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Sample records for ebv-transformed lymphoblastoid cell

  1. Host cell reactivation of uv- and X-ray-damaged herpes simplex virus by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines

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    Henderson, E.E. (Temple Univ. School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA); Long, W.K.

    1981-12-01

    The efficacy of using an infected centers assay, employing herpes simplex virus-infected, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as components, to study host cell reactivation has been explored. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown through the infected centers assay to have detectable but varying ability to lytically infect LCLs established from chromosomal breakage syndromes or closely related genetic disorders. The rate of HSV inactivation by ultraviolet (uv) irradiation was faster in LCLs established from Cockaynes's syndrome than in normal LCLs, and faster still in LCLs established from xeroderma pigmentosum. These results indicate that Cockayne's syndrome, while having what appears to be quantitatively normal levels of uv-induced DNA repair replication, shows decreased ability to host cell reactivated uv-damaged HSV. In direct contrast, X-irradiated HSV showed identical survival when assayed on normal LCLs or LCLs established from ataxia telangiectasia showing increased sensitivity to X irradiation as measured by colony formation. Through the infected centers assay, it has also been possible to demonstrate low levels of multiplicity reactivation of mutagen-damaged HSV in permanently proliferating LCLs.

  2. Induction of p16(INK4a is the major barrier to proliferation when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines.

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    Lenka Skalska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To explore the role of p16(INK4a as an intrinsic barrier to B cell transformation by EBV, we transformed primary B cells from an individual homozygous for a deletion in the CDKN2A locus encoding p16(INK4a and p14(ARF. Using recombinant EBV-BAC viruses expressing conditional EBNA3C (3CHT, we developed a system that allows inactivation of EBNA3C in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs lacking active p16(INK4a protein but expressing a functional 14(ARF-fusion protein (p14/p16. The INK4a locus is epigenetically repressed by EBNA3C--in cooperation with EBNA3A--despite the absence of functional p16(INK4a. Although inactivation of EBNA3C in LCLs from normal B cells leads to an increase in p16(INK4a and growth arrest, EBNA3C inactivation in the p16(INK4a-null LCLs has no impact on the rate of proliferation, establishing that the repression of INK4a is a major function of EBNA3C in EBV-driven LCL proliferation. This conditional LCL system allowed us to use microarray analysis to identify and confirm genes regulated specifically by EBNA3C, independently of proliferation changes modulated by the p16(INK4a-Rb-E2F axis. Infections of normal primary B cells with recombinant EBV-BAC virus from which EBNA3C is deleted or with 3CHT EBV in the absence of activating ligand 4-hydroxytamoxifen, revealed that EBNA3C is necessary to overcome an EBV-driven increase in p16(INK4a expression and concomitant block to proliferation 2-4 weeks post-infection. If cells are p16(INK4a-null, functional EBNA3C is dispensable for the outgrowth of LCLs.

  3. Resveratrol Prevents EBV Transformation and Inhibits the Outgrowth of EBV-Immortalized Human B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, J. Luis; Takami, Akiyoshi; Trung, Ly Quoc; Kato, Shunichi; Nakao, Shinji

    2012-01-01

    Background Epstein Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disease is an increasing complication in patients with immunosuppressive conditions. Although the current therapies for this disorder are effective, they are also associated with significant toxicity. In an attempt to identify newer therapeutic agents, this study investigated the effects of Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, on the EBV transformation of human B cells. Methodology/Principal Findings This study demonstrates that resveratrol prevents EBV transformation in human B cells. These effects are mediated by specific cytotoxic activities of resveratrol against EBV-infected B cells that are associated with the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and survivin. This occurs as a consequence of the inhibition of EBV-induced NFκB and STAT-3 signaling pathways and a resveratrol-induced decrease in the expression of the oncogenic viral product LMP1 in EBV-infected B cells. In addition, resveratrol decreased the expression of miR-155 and miR-34a in EBV-infected B cells, blocked the expression of the anti-apoptotic viral gene BHRF1, and thus interrupted events that are critical for EBV transformation and the survival of EBV-transformed cells. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that resveratrol may therefore be a potentially effective therapeutic alternative for preventing EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases in immune compromised patients. PMID:23251493

  4. Ascorbic Acid Kills Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Positive Burkitt Lymphoma Cells and EBV Transformed B-Cells in Vitro, but not in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatzer, Amber N.; Espey, Michael G.; Chavez, Mayra; Tu, Hongbin; Levine, Mark; Cohen, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to kill various cancer cell lines at pharmacologic concentrations. We found that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells were more susceptible to ascorbic acid-induced cell killing than EBV-negative BL cells or EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Ascorbic acid did not induce apoptosis in any of the tested cells but did induce the production of reactive oxygen species and cell death. Previously, we showed that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, induces cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. We found that ascorbic acid is strongly antagonistic for ascorbic acid-induced cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. Finally, ascorbic acid did not prolong survival of severe combined immunodefiency mice inoculated with LCLs either intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Thus, while ascorbic acid was highly effective at killing EBV-positive BL cells and LCLs in vitro, it antagonized cell killing by bortezomib and was ineffective in an animal model. PMID:23067008

  5. Enhanced outgrowth of EBV-transformed chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells mediated by coculture with macrophage feeder cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Xi; Kozink, Daniel M; Gustilo, Marietta; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Liao, Hua-Xin; Catera, Rosa; Chu, Charles C; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Luftig, Micah A; Haynes, Barton F; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2012-02-16

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is characterized by the clonal expansion of CD5-expressing B lymphocytes that produce mAbs often reactive with microbial or autoantigens. Long-term culture of B-CLL clones would permit the collection and characterization of B-CLL mAbs to study antigen specificity and of B-CLL DNA to investigate molecular mechanisms promoting the disease. However, the derivation of long-term cell lines (eg, by EBV), has not been efficient. We have improved the efficiency of EBV B-CLL transformation of CpG oligonucleotide-stimulated cells by incubating patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence of an irradiated mouse macrophage cell line, J774A.1. Using this approach, peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 13 of 21 B-CLL patients were transformed as documented by IGHV-D-J sequencing. Four clones grew and retained CD5 expression in culture for 2 to 4 months. However, despite documentation of EBV infection by expression of EBNA2 and LMP1, B-CLL cells died after removal of macrophage feeder cells. Nevertheless, using electrofusion technology, we generated 6 stable hetero-hybridoma cell lines from EBV-transformed B-CLL cells, and these hetero-hybridomas produced immunoglobulin. Thus, we have established enhanced methods of B-CLL culture that will enable broader interrogation of B-CLL cells at the genetic and protein levels.

  6. Effect of IL-6 on proliferation and IG production of human EBV-transformed cell lines in serum free culture media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, G. J.; Jordens, R.; van Lier, R. A.; Zeijlemaker, W. P.

    1990-01-01

    To optimalize growth and Ig production of EBV transformed B cells for large scale tissue culture, we analyzed five stable monoclonal EBV-B cell lines for their responsiveness to interleukin (IL)-6 in standard medium with 5% FCS and in several serum-free media. As we previously demonstrated these

  7. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expression by resting B cells increases proliferation following EBV infection, but the overexpression of CD81 induces the apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin; Park, Sung Jae; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Yeong Seok; Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, In-Hak; Yoon, Sung Ho; Lee, Youn Jae; Paeng, Sunghwa; Hur, Dae Young

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 protein binds to CD81, which is a component of the B cell co-stimulatory complex. The E2-CD81 interaction leads to B cell proliferation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and to the hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Epidemiological studies have reported a high prevalence of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HCV-positive patients, suggesting a potential association between HCV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the genesis of B lymphocyte proliferative disorders. In the present study, in order to investigate the association between EBV and HCV in B cells, we created an in vitro EBV-induced B cell transformation model. CD81 was gradually overexpressed during transformation by EBV. B cells isolated from HCV-positive patients grew more rapidly and clumped together earlier than B cells isolated from healthy donors following EBV infection. Pre-stimulation of CD81 expressed by resting B cells with anti-CD81 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or HCV E2 accelerated the generation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) by EBV infection. These cells proliferated prominently through the early expression of interleukin-10 and intracellular latent membrane protein (LMP)-l. By contrast, the overexpression of CD81 on EBV-transformed B cells by anti-CD81 mAb or HCV E2 protein induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. These results suggest that the engagement of CD81 expressed by B cells has differential effects on B cell fate (proliferation or apoptosis) according to EBV infection and the expression level of CD81.

  8. Molecular signatures in response to Isoliquiritigenin in lymphoblastoid cell lines

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    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Nam, Hye-Young [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Meeyul [Research Center for Biomedical Resource of Oriental Medicine, Daegu Haany University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Hyun [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Han, Bok-Ghee, E-mail: bokghee@nih.go.kr [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jae-Pil, E-mail: jpjeon@cdc.go.kr [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified the inhibitory effect of ISL on cell proliferation of LCLs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ISL-induced genes and miRNAs through microarray approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs associated with ISL effect. -- Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of various cancer cells. However, genetic factors regulating ISL effects remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular signatures involved in ISL-induced cell death of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) using microarray analyses. For gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) microarray experiments, each of 12 LCL strains was independently treated with ISL or DMSO as a vehicle control for a day prior to total RNA extraction. ISL treatment inhibited cell proliferation of LCLs in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis showed that ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway, having a potential as regulators in LCL survival and sensitivity to ISL-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, 36 miRNAs including five miRNAs with unknown functions were differentially expressed in ISL-treated LCLs. The integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs. Among them, miR-1207-5p and miR-575 were negatively correlated with p53 pathway- and cell cycle-associated genes, respectively. In conclusion, our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in ISL-induced cytotoxicity in LCLs by targeting signaling pathways including p53 pathway and cell cycle.

  9. Ligation of CD47 induces G1 arrest in EBV-transformed B cells through ROS generation, p38 MAPK/JNK activation, and Tap73 upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ga Bin; Bang, Si Ra; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Daejin; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Jin Kyoung; Kim, Yeong Seok; Hur, Dae Young

    2014-01-01

    CD47 is expressed in normal activated cells as well as in several tumors. It also has been implicated as having antiangiogenic and antimetastatic properties, but its roles in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells are still not fully understood. Herein, we report that EBV infection induced CD47 surface expression on B cells, and CD47 ligation with anti-CD47 mAb (B6H12) reduced cell proliferation and induced G1 arrest. CD47-induced G1 arrest was mediated through increased cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKi) and a simultaneously decreased CDK/cyclins, and p38 MAPK/JNK activation preceded binding of CDKi-CDK. Moreover, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and upregulation of both TAp73 and ER stress sensor proteins were detected after CD47 ligation, and p38 inhibitor SB203580 and JNK inhibitor SP600125 blocked upregulation of TAp73 and cell cycle arrest. We investigated whether ROS generation is the initial event of CD47-mediated G1 arrest because ROS scavenger NAC effectively abrogated the majority of CD47-mediated responses but SB203580 and SP600125 did not block ROS production. Taken together, we concluded that CD47 ligation on EBV-transformed B cells led to G1 arrest by ROS generation and, subsequently, there was p38 MAPK/JNK pathway activation, ER stress triggering, and TAp73 upregulation. Our findings provide data supporting CD47 as a feasible target for EBV-associated tumor therapy.

  10. Unsuitability of lymphoblastoid cell lines as surrogate of cryopreserved isolated lymphocytes for the analysis of DNA double-strand break repair activity

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    Zijno, Andrea [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Porcedda, Paola [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Saini, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Allione, Alessandra [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Garofalo, Bruno; Marcon, Francesca [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Guarrera, Simonetta [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Turinetto, Valentina; Minieri, Valentina [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Funaro, Ada [Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy); Crebelli, Riccardo [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy); Giachino, Claudia [Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Turin (Italy); Matullo, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.matullo@unito.it [Institute for Scientific Interchange (ISI) Foundation, Villa Gualino, Turin (Italy); Department of Genetics, Biology and Biochemistry, University of Turin (Italy)

    2010-02-03

    As first task of a comprehensive investigation on DNA repair genotype-phenotype correlations, the suitability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as surrogate of cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in DNA repair phenotypic assays was evaluated. To this aim the amount of DNA damage induced by {gamma}-rays and DNA repair capacity were evaluated in unstimulated (G{sub 0}) and mitogen-simulated (G{sub 2}) PBMC from 20 healthy subjects and in EBV-transformed LCL obtained from the same individuals. Phosphorylation of histone H2AX, micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations were the end-points investigated. The results obtained show higher basal frequencies of binucleated cells bearing micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridge (NPB) in LCL with respect to PBMC, suggesting that EBV transformation may be associated with chromosomal instability. After irradiation, higher levels of micronuclei were induced in G{sub 0}-treated PBMC compared to cycling LCL; conversely, NPB were more frequent in LCL than in PBMC. Moreover, higher levels of chromosomal aberrations were observed in G{sub 2}-treated PBMC compared to LCL. Concerning {gamma}-H2AX measurements, phosphorylation levels 1 h after treatment and dephosphorylation kinetics were basically similar in LCL and in PBMC. However, while Spearman's test showed a strong correlation between the results obtained in replicated experiments with PBMC, high inter-experimental variability and poor reproducibility was observed in the experiments performed with LCL, possibly due to the intrinsic instability of LCL. In summary, both the analysis of {gamma}-H2AX and the evaluation of chromosome damage highlighted a larger inter-experimental variability in the results obtained with LCL compared to PBMC. Noteworthy, the two set of results proved to lack any significant correlation at the individual level. These results indicate that LCL may be unsuitable for investigating genotype

  11. File list: Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...ciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...5,SRX306570,SRX106080,SRX306566,SRX306568 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... SRX306580,SRX306578,SRX306576,SRX306575 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 DNase-seq Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...8,SRX091623,SRX091605,SRX469953,SRX469951,SRX469955 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...ciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...ciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...7,SRX356718,SRX356754,SRX026054,SRX026069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 DNase-seq Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...0,SRX091618,SRX091595,SRX091598,SRX469953 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... SRX306580,SRX306575,SRX306578,SRX306576 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 DNase-seq Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...8,SRX091598,SRX091626,SRX469951,SRX469953,SRX469955 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  2. File list: ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...6,SRX306568,SRX469953,SRX144527,SRX144520,SRX091596 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  3. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Unclassified Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... SRX306575,SRX306580,SRX306576,SRX306578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 TFs and others Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...ciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Unclassified Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 RNA polymerase Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... SRX306575,SRX306580,SRX306576,SRX306578 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...8,SRX356735,SRX356754,SRX306535,SRX026069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Histone Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...2,SRX306570,SRX356718,SRX356754,SRX026069 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 DNase-seq Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...091606,SRX469953,SRX091596 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Bld.50.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  12. File list: ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 All antigens Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line...ve.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Unclassified Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line hg19 Unclassified Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Bld.10.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line.bed ...

  15. Flavonoids products from Nitraria retusa leaves promote lymphoblastoid cells apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jihed, Boubaker; Bhouri, Wissem; Ben Sghaier, Mohammed; Bouhlel, Ines; Kriffi, Mounira; Skandrani, Ines; Dijoux, Franca Marie Genviève; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2012-01-01

    In this report, the ethyl acetate extract and its major constituent, isorhamnetin 3-o-robinobioside (I3-O-Rob), from Nitraria retusa (N. Retusa) leaf extracts were evaluated for their ability to induce apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6). Apoptosis of TK6 cell line was carried out using DNA fragmentation, poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage with reference to caspase-3 activity. These tested products, from N. Retusa, enhanced the apoptosis effects in the tested cancer cell line. This result was confirmed by DNA fragmentation and PARP cleavage indicating a release of caspase-3 level. Our results indicate that the original ethyl acetate extract and the I3-O-Rob have a great antiproliferative effect on human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6), which may be due to their involvement in the apoptotic pathway.

  16. Individual radiosensitivity does not correlate with radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines or CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wistop, A.; Keller, U.; Grabenbauer, G.G.; Sauer, R.; Distel, L.V.R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Friedrich Alexander Univ. Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Sprung, C.N. [Div. of Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2005-05-01

    Background and purpose: spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from healthy donors, cancer patients and donors with radiosensitivity syndromes as well as CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity were investigated as a possible marker for the detection of individual radiosensitivity. These investigations are based on the hypothesis that hypersensitive patients have reduced levels of apoptosis after in vitro irradiation as a result of a defect in the signaling pathway. Material and methods: Epstein-Barr virus-(EBV-)transformed LCLs derived from five healthy donors, seven patients with heterozygous or homozygous genotype for ataxia-telangiectasia or Nijmegen breakage syndrome and five patients with {>=} grade 3 late toxicity (RTOG) were investigated. In addition, CD{sup 3+} lymphocytes from 21 healthy individuals and 18 cancer patients including five patients with a proven cellular hypersensitivity to radiation were analyzed. Cells were irradiated in vitro with a dose of 2 and 5 Gy and were incubated for 48 h. Apoptotic rates were measured by the TUNEL assay followed by customized image analysis. Results: four out of seven radiosensitivity syndrome patients were identified to have an increased cellular radiosensitivity as determined by reduced apoptotic rates after irradiation of their respective LCLs. Comparatively, only two of the five hypersensitive cancer patients were clearly identified by reduced apoptotic rates. Spontaneous apoptotic rates were very homogeneous among all 39 samples from controls and patients, while lymphocytes of all cancer patients showed significantly lower radiation-induced rates. Conclusion: only a subgroup of hypersensitive patients may be identified by reduction of radiation-induced apoptotic rate. It is concluded that the hypothesis according to which hypersensitive cells have reduced levels of apoptosis is only conditionally true. The authors suggest that this

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  1. File list: NoD.Bld.20.AllAg.Lymphoblastoid_cell_line [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. Different toxic effects of YTX in tumor K-562 and lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fernández Araújo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Yessotoxin (YTX modulates cellular phosphodiesterases (PDEs. In this regard, opposite effects had been described in the tumor model K-562 cell line and fresh human lymphocytes in terms of cell viability, cyclic adenosine 3´,5´-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP production and protein expression after YTX treatment. Studies in depth of the pathways activated by YTX in K-562 cell line, have demonstrated the activation of two different cell death types, apoptosis and autophagy after 24 and 48 hours of treatment, respectively. Furthermore, the key role of type 4A PDE (PDE4A in both pathways activated by YTX was demonstrated. Therefore, taking into account the differences between cellular lines and fresh cells, a study of cell death pathways activated by YTX in a non-tumor cell line with mitotic activity, was performed. The cellular model used was the lymphoblastoid cell line that represents a non-tumor model with normal apoptotic and mitotic machinery. In this context, cell viability and cell proliferation, expression of proteins involved in cell death activated by YTX and mitochondrial mass, were studied after the incubation with the toxin. Opposite to the tumor model, no cell death activation was observed in lymphoblastoid cell line in the presence of YTX. In this sense, variations in apoptosis hallmarks were not detected in the lymphoblastoid cell line after YTX incubation, whereas this type I of programmed cell death was observed in K-526 cells. On the other hand, autophagy cell death was triggered in this cellular line, while other autophagic process is suggested in lymphoblastoid cells. These YTX effects are related to PDE4A in both cellular lines. In addition, while cell death is triggered in K-526 cells after YTX treatment, in lymphoblastoid cells the toxin stops cellular proliferation. These results point to YTX as a specific toxic compound of tumor cells, since in the non-tumor lymphoblastoid cell line, no cell death hallmarks are observed.

  5. Integrity of genome-wide genotype data from low passage lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S. McCarthy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We compared genotype data from the HumanExomeCore Array in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and low passage lymphoblastoid cell lines from the same 24 individuals to test for genotypic errors caused by the Epstein–Barr Virus transformation process. Genotype concordance across the 24 comparisons was 99.57% for unfiltered genotype data, and 99.63% following standard genotype quality control filters. Mendelian error rates and levels of heterozygosity were not significantly different between lymphoblastoid cell lines and their parent peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results show that at low passage numbers, genotype discrepancies are minimal even before stringent quality control, and extend current evidence qualifying the use of low-passage lymphoblastoid cell lines as a reliable DNA source for genotype analysis.

  6. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation.

  7. Utilization of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines as a System for the Molecular Modeling of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Colin A.; Liu, Stephenie Y.; Hicks, Chindo; Gregg, Jeffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide an alternative approach for understanding the biology and genetics of autism, we performed statistical analysis of gene expression profiles of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from children with autism and their families. The goal was to assess the feasibility of using this model in identifying autism-associated genes.…

  8. Malignant transformation of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines by carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Shiraishi, Y; Yosida, T. H.; Sandberg, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as one derived from a normal person, treated with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (0.3 micrograms/ml for 24 hr), were studied for tumorigenicity in nude mice, colony formation in soft agar, cytogenetic changes, and immunoglobulin markers. When normal and Bloom syndrome cells with normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels and karyotypes (type I) were treated with carcinogens, no significant...

  9. Investigation of the apoptotic way induced by digallic acid in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhouri Wissem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The digallic acid (DGA purified from Pistacia lentiscus. L fruits was investigated for its antiproliferative and apoptotic activities on human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. Methods We attempt to characterize the apoptotic pathway activated by DGA. Apoptosis was detected by DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage and by evaluating caspase activities. Results The inhibition of lymphoblastoid cell proliferation was noted from 8.5 μg/ml of DGA. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by DNA fragmentation and PARP cleavage. We have demonstrated that DGA induces apoptosis by activating the caspase-8 extrinsic pathway. Caspase-3 was also activated in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion In summary, DGA exhibited an apoptosis inductor effect in TK6 cells revealing thus its potential as a cancer-preventive agent.

  10. Hsp90 inhibitors block outgrowth of EBV-infected malignant cells in vitro and in vivo through an EBNA1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoping; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Ma, Shidong; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Duellman, Sarah J; Burgess, Richard R; Tellam, Judy; Khanna, Rajiv; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-02-16

    EBV causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) mediates EBV genome replication, partition, and transcription, and is essential for persistence of the viral genome in host cells. Here we demonstrate that Hsp90 inhibitors decrease EBNA1 expression and translation, and that this effect requires the Gly-Ala repeat domain of EBNA1. Hsp90 inhibitors induce the death of established, EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines at doses nontoxic to normal cells, and this effect is substantially reversed when lymphoblastoid cell lines are stably infected with a retrovirus expressing a functional EBNA1 mutant lacking the Gly-Ala repeats. Hsp90 inhibitors prevent EBV transformation of primary B cells, and strongly inhibit the growth of EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease in SCID mice. These results suggest that Hsp90 inhibitors may be particularly effective for treating EBV-induced diseases requiring the continued presence of the viral genome.

  11. Protection against bovine leukosis virus infection in sheep with the BL 20 bovine lymphoblastoid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D H; Lucas, M H; Sands, J; Wibberley, G

    1982-11-01

    The bovine lymphoblastoid BL 20 cell line derived from a case of sporadic bovine leukosis when inoculated into sheep did not induce an antibody response directed against bovine leukosis virus (BLV) structural proteins. Sheep were inoculated twice with the BL 20 cell line and then challenged with BLV infected lymphocytes. Three out of four sheep challenged four weeks after BL 20 inoculation did not develop BLV antibodies. Of the 12 sheep challenged later, three sheep did not develop BLV antibodies. BLV was isolated from all the seropositive animals and from none of the seronegative animals.

  12. Molecular characterization of neoplastic and normal "sister" lymphoblastoid B-cell lines from chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanemo Myhrinder, Anna; Hellqvist, Eva; Bergh, Ann-Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cells resemble self-renewing CD5 + B-cells carrying auto/xeno-antigen-reactive B-cell receptors (BCRs) and multiple innate pattern-recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors and scavenger receptors. Integration of signals from BCRs with multiple surface...... membrane receptors determines whether the cells will be proliferating, anergic or apoptotic. To better understand the role of antigen in leukemogenesis, CLL cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) will facilitate structural analysis of antigens and supply DNA for genetic studies. We present here...... a comprehensive genotypic and phenotypic characterization of available CLL and normal B-cell-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the same individuals (n = 17). Authenticity and verification studies of CLL-patient origin were done by IGHV sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA...

  13. Control of cell respiration by nitric oxide in Ataxia Telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masci, Alessandra; Mastronicola, Daniela; Arese, Marzia; Piane, Maria; De Amicis, Andrea; Blanck, Thomas J J; Chessa, Luciana; Sarti, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT) patients are particularly sensitive to oxidative-nitrosative stress. Nitric oxide (NO) controls mitochondrial respiration via the reversible inhibition of complex IV. The mitochondrial response to NO of AT lymphoblastoid cells was investigated. Cells isolated from three patients and three intrafamilial healthy controls were selected showing within each group a normal diploid karyotype and homogeneous telomere length. Different complex IV NO-inhibition patterns were induced by varying the electron flux through the respiratory chain, using exogenous cell membrane permeable electron donors. Under conditions of high electron flux the mitochondrial NO inhibition of respiration was greater in AT than in control cells (P< or =0.05). This property appears peculiar to AT, and correlates well to the higher concentration of cytochrome c detected in the AT cells. This finding is discussed on the basis of the proposed mechanism of reaction of NO with complex IV. It is suggested that the peculiar response of AT mitochondria to NO stress may be relevant to the mitochondrial metabolism of AT patients.

  14. The translocated c-myc oncogene of Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells is not expressed in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikura, K; Erikson, J; ar-Rushdi, A; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    1985-01-01

    We hybridized Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells, which carry a t(8;14) chromosome translocation, with human lymphoblastoid cells to study the expression of the translocated cellular myc oncogene (c-myc) in the hybrid cells. In Raji cells the c-myc oncogene is translocated to a switch region of the gamma heavy chain locus (S gamma). Because of sequence alterations in the 5' exon of the translocated c-myc oncogene in this cell line, it is possible to distinguish the transcripts of the translocated c-myc gene and of the normal c-myc gene. S1 nuclease protection experiments with a c-myc first exon probe indicate that Raji cells express predominantly the translocated c-myc gene, while the level of expression of the normal c-myc gene is less than 2% of that of the translocated c-myc gene. Somatic cell hybrids between Raji and human lymphoblastoid cells retain the lymphoblastoid phenotype and express only the normal c-myc oncogene. This result indicates that the activation of a c-myc oncogene translocated to a S region depends on the stage of B-cell differentiation of the cells harboring the translocated c-myc gene and not on alterations in the structure of the translocated c-myc oncogene. Images PMID:3857623

  15. Malignant transformation of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines by carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y; Yosida, T H; Sandberg, A A

    1985-08-01

    Three types of Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as one derived from a normal person, treated with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (0.3 micrograms/ml for 24 hr), were studied for tumorigenicity in nude mice, colony formation in soft agar, cytogenetic changes, and immunoglobulin markers. When normal and Bloom syndrome cells with normal sister chromatid exchange (SCE) levels and karyotypes (type I) were treated with carcinogens, no significant changes occurred in the immunoglobulin profile and karyotype, only rare colony formation was seen, and no tumors were produced. In contrast, when Bloom syndrome cells with high SCE levels (type II with normal karyotype and type III with an abnormal karyotype) were treated with carcinogens, tumors were produced in 22 of 53 nude mice injected; a high rate of colony formation in soft agar was seen; the cells exhibited virtual loss of immunoglobulin markers; and structural changes in chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 11, 14, and 15 were found in the tumors in addition to the original chromosome abnormalities present in the injected cells. It appears that Bloom syndrome B-lymphoblastoid cell lines with high levels of SCE are highly susceptible to the action of carcinogens, as evidenced by tumor formation in nude mice and colony formation in agar. Apparently, the carcinogens were capable of transforming only those cells that had a critical level of SCE (approximately 140 per cell) and not those with only mildly increased levels (approximately 13 per cell).

  16. Different Mechanisms of Regulation of the Warburg Effect in Lymphoblastoid and Burkitt Lymphoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas; Klein, George; Kashuba, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The Warburg effect is one of the hallmarks of cancer and rapidly proliferating cells. It is known that the hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1A) and MYC proteins cooperatively regulate expression of the HK2 and PDK1 genes, respectively, in the Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cell line P493-6, carrying an inducible MYC gene repression system. However, the mechanism of aerobic glycolysis in BL cells has not yet been fully understood. Western blot analysis showed that the HIF1A protein was highly expressed in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive BL cell lines. Using biochemical assays and quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), we found that-unlike in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs)-the MYC protein was the master regulator of the Warburg effect in these BL cell lines. Inhibition of the transactivation ability of MYC had no influence on aerobic glycolysis in LCLs, but it led to decreased expression of MYC-dependent genes and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) activity in BL cells. Our data suggest that aerobic glycolysis, or the Warburg effect, in BL cells is regulated by MYC expressed at high levels, whereas in LCLs, HIF1A is responsible for this phenomenon.

  17. P53 alters the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for oxidized graphene in human B-lymphoblastoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibone, Dayton Matthew

    Widespread use of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products raises concern about potential adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is crucial to maintaining cellular and genetic stability to prevent carcinogenesis. Here, we show that oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) absorption and p53 functional status correlate with cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human B-lymphoblastoid cells. Trends in f-G absorption by were dose-dependent. Cells with functional p53 exposed to f-G arrested in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, suppressed f-G induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and had elevated apoptosis. While compared to p53 competent cells, the p53 deficient cells exposed to f-G accumulated in S-phase of the cell cycle, had elevated ROS levels, and evaded apoptosis. The f-G genotoxicity was evident as increased loss-of-heterozygosity mutants independent of p53 status, and structural chromosome damage in p53 deficient cells. These findings have broad implications for the safety and efficacy of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industrial, consumer products and biomedical applications.

  18. Stable human lymphoblastoid cell lines constitutively expressing hepatitis C virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölk, Benno; Gremion, Christel; Ivashkina, Natalia; Engler, Olivier B; Grabscheid, Benno; Bieck, Elke; Blum, Hubert E; Cerny, Andreas; Moradpour, Darius

    2005-06-01

    The cellular immune response plays a central role in virus clearance and pathogenesis of liver disease in hepatitis C. The study of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune responses is limited by currently available cell-culture systems. Here, the establishment and characterization of stable human HLA-A2-positive B-lymphoblastoid x T hybrid cell lines constitutively expressing either the NS3-4A complex or the entire HCV polyprotein are reported. These cell lines, termed T1/NS3-4A and T1/HCVcon, respectively, were maintained in continuous culture for more than 1 year with stable characteristics. HCV structural and non-structural proteins were processed accurately, indicating that the cellular and viral proteolytic machineries are functional in these cell lines. Viral proteins were found in the cytoplasm in dot-like structures when expressed in the context of the HCV polyprotein or in a perinuclear fringe when the NS3-4A complex was expressed alone. T1/NS3-4A and T1/HCVcon cells were lysed efficiently by HCV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes from patients with hepatitis C and from human HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice immunized with a liposomal HCV vaccine, indicating that viral proteins are processed endogenously and presented efficiently via the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. In conclusion, these cell lines represent a unique tool to study the cellular immune response, as well as to evaluate novel vaccine and immunotherapeutic strategies against HCV.

  19. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on the Expression Profile of Microrna in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Story, Michael; Mangala, Lingegowda

    2012-07-01

    EFFECTS OF SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ON THE EXPRESSION PROFILE OF MICRORNA IN HUMAN LYMPHOBLASTOID CELLS Lingegowda S. Mangala1,2, Ye Zhang1,3, Zhenhua He2, Kamal Emami1, Govindarajan T. Ramesh4, Michael Story 5, Larry H. Rohde2, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas, USA 2 University of Houston Clear Lake, Houston, Texas, USA 3 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, Texas, USA 4 Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA, USA 5 University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA This study explores the changes in expression of microRNA (miRNA) and related genes under simulated microgravity conditions. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. miRNA has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. To test the hypothesis that the miRNA expression profile would be altered in zero gravity resulting in altered regulation of gene expression leading to metabolic or functional changes in cells, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV; bioreactor) for 72 h either in the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as a control. Expression of several miRNA was changed significantly in the simulated microgravity condition including miR-150, miR-34a, miR-423-5p, miR-22 and miR-141, miR-618 and miR-222. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA microarray and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR. Network and pathway analysis of gene and miRNA expression profiles indicates that the regulation of cell communication and catalytic activities, as well as pathways involved in immune response_IL-15

  20. Characterization of the microDNA through the response to chemotherapeutics in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Mehanna

    Full Text Available Recently, a new class of extrachromosomal circular DNA, called microDNA, was identified. They are on average 100 to 400 bp long and are derived from unique non-repetitive genomic regions with high gene density. MicroDNAs are thought to arise from DNA breaks associated with RNA metabolism or replication slippage. Given the paucity of information on this entirely novel phenomenon, we aimed to get an additional insight into microDNA features by performing the microDNA analysis in 20 independent human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs prior and after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs. The results showed non-random genesis of microDNA clusters from the active regions of the genome. The size periodicity of 190 bp was observed, which matches DNA fragmentation typical for apoptotic cells. The chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis of LCLs increased both number and size of clusters further suggesting that part of microDNAs could result from the programmed cell death. Interestingly, proportion of identified microDNA sequences has common loci of origin when compared between cell line experiments. While compatible with the original observation that microDNAs originate from a normal physiological process, obtained results imply complementary source of its production. Furthermore, non-random genesis of microDNAs depicted by redundancy between samples makes these entities possible candidates for new biomarker generation.

