche-lobe overflow, where tides systematically circularize the orbit. We explore how the evolution of the orbital parameters depends on the initial conditions and show that eccentricity can be preserved and even increased if the initial separation is large enough. The low spin velocity of the K0 giant implies that accretion of angular momentum from a (tidally-enhanced) RGB wind should not be efficient.

  7. A Highly Eccentric 3.9-Millisecond Binary Pulsar in the Globular Cluster NGC 6652

    CERN Document Server

    DeCesar, Megan E; Kaplan, David L; Ray, Paul S; Geller, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    We present the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope discovery of the highly eccentric binary millisecond pulsar PSR J1835$-$3259A in the Fermi Large Area Telescope-detected globular cluster NGC 6652. Timing over one orbit yields the pulse period 3.89 ms, orbital period 9.25 d, eccentricity $\\sim 0.95$, and an unusually high companion mass of $0.74\\,M_{\\odot}$ assuming a $1.4\\,M_{\\odot}$ pulsar. We caution that the lack of data near periastron prevents a precise measurement of the eccentricity, and that further timing is necessary to constrain this and the other orbital parameters. From tidal considerations, we find that the companion must be a compact object. This system likely formed through an exchange encounter in the dense cluster environment. Our initial timing results predict the measurements of at least two post-Keplerian parameters with long-term phase-connected timing: the rate of periastron advance $\\dot{\\omega} \\sim 0.1^{\\circ}\\,$yr$^{-1}$, requiring 1 yr of phase connection; and the Einstein delay ...

  8. Highly inclined and eccentric massive planets. II. Planet-planet interactions during the disc phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriadis, Sotiris; Libert, Anne-Sophie; Bitsch, Bertram; Crida, Aurélien

    2017-02-01

    Context. Observational evidence indicates that the orbits of extrasolar planets are more various than the circular and coplanar ones of the solar system. Planet-planet interactions during migration in the protoplanetary disc have been invoked to explain the formation of these eccentric and inclined orbits. However, our companion paper (Paper I) on the planet-disc interactions of highly inclined and eccentric massive planets has shown that the damping induced by the disc is significant for a massive planet, leading the planet back to the midplane with its eccentricity possibly increasing over time. Aims: We aim to investigate the influence of the eccentricity and inclination damping due to planet-disc interactions on the final configurations of the systems, generalizing previous studies on the combined action of the gas disc and planet-planet scattering during the disc phase. Methods: Instead of the simplistic K-prescription, our N-body simulations adopt the damping formulae for eccentricity and inclination provided by the hydrodynamical simulations of our companion paper. We follow the orbital evolution of 11 000 numerical experiments of three giant planets in the late stage of the gas disc, exploring different initial configurations, planetary mass ratios and disc masses. Results: The dynamical evolutions of the planetary systems are studied along the simulations, with a particular emphasis on the resonance captures and inclination-growth mechanisms. Most of the systems are found with small inclinations (≤ 10°) at the dispersal of the disc. Even though many systems enter an inclination-type resonance during the migration, the disc usually damps the inclinations on a short timescale. Although the majority of the multiple systems in our simulations are quasi-coplanar, 5% of them end up with high mutual inclinations (≥ 10°). Half of these highly mutually inclined systems result from two- or three-body mean-motion resonance captures, the other half being

  9. Natural orbit approximations in single power-law potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    In a previous paper, I demonstrated the accuracy of simple, precessing, power ellipse (p-ellipse) approximations to orbits of low-to-moderate eccentricity in power-law potentials. Here, I explore several extensions of these approximations to improve accuracy, especially for nearly radial orbits. (1) It is found that moderately improved orbital fits can be achieved with higher order perturbation expansions (in eccentricity), with the addition of `harmonic' terms to the solution. (2) Alternately, a matching of the extreme radial excursions of an orbit can be imposed, and a more accurate estimate of the eccentricity parameter is obtained. However, the error in the precession frequency is usually increased. (3) A correction function of small magnitude corrects the frequency problem. With this correction, even first-order approximations yield excellent fits at quite high eccentricity over a range of potential indices that includes flat and falling rotation-curve cases. (4) Adding a first harmonic term to fit the breadth of the orbital loops, and determining the fundamental and harmonic coefficients by matching to three orbital positions further improves the fit. With a couple of additional small corrections, one obtains excellent fits to orbits with radial ranges of more than a thousand for some potentials. These simple corrections to the basic p-ellipse are basically in the form of several successive approximations, and can provide high accuracy. They suggest new results including that the apsidal precession rate scales approximately as log(1 - e) at very high eccentricities e. New insights are also provided on the occurrence of periodic orbits in various potentials, especially at high eccentricity.

  10. Unstable force analysis for induction motor eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Palazzolo, Alan

    2016-05-01

    The increasing popularity of motors in machinery trains has led to an intensified interest in the forces they produce that may influence machinery vibration. Motor design typically assumes a uniform air gap, however in practice all motors operate with the rotor slightly displaced from the motor centerline in what is referred to as an eccentric position. Rotor center eccentricity can cause a radially unbalanced magnetic field when the motor is operating. This will results in both a radial force pulling the motor further away from the center, and a tangential force which can induce a vibration stability problem. In this paper, a magnetic equivalent circuit MEC modeling method is proposed to calculate both the radial and tangential motor eccentric force. The treatment of tangential force determination is rarely addressed, but it is very important for rotordynamic vibration stability evaluation. The proposed model is also coupled with the motor electric circuit model to provide capability for transient vibration simulations. FEM is used to verify the MEC model. A parametric study is performed on the motor radial and tangential eccentric forces. Also a Jeffcott rotor model is used to study the influence of the motor eccentric force on mechanical vibration stability and nonlinear behavior. Furthermore, a stability criteria for the bearing damping is provided. The motor radial and tangential eccentric forces are both curved fitted to include their nonlinearity in time domain transient simulation for both a Jeffcott rotor model and a geared machinery train with coupled torsional-lateral motion. Nonlinear motions are observed, including limit cycles and bifurcation induced vibration amplitude jumps.

  11. Eccentric connectivity index and eccentric distance sum of some graph operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buzohragul Eskender

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Let $G=(V,E$ be a connected graph. The eccentric connectivity index of $G$, $xi^{c}(G$, is defined as $xi^{c}(G=sum_{vin V(G}deg(vec(v$, where $deg(v$ is the degree of a vertex $v$ and $ec(v$ is its eccentricity. The eccentric distance sum of $G$ is defined as $xi^{d}(G=sum_{vin V(G}ec(vD(v$, where $D(v=sum_{uin V(G}d_{G}(u,v$ and $d_{G}(u,v$ is the distance between $u$ and $v$ in $G$. In this paper, we calculate the eccentric connectivity index and eccentric distance sum of generalized hierarchical product of graphs. Moreover, we present explicit formulae for the eccentric connectivity index of $F$-sum graphs in terms of some invariants of the factors. As applications, we present exact formulae for the values of the eccentric connectivity index of some graphs of chemical interest such as $C_{4}$ nanotubes, $C_{4}$ nanotoris and hexagonal chains.

  12. Analytic perturbation solutions to the Venusian orbiter due to the nonspherical gravitational potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘林; C.K.Shum

    2000-01-01

    The analytic perturbation solutions to the motions of a planetary orbiter given in this paper are effective for0< e< 1, where e is the orbital eccentricity of the orbiter. in the solution, it is as-sumed that the rotation of the central body is slow, and its astronomical background is clear. Examples for such planets in the solar system are Ven黶 and Mercury. The perturbation solution is tested numer-ically on two Venusian orbiters with eccentric orbits, PVO and Magellan, and found to be effective.

  13. Analytic perturbation solutions to the Venusian orbiter due to the nonspherical gravitational potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The analytic perturbation solutions to the motions of a planetary orbiter given in this paper are effective for 0<e<1,where e is the orbital eccentricity of the orbiter.In the solution,it is assumed that the rotation of the central body is slow,and its astronomical background is clear.Examples for such planets in the solar system are Venus and Mercury.The perturbation solution is tested numerically on two Venusian orbiters with eccentric orbits,PVO and Magellan,and found to be effective.

  14. Orbit Alignment in Triple Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokovinin, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    The statistics of the angle Φ between orbital angular momenta in hierarchical triple systems with known inner visual or astrometric orbits are studied. A correlation between apparent revolution directions proves the partial orbit alignment known from earlier works. The alignment is strong in triples with outer projected separation less than ∼50 au, where the average Φ is about 20^\\circ . In contrast, outer orbits wider than 1000 au are not aligned with the inner orbits. It is established that the orbit alignment decreases with the increasing mass of the primary component. The average eccentricity of inner orbits in well-aligned triples is smaller than in randomly aligned ones. These findings highlight the role of dissipative interactions with gas in defining the orbital architecture of low-mass triple systems. On the other hand, chaotic dynamics apparently played a role in shaping more massive hierarchies. The analysis of projected configurations and triples with known inner and outer orbits indicates that the distribution of Φ is likely bimodal, where 80% of triples have {{Φ }}< 70^\\circ and the remaining ones are randomly aligned.

  15. STARCH RETROGRADATION AND PRODUCTION OF RESISTANT STARCH IN COOKED RICE

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    After rice cooking, retrogradation of starch in a cooked rice progresses quickly at under gelatinization temperature. Cold rice (aging rice) is tasteless, firm and digested slowly. My aim in this report is explained the relationship between cold rice tasteless and indexes of starch retrogradation. Starch gelatinization degree, starch whiteness index and resistant starch content that were indexes of starch retrogradation did not change remarkably of cold and aging rice that were very firm and ...

  16. Clinical evaluation of two different materials for retrograde root filling

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena; Papakoca, Kiro; Kovacevska, Ivona; Evrosimovska, Biljana; Georgiev, Zlatko

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Retrograde root filling is indicated when periapical inflammation cannot be resolved by conventional endodontic therapy. A retrograde filling should prevent flow of microorganisms and bacterial endotoxins from the root canal into periapical tissues. The aim was to evaluate the clinical and radiographic treatment outcome of two different materials for retrograde root filling (dentin-bonded resin nano composite and glass ionomer cement) using special preparation performance of re...

  17. Retrograde amnesia for semantic information in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeter, Martijn; Kollen, Ariane; Scheltens, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal controls were tested on a retrograde amnesia test with semantic content (Neologism and Vocabulary Test, or NVT), consisting of neologisms to be defined. Patients showed a decrement as compared to normal controls, pointing to retrograde amnesia within semantic memory. No evidence for a gradient within this amnesia was found, although one was present on an autobiographic test of retrograde amnesia that had a wider time scale. Several explanations for these results are presented, including one that suggests that extended retrograde amnesia and semantic memory deficits are in fact one and the same deficit.

  18. Posttraumatic Orbital Emphysema: A Numerical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Skorek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features—thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall. The observation was made from 1·10-3 to 1·10-2 second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found.

  19. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia following Bitemporal Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schnider

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient suffered very severe anterograde and retrograde amnesia following infarction of both medial temporal lobes (hippocampus and adjacent cortex and the left inferior temporo-occipital area. The temporal stem and the amygdala were intact; these structures do not appear to be critical for new learning in humans. Extension of the left-sided infarct into the inferior temporo-occipital lobe, an area critically involved in visual processing, appears to be responsible for our patient's loss of remote memories.

  20. A phantom gallbladder on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Various complications have been related to laparoscopic cholecystectomy but most occur shortly after the procedure. In this report, we present a case with very late complications in which an abscess developed within the gallbladder fossa 6 years after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The abscess resolved after treatment with CT-guided extrahepatic aspiration. However, 4 years later, an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) performed for choledocholithiasis demonstrated a "gallbladder" which communicated with the common bile duct via a patent cystic duct. This unique case indicates that a cystic duct stump may communicate with the gallbladder fossa many years following cholecystectomy.

  1. Unusual duodenal perforation following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kobborg

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Perforation is a known but rare complication to Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES. Most of the perforations are located in the periampullary area due to ES. This report presents an unusual perforation in the third part of the duodenum following ES. The patient an eigthy-sixt-year-old man underwent ERCP with ES. The patient had Magnetic Resonance Cholangio-pancreatography (MRCP and Computerized Tomography (CT verified cholelithiasis and intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis. The perforation was not found under the ERCP procedure but was clinically revealed when the patient developed pneumoscrotum after the procedure. A CT-scan with oral contrast later confirmed the duodenal perforation.

  2. Retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnham, Arie; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-08-01

    Although there has been an increased interest on premature ejaculation in the recent years, our understanding regarding the disorders of retrograde ejaculation, painful ejaculation and hematospermia remain limited. All three of these conditions require a keen clinical acumen and willingness to engage in thinking outside of the standard established treatment paradigm. The development of novel investigational techniques and treatments has led to progress in the management of these conditions symptoms; however, the literature almost uniformly is limited to small series and rare randomised trials. Further investigation and randomised controlled trials are needed for progress in these often challenging cases.

  3. A new method for orbit determination: Unit vector method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a method of orbit determination is presented according to the principle of unit vector method (UVM). The model and arithmetic are improved and it not only suits initial orbit determination with short arc data, it also suits orbit improvement with data longer. It is also suitable for orbit of any eccentricity and any inclination. It omits most partial derivatives of all the elements which must be calculated in classical differential orbit improvement (DOI), so, it is more efficient than DOI, and the accuracy of orbit determination and convergence of algorithm are also improved appreciably.

  4. The Eccentricity-Mass Distribution of Exoplanets: Signatures of Different Formation Mechanisms?

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, I; Ribas, Ignasi; Miralda-Escude, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    We examine the distributions of eccentricity and host star metallicity of exoplanets as a function of their mass. Planets with M sin i >~ 4 M_J have an eccentricity distribution consistent with that of binary stars, while planets with M sin i <~ 4 M_J are less eccentric than binary stars and more massive planets. In addition, host star metallicities decrease with planet mass. The statistical significance of both of these trends is only marginal with the present sample of exoplanets. To account for these trends, we hypothesize that there are two populations of gaseous planets: the low-mass population forms by gas accretion onto a rock-ice core in a circumstellar disk and is more abundant at high metalliticities, and the high-mass population forms directly by fragmentation of a pre-stellar cloud. Planets of the first population form in initially circular orbits and grow their eccentricities later, and may have a mass upper limit from the total mass of the disk that can be accreted by the core. The second pop...

  5. EXPLORING A 'FLOW' OF HIGHLY ECCENTRIC BINARIES WITH KEPLER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Subo; Katz, Boaz; Socrates, Aristotle [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    With 16-month of Kepler data, 15 long-period (40-265 days) eclipsing binaries on highly eccentric orbits (minimum e between 0.5 and 0.85) are identified from their closely separated primary and secondary eclipses ({Delta}t{sub I,II} = 3-10 days). These systems confirm the existence of a previously hinted binary population situated near a constant angular momentum track at P(1 - e {sup 2}){sup 3/2} {approx} 15 days, close to the tidal circularization period P{sub circ}. They may be presently migrating due to tidal dissipation and form a steady-state 'flow' ({approx}1% of stars) feeding the close-binary population (few % of stars). If so, future Kepler data releases will reveal a growing number (dozens) of systems at longer periods, following dN/dlgP {proportional_to} P {sup 1/3} with increasing eccentricities reaching e {yields} 0.98 for P {yields} 1000 days. Radial-velocity follow-up of long-period eclipsing binaries with no secondary eclipses could offer a significantly larger sample. Orders of magnitude more (hundreds) may reveal their presence from periodic 'eccentricity pulses', such as tidal ellipsoidal variations near pericenter passages. Several new few-day-long eccentricity-pulse candidates with long periods (P = 25-80 days) are reported.

  6. Be discs in binary systems I. Coplanar orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Panoglou, Despina; Vieira, Rodrigo G; Cyr, Isabelle H; Jones, Carol E; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Rivinius, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Be stars are surrounded by outflowing circumstellar matter structured in the form of decretion discs. They are often members of binary systems, where it is expected that the decretion disc interacts both radiatively and gravitationally with the companion. In this work we study how various orbital (period, mass ratio, eccentricity) and disc (viscosity) parameters affect the disc structure in coplanar systems. We simulate such binaries with the use of a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The main effects of the secondary on the disc are its truncation and the accumulation of material inwards of truncation. In circular or nearly circular prograde orbits, the disc maintains a rotating, constant in shape, configuration, which is locked to the orbital phase. The disc is smaller in size, more elongated and more massive for low viscosity parameter, small orbital separation and/or high mass ratio. Highly eccentric orbits are more complex, with the disc structure and total mass strongly dependent on the orbital phas...

  7. Density and Eccentricity of Kepler Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yanqin

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the transit timing variations obtained by the Kepler mission for 22 sub-jovian planet pairs (17 published, 5 new) that lie close to mean motion resonances. We find that the TTV phases for most of these pairs lie close to zero, consistent with an eccentricity distribution that has a very low RMS value of e ~ 0.01; but about a quarter of the pairs possess much higher eccentricities, up to 0.1 - 0.4. For the low-eccentricity pairs, we are able to statistically remove the effect of eccentricity to obtain planet masses from TTV data. These masses, together with those measured by radial velocity, yield a best fit mass-radius relation M~3 M_E (R/R_E). This corresponds to a constant surface escape velocity of 20km/s. We separate the planets into two distinct groups, "mid-sized" (those greater than 3 R_E), and "compact" (those smaller). All mid-sized planets are found to be less dense than water and therefore contain extensive H/He envelopes, likely comparable in mass to that of their cores. We argue that t...

  8. Vibration of an eccentrically clamped annular plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, J.-G.; Wickert, J. A.

    1994-04-01

    Small amplitude vibration of an eccentric annular plate, which is free along its outer edge and clamped along the interior, is investigated through experimental and analytical methods. A disk with this geometry, or a stacked array in which the clamping and symmetry axes of each disk are nominally coincident, is common in data storage and brake systems applications. In the present case, the geometric imperfections on the boundary can have important implications for the disk's dynamic response. Changes that occur in the natural frequency spectrum, the mode shapes, and the free response under eccentric mounting are studied through laboratory measurements and an approximate discrete model of the plate. The natural frequencies and modes are found through global discretization of the Kamke quotient for a classical thin plate. For the axisymmetric geometry, the natural frequencies of the sine and cosine vibration modes for a specified number of nodal diameters are repeated. With increasing eccentricity, on the other hand, each pair of repeated frequencies splits at a rate that depends on the number of nodal diameters. Over a range of clamping and eccentricity ratios, the model's predictions are compared to the measured results.

  9. Eccentric binary black-hole mergers: The transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; González, José A.; Brügmann, Bernd; Ansorg, Marcus

    2008-09-01

    We study the transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity by computing gravitational waveforms of nonspinning, equal-mass black-hole binaries. We consider three sequences of simulations, starting with a quasicircular inspiral completing 1.5, 2.3 and 9.6 orbits, respectively, prior to coalescence of the holes. For each sequence, the binding energy of the system is kept constant and the orbital angular momentum is progressively reduced, producing orbits of increasing eccentricity and eventually a head-on collision. We analyze in detail the radiation of energy and angular momentum in gravitational waves, the contribution of different multipolar components and the final spin of the remnant, comparing numerical predictions with the post-Newtonian approximation and with extrapolations of point-particle results. We find that the motion transitions from inspiral to plunge when the orbital angular momentum L=Lcrit≃0.8M2. For Lcensorship conjecture.

  10. Gravitational radiation by point particle eccentric binary systems in the linearised characteristic formulation of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    M., C E Cedeño

    2016-01-01

    We study a binary system composed of point particles of unequal masses in eccentric orbits in the linear regime of the characteristic formulation of general relativity, generalising a previous study found in the literature in which a system of equal masses in circular orbits is considered. We also show that the boundary conditions on the time-like world tubes generated by the orbits of the particles can be extended beyond circular orbits. Concerning the power lost by the emission of gravitational waves, it is directly obtained from the Bondi's News function. It is worth stressing that our results are completely consistent, because we obtain the same result for the power derived by Peters and Mathews, in a different approach, in their seminal paper of 1963. In addition, the present study constitutes a powerful tool to construct extraction schemes in the characteristic formalism to obtain the gravitational radiation produced by binary systems during the inspiralling phase.

  11. XO-2b: a Prograde Planet with a Negligible Eccentricity, and an Additional Radial Velocity Variation

    CERN Document Server

    Narita, Norio; Sato, Bun'ei; Harakawa, Hiroki; Fukui, Akihiko; Aoki, Wako; Tamura, Motohide

    2011-01-01

    We present precise radial velocities of XO-2 taken with the Subaru HDS, covering two transits of XO-2b with an interval of nearly two years. The data suggest that the orbital eccentricity of XO-2b is consistent with zero within 2$\\sigma$ ($e=0.045\\pm0.024$) and the orbit of XO-2b is prograde (the sky-projected spin-orbit alignment angle $\\lambda=10^{\\circ}\\pm72^{\\circ}$). The poor constraint of $\\lambda$ is due to a small impact parameter (the orbital inclination of XO-2b is almost 90$^{\\circ}$). The data also provide an improved estimate of the mass of XO-2b as $0.62\\pm0.02$ $M_{\\rm Jup}$. We also find a long-term radial velocity variation in this system. Further radial velocity measurements are necessary to specify the cause of this additional variation.

  12. Chain hexagonal cacti with the extremal eccentric distance sum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Hui; Yu, Guihai

    2014-01-01

    Eccentric distance sum (EDS), which can predict biological and physical properties, is a topological index based on the eccentricity of a graph. In this paper we characterize the chain hexagonal cactus with the minimal and the maximal eccentric distance sum among all chain hexagonal cacti of length n, respectively. Moreover, we present exact formulas for EDS of two types of hexagonal cacti.

  13. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques.

  14. Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Mir Abbas; Sarebangholi, Milad S.; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2015-09-01

    We report an unexpected reverse spiral turn in the final stage of the motion of rolling rings. It is well known that spinning disks rotate in the same direction of their initial spin until they stop. While a spinning ring starts its motion with a kinematics similar to disks, i.e., moving along a cycloidal path prograde with the direction of its rigid body rotation, the mean trajectory of its center of mass later develops an inflection point so that the ring makes a spiral turn and revolves in a retrograde direction around a new center. Using high speed imaging and numerical simulations of models featuring a rolling rigid body, we show that the hollow geometry of a ring tunes the rotational air drag resistance so that the frictional force at the contact point with the ground changes its direction at the inflection point and puts the ring on a retrograde spiral trajectory. Our findings have potential applications in designing topologically new surface-effect flying objects capable of performing complex reorientation and translational maneuvers.

  15. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex.

