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Sample records for ebr-ii irradiated mixed

  1. Safety aspects of advanced fuels irradiations in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.

    1975-09-01

    Basic safety questions such as MFCI, loss-of-Na bond, pin behavior during design basis transients, and failure propagation were evaluated as they pertain to advanced fuels in EBR-II. With the exception of pin response to the unlikely loss-of-flow transient, the study indicates that irradiation of significant numbers of advanced fueled subassemblies in EBR-II should pose no safety problems. The analysis predicts, however, that Na boiling may occur during the postulated design basis unlikely loss-of-flow transient in subassemblies containing He-bonded fuel pins with the larger fuel-clad gaps. The calculations indicate that coolant temperatures at top of core in the limiting S/A's, containing the He bonded pins, would reach approximately 1480 0 F during the transient without application of uncertainty factors. Inclusion of uncertainties could result in temperature predictions which approach coolant boiling temperatures (1640 0 F). Further analysis of He-bonded pins is being done in this potential problem area, e.g., to apply best estimates of uncertainty factors and to determine the sensitivity of the preliminary results to gap conductance

  2. Irradiation of microphones in the EBR-II core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Bobis, J.P.

    1976-06-01

    Six ANL developed high temperature microphone (acoustic detectors) have been exposed in flowing sodium in the In-Core Instrument Test Facility (INCOT) in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for seven months without any indications of serious degradation of signal output due to the exposure. The YY05 experiment (EBR-II INCOT experiment designation) was performed to obtain data which would be useful in evaluating the ability of the microphones whose active elements are lithium niobate to serve as sensors for acoustic surveillance of fast breeder reactors. The reactor was at full power for 136 days of the experiment exposure period. The microphone temperatures varied from 371 0 C (700 0 F) to 621 0 C (1150 0 F). Neutron exposure varied from 2.64 x 10 22 nvt for the microphone at the elevation of the bottom of the EBR-II core to 0.24 x 10 22 nvt for the microphone at the elevation of the top of an EBR-II fuel assembly. The maximum gamma dose was 5 x 10 12 rads

  3. Microstructural comparison of HT-9 irradiated in HFIR and EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1985-05-01

    A series of specimens of HT-9 heat 91354 have been examined following irradiation in HFIR to 39 dpa at 300, 400, 500 and 600 0 C and following irradiation in EBR-II to 29 dpa at 390 and 500 0 C. HFIR irradiation was found to have promoted helium bubble formation at all temperatures and voids at 400 0 C. Cavitation had not been observed at lower fluence, nor was it found in EBR-II irradiated specimens. The onset of void swelling in HFIR is attributed to helium generation. The observations provide an explanation for saturation of ductile-brittle transition temperature shifts with increasing fluence

  4. Comparison of measured and calculated composition of irradiated EBR-II blanket assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K. N.

    1998-01-01

    In anticipation of processing irradiated EBR-II depleted uranium blanket subassemblies in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at ANL-West, it has been possible to obtain a limited set of destructive chemical analyses of samples from a single EBR-II blanket subassembly. Comparison of calculated values with these measurements is being used to validate a depletion methodology based on a limited number of generic models of EBR-II to simulate the irradiation history of these subassemblies. Initial comparisons indicate these methods are adequate to meet the operations and material control and accountancy (MC and A) requirements for the FCF, but also indicate several shortcomings which may be corrected or improved

  5. EBR-II: summary of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Leman, J.D.; Lentz, G.L.; Longua, K.J.; Olson, W.H.; Shields, J.A.; Wolz, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. The primary cooling system is a submerged-pool type. The early operation of the reactor successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor operating as an integrated reactor, power plant, and fuel-processing facility. In 1967, the role of EBR-II was reoriented from a demonstration plant to an irradiation facility. Many changes have been made and are continuing to be made to increase the usefulness of EBR-II for irradiation and safety tests. A review of EBR-II's operating history reveals a plant that has demonstrated high availability, stable and safe operating characteristics, and excellent performance of sodium components. Levels of radiation exposure to the operating and maintenance workers have been low; and fission-gas releases to the atmosphere have been minimal. Driver-fuel performance has been excellent. The repairability of radioactive sodium components has been successfully demonstrated a number of times. Recent highlights include installation and successful operation of (1) the hydrogen-meter leak detectors for the steam generators, (2) the cover-gas-cleanup system and (3) the cesium trap in the primary sodium. Irradiations now being conducted in EBR-II include the run-beyond-cladding breach fuel tests for mixed-oxide and carbide elements. Studies are in progress to determine EBR-II's capability for conducting important ''operational safety'' tests. These tests would extend the need and usefulness of EBR-II into the 1980's

  6. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700/sup 0/C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625/sup 0/C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities.

  7. Tensile and fracture properties of EBR-II-irradiated V-15Cr-5Ti containing helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The alloy V-15Cr-5Ti was cyclotron-implanted with 80 appM He and subsequently irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) to 30 dpa. The same alloy was also irradiated in the 10, 20, and 30% cold-worked conditions. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 400 to 700 0 C. No significant effects of helium on mechanical properties were found in this temperature range although the neutron irradiation shifted the temperature of transition from cleavage to ductile fracture to about 625 0 C. Ten percent cold work was found to have a beneficial effect in reducing the tendency for cleavage fracture following irradiation, but high levels (20%) were observed to reduce ductility. Still higher levels (30%) improved ductility by inducing recovery during the elevated-temperature irradiation. Swelling was found to be negligible, but precipitates - titanium oxides or carbonitrides - contained substantial cavities

  8. Performance of commercially produced mixed-oxide fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hales, J.W.; Lawrence, L.A.

    1980-11-01

    Commercially produced fuels for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) were irradiated in EBR-II under conditions of high cladding temperature (approx. 700 0 C) and low power (approx. 200 W/cm) to verify that manufacturing processes did not introduce variables which significantly affect general fuel performance. Four interim examinations and a terminal examination were completed to a peak burnup of 5.2 at. % to provide irradiation data pertaining to fuel restructuring and dimensional stability at low fuel temperature, fuel-cladding reactions at high cladding temperature and general fuel behavior. The examinations indicate completely satisfactory irradiation performance for low heat rates and high cladding temperatures to 5.2 at. % burnup

  9. Tensile properties of vanadium alloys irradiated at 390{degrees}C in EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Tsai, H.C.; Nowicki, L.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    Vanadium alloys were irradiated in Li-bonded stainless steel capsules to {approx}390{degrees}C in the EBR-II X-530 experiment. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of two large-scale (100 and 500 kg) heats of V-4Cr-Ti and laboratory (15-30 kg) heats of boron-doped V-4Cr-4Ti, V-8Cr-6Ti, V-5Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si alloys. Tensile specimens, divided into two groups, were irradiated in two different capsules under nominally similar conditions. The 500-kg heat (No. 832665) and the 100-kg heat (VX-8) of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in one of the subcapsules exhibited complete loss of work-hardening capability, which was manifested by very low uniform plastic strain. In contrast, the 100-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated in another subcapsule exhibited good tensile properties (uniform plastic strain 2.8-4.0%). A laboratory heat of V-3Ti-1Si irradiated in the latter subcapsule also exhibited good tensile properties. These results indicate that work-hardening capability at low irradiation temperatures varies significantly from heat to heat and is influenced by nominally small differences in irradiation conditions.

  10. Tensile properties of helium-injected V-15Cr-5Ti after irradiation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Horak, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Miniature specimens of V-15Cr-5Ti were prepared in the annealed condition and with 10, 20, and 30% cold work. The annealed specimens were cyclotron injected with helium and irradiated in sodium in EBR-II. The cold-worked specimens were irradiated in EBR-II but not helium injected. The specimens were irradiated at 400, 525, 625, and 700 0 C and received a fluence of 4.1 to 5.5 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 meV). Tensile testing revealed very significant embrittlement as a result of the neutron irradiation but a much smaller change, mostly at 400 0 C, resulting from helium injection. 5 references, 9 figures, 2 tables

  11. Swelling and tensile properties of EBR-II-irradiated tantalum alloys for space reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The tantalum alloys T-111, ASTAR-811C, Ta-10 W, and unalloyed tantalum were examined following EBR-II irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 650 to 950 K. Swelling was found to be negligible for all alloys; only tantalum was found to exhibit swelling, 0.36%. Tensile testing revealed that irradiated T-111 and Ta-10 W are susceptible to plastic instability, but ASTAR-811C and tantalum were not. The tensile properties of ASTAR-811C appeared adequate for current SP-100 space nuclear reactor designs. Irradiated, oxygen-doped T-111 exhibited no plastic deformation, and the abrupt failure was intergranular in nature. The absence of plastic instability in ASTAR-811C is encouraging for alloys containing carbide precipitates. These fine precipitates might prevent dislocation channeling, which leads to plastic instability in many bcc metals after irradiation. 10 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Eutectic penetration times in irradiated EBR-II driver fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.R.; Bottcher, J.H.; Seidel, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental test procedure employed the use of a high-temperature furnace which heated pre-irradiated elements to temperature and maintained the environment until element-cladding breach occurred. Pre-irradiated elements of the Mark-II design were first encapsulated in a close-fitting sealed tube that was instrumented with a pressure transducer at the top of the tube and a thermocouple at the element's top-of-fuel axial location. The volume of the capsule was evacuated in order to better identify the pressure pulse which would occur on breach and to minimize contaminants. Next, a three-zone fast-recovery furnace was heated and an axial temperature profile, similar to that experienced in the EBR-II core, was established. The encapsulated element was then quickly inserted into the furnace and remained there until clad breach occurred. The element was then removed from the furnace immediately. Visual and metallurgical examination of the rupture site was done later. A total of seven elements were tested in the above manner

  13. Proof tests of irradiated and unirradiated EBR-II subassembly ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Chopra, P.S.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1977-01-01

    A series of dynamic pressure tests have been conducted within EBR-II subassembly ducts. The tests were designed to simulate bursting of a driver-fuel element in a cluster of such elements at their burnup limit during off-normal conditions in EBR-II. The major objective of the tests was to assure that such failure, which might cause rapid release of stored fission gas, would not deform or otherwise damage subassembly ducts in a way that would hinder movement of a control rod. The test results are described

  14. Use of EBR-II as a principal fast breeder reactor irradiation test facility in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staker, R.G.; Seim, O.S.; Beck, W.N.; Golden, G.H.; Walters, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    The EBR-II as originally designed and operated by the Argonne National Laboratory was successful in demonstrating the operation of a sodium-cooled fast breeder power plant with a closed fuel reprocessing cycle. Subsequent operation has been as an experimental facility where thousands of irradiation tests have been performed. Conversion to this application entailed the design and fabrication of special irradiation subassemblies for in-core irradiations, additions to existing facilities for out-of-core irradiations, and additions to existing facilities for out-of-core experiments. Experimental subassemblies now constitute about one third of the core, and changes in the core configuration occur about monthly, requiring neutronic and thermal-hydraulics analyses and monitoring of the reactor dynamic behavior. The surveillance programs provided a wealth of information on irradiation induced swelling and creep, in-reactor fracture behavior, and the compatibility of materials with liquid sodium. (U.S.)

  15. Microchemical and microstructural evolution of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II at PWR-relevant dpa rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Sencer, B.H. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Marquis, E.A., E-mail: emarq@umich.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    AISI 304 stainless steel was irradiated at 416 °C and 450 °C at a 4.4 × 10{sup −9} and 3.05 × 10{sup −7} dpa/s to ∼0.4 and ∼28 dpa, respectively, in the reflector of the EBR-II fast reactor. Both unirradiated and irradiated conditions were examined using standard and scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography on very small specimens produced by focused ion beam milling. These results are compared with previous electron microscopy examination of 3 mm disks from essentially the same material. By comparing a very low dose specimen with a much higher dose specimen, both derived from a single reactor assembly, it has been demonstrated that the coupled microstructural and microchemical evolution of dislocation loops and other sinks begins very early, with elemental segregation producing at these sinks what appears to be measurable precursors to fully formed precipitates found at higher doses. The nature of these sinks and their possible precursors are examined in detail.

  16. Microchemical and microstructural evolution of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated in EBR-II at PWR-relevant dpa rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Y.; Sencer, B. H.; Garner, F. A.; Marquis, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel was irradiated at 416 °C and 450 °C at a 4.4 × 10-9 and 3.05 × 10-7 dpa/s to ∼0.4 and ∼28 dpa, respectively, in the reflector of the EBR-II fast reactor. Both unirradiated and irradiated conditions were examined using standard and scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and atom probe tomography on very small specimens produced by focused ion beam milling. These results are compared with previous electron microscopy examination of 3 mm disks from essentially the same material. By comparing a very low dose specimen with a much higher dose specimen, both derived from a single reactor assembly, it has been demonstrated that the coupled microstructural and microchemical evolution of dislocation loops and other sinks begins very early, with elemental segregation producing at these sinks what appears to be measurable precursors to fully formed precipitates found at higher doses. The nature of these sinks and their possible precursors are examined in detail.