  1. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Pathway Regulation in T-Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Turrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has shown its antitumor activity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. However, the mechanisms at the basis of CAP-cell interaction are not yet completely understood. The aim of this study is to investigate CAP proapoptotic effect and identify some of the molecular mechanisms triggered by CAP in human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. CAP treatment was performed by means of a wand electrode DBD source driven by nanosecond high-voltage pulses under different operating conditions. The biological endpoints were assessed through flow cytometry and real-time PCR. CAP caused apoptosis in Jurkat cells mediated by p53 upregulation. To test the involvement of intrinsic and/or extrinsic pathway, the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-8 was analyzed. The activation of caspase-8 and the upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 were observed. Moreover, CAP treatment increased ROS intracellular level. The situation reverts after a longer time of treatment. This is probably due to compensatory cellular mechanisms such as the posttranscriptional upregulation of SOD1, CAT, and GSR2. According to ROS increase, CAP induced a significant increase in DNA damage at all treatment conditions. In conclusion, our results provide a deeper understanding of CAP potential in the oncological field and pose the basis for the evaluation of its toxicological profile.

  2. Differences in the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine by human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, E.E.; Strauss, B.

    1975-08-01

    Long term human lymphoblastoid lines differ in their ability to grow in medium containing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and to incorporate analog into their DNA. Eight Burkitts' lymphoma cell lines divided at least twice in BrdU-containing medium and made DNA in which over 90 percent of the thymidine residues were substituted with analog in both strands. Three infectious mononucleosis-derived lines and 24 lines transformed in vitro were inhibited by BrdU after one cell division and made only hybrid DNA in which one strand was substituted with analog. One out of eight normal individuals from whom long term lines were prepared gave cell lines which divided at least twice in BrdU and gave DNA in which both strands were substituted with analog. It would appear that intrinsic cellular factors regulate the response to BrdU and that Burkitt's tumor lines are characterized by their ability to make stable doubly substituted DNA containing a high proportion of halogenated analog.

  3. Proteomic analysis of lymphoblastoid cells derived from monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder: a preliminary study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-a Kazuno

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a severe mental illness characterized by recurrent manic and depressive episodes. In bipolar disorder, family and twin studies suggest contributions from genetic and environmental factors; however, the detailed molecular pathogenesis is yet unknown. Thus, identification of biomarkers may contribute to the clinical diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder are relatively rare but have been reported. Here we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of whole cell lysate derived from lymphoblastoid cells of monozygotic twins discordant for bipolar disorder by using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. We found approximately 200 protein spots to be significantly differentially expressed between the patient and the co-twin (t test, p<0.05. Some of the proteins were subsequently identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and included proteins involved in cell death and glycolysis. To examine whether these proteins could serve as biomarkers of bipolar disorder, we performed Western blot analysis using case-control samples. Expression of phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1, which is involved in glycolysis, was significantly up-regulated in patients with bipolar disorder (t test, p<0.05. Although PGAM1 cannot be regarded as a qualified biomarker of bipolar disorder from this preliminary finding, it could be one of the candidates for further study to identify biomarkers of bipolar disorder.

  4. Differences between the genomes of lymphoblastoid cell lines and blood-derived samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joesch-Cohen LM

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lena M Joesch-Cohen, Gustavo Glusman Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs represent a convenient research tool for expanding the amount of biologic material available from an individual. LCLs are commonly used as reference materials, most notably from the Genome in a Bottle Consortium. However, the question remains how faithfully LCL-derived genome assemblies represent the germline genome of the donor individual as compared to the genome assemblies derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We present an in-depth comparison of a large collection of LCL- and peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived genomes in terms of distributions of coverage and copy number alterations. We found significant differences in the depth of coverage and copy number calls, which may be driven by differential replication timing. Importantly, these copy number changes preferentially affect regions closer to genes and with higher GC content. This suggests that genomic studies based on LCLs may display locus-specific biases, and that conclusions based on analysis of depth of coverage and copy number variation may require further scrutiny. Keywords: genomics, whole-genome sequencing, viral transformation, copy number changes, bioinformatics

  5. Lithium-responsive genes and gene networks in bipolar disorder patient-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, M S; White, C H; Shekhtman, T; Lin, K; Looney, D; Woelk, C H; Kelsoe, J R

    2016-10-01

    Lithium (Li) is the mainstay mood stabilizer for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD), although its mode of action is not yet fully understood nor is it effective in every patient. We sought to elucidate the mechanism of action of Li and to identify surrogate outcome markers that can be used to better understand its therapeutic effects in BD patients classified as good (responders) and poor responders (nonresponders) to Li treatment. To accomplish these goals, RNA-sequencing gene expression profiles of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were compared between BD Li responders and nonresponders with healthy controls before and after treatment. Several Li-responsive gene coexpression networks were discovered indicating widespread effects of Li on diverse cellular signaling systems including apoptosis and defense response pathways, protein processing and response to endoplasmic reticulum stress. Individual gene markers were also identified, differing in response to Li between BD responders and nonresponders, involved in processes of cell cycle and nucleotide excision repair that may explain part of the heterogeneity in clinical response to treatment. Results further indicated a Li gene expression signature similar to that observed with clonidine treatment, an α2-adrenoceptor agonist. These findings provide a detailed mechanism of Li in LCLs and highlight putative surrogate outcome markers that may permit for advanced treatment decisions to be made and for facilitating recovery in BD patients.

  6. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

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    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S. [Institute of Genetics, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from Kenyan pediatric population.

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    Simbiri, Kenneth O; Smith, Nicholas A; Otieno, Richard; Wohlford, Eric E M; Daud, Ibrahim I; Odada, Sumba P; Middleton, Frank; Rochford, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), and in regions of sub-Saharan Africa where endemic BL is common, both the EBV Type 1 (EBV-1) and EBV Type 2 strains (EBV-2) are found. Little is known about genetic variation of EBV strains in areas of sub-Saharan Africa. In the present study, spontaneous lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were generated from samples obtained from Kenya. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the EBV genome was done using multiple primers and sequenced by next-generation sequencing (NGS). Phylogenetic analyses against the published EBV-1 and EBV-2 strains indicated that one sample, LCL10 was closely related to EBV-2, while the remaining 3 LCL samples were more closely related to EBV-1. Moreover, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses showed clustering of LCL variants. We further show by analysis of EBNA-1, BLLF1, BPLF1, and BRRF2 that latent genes are less conserved than lytic genes in these LCLs from a single geographic region. In this study we have shown that NGS is highly useful for deciphering detailed inter and intra-variations in EBV genomes and that within a geographic region different EBV genetic variations can co-exist, the implications of which warrant further investigation. The findings will enhance our understanding of potential pathogenic variants critical to the development and maintenance of EBV-associated malignancies.

  8. Genetic analysis of human traits in vitro: drug response and gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Choy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, originally collected as renewable sources of DNA, are now being used as a model system to study genotype-phenotype relationships in human cells, including searches for QTLs influencing levels of individual mRNAs and responses to drugs and radiation. In the course of attempting to map genes for drug response using 269 LCLs from the International HapMap Project, we evaluated the extent to which biological noise and non-genetic confounders contribute to trait variability in LCLs. While drug responses could be technically well measured on a given day, we observed significant day-to-day variability and substantial correlation to non-genetic confounders, such as baseline growth rates and metabolic state in culture. After correcting for these confounders, we were unable to detect any QTLs with genome-wide significance for drug response. A much higher proportion of variance in mRNA levels may be attributed to non-genetic factors (intra-individual variance--i.e., biological noise, levels of the EBV virus used to transform the cells, ATP levels than to detectable eQTLs. Finally, in an attempt to improve power, we focused analysis on those genes that had both detectable eQTLs and correlation to drug response; we were unable to detect evidence that eQTL SNPs are convincingly associated with drug response in the model. While LCLs are a promising model for pharmacogenetic experiments, biological noise and in vitro artifacts may reduce power and have the potential to create spurious association due to confounding.

  9. Distinct lithium-induced gene expression effects in lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Gabriel R; Colpo, Gabriela D; Monroy-Jaramillo, Nancy; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming; Arnold, Jodi G; Bowden, Charles L; Walss-Bass, Consuelo

    2017-11-01

    Lithium is the most commonly prescribed medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD), yet the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are still unclear. We aimed to compare the effects of lithium treatment in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from BD patients and controls. LCLs were generated from sixty-two BD patients (based on DSM-IV) and seventeen healthy controls matched for age, sex, and ethnicity. Patients were recruited from outpatient clinics from February 2012 to October 2014. LCLs were treated with 1mM lithium for 7 days followed by microarray gene expression assay and validation by real-time quantitative PCR. Baseline differences between groups, as well as differences between vehicle- and lithium-treated cells within each group were analyzed. The biological significance of differentially expressed genes was examined by pathway enrichment analysis. No significant differences in baseline gene expression (adjusted p-value Lithium treatment of LCLs from controls did not lead to any significant differences. However, lithium altered the expression of 236 genes in LCLs from patients; those genes were enriched for signaling pathways related to apoptosis. Among those genes, the alterations in the expression of PIK3CG, SERP1 and UPP1 were validated by real-time PCR. A significant correlation was also found between circadian functioning and CEBPG and FGF2 expression levels. In summary, our results suggest that lithium treatment induces expression changes in genes associated with the apoptosis pathway in BD LCLs. The more pronounced effects of lithium in patients compared to controls suggest a disease-specific effect of this drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Modeled Microgravity on Expression Profiles of Micro RNA in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

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    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Emami, Kamal; Story, Michael; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Among space radiation and other environmental factors, microgravity or an altered gravity is undoubtedly the most significant stress experienced by living organisms during flight. In comparison to the static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. Micro RNA (miRNA) has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. miRNA represents a class of single-stranded noncoding regulatory RNA molecules ( 22 nt) that control gene expressions by inhibiting the translation of mRNA to proteins. However, very little is known on the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. We hypothesized that the miRNA expression profile will be altered in zero gravity resulting in regulation of the gene expression and functional changes of the cells. To test this hypothesis, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in Synthecon s Rotary cell culture system (bioreactors) for 72 h either in the rotating (10 rpm) to model the microgravity in space or in the static condition. The cell viability was determined before and after culturing the cells in the bioreactor using both trypan blue and guava via count. Expressions of a panel of 352 human miRNA were analyzed using the miRNA PCRarray. Out of 352 miRNAs, expressions of 75 were significantly altered by a change of greater than 1.5 folds and seven miRNAs were altered by a fold change greater than 2 under the rotating culture condition. Among these seven, miR-545 and miR-517a were down regulated by 2 folds, whereas miR-150, miR-302a, miR-139-3p, miR-515-3p and miR-564 were up regulated by 2 to 8 folds. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA Illumina Microarray Analysis and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR.

  11. Arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with proteotoxicity in human lymphoblastoid cells

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    Bolt, Alicia M.; Zhao, Fei; Pacheco, Samantha; Klimecki, Walter T., E-mail: klimecki@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-10-15

    Epidemiological studies of arsenic-exposed populations have provided evidence that arsenic exposure in humans is associated with immunosuppression. Previously, we have reported that arsenite-induced toxicity is associated with the induction of autophagy in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). Autophagy is a cellular process that functions in the degradation of damaged cellular components, including protein aggregates formed by misfolded or damaged proteins. Accumulation of misfolded or damaged proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen causes ER stress and activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). In an effort to investigate the mechanism of autophagy induction by arsenite in the LCL model, we examined the potential contribution of ER stress and activation of the UPR. LCL exposed to sodium arsenite for 8-days induced expression of UPR-activated genes, including CHOP and GRP78, at the RNA and the protein level. Evidence for activation of the three arms of the UPR was observed. The arsenite-induced activation of the UPR was associated with an accumulation of protein aggregates containing p62 and LC3, proteins with established roles in the sequestration and autophagic clearance of protein aggregates. Taken together, these data provide evidence that arsenite-induced autophagy is associated with the generation of ER stress, activation of the UPR, and formation of protein aggregates that may be targeted to the lysosome for degradation. -- Highlights: ► Arsenite induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response. ► Arsenite induces the formation of protein aggregates that contain p62 and LC3-II. ► Time-course data suggests that arsenite-induced autophagy precedes ER stress.

  12. DNA-polymerase induced by Herpesvirus papio (HVP) in cells of lymphoblastoid cultures derived from lymphomatous baboons. Report V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djachenko, A G; Lapin, B A

    1981-01-01

    A new DNA-polymerase was found in the cells of suspension lymphoblastoid cultures which produce lymphotropic baboon herpesvirus (HVP). This enzyme was isolated in a partially purified form. Some of its properties vary from those of other cellular DNA-polymerases. HVP-induced DNA-polymerase has a molecule weight of 160,000 and sedimentation coefficient of about 8 S. The enzyme is resistant to high salt concentration and N-ethylmaleimide, but it is very sensitive to phosphonoacetate. It effectively copies "activated" DNA and synthetic deoxyribohomopolymers. Attempts to reveal the DNA-polymerase activity in HVP virions were unsuccessful.

  13. Effects of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) on genome-wide DNA methylation in human B lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jianlin; Wang, Yu; Chen, Junqiang; Ju, Li; Yu, Min; Jiang, Zhaoqiang; Feng, Lingfang; Jin, Lingzhi; Zhang, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Several previous studies highlighted the potential epigenetic effects of Cr(VI), especially DNA methylation. However, few studies have compared the effects of Cr(VI) on DNA methylation profiles between soluble and particulate chromate in vitro. Accordingly, Illumina Infinium Human Methylation 450K BeadChip array was used to analyze DNA methylation profiles of human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to potassium dichromate or lead chromate, and the cell viability was also studied. Array based DNA methylation analysis showed that the impacts of Cr(VI) on DNA methylation were limited, only about 40 differentially methylated CpG sites, with an overlap of 15CpG sites, were induced by both potassium dichromate and lead chromate. The results of mRNA expression showed that after Cr(VI) treatment, mRNA expression changes of four genes (TBL1Y, FZD5, IKZF2, and KIAA1949) were consistent with their DNA methylation alteration, but DNA methylation changes of other six genes did not correlate with mRNA expression. In conclusion, both of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) could induce a small amount of differentially methylated sites in human B lymphoblastoid cells, and the correlations between DNA methylation changes and mRNA expression varied between different genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Gene expression analysis of whole blood, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and lymphoblastoid cell lines from the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joehanes, Roby; Johnson, Andrew D; Barb, Jennifer J; Raghavachari, Nalini; Liu, Poching; Woodhouse, Kimberly A; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Munson, Peter J; Levy, Daniel

    2012-01-18

    Despite a growing number of reports of gene expression analysis from blood-derived RNA sources, there have been few systematic comparisons of various RNA sources in transcriptomic analysis or for biomarker discovery in the context of cardiovascular disease (CVD). As a pilot study of the Systems Approach to Biomarker Research (SABRe) in CVD Initiative, this investigation used Affymetrix Exon arrays to characterize gene expression of three blood-derived RNA sources: lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), whole blood using PAXgene tubes (PAX), and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Their performance was compared in relation to identifying transcript associations with sex and CVD risk factors, such as age, high-density lipoprotein, and smoking status, and the differential blood cell count. We also identified a set of exons that vary substantially between participants, but consistently in each RNA source. Such exons are thus stable phenotypes of the participant and may potentially become useful fingerprinting biomarkers. In agreement with previous studies, we found that each of the RNA sources is distinct. Unlike PAX and PBMC, LCL gene expression showed little association with the differential blood count. LCL, however, was able to detect two genes related to smoking status. PAX and PBMC identified Y-chromosome probe sets similarly and slightly better than LCL.

  15. Inhibition of human antigen-induced lymphoblastoid B-cell function by an in vivo-induced suppressor T cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieva, J A; Stevens, R H

    1983-04-01

    Lymphoblastoid (LB) B cells which spontaneously produce antitetanus toxoid IgG antibodies (Tet-IgG) in short-term cultures (3 days) appear in the circulation 5-7 days after immunization with tetanus toxoid. Addition of pokeweed mitogen (PWM), normally a stimulator of antibody production, caused instead a reduction in the in vitro synthesis of Tet-IgG by the LB cells. In order for this inhibition of antibody production to occur, T cells had to be present, and the inhibition was proportional to the number of T cells added to the culture, demonstrating the existence of PWM-inducible suppressor cells. The cells mediating the suppression had the OKT8 phenotype and also exhibited the following characteristics: (1) a PWM pretreatment period as little as 14 hr was enough to complete activation; (2) conventional inhibitors of suppressor T cells as hydrocortisone and cyclosporin A only partially reversed its effect; and (3) DNA synthesis was not required. The T-suppressor activity was detectable in the circulation before immunization, increased two- to fourfold by 5-12 days after boosting, and waned after 3 weeks. The mechanism of action of this suppression does not appear to involve conventional cytotoxic T cells as (1) the suppression was mediated across allogeneic barriers and (2) the suppression could not be reversed by inclusion of anti-Leu-2a antibodies in the culture. These results suggest that this suppressor T-cell subset may be important in the normal regulation of activated stages of human B lymphocytes.

  16. Dominant expansion of a cryptic subclone with an abnormal karyotype in B lymphoblastoid cell lines during culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjoh, I; Shirota, R; Hiroyama, T; Nakamura, Y

    2013-01-01

    Although B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs) are thought to maintain their original genomic structures during long-term culture, there has been considerable disagreement on the actual genomic stability of these cells. This study was initiated to determine whether B-LCLs develop cell populations with abnormal genomes during culture and to search for factors important to the maintenance of the original genome. We established continuous cultures of B-LCLs for more than 6 months and analyzed the cells using array-based comparative genome hybridization (CGH) analysis, conventional karyotyping and analysis of V(D)J recombination in the immunoglobulin (Ig) gene. We found that one B-LCL acquired an extra chromosome 4 without any other genomic rearrangements at passage 16 of continuous culture. At the Ig light- and heavy-chain loci, analysis of the major cell population showed a difference between cultures at early and later passages. Another aneuploid line was detected among B-LCLs established elsewhere and deposited previously into the RIKEN Cell Bank. Our findings indicate that some of the genomic rearrangements in B-LCLs are not caused by gradual accumulation of mutations and rearrangements during the B-LCL establishment processes, but rather as a result of a change in the cell population from clones with a normal genome to clones with de novo rearrangements. It is therefore feasible to maintain B-LCLs with a normal genomic structure by cell cloning or similar treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Utility of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation

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    Satish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of EBV immortalized LCLs have been generated and maintained in genetic/epidemiological studies as a perpetual source of DNA and as a surrogate in vitro cell model. Recent successes in reprograming LCLs into iPSCs have paved the way for generating more relevant in vitro disease models using this existing bioresource. However, the overall reprogramming efficiency and success rate remain poor and very little is known about the mechanistic changes that take place at the transcriptome and cellular functional level during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. Here, we report a new optimized LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming protocol using episomal plasmids encoding pluripotency transcription factors and mouse p53DD (p53 carboxy-terminal dominant-negative fragment and commercially available reprogramming media. We achieved a consistently high reprogramming efficiency and 100% success rate using this optimized protocol. Further, we investigated the transcriptional changes in mRNA and miRNA levels, using FC-abs ≥ 2.0 and FDR ≤ 0.05 cutoffs; 5,228 mRNAs and 77 miRNAs were differentially expressed during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. The functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated genes and activation of human pluripotency pathways in the reprogrammed iPSCs showed that the generated iPSCs possess transcriptional and functional profiles very similar to those of human ESCs.

  18. Chromosome loss caused by DNA fragmentation induced in main nuclei and micronuclei of human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mika; Wakata, Akihiro; Aoki, Yoshinobu; Miyamae, Yoichi; Kodama, Seiji

    2014-04-01

    Aneuploidy, a change in the number of chromosomes, plays an essential role in tumorigenesis. Our previous study demonstrated that a loss of a whole chromosome is induced in human lymphocytes by colcemid, a well-known aneugen. Here, to clarify the mechanism for colcemid-induced chromosome loss, we investigated the relationship between chromosome loss and DNA fragmentation in human lymphoblastoid cells treated with colcemid (an aneugen) compared with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS; a clastogen). We analyzed the number of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals targeted for a whole chromosome 2 in cytokinesis-blocked binucleated TK6 cells and WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid and MMS, and concurrently detected DNA fragmentation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Results revealed that DNA fragmentation occurred in 60% of all binucleated TK6 cells harboring colcemid-induced chromosome loss (30% of micronuclei and 30% of main nuclei). DNA fragmentation was observed in colcemid-induced micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not in MMS-induced micronuclei containing chromosome fragments. In contrast, colcemid-induced nondisjunction had no effect on induction of DNA fragmentation, suggesting that DNA fragmentation was triggered by micronuclei containing a whole chromosome but not by micronuclei containing chromosome fragments or nondisjunction. In addition, the frequency of binucleated cells harboring chromosome loss with DNA fragmentation in micronuclei or main nuclei was higher in wild-type p53 TK6 cells than in mutated-p53 WTK-1 cells treated with colcemid. Taken together, these present and previous results suggest that colcemid-induced chromosome loss is caused by DNA fragmentation, which is triggered by a micronucleus with a whole chromosome and controlled by the p53-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome-wide association study for biomarker identification of Rapamycin and Everolimus using a lymphoblastoid cell line system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eJiang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, a set of promising potential anti-cancer agents, has shown response variability among individuals. This study aimed to identify novel biomarkers and mechanisms that might influence the response to Rapamycin and Everolimus. Genome-wide association (GWA analyses involving single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, mRNA and microRNAs microarray data were assessed for association with area under the cytotoxicity dose response curve (AUC of two mTOR inhibitors in 272 human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Integrated analysis among SNPs, expression data, microRNA data and AUC values were also performed to help select candidate genes for further functional characterization. Functional validation of candidate genes using siRNA screening in multiple cell lines followed by MTS assays for the two mTOR inhibitors were performed. We found that 16 expression probe sets (genes that overlapped between the two drugs were associated with AUC values of two mTOR inhibitors. 127 and 100 SNPs had P<10-4, while 8 and 10 SNPs had P<10-5 with Rapamycin and Everolimus AUC, respectively. Functional studies indicated that 13 genes significantly altered cell sensitivity to either one or both drugs in at least one cell line. Additionally, one microRNA, miR-10a, was significantly associated with AUC values for both drugs and was shown to repress expression of genes that were associated with AUC and desensitize cells to both drugs. In summary, this study identified genes and a microRNA that might contribute to response to mTOR inhibitors.

  20. Spontaneous chromosomal aberrations in Fanconi anaemia, ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast and Bloom's syndrome lymphoblastoid cell lines as detected by conventional cytogenetic analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto Hojo, E T; van Diemen, P C; Darroudi, F; Natarajan, A T

    1995-02-01

    Several primary and transformed human cell lines derived from cancer prone patients are employed routinely for biochemical and DNA repair studies. Since transformation leads to some chromosomal instability a cytogenetic analysis of spontaneous chromosome aberrations in fibroblast cell lines derived from patients with Fanconi anaemia (FA), ataxia telangiectasia (AT), and in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with Bloom's syndrome (BS), was undertaken. Unstable aberrations were analysed in Giemsa stained preparations and the chromosome painting technique was used for evaluating the frequencies of stable aberrations (translocations). In addition, the frequency of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was determined in differentially stained metaphases. The SV40-transformed fibroblasts from these cell lines have higher frequencies of unstable aberrations than the primary fibroblasts. In the four lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from BS patients higher frequencies of spontaneously occurring chromosomal aberrations in comparison to normal TK6wt cells were also evident. The frequency of spontaneously occurring chromosome translocations was determined with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) and using DNA libraries specific for chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 14, 19, 20 and X. The translocation levels were found to be elevated for primary FA fibroblasts and lymphoblastoid cells derived from BS patients in comparison with control cell lines, hetero- and homozygote BS cell lines not differing in this respect. The SV40-transformed cell lines showed very high frequencies of translocations independent of their origin and almost every cell contained at least one translocation. In addition, clonal translocations were found in transformed control TK6wt and AT cell lines for chromosomes 20 and 14, respectively. The spontaneous frequencies of SCEs were similar in transformed fibroblasts derived from normal individuals and AT patients, whereas in SV40-transformed FA

  1. Genetic factors affecting EBV copy number in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from the 1000 Genome Project samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandage, Rajendra; Telford, Marco; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Farré, Xavier; Layouni, Hafid; Marigorta, Urko M; Cundiff, Caitlin; Heredia-Genestar, Jose Maria; Navarro, Arcadi; Santpere, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpes virus 4, has been classically associated with infectious mononucleosis, multiple sclerosis and several types of cancers. Many of these diseases show marked geographical differences in prevalence, which points to underlying genetic and/or environmental factors. Those factors may include a different susceptibility to EBV infection and viral copy number among human populations. Since EBV is commonly used to transform B-cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) we hypothesize that differences in EBV copy number among individual LCLs may reflect differential susceptibility to EBV infection. To test this hypothesis, we retrieved whole-genome sequenced EBV-mapping reads from 1,753 LCL samples derived from 19 populations worldwide that were sequenced within the context of the 1000 Genomes Project. An in silico methodology was developed to estimate the number of EBV copy number in LCLs and validated these estimations by real-time PCR. After experimentally confirming that EBV relative copy number remains stable over cell passages, we performed a genome wide association analysis (GWAS) to try detecting genetic variants of the host that may be associated with EBV copy number. Our GWAS has yielded several genomic regions suggestively associated with the number of EBV genomes per cell in LCLs, unraveling promising candidate genes such as CAND1, a known inhibitor of EBV replication. While this GWAS does not unequivocally establish the degree to which genetic makeup of individuals determine viral levels within their derived LCLs, for which a larger sample size will be needed, it potentially highlighted human genes affecting EBV-related processes, which constitute interesting candidates to follow up in the context of EBV related pathologies.

  2. In-depth phenotyping of lymphoblastoid cells suggests selective cellular vulnerability in Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Laxmikanth; Buchkremer, Stephan; Coraspe, José Andrés González; Hathazi, Denisa; Senderek, Jan; Weis, Joachim; Zahedi, René P; Roos, Andreas

    2017-09-15

    SIL1 is a ubiquitous protein of the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) acting as a co-chaperone for the ER-resident chaperone, BiP. Recessive mutations of the corresponding gene lead to vulnerability of skeletal muscle and central nervous system in man (Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome; MSS) and mouse. However, it is still unclear how loss of ubiquitous SIL1 leads to selective vulnerability of the nervous system and skeletal muscle whereas other cells and organs are protected from clinical manifestations. In this study we aimed to disentangle proteins participating in selective vulnerability of SIL1-deficient cells and tissues: morphological examination of MSS patient-derived lymphoblastoid cells revealed altered organelle structures (ER, nucleus and mitochondria) thus showing subclinical vulnerability. To correlate structural perturbations with biochemical changes and to identify proteins potentially preventing phenotypical manifestation, proteomic studies have been carried out. Results of proteomic profiling are in line with the morphological findings and show affection of nuclear, mitochondrial and cytoskeletal proteins as well as of such responsible for cellular viability. Moreover, expression patterns of proteins known to be involved in neuromuscular disorders or in development and function of the nervous system were altered. Paradigmatic findings were confirmed by immunohistochemistry of splenic lymphocytes and the cerebellum of SIL1-deficient mice. Ataxin-10, identified with increased abundance in our proteome profile, is necessary for the neuronal survival but also controls muscle fiber apoptosis, thus declaring this protein as a plausible candidate for selective tissue vulnerability. Our combined results provide first insights into the molecular causes of selective cell and tissue vulnerability defining the MSS phenotype.

  3. All-trans retinoic acid upregulates reduced CD38 transcription in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebold, Mathias; Mankuta, David; Lerer, Elad; Israel, Salomon; Zhong, Songfa; Nemanov, Luba; Monakhov, Mikhail V; Levi, Shlomit; Yirmiya, Nurit; Yaari, Maya; Malavasi, Fabio; Ebstein, Richard P

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in social behavior in mice lacking the CD38 gene have been attributed to impaired secretion of oxytocin. In humans, similar deficits in social behavior are associated with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), for which genetic variants of CD38 have been pinpointed as provisional risk factors. We sought to explore, in an in vitro model, the feasibility of the theory that restoring the level of CD38 in ASD patients could be of potential clinical benefit. CD38 transcription is highly sensitive to several cytokines and vitamins. One of these, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), a known inducer of CD38, was added during cell culture and tested on a large sample of N = 120 lymphoblastoid cell (LBC) lines from ASD patients and their parents. Analysis of CD38 mRNA levels shows that ATRA has an upmodulatory potential on LBC derived from ASD patients as well as from their parents. The next crucial issue addressed in our study was the relationship between levels of CD38 expression and psychological parameters. The results obtained indicate a positive correlation between CD38 expression levels and patient scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. In addition, analysis of the role of genetic polymorphisms in the dynamics of the molecule revealed that the genotype of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs6449182; C>G variation) in the CpG island of intron 1, harboring the retinoic-acid response element, exerts differential roles in CD38 expression in ASD and in parental LBC. In conclusion, our results provide an empirical basis for the development of a pharmacological ASD treatment strategy based on retinoids.

  4. New alleles at microsatellite loci in CEPH families mainly arise from somatic mutations in the lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchs, I; Bosch, A; Guimerà, J; Lázaro, C; Puig, A; Estivill, X

    1994-01-01

    In the analysis of 40 CEPH families, under the EUROGEM project, with a total of 29 microsatellites (26 CA-repeats, a TCTA-repeat within the vWFII-3 gene, a TTA-repeat within the PLA-2 gene, and an AAAT-repeat intragenic to the NF1 gene) from human chromosomes 12, 17, and 21, we have detected 21 cases of abnormal segregation of alleles in 16 pedigrees for a total of 14 markers (48%). In 11 cases, the abnormal transmissions were of somatic origin, 10 of which (91%) occurred in the lymphoblastoid cell lines. In 9 other cases, it was not possible to determine if the origin of the new alleles was somatic or germline, and in one case hemizygosity in several family members was observed, so its origin was germline. The 20 new mutations detected in the 22,852 meioses analysed represent a mutation frequency of 8.7 x 10(-4) per locus per allele. The germline mutation rate could be as high as 3.9 x 10(-4) per locus per gamete (from 0 to 3.9 x 10(-4)), but the rate of somatic mutations detected in the study was much higher (4.8 x 10(-4) to 8.7 x 10(-4) per locus per allele). Individual mutation rates ranged from 0 to 3.8 x 10(-3). Among the markers analysed, all three that were tri- or tetranucleotide repeats showed one or two new alleles, compared to only 10 of the 26 (38%) CA-repeats showing mutations. Three CEPH families (102, 45 and 1333) each had several mutational events, and one individual (10210) had somatic mutations for two microsatellites from different chromosomes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Generation of human scFvs antibodies recognizing a prion protein epitope expressed on the surface of human lymphoblastoid cells

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    Imperiale Valentina

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of prion disease is the transformation of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc into an infectious disease-associated isoform, (PrPsc. Anti-prion protein monoclonal antibodies are invaluable for structure-function studies of PrP molecules. Furthermore recent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies can prevent the incorporation of PrPc into propagating prions. In the present article, we show two new human phage antibodies, isolated on recombinant hamster prion protein (rHaPrP. Results We adopted an antibody phage display strategy to isolate specific human antibodies directed towards rHaPrP which has been used as a bait for panning the synthetic ETH-2 antibody phage library. Two phage antibodies clones named MA3.B4 and MA3.G3 were isolated and characterized under genetic biochemical and immunocytochemical aspects. The clones were found to recognize the prion protein in ELISA studies. In flow-cytometry studies, these human single chain Fragment variable (scFv phage-antibodies show a well defined pattern of reactivity on human lymphoblastoid and myeloid cells. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the gene encoding for the antibody fragments and antigen recognition patterns determined by flow-cytometry analysis indicate that the isolated scFvs recognize novel epitopes in the PrPc molecule. These new anti PrPc human antibodies are unique reagents for prion protein detection and may represent a biologic platform to develop new reagents to treat PrPsc associated disease.