  16. Correlations between compositions and orbits established by the giant impact era of planet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Rebekah I; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The giant impact phase of terrestrial planet formation establishes connections between super-Earths' orbital properties (semimajor axis spacings, eccentricities, mutual inclinations) and interior compositions (the presence or absence of gaseous envelopes). Using N-body simulations and analytic arguments, we show that spacings derive not only from eccentricities, but also from inclinations. Flatter systems attain tighter spacings, a consequence of an eccentricity equilibrium between gravitational scatterings, which increase eccentricities, and mergers, which damp them. Dynamical friction by residual disk gas plays a critical role in regulating mergers and in damping inclinations and eccentricities. Systems with moderate gas damping and high solid surface density spawn gas-enveloped super-Earths with tight spacings, small eccentricities, and small inclinations. Systems in which super-Earths coagulate without as much ambient gas, in disks with low solid surface density, produce rocky planets with wider spacings,...

  17. Eccentric Companions to Kepler-448b and Kepler-693b: Clues to the Formation of Warm Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kento

    2017-08-01

    I report the discovery of non-transiting close companions to two transiting warm Jupiters (WJs), Kepler-448/KOI-12b (orbital period P=17.9 {days}, radius {R}{{p}}={1.23}-0.05+0.06 {R}{Jup}) and Kepler-693/KOI-824b (P=15.4 {days}, {R}{{p}}=0.91+/- 0.05 {R}{Jup}), via dynamical modeling of their transit timing and duration variations (TTVs and TDVs). The companions have masses of {22}-5+7 {M}{Jup} (Kepler-448c) and {150}-40+60 {M}{Jup} (Kepler-693c), and both are on eccentric orbits (e={0.65}-0.09+0.13 for Kepler-448c and e={0.47}-0.06+0.11 for Kepler-693c) with periastron distances of 1.5 {au}. Moderate eccentricities are detected for the inner orbits as well (e={0.34}-0.07+0.08 for Kepler-448b and e={0.2}-0.1+0.2 for Kepler-693b). In the Kepler-693 system, a large mutual inclination between the inner and outer orbits ({53}-9+7 \\deg or {134}-10+11 \\deg ) is also revealed by the TDVs. This is likely to induce a secular oscillation in the eccentricity of the inner WJ that brings its periastron close enough to the host star for tidal star-planet interactions to be significant. In the Kepler-448 system, the mutual inclination is weakly constrained, and such an eccentricity oscillation is possible for a fraction of the solutions. Thus these WJs may be undergoing tidal migration to become hot Jupiters (HJs), although the migration via this process from beyond the snow line is disfavored by the close-in and massive nature of the companions. This may indicate that WJs can be formed in situ and could even evolve into HJs via high-eccentricity migration inside the snow line.

  18. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways coverage to antogonistically regulate a light-induced transcription network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde and photosensory-receptor signaling has remained undefined. Here, we show that the phytochrome (phy) and retrograde signaling pathways converge a...

  19. Disrupting circadian rhythms in rats induces retrograde amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, Mátyás; Ree, J.M. van; Niesink, Raymond J.M.; Wied, D. de

    1985-01-01

    Disrupting circadian organization in rats by phase-shifting the illumination cycle or by exposure to a reversed day/night cycle or to continuous light, resulted in retrograde amnesia for passive avoidance behavior. This retrograde amnesia induced by phase-shifting lasted at least 2 days, and

  20. Disrupting circadian rhythms in rats induces retrograde amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, Mátyás; Ree, J.M. van; Niesink, Raymond J.M.; Wied, D. de

    1985-01-01

    Disrupting circadian organization in rats by phase-shifting the illumination cycle or by exposure to a reversed day/night cycle or to continuous light, resulted in retrograde amnesia for passive avoidance behavior. This retrograde amnesia induced by phase-shifting lasted at least 2 days, and gradual

  1. Retrograde amnesia for semantic information in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Kollen, A.; Scheltens, P.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal controls were tested on a retrograde amnesia test with semantic content (Neologism and Vocabulary Test, or NVT), consisting of neologisms to be defined. Patients showed a decrement as compared to normal controls, pointing to retrograde am

  2. Timing the Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar in NGC 1851

    CERN Document Server

    Freire, P C; Gupta, Y; Freire, Paulo C.; Ransom, Scott M.; Gupta, Yashwant

    2007-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope to observe the millisecond pulsar PSR J0514-4002A on 43 occasions spread over 2 years. This 5-ms pulsar is located in the globular cluster NGC 1851; it belongs to a binary system and has a highly eccentric (e = 0.888) orbit. We have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution for this object, including very precise position, spin and orbital parameters. The pulsar is located 4.6" (about 1.3 core radii) from the center of the cluster, and is likely to lie on its more distant half. The non-detection of eclipses at superior conjunction can be used, given the peculiar geometry of this system, to rule out the possibility of an extended companion. We have measured the rate of advance of periastron for this binary system to be $\\dot{\\omega}$ = 0.01289(4) degrees per year, which if due completely to general relativity, implies a total system mass of 2.453(14) solar masses. Given the known mass function, the pulsar mass has to be 0.96 solar masses, implying that it is a heavy white...

  3. On Orbital Elements of Extrasolar Planetary Candidates and Spectroscopic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Black, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate probability densities of orbital elements, periods, and eccentricities, for the population of extrasolar planetary candidates (EPC) and, separately, for the population of spectroscopic binaries (SB) with solar-type primaries. We construct empirical cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) in order to infer probability distribution functions (PDFs) for orbital periods and eccentricities. We also derive a joint probability density for period-eccentricity pairs in each population. Comparison of respective distributions reveals that in all cases EPC and SB populations are, in the context of orbital elements, indistinguishable from each other to a high degree of statistical significance. Probability densities of orbital periods in both populations have P(exp -1) functional form, whereas the PDFs of eccentricities can he best characterized as a Gaussian with a mean of about 0.35 and standard deviation of about 0.2 turning into a flat distribution at small values of eccentricity. These remarkable similarities between EPC and SB must be taken into account by theories aimed at explaining the origin of extrasolar planetary candidates, and constitute an important clue us to their ultimate nature.

  4. Derivation of Capture Probabilities for the Corotation Eccentric Mean Motion Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Moutamid, Maryame El; Renner, Stéfan

    2016-01-01

    We study in this paper the capture of a massless particle into an isolated, first order Corotation Eccentric Resonance (CER), in the framework of the Planar, Eccentric and Restricted Three-Body problem near a m+1:m mean motion commensurability (m integer). While capture into Lindblad Eccentric Resonances (where the perturber's orbit is circular) has been investigated years ago, capture into CER (where the perturber's orbit is elliptic) has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we derive the generic equations of motion near a CER in the general case where both the perturber and the test particle migrate. We derive the probability of capture in that context, and we examine more closely two particular cases: (i) if only the perturber is migrating, capture is possible only if the migration is outward from the primary. Notably, the probability of capture is independent of the way the perturber migrates outward; (ii) if only the test particle is migrating, then capture is possible only if the algebraic value o...

  5. Orbital cellulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemolytic streptococci may also cause orbital cellulitis. Orbital cellulitis infections in children may get worse very quickly and ... in the space around the eye. An orbital cellulitis infection can get worse very quickly. A person with ...

  6. Diffusive chaos in navigation satellites orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Daquin, J; Tsiganis, K

    2016-01-01

    The navigation satellite constellations in medium-Earth orbit exist in a background of third-body secular resonances stemming from the perturbing gravitational effects of the Moon and the Sun. The resulting chaotic motions, emanating from the overlapping of neighboring resonant harmonics, induce especially strong perturbations on the orbital eccentricity, which can be transported to large values, thereby increasing the collision risk to the constellations and possibly leading to a proliferation of space debris. We show here that this transport is of a diffusive nature and we present representative diffusion maps that are useful in obtaining a global comprehension of the dynamical structure of the navigation satellite orbits.

  7. Effects of solar radiation on the orbits of small particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A modification of the Robertson (1937) equations of particle motion in the presence of solar radiation is developed which allows for partial reflection of sunlight as a result of rapid and varying particle rotations caused by interaction with the solar wind. The coefficients and forces in earlier forms of the equations are compared with those in the present equations, and secular rates of change of particle orbital elements are determined. Orbital dimensions are calculated in terms of time, probable sizes and densities of meteoric and cometary particles are estimated, and times of infall to the sun are computed for a particle moving in an almost circular orbit and a particle moving in an elliptical orbit of high eccentricity. Changes in orbital elements are also determined for particles from a long-period sun-grazing comet. The results show that the time of infall to the sun from a highly eccentric orbit is substantially shorter than from a circular orbit with a radius equal to the mean distance in the eccentric orbit. The possibility is considered that the free orbital kinetic energy of particles drawn into the sun may be the energy source for the solar corona.

  8. Highly eccentric inspirals into a Schwarzschild black hole using self-force calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels; Evans, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Eccentric-orbit inspirals into a massive black hole are calculated using the gravitational self-force. Both extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRIs) and intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) are modeled. These calculations include all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects for inspirals into a Schwarzschild black hole. We compute systems with initial eccentricities as high as e = 0.8 and initial separations as large as 100 M. In the case of EMRIs, the calculations follow the decay through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge. Inspirals are computed using an osculating-orbits scheme that is driven by self-force data from a hybridized self-force code. A Lorenz gauge self-force code is combined with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code, allowing the hybrid self-force model to track orbital phase in the inspirals to within 0.1 radians or better. Extensions of the method to include other physical effects are considered.

  9. Effects of Retinal Eccentricity on Human Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovici, Alexandru; Zaal, Peter M. T.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of viewing a primary flight display at different retinal eccentricities on human manual control behavior and performance. Ten participants performed a pitch tracking task while looking at a simplified primary flight display at different horizontal and vertical retinal eccentricities, and with two different controlled dynamics. Tracking performance declined at higher eccentricity angles and participants behaved more nonlinearly. The visual error rate gain increased with eccentricity for single-integrator-like controlled dynamics, but decreased for double-integrator-like dynamics. Participants' visual time delay was up to 100 ms higher at the highest horizontal eccentricity compared to foveal viewing. Overall, vertical eccentricity had a larger impact than horizontal eccentricity on most of the human manual control parameters and performance. Results might be useful in the design of displays and procedures for critical flight conditions such as in an aerodynamic stall.

  10. [Retrograde nailing in a tibial fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Mellado, M; Martí-Garín, D; Fillat-Gomà, F; Marcano-Fernández, F A; González-Vargas, J A

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a severely comminuted type iiia open tibial fracture, with distal loss of bone stock (7 cm), total involvement of the tibial joint surface, and severe instability of the fibular-talar joint. The treatment performed consisted of thorough cleansing, placing a retrograde reamed calcaneal-talar-tibial nail with proximal and distal blockage, as well as a fibular-talar Kirschner nail. Primary closure of the skin was achieved. After 3 weeks, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was performed to fill the bone defect, and the endomedullary nail, which had protruded distally was reimpacted and dynamized distally. The bone defect was eventually consolidated after 16 weeks. Currently, the patient can walk without pain the tibial-astragal arthrodesis is consolidated. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Vagal withdrawal during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, M; Rasmussen, Verner; Schulze, S;

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are at risk of developing cardiorespiratory complications, but the mechanism is still unknown. Treatment with metoprolol 2 h before the endoscopy has been shown to decrease the incidence of myocardial ischaemia...... during ERCP. The present study evaluated whether the endoscopic stress would decrease vagal tone and whether metoprolol given before the procedure could prevent this defence-like reaction. METHODS: Thirty-eight patients were randomized to receive either placebo or 100 mg metoprolol 2 h before ERCP....... During ERCP the patients were monitored with a Holter tape recorder. Holter tapes from 31 patients (16 receiving metoprolol) were available to analyse the ratio of the standard deviations of the RR intervals (SDRR) to the mean RR intervals (measure of vagal tone) during ERCP. RESULTS: A decreased vagal...

  12. THE STATISTICAL MECHANICS OF PLANET ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremaine, Scott, E-mail: tremaine@ias.edu [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    The final “giant-impact” phase of terrestrial planet formation is believed to begin with a large number of planetary “embryos” on nearly circular, coplanar orbits. Mutual gravitational interactions gradually excite their eccentricities until their orbits cross and they collide and merge; through this process the number of surviving bodies declines until the system contains a small number of planets on well-separated, stable orbits. In this paper we explore a simple statistical model for the orbit distribution of planets formed by this process, based on the sheared-sheet approximation and the ansatz that the planets explore uniformly all of the stable region of phase space. The model provides analytic predictions for the distribution of eccentricities and semimajor axis differences, correlations between orbital elements of nearby planets, and the complete N-planet distribution function, in terms of a single parameter, the “dynamical temperature,” that is determined by the planetary masses. The predicted properties are generally consistent with N-body simulations of the giant-impact phase and with the distribution of semimajor axis differences in the Kepler catalog of extrasolar planets. A similar model may apply to the orbits of giant planets if these orbits are determined mainly by dynamical evolution after the planets have formed and the gas disk has disappeared.

  13. Eccentric Connectivity Index of Chemical Trees

    CERN Document Server

    c, Aleksandar Ili\\'

    2011-01-01

    The eccentric connectivity index $\\xi^c$ is a distance--based molecular structure descriptor that was recently used for mathematical modeling of biological activities of diverse nature. We prove that the broom has maximum $\\xi^c$ among trees with a fixed maximum vertex degree, and characterize such trees with minimum $\\xi^c$\\,. In addition, we propose a simple linear algorithm for calculating $\\xi^c$ of trees.

  14. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Fibre Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabadzhiev T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hard-strength training induces strength increasing and muscle damage, especially after eccentric contractions. Eccentric contractions also lead to muscle adaptation. Symptoms of damage after repeated bout of the same or similar eccentrically biased exercises are markedly reduced. The mechanism of this repeated bout effect is unknown. Since electromyographic (EMG power spectra scale to lower frequencies, the adaptation is related to neural adaptation of the central nervous system (CNS presuming activation of slow-non-fatigable motor units or synchronization of motor unit firing. However, the repeated bout effect is also observed under repeated stimulation, i.e. without participation of the CNS. The aim of this study was to compare the possible effects of changes in intracellular action potential shape and in synchronization of motor units firing on EMG power spectra. To estimate possible degree of the effects of central and peripheral changes, interferent EMG was simulated under different intracellular action potential shapes and different degrees of synchronization of motor unit firing. It was shown that the effect of changes in intracellular action potential shape and muscle fibre propagation velocity (i.e. peripheral factors on spectral characteristics of EMG signals could be stronger than the effect of synchronization of firing of different motor units (i.e. central factors.

  15. Roll Eccentricity Control Using Identified Eccentricity of Top/Bottom Rolls by Roll Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Koshinuma, Kazuyoshi

    Roll eccentricity is a periodic disturbance caused by a structure of back up rolls in rolling mills, and it affects product thickness accuracy. It cannot be measured directly by sensors, so it should be identified by measured thickness or measured roll force. When there is a large difference of diameters between top and bottom back up roll, the performance of roll eccentricity control using feedback signals of roll force or thickness has not been so good. Also it has been difficult for the control to be applied from the most head end because it is necessary to identify the roll eccentricity during rolling. A new roll eccentricity control has been developed to improve these disadvantages and to get better performance. The method identifies top and bottom roll eccentricity respectively from one signal of roll force and it can start the control from head end. In this paper the new control method is introduced and actual application results to a hot strip mill are shown.

  16. Retrogradation of starches and maltodextrins of various origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Sobolewska-Zielińska

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The retrogradation which occurs during the processes food storage is an essential problem in food industry. In this study, the ability to retrogradate of native starches and maltodextrins of different botanical origin was analysed. Material and methods. The materials were starches of various botanical origin, including commercial samples: potato, tapioca, wheat, corn, waxy corn starches, and laboratory isolated samples: triticale and rice starches. The above starches were used as material for laboratory production of maltodextrins of medium dextrose equivalents (DE in the range from 8.27 to 12.75. Starches were analysed for amylose content, while the ratio of non-branched/long-chain-branched to short-chain-branched fractions of maltodextrins was calculated from gel permeation chromatography data. The susceptibility to retrogradation of 2% starch pastes and 2% maltodextrin solutions was evaluated according to turbidimetric method of Jacobson. Results. The greatest starch in turbidance of starch gels was observed within initial of the test. days. Initial retrogradation degree of cereal starches was higher than that of tuber and root starches. The waxy corn starch was the least prone to retrogradate. The increase in turbidance of maltodextrin solutions were minimal. Waxy corn maltodextrin was not susceptible to retrogradation. Among other samples, the lowest susceptibility to retrogradation after 14 days was found for rice maltodextrin, while the highest for wheat and triticale maltodextrin. Conclusions. On the basis of this study, the retrogradation dependence on the kind of starches and the maltodextrins was established and the author stated that all the maltodextrins have a much less ability to retrogradation than the native starches.

  17. Analytical representations of precise orbit predictions for Earth orbiting space objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Jizhang; Li, Bin; Chen, Junyu; Zhang, Pin; Ning, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Accurate orbits of Earth orbiting space objects are usually generated from an orbit determination/prediction process using numerical integrators, and presented to users in a tabulated form or a state vector including force model parameters. When dealing with hundreds of thousands of space objects such as in the space conjunction assessment, the memory required for the tabulated orbits or the computing time for propagating orbits using the state vector are both confronting to users. This paper presents two methods of analytically representing numerical orbits considering the accuracy, computing efficiency and memory. The first one is a two-step TLE-based method in which the numerical orbits are first fitted into a TLE set and then correction functions are applied to improve the position accuracy. In the second method, the orbit states are represented in equinoctial elements first, and then again correction functions are applied to reduce the position errors. Experiments using six satellite laser ranging (SLR) satellites and 12 debris objects with accurate orbits show that both methods can represent the accurate orbits over 5 days in an accuracy of a few dozens of meters for the circular orbits and several hundred meters for the eccentric orbits. The computing time is similar to that using the NORAD TLE/SGP4 algorithm, and storage for the orbit elements and function coefficients is about 3-5 KB. These features could make the two methods beneficial for the maintenance of orbit catalog of large numbers of space objects.

  18. Effects of eccentric cycle ergometry in alpine skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, M; Lüthy, F; Kroell, J; Müller, E; Hoppeler, H; Vogt, M

    2010-08-01

    Eccentric cycling, where the goal is to resist the pedals, which are driven by a motor, increases muscle strength and size in untrained subjects. We hypothesized that it could also be beneficial for athletes, particularly in alpine skiing, which involves predominantly eccentric contractions at longer muscle lengths. We investigated the effects of replacing part of regular weight training with eccentric cycling in junior male alpine skiers using a matched-pair design. Control subjects ( N=7) executed 1-h weight sessions 3 times per week, which included 4-5 sets of 4 leg exercises. The eccentric group ( N=8) performed only 3 sets, followed by continuous sessions on the eccentric ergometer for the remaining 20 min. After 6 weeks, lean thigh mass increased significantly only in the eccentric group. There was a groupxtime effect on squat-jump height favouring the eccentric group, which also experienced a 6.5% improvement in countermovement-jump height. The ability to finely modulate muscle force during variable eccentric cycling improved 50% (p=0.004) only in the eccentric group. Although eccentric cycling did not significantly enhance isometric leg strength, we believe it is beneficial for alpine skiers because it provides an efficient means for hypertrophy while closely mimicking the type of muscle actions encountered while skiing.

  19. Relevance of ellipse eccentricity for camera calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordwinzew, W.; Tietz, B.; Boochs, F.; Paulus, D.

    2015-05-01

    Plane circular targets are widely used within calibrations of optical sensors through photogrammetric set-ups. Due to this popularity, their advantages and disadvantages are also well studied in the scientific community. One main disadvantage occurs when the projected target is not parallel to the image plane. In this geometric constellation, the target has an elliptic geometry with an offset between its geometric and its projected center. This difference is referred to as ellipse eccentricity and is a systematic error which, if not treated accordingly, has a negative impact on the overall achievable accuracy. The magnitude and direction of eccentricity errors are dependent on various factors. The most important one is the target size. The bigger an ellipse in the image is, the bigger the error will be. Although correction models dealing with eccentricity have been available for decades, it is mostly seen as a planning task in which the aim is to choose the target size small enough so that the resulting eccentricity error remains negligible. Besides the fact that advanced mathematical models are available and that the influence of this error on camera calibration results is still not completely investigated, there are various additional reasons why bigger targets can or should not be avoided. One of them is the growing image resolution as a by-product from advancements in the sensor development. Here, smaller pixels have a lower S/N ratio, necessitating more pixels to assure geometric quality. Another scenario might need bigger targets due to larger scale differences whereas distant targets should still contain enough information in the image. In general, bigger ellipses contain more contour pixels and therefore more information. This supports the target-detection algorithms to perform better even at non-optimal conditions such as data from sensors with a high noise level. In contrast to rather simple measuring situations in a stereo or multi-image mode, the impact

  20. Normative values of eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, D; Pedersen, M B; Kastrup, K

    2014-01-01

    .354) Nm/kg. CONCLUSION: Normative values for maximal eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners can be calculated by taking into account the differences in strength across genders and the decline in strength that occurs with increasing age. Age and gender were associated with maximal eccentric hip......PURPOSE: Low eccentric strength of the hip abductors, might increase the risk of patellofemoral pain syndrome and iliotibial band syndrome in runners. No normative values for maximal eccentric hip abduction strength have been established. Therefore the purpose of this study was to establish...... normative values of maximal eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners. METHODS: Novice healthy runners (n = 831) were recruited through advertisements at a hospital and a university. Maximal eccentric hip abduction strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. The demographic variables...

  1. The harmonic structure of generic Kerr orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Rebecca; Perez-Giz, Gabe

    2011-01-01

    Generic Kerr orbits exhibit intricate three-dimensional motion. We offer a classification scheme for these intricate orbits in terms of periodic orbits. The crucial insight is that for a given effective angular momentum $L$ and angle of inclination $\\iota$, there exists a discrete set of orbits that are geometrically $n$-leaf clovers in a precessing {\\it orbital plane}. When viewed in the full three dimensions, these orbits are periodic in $r-\\theta$. Each $n$-leaf clover is associated with a rational number, $1+q_{r\\theta}=\\omega_\\theta/\\omega_r$, that measures the degree of perihelion precession in the precessing orbital plane. The rational number $q_{r\\theta}$ varies monotonically with the orbital energy and with the orbital eccentricity. Since any bound orbit can be approximated as near one of these periodic $n$-leaf clovers, this special set offers a skeleton that illuminates the structure of all bound Kerr orbits, in or out of the equatorial plane.