  17. Elevated-temperature tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel irradiated in the EBR-II, AD-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Vitek, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of irradiated on the tensile properties of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel was determined for specimens irradiation in EBR-II at 390 to 550 0 C. Unirradiated control specimens and specimens aged for 5000 h at the irradiation temperatures were also tested. Irradiation to approximately 9 dpa at 390 0 C increased the strength and decreased the ductility compared with the unirradiated and aged specimens. Softening occurred in samples irradiated and tested at 450, 500, and 550 0 C

  18. Review of behavior of mixed-oxide fuel elements in extended overpower transient tests in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    From a series of five tests conducted in EBR-II, a substantial data base has been established on the performance of mixed-oxide fuel elements in a liquid-metal-cooled reactor under slow-ramp transient overpower conditions. Each test contained 19 preirradiated fuel elements with varying design and prior operating histories. Elements with aggressive design features, such as high fuel smear density and/or thin cladding, were included to accentuate transient effects. The ramp rates were either 0.1 or 10% ΔP/P/s and the overpowers ranged between ∼60 and 100% of the elements' prior power ratings. Six elements breached during the tests, all with aggressive design parameters. The other elements, including all those with moderate design features for the reference or advanced long-life drivers for PNC's prototype fast reactor Monju, maintained their cladding integrity during the tests. Posttest examination results indicated that fuel/cladding mechanical interaction (FCMI) was the most significant mechanism causing the cladding strain and breach. In contrast, pressure loading from the fission gas in the element plenum was less important, even in high-burnup elements. During an overpower transient, FCMI arises from fuel/cladding differential thermal expansion, transient fuel swelling, and, significantly, the gas pressure in the sealed central cavity of elements with substantial centerline fuel melting. Fuel performance data from these tests, including cladding breaching margin and transient cladding strain, are correlatable with fuel-element design and operating parameters. These correlations are being incorporated into fuel-element behavior codes. At the two tested ramp rates, fuel element behavior appears to be insensitive to transient ramp rate and there appears to be no particular vulnerability to slow ramp transients as previously perceived

  19. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y., E-mail: yina.huang@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Wiezorek, J.M.K. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Garner, F.A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, 2003 Howell Ave., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Freyer, P.D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Okita, T. [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y. [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Allen, T.R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void

  20. Microstructural characterization and density change of 304 stainless steel reflector blocks after long-term irradiation in EBR-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.; Garner, F. A.; Freyer, P. D.; Okita, T.; Sagisaka, M.; Isobe, Y.; Allen, T. R.

    2015-10-01

    While thin reactor structural components such as cladding and ducts do not experience significant gradients in dpa rate, gamma heating rate, temperature or stress, thick components can develop strong local variations in void swelling and irradiation creep in response to gradients in these variables. In this study we conducted microstructural investigations by transmission electron microscopy of two 52 mm thick 304-type stainless steel hex-blocks irradiated for 12 years in the EBR-II reactor with accumulated doses ranging from ∼0.4 to 33 dpa. Spatial variations in the populations of voids, precipitates, Frank loops and dislocation lines have been determined for 304 stainless steel sections exposed to different temperatures, different dpa levels and at different dpa rates, demonstrating the existence of spatial gradients in the resulting void swelling. The microstructural measurements compare very well with complementary density change measurements regarding void swelling gradients in the 304 stainless steel hex-block components. The TEM studies revealed that the original cold-worked-state microstructure of the unirradiated blocks was completely erased by irradiation, replaced by high densities of interstitial Frank loops, voids and carbide precipitates at both the lowest and highest doses. At large dose levels the amount of volumetric void swelling correlated directly with the gamma heating gradient-related temperature increase (e.g. for 28 dpa, ∼2% swelling at 418 °C and ∼2.9% swelling at 448 °C). Under approximately iso-thermal local conditions, volumetric void swelling was found to increase with dose level (e.g. ∼0.2% swelling at 0.4 dpa, ∼0.5% swelling at 4 dpa and ∼2% swelling at 28 dpa). Carbide precipitate formation levels were found to be relatively independent of both dpa level and temperature and induced a measurable densification. Void swelling was dominant at the higher dose levels and caused measurable decreases in density. Void swelling

  1. Experience with automatic reactor control at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Christensen, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    Satisfactory operation of the ACRDS has extended the capabilities of EBR-II to a transient test facility, achieving automatic transient control. Test assemblies can now be irradiated in transient conditions overlapping the slower transient capability of the TREAT reactor

  2. The influence of mechanical deformation on the irradiation creep of AISI 316 stainless steel irradiated in the EBR-II and FFTF fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Gilbert, E.R.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation creep of stainless steels is thought not to be very responsive to material and environmental variables. To test this perception earlier unpublished experiments conducted in the EBR-II reactor on AISI 316 have been analyzed. While swelling is dependent on the cold-work level at 400-480 o C, the post-transient irradiation creep rate, often called the creep compliance B0, is not dependent on cold-work level. If the tube reaches pressures on reactor start-up that generate above-yield stresses in unirradiated steel, then plastic strains occur prior to significant irradiation, but the post-transient strain rate is identical to that of material that did not exceed the yield stress on start-up. It is shown that both stress-free and stress-affected swelling are isotropic and that the Soderberg relationship is maintained. At temperatures above ∼540 o C thermal creep and stored energy begin to assert themselves, with creep rates accelerating with cold-work and becoming non-linear with stress. These results are in agreement with a similar study on titanium-modified 316 steel in FFTF. (author)

  3. Microsegregation observed in Fe-35.5Ni-7.5Cr irradiated in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    At 593 0 C one alloy, Fe-35.5Ni-7.5Cr, which was particularly resistant to swelling in EBR-II, increased in density 0.9% at 7.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Examination by energy dispersive x-ray analysis revealed that substantial oscillations occur in the nickel content of the alloy, varying from 25 to 53% about the nominal level of 35.5%. These oscillations exhibit a period of approx.200 nm. Regions enriched in nickel are depleted in chromium and iron, and the reverse is true in regions of low nickel content. This spinodal-like process produces a net densification and also appears to eventually destroy the swelling resistance of the alloy. Once voids form in the nickel-poor chromium-rich regions, further segregation of nickel to void surfaces is expected to accelerate the loss of swelling resistance

  4. LMFBR operational safety: the EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Allen, N.L.; Dean, E.M.; Fryer, R.M.; Larson, H.A.; Lehto, W.K.

    1978-01-01

    The mission of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has evolved from that of a small LMFBR demonstration plant to a major irradiation-test facility. Because of that evolution, many operational-safety issues have been encountered. The paper describes the EBR-II operational-safety experience in four areas: protection-system design, safety-document preparation, tests of off-normal reactor conditions, and tests of elements with breached cladding

  5. A transient overpower experiment in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.P.; Tsai, H.; Dean, E.M.; Aoyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    1994-01-01

    The TOPI-IE test was a transient overpower test on irradiate mixed-oxide fuel pins in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The test, the fifth in a series, was part of a cooperative program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan to conduct operational transient testing on mixed-oxide fuel pins in the metal-fueled EBR-II. The principle objective of the TOPI-1E test was to assess breaching margins for irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins over the Plant Protection System (PPS) thresholds during a slow, extended overpower transient. This paper describes the effect of the TOPI-1E experiment on reactor components and the impact of the experiment on the long-term operability of the reactor. The paper discusses the role that SASSYS played in the pre-test safety analysis of the experiment. The ability of SASSYS to model transient overpower events is detailed by comparisons of data from the experiment with computed reactor variables from a SASSYS post-test simulation of the experiment

  6. Performance of advanced oxide fuel pins in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Jensen, S.M.; Hales, J.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Makenas, B.J.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of design and operating parameters on mixed-oxide fuel pin irradiation performance were established for the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) advanced oxide EBR-II test series. Fourteen fuel pins breached in-reactor with reference 316 SS cladding. Seven of the breaches are attributed to FCMI. Of the remaining seven breached pins, three are attributed to local cladding over-temperatures similar to the breach mechanism for the reference oxide pins irradiated in EBR-II. FCCI was found to be a contributing factor in two high burnup, i.e., 11.7 at. % breaches. The remaining two breaches were attributed to mechanical interaction of UO 2 fuel and fission products accumulated in the lower cladding insulator gap, and a loss of cladding ductility possibly due to liquid metal embrittlement. Fuel smear density appears to have the most significant impact on lifetime. Quantitative evaluations of cladding diameter increases attributed to FCMI, established fuel smear density, burnup, and cladding thickness-to-diameter ratio as the major parameters influencing the extent of cladding strain

  7. Postirradiation results and evaluation of helium-bonded uranium--plutonium carbide fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, T.W.; Barner, J.O.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Green, J.L.

    1976-02-01

    An evaluation was made of the performance of 74 helium-bonded uranium-plutonium carbide fuel elements that were irradiated in EBR-II at 38-96 kW/m to 2-12 at. percent burnup. Only 38 of these elements have completed postirradiation examination. The higher failure rate found in fuel elements which contained high-density (greater than 95 percent theoretical density) fuel than those which contained low-density (77-91 percent theoretical density) fuel was attributed to the limited ability of the high-density fuel to swell into the void space provided in the fuel element. Increasing cladding thickness and original fuel-cladding gap size were both found to influence the failure rates for elements containing low-density fuel. Lower cladding strain and higher fission-gas release were found in high-burnup fuel elements having smear densities of less than 81 percent. Fission-gas release was usually less than 5 percent for high-density fuel, but increased with burnup to a maximum of 37 percent in low-density fuel. Maximum carburization in elements attaining 5-10 at. percent burnup and clad in Types 304 or 316 stainless steel and Incoloy 800 ranged from 36-80 μm and 38-52 μm, respectively. Strontium and barium were the fission products most frequently found in contact with the cladding but no penetration of the cladding by uranium, plutonium, or fission products was observed

  8. EBR-II Data Digitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sackett, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  9. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P. [and others

    1997-12-31

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D&D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively {open_quotes}solder{close_quotes} components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible.

  10. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D ampersand D plan has necessitated this current action. The EBR-II is a pool-type reactor. The primary system contains approximately 87,000 gallons of sodium, while the secondary system has 13,000 gallons. In order to properly dispose of the sodium in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), a facility has been built to react the sodium to a dry carbonate powder in a two stage process. Deactivation of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) presents unique concerns. Residual amounts of sodium remaining in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude future concerns with sodium-air reactions that generate explosive mixtures of hydrogen and leave corrosive compounds. Residual amounts of sodium on components will effectively open-quotes solderclose quotes components in place, making future operation or removal unfeasible

  11. Experience with lifetime limits for EBR-II core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Smith, R.N.; Golden, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory and is located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory where most types of American reactor were originally tested. EBR-II is a complete electricity-producing power plant now in its twenty-fourth year of successful operation. During this long history the reactor has had several concurrent missions, such as demonstration of a closed Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel cycle (1964-69); as a steady-state irradiation facility for fuels and materials (1970 onwards); for investigating effects of operational transients on fuel elements (from 1981); for research into the inherent safety aspects of metal-fueled LMR's (from 1983); and, most recently, for demonstration of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept using U-Pu-Zr fuels. This paper describes experience gained at EBR-II in defining lifetime limits for LMR core components, particularly fuel elements

  12. Effect of a time varying power level in EBR-II on mixed-oxide fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, I.Z.; Jost, J.W.; Baker, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    A refined prediction of burnup of mixed-oxide fuel in EBR-2 is compared with measured data. The calculation utilizes a time-varying power factor and results in a general improvement to previous calculations

  13. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Earle, O.K.; Henslee, S.P.; Wells, P.B.; Zahn, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D and D plan has necessitated this current action

  14. Deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelbacher, J A; Earle, O K; Henslee, S P; Wells, P B; Zahn, T P

    1996-01-01

    In January of 1994, the Department of Energy mandated the termination of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program, effective October 1, 1994. To comply with this decision, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a plan providing detailed requirements to place the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a radiologically and industrially safe condition, including removal of all irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor plant, and removal and stabilization of the primary and secondary sodium, a liquid metal used to transfer heat within the reactor plant. The ultimate goal of the deactivation process is to place the EBR-II complex in a stable condition until a decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) plan can be prepared, thereby minimizing requirements for maintenance and surveillance and maximizing the amount of time for radioactive decay. The final closure state will be achieved in full compliance with federal, state and local environmental, safety, and health regulations and requirements. The decision to delay the development of a detailed D and D plan has necessitated this current action.