  6. Molecular signatures of cardiac defects in Down syndrome lymphoblastoid cell lines suggest altered ciliome and Hedgehog pathways.

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    Clémentine Ripoll

    Full Text Available Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD or atrial septal defect (ASD. Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD(-; n = 22 were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD(+; n = 21. After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD(- and AVSD and CHD(- and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset. Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21.

  7. Molecular Signatures of Cardiac Defects in Down Syndrome Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines Suggest Altered Ciliome and Hedgehog Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Clémentine; Rivals, Isabelle; Ait Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Dauphinot, Luce; Paly, Evelyne; Mircher, Clothilde; Ravel, Aimé; Grattau, Yann; Bléhaut, Henri; Mégarbane, André; Dembour, Guy; de Fréminville, Bénédicte; Touraine, Renaud; Créau, Nicole; Potier, Marie Claude; Delabar, Jean Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Forty percent of people with Down syndrome exhibit heart defects, most often an atrioventricular septal defect (AVSD) and less frequently a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial septal defect (ASD). Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were established from lymphocytes of individuals with trisomy 21, the chromosomal abnormality causing Down syndrome. Gene expression profiles generated from DNA microarrays of LCLs from individuals without heart defects (CHD−; n = 22) were compared with those of LCLs from patients with cardiac malformations (CHD+; n = 21). After quantile normalization, principal component analysis revealed that AVSD carriers could be distinguished from a combined group of ASD or VSD (ASD+VSD) carriers. From 9,758 expressed genes, we identified 889 and 1,016 genes differentially expressed between CHD− and AVSD and CHD− and ASD+VSD, respectively, with only 119 genes in common. A specific chromosomal enrichment was found in each group of affected genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, more than 65% are expressed in human or mouse fetal heart tissues (GEO dataset). Additional LCLs from new groups of AVSD and ASD+VSD patients were analyzed by quantitative PCR; observed expression ratios were similar to microarray results. Analysis of GO categories revealed enrichment of genes from pathways regulating clathrin-mediated endocytosis in patients with AVSD and of genes involved in semaphorin-plexin-driven cardiogenesis and the formation of cytoplasmic microtubules in patients with ASD-VSD. A pathway-oriented search revealed enrichment in the ciliome for both groups and a specific enrichment in Hedgehog and Jak-stat pathways among ASD+VSD patients. These genes or related pathways are therefore potentially involved in normal cardiogenesis as well as in cardiac malformations observed in individuals with trisomy 21. PMID:22912673

  8. Effects of cell cycle position on ionizing radiation mutagenesis. I. Quantitative assays of two genetic loci in a human lymphoblastoid cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Yao-Yu; Liber, H.L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Relatively little work has been done on the influence of the position of the cell in the cell cycle on ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis. We synchronized WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells with 200 {mu}M lovastatin for 48 h; under these conditions more than 80% of the cells were arrested in G{sub 1} phase. Upon release, there was a 12-15-h lag followed by movement of a large fraction into S phase. We irradiated cells with either 1.5 Gy X rays at 1, 15, 18, 21 or 24 h or 1.5 Gy {gamma} rays at 1, 5, 10, 15 or 24 h after release from lovastatin. We showed that WTK1 cells were most sensitive to ionizing radiation-induced toxicity in G{sub 1} and into S phase, and more resistant in mid to late S and G{sub 2}/M phase. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that the two different gene loci had different sensitivities to radiation-induced mutation through the cell cycle. Cells in late G{sub 1} through mid-S phase were most sensitive to radiation-induced mutations at the autosomal thymidine kinase (TK) locus, whereas G{sub 1} phase was the most sensitive phase at the X-linked hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) locus. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Studying the protein expression in human B lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) with protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Wei, Zheng; Yezhen, Lu; Jianlin, Lou; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jiliang, He

    2013-03-29

    In the present study, the protein microarray was used to investigate the protein expression in human B-cell lymphoblastoid cells intermittently exposed to 1.8-GHz GSM radiofrequency radiation (RFR) at the specific absorption rate (SAR) of 2.0 W/kg for 24 h. The differential expression of 27 proteins was found, which were related to DNA damage repair, apoptosis, oncogenesis, cell cycle and proliferation (ratio >1.5-fold, P<0.05). The results validated with Western blot assay indicated that the expression of RPA32 was significantly down-regulated (P<0.05) while the expression of p73 was significantly up-regulated in RFR exposure group (P<0.05). Because of the crucial roles of those proteins in DNA repair and cell apoptosis, the results of present investigation may explain the biological effects of RFR on DNA damage/repair and cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of One Year of Cryopreservation on the Activity of Lysosomal Hydrolases from EBV-Transformed Lymphocytes

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    A. S. de Mello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV was used as an agent of B lymphocyte proliferation for subsequent diagnosis of lysosomal storage disease. Due to the constant handling of long-preserved samples in our cell bank, we decided to observe the behavior and then compare cultured and frozen samples for at least one year's cryopreservation. Methods. Twenty-five samples from healthy individuals were used to assess the possible changes in activity of enzymes β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase, α-iduronidase, α-galactosidase, and α-glucosidase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm cell transformation of B lymphocytes into EBV-infected cells, generating lymphoblastoid cell lines. Results. Transmission electron microscopy findings confirmed previous reports in the literature that is, significant and evident morphological changes in the nucleus occur after day 12 and the consequent cell transformation into EBV-infected cells. After thawing and subsequent treatment with the five enzymes utilized, we observed no significant changes in samples cryopreserved for more than one year, as compared to samples cultured for 12 days.

  11. Use of lymphoblastoid cells for the estimation of environmental insults to DNA. Comprehensive report of the overall activities of the contract during the past three years. Progress report, August 1, 1978-June 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    Research progress is reported on a study to detect chronic low-level exposure of individuals to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by analysis of DNA in cells with low turnover rates. The technique used was to measure the level of excision repair activity in lymphoblastoid and lymphoma cell lines. (ACR)

  12. Superoxide dismutase activity and chromosome damage in cultured chromosome instability syndrome cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K H; Abe, S; Yanabe, Y; Matsuda, I; Yoshida, M C

    1990-07-01

    The basal levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and chromosome aberration (CA) and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies were examined in cultured fibroblasts or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). These cells were derived from patients with chromosome instability syndromes (CISs) including Bloom's syndrome (BS), Fanconi's anemia (FA) and ataxia telangiectasia (AT). Embryonal fibroblasts and LCLs from normal subjects served as controls. Although LCLs tended to exhibit a higher SOD level than fibroblasts due to an elevation of Cu/Zn-SOD activity, BS and FA fibroblasts with increased frequencies of CAs and/or SCEs showed abnormally elevated SOD activity due to the manifold increase of Mn-SOD levels compared with control cells. However, BS and AT LCLs with almost control levels of CA and SCE frequencies showed no, or a slightly elevated, SOD activity, suggesting a possible selection of such cells during EBV transformation. The observed parallelism between the SOD activity and the cytogenetic manifestation may imply an involvement of active oxygen species, especially superoxide radicals, in the increased chromosome damage of CIS cells.

  13. Population differences in the rate of proliferation of international HapMap cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Amy L; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Tong; O'Donnell, Peter H; Beiswanger, Christine M; Huang, R Stephanie; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2010-12-10

    The International HapMap Project is a resource for researchers containing genotype, sequencing, and expression information for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from populations across the world. The expansion of the HapMap beyond the four initial populations of Phase 2, referred to as Phase 3, has increased the sample number and ethnic diversity available for investigation. However, differences in the rate of cellular proliferation between the populations can serve as confounders in phenotype-genotype studies using these cell lines. Within the Phase 2 populations, the JPT and CHB cell lines grow faster (p HapMap panels into discovery and replication sets must take this into consideration. Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

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    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  15. Analysis of genome-wide RNA-sequencing data suggests age of the CEPH/Utah (CEU) lymphoblastoid cell lines systematically biases gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yuan; Tian, Lei; Lu, Dongsheng; Xu, Shuhua

    2015-01-22

    In human, Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the CEPH/CEU (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain - Utah) family resource have been extensively used for examining the genetics of gene expression levels. However, we noted that CEU/CEPH cell lines were collected and transformed approximately thirty years ago, much earlier than the other cell lines from the pertaining individuals, which we suspected could potentially affect gene expression, data analysis and results interpretation. In this study, by analyzing RNA sequencing data of CEU and the other three European populations as well as an African population, we systematically examined and evaluated the potential confounding effect of LCL age on gene expression levels and patterns. Our results indicated that gene expression profiles of CEU samples have been biased by the older age of CEU cell lines. Interestingly, most of CEU-specific expressions are associated with functions related to cell proliferation, which are more likely due to older age of cell lines than intrinsic characters of the population. We suggested the results be carefully explained when CEU LCLs are used for transcriptomic data analysis in future studies.

  16. Metformin pharmacogenomics: a genome-wide association study to identify genetic and epigenetic biomarkers involved in metformin anticancer response using human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Nifang; Liu, Tongzheng; Cairns, Junmei; Ly, Reynold C; Tan, Xianglin; Deng, Min; Fridley, Brooke L; Kalari, Krishna R; Abo, Ryan P; Jenkins, Gregory; Batzler, Anthony; Carlson, Erin E; Barman, Poulami; Moran, Sebastian; Heyn, Holger; Esteller, Manel; Wang, Liewei

    2016-11-01

    Metformin is currently considered as a promising anticancer agent in addition to its anti-diabetic effect. To better individualize metformin therapy and explore novel molecular mechanisms in cancer treatment, we conducted a pharmacogenomic study using 266 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Metformin cytotoxicity assay was performed using the MTS assay. Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses were performed in LCLs using 1.3 million SNPs, 485k DNA methylation probes, 54k mRNA expression probe sets, and metformin cytotoxicity (IC50s). Top candidate genes were functionally validated using siRNA screening, followed by MTS assay in breast cancer cell lines. Further study of one top candidate, STUB1, was performed to elucidate the mechanisms by which STUB1 might contribute to metformin action. GWA analyses in LCLs identified 198 mRNA expression probe sets, 12 SNP loci, and 5 DNA methylation loci associated with metformin IC50 with P-values breast cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies revealed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase, STUB1, could influence metformin response by facilitating proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin A. GWAS using a genomic data-enriched LCL model system, together with functional and mechanistic studies using cancer cell lines, help us to identify novel genetic and epigenetic biomarkers involved in metformin anticancer response.

  17. Gene expression profiling of lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant in severity of autism reveals differential regulation of neurologically relevant genes

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    Lee Norman H

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The autism spectrum encompasses a set of complex multigenic developmental disorders that severely impact the development of language, non-verbal communication, and social skills, and are associated with odd, stereotyped, repetitive behavior and restricted interests. To date, diagnosis of these neurologically based disorders relies predominantly upon behavioral observations often prompted by delayed speech or aberrant behavior, and there are no known genes that can serve as definitive biomarkers for the disorders. Results Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that lymphoblastoid cell lines from monozygotic twins discordant with respect to severity of autism and/or language impairment exhibit differential gene expression patterns on DNA microarrays. Furthermore, we show that genes important to the development, structure, and/or function of the nervous system are among the most differentially expressed genes, and that many of these genes map closely in silico to chromosomal regions containing previously reported autism candidate genes or quantitative trait loci. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that novel candidate genes for autism may be differentially expressed in lymphoid cell lines from individuals with autism spectrum disorders. This finding further suggests the possibility of developing a molecular screen for autism based on expressed biomarkers in peripheral blood lymphocytes, an easily accessible tissue. In addition, gene networks are identified that may play a role in the pathophysiology of autism.

  18. Induction of epstein-barr virus (EBV lytic cycle in vitro causes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage in lymphoblastoid B cell lines

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    benmansour Riadh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the oxidative modifications of lipids, proteins and DNA, potential molecular targets of oxidative stress, in two lymphoblastoid cell lines: B95-8 and Raji, after EBV lytic cycle induction. Conjugated dienes level was measured as biomarker of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde adduct and protein carbonyl levels, as well as protein thiol levels were measured as biomarkers of protein oxidation. DNA fragmentation was evaluated as biomarker of DNA oxidation. Results After 48 h (peak of lytic cycle, a significant increase in conjugated dienes level was observed in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.019 respectively. Malondialdehyde adduct, protein carbonyl levels were increased in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls (MDA-adduct: p = 0.008 and p = 0.006 respectively; Carbonyl: p = 0.003 and p = 0.0039 respectively. Proteins thiol levels were decreased by induction in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.046; p = 0.002 respectively. DNA fragmentation was also detected in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the presence of increased combined oxidative modifications in lipids, proteins in B95-8 and Raji cells lines after EBV lytic cycle induction. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA fragmentation are generally induced during EBV lytic cycle induction and probably contribute to the cytopathic effect of EBV.

  19. Necrosis is increased in lymphoblastoid cell lines from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Penelope A E; Thomas, Philip; Esterman, Adrian; Fenech, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterised by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, communication and stereotyped behaviours. As increased DNA damage events have been observed in a range of other neurological disorders, it was hypothesised that they would be elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) obtained from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings. Six case-sibling pairs of LCLs from children with autistic disorder and their non-autistic siblings were obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and cultured in standard RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium. Cells were exposed to medium containing either 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM hydrogen peroxide (an oxidative stressor) or 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 µM s-nitroprusside (a nitric oxide producer) for 1h. Following exposure, the cells were microscopically scored for DNA damage, cytostasis and cytotoxicity biomarkers as measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Necrosis was significantly increased in cases relative to controls when exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress (P = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Nuclear division index was significantly lower in LCLs from children with autistic disorder than their non-autistic siblings when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (P = 0.016), but there was no difference in apoptosis, micronucleus frequency, nucleoplasmic bridges or nuclear buds. Exposure to s-nitroprusside significantly increased the number of micronuclei in non-autistic siblings compared with cases (P = 0.003); however, other DNA damage biomarkers, apoptosis and nuclear division did not differ significantly between groups. The findings of this study show (i) that LCLs from children with autism are more sensitive to necrosis under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress than their non-autistic siblings and (ii) refutes the hypothesis that children with autistic disorder are abnormally

  20. A pharmacodynamic model of ganciclovir antiviral effect and toxicity for lymphoblastoid cells suggests a new dosing regimen to treat cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoly-Dumenil, Audrey; Rouvet, Isabelle; Bleyzac, Nathalie; Morfin, Florence; Zabot, Marie-Therese; Tod, Michel

    2012-07-01

    In bone marrow transplantation, the efficacy of ganciclovir in cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease treatment or prophylaxis remains partial. Because its hematological toxicity is dose limiting, optimization of the dosing schedule is required to increase its therapeutic index. The goal of our study was to describe the influence of the ganciclovir concentration and duration of exposure on cell survival and antiviral efficacy. The study was carried out in vitro on cultures of lymphoblastoid cells infected or not with the CMV AD169 reference strain and exposed to ganciclovir at different concentrations for 1, 2, 7, or 14 days. The data were analyzed by a mathematical model that allowed a quantitative characterization of ganciclovir pharmacodynamics and its variability. Simulations of the model were undertaken to determine the optimal concentration profile for maximizing the ganciclovir therapeutic index. Ganciclovir had very little toxic and antiviral effect, even at 20 mg liter(-1), when the duration of exposure was ≤ 7 days. A biologically significant effect was observed only with a 14-day exposure. Complete inhibition of viral replication was obtained at 20 mg liter(-1). The utility function, assuming equal weights for antiviral effect and toxicity, showed that maximal utility was reached around 10 mg liter(-1). The optimal ganciclovir concentration profile consisted of maintaining the concentration at 20 mg liter(-1) at the intervals 0 to 2 days and 7.58 to 9.58 days and a null concentration at other times. This optimal profile could be obtained by intravenous (i.v.) ganciclovir at 10 mg/kg of body weight twice daily (b.i.d.) at days 1, 2, 8.5, and 9.5 in stem cell transplant patients with normal renal function.

  1. A Study of Alterations in DNA Epigenetic Modifications (5mC and 5hmC) and Gene Expression Influenced by Simulated Microgravity in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Basudev; Seetharam, Arun; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Yunlong; Lossie, Amy C; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Cells alter their gene expression in response to exposure to various environmental changes. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are believed to regulate the alterations in gene expression patterns. In vitro and in vivo studies have documented changes in cellular proliferation, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction, bone mineralization and immune deficiency under the influence of microgravity conditions experienced in space. However microgravity induced changes in the epigenome have not been well characterized. In this study we have used Next-generation Sequencing (NGS) to profile ground-based "simulated" microgravity induced changes on DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine or 5mC), hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine or 5hmC), and simultaneous gene expression in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity induced alterations in the methylome (~60% of the differentially methylated regions or DMRs are hypomethylated and ~92% of the differentially hydroxymethylated regions or DHMRs are hyperhydroxymethylated). Simulated microgravity also induced differential expression in 370 transcripts that were associated with crucial biological processes such as oxidative stress response, carbohydrate metabolism and regulation of transcription. While we were not able to obtain any global trend correlating the changes of methylation/ hydroxylation with gene expression, we have been able to profile the simulated microgravity induced changes of 5mC over some of the differentially expressed genes that includes five genes undergoing differential methylation over their promoters and twenty five genes undergoing differential methylation over their gene-bodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first NGS-based study to profile epigenomic patterns induced by short time exposure of simulated microgravity and we believe that our findings can be a valuable resource for future explorations.

  2. A Study of Alterations in DNA Epigenetic Modifications (5mC and 5hmC and Gene Expression Influenced by Simulated Microgravity in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basudev Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Cells alter their gene expression in response to exposure to various environmental changes. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation are believed to regulate the alterations in gene expression patterns. In vitro and in vivo studies have documented changes in cellular proliferation, cytoskeletal remodeling, signal transduction, bone mineralization and immune deficiency under the influence of microgravity conditions experienced in space. However microgravity induced changes in the epigenome have not been well characterized. In this study we have used Next-generation Sequencing (NGS to profile ground-based "simulated" microgravity induced changes on DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine or 5mC, hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine or 5hmC, and simultaneous gene expression in cultured human lymphoblastoid cells. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity induced alterations in the methylome (~60% of the differentially methylated regions or DMRs are hypomethylated and ~92% of the differentially hydroxymethylated regions or DHMRs are hyperhydroxymethylated. Simulated microgravity also induced differential expression in 370 transcripts that were associated with crucial biological processes such as oxidative stress response, carbohydrate metabolism and regulation of transcription. While we were not able to obtain any global trend correlating the changes of methylation/ hydroxylation with gene expression, we have been able to profile the simulated microgravity induced changes of 5mC over some of the differentially expressed genes that includes five genes undergoing differential methylation over their promoters and twenty five genes undergoing differential methylation over their gene-bodies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first NGS-based study to profile epigenomic patterns induced by short time exposure of simulated microgravity and we believe that our findings can be a valuable resource for future explorations.

  3. Effects of Vitamin K3 and K5 on Daunorubicin-resistant Human T Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Eri; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Anticancer efficacy of vitamin K derivatives on multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been scarcely investigated. The effects of vitamins K3 and K5 on proliferation of human leukemia MOLT-4 cells and on daunorubicin-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells were estimated by a WST assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, followed by flow cytometry. Vitamins K3 and K5 significantly inhibited proliferation of leukemic cells at 10 and 100 μM (pVitamin K3 induced cell apoptosis at 10 and 100 μM in both MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cells (pVitamin K5 also increased apoptotic cells, while rather inducing necrotic cell death. Vitamins K3 and K5 suppress MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cell-proliferation partially through induction of apoptosis, and these vitamin derivatives can overcome drug resistance due to P-glycoprotein expression. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of the soluble HVP-associated antigen of the lymphoblastoid cell line established from lymphomatous baboon (Papio hamadryas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voevodin, A F; Lapin, B A; Agrba, V Z; Timanovskaya, V V

    1978-01-01

    A new technique (indirect double immunodiffusion) for detection of EBV-associated soluble antigen and corresponding antibodies has been developed. This technique includes three steps: 1) simple double immunodiffusion with extracts of Raji cells (or other EBV-genome positive cells) and human sera containing antibodies against EBV-associated soluble antigen; 2) extensive washing and treatment with anti-human globulin; 3) extensive washing and treatment with tannic acid. Using this test it was shown that the soluble antigen indistinguishable from EBV-associated soluble antigen was present in KMPG-1 cells producing HVP.

  5. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction in a subset of autism lymphoblastoid cell lines in a well-matched case control cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Shannon; Frye, Richard E; Slattery, John; Wynne, Rebecca; Tippett, Marie; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Melnyk, Stepan; James, S Jill

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with the autism spectrum disorders. However, little attention has been given to the etiology of mitochondrial dysfunction or how mitochondrial abnormalities might interact with other physiological disturbances associated with autism, such as oxidative stress. In the current study we used respirometry to examine reserve capacity, a measure of the mitochondrial ability to respond to physiological stress, in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from children with autistic disorder (AD) as well as age and gender-matched control LCLs. We demonstrate, for the first time, that LCLs derived from children with AD have an abnormal mitochondrial reserve capacity before and after exposure to increasingly higher concentrations of 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-napthoquinone (DMNQ), an agent that increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Specifically, the AD LCLs exhibit a higher reserve capacity at baseline and a sharper depletion of reserve capacity when ROS exposure is increased, as compared to control LCLs. Detailed investigation indicated that reserve capacity abnormalities seen in AD LCLs were the result of higher ATP-linked respiration and maximal respiratory capacity at baseline combined with a marked increase in proton leak respiration as ROS was increased. We further demonstrate that these reserve capacity abnormalities are driven by a subgroup of eight (32%) of 25 AD LCLs. Additional investigation of this subgroup of AD LCLs with reserve capacity abnormalities revealed that it demonstrated a greater reliance on glycolysis and on uncoupling protein 2 to regulate oxidative stress at the inner mitochondria membrane. This study suggests that a significant subgroup of AD children may have alterations in mitochondrial function which could render them more vulnerable to a pro-oxidant microenvironment derived from intrinsic and extrinsic sources of ROS such as immune activation and pro

  6. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction in a subset of autism lymphoblastoid cell lines in a well-matched case control cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Rose

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition that mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with the autism spectrum disorders. However, little attention has been given to the etiology of mitochondrial dysfunction or how mitochondrial abnormalities might interact with other physiological disturbances associated with autism, such as oxidative stress. In the current study we used respirometry to examine reserve capacity, a measure of the mitochondrial ability to respond to physiological stress, in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs derived from children with autistic disorder (AD as well as age and gender-matched control LCLs. We demonstrate, for the first time, that LCLs derived from children with AD have an abnormal mitochondrial reserve capacity before and after exposure to increasingly higher concentrations of 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-napthoquinone (DMNQ, an agent that increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. Specifically, the AD LCLs exhibit a higher reserve capacity at baseline and a sharper depletion of reserve capacity when ROS exposure is increased, as compared to control LCLs. Detailed investigation indicated that reserve capacity abnormalities seen in AD LCLs were the result of higher ATP-linked respiration and maximal respiratory capacity at baseline combined with a marked increase in proton leak respiration as ROS was increased. We further demonstrate that these reserve capacity abnormalities are driven by a subgroup of eight (32% of 25 AD LCLs. Additional investigation of this subgroup of AD LCLs with reserve capacity abnormalities revealed that it demonstrated a greater reliance on glycolysis and on uncoupling protein 2 to regulate oxidative stress at the inner mitochondria membrane. This study suggests that a significant subgroup of AD children may have alterations in mitochondrial function which could render them more vulnerable to a pro-oxidant microenvironment derived from intrinsic and extrinsic sources of ROS such as immune activation and

  7. Isolation of a human lymphoblastoid line heterozygous at the thymidine kinase locus: possibility for a rapid human cell mutation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopek, T.R.; Liber, H.L.; Penman, B.W.; Thilly, W.G.

    1978-09-29

    A thymidine kinase heterozygote designated H2BT has been isolated from the human lymphoblast line HH4. Significant increase in the trifluorothymidine-resistant fraction was observed in the new cell line following treatment with the mutagens ICR-191 and butylmethansulfonate. Phenotypic expression was complete forty-eight hours after treatment.

  8. The mode of lymphoblastoid cell death in response to gas phase cigarette smoke is dose-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltatzis George E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke (CS is the main cause in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, the pathogenesis of which is related to an extended inflammatory response. In this study, we investigated the effect of low and high doses of gas phase cigarette smoke (GPS on cultured lymphocyte progenitor cells, using techniques to assess cell viability and to elucidate whether cells die of apoptosis or necrosis upon exposure to different doses of GPS. Methods In our approach we utilised a newly-established system of exposure of cells to GPS that is highly controlled, accurately reproducible and simulates CS dosage and kinetics that take place in the smokers' lung. This system was used to study the mode of cell death upon exposure to GPS in conjunction with a range of techniques widely used for cell death studies such as Annexin V staining, activation of caspase -3, cytoplasmic release of cytochrome C, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation. Results Low doses of GPS induced specific apoptotic indexes in CCRF-CEM cells. Specifically, cytochrome C release and cleaved caspase-3 were detected by immunofluorescence, upon treatment with 1-3 puffs GPS. At 4 h post-exposure, caspase-3 activation was observed in western blot analysis, showing a decreasing pattern as GPS doses increased. Concomitant with this behaviour, a dose-dependent change in Δψm depolarization was monitored by flow cytometry 2 h post-exposure, while at 4 h Δψm collapse was observed at the higher doses, indicative of a shift to a necrotic demise. A reduction in DNA fragmentation events produced by 5 puffs GPS as compared to those provoked by 3 puffs GPS, also pointed towards a necrotic response at the higher dose of GPS. Conclusion Collectively, our results support that at low doses gas phase cigarette smoke induces apoptosis in cultured T-lymphocytes, whereas at high doses GPS leads to necrotic death, by-passing the characteristic

  9. Mutagenicity and clastogenicity of extracts of Helicobacter pylori detected by the Ames test and in the micronucleus test using human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Ohta, Kaori; Yuhara, Yuta; Ayabe, Yuka; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Oguma, Keiji; Otsuka, Takanao

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close association between infection with Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) and the development of gastric carcinoma. Chronic H.pylori infection increases the frequency of mutation in gastric epithelial cells. However, the mechanism by which infection of H.pylori leads to mutation in gastric epithelial cells is unclear. We suspected that components in H.pylori may be related to the mutagenic response associated with DNA alkylation, and could be detected with the Ames test using a more sensitive strain for alkylating agents. Our investigation revealed that an extract of H.pylori was mutagenic in the Ames test with Salmonella typhimurium YG7108, which is deficient in the DNA repair of O(6)-methylguanine. The extract of H.pylori may contain methylating or alkylating agents, which might induce O (6)-alkylguanine in DNA. Mutagenicity of the alkylating agents N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in the Ames test with S.typhimurium TA1535 was enhanced significantly in the presence of the extract of H.pylori. The tested extracts of H.pylori resulted in a significant induction of micronuclei in human-derived lymphoblastoid cells. Heat instability and dialysis resistance of the extracts of H.pylori suggest that the mutagenic component in the extracts of H.pylori is a heat-unstable large molecule or a heat-labile small molecule strongly attached or adsorbed to a large molecule. Proteins in the extracts of H.pylori were subsequently fractionated using ammonium sulphate precipitation. However, all fractions expressed enhancing effects toward MNU mutagenicity. These results suggest the mutagenic component is a small molecule that is absorbed into proteins in the extract of H.pylori, which resist dialysis. Continuous and chronic exposure of gastric epithelial cells to the alkylative mutagenic component from H.pylori chronically infected in the stomach might be a causal factor in the gastric carcinogenesis

  10. Expression of the chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR2B is up-regulated in peripheral blood B cells upon EBV infection and in established lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodnyuk, Irina; Rudevica, Zanna; Leonciks, Ainars; Ehlin-Henriksson, Barbro; Kashuba, Elena

    2017-12-01

    In immunocompetent individuals, EBV establishes in B cells an asymptomatic lifelong latent infection controlled by the immune system. Chemokine receptors regulate immune system function. CCR1 and CCR2 share protein sequence similarity and exert responses to multiple chemokines. The role of these receptors in B cells is largely unknown. We show that the mRNA and functional protein expression of CCR1 and CCR2 is induced in ex vivo B cells upon EBV infection and in established lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). The CCR1 and CCR2B ORF transcripts were determined in LCLs. In contrast, in both the EBV-negative and EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, neither the CCR1, CCR2A, and CCR2B ORF transcripts nor their corresponding proteins were detected. Our data suggest that CCR1/CCR2B could be involved in clearing EBV-infected latency III B cells in immunocompetent individuals via directing the migration of these cells and attracting the chemokines-expressing immune cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lymphoblastoids cell lines – Derived iPSC line from a 26-year-old myotonic dystrophy type 1 patient carrying (CTG200 expansion in the DMPK gene: CHUQi001-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie Martineau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immortalized Epstein-Barr virus (EBV lymphoblastoids cells line (LCLs from a 26-year- old male affected by an adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 disease and carrying 200 CTG repeats mutation in the blood was used to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs using the Sendai virus expressing KLF4, OCT4, SOX2 and C-MYC. The resulting iPSCs were EBV free, expressed the pluripotency markers, could be differentiated into the three germ layers in vitro, had a normal karyotype, and retained the genetic DM1 mutation. This iPSC line could be useful for the investigation of DM1 mechanisms.

  12. Lymphoblastoids cell lines - Derived iPSC line from a 26-year-old myotonic dystrophy type 1 patient carrying (CTG)200expansion in the DMPK gene: CHUQi001-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, Laurie; Racine, Véronique; Benichou, Siham Ait; Puymirat, Jack

    2017-12-16

    Human immortalized Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lymphoblastoids cells line (LCLs) from a 26-year- old male affected by an adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) disease and carrying 200 CTG repeats mutation in the blood was used to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using the Sendai virus expressing KLF4, OCT4, SOX2 and C-MYC. The resulting iPSCs were EBV free, expressed the pluripotency markers, could be differentiated into the three germ layers in vitro, had a normal karyotype, and retained the genetic DM1 mutation. This iPSC line could be useful for the investigation of DM1 mechanisms. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Ascorbic acid kills Epstein-Barr virus positive Burkitt lymphoma cells and Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-cells in vitro, but not in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatzer, Amber N; Espey, Michael Graham; Chavez, Mayra; Tu, Hongbin; Levine, Mark; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2013-05-01

    Ascorbic acid has been shown to kill various cancer cell lines at pharmacologic concentrations. We found that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells were more susceptible to ascorbic acid-induced cell killing than EBV-negative BL cells or EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). Ascorbic acid did not induce apoptosis in any of the tested cells but did induce the production of reactive oxygen species and cell death. Previously, we showed that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, induces cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. We found that ascorbic acid is strongly antagonistic for bortezomib-induced cell death in LCLs and EBV-positive BL cells. Finally, ascorbic acid did not prolong survival of severe combined immunodefiency mice inoculated with LCLs either intraperitoneally or subcutaneously. Thus, while ascorbic acid was highly effective at killing EBV-positive BL cells and LCLs in vitro, it antagonized cell killing by bortezomib and was ineffective in an animal model.