  2. Radiation-Driven Warping of Circumbinary Disks Around Eccentric Young Star Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-01-01

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating, circumbinary disk around young binary stars on an eccentric orbit. Such a disk is subject to both the tidal torques due to a time-dependent binary potential and the radiative torques due to radiation emitted from each star. The tilt angle between the circumbinary disk plane and the binary orbital plane is assumed to be very small. We find that there is a radius within/beyond which the circumbinary disk is unstable to radiation-driven warping, depending on the disk density and temperature gradient indices. This marginally stable warping radius is very sensitive to viscosity parameters, a fiducial disk radius and the temperature measured there, the stellar luminosity, and the disk surface density at a radius where the disk changes from the optically thick to thin for the irradiation from the central stars. On the other hand, it is insensitive to the orbital eccentricity and binary irradiation parameter, which is a function of the bina...

  3. Fundamental frequencies and resonances from eccentric and precessing binary black hole inspirals

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Adam G M; Pfeiffer, Harald P

    2016-01-01

    Binary black holes which are both eccentric and undergo precession remain unexplored in numerical simulations. We present simulations of such systems which cover about 50 orbits at comparatively high mass ratios 5 and 7. The configurations correspond to the generic motion of a nonspinning body in a Kerr spacetime, and are chosen to study the transition from finite mass-ratio inspirals to point particle motion in Kerr. We develop techniques to extract analogs of the three fundamental frequencies of Kerr geodesics, compare our frequencies to those of Kerr, and show that the differences are consistent with self-force corrections entering at first order in mass ratio. This analysis also locates orbital resonances where the ratios of our frequencies take rational values. At the considered mass ratios, the binaries pass through resonances in one to two resonant cycles, and we find no discernible effects on the orbital evolution. We also compute the decay of eccentricity during the inspiral and find good agreement w...

  4. On the evolution of eccentric and inclined protoplanets embedded in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Cresswell, Paul; Kley, Willy; Nelson, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    Young planets embedded in their protoplanetary disk interact gravitationally with it leading to energy and angular momentum exchange. This interaction determines the evolution of the planet through changes to the orbital parameters. We investigate changes in the orbital elements of a 20 Earth--mass planet due to the torques from the disk. We focus on the non-linear evolution of initially non-vanishing eccentricity $e$ and/or inclination $i$. We treat the disk as a two- or three-dimensional viscous fluid and perform hydrodynamical simulations with an embedded planet. We find rapid exponential decay of the planet orbital eccentricity and inclination for small initial values of $e$ and $i$, in agreement with linear theory. For larger values of $e > 0.1$ the decay time increases and the decay rate scales as $\\dot{e} \\propto e^{-2}$, consistent with existing theoretical models. For large inclinations ($i$ > 6 deg) the inclination decay rate shows an identical scaling $di/dt \\propto i^{-2}$. We find an interesting ...

  5. Stability of Frozen Orbits Around Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Josué; Vilhena de Moraes, R.; Carvalho, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): A planetary satellite of interest at the present moment for the scientific community is Europa, one of the four largest moons of Jupiter. There are some missions planned to visit Europa in the next years, for example, Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO, NASA) and Jupiter IcyMoon Explorer (JUICE, ESA). In this work we are formulating theories and constructing computer programs to be used in the design of aerospace tasks as regards the stability of artificial satellite orbits around planetary satellites. The studies are related to translational motion of orbits around planetary satellites considering polygenic perturbations due to forces, such as the nonspherical shape of the central body and the perturbation of the third body. The equations of motion will be developed in closed form to avoid expansions in eccentricity and inclination. For a description of canonical formalism are used the Delaunay canonical variables. The canonical set of equations, which are nonlinear differential equations, will be used to study the stability of orbits around Europa. We will use a simplified dynamic model, which considers the effects caused by non-uniform distribution of mass of Europa (J2, J3 and C22) and the gravitational attraction of Jupiter. Emphasis will be given to the case of frozen orbits, defined as having almost constant values of eccentricity, inclination, and argument of pericentre. An approach will be used to search for frozen orbits around planetary satellites and study their stability by applying a process of normalization of Hamiltonian. Acknowledges: FAPESP

  6. Stochastic Orbit Prediction Using KAM Tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    central body (like the rings of Saturn ), or coalesce into a moon or planet. Hannes Alfvén famously described this coalescing of debris using apples...collision, the smashed remnants lose their inclination and eccentricity until eventually a cloud of dust orbits in a ring about the equator of the...269) One method to verify the two-body analytical formation of ⃑ ⃑ ⁄ is to numerically differentiate a

  7. Liver Parenchyma Perforation following Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Kayashima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP is an effective modality for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary and pancreatic diseases, it is still related with several severe complications. We report on the case of a female patient who developed liver parenchyma perforation following ERCP. She underwent ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of a common bile duct stone. Shortly after ERCP, abdominal distension was identified. Abdominal computed tomography revealed intraabdominal air leakage and leakage of contrast dye penetrating the liver parenchyma into the space around the spleen. Since periampullary perforation related to sphincterotomy could not be denied, she was referred for immediate surgery. Obvious perforation could not be found at surgery. Cholecystectomy, insertion of a T tube into the common bile duct, placement of a duodenostomy tube and drainage of the retroperitoneum were performed. She did well postoperatively and was discharged home on postoperative day 28. In conclusion, as it is well recognized that perforation is one of the most serious complication related to ERCP, liver parenchyma perforation should be suspected as a cause.

  8. Liver Parenchyma Perforation following Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayashima, Hiroto; Ikegami, Toru; Kasagi, Yuta; Hidaka, Gen; Yamazaki, Koji; Sadanaga, Noriaki; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Emi, Yasunori; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Okadome, Kenichiro

    2011-01-01

    Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an effective modality for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary and pancreatic diseases, it is still related with several severe complications. We report on the case of a female patient who developed liver parenchyma perforation following ERCP. She underwent ERCP with sphincterotomy and extraction of a common bile duct stone. Shortly after ERCP, abdominal distension was identified. Abdominal computed tomography revealed intraabdominal air leakage and leakage of contrast dye penetrating the liver parenchyma into the space around the spleen. Since periampullary perforation related to sphincterotomy could not be denied, she was referred for immediate surgery. Obvious perforation could not be found at surgery. Cholecystectomy, insertion of a T tube into the common bile duct, placement of a duodenostomy tube and drainage of the retroperitoneum were performed. She did well postoperatively and was discharged home on postoperative day 28. In conclusion, as it is well recognized that perforation is one of the most serious complication related to ERCP, liver parenchyma perforation should be suspected as a cause. PMID:21960953

  9. Biliary Access During Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Carr-Locke

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques have been developed to facilitate cannulation of the papilla during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP. The position of the endoscope should generally provide a 'straight' route to the papilla, and the efforts should be directed at shortening the intraduodenal portion of the bile duct. If a guidewire is used, one should be chosen that possesses suitable tip and shaft characteristics, including flexibility, strength, low friction and trackability, but no one device is likely to be suitable for all purposes. The development of guidewires composed of nitinol has revolutionized endoscopic practice. Access papillotomy ('pre-cut' can be employed as an alternative to (or in addition to insertion of a guidewire when cannulation of the major papilla has been unsuccessful. The same techniques may be used to allow deep cannulation of the bile or pancreatic duct after ductography, when fluoroscopy can also be used. The 'needle-knife', which must be used carefully because it cuts with even slight tissue contact, is moved in the expected direction of the intramural bile (or pancreatic duct to gain direct access into the duct. Access papillotomy is a valuable procedure in difficult cases, but is associated with greater risks than standard ERCP techniques (except perhaps for a reduced likelihood of pancreatitis, and is best employed by personnel who have extensive experience with therapeutic endoscopy. Technical details for a variety of clinical situations are described. Success requires application of 'the four Ps': position, practice, patience and perseverance.

  10. Physiology and Pathology of Endosome-to-Golgi Retrograde Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    Bi-directional traffic between the Golgi apparatus and the endosomal system sustains the functions of the trans Golgi network (TGN) in secretion and organelle biogenesis. Export of cargo from the TGN via the anterograde pathways depletes the organelle of sorting receptors, processing proteases, SNARE molecules, and other factors that are subsequently retrieved from endosomes via the retrograde pathway. Recent studies indicate that retrograde trafficking is vital to early metazoan development,...

  11. Retrograde Melting and Internal Liquid Gettering in Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudelson, Steve; Newman, Bonna K.; Bernardis, Sarah; Fenning, David P.; Bertoni, Mariana I.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Lai, Barry; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-07-01

    Retrograde melting (melting upon cooling) is observed in silicon doped with 3d transition metals, via synchrotron-based temperature-dependent X-ray microprobe measurements. Liquid metal-silicon droplets formed via retrograde melting act as efficient sinks for metal impurities dissolved within the silicon matrix. Cooling results in decomposition of the homogeneous liquid phase into solid multiple-metal alloy precipitates. These phenomena represent a novel pathway for engineering impurities in semiconductor-based systems.

  12. On the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via secular high-eccentricity migration in stellar triples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Adrian S.

    2017-01-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets orbiting their host star in tight orbits of a few days. They are commonly believed not to have formed in situ, requiring inwards migration towards the host star. One of the proposed migration scenarios is secular high-eccentricity or high-e migration, in which the orbit of the planet is perturbed to high eccentricity by secular processes, triggering strong tidal evolution and orbital migration. Previous theoretical studies have considered secular excitation in stellar binaries. Recently, a number of HJs have been observed in stellar triple systems. In the latter, the secular dynamics are much richer compared to stellar binaries, and HJs could potentially be formed more efficiently. Here, we investigate this possibility by modeling the secular dynamical and tidal evolution of planets in two hierarchical configurations in stellar triple systems. We find that the HJ formation efficiency is higher compared to stellar binaries, but only by at most a few tens of per cent. The orbital properties of the HJs formed in the simulations are very similar to HJs formed in stellar binaries, and similarly to studies of the latter we find no significant number of warm Jupiters. HJs are only formed in our simulations for triples with specific orbital configurations, and our constraints are approximately consistent with current observations. In future, this allows to rule out high-e migration in stellar triples if a HJ is detected in a triple grossly violating these constraints.

  13. On the formation of hot and warm Jupiters via secular high-eccentricity migration in stellar triples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Adrian S.

    2017-04-01

    Hot Jupiters (HJs) are Jupiter-like planets orbiting their host star in tight orbits of a few days. They are commonly believed not to have formed in situ, requiring inwards migration towards the host star. One of the proposed migration scenarios is secular high-eccentricity or high-e migration, in which the orbit of the planet is perturbed to high eccentricity by secular processes, triggering strong tidal evolution and orbital migration. Previous theoretical studies have considered secular excitation in stellar binaries. Recently, a number of HJs have been observed in stellar triple systems. In the latter, the secular dynamics are much richer compared to stellar binaries, and HJs could potentially be formed more efficiently. Here, we investigate this possibility by modelling the secular dynamical and tidal evolution of planets in two hierarchical configurations in stellar triple systems. We find that the HJ formation efficiency is higher compared to stellar binaries, but only by at most a few tens of per cent. The orbital properties of the HJs formed in the simulations are very similar to HJs formed in stellar binaries, and similarly to studies of the latter we find no significant number of warm Jupiters. HJs are only formed in our simulations for triples with specific orbital configurations, and our constraints are approximately consistent with current observations. In future, this allows us to rule out high-e migration in stellar triples if a HJ is detected in a triple grossly violating these constraints.

  14. Flow Mode Magnetorheological Dampers with an Eccentric Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Young-Tai; Norman M. Wereley

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes flow mode magnetorheological (MR) dampers with an eccentric annular gap (i.e., a nonuniform annular gap). To this end, an MR damper analysis for an eccentric annular gap is constructed based on approximating the eccentric annular gap using a rectangular duct with a variable gap, as well as a Bingham-plastic constitutive model of the MR fluid. Performance of flow mode MR dampers with an eccentric gap was assessed analytically using both field-dependent damping force and dam...

  15. The inherent catastrophic traps in retrograde CTO PCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eugene B; Tsuchikane, Etsuo

    2017-05-04

    When we learn to drive, our driving instructor tells us how to check the side mirror and turn your head to check the blind spot before changing lanes. He tells us how to stop at stop signs, how to drive in slippery conditions, the safe stopping distances, and these all make our driving safe. Similarly, when we learn PCI, our mentors teach us to seat the guiding catheter co-axially, to wire the vessel safely, to deliver balloon and stents over the wire, to watch the pressure of the guiding, in order that we perform PCI safely and evade complications. In retrograde CTO PCI, there is no such published teaching. Also many individual mentors have not had the wide experience to see all the possible complications of retrograde CTO PCI and, therefore, may not be able to warn their apprentice. As the number of retrograde procedures increase worldwide, there is a corresponding increase in catastrophic complications, many of which, we as experts, can see are easily avoidable. To breach this gap in knowledge, this article describes 12 commonly met inherent traps in retrograde CTO PCI. They are inherent because by arranging our equipment in the manner to perform retrograde CTO PCI, these complications are either induced directly or happen easily. We hope this work will enhance safety of retrograde CTO PCI and avoid many catastrophic complications for our readers and operators. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evaluation of Sperm Parameters of Infertile Men with Retrograde Ejaculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-xing ZHONG; Wei-jie ZHU; Jing LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate sperm parameters of infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.Methods Twelve infertile men with retrograde ejaculation (group A) were enrolled into this study. Sperm samples were obtained from the postejaculation urine. After sperm recovery and washing procedure, sperm parameters were assessed. Twelve semen samples from normospermic donors were used as the control (group B).Results In all retrograde cases, motile sperm with forward movement were observed in the medium. Motility of group A was significantly lower than that of group B (P<0. 01).In group A, sperm motility ranged from 11% to 56%, sperm with intact both head and tail membranes was 42.2 ± 12.3%, sperm count ranged (13-85)×106/ml, and the sperm survival time was highly shortened. Sperm with normal morphology and intact acrosome were observed in retrograde specimens.Conclusion Sperm parameters recovered from retrograde specimens were highly variable between subjects. The toxicity of urine caused deleterious to sperm functions.Motile sperm could be collected by sperm recovery procedure. Sperm parameters could meet the requirement for the use of assisted reproductive techniques for treating infertile men with retrograde ejaculation.

  17. Absolute Dimensions of the Eccentric Eclipsing Binary V541 Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Guillermo; McGruder, Chima D.; Siverd, Robert J.; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Pepper, Joshua; Stevens, Daniel J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Lund, Michael B.; James, David

    2017-02-01

    We report new spectroscopic and photometric observations of the main-sequence, detached, eccentric, double-lined eclipsing binary V541 Cyg (P = 15.34 days, e = 0.468). Using these observations together with existing measurements, we determine the component masses and radii to better than 1% precision: {M}1={2.335}-0.013+0.017 {M}ȯ , {M}2={2.260}-0.013+0.016 {M}ȯ , {R}1={1.859}-0.009+0.012 {R}ȯ , and {R}2={1.808}-0.013+0.015 {R}ȯ . The nearly identical B9.5 stars have estimated effective temperatures of 10650 ± 200 K and 10350 ± 200 K. A comparison of these properties with current stellar evolution models shows excellent agreement at an age of about 190 Myr and [Fe/H] ≈ ‑0.18. Both components are found to be rotating at the pseudo-synchronous rate. The system displays a slow periastron advance that is dominated by general relativity (GR), and has previously been claimed to be slower than predicted by theory. Our new measurement, \\dot{ω }={0.859}-0.017+0.042 deg century‑1, has an 88% contribution from GR and agrees with the expected rate within the uncertainties. We also clarify the use of the gravity darkening coefficients in the light-curve fitting Eclipsing Binary Orbit Program (EBOP), a version of which we use here.

  18. PSR J1753-2240: A mildly recycled pulsar in an eccentric binary system

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M J; Lyne, A G; Eatough, R P; Stairs, I H; Possenti, A; Camilo, F; Manchester, R N

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of PSR J1753-2240 in the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey database. This 95-ms pulsar is in an eccentric binary system with a 13.6-day orbital period. Period derivative measurements imply a characteristic age in excess of 1 Gyr, suggesting that the pulsar has undergone an episode of accretion-induced spin-up. The eccentricity and spin period are indicative of the companion being a second neutron star, so that the system is similar to that of PSR J1811-1736, although other companion types cannot be ruled out at this time. The companion mass is constrained by geometry to lie above 0.48 solar masses, although long-term timing observations will give additional constraints. If the companion is a white dwarf or main sequence star, optical observations may yield a direct detection of the companion. If the system is indeed one of the few known double neutron star systems, it would lie significantly far from the recently proposed spin-period/eccentricity relationship.

  19. Constraining stellar binary black hole formation scenarios with eLISA eccentricity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Berti, Emanuele; Klein, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    A space-based interferometer such as eLISA could observe few to few thousands progenitors of black hole binaries (BHBs) similar to those recently detected by Advanced LIGO. Gravitational radiation circularizes the orbit during inspiral, but some BHBs retain a measurable eccentricity at the low frequencies where eLISA is most sensitive. The eccentricity of a BHB carries precious information about its formation channel: BHBs formed in the field, in globular clusters, or close to a massive black hole (MBH) have distinct eccentricity distributions in the eLISA band. We generate mock eLISA observations, folding in measurement errors, and using Bayesian model selection we study whether eLISA measurements can identify the BHB formation channel. We find that a handful of observations would suffice to tell whether BHBs were formed in the gravitational field of a MBH. Conversely, several tens of observations are needed to tell apart field formation from globular cluster formation. A five-year eLISA mission with the lon...

  20. Detecting eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Resolvable source strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S R; Gair, J R; McWilliams, S T

    2015-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black-hole binaries and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational-waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system's gravitational-wave signal enters the pulsar-timing array band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric supermassive black-hole bi...

  1. Eclipse Timing Variation Analyses of Eccentric Binaries with Close Tertiaries in the Kepler field

    CERN Document Server

    Borkovits, Tamas; Hajdu, Tamas; Sztakovics, Janos

    2014-01-01

    We report eclipse timing variation analyses of 26 compact hierarchical triple stars comprised of an eccentric eclipsing ('inner') binary and a relatively close tertiary component found in the {\\em Kepler} field. We simultaneously fit the primary and secondary $O-C$ curves of each system for the light-travel time effect (LTTE), as well as dynamical perturbations caused by the tertiary on different timescales. For the first time, we include those contributions of three-body interactions which originate from the eccentric nature of the inner binary. These effects manifest themselves both on the period of the triple system, $P_2$, and on the longer "apse-node" timescale. We demonstrate that consideration of the dynamically forced rapid apsidal motion yields an efficient and independent tool for the determination of the binary orbit's eccentricity and orientation, as well as the 3D configuration of the triple. Modeling the forced apsidal motion also helps to resolve the degeneracy between the shapes of the LTTE an...

  2. An eccentric binary millisecond pulsar with a helium white dwarf companion in the Galactic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, John; Stovall, Kevin; Freire, Paulo C; Deneva, Julia S; Koester, Detlev; Jenet, Frederick; Martinez, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to be exclusive products of binary evolution, as the Universe is not yet old enough to produce them from single stars. Because of the strong tidal forces operating during the binary interaction phase, the remnant host systems observed today are expected to have negligible eccentricities. Here, we report on the first unambiguous identification of a LMWD in an eccentric (e=0.13) orbit with a millisecond pulsar, which directly contradicts this picture. We use our spectra and radio-timing solution (derived elsewhere) to infer the WD temperature T_eff = 8600 +/- 190 K) and 3D systemic velocity (179.5 km\\s). We also place model-independent constraints on the WD radius (R_WD = 0.024+/- 0.004/0.002 R_sun) and surface gravity (log g = 7.11 +/- 0.08/0.16 dex). The WD and kinematic properties are consistent with the expectations for low-mass X-ray binary evolution and disfavour a three-body formation channel. In the case of the high eccentricity being the result of a spontaneou...

  3. Formation of Dark Matter Torii Around Supermassive Black Holes Via The Eccentric Kozai-Lidov Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Naoz, Smadar

    2014-01-01

    We explore the effects of long term secular perturbations on the distribution of dark matter particles around Supermassive Black Hole (BH) binaries. We show that in the hierarchical (in separation) three-body problem, one of the BHs and a dark matter particle form an inner binary. Gravitational perturbations from the BH companion, on a much wider orbit, can cause the dark matter particle to reach extremely high eccentricities and even get accreted onto the BH, by what is known as the Eccentric Kozai-Lidov (EKL) mechanism. We show that this may produce a torus-like configuration for the dark matter distribution around the less massive member of the BH binary. We first consider an Intermediate BH (IMBH) in the vicinity of our Galactic Center, which may be a relic of a past minor merger. We show that if the IMBH is close enough (i.e., near the stellar disk) the EKL mechanism is very efficient in exciting the eccentricity of dark matter particles in near-polar configurations to extremely high values where they ar...

  4. Constraining stellar binary black hole formation scenarios with eLISA eccentricity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Sesana, Alberto; Berti, Emanuele; Klein, Antoine

    2017-03-01

    A space-based interferometer such as the evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (eLISA) could observe a few to a few thousands of progenitors of black hole binaries (BHBs) similar to those recently detected by Advanced LIGO. Gravitational radiation circularizes the orbit during inspiral, but some BHBs retain a measurable eccentricity at the low frequencies where eLISA is the most sensitive. The eccentricity of a BHB carries precious information about its formation channel: BHBs formed in the field, in globular clusters, or close to a massive black hole (MBH) have distinct eccentricity distributions in the eLISA band. We generate mock eLISA observations, folding in measurement errors, and using a Bayesian model selection, we study whether eLISA measurements can identify the BHB formation channel. We find that a handful of observations would suffice to tell whether BHBs were formed in the gravitational field of an MBH. Conversely, several tens of observations are needed to tell apart field formation from globular cluster formation. A 5-yr eLISA mission with the longest possible armlength is desirable to shed light on BHB formation scenarios.

  5. Spin-orbit evolution of Mercury revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Noyelles, Benoit; Makarov, Valeri; Efroimsky, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a peculiar case, in that it is locked into the 3:2 spin-orbit resonance. Its rotation period, 58 days, is exactly two thirds of its orbital period. It is accepted that the eccentricity of Mercury (0.206) favours the trapping into this resonance. More controversial is how the capture took place. A recent study by Makarov has shown that entrapment into this resonance is certain if the eccentricity is larger than 0.2, provided that we use a realistic tidal model, based on the Darwin-Kaula expansion of the tidal torque, including both the elastic rebound and anelastic creep of solids. We here revisit the scenario of Mercury's capture into the supersynchronous spin-orbit resonances. The study is based on a realistic model of tidal friction in solids, that takes into account the rheology and the self-gravitation of the planet. Developed in Efroimsky, it was employed by Makarov et al. to determine the likely spin state of the planet GJ581d, with its eccentricity evolution taken into account. It was also u...