  15. Characterization of spent EBR-II driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    Operations and material control and accountancy requirements for the Fuel Conditioning Facility demand accurate prediction of the mass flow of spent EBR-II driver fuel into the facility. This requires validated calculational tools that can predict the burnup and isotopic distribution in irradiated Zr-alloy fueled driver assemblies. Detailed core-follow depletion calculations have been performed for an extensive series of EBR-II runs to produce a database of material inventories for the spent fuel to be processed. As this fuel is processed, comparison of calculated values with measured data obtained from samples of this fuel is producing a growing set of validation data. A more extensive set of samples and measurements from the initial processing of irradiated driver fuel has produced valuable estimates of the biases and uncertainties in both the measured and calculated values. Results of these comparisons are presented herein and indicate the calculated values adequately predict the mass flows

  16. The physics design of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenstein, W.B.

    1962-01-01

    The physics design oi EBR-II. Calculations of the static, dynamic and long-term reactivity behaviour of EBR-II are reported together with results and analysis of EBR-II dry critical and ZPR-III mock-up experiments. Particular emphasis is given to reactor-physics design problems which arise after the conceptual design is established and before the reactor is built or placed into operation. Reactor-safety analyses and hazards-evaluation considerations are described with their influence on the reactor design. The manner of utilizing the EBR-II mock-up on ZPR-III data and the EBR-II dry critical data is described. These experiments, their analysis and theoretical predictions are the basis for predetermining the physics behaviour of the reactor system. The limitations inherent in applying the experimental data to the performance of the power-reactor system are explored in some detail. This includes the specification of reactor core size and/or fuel-alloy enrichment, provisions for adequate operating and shut-down reactivity, determination of operative temperature and power coefficients of reactivity, and details of power- and flux-distribution as a function of position within the reactor structure. The overall problem of transferring information from simple idealized analytical or experimental geometry to actual hexagonal reactor geometry is described. Nuclear performance, including breeding, of the actual reactor system is compared with that of the idealized conceptual system. The long-term reactivity and power behaviour of the reactor blanket is described within the framework of the proposed cycling of the fuel and blanket alloy. Safety considerations, including normal and abnormal rates of reactivity-insertion, the implication of postulated reactivity effects based on the physical behaviour of the fuel alloy and reactor structure as well as extrapolation of TREAT experiments to the EBR-II system are analysed. The EBR-II core melt-down problem is reviewed. (author

  17. Experience with EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Porter, D.L.; Walters, L.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    The exceptional performance of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) metallic driver fuel has been demonstrated by the irradiation of a large number of elements under steady-state, transient overpower, and loss-of-flow conditions. High burnup with high reliability has been achieved by a close coupling of element design and materials selection. Quantification of reliability has allowed full utilization of element lifetime. Improved design and duct materials currently under test are expected to increase the burnup from 8 to 14 at.%

  18. The EBR-II fuel cycle story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    This volume on the history of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR) program and the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) offers both the historical perspective and ''reasons why'' the project was so successful. The operation of the FCF in conjunction with the EBR-II was prepared because of the unique nature of the pyrmetallurgical processing system that was demonstrated at the time. Following brief descriptions and histories of the EBR-I and EBR-II reactors, the FCF and its process requirements are described. The seven principal process steps are presented, including for each one, the development, equipment used, operating procedures, results, problems and other data. Scrap and waste disposition, analytical control, safety, management, and cost of the FCF are also included

  19. EBR-II high-ramp transients under computer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrester, R.J.; Larson, H.A.; Christensen, L.J.; Booty, W.F.; Dean, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    During reactor run 122, EBR-II was subjected to 13 computer-controlled overpower transients at ramps of 4 MWt/s to qualify the facility and fuel for transient testing of LMFBR oxide fuels as part of the EBR-II operational-reliability-testing (ORT) program. A computer-controlled automatic control-rod drive system (ACRDS), designed by EBR-II personnel, permitted automatic control on demand power during the transients

  20. EBR-II: search for the lost subassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Buschman, H.W.; Poloncsik, J.; Remsburg, J.S.; Sine, H.W.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has been operating for nearly 20 years as part of the foundation of the US Department of Energy's LMFBR development program. During that time, the EBR-II fuel-handling system has performed extremely well, especially considering the conditions under which much of the system operates and the reliability required to maintain the high plant factor routinely demonstrated by EBR-II. Since EBR-II is a pool-type reactor, much of the fuel handling is done remotely within the sodium-filled primary tank at 371 0 C. Activities involved in locating a misplaced fuel subassembly in the primary tank are described

  1. Systematic variation of threshold reaction rates in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippincott, E.P.; Combs, B.L.; Davis, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    Characterization of neutron flux, fluence, and spectra in fast reactor irradiation environments is presently being carried out at HEDL utilizing the multiple foil technique. These fluences and spectra are then used to correlate damage effects data to produce damage functions or equations to predict materials effects under future irradiation conditions. The neutron flux and spectrum, then, act as a transfer function to relate present observations to future effects in the same or different environments and thus consistent fluence evaluations are of utmost importance. As part of a continuing program to establish the data base to meet consistency requirements, a systematic correlation of data from a recent dosimetry test in EBR-II is being made. The paper presents preliminary results of some of these correlations involving threshold reactions

  2. EBR-II rotating plug seal maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The EBR-II rotating plug seals require frequent cleaning and maintenance to keep the plugs from sticking during fuel handling. Time consuming cleaning on the cover gas and air sides of the dip ring seal is required to remove oxidation and sodium reaction products that accumulate and stop plug rotation. Despite severely limited access, effective seal cleaning techniques have removed 11 800 lb (5 352 kg) of deposits from the seals since 1964. Temperature control modifications and repairs have also required major maintenance work. Suggested seal design recommendations could significantly reduce maintenance on future similar seals

  3. EBR-II and TREAT Digitization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, George W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Digitizing the technical drawings for EBR-II and TREAT provides multiple benefits. Moving the scanned or hard copy drawings to modern 3-D CAD (Computer Aided Drawing) format saves data that could be lost over time. The 3-D drawings produce models that can interface with other drawings to make complex assemblies. The 3-D CAD format can also include detailed material properties and parametric coding that can tie critical dimensions together allowing easier modification. Creating the new files from the old drawings has found multiple inconsistencies that are being flagged or corrected improving understanding of the reactor(s).

  4. EBR-II and TREAT Digitization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, George W.; Rabiti, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Digitizing the technical drawings for EBR-II and TREAT provides multiple benefits. Moving the scanned or hard copy drawings to modern 3-D CAD (Computer Aided Drawing) format saves data that could be lost over time. The 3-D drawings produce models that can interface with other drawings to make complex assemblies. The 3-D CAD format can also include detailed material properties and parametric coding that can tie critical dimensions together allowing easier modification. Creating the new files from the old drawings has found multiple inconsistencies that are being flagged or corrected improving understanding of the reactor(s).

  5. Response to annealing and reirradiation of AISI 304L stainless steel following initial high-dose neutron irradiation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, D.L.; McVay, G.L.; Walters, L.C.

    1980-01-01

    The object of this study was to measure the stability of irradiation-induced microstructure upon annealing and, by selectively annealing out some of these features and reirradiating the material, it was expected that information could be gained concerning the role of microstructural changes in the void swelling process. Transmission electron microscopic examinations of isochronally annealed (200 to 1050 0 C) AISI 304L stainless steel, which had been irradiated at approximately 415 0 C to a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) neutron fluence of approximately 5.1 x 10 26 n/m 2 , verified that the two-stage hardness recovery with temperatures was related to a low temperature annealing of dislocation structures and a higher temperature annealing of voids and solute redistribution

  6. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II

  7. EBR-II: twenty years of operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.; Buschman, H.W.; Smith, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. For the last 20 years EBR-II has operated safely, has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, has shown excellent performance of its sodium components, and has had an excellent plant factor. These years of operating experience provide a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future liquid metal fast reactors. This report provides a brief description of the EBR-II plant and its early operating experience, describes some recent problems of interest to the nuclear community, and also mentions some of the significant operating achievements of EBR-II. Finally, a few words and speculations on EBR-II's future are offered. 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Reliability and extended-life potential of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although the longlife potential of liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs) has been only partially demonstrated, many factors point to the potential for exceptionally long life. EBR-II has the opportunity to become the first LMR to achieve an operational lifetime of 30 years or more. In 1984 a study of the extended-life potential of EBR-II identified the factors that contribute to the continued successful operation of EBR-II as a power reactor and experimental facility. Also identified were factors that could cause disruptions in the useful life of the facility. Although no factors were found that would inherently limit the life of EBR-II, measures were identified that could help ensure continued plant availability. These measures include the implementation of more effective surveillance, diagnostic, and control systems to complement the inherent safety and reliability features of EBR-II. An operating lifetime of well beyond 30 years is certainly feasible

  9. Sodium technology at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, J.T.; Smith, C.R.F.; Olson, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    Since the installation of purity monitoring systems in 1967, the control of the purity of the primary and secondary sodium and cover gas systems at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has been excellent. A rigorous monitoring program is being used to assure that operating limits for more than 25 chemical and radioactive impurities are not exceeded. The program involves the use of sophisticated sampling and analysis techniques and on-line monitors for both sodium and cover gas systems. Sodium purity control is accomplished by essentially continuous cold trapping of a small side stream of the total circulating sodium. The cold traps have been found to be very effective for the removal of the major chemical impurities (oxygen and hydrogen) and tritium but are almost ineffective for 131 I and 137 Cs that enter the sodium from fuel cladding breaks. Purging with pure argon maintains the cover gas purity

  10. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Carmack; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; H. Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR II as part of the Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few MA bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide, and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the effect of the MAs on fuel cladding chemical interaction and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995–1996 and, currently, represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This report provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  11. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Holland, J.W.; Kramer, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Three furnace heating tests were conducted with irradiated, HT9-clad and U-19wt%Pu-10wt%Zr-alloy, EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements to evaluate the behavior that could be expected during a loss-of-flow event in the reactor. In general, very significant safety margins for cladding breaching have been demonstrated in these tests, under conditions that would envelop a bounding unlikely loss-of-flow event in EBR-II. Highlights of the test results are presented, as are discussions of the cladding breaching mechanisms, axial fuel motion, and fuel surface liquefaction that were found in these tests. (orig.)

  12. Component configuration control system development at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, L.R.; Stratton, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    One ofthe major programs being pursued by the EBR-II Division of Argonne National Laboratory is to improve the reliability of plant control and protection systems. This effort involves looking closely at the present state of the art and needs associated with plant diagnostic, control and protection systems. One of the areas of development at EBR-II involves a component configuration control system (CCCS). This system is a computerized control and planning aid for the nuclear power operator

  13. Operating and test experience of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    EBR-II has operated for 27 years, the longest for any Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) power plant. During that time, much has been learned about successful LMR operation and design. The basic lesson is that conservatism in design can pay significant dividends in operating reliability. Furthermore, such conservatism need not mean high cost. The EBR-II system emphasizes simplicity, minimizing the number of valves in the heat transport system, for example, and simplifying the primary heat-transport-system layout. Another lesson is that emphasizing reliability of the steam generating system at the sodium-water interface (by using duplex tubes in the case of EBR-II) has been well worth the higher initial costs; no problems with leakage have been encountered in EBR-II's operating history. Locating spent fuel storage in the primary tank and providing for decay heat removal by natural connective flow have also been contributors to EBR-II's success. The ability to accommodate loss of forced cooling or loss of heat sink passively has resulted in benefits for simplification, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and in not requiring the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. Also, the 'piped-pool' arrangement minimizes thermal stress to the primary tank and enhances natural convective flow. These benefits have been realized through a history of operation that has seen EBR-II evolve through four major phases in its test programs, culminating in its present mission as the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) prototype. (author)

  14. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable.

  15. X447 EBR-II Experiment Benchmark for Verification of Audit Code of SFR Metal Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Won; Bae, Moo-Hoon; Shin, Andong; Suh, Namduk

    2016-01-01

    In KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety), to prepare audit calculation of PGSFR licensing review, the project has been started to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. To evaluate the fuel integrity and safety during an irradiation, the fuel performance code must be used for audit calculation. In this study, to verify the new code system, the benchmark analysis is performed. In the benchmark, X447 EBR-II experiment data are used. Additionally, the sensitivity analysis according to mass flux change of coolant is performed. In case of LWR fuel performance modeling, various and advanced models have been proposed and validated based on sufficient in-reactor test results. However, due to the lack of experience of SFR operation, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. In this study, X447 EBR-II Experiment data are used for benchmark. The fuel composition of X447 assembly is U-10Zr and PGSFR also uses this composition in initial phase. So we select X447 EBR-II experiment for benchmark analysis. Due to the lack of experience of SFR operation and data, the current understanding of SFR fuel behavior is limited. However, in order to prepare the licensing of PGSFR, regulatory audit technologies of SFR must be secured. So, in this study, to verify the new audit fuel performance analysis code, the benchmark analysis is performed using X447 EBR-II experiment data. Also, the sensitivity analysis with mass flux change of coolant is performed. In terms of verification, it is considered that the results of benchmark and sensitivity analysis are reasonable

  16. Planning for closure and deactivation of the EBR-II complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelbacher, J.A.; Henslee, S.P.; Poland, H.F.; Wells, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    In January 1994, DOE terminated the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Program. Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) prepared a detailed plan to put Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in a safe condition, including removal of irradiated fueled subassemblies from the plant, transfer of subassemblies, and removal and stabilization of primary and secondary sodium liquid heat transfer metal. The goal of deactivation is to stabilize the EBR-II complex until decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) is implemented, thereby minimizing maintenance and surveillance. Deactivation of a sodium cooled reactor presents unique concerns. Residual sodium in the primary and secondary systems must be either reacted or inerted to preclude concerns with explosive sodium-air reactions. Also, residual sodium on components will effectively solder these items in place, making removal unfeasible. Several special cases reside in the primary system, including primary cold traps, a cesium trap, a cover gas condenser, and systems containing sodium-potassium alloy. The sodium or sodium-potassium alloy in these components must be reacted in place or the components removed. The Sodium Components Maintenance Shop at ANL-W provides the capability for washing primary components, removing residual quantities of sodium while providing some decontamination capacity. Considerations need to be given to component removal necessary for providing access to primary tank internals for D ampersand D activities, removal of hazardous materials, and removal of stored energy sources. ANL-W's plan for the deactivation of EBR-II addresses these issues, providing for an industrially and radiologically safe complex, requiring minimal surveillance during the interim period between deactivation and D ampersand D. Throughout the deactivation and closure of the EBR-II complex, federal environmental concerns will be addressed, including obtaining the proper permits for facility condition and waste processing

  17. Evolution of thermal-hydraulics testing in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, G.H.; Planchon, H.P.; Sackett, J.I.; Singer, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulics testing and modeling program has been underway at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for 12 years. This work culminated in two tests of historical importance to commercial nuclear power, a loss of flow without scram and a loss of heat sink wihout scram, both from 100% initial power. These tests showed that natural processes will shut EBR-II down and maintain cooling without automatic control rod action or operator intervention. Supporting analyses indicate that these results are characteristic of a range of sizes of liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs), if these reactors use metal driver fuel. This type of fuel is being developed as part of the Integral Fast Reactor Program at Argonne National Laboratory. Work is now underway at EBR-II to exploit the inherent safety of metal-fueled LMRs with regard to development of improved plant control strategies. (orig.)