  14. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. The food-derived carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine activates S-phase checkpoint and apoptosis, and induces gene mutation in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Boobis, A R; Gooderham, N J

    2000-03-01

    The mutagenic heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-blpyridine (PhIP) is formed at parts per billion levels when meat is cooked. It is efficiently absorbed from cooked food and extensively activated to its genotoxic N-hydroxy derivative by human cytochrome P4501A enzymes. It is also a rodent carcinogen. To better understand the genetic toxicity of PhIP, we have examined its effect on the cell cycle and gene mutation frequency using human lymphoblastoid cells (TK6) as a model. Because TK6 cells are unable to activate PhIP, we have cultured the cells in the presence of irradiated Chinese hamster XEMh1A2-MZ cells that have been genetically engineered to express human CYP1A2. Asynchronized TK6 cells were harvested at various times after treatment with PhIP (1.25-10 microg/ml), fixed and stained with propidium iodide for the examination of cell cycle by fluorescence-activated flow cytometry. After 20 h of PhIP treatment, a slight S-phase delay of the cell cycle was observed. Normal cell cycle recovered after the cells were washed and further cultured in the absence of PhIP for 5 days. However, PhIP treatment for 40 h induced a more pronounced S-phase arrest that was accompanied by a decrease in the level of cyclin A, an S-phase cyclin. This was followed by the appearance of a sub-G1 population (indicative of apoptotic cell death), range from 13 to 54% with PhIP concentrations from 1.25 to 10 microg/ml, compared with 5% in the vehicle control. A concomitant increase of mutation frequency at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus, assessed by colony formation assay in the presence of 6-thioguanine, was detected after 40 h-range, 16 to 45 x 10(-6) compared with 12 x 10(-6) in cultures without PhIP. In G1-enriched cell populations (synchronized culture), although PhIP induced S-phase delay, the induction of sub-G1 cells was substantially decreased. Our studies show that in TK6 cells, PhIP activates S-phase checkpoint, yet eludes

  16. Production of vesicular stomatitis virus by antigen- or mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and continuous lymphoblastoid lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowakowski, M.; Feldman, J.D.; Kano, S.; Bloom, B.R.

    1973-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore at the ultrastructural level the nature of the cells engaged in the production of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in different lymphoid cell populations, particularly after stimulation with several different agents. Specifically, we have examined (a) lymph node cells from guinea pigs with delayed hypersensitivity activated by specific antigen, (b) murine spleen cells activated by selective B cell and T cell mitogens, and (c) cells of human and murine continuous lymphoblastoid or lymphoma lines.

  17. An Epstein-Barr virus isolated from a lymphoblastoid cell line has a 16-kilobase-pair deletion which includes gp350 and the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W; Hwang, Y H; Lee, S K; Subramanian, C; Robertson, E S

    2001-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with human cancers, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, gastric carcinoma and, somewhat controversially, breast carcinoma. EBV infects and efficiently transforms human primary B lymphocytes in vitro. A number of EBV-encoded genes are critical for EBV-mediated transformation of human B lymphocytes. In this study we show that an EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell line obtained from the spontaneous outgrowth of B cells from a leukemia patient contains a deletion, which involves a region of approximately 16 kbp. This deletion encodes major EBV genes involved in both infection and transformation of human primary B lymphocytes and includes the glycoprotein gp350, the entire open reading frame of EBNA3A, and the amino-terminal region of EBNA3B. A fusion protein created by this deletion, which lies between the BMRF1 early antigen and the EBNA3B latent antigen, is truncated immediately downstream of the junction 21 amino acids into the region of the EBNA3B sequence, which is out of frame with respect to the EBNA3B protein sequence, and indicates that EBNA3B is not expressed. The fusion is from EBV coordinate 80299 within the BMRF1 sequence to coordinate 90998 in the EBNA3B sequence. Additionally, we have shown that there is no detectable induction in viral replication observed when SNU-265 is treated with phorbol esters, and no transformants were detected when supernatant is used to infect primary B lymphocytes after 8 weeks in culture. Therefore, we have identified an EBV genome with a major deletion in critical genes involved in mediating EBV infection and the transformation of human primary B lymphocytes that is incompetent for replication of this naturally occurring EBV isolate.

  18. Repair of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet irradiation and aromatic amines in normal and repair-deficient human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevnsner, Tinna; Frandsen, Henrik; Autrup, Herman

    1995-01-01

    belonging to complementation group B of Cockayne's syndrome (CS-B) showed reduced host cell reactivation. Fibroblasts from CS-B patients have reduced gene-specific DNA repair, but normal total genomic DNA repair, thus our data suggest that the HCR assay measures the capacity for gene-specific DNA repair...

  19. T cells specific for different latent and lytic viral proteins efficiently control Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Justyna; Stuehler, Claudia; Egli, Adrian; Battegay, Manuel; Rauser, Georg; Bantug, Glenn Robert; Brander, Christian; Hess, Christoph; Khanna, Nina

    2015-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) belong to the most dreaded complications of immunosuppression. The efficacy of EBV-specific T-cell transfer for PTLD has been previously shown, yet the optimal choice of EBV-derived antigens inducing polyclonal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that cover a wide range of human leukocyte antigen types and efficiently control PTLD remains unclear. A pool of 125 T-cell epitopes from seven latent and nine lytic EBV-derived proteins (EBVmix) and peptide pools of EBNA1, EBNA3c, LMP2a and BZLF1 were used to determine T-cell frequencies and to isolate T cells through the use of the interferon (IFN)-γ cytokine capture system. We further evaluated the phenotype and functionality of the generated T-cell lines in vitro. EBVmix induced significantly higher T-cell frequencies and allowed selecting more CD4(+)IFN-γ(+) and CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) cells than single peptide pools. T cells of all specificities expanded similarly in vitro, recognized cognate antigen, and, to a lower extent, EBV-infected cells, exerted moderate cytotoxicity and showed reduced alloreactivity. However, EBVmix-specific cells most efficiently controlled EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). This control was mainly mediated by EBV-specific CD8(+) cells with an oligoclonal epitope signature covering both latent and lytic viral proteins. Notably, EBV-specific CD4(+) cells unable to control LCLs produced significantly less perforin and granzyme B, probably because of limited LCL epitope presentation. EBVmix induces a broader T-cell response, probably because of its coverage of latent and lytic EBV-derived proteins that may be important to control EBV-transformed B cells and might offer an improvement of T-cell therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutagenic adaptive response to high-LET radiation in human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to low doses of heavy-ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vares, Guillaume, E-mail: vares@nirs.go.jp [Radiation Risk Reduction Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Wang, Bing, E-mail: jp2813km@nirs.go.jp [Radiation Risk Reduction Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tanaka, Kaoru; Kakimoto, Ayana; Eguchi-Kasai, Kyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru [Radiation Risk Reduction Research Program, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive response (AR) and bystander effect are two important phenomena involved in biological responses to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). Furthermore, there is a strong interest in better understanding the biological effects of high-LET radiation. We previously demonstrated the ability of low doses of X-rays to induce an AR to challenging heavy-ion radiation . In this study, we assessed in vitro the ability of priming low doses (0.01 Gy) of heavy-ion radiation to induce a similar AR to a subsequent challenging dose (1-4 Gy) of high-LET IR (carbon-ion: 20 and 40 keV/{mu}m, neon-ion: 150 keV/{mu}m) in TK6, AHH-1 and NH32 cells. Our results showed that low doses of high-LET radiation can induce an AR characterized by lower mutation frequencies at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus and faster DNA repair kinetics, in cells expressing p53.

  1. BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants of high and low clinical significance influence lymphoblastoid cell line post-irradiation gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nic Waddell

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional consequences of missense variants in disease genes are difficult to predict. We assessed if gene expression profiles could distinguish between BRCA1 or BRCA2 pathogenic truncating and missense mutation carriers and familial breast cancer cases whose disease was not attributable to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (BRCAX cases. 72 cell lines from affected women in high-risk breast ovarian families were assayed after exposure to ionising irradiation, including 23 BRCA1 carriers, 22 BRCA2 carriers, and 27 BRCAX individuals. A subset of 10 BRCAX individuals carried rare BRCA1/2 sequence variants considered to be of low clinical significance (LCS. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers had similar expression profiles, with some subclustering of missense mutation carriers. The majority of BRCAX individuals formed a distinct cluster, but BRCAX individuals with LCS variants had expression profiles similar to BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Gaussian Process Classifier predicted BRCA1, BRCA2 and BRCAX status, with a maximum of 62% accuracy, and prediction accuracy decreased with inclusion of BRCAX samples carrying an LCS variant, and inclusion of pathogenic missense carriers. Similarly, prediction of mutation status with gene lists derived using Support Vector Machines was good for BRCAX samples without an LCS variant (82-94%, poor for BRCAX with an LCS (40-50%, and improved for pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation carriers when the gene list used for prediction was appropriate to mutation effect being tested (71-100%. This study indicates that mutation effect, and presence of rare variants possibly associated with a low risk of cancer, must be considered in the development of array-based assays of variant pathogenicity.

  2. Complex forms of mitochondrial DNA in human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Christiansen, C; Zeuthen, J

    1983-01-01

    Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed lymphoblast......Human lymphocytes and lymphoid cell lines were analyzed for the presence of complex forms of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) by electron microscopy. A high frequency (9%-14.5%) of catenated dimers, circular dimers, or oligomers were found in samples from Epstein-Barr-virus-(EBV) transformed...

  3. Measurement of CD8+ and CD4+ T Cell Frequencies Specific for EBV LMP1 and LMP2a Using mRNA-Transfected DCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Dae-Hee; Sohn, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Lee, Seon-Duk; Kim, Sueon; Hyun, Seung-Joo; Cho, Hyun-Il; Cho, Seok-Goo; Lee, Suk-Kyeong; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    An EBV-specific cellular immune response is associated with the control of EBV-associated malignancies and lymphoproliferative diseases, some of which have been successfully treated by adoptive T cell therapy. Therefore, many methods have been used to measure EBV-specific cellular immune responses. Previous studies have mainly used autologous EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs), recombinant viral vectors transfected or peptide pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) as stimulators of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes. In the present study, we used an interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay by using isolated CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells stimulated with mRNA-transfected DCs. The frequency of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1)-specific IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher than that of LMP2a. The frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T cells was significantly correlated with that of CD8(+) T cells in LMP1-specific immune responses (r = 0.7187, Pc EBV-seropositive donors secreted only the Th1 cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, while Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17a) cytokines were not detected. CD4(+) T cells secreted significantly higher cytokine levels than did CD8(+) T cells. Analysis of EBV-specific T cell responses using autologous DCs transfected with mRNA might provide a comprehensive tool for monitoring EBV infection and new insights into the pathogenesis of EBV-associated diseases.

  4. Heterogeneity in both cytokine production and responsiveness of a panel of monoclonal human Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, G. J.; Klein, M. R.; Jordens, R.; Pascual-Salcedo, D.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; van Lier, R. A.; Zeijlemaker, W. P.

    1991-01-01

    To optimize growth and Ig production of in vitro-cultured Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells, a panel of six monoclonal EBV B-cell lines was analyzed for autocrine growth factor production and responsiveness to various cytokines. Three cell lines produced Il-I and four produced Il-6,

  5. Inhibition of the SDF-1alpha-CXCR4 axis by the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 suppresses the migration of cultured cells from ATL patients and murine lymphoblastoid cells from HTLV-I Tax transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Akira; Orba, Yasuko; Kimura, Takashi; Iha, Hidekatsu; Ogata, Masao; Tsuji, Takahiro; Ainai, Akira; Sata, Tetsutaro; Okamoto, Takashi; Hall, William W; Sawa, Hirofumi; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2009-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a T-cell malignancy caused by human T lymphotropic virus type I, and presents as an aggressive leukemia with characteristic widespread leukemic cell infiltration into visceral organs and skin. The molecular mechanisms associated with leukemic cell infiltration are poorly understood. We have used mouse models of ATL to investigate the role of chemokines in this process. Transfer of splenic lymphomatous cells from transgenic to SCID mice reproduces a leukemia and lymphoma that is histologically identical to human disease. It could be shown that lymphomatous cells exhibit specific chemotactic activity in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha). Lymphomatous cells exhibited surface expression of CXCR4, the specific receptor of SDF-1alpha. AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, was found to inhibit both SDF-1alpha-induced migration and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2. Investigation of cultured cells from human ATL patients revealed identical findings. Using the SCID mouse model, it could be demonstrated that AMD3100 inhibited infiltration of lymphomatous cells into liver and lung tissues in vivo. These results demonstrate the involvement of the SDF-1alpha/CXCR4 interaction as one mechanism of leukemic cell migration and this may provide a novel target as part of combination therapy for ATL.

  6. Differential gene expression profiles in neurons generated from lymphoblastoid B-cell line-derived iPS cells from monozygotic twin cases with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and discordant responses to clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Takanobu; Kikuchi, Masataka; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimoto, Michiko; Yasuda, Yuka; Fujiwara, Mikiya; Okada, Shota; Matsumura, Kensuke; Kasai, Atsushi; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Shintani, Norihito; Numata, Shusuke; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakaya, Akihiro; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Ryota

    2017-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric disorder with complex genetic and environmental origins. While many antipsychotics have been demonstrated as effective in the treatment of schizophrenia, a substantial number of schizophrenia patients are partially or fully unresponsive to the treatment. Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic drug for treatment-resistant schizophrenia; however, clozapine has rare but serious side-effects. Furthermore, there is inter-individual variability in the drug response to clozapine treatment. Therefore, the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of clozapine and drug response predictors is imperative. In the present study, we focused on a pair of monozygotic twin cases with treatment-resistant schizophrenia, in which one twin responded well to clozapine treatment and the other twin did not. Using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-based technology, we generated neurons from iPS cells derived from these patients and subsequently performed RNA-sequencing to compare the transcriptome profiles of the mock or clozapine-treated neurons. Although, these iPS cells similarly differentiated into neurons, several genes encoding homophilic cell adhesion molecules, such as protocadherin genes, showed differential expression patterns between these two patients. These results, which contribute to the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of clozapine action, establish a new strategy for the use of monozygotic twin studies in schizophrenia research. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T cells for the treatment of persistent active EBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldo, Barbara; Huls, M Helen; Liu, Zhensheng; Okamura, Takayuki; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra; Sabat, Robert; Babel, Nina; Jones, James F; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Gee, Adrian P; Brenner, Malcolm K; Heslop, Helen E; Rooney, Cliona M

    2002-12-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) infection syndrome is a heterogeneous EBV-related disorder characterized by chronic fatigue, fever, lymphadenopathy, and/or hepatosplenomegaly, associated with abnormal patterns of antibody to EBV. CAEBV can range from disabling mild/moderate forms to rapidly lethal disorders. Even patients with mild/moderate disease frequently suffer adverse effects from long-term anti-inflammatory agents and have a quality of life that progressively deteriorates. It is still unknown why these individuals are unable to produce an effective immune response to control EBV, and no effective treatment is currently available. Since ex vivo-expanded EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (EBV-CTLs) can safely restore EBV-specific cellular immune responses in immunodeficient patients, we assessed the possibility that adoptive immunotherapy might also effectively treat CAEBV infection. Following stimulation with irradiated EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), EBV-CTLs were successfully generated from 8 of 8 patients with the mild/moderate form of CAEBV infection. These CTLs were predominantly CD3(+) CD8(+) cells and produced specific killing of the autologous LCLs. There were 5 patients with 1- to 12-year histories of disease who were treated with 1 to 4 injections of EBV-CTLs. Following infusion, there was resolution of fatigue and malaise, disappearance of fever, and regression of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. The pattern and titers of anti-EBV antibodies also normalized. No toxicity was observed. There were 4 patients who did not show any relapse of disease within 6 to 36 months follow-up; one patient had recurrence of fatigue and myalgia one year after CTL infusion. We suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with autologous EBV-CTLs may represent a safe and feasible alternative treatment for patients affected with mild/moderate CAEBV infection and that this approach should be evaluated in the more severe forms of the disease.

  8. Ultraviolet hypersensitivity of Cockayne syndrome lymphoblastoid lines - the effects of exogenous. beta. -nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Fujio; Kukita, Atsushi

    1986-12-01

    Four Cockayne Syndrome (CS) lymphoblastoid lines were tested for the lethal effects of UV radiation (254 nm) with or without addition of exogenous ..beta..-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (..beta..-NAD/sup +/) to their culture medium. Two of them exhibited a small but significantly increased resistance to UV radiation when ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ was added to the culture. However, their UV sensitivity after ..beta..-NAD+ addition was still much greater than that of normal control lines. Normal control lymphoblastoid lines and those from complementation group A and group C of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) did not reveal any differences in post-UV sensitivity after the addition of exogenous ..beta..-NAD/sup +/. Thus the abnormal response to the lethal effects of UV radiation of CS lymphoblastoid lines could not be rectified by ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ addition. However, ..beta..-NAD/sup +/ does appear to play some partial role in reducing the high UV sensitivity of some CS lymphoblastoid lines.

  9. The compartmentalisation of phosphorylated free oligosaccharides in cells from a CDG Ig patient reveals a novel ER-to-cytosol translocation process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Peric

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biosynthesis of the dolichol linked oligosaccharide (DLO required for protein N-glycosylation starts on the cytoplasmic face of the ER to give Man(5GlcNAc(2-PP-dolichol, which then flips into the ER for further glycosylation yielding mature DLO (Glc(3Man(9GlcNAc(2-PP-dolichol. After transfer of Glc(3Man(9GlcNAc(2 onto protein, dolichol-PP is recycled to dolichol-P and reused for DLO biosynthesis. Because de novo dolichol synthesis is slow, dolichol recycling is rate limiting for protein glycosylation. Immature DLO intermediates may also be recycled by pyrophosphatase-mediated cleavage to yield dolichol-P and phosphorylated oligosaccharides (fOSGN2-P. Here, we examine fOSGN2-P generation in cells from patients with type I Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG I in which defects in the dolichol cycle cause accumulation of immature DLO intermediates and protein hypoglycosylation. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from CDG I patients and normal subjects a correlation exists between the quantities of metabolically radiolabeled fOSGN2-P and truncated DLO intermediates only when these two classes of compounds possess 7 or less hexose residues. Larger fOSGN2-P were difficult to detect despite an abundance of more fully mannosylated and glucosylated DLO. When CDG Ig cells, which accumulate Man(7GlcNAc(2-PP-dolichol, are permeabilised so that vesicular transport and protein synthesis are abolished, the DLO pool required for Man(7GlcNAc(2-P generation could be depleted by adding exogenous glycosylation acceptor peptide. Under conditions where a glycotripeptide and neutral free oligosaccharides remain predominantly in the lumen of the ER, Man(7GlcNAc(2-P appears in the cytosol without detectable generation of ER luminal Man(7GlcNAc(2-P. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The DLO pools required for N-glycosylation and fOSGN2-P generation are functionally linked and this substantiates the hypothesis that

  10. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, N J; Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemi- or homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis.

  11. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royle, N.J.; Armour, J.A.L.; Crosier, M.; Jeffreys, A.J. (Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemior homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  12. A monoclonal antibody defining human B cell differentiation antigen (HLB-1 antigen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, K; Koshiba, H; Ishii, Y; Kikuchi, K

    1983-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for human B cell differentiation antigen (HLB-1) is produced by a hybridoma established by fusion of splenocytes of mice immunized with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed peripheral B cell line, RPMI-8057. This monoclonal, antibody designated anti-HLB-1 monoclonal antibody (anti-HLB-1), reacted with surface immunoglobulin (sIg)-positive B cells of normal peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues and sIg-positive leukemic cells. The cells of T cell leukemia, non-T non-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and nonlymphoid leukemia were HLB-1 negative. These data were further confirmed by studying a panel of cultured human hematopoietic cell lines. Anti-HLB-1 reacted with B cell lines derived from pre-B, Burkitt's lymphoma, B cell type ALL and EBV-transformed peripheral B cells. Anti-HLB-1 was reactive with only one of three human myeloma cell lines, and with none of the T cell, myeloid and non-T non-B ALL cell lines. This newly defined HLB-1 antigen is different from other conventional human B cell markers such as sIg, Ia antigens, and receptors for the Fc portion of Ig and complement C3.

  13. Establishment of B-lymphoid cell lines retaining cytogenetic characteristics of Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Y; Kubonishi, I; Sandberg, A A

    1983-06-01

    The present study describes the establishment of and chromosomal changes in B-lymphoid cell lines from cells of Bloom syndrome (BS) patients using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Even though PHA-stimulated BS lymphocytes from all five patients studied showed high levels of sister chromatid exchange (SCE), three EBV-transformed BS-B-lymphoid cell lines had normal levels of SCE and two yielded two types of cell populations, i.e., one with increased SCE and chromosome instability (including breaks and quadriradials) and another with normal levels of SCE and without structural aberrations. The karyotypic abnormalities, as observed in the BS lines have not been seen in the cells of any established normal B-lymphoid lines transformed by EBV and strongly suggest that the chromosome abnormalities in the BS--B-cell lines with abnormal karyotypes originated in vivo and not through an in vitro effect of EBV. Furthermore, in the EBV-transformed B-cell lines, we found quadriradial formation between sister chromosomes during endomitoses instead of between homologous chromosomes, strongly suggesting that quadriradial formation may be closely related to SCE. The coexistence in BS subjects of abnormal and normal populations of cells with respect to the number of SCE awaits explanation.

  14. Non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints in human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Stephen R. [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Papworth, David [Radiation and Genome Stability Unit, Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Grosovsky, Andrew J. [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, CA (United States)]. E-mail: Grosovsky@ucr.edu

    2006-08-30

    Genomic instability is observed in tumors and in a large fraction of the progeny surviving irradiation. One of the best-characterized phenotypic manifestations of genomic instability is delayed chromosome aberrations. Our working hypothesis for the current study was that if genomic instability is in part attributable to cis mechanisms, we should observe a non-random distribution of chromosomes or sites involved in instability-associated rearrangements, regardless of radiation quality, dose, or trans factor expression. We report here the karyotypic examination of 296 instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breaksites (IACRB) from 118 unstable TK6 human B lymphoblast, and isogenic derivative, clones. When we tested whether IACRB were distributed across the chromosomes based on target size, a significant non-random distribution was evident (p < 0.00001), and three IACRB hotspots (chromosomes 11, 12, and 22) and one IACRB coldspot (chromosome 2) were identified. Statistical analysis at the chromosomal band-level identified four IACRB hotspots accounting for 20% of all instability-associated breaks, two of which account for over 14% of all IACRB. Further, analysis of independent clones provided evidence within 14 individual clones of IACRB clustering at the chromosomal band level, suggesting a predisposition for further breaks after an initial break at some chromosomal bands. All of these events, independently, or when taken together, were highly unlikely to have occurred by chance (p < 0.000001). These IACRB band-level cluster hotspots were observed independent of radiation quality, dose, or cellular p53 status. The non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangements described here significantly differs from the distribution that was observed in a first-division post-irradiation metaphase analysis (p = 0.0004). Taken together, these results suggest that genomic instability may be in part driven by chromosomal cis mechanisms.

  15. MiRNA Profiles in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines of Finnish Prostate Cancer Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Fischer

    Full Text Available Heritable factors are evidently involved in prostate cancer (PrCa carcinogenesis, but currently, genetic markers are not routinely used in screening or diagnostics of the disease. More precise information is needed for making treatment decisions to distinguish aggressive cases from indolent disease, for which heritable factors could be a useful tool. The genetic makeup of PrCa has only recently begun to be unravelled through large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS. The thus far identified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs explain, however, only a fraction of familial clustering. Moreover, the known risk SNPs are not associated with the clinical outcome of the disease, such as aggressive or metastasised disease, and therefore cannot be used to predict the prognosis. Annotating the SNPs with deep clinical data together with miRNA expression profiles can improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of different phenotypes of prostate cancer.In this study microRNA (miRNA profiles were studied as potential biomarkers to predict the disease outcome. The study subjects were from Finnish high risk prostate cancer families. To identify potential biomarkers we combined a novel non-parametrical test with an importance measure provided from a Random Forest classifier. This combination delivered a set of nine miRNAs that was able to separate cases from controls. The detected miRNA expression profiles could predict the development of the disease years before the actual PrCa diagnosis or detect the existence of other cancers in the studied individuals. Furthermore, using an expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL analysis, regulatory SNPs for miRNA miR-483-3p that were also directly associated with PrCa were found.Based on our findings, we suggest that blood-based miRNA expression profiling can be used in the diagnosis and maybe even prognosis of the disease. In the future, miRNA profiling could possibly be used in targeted screening, together with Prostate Specific Antigene (PSA testing, to identify men with an elevated PrCa risk.

  16. MiRNA Profiles in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines of Finnish Prostate Cancer Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Daniel; Wahlfors, Tiina; Mattila, Henna; Oja, Hannu; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Schleutker, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Heritable factors are evidently involved in prostate cancer (PrCa) carcinogenesis, but currently, genetic markers are not routinely used in screening or diagnostics of the disease. More precise information is needed for making treatment decisions to distinguish aggressive cases from indolent disease, for which heritable factors could be a useful tool. The genetic makeup of PrCa has only recently begun to be unravelled through large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The thus far identified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) explain, however, only a fraction of familial clustering. Moreover, the known risk SNPs are not associated with the clinical outcome of the disease, such as aggressive or metastasised disease, and therefore cannot be used to predict the prognosis. Annotating the SNPs with deep clinical data together with miRNA expression profiles can improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of different phenotypes of prostate cancer. In this study microRNA (miRNA) profiles were studied as potential biomarkers to predict the disease outcome. The study subjects were from Finnish high risk prostate cancer families. To identify potential biomarkers we combined a novel non-parametrical test with an importance measure provided from a Random Forest classifier. This combination delivered a set of nine miRNAs that was able to separate cases from controls. The detected miRNA expression profiles could predict the development of the disease years before the actual PrCa diagnosis or detect the existence of other cancers in the studied individuals. Furthermore, using an expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) analysis, regulatory SNPs for miRNA miR-483-3p that were also directly associated with PrCa were found. Based on our findings, we suggest that blood-based miRNA expression profiling can be used in the diagnosis and maybe even prognosis of the disease. In the future, miRNA profiling could possibly be used in targeted screening, together with Prostate Specific Antigene (PSA) testing, to identify men with an elevated PrCa risk.

  17. Isolation and characterization of allergen-binding cells from normal and allergic donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsch, J; Hunzelmann, N; Tesch, H; Merk, H; Maggi, E; Ruffilli, A; Radbruch, A

    1995-08-01

    Flow cytometry of the immune system so far has been limited to the analysis of subpopulations according to lineage markers. The cells involved in a particular immune response could not be assayed due to their low frequency. Here we show the potential of antigen-specific high gradient magnetic cell sorting to enrich cells for visualisation in multiparameter cytometry, functional studies and immortalization. The aim of this study was the development of an efficient technology for staining and isolation of antigen-binding cells from human peripheral blood. In particular, allergen-specific cells from normal and allergic donors should be analysed and compared to develop a cellular diagnosis of allergy. The rare antigen-specific cells were sorted by high-gradient magnetic cell sorting with MACS. Haptenized phospholipase A2 (PLA2), the major allergen of bee venom, or haptenized ParoI, the major allergenic component of Parietaria officinalis, were used as antigens. The cells from normal and allergic donors, binding to the allergen were characterized phenotypically by immuno-fluorescence. Allergen-specific B-cells were immortalized by EBV transformation. Allergen-specific cells can be enriched from blood of both allergic and normal donors to purities of up to 75%, by high gradient magnetic cell sorting. The specificity of labelling with allergen was confirmed by establishing allergen-specific EBV-transformed B-cell lines from the sorted cells. Clear differences exist in the cellular composition of allergen-binding cells from normal compared to allergic donors. In normal donors the allergen-binding cells are B-cells expressing CD19 and CD21. In allergic donors, in addition to allergen-binding B-cells, occurring in about equal absolute numbers as in normal donors, basophilic granulocytes are labeled by allergen. These cells express CD38, CD9 and CD25 on their surface, and stain for IgE.

  18. Skewing to the LFA-3 adhesion pathway by influenza infection of antigen-presenting cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kemenade, F. J.; Kuijpers, K. C.; de Waal-Malefijt, R.; van Lier, R. A.; Miedema, F.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of influenza (FLU) infection on heterotypic conjugate formation between antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes has been studied with FLU-specific T cell clones and FLU-infected B-lymphoblastoid cells (B-LCL). Conjugate formation between FLU-infected B-LCL (FLU+ B-LCL) and T cells was

  19. BDNF and DYRK1A are variable and inversely correlated in lymphoblastoid cell lines from Down syndrome patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tlili, A.; Hoischen, A.; Ripoll, C.; Benabou, E.; Badel, A.; Ronan, A.; Touraine, R.; Grattau, Y.; Stora, S.; Bon, B. van; Vries, B. de; Menten, B.; Bockaert, N.; Gecz, J.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Campion, D.; Potier, M.C.; Blehaut, H.; Delabar, J.M.; Janel, N.

    2012-01-01

    Down syndrome or trisomy 21 is the most common genetic disorder leading to mental retardation. One feature is impaired short- and long-term spatial memory, which has been linked to altered brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Mouse models of Down syndrome have been used to assess

  20. All-trans Retinoic Acid Upregulates Reduced CD38 Transcription in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines from Autism Spectrum Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Riebold, Mathias; Mankuta, David; Lerer, Elad; Israel, Salomon; Zhong, Songfa; Nemanov, Luba; Monakhov, Mikhail V.; Levi, Shlomit; Yirmiya, Nurit; Yaari, Maya; Malavasi, Fabio; Ebstein, Richard P

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in social behavior in mice lacking the CD38 gene have been attributed to impaired secretion of oxytocin. In humans, similar deficits in social behavior are associated with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), for which genetic variants of CD38 have been pinpointed as provisional risk factors. We sought to explore, in an in vitro model, the feasibility of the theory that restoring the level of CD38 in ASD patients could be of potential clinical benefit. CD38 transcription is highly sensi...

  1. B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells and other B cells can produce granzyme B and gain cytotoxic potential after interleukin-21-based activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahrsdörfer, Bernd; Blackwell, Sue E.; Wooldridge, James E.; Huang, Jian; Andreski, Melinda W.; Jacobus, Laura S.; Taylor, Christiana M.; Weiner, George J.

    2006-01-01

    B cells currently are not viewed as being capable of producing granzyme B or being cytotoxic. We found that B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells treated with interleukin-21 (IL-21) produce low levels of granzyme B. The addition of either CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) or anti-B-cell-receptor antibody (anti-BCR) to IL-21 results in enhanced production of functional granzyme B by B-CLL cells. B-CLL cells treated with IL-21 and CpG ODN undergo apoptosis and are able to induce apoptosis of untreated bystander B-CLL cells. This effect can be inhibited by anti-granzyme B antibody. Benign human B cells, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblasts, and many standard lymphoma cell lines produce high levels of granzyme B in response to IL-21 and anti-BCR. Our results suggest that the ability to induce production of functional granzyme B by B cells could open new approaches to the therapy of B-CLL and other B-cell malignancies. Our findings also have significant implications for our understanding of the role of B cells for immune regulation and for a variety of immune phenomena, including cancer immunity, autoimmunity, and infectious immunity. PMID:16809616

  2. Human cell line sensitive to mutation by particle-borne chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, C.L.; Liber, H.L.; Behymer, T.D.; Hites, R.A.; Thilly, W.G.

    1985-07-01

    A human lymphoblastoid cell line with ability to perform oxidative metabolism of various chemicals is mutated by the direct addition of an intact particulate soot. This experiment demonstrates that materials associated with combustion-generated particulates are biologically available and able to cause genetic changes in metabolically competent human cells.

  3. Characterization of a new chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell line for mechanistic in vitro and in vivo studies relevant to disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Hertlein

    Full Text Available Studies of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL have yielded substantial progress, however a lack of immortalized cell lines representative of the primary disease has hampered a full understanding of disease pathogenesis and development of new treatments. Here we describe a novel CLL cell line (OSU-CLL generated by EBV transformation, which displays a similar cytogenetic and immunophenotype observed in the patient's CLL (CD5 positive with trisomy 12 and 19. A companion cell line was also generated from the same patient (OSU-NB. This cell line lacked typical CLL characteristics, and is likely derived from the patient's normal B cells. In vitro migration assays demonstrated that OSU-CLL exhibits migratory properties similar to primary CLL cells whereas OSU-NB has significantly reduced ability to migrate spontaneously or towards chemokine. Microarray analysis demonstrated distinct gene expression patterns in the two cell lines, including genes on chromosomes 12 and 19, which is consistent with the cytogenetic profile in this cell line. Finally, OSU-CLL was readily transplantable into NOG mice, producing uniform engraftment by three weeks with leukemic cells detectable in the peripheral blood spleen and bone marrow. These studies describe a new CLL cell line that extends currently available models to study gene function in this disease.