  6. Large eccentricity, low mutual inclination: the three-dimensional architecture of a hierarchical system of giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, Hearst Field Annex B-20, Berkeley CA 94720-3411 (United States); Johnson, John Asher; Murray-Clay, Ruth A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Institute for Theory and Computation, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 95064 (United States); Foreman-Mackey, Daniel [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Cargile, Phillip A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822-1839 (United States); Hebb, Leslie [Department of Physics, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States); Huber, Daniel [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Shporer, Avi [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A., E-mail: rdawson@berkeley.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-20

    We establish the three-dimensional architecture of the Kepler-419 (previously KOI-1474) system to be eccentric yet with a low mutual inclination. Kepler-419b is a warm Jupiter at semi-major axis a=0.370{sub −0.006}{sup +0.007} AU with a large eccentricity (e = 0.85{sub −0.07}{sup +0.08}) measured via the 'photoeccentric effect'. It exhibits transit timing variations (TTVs) induced by the non-transiting Kepler-419c, which we uniquely constrain to be a moderately eccentric (e = 0.184 ± 0.002), hierarchically separated (a = 1.68 ± 0.03 AU) giant planet (7.3 ± 0.4 M {sub Jup}). We combine 16 quarters of Kepler photometry, radial-velocity (RV) measurements from the HIgh Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on Keck, and improved stellar parameters that we derive from spectroscopy and asteroseismology. From the RVs, we measure the mass of the inner planet to be 2.5 ± 0.3 M {sub Jup} and confirm its photometrically measured eccentricity, refining the value to e = 0.83 ± 0.01. The RV acceleration is consistent with the properties of the outer planet derived from TTVs. We find that despite their sizable eccentricities, the planets are coplanar to within 9{sub −6}{sup +8} degrees, and therefore the inner planet's large eccentricity and close-in orbit are unlikely to be the result of Kozai migration. Moreover, even over many secular cycles, the inner planet's periapse is most likely never small enough for tidal circularization. Finally, we present and measure a transit time and impact parameter from four simultaneous ground-based light curves from 1 m class telescopes, demonstrating the feasibility of ground-based follow-up of Kepler giant planets exhibiting large TTVs.

  7. Multiarticular isokinetic high-load eccentric training induces large increases in eccentric and concentric strength and jumping performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Christos; Theodosiou, Konstantinos; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Gkantiraga, Evangelia; Gissis, Ioannis; Sambanis, Michalis; Souglis, Athanasios; Sotiropoulos, Aristomenis

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of short-term eccentric exercise training using a custom-made isokinetic leg press device, on concentric and eccentric strength and explosiveness as well as jumping performance. Nineteen healthy males were divided into an eccentric (ECC, n = 10) and a control group (CG, n = 9). The ECC group trained twice per week for 8 weeks using an isokinetic hydraulic leg press machine against progressively increasing resistance ranging from 70 to 90% of maximal eccentric force. Jumping performance and maximal force generating capacity were measured before and after eccentric training. In the ECC group, drop jump (DJ) height and maximal power were increased by 13.6 ± 3.2% (p knee, and hip joint angles were also reduced by 33.9 ± 1.1%, 31.1 ± 1.0%, and 32.4 ± 1.6% (all p eccentric and concentric leg press force was increased by 64.9 ± 5.5% (p eccentric force, explosiveness, and DJ performance were markedly increased after only 16 training sessions, possibly because of the high eccentric load attained during the bilateral eccentric leg press exercise performed on this custom-made device.

  8. Moderate Load Eccentric Exercise; A Distinct Novel Training Modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppeler, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years a number of studies have been published using progressive eccentric exercise protocols on motorized ergometers or similar devices that allow for controlled application of eccentric loads. Exercise protocols ramp eccentric loads over an initial 3 weeks period in order to prevent muscle damage and delayed onset muscle soreness. Final training loads reach 400-500 W in rehabilitative settings and over 1200 W in elite athletes. Training is typically carried out three times per week for durations of 20-30 min. This type of training has been characterizes as moderate load eccentric exercise. It has also been denoted RENEW (Resistance Exercise via Negative Eccentric Work by LaStayo et al., 2014). It is distinct from plyometric exercises (i.e., drop jumps) that impose muscle loads of several thousand Watts on muscles and tendons. It is also distinct from eccentric overload training whereby loads in a conventional strength training setting are increased in the eccentric phase of the movement to match concentric loads. Moderate load eccentric exercise (or RENEW) has been shown to be similarly effective as conventional strength training in increasing muscle strength and muscle volume. However, as carried out at higher angular velocities of joint movement, it reduces joint loads. A hallmark of moderate load eccentric exercise is the fact that the energy requirements are typically 4-fold smaller than in concentric exercise of the same load. This makes moderate load eccentric exercise training the tool of choice in medical conditions with limitations in muscle energy supply. The use and effectiveness of moderate load eccentric exercise has been demonstrated mostly in small scale studies for cardiorespiratory conditions, sarcopenia of old age, cancer, diabetes type 2, and neurological conditions. It has also been used effectively in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries of the locomotor system in particular the rehabilitation after anterior cruciate

  9. Disruption of planetary orbits through evection resonance with an external companion: circumbinary planets and multiplanet systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenrui; Lai, Dong

    2016-07-01

    Planets around binary stars and those in multiplanet systems may experience resonant eccentricity excitation and disruption due to perturbations from a distant stellar companion. This `evection resonance' occurs when the apsidal precession frequency of the planet, driven by the quadrupole associated with the inner binary or the other planets, matches the orbital frequency of the external companion. We develop an analytic theory to study the effects of evection resonance on circumbinary planets and multiplanet systems. We derive the general conditions for effective eccentricity excitation or resonance capture of the planet as the system undergoes long-term evolution. Applying to circumbinary planets, we show that inward planet migration may lead to eccentricity growth due to evection resonance with an external perturber, and planets around shrinking binaries may not survive the resonant eccentricity growth. On the other hand, significant eccentricity excitation in multiplanet systems occurs in limited parameter space of planet and binary semimajor axes, and requires the planetary migration to be sufficiently slow.

  10. Disruption of Planetary Orbits Through Evection Resonance with an External Companion: Circumbinary Planets and Multiplanet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Wenrui

    2016-01-01

    Planets around binary stars and those in multiplanet systems may experience resonant eccentricity excitation and disruption due to perturbations from a distant stellar companion. This "evection resonance" occurs when the apsidal precession frequency of the planet, driven by the quadrupole associated with the inner binary or the other planets, matches the orbital frequency of the external companion. We develop an analytic theory to study the effects of evection resonance on circumbinary planets and multiplanet systems. We derive the general conditions for effective eccentricity excitation or resonance capture of the planet as the system undergoes long-term evolution. Applying to circumbinary planets, we show that inward planet migration may lead to eccentricity growth due to evection resonance with an external perturber, and planets around shrinking binaries may not survive the resonant eccentricity growth. On the other hand, significant eccentricity excitation in multiplanet systems occurs in limited paramete...

  11. Asymmetric transition disks: Vorticity or eccentricity?

    CERN Document Server

    Zsom, A; Ghanbari, J

    2013-01-01

    Context. Transition disks typically appear in resolved millimeter observations as giant dust rings surrounding their young host stars. More accurate observations with ALMA have shown several of these rings to be in fact asymmetric: they have lopsided shapes. It has been speculated that these rings act as dust traps, which would make them important laboratories for studying planet formation. It has been shown that an elongated giant vortex produced in a disk with a strong viscosity jump strikingly resembles the observed asymmetric rings. Aims. We aim to study a similar behavior for a disk in which a giant planet is embedded. However, a giant planet can induce two kinds of asymmetries: (1) a giant vortex, and (2) an eccentric disk. We studied under which conditions each of these can appear, and how one can observationally distinguish between them. This is important because only a vortex can trap particles both radially and azimuthally, while the eccentric ring can only trap particles in radial direction. Method...

  12. Continuous normothermic retrograde cardioplegia for valve surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martella, A T; Hoffman, D M; Nakao, T; Frater, R W

    1994-07-01

    We have studied warm heart surgery, deemed as continuous warm blood cardioplegia and normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), as an alternative to the technique of intermittent cold cardioplegia for valvular surgery. Between August 1990 and January 1994, 137 consecutive patients underwent valve repair or replacement using normothermic CPB. Eighty-six of these patients received continuous normothermic retrograde blood cardioplegia via the coronary sinus (CNRC). Fifty-one patients received intermittent cold blood cardioplegia (ICBC). All procedures were performed by the same surgeon (RWMF). The two groups were matched for age, sex, NYHA class, preoperative ejection fraction, diagnosis, procedure and activated clotting time. Warm blood cardioplegia was delivered continuously via the coronary sinus after antegrade arrest (oxygenated blood 1:4 to 1:3, 37 degrees C, 250-300 ml/min, maintaining coronary sinus pressures of 40-60 mmHg. Perioperative myocardial infarction was significantly less prevalent (4.6 vs. 8.0%; p < 0.05) in the warm cardioplegia group. Cardiac output immediately after bypass was significantly higher than before bypass only in the CNRC group (4.1 +/- 0.8 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 L/min; p < 0.01). CNRC patients had significantly higher incidence of spontaneous resumption of sinus rhythm at cross-clamp removal (80 of 86, 93%) compared to the hypothermic patients (14 of 51, 27%, p < 0.001). The time from removal of the aortic cross-clamp to discontinuation of CPB (reperfusion time) was significantly shorter in the warm cardioplegia group (43 +/- 7.4 versus 75 +/- 10.2 min; p < 0.001.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Pancreatits after endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayman M Abdel Aziz; Glen A Lehman

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common complication after endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP); the reported incidence of this complication varies from less than 1% to 40%, but a rate of 4%-8% is reported in most prospective studies involving nonselected patients. Differences in criteria for defining pancreatitis, methods of data collection, and patient populations (i.e. number of high-risk patients included in the published series) are factors that are likely to affect the varying rates of post-ERCP pancreatitis. The severity of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) can range from a minor inconvenience with one or two days of added hospitalization with full recovery to a devastating illness with pancreatic necrosis, multiorgan failure, permanent disability, and even death. Although, most episodes of PEP are mild (about 90%), a small percentage of patients (about 10%) develop moderate or severe pancreatitis. In the past, PEP was often viewed as an unpredictable and unavoidable complication, with no realistic strategy for its avoidance. New data have aided in stratification of patients into PEP risk categories and new measures have been introduced to decrease the risk of PEP. As most ERCPs are performed on an outpatient basis, the majority of patients will not develop PEP and can be discharged. Alternatively, early detection of those patients who will go on to develop PEP can guide decisions regarding hospital admission and aggressive management. In the last decade, great efforts have been addressed toward prevention of this complication. Points of emphasis have included technical measures, pharmacological prophylaxis, and patient selection. This review provides a comprehensive, evidence-based assessment of published data on PEP and current suggestions for its avoidance.

  14. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography during pregnancy without radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adem Akcakaya; Orhan Veli Ozkan; Ismail Okan; Orhan Kocaman; Mustafa Sahin

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To present our experience with pregnant patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) without using radiation, and to evaluate the acceptability of this alternative therapeutic pathway for ERCP during pregnancy. METHODS: Between 2000 and 2008, six pregnant women underwent seven ERCP procedures. ERCP was performed under mild sedoanalgesia induced with pethidine HCl and midazolam. The bile duct was cannulated with a guidewire through the papilla. A catheter was slid over the guidewire and bile aspiration and/or visualization of the bile oozing around the guidewire was used to confirm correct cannulation. Following sphincterotomy, the bile duct was cleared by balloon sweeping. When indicated, stents were placed. Confirmation of successful biliary cannulation and stone extraction was made by laboratory, radiological and clinical improvement. Neither fluoroscopy nor spot radiography was used during the procedure. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 28 years (range, 21-33 years). The mean gestational age for the fetus was 23 wk (range, 14-34 wk). Five patients underwent ERCP because of choledocholithiasis and/or choledocholithiasis-induced acute cholangitis. In one case, a stone was extracted after precut papillotomy with a needle-knife, since the stone was impacted. One patient had ERCP because of persistent biliary fistula after hepatic hydatid disease surgery. Following sphincterotomy, scoleces were removed from the common bile duct. Two weeks later, because of the absence of fistula closure, repeat ERCP was performed and a stent was placed. The fistula was closed after stent placement. Neither post-ERCP complications nor premature birth or abortion was seen. CONCLUSION: Non-radiation ERCP in experienced hands can be performed during pregnancy. Stent placement should be considered in cases for which complete common bile duct clearance is dubious because of a lack of visualization of the biliary tree.

  15. An Eccentric Binary Millisecond Pulsar with a Helium White Dwarf Companion in the Galactic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, John; Kaplan, David L.; Stovall, Kevin; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Deneva, Julia S.; Koester, Detlev; Jenet, Fredrick; Martinez, Jose G.

    2016-10-01

    Low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to be exclusive products of binary evolution, as the universe is not old enough to produce them from single stars. Because of the strong tidal forces operating during the binary interaction phase, the remnant systems observed today are expected to have negligible eccentricities. Here, we report on the first unambiguous identification of an LMWD in an eccentric (e = 0.13) orbit around the millisecond pulsar PSR J2234+0511, which directly contradicts this picture. We use our spectra and radio-timing solution (derived elsewhere) to infer the WD temperature ({T}{{eff}}=8600+/- 190 K), and peculiar systemic velocity relative to the local standard of rest (≃ 31 km s-1). We also place model-independent constraints on the WD radius ({R}{{WD}}={0.024}-0.002+0.004 {R}⊙ ) and surface gravity ({log} g={7.11}-0.16+0.08 dex). The WD and kinematic properties are consistent with the expectations for low-mass X-ray binary evolution and disfavor a dynamic three-body formation channel. In the case of the high eccentricity being the result of a spontaneous phase transition, we infer a mass of ˜1.60 M ⊙ for the pulsar progenitor, which is too low for the quark-nova mechanism proposed by Jiang et al., and too high for the scenario of Freire & Tauris, in which a WD collapses into a neutron star via a rotationally delayed accretion-induced collapse. We find that eccentricity pumping via interaction with a circumbinary disk is consistent with our inferred parameters. Finally, we report tentative evidence for pulsations that, if confirmed, would transform the star into an unprecedented laboratory for WD physics.

  16. Long-term evolution of navigation satellite orbits: GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, C.; Gick, R.

    Earlier studies conducted a The Aerospace Corporation discovered that the GPSt Block II satellites placed in disposal orbits can eventually, perhaps in 20 to 40 years, reenter into the operating constellation. This is because the disposal orbits, while circular initially, evolve int o orbits with significant eccentricity mostly as the result of sun-moon gravitational perturbations. Options of minimizing the eccentricity growth include reducing initial eccentricity of the disposal orbit and inserting into an orbit with a favorable argument of perigee. A recent study was performed to examine whether the same long-term eccentricity evolution exists for the disposal orbits of other navigation satellite systems such as GLONASS and GALILEO. The non-operational GPS Block I satellites are included in the study as well, because the orbits are at 63.4 deg inclination, which is different from that of the GPS Block II satellites. Similar to the earlier studies, long-term perturbations and stability of these orbits were understood through analytical and numerical investigations. Two-hundred-year semi-analytic integration revealed interesting facts about the orbit stability. Initially near circular, these types of orbits may evolve into orbits with large eccentricity (as much as 0.7 over 150 years). Analytical approximations through doubly-averaged equations reveal that the cause is due to the resonance induced by Sun/moon and J2 secular perturbations. A total of 113 non-operational GLONASS satellites and upper stages and 10 GPS/Block I satellites were propagated for 200 years using a high-precision semi-analytical propagator (MEANPROP). Results show that the GLONASS satellites will start to enter the operating GPS constellation after 40 years. The uncovered resonance effect is strongly dependent on o bit inclination and altitude. The effect becomes morer pronounced for GALILEO orbits due to a higher altitude, 3000 km above GPS. Strategies to minimize the significant

  17. Periodic X-ray Modulation and its relation with orbital elements in Compact Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Stellar companion of a black hole orbiting in an eccentric orbit will experience modulating tidal force with a periodicity same as that of the orbital period. This, in turn, would modulate accretion rates, and the seed photon flux which are inverse Comptonized to produce harder X-rays. By analyzing complete all sky monitor (ASM) data (1.5-12 keV) of RXTE and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift/BAT we discover this periodicity in several objects. We also estimate eccentricities from the RMS power of the peak around quasi-orbital periods (QOP). Our method provides an independent way to obtain time periods and eccentricities of such compact binaries.

  18. Orbitally forced sedimentary rhythms in the stratigraphic record: is there room for tidal forcing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.L. de; Trabucho Alexandre, J.

    2011-01-01

    The imprint of orbital cycles, which result from the varying eccentricity of the Earth’s orbit and changes in the orientation of its axis, have been recognised throughout the Phanerozoic rock record. Variations in insolation and their effect on climate are generally considered to be the sole

  19. Orbitally forced sedimentary rhythms in the stratigraphic record: is there room for tidal forcing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.L. de; Trabucho Alexandre, J.

    2011-01-01

    The imprint of orbital cycles, which result from the varying eccentricity of the Earth’s orbit and changes in the orientation of its axis, have been recognised throughout the Phanerozoic rock record. Variations in insolation and their effect on climate are generally considered to be the sole transfe

  20. Response of electrostatic probes to eccentric charge distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    2001-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe mounted in an electrode is examined with reference to eccentric charge distributions. The study involves using the probe λ function to derive a characteristic parameter. This parameter enables the response of the probe to different degrees of eccentricity...

  1. Dynamics of two planets in co-orbital motion

    CERN Document Server

    Giuppone, C A; Michtchenko, T A; Ferraz-Mello, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the stability regions and families of periodic orbits of two planets locked in a co-orbital configuration. We consider different ratios of planetary masses and orbital eccentricities, also we assume that both planets share the same orbital plane. Initially we perform numerical simulations over a grid of osculating initial conditions to map the regions of stable/chaotic motion and identify equilibrium solutions. These results are later analyzed in more detail using a semi-analytical model. Apart from the well known quasi-satellite (QS) orbits and the classical equilibrium Lagrangian points L4 and L5, we also find a new regime of asymmetric periodic solutions. For low eccentricities these are located at $(\\sigma,\\Delta\\omega) = (\\pm 60\\deg, \\mp 120\\deg)$, where \\sigma is the difference in mean longitudes and \\Delta\\omega is the difference in longitudes of pericenter. The position of these Anti-Lagrangian solutions changes with the mass ratio and the orbital eccentricities, and are found for eccentricit...

  2. Eccentric exercise decreases maximal insulin action in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, Svend; Daugaard, J R; Kristiansen, S

    1996-01-01

    1. Unaccustomed eccentric exercise decreases whole-body insulin action in humans. To study the effects of one-legged eccentric exercise on insulin action in muscle and systemically, the euglycaemic clamp technique combined with arterial and bilateral femoral venous catheterization was used. Seven...... subjects participated in two euglycaemic clamps, performed in random order. One clamp was preceded 2 days earlier by one-legged eccentric exercise (post-eccentric exercise clamp (PEC)) and one was without the prior exercise (control clamp (CC)). 2. During PEC the maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake......) necessary to maintain euglycaemia during maximal insulin stimulation was lower during PEC compared with CC (15.7%, 81.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 96.4 +/- 8.8 mumol kg-1 min-1, P eccentric exercise, muscle and whole-body insulin action is impaired at maximal...

  3. Normative values of eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Ramskov; Pedersen, Mette Broen; Kastrup, Kristrian

    2014-01-01

    normative values of maximal eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners. METHODS: Novice healthy runners (n = 831) were recruited through advertisements at a hospital and a university. Maximal eccentric hip abduction strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. The demographic variables......PURPOSE: Low eccentric strength of the hip abductors, might increase the risk of patellofemoral pain syndrome and iliotibial band syndrome in runners. No normative values for maximal eccentric hip abduction strength have been established. Therefore the purpose of this study was to establish...... associated with maximal eccentric hip abduction strength from a univariate analysis were included in a multivariate linear regression model. Based on the results from the regression model, a regression equation for normative hip abduction strength is presented. RESULTS: A SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE IN MAXIMAL...

  4. Eccentric double white dwarfs as LISA sources in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Willems, B; Vecchio, A; Ivanova, N; Rasio, F A; Fregeau, J M; Belczynski, K

    2007-01-01

    We consider the formation of double white dwarfs (DWDs) through dynamical interactions in globular clusters. Such interactions can readily give rise to eccentric DWDs, in contrast to the exclusively circular population that is expected to form in the Galactic disk. We show that for a 5-year Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission and distances as far as the Large Magellanic Cloud, multiple harmonics from eccentric DWDs can be detected at a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 8 for at least a handful of eccentric DWDs, given their formation rate and typical merger lifetimes estimated from current cluster simulations. Consequently the association of eccentricity with stellar-mass LISA sources does not uniquely involve neutron stars, as is usually assumed. Due to the difficulty of detecting these systems with present and planned electromagnetic observatories, LISA could provide unique dynamical identifications of eccentric DWDs in globular clusters.

  5. Cross-education strength and activation after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepley, Lindsey K; Palmieri-Smith, Riann M

    2014-01-01

    After injury, eccentric exercise of the injured limb is often contraindicated. Cross-education training, whereby the uninvolved limb is exercised, is an alternative that may improve quadriceps muscle strength and activation in the unexercised limb. To determine the effect of eccentric exercise on quadriceps strength and activation gains in the unexercised limb. Eighteen healthy individuals were randomly assigned to an eccentric training group or a control group. Quadriceps strength and activation measures were collected at preintervention, midintervention, and postintervention. Eccentric training participants exercised their dominant limb with a dynamometer in eccentric mode at 60°/s, 3 times per week for 8 weeks. Quadriceps strength was quantified at 30° and 60°/s in concentric and eccentric modes. Quadriceps activation was assessed using the burst superimposition technique and quantified via the central activation ratio. A 2 × 3 repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to detect the effects of group and testing session on quadriceps strength and activation. Where appropriate, post hoc Bonferroni multiple-comparisons procedures were used. We found greater eccentric strength in the unexercised limbs of eccentric training participants between preintervention and midintervention and between preintervention and postintervention (preintervention to midintervention: 30°/s P = .05; preintervention to postintervention: 30°/s P = .02, 60°/s P = .02). No differences were noted in concentric strength (P > .05). An overall trend toward greater quadriceps activation in the unexercised knee was detected between preintervention and postintervention (P = .063), with the eccentric training group demonstrating a strong effect (Cohen d = 0.83). Control strength did not change (P > .05). Exercising with eccentric actions resulted in mode-specific and velocity-specific gains in quadriceps strength in the unexercised limb. A trend toward greater quadriceps activation in

  6. Mercury Retrograde Effect in Capital Markets: Truth or Illusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murgea Aurora

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available From the most ancient times, the astrological beliefs have played an important role in human history, thinking, world-views, language and other elements of social culture. The practice of relating the movement of celestial bodies to events in financial markets is relatively newer but despite the inconsistency between financial astrology and standard economic or financial theory, it seems to be largely spread among capital market traders. This paper evaluates one of the astrological effects on the capital market, more precisely the Mercury retrograde effect on US capital market. Despite the fact that it is just an optical illusion the astrological tradition says that Mercury retrograde periods are characterized by confusion and miscommunications. The trades could be less effective, the individuals more prone to make mistakes so there is a long-held belief that it is better to avoid set plans during Mercury retrograde, signing contracts, starting new ventures or open new stock market positions. The main findings of this study are lower return’s volatilities in the Mercury retrograde periods, inconsistent with the astrologic theories assumptions but consistent with the idea that trader’s beliefs in Mercury retrograde effect could change the market volatility exactly in the opposite sense than the predicted one.