  18. Demonstration of passive safety features in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchon, H.P. Jr.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.

    1987-01-01

    Two tests of great importance to the design of future commercial nuclear power plants were carried out in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II on April 3, 1986. These tests, (viewed by about 60 visitors, including 13 foreign LMR specialists) were a loss of flow without scram and a loss of heat sink without scram, both from 100% initial power. In these tests, inherent feedback shut the reactor down without damage to the fuel or other reactor components. This resulted primarily from advantageous characteristics of the metal driver fuel used in EBR-II. Work is currently underway at EBR-II to develop a control strategy that promotes inherent safety characteristics, including survivability of transient overpower accidents. In parallel, work is underway at EBR-II on the development of state-of-the-art plant diagnostic techniques

  19. Tightly coupled transient analysis of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Lehto, W.K.; Sackett, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    A Tightly Coupled transient analysis system for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is currently being tested. The system consists of a faster than real time high fidelity reactor simulation, advanced graphics displays, expert system coupling, and real time data coupling via the EBR-II data acquisition system to and from the plant and the control system. The base, first generation software has been developed and is presently being tested. Various subsystem couplings and the total system integration are being checked out. This system should enhance the diagnostic and prognostic capability of EBR-II in the near term and provide automatic control during startup and power maneuvering in the future, as well as serve as a testbed for new control system development for advanced reactors

  20. System modeling and simulation at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, E.M.; Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    The codes being developed and verified using EBR-II data are the NATDEMO, DSNP and CSYRED. NATDEMO is a variation of the Westinghouse DEMO code coupled to the NATCON code previously used to simulate perturbations of reactor flow and inlet temperature and loss-of-flow transients leading to natural convection in EBR-II. CSYRED uses the Continuous System Modeling Program (CSMP) to simulate the EBR-II core, including power, temperature, control-rod movement reactivity effects and flow and is used primarily to model reactivity induced power transients. The Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power Plants (DSNP) allows a whole plant, thermal-hydraulic simulation using specific component and system models called from libraries. It has been used to simulate flow coastdown transients, reactivity insertion events and balance-of-plant perturbations

  1. EBR-II experience with sodium cleaning and radioactivity decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-01-01

    The EBR-II is now in Its 13th year of operation. During that period more than 2400 subassemblies have been cleaned of sodium without a serious incident of any kind by a two-step process developed at Argonne. Sodium cleaning and decontamination of other reactor components has been performed only on the relatively few occasions in which a repair or replacement has been required. A summary of the EBR-II experience will be presented. A new facility will be described for the improved cleaning and maintenance of sodium-wetted primary components

  2. EBR-II experience with sodium cleaning and radioactivity decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruther, W E; Smith, C R.F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    1978-08-01

    The EBR-II is now in Its 13th year of operation. During that period more than 2400 subassemblies have been cleaned of sodium without a serious incident of any kind by a two-step process developed at Argonne. Sodium cleaning and decontamination of other reactor components has been performed only on the relatively few occasions in which a repair or replacement has been required. A summary of the EBR-II experience will be presented. A new facility will be described for the improved cleaning and maintenance of sodium-wetted primary components.

  3. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Veith, D.J.; Giorgis, G.C.; Walker, D.E.; Seim, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF) is the latest in a series of special EBR-II instrumented in-core test facilities. A flow control valve in the facility is programmed to vary the coolant flow, and thus the temperature, in an experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it and coupled to it. In this way, thermal transients can be simulated in that subassembly without changing the temperatures in surrounding subassemblies. The FPTF also monitors sodium flow and temperature, and detects delayed neutrons in the sodium effluent from the experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it. This facility also has an acoustical detector (high-temperature microphone) for detecting sodium boiling

  4. Bowing-reactivity trends in EBR-II assuming zero-swelling ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.

    1994-01-01

    Predicted trends of duct-bowing reactivities for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are correlated with predicted row-wise duct deflections assuming use of idealized zero-void-swelling subassembly ducts. These assume no irradiation induced swellings of ducts but include estimates of the effects of irradiation-creep relaxation of thermally induced bowing stresses. The results illustrate the manners in which at-power creeps may affect subsequent duct deflections at zero power and thereby the trends of the bowing component of a subsequent power reactivity decrement

  5. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 4: Results of SURV-4 and SURV-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Hayner, G.O.; Carlson, B.G.; Ebersole, E.R.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. For both the irradiated and thermally aged samples, one half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In addition to the fifteen types of metal samples, graphite blocks were irradiated in the SURV subassemblies to determine the effect of irradiation on the graphite neutron shield. In this report, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 2.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (over 2,994 days) are compared with those of similar specimens thermally aged at 370 C for 2,994 days in the storage basket of the reactor. The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, impact strength, and creep

  6. The EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Results and insights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.; Roglans, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the recently completed EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1. 6 10 -6 yr -1 , even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The probability of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquake) is 3.6 10 -6 yr -1 . overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double, vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability

  7. Experimental confirmation of the design to minimize vibration and wear in 61-pin wire-spaced EBR-II subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, S.K.

    1978-05-01

    Examinations of HEDL 61-pin subassemblies comprised of 5.84 mm (0.230) inch diameter mixed-oxide fuel pins with 1.02 mm (0.040'') diameter spacer wire (PNL-9, -10, -11, HEDL-N-E, -N-F), showed severe cladding and spacer wire wear after irradiation in EBR-II. A comparison of a large number of design, fabrication, and irradiation parameters for all of the HEDL subassemblies indicated that the porosity per ring of fuel pins correlated significantly with the occurrence of wear on the fuel pins. The porosity per ring is the clearance between the flat-to-flat pin bundle dimension and the inner hex can dimension divided by the number of hexagonal fuel pin rings in the subassembly. The porosity per ring for PNL-9, -10, -11 and HEDL-N-E was 0.15 mm/ring (6 mils/ring) and 0.18 mm/ring (7 mils/ring) for the HEDL-N-F subassembly. Since the original FTR subassembly design had a porosity/ring spread of 0.04 mm/ring to 0.16 mm/ring (1.67 to 6.11 mils/ring) an additional series of irradiation tests was conducted to confirm that a tighter fuel pin bundle would eliminate the wear

  8. Operating limits for subassembly deformation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    The deformation of a subassembly in response to the core environment is frequently the life limiting factor for that component in an LMFBR. Deformation can occur as diametral and axial growth or bowing of the subassembly. Such deformation has caused several handling problems in both the core and the storage basket of EBR-II and may also have contributed to reactivity anomalies during reactor operation. These problems generally affect plant availability but the reactivity anomalies could lead to a potential safety hazard. Because of these effects the deformation mechanisms must be understood and modeled. Diametral and axial growth of subassembly ducts in EBR-II is due to swelling and creep and is a function of temperature, neutron fluence and stress. The source of stress in a duct is the hydraulic pressure difference across the wall. By coupling the calculated subassembly growth rate to the available clearance in the core or storage basket a limiting neutron fluence, or exposure, can be established

  9. Operating experience of the EBR-II steam generating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschman, H.W.; Penney, W.H.; Quilici, M.D.; Radtke, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) with integrated power producing capability. Superheated steam is produced by eight natural circulation evaporators, two superheaters, and a conventional steam drum. Steam throttle conditions are 438 C (820 F) and 8.62 MPa (1250 psi). The designs of the evaporators and superheaters are essentially identical; both are counterflow units with low pressure nonradioactive sodium on the shell side. Safety and reliability are maximized by using duplex tubes and tubesheets. The performance of the system has been excellent and essentially trouble free. The operating experience of EBR-II provides confidence that the technology can be applied to commercial LMFBR's for an abundant supply of energy for the future. 5 refs

  10. Recent operating experiences and programs at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentz, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) is a pool-type, unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt and an electrical generation capability of 20 MW. It has been operated by Argonne National Laboratory for the US government for almost 20 years. During that time, it has operated safely and has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, high availability, and excellent performance of its sodium components. The 20 years of operating experience of EBR-II is a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future LMFBR's. Since past operating experience has been extensively reported, this report will focus on recent programs and events

  11. Advances in criticality predictions for EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, R.W.; Imel, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    Improvements to startup criticality predictions for the EBR-II reactor have been made. More exact calculational models, methods and data are now used, and better procedures for obtaining experimental data that enter into the prediction are in place. Accuracy improved by more than a factor of two and the largest ECP error observed since the changes is only 18 cents. An experimental method using subcritical counts is also being implemented

  12. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR

  13. EBR-II water-to-sodium leak detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrightson, M.M.; McKinley, K.; Ruther, W.E.; Holmes, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    The water-to-sodium leak detection system installed at EBR-II in April, 1975, is described in detail. Topics covered include operational characteristics, maintenance problems, alarm functions, background hydrogen level data, and future plans for refinements to the system. Particular emphasis is given to the failures of eight of the ten leak detectors due to sodium-to-vacuum leakage, and the program anticipated for complete recovery of the system

  14. Experimental studies of U-Pu-Zr fast reactor fuel pins in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Hofman, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a generic reactor concept under development by Argonne National Laboratory. Much of the technology for the IFR is being demonstrated at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) on the Department of Energy site near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The IFR concept relies on four technical features to achieve breakthroughs in nuclear power economics and safety: (1) a pool-type reactor configuration, (2) liquid sodium cooling, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) an integral fuel cycle with on-site reprocessing. The purpose of this paper will be to summarize our latest results of irradiation testing uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) fuel in the EBR-II. 10 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Breached fuel pin contamination from Run Beyond Cladding Breach (RBCB) tests in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colburn, R.P.; Strain, R.V.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Ukai, S.; Shibahara, I.

    1988-09-01

    Studies indicate there may be a large economic incentive to permit some continued reactor operation with breached fuel pin cladding. A major concern for this type of operation is the potential spread of contamination in the primary coolant system and its impact on plant maintenance. A study of the release and transport of contamination from naturally breached mixed oxide Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel pins was performed as part of the US Department of Energy/Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (DOE/PNC) Run Beyond Cladding Breach (RBCB) Program at EBR-II. The measurements were made using the Breached Fuel Test Facility (BFTF) at EBR-II with replaceable deposition samplers located approximately 1.5 meters from the breached fuel test assemblies. The effluent from the test assemblies containing the breached fuel pins was routed up through the samplers and past dedicated instrumentation in the BFTF before mixing with the main coolant flow stream. This paper discusses the first three contamination tests in this program. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  16. The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 5: Results of SURV-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruther, W.E.; Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, B.G.; Allen, T.R.

    1998-01-01

    In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. One half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In this work, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 3.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 were determined. These materials are the fifth set of irradiated subassemblies to be examined as part of the SURV program (SURV-5). The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, and fracture resistance. Of all the alloys examined in SURV-5, only Berylco-25 showed any significant weight loss. Stainless steel (both 304 and 347) had the largest density decrease, although the density decrease from irradiation for all alloys was less than 0.4 percent. The microstructure of both Berylco-25 and the aluminum-bronze alloy was altered significantly. Iron- and nickel-base alloys showed little change in microstructure. Austenitic steels (304 and 347) harden with irradiation. The hardness of Inconel X750 did not change significantly with irradiation. The ultimate tensile strength of Inconel X750, 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel and welded 304 changed little due to a fluence increase from 2.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (the maximum fluence of the SURV-4 samples) to 3.2 x 10 22 n/cm 2

  17. Parametric investigation of fracture of EBR-II ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Moustakakis, B.

    1977-01-01

    Results of preliminary static and dynamic finite element fracture mechanics analyses that were conducted to analytically simulate the dynamic fracture behavior of EBR-II ducts are presented. The loads considered are those that may arise because of rapid release of fission gases from a failed fuel element inside a duct, obtained from some previous tests and a recent analytical model. In spite of the motivation for the present work, the analytical procedures described may have a wider general application in the fail-safe design of structures

  18. Data systems in FFTF and EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrick, R.P.; Ritter, W.M.

    1980-02-01

    This paper describes the Data System used to monitor operation and collect experimental data in FFTF. This data system has evolved since initial inception from a relatively simple, single computer system monitoring a relatively few (approx. 1000) instrument channels important for operation to one which has increased capability to support the long-range testing needs in FFTF. The system, while still relatively simple, now contains multiple computers which normally perform independent functions. The computers, however, provide backup processing for certain simple tasks. Operator interfacing is provided through CRT's. The output capabilities of the system are described. A description of the Data System in EBR-II is also included

  19. Water treatment in the EBR-II steam system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.A.; Hurst, H.

    1975-01-01

    Boiler-water treatment in the EBR-II steam system consists of demineralizing makeup water and using hydrazine to remove traces of oxygen and morpholine to adjust pH to 8.8-9.2. This treatment is called a ''zero-solids'' method, because the chemical agents and reaction products are either volatile or form water and do not contribute solids to the boiler water. A continuous blowdown is cooled, filtered, and deionized to remove impurities and maintain high purity of the water. If a cooling-water leak occurs, phosphate is added to control scaling, and the ''zero-solids'' eatment is suspended until the leak is repaired. Water streams are sampled at six points to control water purity. Examination of the steam drum and an evaporator show the metal surfaces to be in excellent condition with minimal corrosion. The EBR-II steam-generating plant has accumulated over 85,000 hours of in-service operation and has operated successfully for over ten years with the ''zero-solids'' treatment. (auth)

  20. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.; Heintzelman, J.; Squires, L.; Meservey, R.