  4. CYP17A1 intron mutation causing cryptic splicing in 17α-hydroxylase deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daw-Yang Hwang

    Full Text Available 17α-Hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase deficiency (17OHD is an autosomal recessive disease causing congenital adrenal hyperplasia and a rare cause of hypertension with hypokalemia. The CYP17A1 gene mutation leads to 17OHD and its clinical features. We described an 18 y/o female with clinical features of 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase deficiency and characterized the functional consequences of an intronic CYP17A1 mutation. The coding regions and flanking intronic bases of the CYP17A1 gene were amplified by PCR and sequenced. The patient is a compound heterozygote for the previously described p.R358X and IVS1 +2T>C mutations. A first intron splice donor site mutation was re-created in minigene and full-length expression vectors. Pre-mRNA splicing of the variant CYP17A1 intron was studied in transfected cells and in a transformed lymphoblastoid cell line. When the full-length CYP17A1 gene and minigene containing the intronic mutation was expressed in transfected cells, the majority (>90% of mRNA transcripts were incorrectly spliced. Only the p.R358X transcript was detected in the EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line. The IVS1 +2T>C mutation abolished most 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase enzyme activity by aberrant mRNA splicing to an intronic pseudo-exon, causing a frame shift and early termination.

  5. MYC overexpression imposes a nonimmunogenic phenotype on Epstein–Barr virus-infected B cells

    OpenAIRE

    Staege, Martin S.; Lee, Steven P.; Frisan, Teresa; Mautner, Josef; Scholz, Siegfried; Pajic, Alexander; Rickinson, Alan B.; Masucci, Maria G.; Polack, Axel; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines, generated by immortalization of normal B cells by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) in vitro, have strong antigen-presenting capacity, are sensitive to EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, and are highly allostimulatory in mixed lymphocyte culture. By contrast, EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells are poor antigen presenters, are not recognized by EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, and are poorly allostimulatory, which raises the question of whether immunological pressure exerte...

  6. Ganetespib, an HSP90 inhibitor, kills Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B and T cells and reduces the percentage of EBV-infected cells in the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatzer, Amber; Ali, Mir A; Chavez, Mayra; Dowdell, Kennichi; Lee, Min-Jung; Tomita, Yusuke; El-Hariry, Iman; Trepel, Jane B; Proia, David A; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-04-01

    HSP90 inhibitors have been shown to kill Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells by reducing the level of EBV EBNA-1 and/or LMP1. We treated virus-infected cells with ganetespib, an HSP90 inhibitor currently being evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer and found that the drug killed EBV-positive B and T cells and reduced the level of both EBV EBNA-1 and LMP1. Treatment of cells with ganetespib also reduced the level of pAkt. Ganetespib delayed the onset of EBV-positive lymphomas and prolonged survival in SCID mice inoculated with one EBV-transformed B-cell line, but not another B-cell line. The former cell line showed lower levels of EBNA-1 after treatment with ganetespib in vitro. Treatment of a patient with T-cell chronic active EBV with ganetespib reduced the percentage of EBV-positive cells in the peripheral blood. These data indicate that HSP90 inhibitors may have a role in the therapy of certain EBV-associated diseases.

  7. Upregulation of the Cell-Cycle Regulator RGC-32 in Epstein-Barr Virus-Immortalized Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Sandra N.; Wood, C. David; Gunnell, Andrea; Webb, Helen M.; Khasnis, Sarika; Schepers, Aloys; West, Michelle J.

    2011-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple human tumours of lymphoid and epithelial origin. The virus infects and immortalizes B cells establishing a persistent latent infection characterized by varying patterns of EBV latent gene expression (latency 0, I, II and III). The CDK1 activator, Response Gene to Complement-32 (RGC-32, C13ORF15), is overexpressed in colon, breast and ovarian cancer tissues and we have detected selective high-level RGC-32 protein expression in EBV-immortalized latency III cells. Significantly, we show that overexpression of RGC-32 in B cells is sufficient to disrupt G2 cell-cycle arrest consistent with activation of CDK1, implicating RGC-32 in the EBV transformation process. Surprisingly, RGC-32 mRNA is expressed at high levels in latency I Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cells and in some EBV-negative BL cell-lines, although RGC-32 protein expression is not detectable. We show that RGC-32 mRNA expression is elevated in latency I cells due to transcriptional activation by high levels of the differentially expressed RUNX1c transcription factor. We found that proteosomal degradation or blocked cytoplasmic export of the RGC-32 message were not responsible for the lack of RGC-32 protein expression in latency I cells. Significantly, analysis of the ribosomal association of the RGC-32 mRNA in latency I and latency III cells revealed that RGC-32 transcripts were associated with multiple ribosomes in both cell-types implicating post-initiation translational repression mechanisms in the block to RGC-32 protein production in latency I cells. In summary, our results are the first to demonstrate RGC-32 protein upregulation in cells transformed by a human tumour virus and to identify post-initiation translational mechanisms as an expression control point for this key cell-cycle regulator. PMID:22163048

  8. Selective in vitro expansion of HLA class I-restricted HIV-1 gag-specific CD8+ T cells: cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes and precursor frequencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. van Baalen (Carel); M.R. Klein (Michèl); A.M. Geretti (Anna Maria); R.I.P.M. Keet; F. Miedema (Frank); C.A.C.M. van Els (Cécile); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To identify HIV-1 Gag cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes and HLA restriction of their recognition, and to define precursor frequencies of HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL in the blood of seropositive individuals. METHODS: B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) infected with recombinant

  9. Early T Cell Recognition of B Cells following Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Identifying Potential Targets for Prophylactic Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus, is the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has strong aetiologic links with several malignancies and has been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases. Efforts to develop a prophylactic vaccine to prevent or reduce EBV-associated disease have, to date, focused on the induction of neutralising antibody responses. However, such vaccines might be further improved by inducing T cell responses capable of recognising and killing recently-infected B cells. In that context, EBNA2, EBNA-LP and BHRF1 are the first viral antigens expressed during the initial stage of B cell growth transformation, yet have been poorly characterised as CD8+ T cell targets. Here we describe CD8+ T cell responses against each of these three "first wave" proteins, identifying target epitopes and HLA restricting alleles. While EBNA-LP and BHRF1 each contained one strong CD8 epitope, epitopes within EBNA2 induced immunodominant responses through several less common HLA class I alleles (e.g. B*3801 and B*5501, as well as subdominant responses through common class I alleles (e.g. B7 and C*0304. Importantly, such EBNA2-specific CD8+ T cells recognised B cells within the first day post-infection, prior to CD8+ T cells against well-characterised latent target antigens such as EBNA3B or LMP2, and effectively inhibited outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cell lines. We infer that "first wave" antigens of the growth-transforming infection, especially EBNA2, constitute potential CD8+ T cell immunogens for inclusion in prophylactic EBV vaccine design.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–encoded small RNA is released from EBV-infected cells and activates signaling from toll-like receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Dai; Zhou, Li; Samanta, Mrinal; Matsumoto, Misako; Ebihara, Takashi; Seya, Tsukasa; Imai, Shosuke; Fujieda, Mikiya; Kawa, Keisei

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus–encoded small RNA (EBER) is nonpolyadenylated, noncoding RNA that forms stem-loop structure by intermolecular base-pairing, giving rise to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)–like molecules, and exists abundantly in EBV-infected cells. Here, we report that EBER induces signaling from the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), which is a sensor of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and induces type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. A substantial amount of EBER, which was sufficient to induce signaling from TLR3, was released from EBV-infected cells, and the majority of the released EBER existed as a complex with a cellular EBER-binding protein La, suggesting that EBER was released from the cells by active secretion of La. Sera from patients with infectious mononucleosis (IM), chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV), and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (EBV-HLH), whose general symptoms are caused by proinflammatory cytokines contained EBER, and addition of RNA purified from the sera into culture medium induced signaling from TLR3 in EBV-transformed lymphocytes and peripheral mononuclear cells. Furthermore, DCs treated with EBER showed mature phenotype and antigen presentation capacity. These findings suggest that EBER, which is released from EBV-infected cells, is responsible for immune activation by EBV, inducing type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. EBER-induced activation of innate immunity would account for immunopathologic diseases caused by active EBV infection. PMID:19720839

  11. Immunofluorescent staining of nuclear antigen in lymphoid cells transformed by Herpesvirus papio (HVP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, H

    1981-01-01

    An improved fixation method for antigen detection in lymphoblastoid cells is described. Herpesvirus papio nuclear antigen (HUPNA) could be stained in several transformed lymphoid cell lines by anti-complement immunofluorescence (ACIF). Antibody to HUPNA was detected in many human sera containing antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid and nuclear antigen (EBNA). Rheumatoid arthritis sera showed a high incidence of both anti-EBNA and anti-HUPNA antibodies.

  12. Interferon enhancement of the invasive capacity of Ewing sarcoma cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Gene P.; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P.; Russo, Raimondo G.; Wallace, Donald M.; Liotta, Lance A.; Berger, Shelby L.

    1982-01-01

    The ability of interferons to reduce cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo is a well-studied phenomenon. To extend such observations, the effect of interferons on the invasiveness in vitro of human malignant cells derived from a Ewing sarcoma was evaluated. Two related parameters were examined: (i) production of type IV (basement membrane) collagenase and (ii) penetration of human amnion basement membrane and collagenous stroma. After 6 days of treatment with crude fibroblast, leukocyte, or lymphoblastoid interferon at 100 units/ml in serum-free medium, type IV collagenase levels increased 2- to 4-fold per cell relative to those of untreated controls. With homogeneous fibroblast and lymphoblastoid interferons, a 2-fold elevation in type IV collagenase was detected after 2 days, with further increases, occasionally dramatic, occurring on the 4th and 6th day of treatment. The ability of Ewing sarcoma cells to invade human amnion connective tissue was measured after 6 days of treatment with various interferons. Relative to the behavior of untreated controls, crude leukocyte interferon, homogeneous lymphoblastoid interferon, and homogeneous fibroblast interferon at 100 units/ml augmented invasiveness 3-, 17- and 22-fold, respectively, when cells were allowed 4 days in which to traverse the amnion. When untreated cells were exposed simultaneously to the amnion and to homogeneous lymphoblastoid or fibroblast interferon, a 4- to 5-fold increase in invasiveness above control levels was observed in 2 days. These data emphasize the complexity of interferon-induced phenomena. In any overview, the effects of interferon on both the tumor cell and the host must be considered. PMID:6180434

  13. Characterization of natural Epstein-Barr virus infection and replication in smooth muscle cells from a leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, H B; Montalvo, E A; McClain, K L; Ench, Y; Heard, P; Christy, B A; Dewalt-Hagan, P J; Moyer, M P

    1999-01-01

    Cells from a leiomyosarcoma tumor (LMS-1) from a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were explanted, cultured in vitro, and studied by phase-contrast microscopy for morphologic and growth characteristics, immunostaining for cell markers, EBER in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction for detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and immunostaining for expression of EBV antigens. The cells exhibited very slow growth in vitro, with unusual elliptical and spindle-shaped morphology and fragmentation of the cytoplasm into long, tapering, cytoplasmic processes. Greater than 90% of cells expressed diffuse distribution of the smooth muscle isoform of actin by immunoperoxidase staining. Approximately 25% of cells expressed very bright fluorescence by immunostaining of the smooth muscle isoforms of calponin and actin. The majority of cells demonstrated a weak signal for CD21; approximately 5-10% of cells showed a strong signal that was confined to cell surfaces. The cultured cells harbored EBV, and infectious EBV continued to be detected by polymerase chain reaction and virus culture through several passages in vitro. Several EBV antigens were expressed, including latent antigen EBNA-1, immediate-early antigen BZLF1, early antigen EA-D, and late antigens, including viral capsid antigen p160, gp125, and membrane antigen gp350. Human umbilical cord lymphocytes that were transformed with virus isolated from cultured cells yielded immortalized cell lines that expressed EBV antigens similar to other EBV-transformed lymphocyte cell lines. These results confirm that EBV is capable of lytic infection of smooth muscle cells with expression of a repertoire of latent and replicative viral products and production of infectious virus. EBV infection of smooth muscle cells may contribute to the oncogenesis of leiomyosarcomas.

  14. B-lymphoblastoid cell lines from multiple sclerosis patients and a healthy control producing a putative new human retrovirus and Epstein-Barr virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, M; Møller-Larsen, A; Christensen, T

    1995-01-01

    with MS who had a reactivated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Both LCLs were found by EM to produce RVLP and EBV particles. Reverse transcriptase (RT) assays were positive in purified viral material from both LCLs. To substantiate these findings we initiated an intensified culturing procedure and were...

  15. Human B cells fail to secrete type I interferons upon cytoplasmic DNA exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, Anna M; Sun, Chenglong; Landman, Sanne L; Oosenbrug, Timo; Koppejan, Hester J; Kwakkenbos, Mark J; Hoeben, Rob C; Paludan, Søren R; Ressing, Maaike E

    2017-11-01

    Most cells are believed to be capable of producing type I interferons (IFN I) as part of an innate immune response against, for instance, viral infections. In macrophages, IFN I is potently induced upon cytoplasmic exposure to foreign nucleic acids. Infection of these cells with herpesviruses leads to triggering of the DNA sensors interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) and cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS). Thereby, the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and the downstream molecules TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) are sequentially activated culminating in IFN I secretion. Human gamma-herpesviruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), exploit B cells as a reservoir for persistent infection. In this study, we investigated whether human B cells, similar to macrophages, engage the cytoplasmic DNA sensing pathway to induce an innate immune response. We found that the B cells fail to secrete IFN I upon cytoplasmic DNA exposure, although they express the DNA sensors cGAS and IFI16 and the signaling components TBK1 and IRF3. In primary human B lymphocytes and EBV-negative B cell lines, this deficiency is explained by a lack of detectable levels of the central adaptor protein STING. In contrast, EBV-transformed B cell lines did express STING, yet both these lines as well as STING-reconstituted EBV-negative B cells did not produce IFN I upon dsDNA or cGAMP stimulation. Our combined data show that the cytoplasmic DNA sensing pathway is dysfunctional in human B cells. This exemplifies that certain cell types cannot induce IFN I in response to cytoplasmic DNA exposure providing a potential niche for viral persistence. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Resveratrol, piperine and apigenin differ in their NADPH-oxidase inhibitory and reactive oxygen species-scavenging properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Scott; Chen, Pei-Lin; Greenshields, Anna L; Nightingale, Mat; Hoskin, David W; Bedard, Karen

    2016-11-15

    Many plant-derived chemicals have been studied for their potential benefits in ailments including inflammation, cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease. The health benefits of phytochemicals are often attributed to the targeting of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, it is not always clear whether these agents act directly as antioxidants to remove ROS, or whether they act indirectly by blocking ROS production by enzymes such as NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes, or by influencing the expression of cellular pro- and anti- oxidants. Here we evaluate the pro- and anti-oxidant and NOX-inhibiting qualities of four phytochemicals: celastrol, resveratrol, apigenin, and piperine. This work was done using the H661 cell line expressing little or no NOX, modified H661 cells expressing NOX1 and its subunits, and an EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell line expressing endogenous NOX2. ROS were measured using Amplex Red and nitroblue tetrazolium assays. In addition, direct ROS scavenging of hydrogen peroxide or superoxide generated were measured using Amplex Red and methyl cypridina luciferin analog (MCLA). Of the four plant-derived compounds evaluated, only celastrol displayed NOX inhibitory activities, while celastrol and resveratrol both displayed ROS scavenging activity. Very little impact on ROS was observed with apigenin, or piperine. The results of this study reveal the differences that exist between cell-free and intracellular pro-oxidant and antioxidant activities of several plant-derived compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Methodological approach to the ex vivo expansion and detection of T. cruzi-specific T cells from chronic Chagas disease patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo R Acevedo

    Full Text Available The discovery of T cell epitopes is essential not only for gaining knowledge about host response to infectious disease but also for the development of immune-intervention strategies. In Chagas disease, given the size and complexity of the Trypanosoma cruzi proteome and its interaction with the host's immune system, the fine specificity of T cells has not been extensively studied yet, and this is particularly true for the CD4+ T cell compartment. The aim of the present work was to optimize a protocol for the generation of parasite-specific memory T cell lines, representative of their in vivo precursor populations and capable of responding to parasite antigens after long-term culture. Accordingly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from both chronic asymptomatic and cardiac patients, and from non-infected individuals, underwent different in vitro culture and stimulation conditions. Subsequently, cells were tested for their capacity to respond against T. cruzi lysate by measuring [3H]-thymidine incorporation and interferon-γ and GM-CSF secretion. Results allowed us to adjust initial T. cruzi lysate incubation time as well as the number of expansions with phytohemagglutinin (PHA and irradiated allogeneic PBMC prior to specificity evaluation. Moreover, our data demonstrated that parasite specific T cells displayed a clear and strong activation by using T. cruzi lysate pulsed, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-transformed human B lymphocytes (B-LCL, as autologous antigen presenting cells. Under these culture conditions, we generated a clone from an asymptomatic patient's memory CD4+ T cells which responded against epimastigote and trypomastigote protein lysate. Our results describe a culture method for isolating T. cruzi specific T cell clones from patients with Chagas disease, which enable the acquisition of information on functionality and specificity of individual T cells.

  18. Adoptive immunotherapy with unselected or EBV-specific T cells for biopsy-proven EBV+ lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Oflaz-Sozmen, Banu; Prockop, Susan E.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Abramson, Sara; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hedvat, Cyrus; Chou, Joanne F.; Heller, Glenn; Barker, Juliet N.; Boulad, Farid; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; George, Diane; Jakubowski, Ann; Koehne, Guenther; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Small, Trudy N.; Khalaf, Ramzi; Young, James W.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated HLA-compatible donor leukocyte infusions (DLIs) and HLA-compatible or HLA-disparate EBV-specific T cells (EBV-CTLs) in 49 hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients with biopsy-proven EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). DLIs and EBV-CTLs each induced durable complete or partial remissions in 73% and 68% of treated patients including 74% and 72% of patients surviving ≥ 8 days after infusion, respectively. Reversible acute GVHD occurred in recipients of DLIs (17%) but not EBV-CTLs. The probability of complete response was significantly lower among patients with multiorgan involvement. In responders, DLIs and EBV-CTLs regularly induced exponential increases in EBV-specific CTL precursor (EBV-CTLp) frequencies within 7-14 days, with subsequent clearance of EBV viremia and resolution of disease. In nonresponders, EBV-CTLps did not increase and EBV viremia persisted. Treatment failures were correlated with impaired T-cell recognition of tumor targets. Either donor-derived EBV-CTLs that had been sensitized with autologous BLCLs transformed by EBV strain B95.8 could not lyse spontaneous donor-derived EBV-transformed BLCLs expanded from the patient's blood or biopsied tumor or they failed to lyse their targets because they were selectively restricted by HLA alleles not shared by the EBV-LPD. Therefore, either unselected DLIs or EBV-specific CTLs can eradicate both untreated and Rituxan-resistant lymphomatous EBV-LPD, with failures ascribable to impaired T-cell recognition of tumor-associated viral antigens or their presenting HLA alleles. PMID:22138512

  19. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  20. The translation inhibitor silvestrol exhibits direct anti-tumor activity while preserving innate and adaptive immunity against EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, John T; Lustberg, Mark E; Lozanski, Gerard; Garman, Sabrina L; Towns, William H; Drohan, Callie M; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Bolon, Brad; Pan, Li; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Grever, Michael R; Lucas, David M; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2015-02-20

    Treatment options for patients with Epstein-Barr Virus-driven lymphoproliferative diseases (EBV-LPD) are limited. Chemo-immunotherapeutic approaches often lead to immune suppression, risk of lethal infection and EBV reactivation, thus it is essential to identify agents that can deliver direct anti-tumor activity while preserving innate and adaptive host immune surveillance. Silvestrol possesses direct anti-tumor activity in multiple hematologic malignancies while causing minimal toxicity to normal mononuclear cells. However, the effects of silvestrol on immune function have not been described. We utilized in vitro and in vivo models of EBV-LPD to simultaneously examine the impact of silvestrol on both tumor and normal immune function. We show that silvestrol induces direct anti-tumor activity against EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), with growth inhibition, decreased expression of the EBV oncogene latent membrane protein-1, and inhibition of the downstream AKT, STAT1 and STAT3 signaling pathways. Silvestrol promoted potent indirect anti-tumor effects by preserving expansion of innate and EBV antigen-specific adaptive immune effector subsets capable of effective clearance of LCL tumor targets in autologous co-cultures. In an animal model of spontaneous EBV-LPD, silvestrol demonstrated significant therapeutic activity dependent on the presence of CD8-positive T-cells. These findings establish a novel immune-sparing activity of silvestrol, justifying further exploration in patients with EBV-positive malignancies.

  1. Ultraviolet mutagenesis in a plasmid vector replicated in lymphoid cells from patient with the melanoma-prone disorder dysplastic nevus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetharam, S.; Waters, H.L.; Seidman, M.M.; Kraemer, K.H. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The hereditary dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS) is an autosomal dominant disorder in which affected individuals have increased numbers of dysplastic (premalignant) nevi and a greater than 100-fold increased risk of developing cutaneous melanoma. Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines from patients with hereditary DNS have been shown to be hypermutable to UV radiation. To examine the mechanism involved in this UV hypermutability, we used a shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, which carries a 160-base pair marker gene, supF, and can replicate in human cells. pZ189 was treated with UV radiation and transfected into DNS6BE, a lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with hereditary DNS. Plasmid survival after UV was similar with the DNS6BE line and with a lymphoblastoid cell line from a normal donor. Plasmid mutation frequency was greater with the DNS line in accord with the DNS cellular hypermutability. Base sequence analysis was performed on 69 mutated plasmids recovered from the DNS line. There were significantly more plasmids with single base substitution mutations (P less than 0.01) in comparison to UV-treated plasmids passed through normal fibroblasts. pZ189 hypermutability and an increased frequency of single base substitutions was previously found with a cell line from a melanoma-prone xeroderma pigmentosum patient. These differences may be related to the increased melanoma susceptibility in both DNS and xeroderma pigmentosum.

  2. High-throughput isolation of immunoglobulin genes from single human B cells and expression as monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Levesque, Marc C.; Nagel, Ashleigh; Dixon, Ashlyn; Zhang, Ruijun; Walter, Emmanuel; Parks, Robert; Whitesides, John; Marshall, Dawn J.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Yang, Yi; Chen, Xi; Gao, Feng; Munshaw, Supriya; Kepler, Thomas B.; Denny, Thomas; Moody, M. Anthony; Haynes, Barton F.

    2009-01-01

    Defining human B cell repertoires to viral pathogens is critical for design of vaccines that induce broadly protective antibodies to infections such as HIV-1 and influenza. Single B cell sorting and cloning of immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL) is a powerful technology for defining anti-viral B cell repertoires. However, the Ig-cloning step is time-consuming and prevents high-throughput analysis of the B cell repertoire. Novel linear Ig heavy- and light-chain gene expression cassettes were designed to express Ig VH and VL genes isolated from sorted single B cells as IgG1 antibody without a cloning step. The cassettes contain all essential elements for transcriptional and translational regulation, including CMV promoter, Ig leader sequences, constant region of IgG1 heavy- or Ig light-chain, poly(A) tail and substitutable VH or VL genes. The utility of these Ig gene expression cassettes was established using synthetic VH or VL genes from an anti-HIV-1 gp41 mAb 2F5 as a model system, and validated further using VH and VL genes isolated from cloned EBV-transformed antibody-producing cell lines. Finally, this strategy was successfully used for rapid production of recombinant influenza mAbs from sorted single human plasmablasts after influenza vaccination. These Ig gene expression cassettes constitute a highly efficient strategy for rapid expression of Ig genes for high-throughput screening and analysis without cloning. PMID:19428587

  3. Perturbation in mitochondrial network dynamics and in complex I dependent cellular respiration in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Marina; Brenner-Lavie, Hanit; Ari, Shunit Gal-Ben; Kavushansky, Alexandra; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2011-05-15

    Mitochondria have been suggested to be involved in the pathology of bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia. However, the mechanism underlying mitochondrial dysfunction is unclear. Mitochondrial network dynamics, which reflects cellular metabolic state, is important for embryonic development, synapse formation, and neurodegeneration. This study aimed to investigate mitochondrial network dynamics and its plausible association with abnormal cellular oxygen consumption in schizophrenia. Viable Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphocytes (lymphoblastoids) from DSM-IV diagnosed patients with schizophrenia (n = 17), BD (n = 15), and healthy control subjects (n = 15) were assessed for mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial dynamics, and relevant protein levels by oxygraph, confocal microscopy, and immunoblotting, respectively. Respiration of schizophrenia-derived lymphoblastoids was significantly lower compared with control subjects, and was twice as sensitive to dopamine (DA)-induced inhibition. Unlike DA, haloperidol inhibited complex I-driven respiration to a similar extent in both schizophrenia and the control cells. Both drugs interact with complex I but at different sites. At the site of DA interaction, we found alterations in protein levels of three subunits of complex I in schizophrenia. In addition, we observed structural and connectivity perturbations in the mitochondrial network, associated with alterations in the profusion protein OPA1, which was similarly reduced in schizophrenia prefrontal cortex specimens. None of these alterations were observed in the BD cells, which were similar to control cells. We show impaired mitochondrial network dynamics associated with reduced cellular respiration and complex I abnormalities in schizophrenia but not in BD. If these findings represent disease-specific alterations, they may become an endophenotype biomarker for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plymale, D. R.; Tang, D. S.; Comardelle, A. M.; Fermin, C. D.; Lewis, D. E.; Garry, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data currently available on HIV-1-induced cytopathology is unclear regarding the mechanism of cell killing. OBJECTIVE: To clarify the extent to which apoptosis or necrosis is involved in HIV-1-induced cell death in view of conflicting existing data. METHODS: T lymphoblastoid cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells were infected by various strains of HIV-1 and the numbers of apoptotic or necrotic cells were quantified at various times after infection using video-image analysis techniques; the results were compared with the amount of fragmented DNA using a quantitative method. Measurement of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (deltapsi(m)) and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca2+]i was performed with fluorescent probes and fluorescence concentration analysis (FCA). RESULTS: Although lymphoblastoid and monocytoid cells acutely infected by HIV-1 had increased levels of fragmented DNA, a marker of apoptotic cell death, few (<12%) had condensed chromatin and fragmented nuclei, the morphological features of apoptosis. The predominant alterations in acutely infected cells were distended endoplasmic reticulum and abnormal mitochondria; these ultrastructural changes are consistent with necrosis, although some infected cells simultaneously displayed features of both necrosis and apoptosis. Viability of cells persistently infected by HIV-1 was only minimally reduced from that of uninfected cells. This reduction was accounted for by an increased propensity of the persistently infected cells to die by apoptosis. Alterations in [Ca2+]i and deltapsi(m) occurred in both acutely and persistently infected cells. CONCLUSION: Both necrosis and apoptosis contribute to HIV-1-induced killing of CD4 cells.

  5. Nuclear retention of 18S ribosoma RNA by human myeloma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bynum, J.W. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale); Volkin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Normal quiescent lymphocytes regulate their ribosome content by selectively degrading newly synthesized 18S ribosomal RNA. Unlike actively dividing HeLa cells, lymphocytes retain 18S ribosomal RNA in the nucleus after synthesis instead of immediately transporting it to the cytoplasm. Subcellular fractionation of the highly differentiated human neoplastic lymphocyte RPMI-8226 reveals that this cell line also retains 18S ribosomal RNA in the nucleus, a trait not displayed by the less differentiated human lymphoblastoid cell line RPMI-4265. These observations suggest that neoplastic cells can be phenotypically characterized by their ribosomal RNA processing patterns.

  6. Population genomics of human gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranger, Barbara E.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Forrest, Matthew S.; Dimas, Antigone; Bird, Christine P.; Beazley, Claude; Ingle, Catherine E.; Dunning, Mark; Flicek, Paul; Koller, Daphne; Montgomery, Stephen; Tavaré, Simon; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variation influences gene expression, and this can be efficiently mapped to specific genomic regions and variants. We used gene expression profiling of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines of all 270 individuals of the HapMap consortium to elucidate the detailed features of genetic variation underlying gene expression variation. We find gene expression levels to be heritable and differentiation between populations in agreement with earlier small-scale studies. A detailed association analysis of over 2.2 million common SNPs per population (5% frequency HapMap) with gene expression identified at least 1348 genes with association signals in cis and at least 180 in trans. Replication in at least one independent population was achieved for 37% of cis- signals and 15% of trans- signals, respectively. Our results strongly support an abundance of cis- regulatory variation in the human genome. Detection of trans- effects is limited but suggests that regulatory variation may be the key primary effect contributing to phenotypic variation in humans. Finally, we explore a variety of methodologies that improve the current state of analysis of gene expression variation. PMID:17873874

  7. Accurate detection of carcinoma cells by use of a cell microarray chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohei Yamamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate detection and analysis of circulating tumor cells plays an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cancer treatment. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cell microarray chip was used to detect spiked carcinoma cells among leukocytes. The chip, with 20,944 microchambers (105 µm width and 50 µm depth, was made from polystyrene; and the formation of monolayers of leukocytes in the microchambers was observed. Cultured human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CCRF-CEM cells were used to examine the potential of the cell microarray chip for the detection of spiked carcinoma cells. A T lymphoblastoid leukemia suspension was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 15 min standing to allow the leukocytes to settle down into the microchambers. Approximately 29 leukocytes were found in each microchamber when about 600,000 leukocytes in total were dispersed onto a cell microarray chip. Similarly, when leukocytes isolated from human whole blood were used, approximately 89 leukocytes entered each microchamber when about 1,800,000 leukocytes in total were placed onto the cell microarray chip. After washing the chip surface, PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody and APC-labeled anti-CD326 (EpCAM monoclonal antibody solution were dispersed onto the chip surface and allowed to react for 15 min; and then a microarray scanner was employed to detect any fluorescence-positive cells within 20 min. In the experiments using spiked carcinoma cells (NCI-H1650, 0.01 to 0.0001%, accurate detection of carcinoma cells was achieved with PE-labeled anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, verification of carcinoma cells in the microchambers was performed by double staining with the above monoclonal antibodies. CONCLUSION: The potential application of the cell microarray chip for the detection of CTCs was shown, thus demonstrating accurate detection by double staining for cytokeratin and EpCAM at the single carcinoma cell level.

  8. A chimeric EBV gp350/220-based VLP replicates the virion B-cell attachment mechanism and elicits long-lasting neutralizing antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogembo, Javier Gordon; Muraswki, Matthew R; McGinnes, Lori W; Parcharidou, Agapi; Sutiwisesak, Rujapak; Tison, Timelia; Avendano, Juan; Agnani, Deep; Finberg, Robert W; Morrison, Trudy G; Fingeroth, Joyce D

    2015-02-06

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus, causes acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) and is linked to the development of several human malignancies. There is an urgent need for a vaccine that is safe, prevents infection and/or limits disease. Unique among human herpesviruses, glycoprotein (gp)350/220, which initiates EBV attachment to susceptible host cells, is the major ligand on the EBV envelope and is highly conserved. Interaction between gp350/220 and complement receptor type 2 (CR2)/CD21 and/or (CR1)/CD35 on B-cells is required for infection. Potent antibody responses to gp350/220 occur in animal models and humans. Thus, gp350/220 provides an attractive candidate for prophylactic subunit vaccine development. However, in a recent Phase II clinical trial immunization with soluble recombinant gp350 reduced the incidence of AIM, but did not prevent infection. Despite various attempts to produce an EBV vaccine, no vaccine is licensed. Herein we describe a sub-unit vaccine against EBV based on a novel Newcastle disease virus (NDV)-virus-like particle (VLP) platform consisting of EBVgp350/220 ectodomain fused to NDV-fusion (F) protein. The chimeric protein EBVgp350/220-F is incorporated into the membrane of a VLP composed of the NDV matrix and nucleoprotein. The particles resemble native EBV in diameter and shape and bind CD21 and CD35. Immunization of BALB/c mice with EBVgp350/220-F VLPs elicited strong, long-lasting neutralizing antibody responses when assessed in vitro. This chimeric VLP is predicted to provide a superior safety profile as it is efficiently produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using a platform devoid of human nucleic acid and EBV-transforming genes.