  7. Inefficient highly eccentric accretion and the low luminosity of stellar tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Svirski, Gilad; Krolik, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Models for tidal disruption events (TDEs) in which a supermassive black hole disrupts a star commonly assume that the highly eccentric streams of bound stellar debris promptly form a circular accretion disk at the pericenter scale. However, the bolometric peak luminosity of most TDE candidates, $\\sim10^{44}\\,\\rm{erg\\,s^{-1}}$, implies that we observe only $\\sim1\\%$ of the energy expected from accretion. Moreover, recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al. 2015) have shown that dissipation via hydrodynamical shocks is insufficient to circularize debris orbits on the pericenter scale, and the debris flow retains its initial semi-major axis scale throughout the first $\\sim10$ orbits of the event. Motivated by these numerical results, Piran et al. (2015) suggested that the observed optical TDE emission is powered by shocks at the apocenter between freshly infalling material and earlier-arriving matter. This model explains the small radiated energy, the low temperature, and the large radius implied by the obser...

  8. Impact of eccentricity build-up and graveyard disposal Strategies on MEO navigation constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Jonas; Domínguez-González, Raúl; Flegel, Sven K.; Sánchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Merz, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    With currently two constellations being in or close to the build-up phase, in a few years the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) region will be populated with four complete navigation systems in relatively close orbital altitudes: The American GPS, Russian GLONASS, European Galileo, and Chinese BeiDou. To guarantee an appropriate visibility of constellation satellites from Earth, these constellations rely on certain defined orbits. For this, both the repeat pattern, which is basically defined by the semimajor axis and inclination, as well as the orbital planes, which are defined by the right ascension of ascending node, are determining values. To avoid an overcrowding of the region of interest, the disposal of satellites after their end-of-life is recommended. However, for the MEO region, no internationally agreed mitigation guidelines exist. Because of their distances to Earth, ordinary disposal manoeuvres leading to a direct or delayed re-entry due to atmospheric drag are not feasible: The needed fuel masses for such manoeuvres are by far above the reasonable limits and available fuel budgets. Thus, additional approaches have to be applied. For this, in general two options exist: disposal to graveyard orbits or the disposal to eccentricity build-up orbits. In the study performed, the key criterion for the graveyard strategy is that the disposed spacecraft must keep a safe minimum distance to the altitude of the active constellation on a long-term time scale of up to 200 years. This constraint imposes stringent requirements on the stability of the graveyard orbit. Similar disposals are also performed for high LEO satellites and disposed GEO payloads. The eccentricity build-up strategy on the other hand uses resonant effects between the Earth's geopotential, the Sun and the Moon. Depending on the initial conditions, these can cause a large eccentricity build-up, which finally can lead to a re-entry of the satellite. In this paper, the effects of applying either the first or

  9. Detection of a low-eccentricity and super-massive planet to the subgiant HD 38801

    CERN Document Server

    Harakawa, Hiroki; Fischer, Debra A; Ida, Shigeru; Omiya, Masashi; Johnson, John A; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Toyota, Eri; Hori, Yasunori; Howard, Andrew W

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of a large mass planet orbiting around the K0 metal-rich subgiant HD38801 ($V=8.26$) by precise radial velocity (RV) measurements from the Subaru Telescope and the Keck Telescope. The star has a mass of $1.36M_{\\odot}$ and metallicity of [Fe/H]= +0.26. The RV variations are consistent with a circular orbit with a period of 696.0 days and a velocity semiamplitude of 200.0\\mps, which yield a minimum-mass for the companion of $10.7\\mjup$ and semimajor axis of 1.71 AU. Such super-massive objects with very low-eccentricities and hundreds of days period are uncommon among the ensemble of known exoplanets.

  10. Objects orbiting the Earth in deep resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Sampaio, J C; de Moraes, R Vilhena; Fernandes, S S

    2012-01-01

    The increasing number of objects orbiting the Earth justifies the great attention and interest in the observation, spacecraft protection and collision avoidance. These studies involve different disturbances and resonances in the orbital motions of these objects distributed by the distinct altitudes. In this work, the TLE (Two-Line Elements) of the NORAD are studied observing the resonant period of the objects orbiting the Earth and the main resonance in the LEO region. The time behavior of the semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination of some space debris are studied. Possible irregular motions are observed by the frequency analysis and by the presence of different resonant angles describing the orbital dynamics of these objects.

  11. On the co-orbital motion of two planets in quasi-circular orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Robutel, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We develop an analytical Hamiltonian formalism adapted to the study of the motion of two planets in co-orbital resonance. The Hamiltonian, averaged over one of the planetary mean longitude, is expanded in power series of eccentricities and inclinations. The model, which is valid in the entire co-orbital region, possesses an integrable approximation modeling the planar and quasi-circular motions. First, focusing on the fixed points of this approximation, we highlight relations linking the eigenvectors of the associated linearized differential system and the existence of certain remarkable orbits like the elliptic Eulerian Lagrangian configurations, the Anti-Lagrange (Giuppone et al., 2010) orbits and some second sort orbits discovered by Poincar\\'e. Then, the variational equation is studied in the vicinity of any quasi-circular periodic solution. The fundamental frequencies of the trajectory are deduced and possible occurrence of low order resonances are discussed. Finally, with the help of the construction of...

  12. Warping and tearing of misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric SMBH binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Naito, Tsuguya

    2015-01-01

    We study the warping and tearing of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on an eccentric orbit. The circumbinary disk is significantly misaligned with the binary orbital plane, and is subject to the time-dependent tidal torques. In principle, such a disk is warped and precesses, and is torn into mutually misaligned rings in the region, where the tidal precession torques are stronger than the local viscous torques. We derive the tidal-warp and tearing radii of the misaligned circumbinary disks around eccentric SMBH binaries. We find that in disks with the viscosity parameter, alpha, larger than a critical value depending on the disk aspect ratio, the disk warping appears outside the tearing radius. This condition is expressed as alpha > sqrt{H/3r} for H/r ~<0.1, where H is the disk scale height. If alpha < sqrt{H/3r}, only the disk tearing occurs because the tidal warp radius is inside the tearing radius, where most of disk material is likely to rapi...

  13. Importance of tides for periastron precession in eccentric neutron star-white dwarf binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sravan, N.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Althaus, L. G., E-mail: niharika.sravan@gmail.com [Grupo de Evolución Estelar y Pulsaciones, Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina Instituto de Astrofísica La Plata, CONICET-UNLP, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2014-09-10

    Although not nearly as numerous as binaries with two white dwarfs, eccentric neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries are important gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the next generation of space-based detectors sensitive to low frequency waves. Here we investigate periastron precession in these sources as a result of general relativistic, tidal, and rotational effects; such precession is expected to be detectable for at least some of the detected binaries of this type. Currently, two eccentric NS-WD binaries are known in the galactic field, PSR J1141–6545 and PSR B2303+46, both of which have orbits too wide to be relevant in their current state to GW observations. However, population synthesis studies predict the existence of a significant Galactic population of such systems. Though small in most of these systems, we find that tidally induced periastron precession becomes important when tides contribute to more than 3% of the total precession rate. For these systems, accounting for tides when analyzing periastron precession rate measurements can improve estimates of the inferred WD component mass and, in some cases, will prevent us from misclassifying the object. However, such systems are rare, due to rapid orbital decay. To aid the inclusion of tidal effects when using periastron precession as a mass measurement tool, we derive a function that relates the WD radius and periastron precession constant to the WD mass.

  14. Formation of planetary debris discs around white dwarfs I: Tidal disruption of an extremely eccentric asteroid

    CERN Document Server

    Veras, Dimitri; Bonsor, Amy; Gaensicke, Boris T

    2014-01-01

    25%-50% of all white dwarfs (WDs) host observable and dynamically active remnant planetary systems based on the presence of close-in circumstellar dust and gas and photospheric metal pollution. Currently-accepted theoretical explanations for the origin of this matter include asteroids that survive the star's giant branch evolution at au-scale distances and are subsequently perturbed onto WD-grazing orbits following stellar mass loss. In this work we investigate the tidal disruption of these highly-eccentric (e > 0.98) asteroids as they approach and tidally disrupt around the WD. We analytically compute the disruption timescale and compare the result with fully self-consistent numerical simulations of rubble piles by using the N-body code PKDGRAV. We find that this timescale is highly dependent on the orbit's pericentre and largely independent of its semimajor axis. We establish that spherical asteroids readily break up and form highly eccentric collisionless rings, which do not accrete onto the WD without add...

  15. Red-giant stars in eccentric binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck P. G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unparalleled photometric data obtained by NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has led to improved understanding of red-giant stars and binary stars. We discuss the characterization of known eccentric system, containing a solar-like oscillating red-giant primary component. We also report several new binary systems that are candidates for hosting an oscillating companion. A powerful approach to study binary stars is to combine asteroseimic techniques with light curve fitting. Seismology allows us to deduce the properties of red giants. In addition, by modeling the ellipsoidal modulations we can constrain the parameters of the binary system. An valuable independent source are ground-bases, high-resolution spectrographs.

  16. FUZZY ECCENTRICITY AND GROSS ERROR IDENTIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The dominant and recessive effect made by exceptional interferer is analyzed in measurement system based on responsive character, and the gross error model of fuzzy clustering based on fuzzy relation and fuzzy equipollence relation is built. The concept and calculate formula of fuzzy eccentricity are defined to deduce the evaluation rule and function of gross error, on the base of them, a fuzzy clustering method of separating and discriminating the gross error is found. Utilized in the dynamic circular division measurement system, the method can identify and eliminate gross error in measured data, and reduce measured data dispersity. Experimental results indicate that the use of the method and model enables repetitive precision of the system to improve 80% higher than the foregoing system, to reach 3.5 s, and angle measurement error is less than 7 s.

  17. Eccentric binary black-hole mergers: The transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Sperhake, U; Cardoso, V; González, J A; Brügmann, B; Ansorg, M

    2007-01-01

    We study the transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity by computing gravitational waveforms of non-spinning, equal-mass black-hole binaries. We consider two sequences of simulations. The longer (shorter) sequence starts with a quasi-circular inspiral completing about 2.3 (1.5) orbits prior to coalescence of the holes. For each sequence, the binding energy of the system is kept constant and the orbital angular momentum is progressively reduced to zero, producing orbits of increasing eccentricity and eventually a head-on collision. We analyze in detail the radiation of energy and angular momentum in gravitational waves, the contribution of different multipolar components and the final spin of the remnant. We find that the motion transitions from inspiral to plunge when the orbital angular momentum L=L_crit is about 0.8M. For LOrbits with L of about L_crit produce the largest dimensionless Kerr parameter for the remnant, j=J/M^2=0.705. Generalizin...

  18. Is the activity level of HD 80606 influenced by its eccentric planet?

    CERN Document Server

    Figueira, P; da Silva, J Gomes; Abe, L; Adibekyan, V Zh; Bendjoya, P; Correia, A C M; Delgado-Mena, E; Faria, J P; Hebrard, G; Lovis, C; Oshagh, M; Rivet, J -P; Santos, N C; Suarez, O; Vidotto, A A

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Several studies suggest that the activity level of a planet-host star can be influenced by the presence of a close-by orbiting planet. Moreover, the interaction mechanisms that have been proposed, magnetic interaction and tidal interaction, exhibit a very different dependence on orbital separation between the star and the planet. A detection of activity enhancement and characterization of its dependence on planetary orbital distance can, in principle, allow us to characterize the physical mechanism behind the activity enhancement. Methods: We used the HARPS-N spectrograph to measure the stellar activity level of HD 80606 during the planetary periastron passage and compared the activity measured to that close to apastron. Being characterized by an eccentricity of 0.93 and an orbital period of 111 days, the system's extreme variation in orbital separation makes it a perfect target to test our hypothesis. Results: We find no evidence for a variation in the activity level of the star as a function of planet...

  19. Periodic X-ray Modulation and its Possible Relation with Eccentricity in Black Hole Binaries : Long-Term Swift/BAT and RXTE/ASM Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    X-ray binary orbits are expected to have some eccentricity, albeit small. Stellar companion of a black hole orbiting in an eccentric orbit will experience modulating tidal force with a periodicity same as that of the orbital period which will result in a modulation of accretion rates, seed photon flux, and flux of inverse Comptonized harder X-rays as well. Timing analysis of long-term X-ray data (1.5-12 keV) of RXTE/ASM and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift/BAT satellites reveal this periodicity in several black hole candidates. If this modulation is assumed to be solely due to tidal effects (without taking other effects, such as eclipses, reflection from winds, super-hump phenomena etc. into account), the RMS-value of the peak in power density spectrum allows us to estimate eccentricities of these orbits. We present these very interesting results. We show that our results generally agree with independent studies of these parameters.

  20. Eccentric Exercise Versus Eccentric Exercise and Soft Tissue Treatment (Astym) in the Management of Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Joshua R; Underwood, Frank B; Slaven, Emily J; Cappaert, Thomas A

    Eccentric exercise is commonly used in the management of Achilles tendinopathy (AT) but its effectiveness for insertional AT has been questioned. Soft tissue treatment (Astym) combined with eccentric exercise could result in better outcomes than eccentric exercise alone. Soft tissue treatment (Astym) plus eccentric exercise will be more effective than eccentric exercise alone for subjects with insertional AT. Prospective randomized controlled trial. Level 2. Sixteen subjects were randomly assigned to either a soft tissue treatment (Astym) and eccentric exercise group or an eccentric exercise-only group. Intervention was completed over a 12-week period, with outcomes assessed at baseline, 4, 8, 12, 26, and 52 weeks. Outcomes included the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment Achilles-Specific Questionnaire (VISA-A), the numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), and the global rating of change (GROC). Significantly greater improvements on the VISA-A were noted in the soft tissue treatment (Astym) group over the 12-week intervention period, and these differences were maintained at the 26- and 52-week follow-ups. Both groups experienced a similar statistically significant improvement in pain over the short and long term. A significantly greater number of subjects in the soft tissue treatment (Astym) group achieved a successful outcome at 12 weeks. Soft tissue treatment (Astym) plus eccentric exercise was more effective than eccentric exercise only at improving function during both short- and long-term follow-up periods. Soft tissue treatment (Astym) plus eccentric exercise appears to be a beneficial treatment program that clinicians should consider incorporating into the management of their patients with insertional AT.

  1. Study of the prograde and retrograde Chandler excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotov, , L.; Bizouard, , C.

    2014-12-01

    Observed motion of the Earth's rotation axis consists of components at both positive and negative frequencies. New generalized equations of Bizouard, which takes into account triaxiality of the Earth and asymmetry of the ocean tide, show that retrograde and prograde excitations are coupled. In this work using designed narrow-band filter and inversion we reconstruct geodetic excitation at the prograde and retrograde Chandler frequencies. Then we compare it with geophysical excitation, filtered out from the series of the oceanic angular momentum (OAM) and atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) for 1960-2000 yrs. Their sum coincides well with geodetic excitation only in the prograde Chandler band. The retrograde excitation coincides worse, probably in result of amplification of observational noises.

  2. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  3. Secular orbital evolution of Jupiter family comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The issue of the long term dynamics of Jupiter family comets (JFCs) involves uncertain assumptions about the physical evolution and lifetimes of these comets. Contrary to what is often assumed, real effects of secular dynamics cannot be excluded and therefore merit investigation. Aims: We use a random sample of late heavy bombardment cometary projectiles to study the long-term dynamics of JFCs by a Monte Carlo approach. In a steady-state picture of the Jupiter family, we investigate the orbital distribution of JFCs, including rarely visited domains like retrograde orbits or orbits within the outer parts of the asteroid main belt. Methods: We integrate 100 000 objects over a maximum of 100 000 orbital revolutions including the Sun, a comet, and four giant planets. Considering the steady-state number of JFCs to be proportional to the total time spent in the respective orbital domain, we derive the capture rate based on observed JFCs with small perihelia and large nuclei. We consider a purely dynamical model and one where the nuclei are eroded by ice sublimation. Results: The JFC inclination distribution is incompatible with our erosional model. This may imply that a new type of comet evolution model is necessary. Considering that comets may live for a long time, we show that JFCs can evolve into retrograde orbits as well as asteroidal orbits in the outer main belt or Cybele regions. The steady-state capture rate into the Jupiter family is consistent with 1 × 109 scattered disk objects with diameters D > 2 km. Conclusions: Our excited scattered disk makes it difficult to explain the JFC inclination distribution, unless the physical evolution of JFCs is more intricate than assumed in standard, erosional models. Independent of this, the population size of the Jupiter family is consistent with a relatively low-mass scattered disk.

  4. Neuromuscular adaptations to isoload versus isokinetic eccentric resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, Gaël; Cornu, Christophe; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Guével, Arnaud

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare neuromuscular adaptations induced by work-matched isoload (IL) versus isokinetic (IK) eccentric resistance training. A total of 31 healthy subjects completed a 9-wk IL (n = 11) or IK (n = 10) training program for the knee extensors or did not train (control group; n = 10). The IL and IK programs consisted of 20 training sessions, which entailed three to five sets of eight repetitions in the respective modalities. The amount of work and the mean angular velocity were strictly matched between IL and IK conditions. Neuromuscular tests were performed before and after training and consisted of the assessment of quadriceps muscle strength, muscle architecture (vastus lateralis), EMG activity, and antagonist coactivation. IL, but not IK, eccentric resistance training enhanced eccentric strength at short muscle length (+20%), high-velocity eccentric strength (+15%), muscle thickness (+10%), and fascicle angle measured at rest (+11%; P eccentric movements (i.e., at short muscle lengths), which results in greater torque and angular velocities compared with IK actions, is the main determinant of strength and neuromuscular adaptations to eccentric training. These findings have important consequences for the optimization of IL and IK eccentric exercise for resistance training and rehabilitation purposes.

  5. Thermal hydraulics of rod bundles: The effect of eccentricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Amit K., E-mail: amit_fmlab@yahoo.co.in [Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Prasad, B.V.S.S.S., E-mail: prasad@iitm.ac.in [Thermal Turbomachines Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Patnaik, B.S.V., E-mail: bsvp@iitm.ac.in [Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Present CFD investigation explores, whole bundle eccentricity for the first time. • Fluid flow and thermal characteristics in various subchannels are analyzed. • Mass flux distribution is particularly analyzed to study eccentricity effect. • Higher eccentricity resulted in a shoot up in rod surface temperature distribution. • Both tangential and radial flow in rod bundles has resulted due to eccentricity. -- Abstract: The effect of eccentricity on the fluid flow and heat transfer through a 19-rod bundle is numerically carried out. When the whole bundle shifts downwards with respect to the outer (pressure) tube, flow redistribution happens. This in turn is responsible for changes in mass flux, pressure and differential flow development in various subchannels. The heat flux imposed on the surface of the fuel rods and the mass flux through the subchannels determines the coolant outlet temperatures. The simulations are performed for a coolant flow Reynolds number of 4 × 10{sup 5}. For an eccentricity value of 0.7, the mass flux in the bottom most subchannel (l) was found to decrease by 10%, while the surface temperature of the fuel rod in the vicinity of this subchannel increased by 250% at the outlet section. Parameters of engineering interest including skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number, etc., have been systematically explored to study the effect of eccentricity on the rod bundle.

  6. Insights into the neural control of eccentric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchateau, Jacques; Baudry, Stéphane

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to examine our current knowledge of the neural control of eccentric contractions. The review focuses on three main issues. The first issue considers the ability of individuals to activate muscles maximally during eccentric contractions. Most studies indicate that, regardless of the experimental approach (surface EMG amplitude, twitch superimposition, and motor unit recordings), it is usually more difficult to achieve full activation of a muscle by voluntary command during eccentric contractions than during concentric and isometric contractions. The second issue is related to the specificity of the control strategy used by the central nervous system during submaximal eccentric contractions. This part underscores that although the central nervous system appears to employ a single size-related strategy to activate motoneurons during the different types of contractions, the discharge rate of motor units is less during eccentric contractions across different loading conditions. The last issue addresses the mechanisms that produce this specific neural activation. This section indicates that neural adjustments at both supraspinal and spinal levels contribute to the specific modulation of voluntary activation during eccentric contractions. Although the available information on the control of eccentric contractions has increased during the last two decades, this review indicates that the exact mechanisms underlying the unique neural modulation observed in this type of contraction at spinal and supraspinal levels remains unknown and their understanding represents, therefore, a major challenge for future research on this topic.

  7. Neuromuscular factors contributing to in vivo eccentric moment generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, S; Kriellaars, D

    1997-07-01

    Muscle series elasticity and its contribution to eccentric moment generation was examined in humans. While subjects [male, n = 30; age 26.3 +/- 4.8 (SD) yr; body mass 78.8 +/- 13.1 kg] performed an isometric contraction of the knee extensors at 60 degrees of knee flexion, a quick stretch was imposed with a 12 degrees -step displacement at 100 degrees /s. The test was performed at 10 isometric activation levels ranging from 1.7 to 95.2% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). A strong linear relationship was observed between the peak imposed eccentric moment derived from quick stretch and the isometric activation level (y = 1.44x + 7.08; r = 0.99). This increase in the eccentric moment is consistent with an actomyosin-dependent elasticity located in series with the contractile element of muscle. By extrapolating the linear relationship to 100% MVC, the predicted maximum eccentric moment was found to be 151% MVC, consistent with in vitro data. A maximal voluntary, knee extensor strength test was also performed (5-95 degrees, 3 repetitions, +/-50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 degrees/s). The predicted maximum eccentric moment was 206% of the angle- and velocity-matched, maximal voluntary eccentric moments. This was attributed to a potent neural regulatory mechanism that limits the recruitment and/or discharge of motor units during maximal voluntary eccentric contractions.