    2009-01-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in about 100,000 gallons of wash water. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to evaluate alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. A brainstorming session was held to identify possible alternative treatment methods that would meet the primary functions and criteria of neutralizing the hazards, maximizing byproduct removal and minimizing waste generation. An initial list of some 20 probable alternatives was evaluated and refined down

  1. EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor-II] system surveillance using pattern recognition software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mott, J.E.; Radtke, W.H.; King, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    The problem of most accurately determining the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) reactor outlet temperature from currently available plant signals is investigated. Historically, the reactor outlet pipe was originally instrumented with 8 temperature sensors but, during 22 years of operation, all these instruments have failed except for one remaining thermocouple, and its output had recently become suspect. Using pattern recognition methods to compare values of 129 plant signals for similarities over a 7 month period spanning reconfiguration of the core and recalibration of many plant signals, it was determined that the remaining reactor outlet pipe thermocouple is still useful as an indicator of true mixed mean reactor outlet temperature. Application of this methodology to investigate one specific signal has automatically validated the vast majority of the 129 signals used for pattern recognition and also highlighted a few inconsistent signals for further investigation

  2. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  3. Operational reliability testing of FBR fuel in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaga, Takeo; Ukai, Shigeharu; Nomura, Shigeo; Shikakura, Sakae

    1991-01-01

    The operational reliability testing of FBR fuel has been conducting in EBR-II as a DOE/PNC collaboration program. This paper reviews the achieved summary of Phase-I test as well as outline of progressing Phase-II test. In Phase-I test, the reliability of FBR fuel pins including 'MONJU' fuel was demonstrated at the event of operational transient. Continued operation of the failed pins was also shown to be feasible without affecting the plant operation. The objectives of the Phase-II test is to extend the data base relating with the operational reliability for long life fuel, and to supply the highly quantitative evaluation. The valuable insight obtained in Phase-II test are considerably expected to be useful toward the achievement of commercial FBR. (author)

  4. Degradation of EBR-II driver fuel during wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R. G.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization data are reported for sodium bonded EBR-II reactor fuel which had been stored underwater in containers since the 1981--1982 timeframe. Ten stainless steel storage containers, which had leaked water during storage due to improper sealing, were retrieved from the ICPP-603 storage basin at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in Idaho. In the container chosen for detailed destructive analysis, the stainless steel cladding on the uranium alloy fuel had ruptured and fuel oxide sludge filled the bottom of the container. Headspace gas sampling determined that greater than 99% hydrogen was present. Cesium 137, which had leached out of the fuel during the aqueous corrosion process, dominated the radionuclide source term of the water. The metallic sodium from the fuel element bond had reacted with the water, forming a concentrated caustic solution of NaOH

  5. EBR-II fuel handling console digital upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.G.; Wiege, D.D.; Christensen, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    The main fuel handling console and control system at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are being upgraded to a computerized system using high-end workstations for the operator interface and a programmable logic controller (PLC) for the control system. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics will be provided for the operator which will show the relative position of under-sodium fuel handling equipment. This equipment is operated remotely with no means of directly viewing the transfer. This paper describes various aspects of the modification including reasons for the upgrade, capabilities the new system provides over the old control system, philosophies and rationale behind the new design, testing and simulation work, diagnostic features, and the advanced graphics techniques used to display information to the operator

  6. Transient performance of EBR-II driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzzell, J.A.; Hudman, G.D.; Porter, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The first phases of qualification of the EBR-II driver fuel for repeated transient overpower operation have recently been completed. The accomplishments include prediction of the transient fuel and cladding performance through ex-core testing and fuel-element modeling studies, localized in-core power testing during steady-state operation, and whole-core multiple transient testing. The metallic driver fuel successfully survived 56 transients, spaced over a 45-day period, with power increases of approx. 160% at rates of approx. 1%/s with a 720-second hold at full power. The performance results obtained from both ex-core and n-core tests indicate that the fuel is capable of repeated transient operation

  7. Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses several metallic fuel element designs which have been tested and used as driver fuel in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The most recent advanced designs have all performed acceptably in EBR-H and can provide reliable performance to high burnups. Fuel elements tested have included use of U-l0Zr metallic fuel with either D9, 316 or HT9 stainless steel cladding; the D9 and 316-clad designs have been used as standard driver fuel. Experimental data indicate that fuel performance characteristics are very similar for the various designs tested. Cladding materials can be selected that optimize performance based on reactor design and operational goals

  8. Computer imaging of EBR-II handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.H.; Peters, G.G.

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional graphics application used to visualize the positions of remotely operated fuel handling equipment in the EBR-II reactor. The system described in this paper uses actual signals to move a three-dimensional graphics model in real-time in response to movements of equipment in the plant. A three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique is necessary to simulate direct visual observation of the transfers of fuel and experiments into and out of the reactor because the fuel handling equipment is submerged in liquid sodium and therefore is not visible to the operator. This paper will present details on how the 3D model was created and how real-time dynamic behavior was added to each of the moving components

  9. Computer imaging of EBR-II fuel handling equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, G.G.; Hansen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional graphics application used to visualize the positions of remotely operated fuel handling equipment in the EBR-II reactor. A three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique is necessary to simulate direct visual observation of the transfers of fuel and experiments into and out of the reactor because the fuel handling equipment is submerged in liquid sodium and therefore is not visible to the operator. The system described in this paper uses actual signals to drive a three-dimensional computer-generated model in real-time in response to movements of equipment in the plant This paper will present details on how the 3D model of the intank equipment was created and how real-time dynamic behavior was added to each of the moving components

  10. Review process and quality assurance in the EBR-II probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans, J.; Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Within the scope of the ANL QA Programs, a QA Plan specifically for the EBR-II PRA was developed. The QA Plan covered all aspects of the PRA development, with emphasis on the procedures for document and software control, and the internal and external review process. The effort spent in the quality assurance tasks for the EBR-II PRA has reciprocated by providing acceptance of the work and confidence in the quality of the results

  11. Pattern-recognition system application to EBR-II plant-life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Radtke, W.H.; Mott, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A computer-based pattern-recognition system, the System State Analyzer (SSA), is being used as part of the EBR-II plant-life extension program for detection of degradation and other abnormalities in plant systems. The SSA is used for surveillance of the EBR-II primary system instrumentation, primary sodium pumps, and plant heat balances. Early results of this surveillance indicate that the SSA can detect instrumentation degradation and system performance degradation over varying time intervals, and can provide derived signal values to replace signals from failed critical sensors. These results are being used in planning for extended-life operation of EBR-II

  12. Nuclear instrumentation system operating experience and nuclear instrument testing in the EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yingling, G.E.; Curran, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    In March of 1972 three wide range nuclear channels were purchased from Gulf Atomics Corporation and installed in EBR-II as a test. The three channels were operated as a test until April 1975 when they became a permanent part of the reactor shutdown system. Also described are the activities involved in evaluating and qualifying neutron detectors for LMFBR applications. Included are descriptions of the ANL Components Technology Division Test Program and the EBR-II Nuclear Instrument Test Facilities (NITF) used for the in-reactor testing and a summary of program test results from EBR-II

  13. Data handling at EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] for advanced diagnostics and control work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, R.W.; Schorzman, L.W.

    1988-01-01

    Improved control and diagnostics systems are being developed for nuclear and other applications. The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Division of Argonne National Laboratory has embarked on a project to upgrade the EBR-II control and data handling systems. The nature of the work at EBR-II requires that reactor plant data be readily available for experimenters, and that the plant control systems be flexible to accommodate testing and development needs. In addition, operational concerns require that improved operator interfaces and computerized diagnostics be included in the reactor plant control system. The EBR-II systems have been upgraded to incorporate new data handling computers, new digital plant process controllers, and new displays and diagnostics are being developed and tested for permanent use. In addition, improved engineering surveillance will be possible with the new systems

  14. Safety and operating experience at EBR-II: lessons for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Golden, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    EBR-II is a small LMFBR power plant that has performed safely and reliably for 16 years. Much has been learned from operating it to facilitate the design, licensing, and operation of large commercial LMFBR power plants in the US. EBR-II has been found relatively easy to keep in conformity with evolving safety requirements, largely because of inherent safety features of the plant. Such features reduce dependence on active safety systems to protect against accidents. EBR-II has experienced a number of plant-transient incidents, some planned, others inadvertent; none has resulted in any significant plant damage. The operating experience with EBR-II has led to the formulation of an Operational Reliability Test Program (ORTP), aimed at showing inherently safe performance of fuel and plant systems

  15. Technical assessment of continued wet storage of EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Franklin, E.M.; Ebner, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    A technical assessment of the continued wet storage of EBR-II fuel has been made. Previous experience has shown that in-basin cladding failure occurs by intergranular attack of sensitized cladding, likely assisted by basin water chlorides. Subsequent fuel oxidation is rapid and leads to loss of configuration and release of fission products. The current inventory of EBR-II fuel stored in the ICPP basins is at risk from similar corrosion reactions

  16. Metal waste forms from treatment of EBR-II spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D. P.

    1998-01-01

    Demonstration of Argonne National Laboratory's electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel is currently being conducted on irradiated, metallic driver fuel and blanket fuel elements from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in Idaho. The residual metallic material from the electrometallurgical treatment process is consolidated into an ingot, the metal waste form (MWF), by employing an induction furnace in a hot cell. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and chemical analyses have been performed on irradiated cladding hulls from the driver fuel, and on samples from the alloy ingots. This paper presents the microstructures of the radioactive ingots and compares them with observations on simulated waste forms prepared using non-irradiated material. These simulated waste forms have the baseline composition of stainless steel - 15 wt % zirconium (SS-15Zr). Additions of noble metal elements, which serve as surrogates for fission products, and actinides are made to that baseline composition. The partitioning of noble metal and actinide elements into alloy phases and the role of zirconium for incorporating these elements is discussed in this paper

  17. Application of PCT to the EBR II ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.; Lewis, M. A.; Johnson, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    We are evaluating the use of the Product Consistency Test (PCT) developed to monitor the consistency of borosilicate glass waste forms for application to the multiphase ceramic waste form (CWF) that will be used to immobilize waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical conditioning of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR II). The CWF is a multiphase waste form comprised of about 70% sodalite, 25% borosilicate glass binder, and small amounts of halite and oxide inclusions. It must be qualified for disposal as a non-standard high-level waste (HLW) form. One of the requirements in the DOE Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document (WASRD) for HLW waste forms is that the consistency of the waste forms be monitored.[1] Use of the PCT is being considered for the CWF because of the similarities of the dissolution behaviors of both the sodalite and glass binder phases in the CWF to borosilicate HLW glasses. This paper provides (1) a summary of the approach taken in selecting a consistency test for CWF production and (2) results of tests conducted to measure the precision and sensitivity of the PCT conducted with simulated CWF

  18. EBR-II spent fuel treatment demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    For approximately 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory was developed a fast reactor fuel cycle based on dry processing. When the US fast reactor program was canceled in 1994, the fuel processing technology, called the electrometallurgical technique, was adapted for treating unstable spent nuclear fuel for disposal. While this technique, which involves electrorefining fuel in a molten salt bath, is being developed for several different fuel categories, its initial application is for sodium-bonded metallic spent fuel. In June 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved a radiation demonstration program in which 100 spent driver assemblies and 25 spent blanket assemblies from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) will be treated over a three-year period. This demonstrated will provide data that address issues in the National Research Council's evaluation of the technology. The planned operations will neutralize the reactive component (elemental sodium) in the fuel and produce a low enriched uranium product, a ceramic waste and a metal waste. The fission products and transuranium elements, which accumulate in the electrorefining salt, will be stabilized in the glass-bonded ceramic waste form. The stainless steel cladding hulls, noble metal fission products, and insoluble residues from the process will be stabilized in a stainless steel/zirconium alloy. Upon completion of a successful demonstration and additional environmental evaluation, the current plans are to process the remainder of the DOE sodium bonded fuel