  9. Analysis of innate and acquired resistance to anti-CD20 antibodies in malignant and nonmalignant B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George W. Small

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab, provides a significant therapeutic benefit for patients with B-cell disorders. However, response to therapy varies and relapses are common, so an understanding of both inherited and acquired rituximab resistance is needed. In order to identify mechanisms of inherited resistance, sensitive versus resistant individuals were selected from a survey of 92 immortalized lymphoblastoid B-cell lines from normal individuals. Levels of CD20 protein and surface expression were lower in the resistant group. In contrast, CD20 mRNA levels were not correlated with susceptibility, suggesting regulation at a post-transcriptional level. To examine acquired resistance, resistant sublines were selected from both lymphoblastoid as well as lymphoma cell lines. Confirming previous findings, there was significant down-regulation of CD20 protein expression in all the resistant sublines. CD20 mRNA splice variants are reported to be associated with development of resistance. Three splice variants were observed in our cell lines, each lacking the binding epitope for rituximab, but none were associated with rituximab resistance. The second generation anti-CD20 mAb, ofatumumab, was more active compared with rituximab in vitro in the survey of all B-cell lines, mirroring results that have been reported previously with malignant B-cells. These studies show that normal B-lymphoblastoid cell lines can be used to model both innate and acquired mechanisms of resistance. They validate the important role of CD20 expression and enable future genetic studies to identify additional mediators of anti-CD20 mAb resistance.

  10. EBV and Apoptosis: The Viral Master Regulator of Cell Fate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gemma L.

    2017-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) was first discovered in cells from a patient with Burkitt lymphoma (BL), and is now known to be a contributory factor in 1–2% of all cancers, for which there are as yet, no EBV-targeted therapies available. Like other herpesviruses, EBV adopts a persistent latent infection in vivo and only rarely reactivates into replicative lytic cycle. Although latency is associated with restricted patterns of gene expression, genes are never expressed in isolation; always in groups. Here, we discuss (1) the ways in which the latent genes of EBV are known to modulate cell death, (2) how these mechanisms relate to growth transformation and lymphomagenesis, and (3) how EBV genes cooperate to coordinately regulate key cell death pathways in BL and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Since manipulation of the cell death machinery is critical in EBV pathogenesis, understanding the mechanisms that underpin EBV regulation of apoptosis therefore provides opportunities for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:29137176

  11. [DNA-dependent DNA polymerase induced by herpes virus papio (HVP) in producing cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'iachenko, A G; Beriia, L Ia; Matsenko, L D; Kakubava, V V; Kokosh, L V

    1980-11-01

    A new DNA polymerase was found in the cells of suspension lymphoblastoid cultures, which produce lymphotropic baboon herpes virus (HVP). The enzyme was isolated in a partially purified form. In some properties the enzyme differs from other cellular DNA polymerases. The HVP-induced DNA polymerase has the molecular weight of 1,6 x 10(5) and sedimentation coefficient of about 8S. The enzyme is resistant to high salt concentrations and N-ethylmaleimide, but shows a pronounced sensitivity to phosphonoacetate. The enzyme effectively copies "activated" DNA and synthetic deoxyribohomopolymers. The attempts to detect the DNA polymerase activity in HVP virions were unsuccessful.

  12. {gamma}-irradiation deregulates cell cycle control and apoptosis in nevoid basal cell carcinomas syndrome-derived cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masao [National Children' s Medical Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Sugita, Katsuo; Kohno, Yoichi; Nishie, Haruko; Yasumoto, Shin-ichiro; Furue, Masutaka

    1999-12-01

    The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by nevi, palmar and plantar pits, falx calcification, vertebrate anomalies and basal cell carcinomas. It is well known in NBCCS that {gamma}-irradiation to the skin induces basal cell carcinomas or causes an enlargement of the tumor size, although the details of the mechanism remain unknown. We have established lymphoblastoid cell lines from three NBCCS patients, and we present here the first evidence of abnormal cell cycle and apoptosis regulations. A novel mutation (single nucleotide deletion) in the coding region of the human patched gene, PTCH, was identified in two sibling patients, but no apparent abnormalities were detected in the gene of the remaining patient. Nevertheless, the three established cell lines showed similar features in the following analyses. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that the NBCCS-derived cells were accumulated in the G{sub 2}M phase after {gamma}-irradiation, whereas normal cells showed cell cycle arrest both in the G{sub 0}G{sub 1} and G{sub 2}M phases. The fraction of apoptotic cells after {gamma}-irradiation was smaller in the NBCCS cells. The level of p27 expression markedly decreased after {gamma}-irradiation in the NBCCS cells, although the effects of the irradiation on the expression profiles for p53, p21 and Rb did not differ in normal and NBCCS cells. These findings may provide a clue to the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis in NBCCS. (author)

  13. Experiment list: SRX189419 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically normal; 4 paternal cousins have Cornelia de Lange syndrome; 46,...te=1,2 || cell=GM10248 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically norma

  14. Experiment list: SRX189421 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozygotic twin sister with Cornelia De Lange syndrome...cell=GM13976 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozyg

  15. CD70 Deficiency due to a Novel Mutation in a Patient with Severe Chronic EBV Infection Presenting As a Periodic Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Caorsi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary immunodeficiencies with selective susceptibility to EBV infection are rare conditions associated with severe lymphoproliferation. We followed a patient, son of consanguineous parents, referred to our center for recurrent periodic episodes of fever associated with tonsillitis and adenitis started after an infectious mononucleosis and responsive to oral steroid. An initial diagnosis of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis syndrome was done. In the following months, recurrent respiratory infections and episodes of keratitis were also observed, together with a progressive reduction of immunoglobulin levels and an increase of CD20+ cells. Cell sorting and EBV PCR showed 25,000 copies for 100,000 leukocytes with predominant infection of B lymphocytes. Lymph node’s biopsy revealed reactive lymphadenopathy with paracortical involvement consistent with a chronic EBV infection. Molecular analysis of XIAP, SHA2D1A, ITK, and CD27 genes did not detect any pathogenic mutation. The patients underwent repeated courses of anti-CD20 therapy with only a partial control of the disease, followed by stem cell transplantation with a complete normalization of clinical and immunological features. Whole exome sequencing of the trio was performed. Among the variants identified, a novel loss of function homozygous c.163-2A>G mutation of the CD70 gene, affecting the exon 2 AG-acceptor splice site, fit the expected recessive model of inheritance. Indeed, deficiency of both CD27, and, more recently, of its ligand CD70, has been reported as a cause of EBV-driven lymphoproliferation and hypogammaglobulinemia. Cell surface analysis of patient-derived PHA-T cell blasts and EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines confirmed absence of CD70 expression. In conclusion, we describe a case of severe chronic EBV infection caused by a novel mutation of CD70 presenting with recurrent periodic fever.

  16. Regulation of EBV LMP1-triggered EphA4 downregulation in EBV-associated B lymphoma and its impact on patients' survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Chi; Lin, Sue-Jane; Lin, Kai-Min; Chou, Ya-Ching; Lin, Chung-Wu; Yu, Shan-Chi; Chen, Chi-Long; Shen, Tang-Long; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Lu, Jean; Chen, Mei-Ru; Tsai, Ching-Hwa

    2016-09-22

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an oncogenic human virus, is associated with several lymphoproliferative disorders, including Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). In vitro, EBV transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Recently, several studies have shown that receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play important roles in EBV-associated neoplasia. However, details of the involvement of RTKs in EBV-regulated B-cell neoplasia and malignancies remain largely unclear. Here, we found that erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A4 (EphA4), which belongs to the largest RTK Eph family, was downregulated in primary B cells post-EBV infection at the transcriptional and translational levels. Overexpression and knockdown experiments confirmed that EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was responsible for this EphA4 suppression. Mechanistically, LMP1 triggered the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and promoted Sp1 to suppress EphA4 promoter activity. Functionally, overexpression of EphA4 prevented LCLs from proliferation. Pathologically, the expression of EphA4 was detected in EBV(-) tonsils but not in EBV(+) PTLD. In addition, an inverse correlation of EphA4 expression and EBV presence was verified by immunochemical staining of EBV(+) and EBV(-) DLBCL, suggesting EBV infection was associated with reduced EphA4 expression. Analysis of a public data set showed that lower EphA4 expression was correlated with a poor survival rate of DLBCL patients. Our findings provide a novel mechanism by which EphA4 can be regulated by an oncogenic LMP1 protein and explore its possible function in B cells. The results provide new insights into the role of EphA4 in EBV(+) PTLD and DLBCL. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sanchez-Martinez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.□

  18. F-box protein FBXL2 targets cyclin D2 for ubiquitination and degradation to inhibit leukemic cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bill B.; Glasser, Jennifer R.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Zou, Chunbin; Miller, Hannah L.; Fenton, Moon; McDyer, John F.; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hematologic maligancies exhibit a growth advantage by up-regulation of components within the molecular apparatus involved in cell-cycle progression. The SCF (Skip-Cullin1-F-box protein) E3 ligase family provides homeostatic feedback control of cell division by mediating ubiquitination and degradation of cell-cycle proteins. By screening several previously undescribed E3 ligase components, we describe the behavior of a relatively new SCF subunit, termed FBXL2, that ubiquitinates and destabilizes cyclin D2 protein leading to G0 phase arrest and apoptosis in leukemic and B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. FBXL2 expression was strongly suppressed, and yet cyclin D2 protein levels were robustly expressed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patient samples. Depletion of endogenous FBXL2 stabilized cyclin D2 levels, whereas ectopically expressed FBXL2 decreased cyclin D2 lifespan. FBXL2 did not bind a phosphodegron within its substrate, which is typical of other F-box proteins, but uniquely targeted a calmodulin-binding signature within cyclin D2 to facilitate its polyubiquitination. Calmodulin competes with the F-box protein for access to this motif where it bound and protected cyclin D2 from FBXL2. Calmodulin reversed FBXL2-induced G0 phase arrest and attenuated FBXL2-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cells. These results suggest an antiproliferative effect of SCFFBXL2 in lymphoproliferative malignancies. PMID:22323446

  19. Experiment list: SRX306563 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ce_name=lymphoblastoid cell line || biomaterial_provider=Coriell; http://ccr.coriell.org/Sections/Search.../Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM18505 || cell line=GM18505 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell

  20. Bubble-seq analysis of the human genome reveals distinct chromatin-mediated mechanisms for regulating early- and late-firing origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesner, Larry D.; Valsakumar, Veena; Cieślik, Marcin; Pickin, Rebecca; Hamlin, Joyce L.; Bekiranov, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    We have devised a method for isolating virtually pure and comprehensive libraries of restriction fragments that contained replication initiation sites (bubbles) in vivo. We have now sequenced and mapped the bubble-containing fragments from GM06990, a near-normal EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line, and have compared origin distributions with a comprehensive replication timing study recently published for this cell line. We find that early-firing origins, which represent ∼32% of all origins, overwhelmingly represent zones, associate only marginally with active transcription units, are localized within large domains of open chromatin, and are significantly associated with DNase I hypersensitivity. Origin “density” falls from early- to mid-S-phase, but rises again in late S-phase to levels only 17% lower than in early S-phase. Unexpectedly, late origin density calculated on the 1-Mb scale increases as a function of increasing chromatin compaction. Furthermore, the median efficiency of origins in late-replicating, heterochromatic domains is only 25% lower than in early-replicating euchromatic loci. Thus, the activation of early- and late-firing origins must be regulated by quintessentially different mechanisms. The aggregate data can be unified into a model in which initiation site selection is driven almost entirely by epigenetic factors that fashion both the long-range and local chromatin environments, with underlying DNA sequence and local transcriptional activity playing only minor roles. Importantly, the comprehensive origin map we have prepared for GM06990 overlaps moderately well with origin maps recently reported for the genomes of four different human cell lines based on the distributions of small nascent strands. PMID:23861383

  1. Experiment list: SRX306567 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rce_name=lymphoblastoid cell line || biomaterial_provider=Coriell; http://ccr.coriell.org/Sections/Search.../Search.aspx?PgId=165&q=GM18522 || cell line=GM18522 || cell type=lymphoblastoid cel

  2. Experiment list: SRX188972 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically normal; 4 paternal cousins have Cornelia de Lange syndr...sm=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, Clinically normal; 4 paternal cousins have Cornelia d

  3. Experiment list: ERX329652 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || popu

  4. Experiment list: ERX329619 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...rganism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || popul

  5. Experiment list: ERX329692 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || population n

  6. Experiment list: ERX329697 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || population n

  7. Experiment list: ERX329708 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || population na

  8. Experiment list: ERX329615 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste... organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || pop

  9. Experiment list: ERX329682 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...rganism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || popul

  10. Experiment list: ERX329651 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...m=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || population

  11. Experiment list: ERX329681 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...rganism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || popul

  12. Experiment list: ERX329690 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...m=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || population

  13. Experiment list: ERX329641 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...sm=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || population

  14. Experiment list: ERX329667 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...sm=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || population

  15. Experiment list: ERX329632 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || population n

  16. Experiment list: ERX329657 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste... organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || pop

  17. Experiment list: ERX329636 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || population na

  18. Experiment list: ERX329678 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste... organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || pop

  19. Experiment list: ERX329706 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || popu

  20. Experiment list: ERX329694 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...m=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || population

  1. Experiment list: ERX329677 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || popu

  2. Experiment list: ERX329661 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...ganism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || popula

  3. Experiment list: ERX329612 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || population na

  4. Experiment list: ERX329663 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || population na

  5. Experiment list: ERX329659 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || popu

  6. Experiment list: ERX329713 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...m=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || population

  7. Experiment list: ERX329647 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || popu

  8. Experiment list: ERX329639 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || popu

  9. Experiment list: ERX329634 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || population n

  10. Experiment list: ERX329685 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || popu

  11. Experiment list: ERX329703 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || population n

  12. Experiment list: ERX329649 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...rganism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || popul

  13. Experiment list: ERX329616 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...m=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || population

  14. Experiment list: ERX329650 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || population n

  15. Experiment list: ERX329719 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...rganism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || popul

  16. Experiment list: ERX329715 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || population n

  17. Experiment list: ERX329658 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...m=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || population

  18. Experiment list: ERX329645 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || popu

  19. Experiment list: ERX329611 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12892 || population=HapMap CEU || popu

  20. Experiment list: ERX329614 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste... organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19240 || population=HapMap YRI || pop

  1. Experiment list: ERX329621 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || population n

  2. Experiment list: ERX329705 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste... organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || pop

  3. Experiment list: ERX329655 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19239 || population=HapMap YRI || popu

  4. Experiment list: ERX329714 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || popu

  5. Experiment list: ERX329716 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epstei...Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12891 || population=HapMap CEU || population na

  6. Experiment list: ERX329675 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste...m=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || population

  7. Experiment list: ERX329696 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epste... organism=Homo sapiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA19238 || population=HapMap YRI || pop

  8. Experiment list: SRX188971 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozygotic twin sister with Cornelia De Lange ... cell description=lymphoblastoid cell line, clinically normal; monozygotic twin sister with Cornelia De Lang

  9. Experiment list: SRX080369 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein... || cell=GM12878 || cell organism=Human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - C

  10. Experiment list: SRX150719 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, tr... || cell=GM12892 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapM

  11. Experiment list: SRX080339 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...aspx?Ref=GM12864 || cell=GM12864 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  12. Experiment list: SRX080333 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12875 || cell=GM12875 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  13. Experiment list: SRX080355 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12872 || cell=GM12872 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  14. Experiment list: SRX080349 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12873 || cell=GM12873 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  15. Experiment list: SRX080403 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12865 || cell=GM12865 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  16. Experiment list: SRX080332 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...f=GM12878 || cell=GM12878 || cell organism=Human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Pr

  17. Experiment list: SRX150532 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme... || cell=GM12891 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapM

  18. Experiment list: SRX069118 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...&q=GM12864 || cell=GM12864 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  19. Experiment list: SRX080364 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Ba...f=GM12801 || cell=GM12801 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  20. Experiment list: SRX080393 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...aspx?Ref=GM12873 || cell=GM12873 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  1. Experiment list: SRX080374 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus...1 || cell=GM12801 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International Hap

  2. Experiment list: SRX150489 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-...n=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=GM12878 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  3. Experiment list: SRX080425 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst....aspx?Ref=GM12864 || cell=GM12864 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  4. Experiment list: SRX069228 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus... cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/

  5. Experiment list: SRX080371 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus...90 || cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  6. Experiment list: SRX069105 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...&q=GM12865 || cell=GM12865 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  7. Experiment list: SRX080368 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus...90 || cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  8. Experiment list: SRX069151 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus... cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/

  9. Experiment list: SRX069154 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...&q=GM12865 || cell=GM12865 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  10. N-acetyl cysteine protects against ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage but not against cell killing in yeast and mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reliene, Ramune [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Human Nutrition, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pollard, Julianne M. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sobol, Zhanna; Trouiller, Benedicte [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gatti, Richard A. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Human Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Schiestl, Robert H., E-mail: rschiestl@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Biomedical Physics Interdepartmental Program, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA strand breaks leading to cell death or deleterious genome rearrangements. In the present study, we examined the role of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a clinically proven safe agent, for it's ability to protect against {gamma}-ray-induced DNA strand breaks and/or DNA deletions in yeast and mammals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA deletions were scored by reversion to histidine prototrophy. Human lymphoblastoid cells were examined for the frequency of {gamma}-H2AX foci formation, indicative of DNA double strand break formation. DNA strand breaks were also measured in mouse peripheral blood by the alkaline comet assay. In yeast, NAC reduced the frequency of IR-induced DNA deletions. However, NAC did not protect against cell death. NAC also reduced {gamma}-H2AX foci formation in human lymphoblastoid cells but had no protective effect in the colony survival assay. NAC administration via drinking water fully protected against DNA strand breaks in mice whole-body irradiated with 1 Gy but not with 4 Gy. NAC treatment in the absence of irradiation was not genotoxic. These data suggest that, given the safety and efficacy of NAC in humans, NAC may be useful in radiation therapy to prevent radiation-mediated genotoxicity, but does not interfere with efficient cancer cell killing.

  11. A supporting role of Chinese National Immortalized Cell Bank in life science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chong-feng; Duan, Zi-yuan

    2017-01-20

    A biorepository of human samples is essential to support the research of life science. Lymphoblastoid B cell line (LCL), which is easy to be prepared and can reproduce indefinitely, is a convenient form of sample preservation. LCLs are established from human B cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Chinese National Immortalized Cell Bank has preserved human LCLs from different ethnic groups in China. As there are many studies on the nature of LCLs and public available resources with genome-wide data for LCLs, they have been widely applied in genetics, immunology, pharmacogenetics/genomics, regenerative medicine, cancer pathogenesis and immunotherapy, screening and generation of fully human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and study on EBV pathogenesis. Here, we review the characteristics of LCLs and their contributions to scientific research, and introduce preserved samples in Chinese National Immortalized Cell Bank to the scientific community. We hope this bank can support more areas in the scientific research.

  12. Genetic diversity of EBV-encoded LMP1 in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study and implication for NF-Κb activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Zuercher

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with several types of cancers including Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1, a multifunctional oncoprotein, is a powerful activator of the transcription factor NF-κB, a property that is essential for EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell survival. Previous studies reported LMP1 sequence variations and induction of higher NF-κB activation levels compared to the prototype B95-8 LMP1 by some variants. Here we used biopsies of EBV-associated cancers and blood of individuals included in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS to analyze LMP1 genetic diversity and impact of sequence variations on LMP1-mediated NF-κB activation potential. We found that a number of variants mediate higher NF-κB activation levels when compared to B95-8 LMP1 and mapped three single polymorphisms responsible for this phenotype: F106Y, I124V and F144I. F106Y was present in all LMP1 isolated in this study and its effect was variant dependent, suggesting that it was modulated by other polymorphisms. The two polymorphisms I124V and F144I were present in distinct phylogenetic groups and were linked with other specific polymorphisms nearby, I152L and D150A/L151I, respectively. The two sets of polymorphisms, I124V/I152L and F144I/D150A/L151I, which were markers of increased NF-κB activation in vitro, were not associated with EBV-associated HL in the SHCS. Taken together these results highlighted the importance of single polymorphisms for the modulation of LMP1 signaling activity and demonstrated that several groups of LMP1 variants, through distinct mutational paths, mediated enhanced NF-κB activation levels compared to B95-8 LMP1.

  13. Transcriptome sequencing from diverse human populations reveals differentiated regulatory architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia R Martin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale sequencing efforts have documented extensive genetic variation within the human genome. However, our understanding of the origins, global distribution, and functional consequences of this variation is far from complete. While regulatory variation influencing gene expression has been studied within a handful of populations, the breadth of transcriptome differences across diverse human populations has not been systematically analyzed. To better understand the spectrum of gene expression variation, alternative splicing, and the population genetics of regulatory variation in humans, we have sequenced the genomes, exomes, and transcriptomes of EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 45 individuals in the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP. The populations sampled span the geographic breadth of human migration history and include Namibian San, Mbuti Pygmies of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Algerian Mozabites, Pathan of Pakistan, Cambodians of East Asia, Yakut of Siberia, and Mayans of Mexico. We discover that approximately 25.0% of the variation in gene expression found amongst individuals can be attributed to population differences. However, we find few genes that are systematically differentially expressed among populations. Of this population-specific variation, 75.5% is due to expression rather than splicing variability, and we find few genes with strong evidence for differential splicing across populations. Allelic expression analyses indicate that previously mapped common regulatory variants identified in eight populations from the International Haplotype Map Phase 3 project have similar effects in our seven sampled HGDP populations, suggesting that the cellular effects of common variants are shared across diverse populations. Together, these results provide a resource for studies analyzing functional differences across populations by estimating the degree of shared gene expression, alternative splicing, and

  14. Experiment list: SRX150361 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epstein-Barr...| cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijin

  15. Experiment list: SRX067520 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Bar...hromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  16. Experiment list: SRX150527 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Japan, treatment: Epstein-B...1 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo

  17. Experiment list: SRX067415 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Bar...hromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  18. Experiment list: SRX067523 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Bar...Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  19. Experiment list: SRX067459 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Bar...=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  20. Experiment list: SRX150534 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...9 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger

  1. Experiment list: SRX150402 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger

  2. Experiment list: SRX150405 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epst...193 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger

  3. Experiment list: SRX150404 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger

  4. Experiment list: SRX150533 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-B...3 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger

  5. Experiment list: SRX150403 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epst...099 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger

  6. Experiment list: SRX150607 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Japan, treatment: Epstein-B...cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Jap

  7. Experiment list: SRX150362 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epstein-Barr...|| cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, N

  8. Experiment list: SRX150609 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tokyo, Japan, treatment: Epst...951 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Japanese in Tok

  9. Experiment list: SRX150601 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment:...=GM18505 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in

  10. Experiment list: SRX150604 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epst...26 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in B

  11. Experiment list: SRX067487 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Ba...=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  12. Experiment list: SRX199864 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...12865 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  13. Experiment list: SRX067518 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Barr ...atin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International Ha

  14. Experiment list: SRX199857 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...M12873 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project

  15. Experiment list: SRX067503 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein...=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  16. Experiment list: SRX199861 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...M12872 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project

  17. Experiment list: SRX067509 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Ba...Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  18. Experiment list: SRX193598 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...2865 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project,

  19. Experiment list: SRX150528 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment: Epst...18526 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese i

  20. Experiment list: SRX150467 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...l=GM12891 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Proj

  1. Experiment list: SRX150643 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...|| cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH

  2. Experiment list: SRX150366 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...l=GM12892 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Proj

  3. Experiment list: SRX150603 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese in Beijing, China, treatment:...GM18526 || cell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Han Chinese

  4. Experiment list: SRX150605 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...GM12891 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Projec

  5. Experiment list: SRX199892 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...M12864 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project

  6. Epstein-Barr virus LMP2A signaling in statu nascendi mimics a B cell antigen receptor-like activation signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engels Niklas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The latent membrane protein (LMP 2A of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is expressed during different latency stages of EBV-infected B cells in which it triggers activation of cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases. Early studies revealed that an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM in the cytoplasmic N-terminus of LMP2A can trigger a transient increase of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration similar to that observed in antigen-activated B cells when expressed as a chimeric transmembrane receptor. Even so, LMP2A was subsequently ascribed an inhibitory rather than an activating function because its expression seemed to partially inhibit B cell antigen receptor (BCR signaling in EBV-transformed B cell lines. However, the analysis of LMP2A signaling has been hampered by the lack of cellular model systems in which LMP2A can be studied without the influence of other EBV-encoded factors. Results We have reanalyzed LMP2A signaling using B cells in which LMP2A is expressed in an inducible manner in the absence of any other EBV signaling protein. This allowed us for the first time to monitor LMP2A signaling in statu nascendi as it occurs during the EBV life cycle in vivo. We show that mere expression of LMP2A not only stimulated protein tyrosine kinases but also induced phospholipase C-γ2-mediated Ca2+ oscillations followed by activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and induction of the lytic EBV gene bzlf1. Furthermore, expression of the constitutively phosphorylated LMP2A ITAM modulated rather than inhibited BCR-induced Ca2+ mobilization. Conclusion Our data establish that LMP2A expression has a function beyond the putative inhibition of the BCR by generating a ligand-independent cellular activation signal that may provide a molecular switch for different EBV life cycle stages and most probably contributes to EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard L. Liber; Jeffrey L. Schwartz

    2005-10-31

    There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells has been to isolate individual clones and analyze gene and chromosome mutation frequencies in each. This approach maximizes the possibility of detecting low frequency events that might be selected against in mass cultures.

  8. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopek, Thomas R. (Somerville, MA); Liber, Howard L. (Brookline, MA); Penman, Bruce W. (Cambridge, MA); Thilly, William G. (Cambridge, MA); Hoppe, IV, Henry (Arlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  9. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopek, T.R.; Liber, H.L.; Penman, B.W.; Thilly, W.G.; Hoppe, H. IV.

    1981-11-24

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay. 7 figs.

  10. Ultraviolet light-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured cells from Cockayne syndrome and complementation group C xeroderma pigmentosum patients: lack of correlation with cancer susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, L.R.; Tarone, R.E.; Liao, K.H.; Robbins, J.H.

    1988-03-01

    Both Cockayne syndrome (CS) and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are inherited diseases with defective repair of damage induced in DNA by UV. Patients with XP, but not those with CS, have an increased susceptibility to formation of sunlight-induced skin tumors. We determined the frequency of UV-induced chromosomal aberrations in cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines from five CS patients and three complementation-group-C XP patients to determine whether such aberrations were abnormally increased only in the XP cells. We found that CS cells had the same abnormally increased number of induced aberrations as the XP cells, indicating that the number of UV-induced aberrations in XP group C cells does not account for the susceptibility of these XP patients to sunlight-induced skin cancer.

  11. Experiment list: SRX150492 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...an || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Cau

  12. Experiment list: SRX150470 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...ll organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah

  13. Experiment list: SRX111773 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigre

  14. Experiment list: SRX150718 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus trans...uman || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Vi

  15. Experiment list: SRX150359 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Barr Viru...ll organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera

  16. Experiment list: SRX306582 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, t...l type=lymphoblastoid cell line || population=YRI || ethnicity=Yoruba || country of origin=Nigeria || chip a

  17. Experiment list: SRX150353 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Barr Viru...ll organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera

  18. Experiment list: SRX306581 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, t...l type=lymphoblastoid cell line || population=YRI || ethnicity=Yoruba || country of origin=Nigeria || chip a

  19. Experiment list: SRX111775 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...ism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  20. Experiment list: SRX150469 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus ...nism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-B

  1. Experiment list: SRX150529 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...ell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Uta

  2. Experiment list: SRX100561 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epste...escription=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  3. Experiment list: SRX111776 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  4. Experiment list: SRX100443 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...cription=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree

  5. Experiment list: SRX100391 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,... description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap

  6. Experiment list: SRX111774 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigre

  7. Experiment list: SRX111778 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigre

  8. Experiment list: SRX111777 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatment: Epst...nism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigre

  9. Experiment list: SRX100534 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap P

  10. Experiment list: SRX102991 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - Euro

  11. Experiment list: SRX100396 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...pe description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMa

  12. Experiment list: SRX150530 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus trans...ism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Ba

  13. Experiment list: SRX150557 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein... organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah -

  14. Experiment list: SRX100530 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Cauca... cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasio

  15. Experiment list: SRX100444 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mesoderm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, tr...datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International

  16. Whole-cell biosensor for label-free detection of GPCR-mediated drug responses in personal cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillger, Julia M; Schoop, Jeffison; Boomsma, Dorret I; Slagboom, P Eline; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2015-12-15

    Deciphering how genetic variation in drug targets such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) affects drug response is essential for precision medicine. GPCR signaling is traditionally investigated in artificial cell lines which do not provide sufficient physiological context. Patient-derived cell lines such as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) could represent the ideal cellular model system. Here we describe a novel label-free, whole-cell biosensor method for characterizing GPCR-mediated drug responses in LCLs. Generally, such biosensor technology is deemed only compatible with adherent cell lines. We optimized and applied the methodology to study cellular adhesion properties as well as GPCR drug responses in LCLs, which are suspension cells. Coating the detector surface with the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin resulted in cell adherence and allowed detection of cellular responses. A prototypical GPCR present on these cells, i.e. the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), was selected for pharmacological characterization. Receptor activation with the agonist JWH133, blockade by antagonist AM630 as well as downstream signaling inhibition by PTX could be monitored sensitively and receptor-specifically. Potencies and effects were comparable between LCLs of two genetically unrelated individuals, providing the proof-of-principle that this biosensor technology can be applied to LCLs, despite their suspension cell nature, in order to serve as an in vitro model system for the evaluation of individual genetic influences on GPCR-mediated drug responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Experiment list: SRX100905 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epstein-Barr Viru... || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Epst...licate=1,3,2 || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, Tre

  18. Experiment list: SRX100903 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Eps... HS Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger... || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, T

  19. Experiment list: SRX100910 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Eps...Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger...cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, Treat

  20. Experiment list: SRX100914 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein... || datatype=DnaseSeq || datatype description=DNaseI HS Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...-value cutoff: 0.05,1% ENCODE array platform validation tests || replicate=1,3,2 || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International

  1. Experiment list: SRX100458 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...ype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapM...ll organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Projec

  2. Experiment list: SRX100481 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion,...type description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International Hap...ell organism=human || cell description=lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Proje

  3. Caffeic Acid Phenylethyl Ester and MG-132 Have Apoptotic and Antiproliferative Effects on Leukemic Cells But Not on Normal Mononuclear Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaliere, Victoria; Papademetrio, Daniela L; Lorenzetti, Mario; Valva, Pamela; Preciado, María Victoria; Gargallo, Patricia; Larripa, Irene; Monreal, Mariela B; Pardo, María Laura; Hajos, Silvia E; Blanco, Guillermo AC; Álvarez, Élida MC

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy aims to limit proliferation and induce apoptotic cell death in tumor cells. Owing to blockade of signaling pathways involved in cell survival and proliferation, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitors can induce apoptosis in a number of hematological malignancies. The efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, such as vincristine (VCR) and doxorubicine (DOX), may be enhanced with combined therapy based on NF-κB modulation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE) and MG-132, two nonspecific NF-κB inhibitors, and conventional chemotherapeutics drugs DOX and VCR on cell proliferation and apoptosis induction on a lymphoblastoid B-cell line, PL104, established and characterized in our laboratory. CAPE and MG-132 treatment showed a strong antiproliferative effect accompanied by clear cell cycle deregulation and apoptosis induction. Doxorubicine and VCR showed antiproliferative effects similar to those of CAPE and MG-132, although the latter drugs showed an apoptotic rate two-fold higher than DOX and VCR. None of the four compounds showed cytotoxic effect on peripheral mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers. CAPE- and MG-132-treated bone marrow cells from patients with myeloid and lymphoid leukemias showed 69% (P < .001) and 25% decrease (P < .01) in cell proliferation and 42% and 34% (P < .01) apoptosis induction, respectively. Overall, our results indicate that CAPE and MG-132 had a strong and selective apoptotic effect on tumor cells that may be useful in future treatment of hematological neoplasias. PMID:19252751

  4. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X Tracy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC for biofuel cell (BFC applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient, a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL, and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  5. A metabolic biofuel cell: conversion of human leukocyte metabolic activity to electrical currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, Gusphyl A; Zhang, Yingze; Cui, X Tracy; Bradberry, Charles W; Sun, Mingui; Sclabassi, Robert J

    2011-05-10

    An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC) for biofuel cell (BFC) applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc) between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient), a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL), and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester) activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  6. Experiment list: SRX100911 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, treatment: Eps...Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Niger... description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, Yoruba in Ibadan, Nigera, Treatment

  7. Experiment list: SRX100908 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...equencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree...escription=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: E

  8. Experiment list: SRX100909 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatment: Epst...equencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree...ll description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatmen

  9. Somatic cell mutation frequency at the HPRT, T-cell antigen receptor and glycophorin A loci in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y W; Kubota, M; Hirota, H; Furusho, K; Tomiwa, K; Ochi, J; Kasahara, Y; Sasaki, H; Ohta, S

    1995-07-01

    Skin fibroblasts of patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to the lethal or mutagenic effect of ultraviolet light, which may cause genetic instability. Up to now, however, no systematic study of in vivo somatic cell mutation in CS cells has been reported. This article describes our investigation of the mutation frequencies (Mfs) at three different loci, i.e. hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) and glycophorin A (GPA), in six patients with CS. Mfs at the HPRT and TCR loci were found to be within the normal range as determined in age-matched controls. In the GPA locus of two patients, there was a slight increase, but it was much smaller than that reported in other DNA repair deficient syndromes. The frequency of spontaneous HPRT mutation in Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-lymphoblastoid cells derived from CS patients was similar to that in cells from normal children. The molecular characterization of the representative HPRT mutant T cell clones from CS patients did not show any structural alterations. These results may explain, at least in part, why CS is not associated with predisposition to cancer.