  8. Eccentricity effect of micropatterned surface on contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashaninejad, Navid; Chan, Weng Kong; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2012-03-13

    This article experimentally shows that the wetting property of a micropatterned surface is a function of the center-to-center offset distance between successive pillars in a column, referred to here as eccentricity. Studies were conducted on square micropatterns which were fabricated on a silicon wafer with pillar eccentricity ranging from 0 to 6 μm for two different pillar diameters and spacing. Measurement results of the static as well as the dynamic contact angles on these surfaces revealed that the contact angle decreases with increasing eccentricity and increasing relative spacing between the pillars. Furthermore, quantification of the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) shows that, for the case of lower pillar spacing, CAH could increase up to 41%, whereas for the case of higher pillar spacing, this increment was up to 35%, both corresponding to the maximum eccentricity of 6 μm. In general, the maximum obtainable hydrophobicity corresponds to micropillars with zero eccentricity. As the pillar relative spacing decreases, the effect of eccentricity on hydrophobicity becomes more pronounced. The dependence of the wettability conditions of the micropatterned surface on the pillar eccentricity is attributed to the contact line deformation resulting from the changed orientation of the pillars. This finding provides additional insights in design and fabrication of efficient micropatterned surfaces with controlled wetting properties.

  9. Comments on the paper "Terminal retrograde turn of rolling rings"

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Alexey V; Karavaev, Yury L

    2016-01-01

    Mir Abbas Jalali et al. [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032913(2015)] explained the retrograde turn of rings by aerodynamic phenomena due to the presence of a central hole in the ring as opposed to a disk. The results of our experiments suggest that the drag torque is not the main reason for the retrograde turn of the rings, and the results of theoretical research have shown that such a motion is possible for both the ring and the disk in the case of rolling without slipping.

  10. Understanding nonlinear responses of the climate system to orbital forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, J. A.; Anaclerio, C. A.

    2000-12-01

    We have recently introduced the working hypothesis that frequency modulation (FM) of the orbital eccentricity forcing may be one important source of the nonlinearities observed in δ 18O time series from deep-sea sediment cores (J.H. Rial (1999a) Pacemaking the lce Ages by frequency modulation of Earth's orbital eccentricity. Science 285, 564-568). In this paper we shall discuss further evidence of frequency modulation found in data from the Vostok ice core. Analyses of the 430,000-year long, orbitally untuned, time series of CO 2, deuterium, aerosol and methane, suggest frequency modulation of the 41 kyr (0.0244 kyr -1) obliquity forcing by the 413 kyr-eccentricity signal and its harmonics. Conventional and higher-order spectral analyses show that two distinct spectral peaks at ˜29 kyr (0.034 kyr -1) and ˜69 kyr (0.014 kyr -1) and other, smaller peaks surrounding the 41 kyr obliquity peak are harmonically (nonlinearly) related and likely to be FM-generated sidebands of the obliquity signal. All peaks can be closely matched by the spectrum of an appropriately built theoretical FM signal. A preliminary model, based on the classic logistic growth delay differential equation, reproduces the longer period FM effect and the familiar multiply peaked spectra of the eccentricity band. Since the FM effect appears to be a common feature in climate response, finding out its cause may help understand climate dynamics and global climate change.

  11. Blocking low-eccentricity EMRIs: A statistical direct-summation N-body study of the Schwarzschild barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Brem, Patrick; Sopuerta, Carlos F

    2012-01-01

    The capture of a compact object in a galactic nucleus by a massive black hole (MBH), an extreme-mass ratio inspiral (EMRI), is the best way to map space and time around it. Recent work on stellar dynamics has demonstrated that there seems to be a complot in phase space acting on low-eccentricity captures, since their rates decrease significantly by the presence of a blockade in the rate at which orbital angular momenta change takes place. This so-called "Schwarzschild barrier" is a result of the impact of relativistic precession on to the stellar potential torques, and thus it affects the enhancement on lower-eccentricity EMRIs that one would expect from resonant relaxation. We confirm and quantify the existence of this barrier using a statistical sample of 2,500 direct-summation N-body simulations using both a post-Newtonian and also for the first time in a direct-summation code a geodesic approximation for the relativistic orbits. The existence of the barrier prevents low-eccentricity EMRIs from approaching...

  12. Effects of Geopotential and Atmospheric Drag Effects on Frozen Orbits Using Nonsingular Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristiane Pinto Mesquita Pardal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of frozen orbit has been applied in space missions mainly for orbital tracking and control purposes. This type of orbit is important for orbit design because it is characterized by keeping the argument of perigee and eccentricity constant on average, so that, for a given latitude, the satellite always passes at the same altitude, benefiting the users through this regularity. Here, the system of nonlinear differential equations describing the motion is studied, and the effects of geopotential and atmospheric drag perturbations on frozen orbits are taken into account. Explicit analytical expressions for secular and long period perturbations terms are obtained for the eccentricity and the argument of perigee. The classical equations of Brouwer and Brouwer and Hori theories are used. Nonsingular variables approach is used, which allows obtaining more precise previsions for CBERS (China Brazil Earth Resources Satellite satellites family and similar satellites (SPOT, Landsat, ERS, and IRS orbital evolution.

  13. ν Octantis: a conjectured S-type retrograde planet in a spectroscopic binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin E.; Ramm, David; Endl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ν Octantis is a single-lined spectroscopic binary system consisting of a K-giant primary and a secondary orbiting near 1050 days. Radial velocity observations reveal an additional ~400 day periodicity with a semi-amplitude of 40 m/s. If this signal is planetary in nature, the ν Octantis system would be unique amongst all known exoplanet systems in that long-term stability can only be achieved if the orbit is retrograde with respect to the stellar companions (i.e. mutual inclination ~ 180°).Spectral line analyses suggest this signal is unlikely to be due to surface activity or pulsations (Ramm 2015). We also rule out an exotic scenario where the secondary itself is a binary.We report an analysis of 1437 radial velocity measurements taken with HERCULES at the Mt. John Observatory spanning nearly 13 years, 1180 being new iodine iodine-cell velocities (2009-2013). The sensitive orbital dynamics of the two-companion model allow us to constrain the three-dimensional orbital architecture directly from the observations. Posterior samples obtained from an n-body Markov chain Monte Carlo (Nelson et al. 2014) yields a mutual inclination of 158.4 ± 1.2°. None of these are dynamically stable beyond 106 years. However, a grid search around the posterior sample suggests that they are in close proximity to a region of parameter space that is stable for at least 106 years.If real, the tight orbital architecture here imposes a considerable challenge for formation of this dynamically extreme system.

  14. More support for the extreme S-type retrograde planet in the spectroscopic binary ν Octantis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin Earl; Ramm, David; Endl, Michael; Gunn, Fraser; Hearnshaw, John; Kilmartin, Pam; Bergmann, Christoph; Brogt, Erik

    2015-12-01

    ν Octantis is a single-lined spectroscopic binary system consisting of a K-giant primary and a secondary orbiting near 1050 days. Radial velocity observations reveal an additional ~400 day periodicity with a semi-amplitude of 40 m/s. If this signal is planetary in nature, the ν Octantis system would be unique amongst all known exoplanet systems in that long-term stability can only be achieved if the orbit is retrograde with respect to the stellar companions (i.e. mutual inclination ~ 180°).Spectral line analyses suggest this signal is unlikely to be due to surface activity or pulsations (Ramm 2015). We also rule out an exotic scenario where the secondary itself is a binary.We report an analysis of 1437 radial velocity measurements taken with HERCULES at the Mt. John Observatory spanning nearly 13 years, 1180 being new iodine iodine-cell velocities (2009-2013). The sensitive orbital dynamics of the two-companion model allow us to constrain the three-dimensional orbital architecture directly from the observations. Posterior samples obtained from an n-body Markov chain Monte Carlo (Nelson et al. 2014) yields a mutual inclination of 158.4 ± 1.2°. None of these are dynamically stable beyond 106 years. However, a grid search around the posterior sample suggests that they are in close proximity to a region of parameter space that is stable for at least 106 years.If real, the tight orbital architecture here imposes a considerable challenge for formation of this dynamically extreme system.

  15. Eccentric Exercise Program Design: A Periodization Model for Rehabilitation Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Love, Michael O; Seamon, Bryant A; Gonzales, Tomas I; Hernandez, Haniel J; Pennington, Donte; Hoover, Brian M

    2017-01-01

    The applied use of eccentric muscle actions for physical rehabilitation may utilize the framework of periodization. This approach may facilitate the safe introduction of eccentric exercise and appropriate management of the workload progression. The purpose of this data-driven Hypothesis and Theory paper is to present a periodization model for isokinetic eccentric strengthening of older adults in an outpatient rehabilitation setting. Exemplar and group data are used to describe the initial eccentric exercise prescription, structured familiarization procedures, workload progression algorithm, and feasibility of the exercise regimen. Twenty-four men (61.8 ± 6.3 years of age) completed a 12-week isokinetic eccentric strengthening regimen involving the knee extensors. Feasibility and safety of the regimen was evaluated using serial visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) values for self-reported pain, and examining changes in the magnitude of mean eccentric power as a function of movement velocity. Motor learning associated with the familiarization sessions was characterized through torque-time curve analysis. Total work was analyzed to identify relative training plateaus or diminished exercise capacity during the progressive phase of the macrocycle. Variability in the mean repetition interval decreased from 68 to 12% during the familiarization phase of the macrocycle. The mean VAS values were 2.9 ± 2.7 at the start of the regimen and 2.6 ± 2.9 following 12 weeks of eccentric strength training. During the progressive phase of the macrocycle, exercise workload increased from 70% of the estimated eccentric peak torque to 141% and total work increased by 185% during this training phase. The slope of the total work performed across the progressive phase of the macrocycle ranged from -5.5 to 29.6, with the lowest slope values occurring during microcycles 8 and 11. Also, mean power generation increased by 25% when eccentric isokinetic velocity increased from 60 to 90° s(-1) while

  16. Eccentric Exercise Program Design: A Periodization Model for Rehabilitation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Love, Michael O.; Seamon, Bryant A.; Gonzales, Tomas I.; Hernandez, Haniel J.; Pennington, Donte; Hoover, Brian M.

    2017-01-01

    The applied use of eccentric muscle actions for physical rehabilitation may utilize the framework of periodization. This approach may facilitate the safe introduction of eccentric exercise and appropriate management of the workload progression. The purpose of this data-driven Hypothesis and Theory paper is to present a periodization model for isokinetic eccentric strengthening of older adults in an outpatient rehabilitation setting. Exemplar and group data are used to describe the initial eccentric exercise prescription, structured familiarization procedures, workload progression algorithm, and feasibility of the exercise regimen. Twenty-four men (61.8 ± 6.3 years of age) completed a 12-week isokinetic eccentric strengthening regimen involving the knee extensors. Feasibility and safety of the regimen was evaluated using serial visual analog scale (VAS, 0–10) values for self-reported pain, and examining changes in the magnitude of mean eccentric power as a function of movement velocity. Motor learning associated with the familiarization sessions was characterized through torque-time curve analysis. Total work was analyzed to identify relative training plateaus or diminished exercise capacity during the progressive phase of the macrocycle. Variability in the mean repetition interval decreased from 68 to 12% during the familiarization phase of the macrocycle. The mean VAS values were 2.9 ± 2.7 at the start of the regimen and 2.6 ± 2.9 following 12 weeks of eccentric strength training. During the progressive phase of the macrocycle, exercise workload increased from 70% of the estimated eccentric peak torque to 141% and total work increased by 185% during this training phase. The slope of the total work performed across the progressive phase of the macrocycle ranged from −5.5 to 29.6, with the lowest slope values occurring during microcycles 8 and 11. Also, mean power generation increased by 25% when eccentric isokinetic velocity increased from 60 to 90° s−1

  17. Semianalytic Integration of High-Altitude Orbits under Lunisolar Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term effect of lunisolar perturbations on high-altitude orbits is studied after a double averaging procedure that removes both the mean anomaly of the satellite and that of the moon. Lunisolar effects acting on high-altitude orbits are comparable in magnitude to the Earth’s oblateness perturbation. Hence, their accurate modeling does not allow for the usual truncation of the expansion of the third-body disturbing function up to the second degree. Using canonical perturbation theory, the averaging is carried out up to the order where second-order terms in the Earth oblateness coefficient are apparent. This truncation order forces to take into account up to the fifth degree in the expansion of the lunar disturbing function. The small values of the moon’s orbital eccentricity and inclination with respect to the ecliptic allow for some simplification. Nevertheless, as far as the averaging is carried out in closed form of the satellite’s orbit eccentricity, it is not restricted to low-eccentricity orbits.

  18. Persistent knee complaints after retrograde unreamed nailing of femoral shaft fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Moumni, Mostafa; Schraven, Pim; ten Duis, Henk Jan; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde nailing is an attractive method for stabilisation of femoral shaft fractures in cases of polytrauma, ipsilateral pelvic, acetabular, tibial and femoral neck fractures, bilateral femoral fractures, obese and pregnant patients. However, retrograde nailing may result in complaints about the

  19. Transneuronal retrograde dual viral labelling of central autonomic circuitry : possibilities and pitfalls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, GJ

    2000-01-01

    Viral retrograde transneuronal labelling has become an important neuroanatomical tract-tracing tool for characterization of Limbic neuronal networks. Recently, dual viral retrograde transneuronal labelling has been introduced; a method employing differential transgene expression of two genetically e

  20. Effect of Eccentricity and Radius Ratio on Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Inside and Eccentric Semicircular Enclosure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ProdipKumarDas; ShohelMahmud

    2000-01-01

    The problem of laminar natural convective heat transfer inside an eccentric semicircular enclosure of different radius ratio and eccentricity is investigated numerically,At the same time,combined effect of the radius ratio and eccentricity on fluid flow is also observed with isothermal upper and lower surface.Here laminar,steady nuatural convection heat transfer are predicted for radius ratio R*=1.75,2.0,2.25,2.5.Simulation was carried out for a range of eccentricity,ε=0.0 to 0.6.Governing equations are solved using finite volume method with a body fitted grid with collocated variable arrangement for a range of Grashof numer 101-107 based on R0.Results are presented in the form of constant stream function,isothermal lines,local Nusselt number and average Nusselt number at different angular position.Eccentricity has little dominance on heat transfer rate.But significant effect of eccentricity is observed on flow field.Radius ratio has significant effect on natural convection heat transfer as well as on flow field.At higher eccentricity,bi-cellular flow is observed with one crescent-shape vortex at narrower coross section.This crescent shaped vortex is broken down into two cells with the increase of radius ratio that means transition Grashof number for bi-cellular flow to tri-cellular flow is decreased with the increase of radius ratio.Eccentricity also has the same effect of flow field.Eccentricity has little effect on heat transfer but with the increase of radius ratio.average heat trasfer rate increases.

  1. An Assessment of Relativistic Effects for Low Earth Orbiters: The GRACE Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    IOP PUBLISHING METROLOGIA Metrologia 44 (2007) 484–490 doi:10.1088/0026-1394/44/6/007 An assessment of relativistic effects for low Earth orbiters...for the larger-eccentricity orbit is shown in figure 2(b). Metrologia , 44 (2007) 484–490 485 K M Larson et al Figure 1. Amplitude of the once/rev...486 Metrologia , 44 (2007) 484–490 Assessment of relativistic effects for low Earth orbiters combination was launched on TOPEX in 1992. Unfortunately

  2. Osteochondral lesion of the tibial plafond treated with a retrograde osteochondral autograft: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Okamura

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Use of the retrograde osteochondral autograft produced satisfactory results including the return to sports. The retrograde osteochondral autograft can be considered recommendable for treating OLTPs.

  3. On Some Bounds and Exact Formulae for Connective Eccentric Indices of Graphs under Some Graph Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjan De

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The connective eccentric index of a graph is a topological index involving degrees and eccentricities of vertices of the graph. In this paper, we have studied the connective eccentric index for double graph and double cover. Also we give the connective eccentric index for some graph operations such as joins, symmetric difference, disjunction, and splice of graphs.

  4. The GAPS Programme with HARPS-N at TNG . XIV. Investigating giant planet migration history via improved eccentricity and mass determination for 231 transiting planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, A. S.; Desidera, S.; Benatti, S.; Borsa, F.; Crespi, S.; Damasso, M.; Lanza, A. F.; Sozzetti, A.; Lodato, G.; Marzari, F.; Boccato, C.; Claudi, R. U.; Cosentino, R.; Covino, E.; Gratton, R.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Piotto, G.; Poretti, E.; Smareglia, R.; Affer, L.; Biazzo, K.; Bignamini, A.; Esposito, M.; Giacobbe, P.; Hébrard, G.; Malavolta, L.; Maldonado, J.; Mancini, L.; Martinez Fiorenzano, A.; Masiero, S.; Nascimbeni, V.; Pedani, M.; Rainer, M.; Scandariato, G.

    2017-06-01

    We carried out a Bayesian homogeneous determination of the orbital parameters of 231 transiting giant planets (TGPs) that are alone or have distant companions; we employed differential evolution Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to analyse radial-velocity (RV) data from the literature and 782 new high-accuracy RVs obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph for 45 systems over 3 years. Our work yields the largest sample of systems with a transiting giant exoplanet and coherently determined orbital, planetary, and stellar parameters. We found that the orbital parameters of TGPs in non-compact planetary systems are clearly shaped by tides raised by their host stars. Indeed, the most eccentric planets have relatively large orbital separations and/or high mass ratios, as expected from the equilibrium tide theory. This feature would be the outcome of planetary migration from highly eccentric orbits excited by planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov perturbations, or secular chaos. The distribution of α = a/aR, where a and aR are the semi-major axis and the Roche limit, for well-determined circular orbits peaks at 2.5; this agrees with expectations from the high-eccentricity migration (HEM), although it might not be limited to this migration scenario. The few planets of our sample with circular orbits and α> 5 values may have migrated through disc-planet interactions instead of HEM. By comparing circularisation times with stellar ages, we found that hot Jupiters with a< 0.05 au have modified tidal quality factors 105 ≲ Q'p ≲ 109, and that stellar Q's ≳ 106 - 107 are required to explain the presence of eccentric planets at the same orbital distance. As aby-product of our analysis, we detected a non-zero eccentricity e = 0.104-0.018+0.021 for HAT-P-29; we determined that five planets that were previously regarded to be eccentric or to have hints of non-zero eccentricity, namely CoRoT-2b, CoRoT-23b, TrES-3b, HAT-P-23b, and WASP-54b, have circular orbits or undetermined

  5. Retrograde transport of protein toxins through the Golgi apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Skotland, Tore; van Deurs, Bo

    2013-01-01

    at the cell surface, and they are endocytosed both by clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent mechanisms. Sorting to the Golgi and retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are common to these toxins, but the exact mechanisms turn out to be toxin and cell-type dependent. In the ER...

  6. Rutinemaessig endoskopisk retrograd kolangiopankreatikografi kan ikke anbefales ved galdestenspankreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ainsworth, Alan Patrick; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2009-01-01

    Danish guidelines recommend that patients with presumed severe gallstone-induced acute pancreatitis (GAP) should receive endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) within 72 hours. The results of a newly performed meta-analysis show that acute ERCP in patients with GAP does not reduce...

  7. A study of retrograde degeneration of median nerve forearm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mona Mokhtar El Bardawil

    2013-10-22

    Oct 22, 2013 ... forearm segment in patients with CTS and its relation to variable severity of CTS in Egyptian patients. Patients ... Retrograde degeneration is not related to grade of severity of CTS. .... dominant hand using NEUROPACK 2 Electroneuromyog- ... was evaluated using Fisher Exact and Monte Carlo test.18,19.

  8. Water dynamics and retrogradation of ultrahigh pressurized wheat starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doona, Christopher J; Feeherry, Florence E; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2006-09-06

    The water dynamics and retrogradation kinetics behavior of gelatinized wheat starch by either ultrahigh pressure (UHP) processing or heat are investigated. Wheat starch completely gelatinized in the condition of 90, 000 psi at 25 degrees C for 30 min (pressurized gel) or 100 degrees C for 30 min (heated gel). The physical properties of the wheat starches were characterized in terms of proton relaxation times (T2 times) measured using time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and evaluated using commercially available continuous distribution modeling software. Different T2 distributions in both micro- and millisecond ranges between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels suggest distinctively different water dynamics between pressurized and heated wheat starch gels. Smaller water self-diffusion coefficients were observed for pressurized wheat starch gels and are indicative of more restricted translational proton mobility than is observed with heated wheat starch gels. The physical characteristics associated with changes taking place during retrogradation were evaluated using melting curves obtained with differential scanning calorimetry. Less retrogradation was observed in pressurized wheat starch, and it may be related to a smaller quantity of freezable water in pressurized wheat starch. Starches comprise a major constituent of many foods proposed for commercial potential using UHP, and the present results furnish insight into the effect of UHP on starch gelatinization and the mechanism of retrogradation during storage.

  9. Selected properties of acetylated adipate of retrograded starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zięba, T; Gryszkin, A; Kapelko, M

    2014-01-01

    Native potato starch (NS) and retrograded starch (R - obtained via freezing and defrosting of a starch paste) were used to prepare starch acetates: NS-A and R-A, and then acetylated distarch adipates: NS-ADA and R-ADA. The chemically-modified preparations produced from retrograded starch (R-A; R-ADA) were characterized by a higher degree of esterification compared to the modified preparations produced under the same conditions from native potato starch (NS-A; NS-ADA). Starch resistance to amylolysis was observed to increase (to 30-40 g/100 g) as a result of starch retrogradation and acetylation. Starch cross-linking had a significant impact on the increased viscosity of the paste in the entire course of pasting characteristics and on the increased values of rheological coefficients determined from the equations describing flow curves. The produced preparation of acetylated retrograded starch cross-linked with adipic acid (R-ADA) may be deemed an RS3/4 preparation to be used as a food thickening agent.