  19. Automated start-up of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are undertaking a joint project to develop control philosophies, strategies, and algorithms for computer control of the start-up mode of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). The major objective of this project is to show that advanced liquid-metal reactor (LMR) plants can be operated from low power to full power using computer control. Development of an automated control system with this objective in view will help resolve specific issues and provide proof through demonstration that automatic control for plant start-up is feasible. This paper describes the approach that will be used to develop such a system and some of the features it is expected to have. Structured, rule-based methods, which will provide start-up capability from a variety of initial plant conditions and degrees of equipment operability, will be used for accomplishing mode changes during plant start-up. Several innovative features will be incorporated such as signal, command, and strategy validation to maximize reliability, flexibility to accommodate a wide range of plant conditions, and overall utility. Continuous control design will utilize figures of merit to evaluate how well the controller meets the mission requirements. The operator interface will have unique ''look ahead'' features to let the operator see what will happen next. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Kramer, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The next step in the development of metal fuels for the integral fast reactor (IFR) is the conversion of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) core to one containing the ternary U-20 Pu-10 Zr alloy clad with HT-9 cladding, i.e., the Mk-V core. This paper presents results of three hot-cell furnace simulation tests on irradiated Mk-V-type fuel elements (U-19 Pu-10 Zr/HT-9), which were performed to support the safety case for the Mk-V core. These tests were designed to envelop an umbrella (bounding) unlikely loss-of-flow (LOF) event in EBR-II during which the calculated peak cladding temperature would reach 776 degree C for < 2 min. The principal objectives of these tests were (a) demonstration of the safety margin of the fuel element, (b) investigation of cladding breaching behavior, and (c) provision of data for validation of the FPIN2 and LIFE-METAL codes

  1. System modeling of spent fuel transfers at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The unloading of spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) for interim storage and subsequent processing in the Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) is a multi-stage process, involving complex operations at a minimum of four different facilities at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) site. Each stage typically has complicated handling and/or cooling equipment that must be periodically maintained, leading to both planned and unplanned downtime. A program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. Routine operation of the reactor for fuels performance and materials testing occurred simultaneously in FY 1994 with the blanket unloading. In the summer of 1994, Congress dictated the October 1, 1994 shutdown of EBR-2. Consequently, all blanket S/As and fueled drivers will be removed from the reactor tank and replaced with stainless steel assemblies (which are needed to maintain a precise configuration within the grid so that the under sodium fuel handling equipment can function). A system modeling effort was conducted to determine the means to achieve the objective for the blanket and fuel unloading program, which under the current plan requires complete unloading of the primary tank of all fueled assemblies in 2 1/2 years. A simulation model of the fuel handling system at ANL-W was developed and used to analyze different unloading scenarios; the model has provided valuable information about required resources and modifications to equipment and procedures. This paper reports the results of this modeling effort

  2. High burnup, high power irradiation behavior of helium-bonded mixed carbide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, P.J.; Nayak, U.P.; Boltax, A.

    1983-01-01

    Large diameter (9.4 mm) helium-bonded mixed carbide fuel pins were successfully irradiated in EBR-II to high burnup (12%) at high power levels (100 kW/m) with peak cladding midwall temperatures of 550 0 C. The wire-wrapped pins were clad with 0.51-mm-thick, 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel and contained hyperstoichiometric (Usub(0.8)Pusub(0.2))C fuel covering the smeared density range from 75-82% TD. Post-irradiation examinations revealed: extensive fuel-cladding mechanical interaction over the entire length of the fuel column, 35% fission gas release at 12% burnup, cladding carburization and fuel restructuring. (orig.)

  3. The physics design of EBR-II; Physique du reacteur EBR-II; Fizicheskij raschet ehksperimental'nogo reaktora - razmnozhitelya EVR-II; Aspectos fisicos del reactor EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenstein, W. B. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    1962-03-15

    The physics design oi EBR-II. Calculations of the static, dynamic and long-term reactivity behaviour of EBR-II are reported together with results and analysis of EBR-II dry critical and ZPR-III mock-up experiments. Particular emphasis is given to reactor-physics design problems which arise after the conceptual design is established and before the reactor is built or placed into operation. Reactor-safety analyses and hazards-evaluation considerations are described with their influence on the reactor design. The manner of utilizing the EBR-II mock-up on ZPR-III data and the EBR-II dry critical data is described. These experiments, their analysis and theoretical predictions are the basis for predetermining the physics behaviour of the reactor system. The limitations inherent in applying the experimental data to the performance of the power-reactor system are explored in some detail. This includes the specification of reactor core size and/or fuel-alloy enrichment, provisions for adequate operating and shut-down reactivity, determination of operative temperature and power coefficients of reactivity, and details of power- and flux-distribution as a function of position within the reactor structure. The overall problem of transferring information from simple idealized analytical or experimental geometry to actual hexagonal reactor geometry is described. Nuclear performance, including breeding, of the actual reactor system is compared with that of the idealized conceptual system. The long-term reactivity and power behaviour of the reactor blanket is described within the framework of the proposed cycling of the fuel and blanket alloy. Safety considerations, including normal and abnormal rates of reactivity-insertion, the implication of postulated reactivity effects based on the physical behaviour of the fuel alloy and reactor structure as well as extrapolation of TREAT experiments to the EBR-II system are analysed. The EBR-II core melt-down problem is reviewed. (author

  4. Behavior of EBR-II Mk-V-type fuel elements in simulated loss-of-flow tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Holland, J.W.; Kramer, J.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report discusses three furnace heating tests which were conducted with irradiated, HT9-clad and U-19wt.%Pu-l0wt.%Zr-alloy fuel, Mk-V-type fuel elements in the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois. In general, very significant safety margins for fuel-element cladding breaching have been demonstrated in these tests, under conditions that would envelop a bounding unlikely loss-of-flow event in EBR-II. Highlights of the test results will be given, as well as discussions of the cladding breaching mechanisms, axial fuel motion, and fuel surface liquefaction found in high-temperature testing of irradiated metallic fuel elements

  5. Off-normal performance of EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] driver fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Batte, G.L.; Lahm, C.E.; Fryer, R.M.; Koenig, J.F.; Hofman, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The off-normal performance of EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel has been more than satisfactory as demonstrated by robust reliability under repeated transient overpower and undercooled loss-of-flow tests, by benign run-beyond-cladding-breach behavior, and by forgiving response to fabrication defects including lack of bond. Test results have verified that the metallic driver fuel is very tolerant of off-normal events. This behavior has allowed EBR-II to operate in a combined steady-state and transient mode to provide test capability without limitation from the metallic driver fuel

  6. Current status of experimental breeder reactor-II [EBR-II] shutdown planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, M. D.; Griffin, C. D.; Michelbacher, J. A.; Earle, O. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor--II (EBR-II) at Argonne National Laboratory--West (ANL-W) in Idaho, was shutdown in September, 1994 as mandated by the US Department of Energy. This sodium cooled reactor had been in service since 1964, and was to be placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for ultimate decommissioning. The deactivation of a liquid metal reactor presents unique concerns. The first major task associated with the project was the removal of all fueled assemblies. In addition, sodium must be drained from systems and processed for ultimate disposal. Residual quantities of sodium remaining in systems must be deactivated or inerted to preclude future hazards associated with pyrophoricity and generation of potentially explosive hydrogen gas. A Sodium Process Facility was designed and constructed to react the elemental sodium from the EBR-II primary and secondary systems to sodium hydroxide for disposal. This facility has a design capacity to allow the reaction of the complete inventory of sodium at ANL-W in less than two years. Additional quantities of sodium from the Fermi-1 reactor are also being treated at the Sodium Process Facility. The sodium environment and the EBR-II configuration, combined with the radiation and contamination associated with thirty years of reactor operation, posed problems specific to liquid metal reactor deactivation. The methods being developed and implemented at EBR-II can be applied to other similar situations in the US and abroad

  7. Remote, under-sodium fuel handling experience at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.W.; Planchon, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The EBR-II is a pool-type design; the reactor fuel handling components and entire primary-sodium coolant system are submerged in the primary tank, which is 26 feet in diameter, 26 feet high, and contains 86,000 gallons of sodium. Since the reactor is submerged in sodium, fuel handling operations must be performed blind, making exact positioning and precision control of the fuel handling system components essential. EBR-II operated for 30 years, and the fuel handling system has performed approximately 25,000 fuel transfer operations in that time. Due to termination of the IFR program, EBR-II was shut down on September 30, 1994. In preparation for decommissioning, all fuel in the reactor will be transferred out of EBR-II to interim storage. This intensive fuel handling campaign will last approximately two years, and the number of transfers will be equivalent to the fuel handling done over about nine years of normal reactor operation. With this demand on the system, system reliability will be extremely important. Because of this increased demand, and considering that the system has been operating for about 32 years, system upgrades to increase reliability and efficiency are proceeding. Upgrades to the system to install new digital, solid state controls, and to take advantage of new visualization technology, are underway. Future reactor designs using liquid metal coolant will be able to incorporate imaging technology now being investigated, such as ultraviolet laser imaging and ultrasonic imaging

  8. The EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment: lessons learned regarding passive safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.; Roglans, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1.6 10 -6 yr -1 , even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The annual frequency of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquakes) is 3.6 10 -6 yr -1 and the contribution of seismic events is 1.7 10 -5 yr -1 . Overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability

  9. The EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment: lessons learned regarding passive safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D J; Ragland, W A; Roglans, J

    1998-11-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1.6 10{sup -6} yr{sup -1}, even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The annual frequency of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquakes) is 3.6 10{sup -6} yr{sup -1} and the contribution of seismic events is 1.7 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1}. Overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability.

  10. The EBR-II probabilistic risk assessment lessons learned regarding passive safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.; Ragland, W.A.; Roglans, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the recently completed EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and provides an analysis of the source of risk of the operation of EBR-II from both internal and external initiating events. The EBR-II PRA explicitly accounts for the role of reactivity feedbacks in reducing fuel damage. The results show that the expected core damage frequency from internal initiating events at EBR-II is very low, 1.6 10 -6 yr -1 , even with a wide definition of core damage (essentially that of exceeding Technical Specification limits). The annual frequency of damage, primarily due to liquid metal fires, from externally initiated events (excluding earthquakes) is 3.6 10 -6 yr -1 and the contribution of seismic events is 1.7 10 -5 yr -1 . Overall these results are considerably better than results for other research reactors and the nuclear industry in general and stem from three main sources: low likelihood of loss of coolant due to low system pressure and top entry double vessels; low likelihood of loss of decay heat removal due to reliance on passive means; and low likelihood of power/flow mismatch due to both passive feedbacks and reliability of rod scram capability

  11. Modification of EBR-II plant to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messick, N C; Betten, P R; Booty, W F; Christensen, L J; Fryer, R M; Mohr, D; Planchon, H P; Radtke, W H

    1987-04-01

    This paper describes the details of and the philosophy behind changes made to the EBR-II plant in order to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests. No changes were required to conduct loss-of-heat-sink-without-scram tests.

  12. Modification of EBR-II plant to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, N.C.; Betten, P.R.; Booty, W.F.; Christensen, L.J.; Fryer, R.M.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.; Radtke, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the details of and the philosophy behind changes made to the EBR-II plant in order to conduct loss-of-flow-without-scram tests. No changes were required to conduct loss-of-heat-sink-without-scram tests. (orig.)

  13. Whole-Pin Furnace system: An experimental facility for studying irradiated fuel pin behavior under potential reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tsai, H.C.; Donahue, D.A.; Pushis, D.O.; Savoie, F.E.; Holland, J.W.; Wright, A.E.; August, C.; Bailey, J.L.; Patterson, D.R.

    1990-05-01

    The whole-pin furnace system is a new in-cell experimental facility constructed to investigate how irradiated fuel pins may fail under potential reactor accident conditions. Extensive checkouts have demonstrated excellent performance in remote operation, temperature control, pin breach detection, and fission gas handling. The system is currently being used in testing of EBIR-II-irradiated Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel pins; future testing will include EBR-II-irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins. 7 refs., 4 figs

  14. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  15. Analysis of carbon transport in the EBR-II and FFTF primary sodium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, R.B.; Natesan, K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the carburization-decarburization behavior of austenitic stainless steels in the primary heat-transport systems of the EBR-II and FFTF has been made that is based upon a kinetic model for the diffusion process and the surface area of steel in contact with flowing sodium at various temperatures in the two systems. The analysis was performed for operating conditions that result in sodium outlet temperatures of 474 and 566 0 C in the FFTF and 470 0 C in the EBR-II. If there was no external source of carbon to the system, i.e., other than the carbon initially present in the steel and the sodium, the dynamic-equilibrium carbon concentrations calculated for the FFTF primary sodium were approximately 0.025 and approximately 0.065 ppm for the 474 and 566 0 C outlet temperatures, respectively, and approximately 0.018 ppm for the EBR-II primary system. The analysis indicated that a carbon-source rate of approximately 250 g/y would be required to increase the carbon concentration of the EBR-II sodium to the measured range of approximately 0.16--0.19 ppm. An evaluation of possible carbon sources and the amount of carbonaceous material introduced into the reactor cover gas and sodium suggests that the magnitude of the calculated contamination rate is reasonable. For a 566 0 C outlet temperature, carbonaceous material would have to be introduced into the FFTF primary system at a rate approximately 4--6 times higher than in EBR-II to achieve the same carbon concentration in the sodium in the two systems. Since contamination rates of approximately 1500 g/y are unlikely, high-temperature fuel cladding in the FFTF should exhibit decarburization similar to that observed in laboratory loop systems, in contrast to the minimal compositional changes that result after exposure of Type 316 stainless steel to EBR-II sodium at temperatures between approximately 625 and 650 0 C