  10. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease patient with MPZ mutation (CMT1B).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Daryeon; Kang, Phil Jun; Yun, Wonjin; You, Seungkwon

    2017-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1B) is an inherited neurological disorder caused by mutation of the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. We generated an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line from an 81-year-old patient with CMT1B by electroporating of lymphoblastoid cell lines with episomal plasmids encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, L-MYC, LIN28, and p53-targeting shRNA. The established iPSCs expressed various pluripotency markers, demonstrated the potential to differentiate into cells of the three germ layers in vitro, had a normal karyotype and retained the MPZ mutation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Exosomes released in vitro from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Andrea; Venturi, Giulietta; Borghi, Martina; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with a number of malignancies. Both lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), and EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells have been demonstrated to release exosomes containing the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), and mature micro-RNAs (EBV-miRNAs). Here we analyze the EBV protein and nucleic acid content of exosomes from different EBV-infected cells (LCL, 721 and Daudi) and we show for the first time that exosomes released from LCLs and 721 also contain EBV-encoded latent phase mRNAs. This confirms and strengthens exosomes pathogenetic potential, and might provide insights for development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Large-scale population study of human cell lines indicates that dosage compensation is virtually complete.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette M Johnston

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation in female mammals results in dosage compensation of X-linked gene products between the sexes. In humans there is evidence that a substantial proportion of genes escape from silencing. We have carried out a large-scale analysis of gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from four human populations to determine the extent to which escape from X chromosome inactivation disrupts dosage compensation. We conclude that dosage compensation is virtually complete. Overall expression from the X chromosome is only slightly higher in females and can largely be accounted for by elevated female expression of approximately 5% of X-linked genes. We suggest that the potential contribution of escape from X chromosome inactivation to phenotypic differences between the sexes is more limited than previously believed.

  13. Control of Epstein-Barr virus infection in vitro by T helper cells specific for virion glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Dinesh; Behrends, Uta; Moosmann, Andreas; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2006-04-17

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes lifelong persistent infections in humans by latently infecting B cells, with occasional cycles of reactivation, virus production, and reinfection. Protective immunity against EBV is mediated by T cells, but the role of EBV-specific T helper (Th) cells is still poorly defined. Here, we study the Th response to the EBV lytic cycle proteins BLLF1 (gp350/220), BALF4 (gp110), and BZLF1 and show that glycoprotein-specific Th cells recognize EBV-positive cells directly; surprisingly, a much higher percentage of target cells than those expressing lytic cycle proteins were recognized. Antigen is efficiently transferred to bystander B cells by receptor-mediated uptake of released virions, resulting in recognition of target cells incubated with virus entry before latency is established. Glycoprotein-specific Th cells are cytolytic and inhibit proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the outgrowth of LCL after infection of primary B cells with EBV. These results establish a novel role for glycoprotein-specific Th cells in the control of EBV infection and identify virion proteins as important immune targets. These findings have implications for the treatment of diseases associated with EBV and potentially other coated viruses infecting MHC class II-positive cells.

  14. Identification of 4 ataxia telangiectasia cell lines hypersensitive to. gamma. -irradiation but not to hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoni, O.; Sestili, P.; Santoro, M.P.; Tannoia, M.C.; Cattabeni, F. (Universita degli Studi di Urbino (Italy). Istituto di Farmacologia e Farmacognosia and Centro di Farmacologia Oncologia Sperimentale); Novelli, G.; Dallapiccola, B. (Universit degli Studi di Urbino (Italy). Cattedra di Genetica); Fiorilli, M. (Universita di Roma ' La Sapienze' (Italy). Cattedra di Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica)

    1989-09-01

    The effct of hydrogen peroxide on the rate of semi-conservative DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and normal human lymphoblastoid cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in AT cells was not depressed to a lesser extent than in normal cells, as might have been expected since H{sub 2O2} is a radiomimetic agent. On the contrary, 4 AT cell lines displayed a higher sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of H{sub 2O2} on DNA synthesis than 2 normal cell lines. Comparable levels of cytotoxicity were detected in cell vaibility studies. Furthermore, neither the level of DNA breakage produced by H{sub 2O2}, nor the rate of repair of these lesions was signigicantly different in normal and AT cells. Together, these results indicate that the AT cell lines utilized in this study are not hypersensitive to the oxidant. It is suggested that H-2-O-2 may not induce lethality via the direct ation of the hydroxyl radical (OH). (Author). 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab.

  15. TRAF1 Coordinates Polyubiquitin Signaling to Enhance Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1-Mediated Growth and Survival Pathway Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Greenfeld

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 signals through two C-terminal tail domains to drive cell growth, survival and transformation. The LMP1 membrane-proximal TES1/CTAR1 domain recruits TRAFs to activate MAP kinase, non-canonical and canonical NF-kB pathways, and is critical for EBV-mediated B-cell transformation. TRAF1 is amongst the most highly TES1-induced target genes and is abundantly expressed in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. We found that TRAF1 expression enhanced LMP1 TES1 domain-mediated activation of the p38, JNK, ERK and canonical NF-kB pathways, but not non-canonical NF-kB pathway activity. To gain insights into how TRAF1 amplifies LMP1 TES1 MAP kinase and canonical NF-kB pathways, we performed proteomic analysis of TRAF1 complexes immuno-purified from cells uninduced or induced for LMP1 TES1 signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that LMP1 TES1 domain signaling induced an association between TRAF1 and the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC, and stimulated linear (M1-linked polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes. LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes isolated from EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (LCLs were highly modified by M1-linked polyubiqutin chains. The M1-ubiquitin binding proteins IKK-gamma/NEMO, A20 and ABIN1 each associate with TRAF1 in cells that express LMP1. TRAF2, but not the cIAP1 or cIAP2 ubiquitin ligases, plays a key role in LUBAC recruitment and M1-chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, implicating the TRAF1:TRAF2 heterotrimer in LMP1 TES1-dependent LUBAC activation. Depletion of either TRAF1, or the LUBAC ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit HOIP, markedly impaired LCL growth. Likewise, LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes purified from LCLs were decorated by lysine 63 (K63-linked polyubiqutin chains. LMP1 TES1 signaling induced K63-polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, and TRAF2 was identified as K63-Ub chain target. Co-localization of M1- and K63

  16. Isolation, production and characterization of fully human monoclonal antibodies directed to Plasmodium falciparum MSP10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskus, Dominika J; Bethke, Susanne; Seidel, Melanie; Kapelski, Stephanie; Addai-Mensah, Otchere; Boes, Alexander; Edgü, Güven; Spiegel, Holger; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Klockenbring, Torsten; Fendel, Rolf

    2015-07-16

    Semi-immunity against the malaria parasite is defined by a protection against clinical episodes of malaria and is partially mediated by a repertoire of inhibitory antibodies directed against the blood stage of Plasmodium falciparum, in particular against surface proteins of merozoites, the invasive form of the parasite. Such antibodies may be used for preventive or therapeutic treatment of P. falciparum malaria. Here, the isolation and characterization of novel human monoclonal antibodies (humAbs) for such applications is described. B lymphocytes had been selected by flow cytometry for specificity against merozoite surface proteins, including the merozoite surface protein 10 (MSP10). After Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformation and identification of promising resulting lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), human immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable regions (Vh or Vl regions) were secured, cloned into plant expression vectors and transiently produced in Nicotiana benthamiana in the context of human full-size IgG1:κ. The specificity and the affinity of the generated antibodies were assessed by ELISA, dotblot and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. The growth inhibitory activity was evaluated based on growth inhibition assays (GIAs) using the parasite strain 3D7A. Supernatants from two LCLs, 5E8 and 5F6, showed reactivity against the second (5E8) or first (5F6) epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain of MSP10. The isolated V regions were recombinantly expressed in their natural pairing as well as in combination with each other. The resulting recombinant humAbs showed affinities of 9.27 × 10(-7) M [humAb10.1 (H5F6:κ5E8)], 5.46 × 10(-9) M [humAb10.2 (H5F6:κ5F6)] and 4.34 × 10(-9) M [humAb10.3 (H5E8:κ5E8)]. In GIAs, these antibodies exhibited EC50 values of 4.1 mg/ml [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.6-6.6 mg/ml], 6.9 mg/ml (CI 5.5-8.6 mg/ml) and 9.5 mg/ml (CI 5.5-16.4 mg/ml), respectively. This report describes a platform for the isolation of

  17. A Novel DNA-Based Vaccine Methodology for Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    to Malaria Elicited by Hybrid Hepatits B Virus Core Particles Carrying Circumsporozoite Protein Eptiopes. JExp Med 180:1037-1046 41. Hanke, T...marked as limited rights data shall not, without the written permission of the above contractor, be (a) released or disclosed outside the government, ( b ...EBV- transformed autologous B cell targets infected with a recombinant vaccinia expressing SIV gag, pol, or env. Preliminary data in Table 1 shows

  18. Detection of EBV, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, HTLV-I and -II, and SMRV in Human and Other Primate Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord C. Uphoff

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of contaminated cell cultures suggests that viral contaminations might be distributed among cultures. We investigated more than 460 primate cell lines for Epstein-Barr (EBV, hepatitis B (HBV, hepatitis C (HCV, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus I and II (HTLV-I/-II, and squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV infections for risk assessment. None of the cell lines were infected with HCV, HIV-1, or HTLV-I/-II. However, one cell line displayed reverse transcriptase activity. Thirty-nine cell lines harbored EBV DNA sequences. Studies on the lytic phase of EBV revealed that five cell lines produce EBV particles and six further cell lines produced EBV upon stimulation. One cell line contained an integrated HBV genome fragment but showed no virus production. Six cell lines were SMRV-infected. Newly established cell lines should be tested for EBV infections to detect B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL. B-LCLs established with EBV from cell line B95-8 should be tested for SMRV infections.

  19. Effects of biomaterials for Lab-on-a-chip production on cell growth and expression of differentiated functions of leukemic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro, Federica; Borgatti, Monica; Iafelice, Bruno; Gavioli, Riccardo; Braun, Tanja; Bauer, Jörg; Böttcher, Lars; Jung, Erik; Bocchi, Massimo; Guerrieri, Roberto; Gambari, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    The rapid increase of the applications for Lab-on-a-chip devices has attracted the interest of researchers and engineers on standard process of the electronics industry for low production costs and large scale development, necessary for disposable applications. The printed circuit board technology could be used for this purpose, in particular for the wide range of materials available. In this paper, assays on biocompatibility of materials used for Lab-on-a-chip fabrication has been carried out using two tumor cell lines growing in suspension, the human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line, able to undergo erythroid differentiation when cultured with chemical inducers, and the lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL), extensively used for screening of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs). We have demonstrated that some materials strongly inhibit cell proliferation of both the two cell lines to an extent higher that 70-75%, but only after a prolonged exposure of 3-6 days (Copper, Gold over Nickel, Aramid fiber filled epoxy uncured, b-stage epoxy die attach film, Tesa 4985 adhesive tape, Pyralux uncured, Copper + 1-octodecanethiol). However, when experiments were performed with short incubation time (1 h), only Aramid fiber filled epoxy uncured was cytotoxic. Variation of the results concerning the other materials was appreciable when the experiments performed on two cell lines were compared together. Furthermore, the effects of the materials on erythroid differentiation and CTL-mediated LCL lysis confirmed, in most of the cases, the data obtained in cytotoxic and antiproliferative tests.

  20. Epstein-Barr virus-positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qingqing; Chen, Kailin; Young, Ken H

    2015-01-23

    Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, can induce both lytic and latent infections that result in a variety of human diseases, including lymphoproliferative disorders. The oncogenic potential of Epstein-Barr virus is related to its ability to infect and transform B lymphocytes into continuously proliferating lymphoblastoid cells. However, Epstein-Barr virus has also been implicated in the development of T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Epstein-Barr virus encodes a series of products that mimic several growth, transcription and anti-apoptotic factors, thus usurping control of pathways that regulate diverse homeostatic cellular functions and the microenvironment. However, the exact mechanism by which Epstein-Barr virus promotes oncogenesis and inflammatory lesion development remains unclear. Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases often have overlapping clinical symptoms as well as histologic and immunophenotypic features because both lymphoid cell types derive from a common precursor. Accurate classification of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is a prerequisite for appropriate clinical management. Currently, the treatment of most T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases is less than satisfactory. Novel and targeted therapies are strongly required to satisfy clinical demands. This review describes our current knowledge of the genetics, oncogenesis, biology, diagnosis and treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-associated T/natural killer cell lymphoproliferative diseases.

  1. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, South Mimms, (United Kingdom))

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  2. Neutron Exposures in Human Cells: Bystander Effect and Relative Biological Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Stewart, Robert D.; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pneutrons do not induce a bystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0±0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8±2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety. PMID:24896095

  3. Neutron exposures in human cells: bystander effect and relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Isheeta; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Stewart, Robert D; Emery, Robert; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-01-01

    Bystander effects have been observed repeatedly in mammalian cells following photon and alpha particle irradiation. However, few studies have been performed to investigate bystander effects arising from neutron irradiation. Here we asked whether neutrons also induce a bystander effect in two normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines. These cells were exposed to fast neutrons produced by targeting a near-monoenergetic 50.5 MeV proton beam at a Be target (17 MeV average neutron energy), and irradiated-cell conditioned media (ICCM) was transferred to unirradiated cells. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to quantify genetic damage in radiation-naïve cells exposed to ICCM from cultures that received 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 or 4 Gy neutrons. Cells grown in ICCM from irradiated cells showed no significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or nucleoplasmic bridges compared to cells grown in ICCM from sham irradiated cells for either cell line. However, the neutron beam has a photon dose-contamination of 5%, which may modulate a neutron-induced bystander effect. To determine whether these low doses of contaminating photons can induce a bystander effect, cells were irradiated with cobalt-60 at doses equivalent to the percent contamination for each neutron dose. No significant increase in the frequencies of micronuclei or bridges was observed at these doses of photons for either cell line when cultured in ICCM. As expected, high doses of photons induced a clear bystander effect in both cell lines for micronuclei and bridges (pbystander effect in these cells. Finally, neutrons had a relative biological effectiveness of 2.0 ± 0.13 for micronuclei and 5.8 ± 2.9 for bridges compared to cobalt-60. These results may be relevant to radiation therapy with fast neutrons and for regulatory agencies setting standards for neutron radiation protection and safety.

  4. Integration of cell line and clinical trial genome-wide analyses supports a polygenic architecture of Paclitaxel-induced sensory peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Heather E; Gamazon, Eric R; Wing, Claudia; Njiaju, Uchenna O; Njoku, Chidiamara; Baldwin, Robert Michael; Owzar, Kouros; Jiang, Chen; Watson, Dorothy; Shterev, Ivo; Kubo, Michiaki; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Winer, Eric P; Hudis, Clifford A; Shulman, Lawrence N; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ratain, Mark J; Kroetz, Deanna L; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, Mary Eileen

    2013-01-15

    We sought to show the relevance of a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) model in the discovery of clinically relevant genetic variants affecting chemotherapeutic response by comparing LCL genome-wide association study (GWAS) results to clinical GWAS results. A GWAS of paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity was conducted in 247 LCLs from the HapMap Project and compared with a GWAS of sensory peripheral neuropathy in patients with breast cancer (n = 855) treated with paclitaxel in the Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 40101 trial. Significant enrichment was assessed by permutation resampling analysis. We observed an enrichment of LCL cytotoxicity-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the sensory peripheral neuropathy-associated SNPs from the clinical trial with concordant allelic directions of effect (empirical P = 0.007). Of the 24 SNPs that overlap between the clinical trial (P architecture of related traits in patients. ©2012 AACR.

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T cells reveals an early host response in important biological pathways: Protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navare, Arti T.; Sova, Pavel; Purdy, David E.; Weiss, Jeffrey M. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro [Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Korth, Marcus J.; Chang, Stewart T.; Proll, Sean C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Jahan, Tahmina A. [Proteomics Resource, UW Medicine at South Lake Union, Seattle, WA (United States); Krasnoselsky, Alexei L.; Palermo, Robert E. [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Katze, Michael G., E-mail: honey@uw.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) depends upon host-encoded proteins to facilitate its replication while at the same time inhibiting critical components of innate and/or intrinsic immune response pathways. To characterize the host cell response on protein levels in CD4+ lymphoblastoid SUP-T1 cells after infection with HIV-1 strain LAI, we used mass spectrometry (MS)-based global quantitation with iTRAQ (isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification). We found 266, 60 and 22 proteins differentially expressed (DE) (P-value{<=}0.05) at 4, 8, and 20 hours post-infection (hpi), respectively, compared to time-matched mock-infected samples. The majority of changes in protein abundance occurred at an early stage of infection well before the de novo production of viral proteins. Functional analyses of these DE proteins showed enrichment in several biological pathways including protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and T-cell activation. Importantly, these early changes before the time of robust viral production have not been described before.

  6. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ryan Y; Hammond, Ming C; Rio, Donald C; Lee, Yeon J

    2015-12-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion.

  7. Mitochondrial mutant cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation, phleomycin and mitomycin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Rohan; Reither, Adrian; Thomas, Robert A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, 5047 Gullen Mall, Suite 1370, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2009-04-26

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is an important contributor to the ATP-generating oxidative phosphorylation complex. Single nucleotide mutations in mitochondrial genes involved in ATP synthesis result in a broad range of diseases. Leber optic atrophy and Leigh's syndrome are two such diseases arising from point mutations in the mitochondrial genome. Here, ionizing radiation, phleomycin and mitomycin C (MMC) were used to induce structural chromosomal aberrations in Leber's and Leigh's cells to investigate how these mitochondrial mutations affect the cell's DNA repair processes. Because of the energy deprivation that results from mitochondrial mutations, we hypothesized that these mutant cells would demonstrate hypersensitivity when exposed to oxidative and genotoxic stress and we also expected that these cells would not be able to repair nuclear DNA damage as efficiently as normal cells. As a consequence, these mutant cells are expected to show increased levels of DNA damage, longer cell cycle delays and increased levels of cell death. Following acute radiation exposure these mutant cells showed an increase in the number of chromosomal aberrations and decreased mitotic indices when compared with normal human lymphoblastoid cells with wild-type mtDNA. When exposed to phleomycin or MMC, the mitochondrial mutant cells again showed hypersensitivity and decreased mitotic indices compared to normal cells. These results suggest that Leber's and Leigh's cells have an impaired ability to cope with oxidative and genotoxic stress. These observations may help explain the role of ATP generation in understanding the enhanced sensitivity of mitochondrial mutant cells to cancer therapeutic agents and to adverse environmental exposure, suggesting that individuals with mtDNA mutations may be at a greater risk for cancer and other diseases that result from an accumulation of nuclear DNA damage.

  8. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Yu-Shen; Chang, Mingi; Hsu, Chuan-Lung

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Constituents of French Marigold (Tagetes patula L.) Flowers Protect Jurkat T-Cells against Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chkhikvishvili, Irakli; Sanikidze, Tamar; Gogia, Nunu; Enukidze, Maia; Machavariani, Marine; Kipiani, Nana; Vinokur, Yakov; Rodov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The flowers of French marigold (Tagetes patula L.) are widely used in folk medicine, in particular for treating inflammation-related disorders. However, cellular mechanisms of this activity demand further investigation. In the present work, we studied the potential of T. patula compounds to alleviate the oxidative stress in hydrogen peroxide-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cells. Crude extracts of marigold flowers and purified fractions containing flavonoids patuletin, quercetagetin, and quercetin and their derivatives, as well as the carotenoid lutein, were brought in contact with Jurkat cells challenged with 25 or 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative stress in the cells, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced viability, arrested cell cycle, and enhanced apoptosis. The stress was alleviated by marigold ingredients that demonstrated high radical-scavenging capacity and enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes involved in neutralization of reactive oxygen species. Flavonoid fraction rich in quercetin and quercetagetin showed the highest cytoprotective activity, while patuletin in high dose exerted a cytotoxic effect associated with its anticancer potential. T. patula compounds enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant interleukin-10 (IL-10) in Jurkat cells. Both direct radical-scavenging capacity and stimulation of protective cellular mechanisms can underlay the anti-inflammatory properties of marigold flowers.

  10. Constituents of French Marigold (Tagetes patula L. Flowers Protect Jurkat T-Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irakli Chkhikvishvili

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flowers of French marigold (Tagetes patula L. are widely used in folk medicine, in particular for treating inflammation-related disorders. However, cellular mechanisms of this activity demand further investigation. In the present work, we studied the potential of T. patula compounds to alleviate the oxidative stress in hydrogen peroxide-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T-cells. Crude extracts of marigold flowers and purified fractions containing flavonoids patuletin, quercetagetin, and quercetin and their derivatives, as well as the carotenoid lutein, were brought in contact with Jurkat cells challenged with 25 or 50 μM H2O2. Hydrogen peroxide caused oxidative stress in the cells, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced viability, arrested cell cycle, and enhanced apoptosis. The stress was alleviated by marigold ingredients that demonstrated high radical-scavenging capacity and enhanced the activity of antioxidant enzymes involved in neutralization of reactive oxygen species. Flavonoid fraction rich in quercetin and quercetagetin showed the highest cytoprotective activity, while patuletin in high dose exerted a cytotoxic effect associated with its anticancer potential. T. patula compounds enhanced the production of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant interleukin-10 (IL-10 in Jurkat cells. Both direct radical-scavenging capacity and stimulation of protective cellular mechanisms can underlay the anti-inflammatory properties of marigold flowers.

  11. Attenuation of Theileria lestoquardi infected cells and immunization of sheep against malignant ovine theileriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Bukhari M; Taha, Khalid M; Enan, Khalid A; Elfahal, Abdelghafar M; El Hussein, Abdel Rahim M

    2013-10-01

    Malignant ovine theileriosis caused by Theileria lestoquardi is an economically important disease infecting small ruminants in the Sudan. The disease causes massive losses among sheep in many regions of Northern Sudan. The present studies were done to isolate lymphoblastoid cells infected with malignant ovine theileriosis and attenuate them by passage using culture media to develop and produce schizonts candidate vaccine, then test its efficacy and safety by exposing immunized lambs to field challenge in an area endemic with T. lestoquardi. In the present experiments we isolated and established an in vitro culture of T. lestoquardi infected lymphoblast cell line. Long-term culture of T. lestoquardi infected lymphoplastoid cells was shown to result in attenuation of their virulence and lambs inoculated with different doses of such cells at passage 105 exhibited very mild reactions with fever that lasted for 1-5 days and parasitaemia of <0.2%. The experimental lambs immunized with this candidate vaccine were immune and protected when exposed to field challenge in an area endemic of ovine theileriosis, while morbidity and mortality among non-immunized animals reached 76.9% and 46.15%, respectively, and they exhibited the clinical signs of malignant ovine theileriosis that included, high fever, loss of appetite, enlargement of lymph nodes, jaundice, loss of weight and death. The present study demonstrates the efficacy and the safety of this attenuated cell line as a live attenuated candidate vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experiment list: SRX069213 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein... cell=GM12878 || cell organism=Human || cell description=lymphoblastoid || cell karyotype=relatively normal || cell lineage=Internati...onal HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion; Epstein-Barr Virus || cell se

  13. Experiment list: SRX069089 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein...cell=GM12878 || cell organism=Human || cell description=lymphoblastoid || cell karyotype=relatively normal || cell lineage=Internatio...nal HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion; Epstein-Barr Virus || cell sex

  14. Reovirus type 3 synthesizes proteins in interferon-treated HeLa cells without reversing the antiviral state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Esteban, M; Carrasco, L

    1988-06-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with human lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN-alpha) does not inhibit reovirus type 3 protein synthesis during virus infection. In contrast, reovirus translation is blocked by treatment of L cells with mouse IFN-alpha. The (2'-5')A synthetase activity is induced in HeLa cells by IFN-alpha treatment and is activated after reovirus infection, since cell lysates from these cells synthesize in vitro (2'-5')A oligonucleotides. The IFN-induced protein kinase activity is also triggered in those lysates upon dsRNA addition. Thus, contrary to DNA-containing viruses, such as vaccinia virus or adenovirus, reovirus infection does not destroy or reverse the IFN-induced antiviral state. In support of this conclusion, superinfection with poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus of reovirus-infected HeLa cells treated with IFN leads only to a blockade of translation of the former viruses. These results provide a remarkable example where in the same cells doubly infected with two different viruses, the antiviral state induced by IFN-alpha is manifested by selectively inhibiting translation of one kind of virus (poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus) without affecting the translation of reovirus type 3. In addition, these results indicate that the resistance of reovirus translation to inhibition by IFN is different from the mechanism of resistance induced by DNA-containing viruses.

  15. Experiment list: SRX100527 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...ChipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...SL1783 || labexpid=SL1783 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, Interna...tional HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus trans

  16. Experiment list: SRX100533 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...hipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...L818 || labexpid=SL818 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, Internatio...nal HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transfor

  17. Experiment list: SRX100512 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...hipSeq || datatype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International...L1782 || labexpid=SL1782 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, Internat...ional HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, Treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transf

  18. Rosmarinic Acid-Rich Extracts of Summer Savory (Satureja hortensis L. Protect Jurkat T Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irakli Chkhikvishvili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Summer savory (Satureja hortensis L., Lamiaceae is used in several regions of the world as a spice and folk medicine. Anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of S. hortensis and of its rosmarinic acid-rich phenolic fraction have been demonstrated in animal trials. However, previous studies of rosmarinic acid in cell models have yielded controversial results. In this study, we investigated the effects of summer savory extracts on H2O2-challenged human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cells. LC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of rosmarinic acid and flavonoids such as hesperidin and naringin in the phenolic fraction. Adding 25 or 50 µM of H2O2 to the cell culture caused oxidative stress, manifested as generation of superoxide and peroxyl radicals, reduced cell viability, G0/G1 arrest, and enhanced apoptosis. This stress was significantly alleviated by the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of S. hortensis and by the partially purified rosmarinic acid fraction. The application of an aqueous S. hortensis extract doubled the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase in the cells. The production of IL-2 and IL-10 interleukins was stimulated by H2O2 and was further enhanced by the addition of the S. hortensis extract or rosmarinic acid fraction. The H2O2-challenged Jurkat cells may serve as a model for investigating cellular mechanisms of cytoprotective phytonutrient effects.

  19. Use of CEPH and non-CEPH lymphoblast cell lines in pharmacogenetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sunita J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2005-04-01

    A long-term goal of pharmacogenomic research is the design of individualized therapy based on the genomic sequence of the patient in order to maximize response and minimize adverse drug reactions. Identifying genetic variants that predict drug response is challenging because drug responses reflect not only properties intrinsic to the target cell, but also host metabolic factors. One model that is currently being employed to study genotype-phenotype correlations involves the use of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). These cell lines have been used to identify genetic variation that influences response or susceptibility to cancer, radiation, transport, cytotoxicity, and variation in global gene expression. LCLs, particularly those derived from large pedigrees, are a valuable resource for identifying candidate genes and have potential for studies of many relevant phenotypes. This paper highlights studies that have utilized Centre d' Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) and non-CEPH cell lines derived from humans for pharmacogenetic studies, and the advantages and disadvantages associated with this approach.

  20. Mixed effects modeling of proliferation rates in cell-based models: consequence for pharmacogenomics and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Kyung Im

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The International HapMap project has made publicly available extensive genotypic data on a number of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs. Building on this resource, many research groups have generated a large amount of phenotypic data on these cell lines to facilitate genetic studies of disease risk or drug response. However, one problem that may reduce the usefulness of these resources is the biological noise inherent to cellular phenotypes. We developed a novel method, termed Mixed Effects Model Averaging (MEM, which pools data from multiple sources and generates an intrinsic cellular growth rate phenotype. This intrinsic growth rate was estimated for each of over 500 HapMap cell lines. We then examined the association of this intrinsic growth rate with gene expression levels and found that almost 30% (2,967 out of 10,748 of the genes tested were significant with FDR less than 10%. We probed further to demonstrate evidence of a genetic effect on intrinsic growth rate by determining a significant enrichment in growth-associated genes among genes targeted by top growth-associated SNPs (as eQTLs. The estimated intrinsic growth rate as well as the strength of the association with genetic variants and gene expression traits are made publicly available through a cell-based pharmacogenomics database, PACdb. This resource should enable researchers to explore the mediating effects of proliferation rate on other phenotypes.