  10. Arfaptin-1 negatively regulates Arl1-mediated retrograde transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien-Hung Huang

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Arf-like protein 1 (Arl1 is well known for its role in intracellular vesicular transport at the trans-Golgi network (TGN. In this study, we used differential affinity chromatography combined with mass spectrometry to identify Arf-interacting protein 1b (arfaptin-1b as an Arl1-interacting protein and characterized a novel function for arfaptin-1 (including the arfaptin-1a and 1b isoforms in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport. Using a Shiga-toxin subunit B (STxB transportation assay, we demonstrated that knockdown of arfaptin-1 accelerated the retrograde transport of STxB from the endosome to the Golgi apparatus, whereas Arl1 knockdown inhibited STxB transport compared with control cells. Arfaptin-1 overexpression, but not an Arl1 binding-defective mutant (arfaptin-1b-F317A, consistently inhibited STxB transport. Exogenous arfaptin-1 expression did not interfere with the localization of the Arl1-interacting proteins golgin-97 and golgin-245 to the TGN and vice versa. Moreover, we found that the N-terminal region of arfaptin-1 was involved in the regulation of retrograde transport. Our results show that arfaptin-1 acts as a negative regulator in Arl1-mediated retrograde transport and suggest that different functional complexes containing Arl1 form in distinct microdomains and are responsible for different functions.

  11. Retrograde ejaculation and sexual dysfunction in men with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedder, J; Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Brandslund, I;

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde ejaculation (RE) and erectile dysfunction may be caused by diabetes mellitus (DM), but the prevalence of RE among DM patients is unknown. A prospective, blinded case-control study comparing men with DM with matched controls according to RE and erectile dysfunction was performed. Twenty...

  12. Retrograde pylorogastric intussusception – Case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Avinadav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A case of gastric outlet obstruction in an infant due to retrograde intussusception of the pylorus into the stomach is presented. This anomaly is extremely rare, with almost no reports in the literature. The patient underwent formal Heineke-Mikulicz pyloroplasty with an uneventful recovery and resumed full enteral feeding.

  13. Effects of recovery modes after knee extensor muscles eccentric contractions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin, Vincent; Millet, Guillaume Y; Lattier, Grégory; Perrod, Loïc

    2004-01-01

    ...) to hasten the recovery process from eccentric-contraction-induced injury. Before and 30 min, 24 h, 48 h, and 96 h after a one-legged downhill run, electrical stimulations were applied to the femoral nerve of healthy volunteers...

  14. Near- and Far-Field Optical Response of Eccentric Nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rodríguez, Ovidio; Díaz-Núñez, Pablo; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Vladimir; Montaño-Priede, Luis; Rivera, Antonio; Pal, Umapada

    2017-12-01

    We study the optical response of eccentric nanoshells (i.e., spherical nanoparticles with an eccentric spherical inclusion) in the near and the far field through finite-difference time-domain simulations. Plasmon hybridization theory is used to explain the obtained results. The eccentricity generates a far-field optical spectrum with various plasmon peaks. The number, position, and width of the peaks depend on the core offset. Near-field enhancements in the surroundings of these structures are significantly larger than those obtained for equivalent concentric nanoshells and, more importantly, they are almost independent of the illumination conditions. This opens up the door for using eccentric nanoshells in applications requiring intense near-field enhancements.

  15. Kepler Planet Masses and Eccentricities from TTV Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hadden, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We conduct a uniform analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of 145 planets from 55 Kepler multiplanet systems to infer planet masses and eccentricities. Eighty of these planets do not have previously reported mass and eccentricity measurements. We employ two complementary methods to fit TTVs: Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations based on N-body integration and an analytic fitting approach. Mass measurements of 49 planets, including 12 without previously reported masses, meet our criterion for classification as robust. Using mass and radius measurements, we infer the masses of planets' gaseous envelopes for both our TTV sample as well as transiting planets with radial velocity observations. Insight from analytic TTV formulae allows us to partially circumvent degeneracies inherent to inferring eccentricities from TTV observations. We find that planet eccentricities are generally small, typically a few percent, but in many instances are non-zero.

  16. Orbital Parameters of the Microquasar LSI +61 303

    CERN Document Server

    Casares, J; Paredes, J M; Martí, J; Allende-Prieto, C

    2005-01-01

    New optical spectroscopy of the HMXB microquasar LSI +61 303 is presented. Eccentric orbital fits to our radial velocity measurements yield updated orbital parameters in good agreement with previous work. Our orbital solution indicates that the periastron passage occurs at radio phase 0.23 and the X-ray/radio outbursts are triggered 2.5--4 days after the compact star passage. The spectrum of the optical star is consistent with a B0 V spectral type and contributes ~65 percent of the total light, the remaining due to emission by a circumstellar disc. We also measure the projected rotational velocity to be v sin i = 113 km/s.

  17. Inner mean-motion resonances with eccentric planets: a possible origin for exozodiacal dust clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramaz, V.; Ertel, S.; Booth, M.; Cuadra, J.; Simmonds, C.

    2017-02-01

    High levels of dust have been detected in the immediate vicinity of many stars, both young and old. A promising scenario to explain the presence of this short-lived dust is that these analogues to the zodiacal cloud (or exozodis) are refilled in situ through cometary activity and sublimation. As the reservoir of comets is not expected to be replenished, the presence of these exozodis in old systems has yet to be adequately explained. It was recently suggested that mean-motion resonances with exterior planets on moderately eccentric (ep ≳ 0.1) orbits could scatter planetesimals on to cometary orbits with delays of the order of several 100 Myr. Theoretically, this mechanism is also expected to sustain continuous production of active comets once it has started, potentially over Gyr time-scales. We aim here to investigate the ability of this mechanism to generate scattering on to cometary orbits compatible with the production of an exozodi on long time-scales. We combine analytical predictions and complementary numerical N-body simulations to study its characteristics. We show, using order of magnitude estimates, that via this mechanism, low-mass discs comparable to the Kuiper belt could sustain comet scattering at rates compatible with the presence of the exozodis which are detected around Solar-type stars, and on Gyr time-scales. We also find that the levels of dust detected around Vega could be sustained via our proposed mechanism if an eccentric Jupiter-like planet were present exterior to the system's cold debris disc.

  18. The Effects of Orbital Inclination on the Scale Size and Evolution of Tidally Filling Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Jeremy J; Harris, William E; Hurley, Jarrod R

    2014-01-01

    We have performed N-body simulations of tidally filling star clusters with a range of orbits in a Milky Way-like potential to study the effects of orbital inclination and eccentricity on their structure and evolution. At small galactocentric distances Rgc, a non-zero inclination results in increased mass loss rates. Tidal heating and disk shocking, the latter sometimes consisting of two shocking events as the cluster moves towards and away from the disk, help remove stars from the cluster. Clusters with inclined orbits at large Rgc have decreased mass loss rates than the non-inclined case, since the strength the disk potential decreases with Rgc. Clusters with inclined and eccentric orbits experience increased tidal heating due to a constantly changing potential, weaker disk shocks since passages occur at higher Rgc, and an additional tidal shock at perigalacticon. The effects of orbital inclination decrease with orbital eccentricity, as a highly eccentric cluster spends the majority of its lifetime at a larg...

  19. Effects of Variable Eccentricity on the Climate of an Earth-like World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, M. J.; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler era of exoplanetary discovery has presented the astronomical community with a cornucopia of planetary systems that are very different from the one that we inhabit. It has long been known that Jupiter plays a major role in the orbital parameters of Mars and its climate, but there is also a long-standing belief that Jupiter would play a similar role for Earth if not for the Moon. Using a three-dimensional general circulation model (3D GCM) with a fully coupled ocean, we simulate what would happen to the climate of an Earth-like world if Mars did not exist, but a Jupiter-like planet was much closer to Earth’s orbit. We investigate two scenarios that involve the evolution of the Earth-like planet’s orbital eccentricity from 0 to 0.283 over 6500 years, and from 0 to 0.066 on a timescale of 4500 years. In both cases we discover that they would maintain relatively temperate climates over the timescales simulated. More Earth-like planets in multi-planet systems will be discovered as we continue to survey the skies and the results herein show that the proximity of large gas giant planets may play an important role in the habitability of these worlds. These are the first such 3D GCM simulations using a fully coupled ocean with a planetary orbit that evolves over time due to the presence of a giant planet.

  20. Orbital pseudotumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman ... 423. Review Date 8/20/2016 Updated by: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La ...

  1. Achilles tendinopathy modulates force frequency characteristics of eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Nicole L; Wearing, Scott C; O'Toole, John M; Smeathers, James E

    2013-03-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that ground reaction force (GRF) recorded during eccentric ankle exercise is characterized by greater power in the 8- to 12-Hz bandwidth when compared with that recorded during concentric ankle exercise. Subsequently, it was suggested that vibrations in this bandwidth may underpin the beneficial effect of eccentric loading in tendon repair. However, this observation has been made only in individuals without Achilles tendinopathy. This research compared the force frequency characteristics of eccentric and concentric exercises in individuals with and without Achilles tendinopathy. Eleven male adults with unilateral midportion Achilles tendinopathy and nine control male adults without tendinopathy participated in the research. Kinematics and GRF were recorded while the participants performed a common eccentric rehabilitation exercise protocol and a concentric equivalent. Ankle joint kinematics and the frequency power spectrum of the resultant GRF were calculated. Eccentric exercise was characterized by a significantly greater proportion of spectral power between 4.5 and 11.5 Hz when compared with concentric exercise. There were no significant differences between limbs in the force frequency characteristics of concentric exercise. Eccentric exercise, in contrast, was defined by a shift in the power spectrum of the symptomatic limb, resulting in a second spectral peak at 9 Hz, rather than 10 Hz in the control limb. Compared with healthy tendon, Achilles tendinopathy was characterized by lower frequency vibrations during eccentric rehabilitation exercises. This finding may be associated with changes in neuromuscular activation and tendon stiffness that have been shown to occur with tendinopathy and provides a possible rationale for the previous observation of a different biochemical response to eccentric exercise in healthy and injured Achilles tendons.

  2. Eccentric hamstring strength and hamstring injury risk in Australian footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opar, David A; Williams, Morgan D; Timmins, Ryan G; Hickey, Jack; Duhig, Steven J; Shield, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Are eccentric hamstring strength and between-limb imbalance in eccentric strength, measured during the Nordic hamstring exercise, risk factors for hamstring strain injury (HSI)? Elite Australian footballers (n = 210) from five different teams participated. Eccentric hamstring strength during the Nordic exercise was obtained at the commencement and conclusion of preseason training and at the midpoint of the season. Injury history and demographic data were also collected. Reports on prospectively occurring HSI were completed by the team medical staff. Relative risk (RR) was determined for univariate data, and logistic regression was employed for multivariate data. Twenty-eight new HSI were recorded. Eccentric hamstring strength below 256 N at the start of the preseason and 279 N at the end of the preseason increased the risk of future HSI 2.7-fold (RR, 2.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 5.5; P = 0.006) and 4.3-fold (RR, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 11.0; P = 0.002), respectively. Between-limb imbalance in strength of greater than 10% did not increase the risk of future HSI. Univariate analysis did not reveal a significantly greater RR for future HSI in athletes who had sustained a lower limb injury of any kind within the last 12 months. Logistic regression revealed interactions between both athlete age and history of HSI with eccentric hamstring strength, whereby the likelihood of future HSI in older athletes or athletes with a history of HSI was reduced if an athlete had high levels of eccentric strength. Low levels of eccentric hamstring strength increased the risk of future HSI. Interaction effects suggest that the additional risk of future HSI associated with advancing age or previous injury was mitigated by higher levels of eccentric hamstring strength.

  3. Flow of viscoplastic fluids in eccentric annular geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Hassager, Ole

    1992-01-01

    A classification of flowfields for the flow of a Bingham fluid in general eccentric annular geometries is presented. Simple arguments show that a singularity can exist in the stress gradient on boundaries between zones with yielded and un-yielded fluid respectively. A Finite Element code is used...... to verify this property of the Bingham fluid. An analytical solution for the flowfield in case of small eccentricities is derived....

  4. Chronic Adaptations to Eccentric Training: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jamie; Pearson, Simon; Ross, Angus; McGuigan, Mike

    2017-05-01

    Resistance training is an integral component of physical preparation for athletes. A growing body of evidence indicates that eccentric strength training methods induce novel stimuli for neuromuscular adaptations. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the effects of eccentric training in comparison to concentric-only or traditional (i.e. constrained by concentric strength) resistance training. Searches were performed using the electronic databases MEDLINE via EBSCO, PubMed and SPORTDiscus via EBSCO. Full journal articles investigating the long-term (≥4 weeks) effects of eccentric training in healthy (absence of injury or illness during the 4 weeks preceding the training intervention), adult (17-35 years), human participants were selected for the systematic review. A total of 40 studies conformed to these criteria. Eccentric training elicits greater improvements in muscle strength, although in a largely mode-specific manner. Superior enhancements in power and stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) function have also been reported. Eccentric training is at least as effective as other modalities in increasing muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), while the pattern of hypertrophy appears nuanced and increased CSA may occur longitudinally within muscle (i.e. the addition of sarcomeres in series). There appears to be a preferential increase in the size of type II muscle fibres and the potential to exert a unique effect upon fibre type transitions. Qualitative and quantitative changes in tendon tissue that may be related to the magnitude of strain imposed have also been reported with eccentric training. Eccentric training is a potent stimulus for enhancements in muscle mechanical function, and muscle-tendon unit (MTU) morphological and architectural adaptations. The inclusion of eccentric loads not constrained by concentric strength appears to be superior to traditional resistance training in improving variables associated with strength, power and speed

  5. Eccentricity in Zone Routing Protocol for MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrs Komal Nair

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A Mobile Ad-Hoc Network (MANET is a decentralized network of autonomous mobile nodes, able to communicate with each other over wireless links. Due to the mobility of the nodes, the topology ofthe network changes spontaneously, therefore use of conventional routing tables maintained at fixed points (routers is not suggested. Such a network may operate in a standalone fashion. There are variousrouting protocols available for MANETs. The most popular ones are DSR, DSDV and ZRP .The zone routing protocol (ZRP is a hybrid routing protocol that proactively maintains routes within a localregion of the network. ZRP can be configured for a particular network through adjustment of a single parameter, the routing zone radius. In this paper, we address the issue of configuring the ZRP to providethe best performance for a particular network at any time with the concept of eccentricity. The results illustrate the important characteristics of different protocols based on their performance and thus suggest some improvements in the respective protocol. The tools used for the simulation are NS2 which is the main simulator, NAM (Network Animator and Tracegraph which is used for preparing the graphs from the trace files.

  6. Foreign body orbital cyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanfard, Younes; Heegard, Steffen; Fledelius, Hans C.

    2001-01-01

    Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology......Ophthalmology, penetrating orbital injury, orbital foreign body, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), histology...

  7. Initial partonic eccentricity fluctuations in a multiphase transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.

    2016-10-01

    Initial partonic eccentricities in Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy √{sN N}=200 GeV are investigated by using a multiphase transport model with a string-melting scenario. The initial eccentricities in different order of harmonics are studied by using participant and cumulant definitions. Eccentricity in terms of second-, fourth- and sixth-order cumulants as a function of number of participant nucleons are compared systematically with the traditional participant definition. The ratio of the cumulant eccentricities ɛ {4 }/ɛ {2 } and ɛ {6 }/ɛ {4 } are studied in comparison with the ratio of the corresponding flow harmonics. The conversion coefficients (vn/ɛn ) are explored up to fourth-order harmonics based on the cumulant method. Furthermore, studies on transverse momentum (pT) and pseudorapidity (η ) dependencies of eccentricities and their fluctuations are presented. As in ideal hydrodynamics, initial eccentricities are expected to be closely related to the final flow harmonics in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, studies of the fluctuating initial condition in the AMPT model will shed light on the tomography properties of the initial source geometry.

  8. Excitation of the Orbital Inclination of Iapetus during Planetary Encounters

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvorny, David; Deienno, Rogerio; Walsh, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Saturn's moon Iapetus has an orbit in a transition region where the Laplace surface is bending from the equator to the orbital plane of Saturn. The orbital inclination of Iapetus to the local Laplace plane is ~8 deg, which is unexpected, because the inclination should be ~0 if Iapetus formed from a circumplanetary disk on the Laplace surface. It thus appears that some process has pumped up Iapetus's inclination while leaving its eccentricity near zero (e=0.03 at present). Here we examined the possibility that Iapetus's inclination was excited during the early solar system instability when encounters between Saturn and ice giants occurred. We found that the dynamical effects of planetary encounters on Iapetus's orbit sensitively depend on the distance of the few closest encounters. In four out of ten instability cases studied here, the orbital perturbations were too large to be plausible. In one case, Iapetus's orbit was practically unneffected. In the remaining five cases, the perturbations of Iapetus's incli...

  9. Theory of Secular Chaos and Mercury's Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Lithwick, Yoram

    2010-01-01

    We study the chaotic orbital evolution of planetary systems, focusing on secular (i.e., orbit-averaged) interactions, because these often dominate on long timescales. We first focus on the evolution of a test particle that is forced by multiple massive planets. To linear order in eccentricity and inclination, its orbit precesses with constant frequencies. But nonlinearities can shift the frequencies into and out of secular resonance with the planets' eigenfrequencies, or with linear combinations of those frequencies. The overlap of these nonlinear secular resonances drive secular chaos in planetary systems. We quantify the resulting dynamics for the first time by calculating the locations and widths of nonlinear secular resonances. When results from both analytical calculations and numerical integrations are displayed together in a newly developed "map of the mean momenta" (MMM), the agreement is excellent. This map is particularly revealing for non-coplanar planetary systems and demonstrates graphically that...

  10. The GEOS-3 orbit determination investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, V. L.; Eisner, A.; Yionoulis, S. M.; Mcconahy, R. J.; Black, H. D.; Pryor, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The nature and improvement in satellite orbit determination when precise altimetric height data are used in combination with conventional tracking data was determined. A digital orbit determination program was developed that could singly or jointly use laser ranging, C-band ranging, Doppler range difference, and altimetric height data. Two intervals were selected and used in a preliminary evaluation of the altimeter data. With the data available, it was possible to determine the semimajor axis and eccentricity to within several kilometers, in addition to determining an altimeter height bias. When used jointly with a limited amount of either C-band or laser range data, it was shown that altimeter data can improve the orbit solution.

  11. Mass and orbit constraints of the gamma-ray binary LS 5039

    CERN Document Server

    Szalai, T; Kiss, L L; Matthews, J M; Vinkó, J; Kiss, Cs

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of space-based photometric and ground-based spectroscopic observing campaigns on the gamma-ray binary LS 5039. The new orbital and physical parameters of the system are similar to former results, except we found a lower eccentricity. Our MOST-data show that any broad-band optical photometric variability at the orbital period is below the 2 mmag level. Light curve simulations support the lower value of eccentricity and imply that the mass of the compact object is higher than 1.8 solar masses.

  12. An unusual combination of Unilateral Orbital Plexiform Neurofibroma in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Saravanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female patient presented with proptosis of right eye for the past 15 days and defective vision in both eyes since birth. She was found to have eccentric painful proptosis of right eye along with features of oculocutaneous albinism. Eccentric proptosis was due to an orbital mass which proved to be a plexiform neurofibroma by histopathological examination. The case is presented for its rarity, as an isolated orbital plexiform neurofibroma without the systemic features of neurofibromatosis is rare and its coincidental presentation with oculocutaneous albinism is yet rare and has not been reported so far.

  13. Anti-correlation between multiplicity and orbital properties in exoplanetary systems as a possible record of their dynamical histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinzi, A.; Turrini, D.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Previous works focused on exoplanets discovered with the radial velocity (RV) method reported an anti-correlation between the orbital eccentricities of the exoplanets and the multiplicity M (i.e., the number of planets) of the systems they inhabit. Aims: We further investigate this reported anti-correlation here using a dataset comprising exoplanets discovered with both the RV and transit methods, searching for hints of its causes by exploring the connection between the number of planets and the dynamical state of the exosystems. Methods: In order to examine the correlation between multiplicity and orbital eccentricity, for every multiplicity case considered (2 ≤ M ≤ 6), we computed the weighted average eccentricities instead of the median eccentricities used previously. The average eccentricities were calculated using the inverse of the uncertainty on the eccentricity values as weights. The analysis of the dynamic state of the exosystems was performed by computing their angular momentum deficit (AMD), which is a diagnostic parameter successfully used in the study of the solar system and recently applied to exosystems as well. Results: Our results confirm the reported multiplicity-eccentricity anti-correlation and show that the use of the uncertainties on the orbital eccentricities in the analysis allows for a better agreement between the data and the fits. Specifically, our best fit reproduces well the behaviour of the average eccentricities for all systems with M> 1, including the additional cases of TRAPPIST-1 (M = 7) and of the solar system (M = 8). The AMD analysis, while not conclusive due to the limited number of exosystems that could be analysed, also suggests the existence of an anti-correlation between the multiplicity and the AMD of exosystems. This second anti-correlation, if confirmed by future studies, raises the possibility that the population of low-multiplicity exosystems is contaminated by former high-multiplicity systems that became

  14. Studies of the retrogradation process for various starch gels using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Petra M; Wartewig, Siegfried; Kleinebudde, Peter; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2005-11-21

    The retrogradation of untreated wild-type starches (potato, maize, and wheat), waxy maize starches, and one pregelatinized, modified amylose-rich starch was investigated continuously using Raman spectroscopy. The method detects conformational changes due to the multi-stage retrogradation, the rate of which differs between the starches. The pregelatinized, modified amylose-rich starch shows all stages of retrogradation in the course of its Raman spectra. In comparison to amylose, the retrogradation of amylopectin is faster at the beginning of the measurements and slower in the later stages. The untreated starches can be ranked in the order of their rate of retrogradation as follows: potato>maize>wheat.

  15. Tatooine's Future: The Eccentric Response of Kepler's Circumbinary Planets to Common-Envelope Evolution of their Host Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kostov, Veselin B; Tamayo, Daniel; Jayawardhana, Ray; Rinehart, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the recent Kepler discoveries of circumbinary planets orbiting nine close binary stars, we explore the fate of the former as the latter evolve off the main sequence. We combine binary star evolution models with dynamical simulations to study the orbital evolution of these planets as their hosts undergo common-envelope stages, losing in the process a tremendous amount of mass on dynamical timescales. Five of the systems experience at least one Roche-lobe overflow and common-envelope stages (Kepler-1647 experiences three), and the binary stars either shrink to very short orbits or coalesce; two systems trigger a double-degenerate supernova explosion. Kepler's circumbinary planets predominantly remain gravitationally bound at the end of the common-envelope phase, migrate to larger orbits, and may gain significant eccentricity; their orbital expansion can be more than an order of magnitude and can occur over the course of a single planetary orbit. The orbits these planets can reach are qualitatively c...

  16. NanoSail - D Orbital and Attitude Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Andrew F.; Faller, Brent F.; Katan, Chelsea K.