  16. The roles of EBR-II and TREAT [Transient Reactor Test] in establishing liquid metal reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lehto, W.K.; Solbrig, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the role of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) and Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facilities in contributing to the understanding and resolution of key safety issues in liquid metal reactor safety during the decade of the 80's. Fuels and materials testing has been carried out to address questions on fuels behavior during steady-state and upset conditions. In addition, EBR-II has conducted plant tests to demonstrate passive response to ATWS events and to develop control and diagnostic strategies for safe operation of advanced LMRs. TREAT and EBR-II complement each other and between them provide a transient testing capability that covers the whole range of concerns during overpower conditions. EBR-II, with use of the special Automatic Control Rod Drive System, can generate power change rates that overlap the lower end of the TREAT capability. 21 refs

  17. Results and implications of the EBR-II inherent safety demonstration tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planchon, H.P.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.; Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    On April 3, 1986 two milestone tests were conducted in Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-II). The first test was a loss of flow without scram and the second was a loss of heat sink without scram. Both tests were initiated from 100% power and in both tests the reactor was shut down by natural processes, principally thermal expansion, without automatic scram, operator intervention or the help of special in-core devices. The temperature transients during the tests were mild, as predicted, and there was no damage to the core or reactor plant structures. In a general sense, therefore, the tests plus supporting analysis demonstrated the feasibility of inherent passive shutdown for undercooling accidents in metal-fueled LMRs. The results provide a technical basis for future experiments in EBR-II to demonstrate inherent safety for overpower accidents and provide data for validation of computer codes used for design and safety analysis of inherently safe reactor plants

  18. SASSYS-1 computer code verification with EBR-II test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.; Dunn, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The EBR-II natural circulation experiment, XX08 Test 8A, is simulated with the SASSYS-1 computer code and the results for the latter are compared with published data taken during the transient at selected points in the core. The SASSYS-1 results provide transient temperature and flow responses for all points of interest simultaneously during one run, once such basic parameters as pipe sizes, initial core flows, and elevations are specified. The SASSYS-1 simulation results for the EBR-II experiment XX08 Test 8A, conducted in March 1979, are within the published plant data uncertainties and, thereby, serve as a partial verification/validation of the SASSYS-1 code

  19. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required

  20. Simulation and operation of the EBR-II automatic control rod drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.; Christensen, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic control rod drive system (ACRDS) installed at EBR-II produces shaped power transients from 40% to full reactor power at a linear ramp rate of 4 MWt/s. A digital computer and modified control-rod-drive provides this capability. Simulation and analysis of ACRDS experiments establish the safety envelope for reactor transient operation. Tailored transients are required as part of USDOE Operational Reliability Testing program for prototypic fast reactor fuel cladding breach behavior studies. After initial EBR-II driver fuel testing and system checkout, test subassemblies were subjected to both slow and fast transients. In addition, the ACRDS is used for steady-state operation and will be qualified to control power ascent from initial critical to full power

  1. Analysis of EBR-II neutron and photon physics by multidimensional transport-theory techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacqmin, R.P.; Finck, P.J.; Palmiotti, G.

    1994-01-01

    This paper contains a review of the challenges specific to the EBR-II core physics, a description of the methods and techniques which have been developed for addressing these challenges, and the results of some validation studies relative to power-distribution calculations. Numerical tests have shown that the VARIANT nodal code yields eigenvalue and power predictions as accurate as finite difference and discrete ordinates transport codes, at a small fraction of the cost. Comparisons with continuous-energy Monte Carlo results have proven that the errors introduced by the use of the diffusion-theory approximation in the collapsing procedure to obtain broad-group cross sections, kerma factors, and photon-production matrices, have a small impact on the EBR-II neutron/photon power distribution

  2. Simulation and operation of the EBR-II automatic control rod drive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.; Christensen, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    An automatic control rod drive system (ACRDS) installed at EBR-II produces shaped power transients from 40% to full reactor power at a linear ramp rate of 4 MWt/s. A digital computer and modified control-rod-drive provides this capability. Simulation and analysis of ACRDS experiments establish the safety envelope for reactor transient operation. Tailored transients are required as part of USDOE Operational Reliability Testing program for prototypic fast reactor fuel cladding breach behavior studies. After initial EBR-II driver fuel testing and system checkout, test subassemblies were subjected to both slow and fast transients. In additions, the ACRDS is used for steady-state operation and will be qualified to control power ascent from initial critical to full power

  3. Evidence of fast non-linear feedback in EBR-II rod-drop measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-06-01

    Feedback reactivities determine the time dependence of a reactor during and after a transient initiating event. Recent analysis of control-rod drops in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Reactor has indicated that some relatively fast feedback may exist which cannot be accounted for by the linear feedback mechanisms. The linear and deduced non-linear feedback reactivities from a control-rod drop in EBR-II run 93A using detailed temperature coefficients of reactivity in the EROS kinetics code have been reported. The transient analyses have now been examined in more detail for times close to the drop to ascertain if additional positive reactivity is being built-in early in the drop which could be gradually released later in the drop

  4. Operational-safety advantages of LMFBR's: the EBR-II experience and testing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.; Lindsay, R.W.; Golden, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    LMFBR's contain many inherent characteristics that simplify control and improve operating safety and reliability. The EBR-II design is such that good advantage was taken of these characteristics, resulting in a vary favorable operating history and allowing for a program of off-normal testing to further demonstrate the safe response of LMFBR's to upsets. The experience already gained, and that expected from the future testing program, will contribute to further development of design and safety criteria for LMFBR's. Inherently safe characteristics are emphasized and include natural convective flow for decay heat removal, minimal need for emergency power and a large negative reactivity feedback coefficient. These characteristics at EBR-II allow for ready application of computer diagnosis and control to demonstrate their effectiveness in response to simulated plant accidents. This latter testing objective is an important part in improvements in the man-machine interface

  5. Transforming criticality control methods for EBR-II fuel handling during reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, C.S.; Dean, E.M.; Angelo, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the Department of Energy (DOE) request to decommission the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was conducted in order to develop a scope of work and analysis method for performing the safety review of the facility. Evaluation of the current national standards, DOE orders, EBR-II nuclear safeguards and criticality control practices showed that a decommissioning policy for maintaining criticality safety during a long term fuel transfer process did not exist. The purpose of this research was to provide a technical basis for transforming the reactor from an instrumentation and measurement controlled system to a system that provides both physical constraint and administrative controls to prevent criticality accidents. Essentially, this was done by modifying the reactor core configuration, reactor operations procedures and system instrumentation to meet the safety practices of ANS-8.1-1983. Subcritical limits were determined by applying established liquid metal reactor methods for both the experimental and computational validations

  6. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-12-31

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

  7. An evaluation of multigroup flux predictions in the EBR-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.N.; Fanning, T.H.; Finck, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The unique physics characteristics of EBR-II which are difficult to model with conventional neutronic methodologies are identified; the high neutron leakage fraction and importance of neutron reflection cause errors when conventional calculational approximations are utilized. In this paper, various conventional and higher-order group constant evaluations and flux computation methods are compared for a simplified R-Z model of the EBR-II system. Although conventional methods do provide adequate predictions of the flux in the core region, significant mispredictions are observed in the reflector and radial blanket regions. Calculational comparisons indicate that a fine energy group structure is required for accurate predictions of the eigenvalue and flux distribution; greater detail is needed in the iron resonance scattering treatment. Calculational comparisons also indicate that transport theory with detailed anisotropic scattering treatment is required.

  8. Thermal-structural response of EBR-II major components under reactor operational transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the LMFBR safety research has been focused primarily on severe but highly unlikely accident, such as hypothetical-core-disruptive accidents (HCDA's), and not enough attention has been given to accident prevention, which is less severe but more likely sequence. The objective of the EBR-II operational reliability testing (ORT) is to demonstrate that the reactor can be designed and operated to prevent accident. A series of mild duty cycles and overpower transients were designed for accident prevention tests. An assessment of the EBR-II major plant components has been performed to assure structural integrity of the reactor plant for the ORT program. In this paper, the thermal-structural response and structural evaluation of the reactor vessel, the reactor-vessel cover, the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and the superheater are presented

  9. Studies related to emergency decay heat removal in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Mohr, D.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.; Dean, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies related to emergency decay heat removal by natural circulation in the EBR-II heat transport circuits are described. Three general categories of natural circulation plant transients are discussed and the resultant reactor flow and temperature response to these events are presented. these categories include the following: (1) loss of forced flow from decay power and low initial flow rates; (2) reactor scram with a delayed loss of forced flow; and (3) loss of forced flow with a plant protective system activated scram. In all cases, the transition from forced to natural convective flow was smooth and the peak in-core temperature rises were small to moderate. Comparisons between experimental measurements in EBR-II and analytical predictions of the NATDEMO code are included

  10. EBR-II argon cooling system restricted fuel handling I and C upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Start, S.E.; Carlson, R.B.; Gehrman, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The instrumentation and control of the Argon Cooling System (ACS) restricted fuel handling control system at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is being upgraded from a system comprised of many discrete components and controllers to a computerized system with a graphical user interface (GUI). This paper describes the aspects of the upgrade including reasons for the upgrade, the old control system, upgrade goals, design decisions, philosophies and rationale, and the new control system hardware and software

  11. IFR fuel cycle demonstration in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Rigg, R.H.; Benedict, R.W.; Carnes, M.D.; Herceg, J.E.; Holtz, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase which includes completion of facility modifications, and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the design and construction of the facility, the design and fabrication of the process equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation. (author)

  12. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II subassembly types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-01-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel

  13. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor] subassembly types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1986-09-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel

  14. Time constants and feedback transfer functions of EBR-II subassembly types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-01-01

    Time constants, feedback reactivity transfer functions and power coefficients are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a reactor kinetic code analysis for a step change in power. Due to the multiplicity of eigenvalues, there are several time constants for each nodal position in a subassembly. Compared with these calculated values are analytically derived values for the initial node of a given channel. (author)

  15. IFR fuel cycle demonstration in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.; Rigg, R.H.; Benedict, R.W.; Carnes, M.D.; Herceg, J.E.; Holtz, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase which includes completion of facility modifications, and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the design and construction of the facility, the design and fabrication of the process equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation. 5 refs., 4 figs

  16. Zr-rich layers electrodeposited onto stainless steel cladding during the electrorefining of EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Mariani, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing an electrometallurgical treatment for spent nuclear fuels. The initial demonstration of this process is being conducted on U-Zr alloy fuel elements irradiated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II). We report the first metallographic characterization of cladding hull remains for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent metallic fuel. During the electrorefining process, Zr-rich layers, with some U, deposit on all exposed surfaces of irradiated cladding segments (hulls) that originally contained the fuel alloy that was being treated. In some cases, not only was residual Zr (and U) found inside the cladding hulls, but a Zr-rind was also observed near the interior cladding hull surface. The Zr-rind was originally formed during the fuel casting process on the fuel slug. The observation of Zr deposits on all exposed cladding surfaces is explained with thermodynamic principles, when two conditions are met. These conditions are partial oxidation of Zr and the presence of residual uranium in the hulls when the electrorefining experiment is terminated. Comparisons are made between the structure of the initial irradiated fuel before electrorefining and the morphology of the material remaining in the cladding hulls after electrorefining. (orig.)

  17. The EBR-II steam generating system - operation, maintenance, and inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschman, H.W.; Penney, W.H.; Longua, K.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) has operated for 20 years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls. EBR-II is a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) with integrated power producing capability. EBR-II has operated at a capacity factor over 70% in the past few years. Superheated steam is produced by eight natural circulation evaporators, two superheaters, and a conventional steam drum. Steam throttle conditions are 438 C and 8.62 MPa. The designs of the evaporators and superheaters are essentially identical; both are counterflow units with low pressure nonradioactive sodium on the shell side. During the 20 years of operation, components of the steam generator have been subjected to a variety of inspections including visual, dimensional, and ultrasonic. One superheater was removed from service because of anomalous performance and was replaced with an evaporator which was removed, examined, and converted into a superheater. Overall operating experience of the system has been excellent and essentially trouble free. Inspections have not revealed any conditions that are performance or life limiting. (author)

  18. Reirradiation of mixed-oxide fuel pins at increased temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Weber, E.T.