  1. Mixed Effects Modeling of Proliferation Rates in Cell-Based Models: Consequence for Pharmacogenomics and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hae Kyung; Gamazon, Eric R.; Stark, Amy L.; Huang, R. Stephanie; Cox, Nancy J.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The International HapMap project has made publicly available extensive genotypic data on a number of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). Building on this resource, many research groups have generated a large amount of phenotypic data on these cell lines to facilitate genetic studies of disease risk or drug response. However, one problem that may reduce the usefulness of these resources is the biological noise inherent to cellular phenotypes. We developed a novel method, termed Mixed Effects Model Averaging (MEM), which pools data from multiple sources and generates an intrinsic cellular growth rate phenotype. This intrinsic growth rate was estimated for each of over 500 HapMap cell lines. We then examined the association of this intrinsic growth rate with gene expression levels and found that almost 30% (2,967 out of 10,748) of the genes tested were significant with FDR less than 10%. We probed further to demonstrate evidence of a genetic effect on intrinsic growth rate by determining a significant enrichment in growth-associated genes among genes targeted by top growth-associated SNPs (as eQTLs). The estimated intrinsic growth rate as well as the strength of the association with genetic variants and gene expression traits are made publicly available through a cell-based pharmacogenomics database, PACdb. This resource should enable researchers to explore the mediating effects of proliferation rate on other phenotypes. PMID:22346769

  2. Spectra of spontaneous and X-ray-induced mutations at the hprt locus in related human lymphoblast cell lines that express wild-type or mutant p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, E.N.; Xia, F.; Kelsey, K.T.; Liber, H.L. [Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Previous work showed that WTK1 human lymphoblastoid cells are radioresistant but more sensitive to X-ray-induced mutation than the closely related line TK6. In addition, WTK1 cells contain a mutant p53 while in TK6 cells p53 is wild-type. In this work, we examined the spectra of 68 X-ray-induced and 56 spontaneous mutants at the hemizygous hprt locus in WTK1 cells. The induced spectra were classified by Southern blot and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR); there were 19 point mutations (28%) with an unaltered Southern blot or PCR pattern, 26 (38%) partial deletions or rearrangements and 23 (34%) complete gene deletions. The spontaneous spectrum included 25 (45%) point mutations, 22 (39%) partial deletions and 9 (16%) complete gene deletions. These spectra of mutations were compared to those of TK6 cells. Although distinct differences in the spectra of mutations at the tk locus were reported previously, overall there is no significant difference in the spectra of X-ray-induced or spontaneous mutations at the hprt locus in these two cell lines. While there was an increase in the proportion of large-scale changes that occurred at tk after X irradiation, the spectrum of mutations at the hprt locus shows all classes of mutations increasing proportionately in WTK1 cells. However, the proportion of internal partial deletion mutations at the hprt locus was about 2 times more frequent in WTK1 than in TK6 cells. 39 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Ultraviolet-induced mutations in Cockayne syndrome cells are primarily caused by cyclobutane dimer photoproducts while repair of other photoproducts is normal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parris, C.N.; Kraemer, K.H. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The authors compared the contribution to mutagenesis on Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of the major class of UV photoproducts, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, to that of other DNA photoproducts by using the mutagenesis shuttle vector pZ189. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from the DNA repair-deficient disorders CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and a normal line were transfected with UV-treated pZ189. Cyclobutane dimers were selectively removed before transfection by photoreactivation (PR), leaving nondimer photoproducts intact. After UV exposure and replication in CS and XP cells, plasmid survival was abnormally elevated. After PR, plasmid survival increased and mutation frequency in CS cells decreased to normal levels but remained abnormal in XP cells. Sequence analysis of >200 mutant plasmids showed that with CS cells a major mutational hot spot was caused by unrepaired cyclobutane dimers. These data indicate that with both CS and XP cyclobutane dimers are major photoproducts generating reduced plasmid survival and increased mutation frequency. However, unlike XP, CS cells are proficient in repair of nondimer photoproducts. Since XP but not CS patients have a high frequency of UV-induced skin cancers, the data suggest that prevention of UV-induced skin cancers is associated with proficient repair of nondimer photoproducts. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in cohesin mutant human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinglan; Zhang, Zhe; Bando, Masashige; Itoh, Takehiko; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Li, Jennifer R.; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Tatsuro, Kondo; Kline, Antonie D.; Chang, Celia; Vega, Hugo; Jackson, Laird G.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Krantz, Ian D.

    2010-01-01

    The cohesin complex has recently been shown to be a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression, although the mechanisms by which it exerts its effects are poorly understood. We have undertaken a genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation in cohesin-deficient cell lines from probands with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Heterozygous mutations in NIPBL, SMC1A and SMC3 genes account for ∼65% of individuals with CdLS. SMC1A and SMC3 are subunits of the cohesin complex that controls sister chromatid cohesion, whereas NIPBL facilitates cohesin loading and unloading. We have examined the methylation status of 27 578 CpG dinucleotides in 72 CdLS and control samples. We have documented the DNA methylation pattern in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) as well as identified specific differential DNA methylation in CdLS. Subgroups of CdLS probands and controls can be classified using selected CpG loci. The X chromosome was also found to have a unique DNA methylation pattern in CdLS. Cohesin preferentially binds to hypo-methylated DNA in control LCLs, whereas the differential DNA methylation alters cohesin binding in CdLS. Our results suggest that in addition to DNA methylation multiple mechanisms may be involved in transcriptional regulation in human cells and in the resultant gene misexpression in CdLS. PMID:20448023

  5. Withania somnifera Induces Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Effects on Human T Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Turrini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer chemotherapy is characterized by an elevated intrinsic toxicity and the development of drug resistance. Thus, there is a compelling need for new intervention strategies with an improved therapeutic profile. Immunogenic cell death (ICD represents an innovative anticancer strategy where dying cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns promoting tumor-specific immune responses. The roots of Withania somnifera (W. somnifera are used in the Indian traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, neuroprotective, and anticancer activities. The present study is designed to explore the antileukemic activity of the dimethyl sulfoxide extract obtained from the roots of W. somnifera (WE. We studied its cytostatic and cytotoxic activity, its ability to induce ICD, and its genotoxic potential on a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line by using different flow cytometric assays. Our results show that WE has a significant cytotoxic and cytostatic potential, and induces ICD. Its proapoptotic mechanism involves intracellular Ca2+ accumulation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In our experimental conditions, the extract possesses a genotoxic potential. Since the use of Withania is suggested in different contexts including anti-infertility and osteoarthritis care, its genotoxicity should be carefully considered for an accurate assessment of its risk–benefit profile.

  6. Withania somnifera Induces Cytotoxic and Cytostatic Effects on Human T Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Eleonora; Calcabrini, Cinzia; Sestili, Piero; Catanzaro, Elena; de Gianni, Elena; Diaz, Anna Rita; Hrelia, Patrizia; Tacchini, Massimo; Guerrini, Alessandra; Canonico, Barbara; Papa, Stefano; Valdrè, Giovanni; Fimognari, Carmela

    2016-05-12

    Cancer chemotherapy is characterized by an elevated intrinsic toxicity and the development of drug resistance. Thus, there is a compelling need for new intervention strategies with an improved therapeutic profile. Immunogenic cell death (ICD) represents an innovative anticancer strategy where dying cancer cells release damage-associated molecular patterns promoting tumor-specific immune responses. The roots of Withania somnifera (W. somnifera) are used in the Indian traditional medicine for their anti-inflammatory, immunomodulating, neuroprotective, and anticancer activities. The present study is designed to explore the antileukemic activity of the dimethyl sulfoxide extract obtained from the roots of W. somnifera (WE). We studied its cytostatic and cytotoxic activity, its ability to induce ICD, and its genotoxic potential on a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line by using different flow cytometric assays. Our results show that WE has a significant cytotoxic and cytostatic potential, and induces ICD. Its proapoptotic mechanism involves intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In our experimental conditions, the extract possesses a genotoxic potential. Since the use of Withania is suggested in different contexts including anti-infertility and osteoarthritis care, its genotoxicity should be carefully considered for an accurate assessment of its risk-benefit profile.

  7. Chromosomal instability in B-lymphoblasotoid cell lines from Werner and Bloom syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Masamitsu; Tadokoro, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Tanabe, Hideyuki; Sugimoto, Masanobu; Furuichi, Yasuhiro; Satoh, Takatomo; Sofuni, Toshio; Goto, Makoto; Hayashi, Makoto

    2002-09-26

    Werner's syndrome (WS) and Bloom's syndrome (BS) are rare autosomal genetic diseases that predispose to cancer and are associated with genomic instability. To characterize the genomic instability of WS and BS, we analyzed and compared the cytogenetics of B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from WS and BS patients and healthy donors. Although, similar spontaneous frequencies of micronuclei (MN) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) were observed in LCLs from WS patients and healthy donors, they were much higher in BS-LCLs. We also examined the cells' cytotoxic and cytogenetic formation (MN) response to camptothecin (CAM), etoposide (ETO), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), and mitomycin C (MMC). Compared to healthy donor LCLs, BS-LCLs but not WS-LCLs tended to be resistant to cytotoxicity and sensitive to MN induction by 4NQO and MMC. Spectrum karyotyping analysis revealed that most WS- and BS-LCLs generated "variegated translocation mosaicism" at high frequencies during cell culture. These findings support the idea that the basis of genomic instability in WS is different from that in BS.

  8. Analysis of baseline and cisplatin-inducible gene expression in Fanconi anemia cells using oligonucleotide-based microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Johnson M

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Fanconi anemia (FA suffer from multiple defects, most notably of the hematological compartment (bone marrow failure, and susceptibility to cancer. Cells from FA patients show increased spontaneous chromosomal damage, which is aggravated by exposure to low concentrations of DNA cross-linking agents such as mitomycin C or cisplatin. Five of the identified FA proteins form a nuclear core complex. However, the molecular function of these proteins remains obscure. Methods Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to compare the expression of approximately 12,000 genes from FA cells with matched controls. Expression profiles were studied in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from three different FA patients, one from the FA-A and two from the FA-C complementation groups. The isogenic control cell lines were obtained by either transfecting the cells with vectors expressing the complementing cDNAs or by using a spontaneous revertant cell line derived from the same patient. In addition, we analyzed expression profiles from two cell line couples at several time points after a 1-hour pulse treatment with a discriminating dose of cisplatin. Results Analysis of the expression profiles showed differences in expression of a number of genes, many of which have unknown function or are difficult to relate to the FA defect. However, from a selected number of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and chromatin structure, Western blot analysis showed that p21waf1/Cip1 was significantly upregulated after low dose cisplatin treatment in FA cells specifically (as well as being expressed at elevated levels in untreated FA cells. Conclusions The observed increase in expression of p21waf1/Cip1 after treatment of FA cells with crosslinkers suggests that the sustained elevated levels of p21waf1/Cip1 in untreated FA cells detected by Western blot analysis likely reflect increased spontaneous damage in these cells.

  9. Dynamic Epstein-Barr Virus Gene Expression on the Path to B-Cell Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexander M.; Luftig, Micah A.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus is an oncogenic human herpesvirus in the γ-herpesvirinae sub-family that contains a 170–180 kb double stranded DNA genome. In vivo, EBV commonly infects B and epithelial cells and persists for the life of the host in a latent state in the memory B cell compartment of the peripheral blood. EBV can be reactivated from its latent state leading to increased expression of lytic genes that primarily encode for enzymes necessary to replicate the viral genome as well as structural components of the virion. Lytic cycle proteins also aid in immune evasion, inhibition of apoptosis, and the modulation of other host responses to infection. In vitro, EBV has the potential to infect primary human B cells and induce cellular proliferation to yield effectively immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, or LCLs. EBV immortalization of B cells in vitro serves as a model system for studying EBV-mediated lymphomagenesis. While much is known about the steady state viral gene expression within EBV immortalized LCLs and other EBV-positive cell lines, relatively little is known about the early events after primary B-cell infection. It was previously thought that upon latent infection EBV only expressed the well-characterized latency associated transcripts found in LCLs. However, recent work has characterized the early, but transient, expression of lytic genes necessary for efficient transformation as well as delayed responses in the known latency genes. This review summarizes these recent findings that show how dynamic and controlled expression of multiple EBV genes can control the activation of B cells, entry into the cell cycle, inhibition of apoptosis, and control of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:24373315

  10. Proteoglycan expression correlates with the phenotype of malignant and non-malignant EBV-positive B-cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsidulko, Alexandra Y; Matskova, Liudmila; Astakhova, Lidiia A; Ernberg, Ingemar; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2015-12-22

    The involvement of proteoglycans (PGs) in EBV-host interactions and lymphomagenesis remains poorly investigated. In this study, expression of major proteoglycans (syndecan-1, glypican-1, perlecan, versican, brevican, aggrecan, NG2, serglycin, decorin, biglycan, lumican, CD44), heparan sulphate (HS) metabolic system (EXT1/2, NDST1/2, GLCE, HS2ST1, HS3ST1/2, HS6ST1/2, SULF1/2, HPSE) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen 1A1, fibronectin, elastin) in primary B cells and EBV carrying cell lines with different phenotypes, patterns of EBV-host cell interaction and viral latency stages (type I-III) was investigated. Primary B cells expressed a wide repertoire of PGs (dominated by serglycin and CD44) and ECM components. Lymphoblastoid EBV+ B cell lines (LCLs) showed specific PG expression with down-regulation of CD44 and ECM components and up-regulation of serglycin and perlecan/HSPG2. For Burkitt's lymphoma cells (BL), serglycin was down-regulated in BL type III cells and perlecan in type I BL cells. The biosynthetic machinery for HS was active in all cell lines, with some tendency to be down-regulated in BL cells. 5'-aza-dC and/or Trichostatin A resulted in transcriptional upregulation of the genes, suggesting that low expression of ECM components, proteoglycan core proteins and HS biosynthetic system is due to epigenetic suppression in type I cells. Taken together, our data show that proteoglycans are expressed in primary B lymphocytes whereas they are not or only partly expressed in EBV-carrying cell lines, depending on their latency type program.

  11. Effects of Citrus aurantifolia concentrated extract on the spontaneous proliferation of MDA-MB-453 and RPMI-8866 tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, M; Doroudchi, M; Ghaderi, A

    2002-07-01

    The in vitro effects of concentrated lime juice (CLJ) extract on the spontaneous proliferation of a human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-453) and a human lymphoblastoid B cell line (RPMI-8866) were investigated. CLJ extract was prepared by freeze-drying fresh fruit juice and dialyzing the concentrated extract against phosphate buffered saline in order to deplete low molecular weight micronutrients such as flavonoids as well as adjusting the pH of the extract to the physiological range. The effects of different concentrations of the CLJ extract on the spontaneous proliferative responses of the cell lines were determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 24 hrs of incubation. CLJ extract had no significant effect on MDA-MB-453 cell line, however, using the concentrations of 125, 250, and 500 microg/ml of CLJ extract a significant inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of RPMI-8866 cell line was detected (P < 0.05). Due to the protein nature of the biologically active macromolecules of the CLJ extract (Gharagozloo and Ghaderi, 2001), it is reasonable to assume that the protein components of the CLJ extract may have anti-proliferative effects on tumor cell lines.

  12. Interactive effects of fumonisin B1 and alpha-zearalenol on proliferation and cytokine expression in Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, D; Severino, L; Bergamo, P; De Luna, R; Lucisano, A; Rossi, M

    2006-12-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of fungi that grow on various food and feed. These compounds elicit a wide spectrum of toxicological effects, including the capacity to alter normal immune function. Feed commodities are usually contaminated with more than one mycotoxin; however, extensive information on the interaction between concomitantly occurring mycotoxins and the consequence for their toxicity is lacking. In the present study, we examined the effects in vitro of fumonisin B1 (FB1) and alpha-zearalenol (alpha-ZEA), alone or in combination, on the immune function in the human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cell line. Treatment of cells with increasing concentrations of FB1 resulted in a dose-dependent induction of proliferation. In contrast, alpha-ZEA showed a marked inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, even at very low doses, essentially mediated by apoptosis. In stimulated cells pre-incubated with FB1, the levels of IL-2 and IFN gamma mRNAs were similar to control whereas a reduction of cytokine transcripts was reported following alpha-ZEA treatment. Interestingly, co-administration of mycotoxins resulted in further inhibition of both proliferation and IFN gamma mRNA expression when compared with alpha-ZEA alone. In conclusion, FB1 and alpha-ZEA showed different immunomodulation abilities when individually administered. Combination of mycotoxins resulted instead in interactive effects.

  13. Analysis of mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in hMTH1 knockdown TK6 cells exposed to UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotouhi, Asal [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Hagos, Winta Woldai [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Ilic, Marina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Gruijl, Frank de [Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon; Jansen, Jacob G. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • hMTH1 protects cells from mutagenesis induced by UVA and UVB, but not UVC. • No protective role of hMTH1 in cell survival post UVB and UVC irradiation. • hMTH1 prevents induction of transition-type mutations at AT and GC post UVA irradiation. • 2-OH-dATP rather than 8-oxo-dGTP in the nucleotide pool likely contributes in UVA-induced mutations. - Abstract: Ultraviolet radiation is a highly mutagenic agent that damages the DNA by the formation of mutagenic photoproducts at dipyrimidine sites and by oxidative DNA damages via reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can also give rise to mutations via oxidation of dNTPs in the nucleotide pool, e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP and subsequent incorporation during DNA replication. Here we show that expression of human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) which sanitizes the nucleotide pool by dephosphorylating oxidized dNTPs, protects against mutagenesis induced by long wave UVA light and by UVB light but not by short wave UVC light. Mutational spectra analyses of UVA-induced mutations at the endogenous Thymidine kinase gene in human lymphoblastoid cells revealed that hMTH1 mainly protects cells from transitions at GC and AT base pairs.

  14. Gene expression patterns vary in clonal cell cultures from Rett syndrome females with eight different MECP2 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzeroni Laura

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Females with the neurological disorder Rett syndrome are heterozygous for mutations in X-linked MECP2 that encodes methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 thought to act as a transcriptional repressor. To identify target genes for MeCP2 modulation, we studied global gene expression in single cell-derived wild-type and mutant MECP2 expressing fibroblast clones with four common mutations (R106W, R306C, 705delG, 1155del32 and in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs that included four mutant MeCP2 (T158M, 803delG, R168X and 1159del28 expressing, and five (1159del28, R106W, R255X, 803delG, 803delG wild-type MeCP2 expressing lines. Methods Clonality and mutation status were verified by androgen receptor methylation assays for X-inactivation and by sequencing MECP2 transcripts. Expression studies were done with oligonucleotide microarrays (Affymetrix U95 and verified with real-time quantitative RT-PCR using Sybr Green. Results Expression of 49 transcripts was increased, and expression of 21 transcripts was decreased, in at least 3 of 4 mutant/wild-type fibroblast comparisons. Transcript levels of 11 genes, determined by quantitative RT-PCR, were highly correlated with the microarray data. Therefore, multiple additional clones from two Rett individuals were tested by RT-PCR only. Striking expression differences were found in both mutant and wildtype MeCP2 expressing clones. Comparing expression profiles of lymphoblastoid cell lines yielded 16 differentially expressed genes. Conclusions MeCP2 deficiency does not lead to global deregulation of gene expression. Either MeCP2's in vivo function does not involve widespread transcriptional repression, or its function is redundant in cell types that also express other methyl-CpG binding proteins. Our data suggest that clonal fibroblast strains may show substantial inter-strain variation, making them a difficult and unstable resource for genome-wide expression profiling studies.

  15. Experiment list: SRX189995 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. Experiment list: SRX150396 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. Experiment list: ERX329642 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. Experiment list: ERX329687 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. Experiment list: ERX329712 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-B...apiens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12878 || population=HapMap CEU || population name=CEP

  5. Experiment list: ERX329718 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. Experiment list: ERX329660 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available ption=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-B...piens || cell type=lymphoblastoid cell || cell line=NA12878 || population=HapMap CEU || population name=CEPH

  7. Experiment list: ERX329707 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. Experiment list: SRX150531 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1463, treatme...| cell=GM12892 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedig...ree 1463, treatment: Epstein-Barr Virus transformed || c

  9. Experiment list: SRX189962 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. Experiment list: SRX356488 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. Experiment list: SRX764659 [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. Experiment list: SRX764670 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764670 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28767994,99.1,5.5,45452 GSM1550991: GM1

  13. Experiment list: SRX764498 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764498 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 26310783,98.8,13.6,45782 GSM1550819: GM

  14. Experiment list: SRX1027613 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ge=mesoderm|Description=parental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 136038910,94.9,33.6,8080 ChIP-seq of...SRX1027613 hg19 No description NA Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Linea

  15. Experiment list: SRX764619 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764619 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27095108,98.7,10.1,53730 GSM1550940: GM

  16. Experiment list: SRX356719 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 23932540,98.1,6.6,831 GSM1234151: GM22...SRX356719 hg19 Histone H3K36me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  17. Experiment list: SRX027300 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX027300 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 8789614,97.3,11.6,17704 GSM593367: H3K4

  18. Experiment list: SRX764523 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764523 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27342202,99.0,2.2,27485 GSM1550844: GM1

  19. Experiment list: SRX356757 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356757 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 32425885,98.3,5.7,55730 GSM1234189: GM2

  20. Experiment list: SRX356753 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 81250951,98.8,11.3,1148 GSM1234185: GM...SRX356753 hg19 Histone H3K27me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  1. Experiment list: SRX764548 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764548 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31872768,97.1,7.1,29493 GSM1550869: GM1

  2. Experiment list: SRX764540 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764540 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30405388,99.2,6.8,29148 GSM1550861: GM1

  3. Experiment list: SRX356493 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356493 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 33418470,98.6,5.2,68958 GSM1233925: GM1

  4. Experiment list: SRX764527 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764527 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 26143483,98.9,6.9,25316 GSM1550848: GM1

  5. Experiment list: SRX764535 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764535 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28476862,99.2,6.0,43524 GSM1550856: GM1

  6. Experiment list: SRX764626 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764626 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28705882,98.3,11.1,27829 GSM1550947: GM

  7. Experiment list: SRX764678 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764678 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30462849,99.3,5.5,47716 GSM1550999: GM1

  8. Experiment list: SRX356772 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 62267279,98.9,13.2,1522 GSM1234204: GM...SRX356772 hg19 Histone H3K27me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  9. Experiment list: SRX764676 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764676 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28791533,99.1,8.6,47523 GSM1550997: GM1

  10. Experiment list: SRX764592 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764592 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30878939,99.0,23.9,43760 GSM1550913: GM

  11. Experiment list: SRX356770 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356770 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28464073,98.9,5.8,46781 GSM1234202: GM2

  12. Experiment list: SRX356486 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356486 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30840928,98.9,4.5,45869 GSM1233918: GM1

  13. Experiment list: SRX764627 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764627 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29321597,99.2,4.5,50115 GSM1550948: GM1

  14. Experiment list: SRX764651 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764651 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27861386,99.2,6.8,26675 GSM1550972: GM1

  15. Experiment list: SRX764473 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764473 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31858717,99.3,15.7,28123 GSM1550794: GM

  16. Experiment list: SRX764485 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764485 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27269244,49.1,0.0,0 GSM1550806: GM19101

  17. Experiment list: SRX764586 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764586 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31613285,99.0,10.9,45046 GSM1550907: GM

  18. Experiment list: SRX764487 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764487 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 25655556,99.3,4.9,46223 GSM1550808: GM1

  19. Experiment list: SRX764542 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764542 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34647650,99.2,3.9,50842 GSM1550863: GM1

  20. Experiment list: SRX764691 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764691 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29548007,99.1,21.0,51148 GSM1551012: GM

  1. Experiment list: SRX764572 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764572 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 25773237,99.2,9.5,49623 GSM1550893: GM1

  2. Experiment list: SRX764494 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764494 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31906028,99.0,10.5,26144 GSM1550815: GM

  3. Experiment list: SRX356555 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356555 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 35155010,99.4,6.8,74955 GSM1233987: GM1

  4. Experiment list: SRX356778 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356778 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34796608,99.0,4.6,32160 GSM1234210: GM2

  5. Experiment list: SRX356721 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356721 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34201660,98.3,4.5,70303 GSM1234153: GM2

  6. Experiment list: SRX764653 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764653 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29569353,98.5,26.0,49029 GSM1550974: GM

  7. Experiment list: SRX764591 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764591 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 25059443,98.5,10.9,49256 GSM1550912: GM

  8. Experiment list: SRX764607 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764607 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 26598634,99.1,4.0,44035 GSM1550928: GM1

  9. Experiment list: SRX764672 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764672 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31969991,99.3,7.4,49531 GSM1550993: GM1

  10. Experiment list: SRX764580 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764580 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27889940,99.1,21.3,49801 GSM1550901: GM

  11. Experiment list: SRX764608 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764608 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 33726621,99.0,14.4,56679 GSM1550929: GM

  12. Experiment list: SRX764546 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764546 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31595303,99.2,5.6,29486 GSM1550867: GM1

  13. Experiment list: SRX764481 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764481 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28465800,99.1,5.9,25340 GSM1550802: GM1

  14. Experiment list: SRX356740 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356740 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27455847,98.1,4.0,61903 GSM1234172: GM2

  15. Experiment list: SRX1027617 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ge=mesoderm|Description=parental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 77030349,96.6,8.0,18455 ChIP-seq of ...SRX1027617 hg19 No description NA Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Linea

  16. Experiment list: SRX651496 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX651496 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 69691566,95.6,1.1,20390 GSM1435521: LCL

  17. Experiment list: SRX356751 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356751 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 32977761,98.4,6.2,50931 GSM1234183: GM2

  18. Experiment list: SRX764632 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764632 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 24550608,98.9,12.7,49901 GSM1550953: GM

  19. Experiment list: SRX764504 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764504 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30438398,97.7,5.9,26914 GSM1550825: GM1

  20. Experiment list: SRX651494 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX651494 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 164816028,93.8,3.0,49161 GSM1435519: LC

  1. Experiment list: SRX764634 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764634 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28672579,98.9,8.9,23145 GSM1550955: GM1

  2. Experiment list: SRX1027611 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ge=mesoderm|Description=parental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 132887926,94.3,21.5,45014 ChIP-seq o...SRX1027611 hg19 No description NA Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Linea

  3. Experiment list: SRX764620 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764620 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27699196,99.3,4.4,28113 GSM1550941: GM1

  4. Experiment list: SRX764645 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764645 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 26309117,99.2,5.3,27204 GSM1550966: GM1

  5. Experiment list: SRX764683 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764683 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 24575637,99.3,4.2,43693 GSM1551004: GM1

  6. Experiment list: SRX764573 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764573 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 33157748,99.1,8.1,25073 GSM1550894: GM1

  7. Experiment list: SRX356769 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356769 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28202059,99.2,5.3,49771 GSM1234201: GM2

  8. Experiment list: SRX356734 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356734 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30687263,98.3,5.1,53754 GSM1234166: GM2

  9. Experiment list: SRX764579 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764579 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29302368,49.0,0.0,0 GSM1550900: GM18916

  10. Experiment list: SRX764701 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764701 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28432709,99.0,2.6,46655 GSM1551022: GM1

  11. Experiment list: SRX764502 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764502 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27978333,99.1,5.7,43053 GSM1550823: GM1

  12. Experiment list: SRX764689 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764689 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 33503308,99.1,7.0,29961 GSM1551010: GM1

  13. Experiment list: SRX356738 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 61426300,99.1,7.9,5497 GSM1234170: GM2...SRX356738 hg19 Histone H3K36me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  14. Experiment list: SRX764492 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764492 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29345339,98.6,20.9,46895 GSM1550813: GM

  15. Experiment list: SRX764646 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764646 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30468911,49.2,0.0,0 GSM1550967: GM19147

  16. Experiment list: SRX764638 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764638 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30742502,99.0,8.0,45663 GSM1550959: GM1

  17. Experiment list: SRX764584 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764584 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 36650587,99.2,8.0,50234 GSM1550905: GM1

  18. Experiment list: SRX764479 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764479 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27645450,98.8,6.6,24428 GSM1550800: GM1

  19. Experiment list: SRX356549 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356549 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 23226517,99.3,9.9,45716 GSM1233981: GM1

  20. Experiment list: SRX764664 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764664 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30487455,99.0,13.9,49028 GSM1550985: GM

  1. Experiment list: SRX356776 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356776 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 32890861,98.0,5.1,63150 GSM1234208: GM2

  2. Experiment list: SRX764510 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764510 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30398147,99.0,21.4,25043 GSM1550831: GM

  3. Experiment list: SRX651490 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX651490 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 32623743,96.4,0.6,15547 GSM1435514: LCL

  4. Experiment list: SRX764554 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764554 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 21541395,49.2,0.0,0 GSM1550875: GM18523

  5. Experiment list: SRX651500 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX651500 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34626176,96.9,1.1,44484 GSM1435525: LCL

  6. Experiment list: SRX764516 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764516 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30516212,99.2,13.3,28341 GSM1550837: GM

  7. Experiment list: SRX764508 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764508 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30289453,98.8,8.3,23413 GSM1550829: GM1

  8. Experiment list: SRX764598 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764598 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 26397968,99.1,5.8,26303 GSM1550919: GM1

  9. Experiment list: SRX080394 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah, treatment: Epstein-Ba...f=GM06990 || cell=GM06990 || cell organism=Human || cell description=Lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Pr

  10. Experiment list: SRX080348 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatme...Detail.aspx?Ref=GM12873 || cell=GM12873 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  11. Experiment list: SRX189971 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein-Bar...ernational HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasi...type description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=GM12878 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, Int

  12. Experiment list: SRX150586 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ription=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucasion, Epstein...ocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project - CEPH/Utah - European Caucas...atype description=Chromatin IP Sequencing || cell=GM12878 || cell organism=human || cell description=B-lymph

  13. Experiment list: SRX080440 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatme...Detail.aspx?Ref=GM12865 || cell=GM12865 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  14. Experiment list: SRX080405 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatme...Detail.aspx?Ref=GM12874 || cell=GM12874 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  15. Experiment list: SRX080428 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatme...Detail.aspx?Ref=GM12872 || cell=GM12872 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  16. Experiment list: SRX080387 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available erm|Description=B-lymphocyte, lymphoblastoid, International HapMap Project, CEPH/Utah pedigree 1459, treatme..._Detail.aspx?Ref=GM12875 || cell=GM12875 || cell organism=Human || cell description=B-Lymphocyte, Lymphoblastoid, International

  17. Experiment list: SRX764563 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764563 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 32370222,99.0,7.4,25392 GSM1550884: GM1

  18. Experiment list: SRX764589 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764589 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 31126518,99.0,2.5,50554 GSM1550910: GM1

  19. Experiment list: SRX356489 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 20851662,98.3,17.3,940 GSM1233921: GM1...SRX356489 hg19 Histone H3K36me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=par

  20. Experiment list: SRX764596 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764596 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 25131144,99.0,14.0,50229 GSM1550917: GM

  1. Experiment list: SRX764477 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764477 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 26516656,98.8,6.4,26419 GSM1550798: GM1

  2. Experiment list: SRX764662 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764662 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29648477,99.1,6.1,25734 GSM1550983: GM1

  3. Experiment list: SRX764512 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764512 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 18709982,99.1,1.0,40986 GSM1550833: GM1

  4. Experiment list: SRX764488 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764488 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 33247617,99.3,4.9,50992 GSM1550809: GM1

  5. Experiment list: SRX764471 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764471 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28366955,99.0,11.7,41806 GSM1550792: GM

  6. Experiment list: SRX764482 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764482 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28761359,99.0,1.6,45644 GSM1550803: GM1

  7. Experiment list: SRX764673 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764673 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 25299365,99.0,11.0,44302 GSM1550994: GM

  8. Experiment list: SRX764583 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764583 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 21434279,49.3,0.0,0 GSM1550904: GM19137

  9. Experiment list: SRX764675 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764675 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 28392223,99.2,4.4,26423 GSM1550996: GM1

  10. Experiment list: SRX764611 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764611 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29225283,99.0,10.9,23154 GSM1550932: GM

  11. Experiment list: SRX764491 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764491 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 30547551,99.1,10.2,45256 GSM1550812: GM

  12. Experiment list: SRX764501 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764501 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34268427,99.0,1.7,42941 GSM1550822: GM1

  13. Experiment list: SRX651498 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX651498 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 32875468,96.3,1.1,47142 GSM1435523: LCL

  14. Experiment list: SRX764507 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764507 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 17571288,49.0,0.0,0 GSM1550828: GM19203

  15. Experiment list: SRX356760 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX356760 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 34859141,98.0,5.0,33064 GSM1234192: GM2

  16. Experiment list: SRX1027610 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ge=mesoderm|Description=parental cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 161929200,96.0,21.9,74903 ChIP-seq o...SRX1027610 hg19 No description NA Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Linea

  17. Experiment list: SRX764655 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764655 hg19 Histone H3K27ac Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 24870777,99.0,6.1,40941 GSM1550976: GM1

  18. Experiment list: SRX764631 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764631 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 27574632,99.0,18.4,25892 GSM1550952: GM

  19. Experiment list: SRX764475 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764475 hg19 Histone H3K4me1 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 22247757,49.0,0.0,0 GSM1550796: GM19140

  20. Experiment list: SRX764556 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SRX764556 hg19 Histone H3K4me3 Blood Lymphoblastoid cell line Tissue=blood|Lineage=mesoderm|Description=pare...ntal cell type to lymphoblastoid cell lines 29798067,99.2,3.6,29094 GSM1550877: GM1