    2013-01-01

    NanoSail-D unfurled January 20th, 2011 and successfully demonstrated the deployment and deorbit capability of a solar sail in low Earth orbit. The orbit was strongly perturbed by solar radiation pressure, aerodynamic drag, and oblate gravity which were modeled using STK HPOP. A comparison of the ballistic coefficient history to the orbit parameters exhibits a strong relationship between orbital lighting, the decay rate of the mean semi-major axis and mean eccentricity. A similar comparison of mean solar area using the STK HPOP solar radiation pressure model exhibits a strong correlation of solar radiation pressure to mean eccentricity and mean argument of perigee. NanoSail-D was not actively controlled and had no capability on-board for attitude or orbit determination. To estimate attitude dynamics we created a 3-DOF attitude dynamics simulation that incorporated highly realistic estimates of perturbing forces into NanoSail-D torque models. By comparing the results of this simulation to the orbital behavior and ground observations of NanoSail-D, we conclude that there is a coupling between the orbit and attitude dynamics as well as establish approximate limits on the location of the NanoSail-D solar center of pressure. Both of these observations contribute valuable data for future solar sail designs and missions.

  17. Crowding and eccentricity determine reading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelli, Denis G; Tillman, Katharine A; Freeman, Jeremy; Su, Michael; Berger, Tracey D; Majaj, Najib J

    2007-10-26

    Bouma's law of crowding predicts an uncrowded central window through which we can read and a crowded periphery through which we cannot. The old discovery that readers make several fixations per second, rather than a continuous sweep across the text, suggests that reading is limited by the number of letters that can be acquired in one fixation, without moving one's eyes. That "visual span" has been measured in various ways, but remains unexplained. Here we show (1) that the visual span is simply the number of characters that are not crowded and (2) that, at each vertical eccentricity, reading rate is proportional to the uncrowded span. We measure rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) reading rate for text, in both original and scrambled word order, as a function of size and spacing at central and peripheral locations. As text size increases, reading rate rises abruptly from zero to maximum rate. This classic reading rate curve consists of a cliff and a plateau, characterized by two parameters, critical print size and maximum reading rate. Joining two ideas from the literature explains the whole curve. These ideas are Bouma's law of crowding and Legge's conjecture that reading rate is proportional to visual span. We show that Legge's visual span is the uncrowded span predicted by Bouma's law. This result joins Bouma and Legge to explain reading rate's dependence on letter size and spacing. Well-corrected fluent observers reading ordinary text with adequate light are limited by letter spacing (crowding), not size (acuity). More generally, it seems that this account holds true, independent of size, contrast, and luminance, provided only that text contrast is at least four times the threshold contrast for an isolated letter. For any given spacing, there is a central uncrowded span through which we read. This uncrowded span model explains the shape of the reading rate curve. We test the model in several ways. We use a "silent substitution" technique to measure the

  18. Towards an analytical theory of the third-body problem for highly elliptical orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Lion, Guillaume; Deleflie, Florent

    2016-01-01

    When dealing with satellites orbiting a central body on a highly elliptical orbit, it is necessary to consider the effect of gravitational perturbations due to external bodies. Indeed, these perturbations can become very important as soon as the altitude of the satellite becomes high, which is the case around the apocentre of this type of orbit. For several reasons, the traditional tools of celestial mechanics are not well adapted to the particular dynamic of highly elliptical orbits. On the one hand, analytical solutions are quite generally expanded into power series of the eccentricity and therefore limited to quasi-circular orbits [17, 25]. On the other hand, the time-dependency due to the motion of the third-body is often neglected. We propose several tools to overcome these limitations. Firstly, we have expanded the disturbing function into a finite polynomial using Fourier expansions of elliptic motion functions in multiple of the satellite's eccentric anomaly (instead of the mean anomaly) and involving...

  19. Spin–Orbit Misalignment of Merging Black Hole Binaries with Tertiary Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Lai, Dong

    2017-09-01

    We study the effect of an external companion on the orbital and spin evolution of merging black hole (BH) binaries. A sufficiently nearby and inclined companion can excite Lidov–Kozai (LK) eccentricity oscillations in the binary, thereby shortening its merger time. During such LK-enhanced orbital decay, the spin axis of the BH generally exhibits chaotic evolution, leading to a wide range (0°–180°) of the final spin–orbit misalignment angle from an initially aligned configuration. For systems that do not experience eccentricity excitation, only modest (≲ 20^\\circ ) spin–orbit misalignment can be produced, and we derive an analytic expression for the final misalignment using the principle of adiabatic invariance. The spin–orbit misalignment directly impacts the gravitational waveform and can be used to constrain the formation scenarios of BH binaries and dynamical influences of external companions.

  20. Effect of pullulan on the short-term and long-term retrogradation of rice starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Ren, Fei; Zhang, Zipei; Tong, Qunyi; Rashed, Marwan M A

    2015-01-22

    The effect of pullulan (PUL) on the retrogradation of rice starch (RS) was investigated by means of rapid visco-analyzer (RVA), rotational rheometer, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). RVA results showed that addition of pullulan significantly decreased the breakdown and setback values, which meant that the short-term retrogradation of RS was inhibited. The dynamic time sweep of samples also proved the retarding effect of pullulan on the retrogradation of RS. DSC curves showed clearly that pullulan significantly reduced the retrogradation enthalpy of amylopectin, and the kinetics of retrogradation was analyzed using the Avrami model. XRD results showed that recrystallinity of RS was reduced from 11.565% to 8.841% with the addition of pullulan and this was in line with the DSC results. It could be concluded that the addition of pullulan apparently influenced not only the short-term retrogradation of amylose, but also the long-term retrogradation of amylopectin.

  1. Effects of inulin with different degree of polymerization on gelatinization and retrogradation of wheat starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Denglin; Li, Yun; Xu, Baocheng; Ren, Guangyue; Li, Peiyan; Li, Xuan; Han, Sihai; Liu, Jianxue

    2017-08-15

    The effects of three types of inulin, including FS (DP≤10), FI (DP of 2-60) and FXL (DP≥23), on the gelatinization and retrogradation characteristics of wheat starch were investigated. As the concentration of inulin added into starch increased, the gelatinization temperature increased whereas the breakdown value decreased, and the value of setback first decreased and then increased slightly. The three types of inulin with lower concentrations (<15%) all showed obvious suppression effects on the short-term retrogradation of wheat starch. After 7days of storage, the three types of inulin showed a significant suppression of starch retrogradation in the addition range of 5-7.5%. They can all inhibit amylose retrogradation, but accelerate amylopectin retrogradation. Inulin with lower DP has stronger effects on the starch retrogradation. Generally, the three types of inulin can all retard the retrogradation performance of wheat starch to some extent in the long-term storage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. WASP-8b: Characterization of a Cool and Eccentric Exoplanet with Spitzer

    CERN Document Server

    Cubillos, Patricio; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Stevenson, Kevin B; Hardy, Ryan A; Blecic, Jasmina; Anderson, David R; Hardin, Matthew; Campo, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    WASP-8b has 2.18 times Jupiter's mass and is on an eccentric ($e=0.31$) 8.16-day orbit. With a time-averaged equilibrium temperature of 948 K, it is one of the least-irradiated hot Jupiters observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. We have analyzed six photometric light curves of WASP-8b during secondary eclipse observed in the 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 {\\microns} Infrared Array Camera bands. The eclipse depths are $0.113\\pm 0.018$%, $0.069\\pm 0.007$%, and $0.093\\pm 0.023$%, respectively, giving respective brightness temperatures of 1552, 1131, and 938 K. We characterized the atmospheric thermal profile and composition of the planet using a line-by-line radiative transfer code and a Markov-chain Monte Carlo sampler. The data indicated no thermal inversion, independently of any assumption about chemical composition. We noted an anomalously high 3.6-{\\microns} brightness temperature (1552 K); by modeling the eccentricity-caused thermal variation, we found that this temperature is plausible for radiative time scales le...

  3. Importance of Tides for Periastron Precession in Eccentric Neutron Star - White Dwarf Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sravan, Niharika; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Althaus, Leandro G

    2014-01-01

    Although not nearly as numerous as binaries with two white dwarfs, eccentric neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries are important gravitational wave sources for the next generation of space-based detectors sensitive to low frequency waves. Here we investigate periastron precession in these sources as a result of general relativistic, tidal, and rotational effects; such precession is expected to be detectable for at least some of the detected binaries of this type. Currently, two eccentric NS-WD binaries are known in the galactic field, PSR J1141-6545 and PSR B2303+46, both of which have orbits too wide to be relevant in their current state to gravitational-wave observations. However, population synthesis studies predict the existence of a significant Galactic population of such systems. We find that the contribution from tides should not be neglected when analyzing periastron precession signatures in gravitational-wave signals: not accounting for tides can produce errors as high as a factor of 80 in the WD...

  4. Joint-specific power loss after eccentric exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, Steven J; Martin, James C

    2010-09-01

    Previous investigators have reported changes in maximal power after eccentric exercise. The influence of eccentric joint-specific power absorption on subsequent concentric joint-specific power production during multijoint actions has not been reported. Our purposes were to determine the extent to which ankle, knee, and hip joint actions absorbed power during eccentric cycling (ECCcyc) and to evaluate changes in power produced by those joint actions during subsequent maximal concentric cycling (CONcyc). We hypothesized that joint actions that absorbed the most power during ECCcyc would exhibit the greatest reductions in power during subsequent maximal CONcyc. Nineteen cyclists performed baseline trials of maximal single-leg CONcyc immediately before and 24 h after acute single-leg ECCcyc (5 min, 40% maximum single-leg CONcyc power). Pedal forces and limb kinematics were determined with a force-sensing pedal and instrumented spatial linkage system, respectively. Joint-specific powers were calculated using inverse dynamics and averaged over complete crank revolutions and over extension and flexion phases. The largest power-absorbing actions during ECCcyc were eccentric knee extensor activity (-185 +/- 12 W) followed by eccentric hip extensor activity (-92 +/- 12 W). Power absorbed through ankle joint actions was small (-10 +/- 2 W). At 24 h, pedal power produced during maximal CONcyc was reduced by 11% +/- 3% relative to baseline. Compared with baseline, knee extension power was reduced by 19% +/- 0 7%, whereas hip extension power did not differ. Power absorbed through eccentric knee extension actions significantly reduced knee extension power produced during subsequent maximal CONcyc. Even with reduced knee extensor function, participants were able to deliver 89% of their baseline power to the environment. These results have implications for individuals who must continue to perform multijoint activities after eccentric exercise.

  5. Eccentric endurance exercise economically improves metabolic and inflammatory risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeppetzauer, Markus; Drexel, Heinz; Vonbank, Alexander; Rein, Philipp; Aczel, Stefan; Saely, Christoph H

    2013-08-01

    Exercise is a cornerstone of cardiovascular prevention. Because many individuals are not willing or not able to perform regular exercise, new methods of exercise (like eccentric exercise) are necessary. Eccentric endurance exercise is supposed to be less strenuous than concentric exercise but its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in relation to energy expenditure are unclear. We randomly allocated 45 healthy sedentary individuals to one of two groups, each hiking upwards or downwards for 2 months, with a crossover for a further 2 months; for the opposite way, a cable car was used. The difference in altitude was 540 metres; the distance was covered between three and five times a week. Energy expenditure was assessed for each hiking period. Both eccentric and concentric endurance exercise improved glucose tolerance vs. baseline (by 4.1%, p = 0.136; 6.2%, p = 0.023, respectively). Of note, adjustment for energy expenditure per exercise unit (127 ± 22 kcal/unit with eccentric and 442 ± 78 kcal/unit with concentric exercise) revealed a significantly greater improvement of glucose tolerance per kilocalorie spent by eccentric than by concentric exercise (4-times more economical; 0.1123 mg h/dl/kcal vs. 0.0245 mg h/dl/kcal; p = 0.038). Also the decrease of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol per kilocalorie spent was significantly stronger with eccentric exercise (0.0982 mg/dl/kcal vs. 0.0346 mg/dl/kcal, p = 0.014). Serum levels of C-reactive protein and creatine kinase activity were reduced in both groups. Eccentric endurance exercise economically improves glucose tolerance and LDL cholesterol. It therefore is a promising new exercise modality for individuals who are not able to participate in more strenuous exercise regimens.

  6. HD 174884: a strongly eccentric, short-period early-type binary system discovered by CoRoT

    CERN Document Server

    Maceroni, C; Michel, E; Harmanec, P; Prsa, A; Briquet, M; Niemczura, E; Morel, T; Ladjal, D; Auvergne, M; Baglin, A; Baudin, F; Catala, C; Samadi, R; Aerts, C

    2009-01-01

    Accurate photometric CoRoT space observations of a secondary seismological target, HD 174884, led to the discovery that this star is an astrophysically important double-lined eclipsing spectroscopic binary in an eccentric orbit (e of about 0.3), unusual for its short (3.65705d) orbital period. The high eccentricity, coupled with the orientation of the binary orbit in space, explains the very unusual observed light curve with strongly unequal primary and secondary eclipses having the depth ratio of 1-to-100 in the CoRoT 'seismo' passband. Without the high accuracy of the CoRoT photometry, the secondary eclipse, 1.5 mmag deep, would have gone unnoticed. A spectroscopic follow-up program provided 45 high dispersion spectra. The analysis of the CoRoT light curve was performed with an adapted version of PHOEBE that supports CoRoT passbands. The final solution was obtained by simultaneous fitting of the light and the radial velocity curves. Individual star spectra were derived by spectrum disentangling. The uncerta...

  7. Coupled orbital and spin evolution of the CoRoT-7 two-planet system using a Maxwell viscoelastic rheology

    CERN Document Server

    Colucci, Adrián Rodríguez; Correia, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the orbital and rotational evolution of the CoRoT-7 two-planet system, assuming that the innermost planet behaves like a Maxwell body. We numerically resolve the coupled differential equations governing the instantaneous deformation of the inner planet together with the orbital motion of the system. We show that, depending on the relaxation time for the deformation of the planet, the orbital evolution has two distinct behaviours: for relaxation times shorter than the orbital period, we reproduce the results from classic tidal theories, for which the eccentricity is always damped. However, for longer relaxation times, the eccentricity of the inner orbit is secularly excited and can grow to high values. This mechanism provides an explanation for the present high eccentricity observed for CoRoT-7 b, as well as for other close-in super-Earths in multiple planetary systems.

  8. Coupled orbital and spin evolution of the CoRoT-7 two-planet system using a Maxwell viscoelastic rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A.; Callegari, N.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the orbital and rotational evolution of the CoRoT-7 two-planet system, assuming that the innermost planet behaves like a Maxwell body. We numerically resolve the coupled differential equations governing the instantaneous deformation of the inner planet together with the orbital motion of the system. We show that, depending on the relaxation time for the deformation of the planet, the orbital evolution has two distinct behaviours: for relaxation times shorter than the orbital period, we reproduce the results from classic tidal theories, for which the eccentricity is always damped. However, for longer relaxation times, the eccentricity of the inner orbit is secularly excited and can grow to high values. This mechanism provides an explanation for the present high eccentricity observed for CoRoT-7 b, as well as for other close-in super-Earths in multiple planetary systems.

  9. Prograde and Retrograde Black Holes: Whose Jet is More Powerful?

    CERN Document Server

    Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We study prograde and retrograde disc accretion on rapidly spinning black holes (BHs) via global 3D time-dependent non-radiative general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Our discs contain more large-scale vertical magnetic flux than the accreting gas can push into the BH. As a result, the BH becomes saturated with flux, and strong centrally concentrated large-scale magnetic fields form that obstruct the accretion and lead to a magnetically arrested disc. We show that the efficiency with which such accretion systems generate steady outflows depends only on the dimensionless BH spin, a, and accretion disc angular thickness, h/r. Prograde BHs with thick discs (h/r ~ 0.3-0.6) generate jets and outflows several times more efficiently than retrograde BHs, for the same absolute value of spin. Both orientations can reach high values of outflow efficiency, eta ~ 100%, with higher efficiency values for thicker discs.

  10. WLS retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum during Wnt secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia; Chia, Joanne; Canning, Claire Ann; Jones, C Michael; Bard, Frédéric A; Virshup, David M

    2014-05-12

    Wnts are transported to the cell surface by the integral membrane protein WLS (also known as Wntless, Evi, and GPR177). Previous studies of WLS trafficking have emphasized WLS movement from the Golgi to the plasma membrane (PM) and then back to the Golgi via retromer-mediated endocytic recycling. We find that endogenous WLS binds Wnts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cycles to the PM, and then returns to the ER through the Golgi. We identify an ER-targeting sequence at the carboxyl terminus of native WLS that is critical for ER retrograde recycling and contributes to Wnt secretory function. Golgi-to-ER recycling of WLS requires the COPI regulator ARF as well as ERGIC2, an ER-Golgi intermediate compartment protein that is also required for the retrograde trafficking of the KDEL receptor and certain toxins. ERGIC2 is required for efficient Wnt secretion. ER retrieval is an integral part of the WLS transport cycle.

  11. Retrograde trafficking of AB₅ toxins: mechanisms to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Linstedt, Adam D

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial AB5 toxins are a clinically relevant class of exotoxins that include several well-known members such as Shiga, cholera, and pertussis toxins. Infections with toxin-producing bacteria cause devastating human diseases that affect millions of individuals each year and have no definitive medical treatment. The molecular targets of AB5 toxins reside in the cytosol of infected cells, and the toxins reach the cytosol by trafficking through the retrograde membrane transport pathway that avoids degradative late endosomes and lysosomes. Focusing on Shiga toxin as the archetype member, we review recent advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the retrograde trafficking of AB5 toxins and highlight how these basic science advances are leading to the development of a promising new therapeutic approach based on inhibiting toxin transport.

  12. Ureteroscopy assisted retrograde nephrostomy for complete staghorn renal calculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-09-01

    Complete staghorn calculi are typically managed with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). However, dilating nephrostomy and inserting a nephro access sheath can be difficult to perform without hydronephrosis. We reported the procedure of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) during PCNL. UARN is effective without dilating the renal collecting system in cases of complete staghorn calculi. A 63-year old female with a left complete staghorn renal calculus was referred to our hospital. Under general and epidural anesthesia, the patient was placed in a modified-Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope was inserted and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible ureteroscope. The puncture wire was forwarded along the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was done using a pneumatic lithotripter and the Ho: YAG laser. UARN during PCNL was effective for the treatment of a complete staghorn calculus.

  13. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawahara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL.

  14. Ureteroscopy-Assisted Retrograde Nephrostomy (UARN) after Anatrophic Nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ito, Hiroki; Terao, Hideyuki; Kato, Yoshitake; Ogawa, Takehiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Open surgical anatrophic nephrolithotomy (ANL) had been the standard treatment for large renal calculi prior to the development of endoscopic devices and endoscopic techniques. A previous report described the efficacy of ureteroscopy-assisted retrograde nephrostomy (UARN) and presented a case of renal calculi successfully treated with UARN during percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a patient after ANL. Case Presentation. A 61-year-old male with left renal calculi was referred for further treatment. The patient was placed under general and epidural anesthesia, in a Galdakao-modified Valdivia position. A flexible ureteroscope (URS) was inserted, and a Lawson retrograde nephrostomy puncture wire was advanced into the flexible URS. The puncture wire then followed the route from the renal pelvis to the exit skin. Calculus fragmentation was undertaken using a pneumatic lithotripter. Conclusions. UARN for PCNL was therefore found to be a safe, effective, and appropriate treatment for a patient presenting with renal calculi after undergoing ANL.

  15. The Effect of Charon's Tidal Damping on the Orbits of Pluto's Three Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Lithwick, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Pluto's recently discovered minor moons, Nix and Hydra, have almost circular orbits, and are nearly coplanar with Charon, Pluto's major moon. This is surprising because tidal interactions with Pluto are too weak to damp their eccentricities. We consider an alternative possibility: that Nix and Hydra circularize their orbits by exciting Charon's eccentricity via secular interactions, and Charon in turn damps its own eccentricity by tidal interaction with Pluto. The timescale for this process can be less than the age of the Solar System, for plausible tidal parameters and moon masses. However, as we show numerically and analytically, the effects of the 2:1 and 3:1 resonant forcing terms between Nix and Charon complicate this picture. In the presence of Charon's tidal damping, the 2:1 term forces Nix to migrate outward and the 3:1 term changes the eccentricity damping rate, sometimes leading to eccentricity growth. We conclude that this mechanism probably does not explain Nix and Hydra's current orbits. Instead,...

  16. Electrocardiographic Changes in Elderly Patients During Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NG Kounis

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiorespiratory complications may occur during gastrointestinal endoscopy, and elderly people seem to be more vulnerable to these complications during endoscopic procedures involving the manipulation of abdominal viscera. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias, changes in oxygen saturation, heart rate and blood pressure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP via Holter monitoring in elderly patients older than 70 years of age.

  17. Life threatening hemobilia after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Ihab I; Sherman, Stuart; Pyko, Maximilian; Lehman, Glen A

    2017-09-11

    Arterial vascular complication from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is exceedingly rare. This report describes a life threatening hemobilia, from a pseudoaneurysm of the right hepatic artery (RHA), which occurred post ERCP. The pseudoaneurysm and the active bleed were diagnosed by selective angiography of the RHA, and successfully treated with stenting. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Successful recanalisation of RCA CTO using retrograde approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Król, Marek; Skwarna, Bartosz; Buszman, Paweł

    2009-03-01

    A 51-year-old female two years after CABG presented with unstable angina and inferior wall ischaemia. Coronary angiography revealed occluded graft to RCA and chronic total occlusion of RCA with good collateral flow from distal LAD to RCA. The CTO was successfully crossed and dilated through epicardial collaterals from distal LAD (retrograde approach). Finally, antegrade angioplasty with two stents implantation was performed achieving TIMI 3 flow.

  19. The Management of Retrograde Peri-Implantitis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Alam, Md Nazish; Singh, Gurudeep; Chandrasekaran, S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Peri-Implantitis is defined as an inflammatory reaction with the loss of the supporting bone in the tissues which surround a functioning implant. The peri-implantitis lesions are often asymptomatic and they are usually detected during the routine recall appointments. Careful probing around the teeth and the implants should be done routinely along with the radiologic evaluation during these check-up appointments. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove even more difficult to identify, ...

  20. Notes on counter-orbiting globular clusters in the Milky Way

    OpenAIRE

    Yankelevich, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    It is argued that Galactic globular clusters rotating retrograde may originate from prograde globular clusters that change their angular momenturm due to gravitational perturbations from the Magellanic Cloud galaxies. It is shown that those galactic globular clusters with orbits near the Lagrangiane point of the system "Milky Way - Maggellanic Clouds" can change the sign of their angular momentum in few Gyr time scale.