    1976-05-01

    Mixed-oxide fuel pins from EBR-II irradiations were reirradiated in the General Electric Test Reactor (GETR) at higher temperatures than experienced in EBR-II to study effects of the increased operating temperatures on thermal/mechanical and chemical behavior. The response of a mixed-oxide fuel pin to a power increase after having operated at a lower power for a significant portion of its life-time is an area of performance evaluation where little information currently exists. Results show that the cladding diameter changes resulting from the reirradiation are strongly dependent upon both prior burnup level and the magnitude of the temperature increase. Results provide the initial rough outlines of boundaries within which mixed-oxide fuel pins can or cannot tolerate power increases after substantial prior burnup at lower powers

  19. Assessment calculation of MARS-LMR using EBR-II SHRT-45R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, C.; Ha, K.S.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior predicted by MARS-LMR is validated with EBR-II SHRT-45R test data. • Decay heat model of ANS-94 give better prediction of the fission power. • The core power is well predicted by reactivity feedback during initial transient, however, the predicted power after approximately 200 s is over-estimated. The study of the reactivity feedback model of the EBR-II is necessary for the better calculation of the power. • Heat transfer between inter-subassemblies is the most important parameter, especially, a low flow and power subassembly, like non-fueled subassembly. - Abstract: KAERI has designed a prototype Gen-IV SFR (PGSFR) with metallic fuel. And the safety analysis code for the PGSFR, MARS-LMR, is based on the MARS code, and supplemented with various liquid metal related features including sodium properties, heat transfer, pressure drop, and reactivity feedback models. In order to validate the newly developed MARS-LMR, KAERI has joined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) coordinated research project (CRP) on “Benchmark Analysis of an EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)”. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has technically supported and participated in this program. One of benchmark analysis tests is SHRT-45R, which is an unprotected loss of flow test in an EBR-II. So, sodium natural circulation and reactivity feedbacks are major phenomena of interest. A benchmark analysis was conducted using MARS-LMR with original input data provided by ANL. MARS-LMR well predicts the core flow and power change by reactivity feedbacks in the core. Except the results of the XX10, the temperature and flow in the XX09 agreed well with the experiments. Moreover, sensitivity tests were carried out for a decay heat model, reactivity feedback model, inter-subassembly heat transfer, internal heat structures and so on, to evaluate their sensitivity and get a better prediction. The decay heat model of ANS-94 shows

  20. Assessment calculation of MARS-LMR using EBR-II SHRT-45R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, C.; Ha, K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behavior predicted by MARS-LMR is validated with EBR-II SHRT-45R test data. • Decay heat model of ANS-94 give better prediction of the fission power. • The core power is well predicted by reactivity feedback during initial transient, however, the predicted power after approximately 200 s is over-estimated. The study of the reactivity feedback model of the EBR-II is necessary for the better calculation of the power. • Heat transfer between inter-subassemblies is the most important parameter, especially, a low flow and power subassembly, like non-fueled subassembly. - Abstract: KAERI has designed a prototype Gen-IV SFR (PGSFR) with metallic fuel. And the safety analysis code for the PGSFR, MARS-LMR, is based on the MARS code, and supplemented with various liquid metal related features including sodium properties, heat transfer, pressure drop, and reactivity feedback models. In order to validate the newly developed MARS-LMR, KAERI has joined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) coordinated research project (CRP) on “Benchmark Analysis of an EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test (SHRT)”. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has technically supported and participated in this program. One of benchmark analysis tests is SHRT-45R, which is an unprotected loss of flow test in an EBR-II. So, sodium natural circulation and reactivity feedbacks are major phenomena of interest. A benchmark analysis was conducted using MARS-LMR with original input data provided by ANL. MARS-LMR well predicts the core flow and power change by reactivity feedbacks in the core. Except the results of the XX10, the temperature and flow in the XX09 agreed well with the experiments. Moreover, sensitivity tests were carried out for a decay heat model, reactivity feedback model, inter-subassembly heat transfer, internal heat structures and so on, to evaluate their sensitivity and get a better prediction. The decay heat model of ANS-94 shows

  1. Considerations for advanced reactor design based on EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The long-term success of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) provides several insights into fundamental characteristics and design features of a nuclear generating station that enhance safety, operability, and maintainability. Some of these same characteristics, together with other features, offer the potential for operational lifetimes well beyond the current licensing time frame, and improved reliability that could potentially reduce amortized capital costs as well as overall operation and maintenance costs if incorporated into advanced plant designs. These features and characteristics are described and the associated benefits are discussed

  2. EBR-II facility for cleaning and maintenance of LMR components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cleaning and maintenance of EBR-II sodium wetted components is accomplished in a separate hands-on maintenance facility known as the Sodium Components Maintenance Shop (SCMS). Sodium removal is mostly done using alcohol but steam or water is used. The SCMS has three alcohol cleaning systems: one for small nonradioactive components, one for small radioactive components, and one for large radioactive components. The SCMS also has a water-wash station for the removal of sodium with steam or water. An Alcohol Recovery Facility removes radioactive contaminants from the alcohol and reclaims the alcohol for reuse. Associated with the large components cleaning system is a major component handling system

  3. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade process control system structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Staffon, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; describes the main control computer hardware and system software features in more detail; and, then, describes the real-time control tasks, and how they interact with each other, and how they interact with the operator interface task

  4. Reactivity-induced time-dependencies of EBR-II linear and non-linear feedbacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1988-01-01

    Time-dependent linear feedback reactivities are calculated for stereotypical subassemblies in the EBR-II reactor. These quantities are calculated from nodal reactivities obtained from a kinetic code analysis of an experiment in which the change in power resulted from the dropping of a control rod. Shown with these linear reactivities are the reactivity associated with the control-rod shaft contraction and also time-dependent non-linear (mainly bowing) component deduced from the inverse kinetics of the experimentally measured fission power and the calculated linear reactivities. (author)

  5. Criticality safety requirements for transporting EBR-II fuel bottles stored at INTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, R. M.; Pope, C. L.

    2000-01-01

    Two carrier/shipping cask options are being developed to transport bottles of EBR-II fuel elements stored at INTEC. Some fuel bottles are intact, but some have developed leaks. Reactivity control requirements to maintain subcriticality during the hypothetical transport accident have been examined for both transport options for intact and leaking bottles. Poison rods, poison sleeves, and dummy filler bottles were considered; several possible poison materials and several possible dummy filler materials were studied. The minimum number of poison rods or dummy filler bottles has been determined for each carrier for transport of intact and leaking bottles

  6. Fail-safety of the EBR-II steam generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Stone, C.C.; Hutter, E.; Barney, W.K.; Staker, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Fail-safe analyses of the EBR-II steam-generator system show that a postulated non-instantaneous leak of water or steam into sodium, through a duplex tube or a tubesheet, at credible leak rates will not structurally damage the evaporators and superheaters. However, contamination of the system and possible shell wastage by sodium-water reaction products may render the system inoperable for a period exceeding six months. This period would be shortened to three months if the system were modified by adding a remotely operated water dump system, a steam vent system, a secondary sodium superheater relief line, and a tubesheet leak-detection system

  7. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System upgrade distributed control and front end computer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) control system was upgraded in 1991 to improve control and provide a graphical operator interface. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper briefly describes the Cover Gas Cleanup System and the overall control system; gives reasons behind the computer system structure; and then gives a detailed description of the distributed control computer, the front end computer, and how these computers interact with the main control computer. The descriptions cover both hardware and software

  8. Dynamic modeling and simulation of EBR-II steam generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkan, R.C.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a low order dynamic model of the Experimental breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) steam generator system. The model development includes the application of energy, mass and momentum balance equations in state-space form. The model also includes a three-element controller for the drum water level control problem. The simulation results for low-level perturbations exhibit the inherently stable characteristics of the steam generator. The predictions of test transients also verify the consistency of this low order model

  9. Safety philosophy in upgrading the EBR-II plant protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1976-01-01

    The EBR-II plant protection system (PPS) has been substantially modified, upgrading its performance to more fully comply with modern safety philosophy and criteria. The upgrading effort required that the total reactor system be evaluated for possible faults and that a PPS be designed to accommodate them. The result was deletion of a number of existing trip functions and upgrading of others. Particular attention was given to loss of primary pumping power and reactivity insertion events. The design and performance criteria for the PPS has been more firmly established, understanding of the PPS function has been improved and the reactor has been subjected to fewer spurious trips, improving operational reliability

  10. Tightly coupled transient analysis of EBR-II: An INEL [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory] Engineering Simulation Center Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Barber, D.G.; Dean, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    A ''Tightly Coupled'' transient analysis system for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (FBR-II) is presently under development. The system consists of a faster-than-real-time high fidelity reactor simulation, advanced graphics displays, expert system coupling, and real-time data coupling via the EBR-II data acquisition system to and from the plant and the control system. The first generation software has been developed and tested. Various subsystem couplings and the total system integration have been checked out. A ''Lightly Coupled'' EBR-II reactor startup was conducted in August of 1988 as a demonstration of the system. This system should enhance the diagnostic and prognostic capability of EBR-II in the near term and provide automatic control during startup and power maneuvering in the future, as well as serve as a testbed for new control system development for advanced reactors. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  11. Seismic response of the EBR-II to the Mt. Borah earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.G.; Lehto, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    On October 28, 1983, an earthquake of magnitude 7.3 occurred in the mountains of central Idaho at a distance of 114-km from the ANL-West site. The earthquake tripped the seismic sensors in the EBR-II reactor shutdown system causing a reactor scram. Visual and operability checks of structures, components, and systems showed no indication of damage or system abnormalities and reactor restart was initiated. As a result of the earthquake, questions arose as to the magnitude of the actual stress levels in critical components and what value of ground acceleration could be experienced without damage to reactor structures. EBR-II was designed prior to implementation of present day requirements for seismic qualification and appropriate analyses had not been conducted. A lumped-mass, finite element model of the primary tank, support structure, and the reactor was generated and analyzed using the response spectrum technique. The analysis showed that the stress levels in the primary tank system were very low during the Mount Borah earthquake and that the system could experience seismic loadings three to four times those of the Mount Borah earthquake without exceeding yield stresses in any of the components

  12. System modelling to support accelerated fuel transfer rate at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.; Houshyar, A.; Planchon, H.P.; Cutforth, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) ia a 62.5 MW(th) liquid metal reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory for The United States Department of Energy. The reactor is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho at the Argonne-West site (ANL-W). Full power operation was achieved in 1964,- the reactor operated continuously since that time until October 1994 in a variety of configurations depending on the programmatic mission. A three year program was initiated in October, 1993 to replace the 330 depleted uranium blanket subassemblies (S/As) with stainless steel reflectors. It was intended to operate the reactor during the three year blanket unloading program, followed by about a half year of driver fuel unloading. However, in the summer of 1994, Congress dictacted that EBR-II be shut down October 1, and complete defueling without operation. To assist in the planning for resources needed for this defueling campaign, a mathematical model of the fuel handling sequence was developed utilizing the appropriate reliability factors and inherent mm constraints of each stage of the process. The model allows predictions of transfer rates under different scenarios. Additionally, it has facilitated planning of maintenance activities, as well as optimization of resources regarding manpower and modification effort. The model and its application is described in this paper

  13. On-line sodium and cover as purity monitors gas operating tools at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.; Richardson, W.J.; Holmes, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Plugging temperature indicators, electrochemical oxygen meters and hydrogen diffusion meters are the on-line sodium purity monitors now in use at EBR-II. On-line gas chromatographs are used to monitor helium, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen impurities in the argon cover gases. Monitors for tritium-in-sodium and for hydrocarbons-in-cover gas have been developed and are scheduled for installation in the near future. An important advantage of on-line monitors over the conventional grab-sampling techniques is the speed of response to changing reactor conditions. This helps us to identify the source of the impurity, whether the cause may be transient or constant, and take corrective action as necessary. The oxygen meter is calibrated monthly against oxygen in sodium determined by the vanadium wire equilibration method. The other instruments either do not require calibration or are self-calibrating. The ranges, sensitivity and response times of all of the on-line purity monitors has proven satisfactory under EBR-II operating conditions

  14. SASSYS validation with the EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    SASSYS is a coupled neutronic and thermal hydraulic code developed for the analysis of transients in liquid metal cooled reactors (LMRs). The code is especially suited for evaluating of normal reactor transients -- protected (design basis) and unprotected (anticipated transient without scram) transients. Because SASSYS is heavily used in support of the IFR concept and of innovative LMR designs, such as PRISM, a strong validation base for the code must exist. Part of the validation process for SASSYS is analysis of experiments performed on operating reactors, such as the metal fueled Experimental Breeder Reactor -- II (EBR-II). During the course of a series of historic whole-plant experiments, EBR-II illustrated key safety features of metal fueled LMRs. These experiments, the Shutdown Heat Removal Tests (SHRT), culminated in unprotected loss of flow and loss of heat sink transients from full power and flow. Analysis of these and earlier SHRT experiments constitutes a vital part of SASSYS validation, because it facilitates scrutiny of specific SASSYS models and of integrated code capability. 12 refs., 11 figs

  15. Simulation of LMFBR pump transients and comparison to LOF that occurred at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, F.F.; Dean, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    In a large LMFBR plant design, a number of pumps in parallel will feed the core. It must be demonstrated that the plant can continue to operate with the loss of one of the primary pumps. It is desirable not to have check valves in the loop from a reliability and economic standpoint. Simulations have been made to determine the consequences of a loss of one pump in a four-loop pool plant in which no plant protection action is taken. This analysis would be used to determine the required power rundown that would accompany pump loss. The two primary centrifugal pumps in EBR-II feed the core and blanket plenums in two parallel flow paths. The loss of one pump will result in decrease core flow and reverse flow through the down pump since no check valves are present in the system. For a large pool plant with four primary pumps, the loss of one pump will also result in reverse flow through the down pump if check valves of flow diodes are not included. The resulting flow transient has been modeled for EBR-II and the large plant using the DNSP program

  16. Simulation and verification of the EBR-II automatic control rod drive system with continuous system modeling codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The two computer programs are successful in modeling the EBR-II ACRDS. In fact, this is very convenient for a presampling of the consequences of a desired power movement. The ACRDS is to be modified so that the error signal is a comparison between demand position and measured position. Purpose of this change is to permit pseudo-random binary types of reactivity transfer function experiments at EBR-II. Questions asked about the computer software and hardware to accommodate this change can be quickly answered with either of the verified codes discussed here

  17. Power and power-to-flow reactivity transfer functions in EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity transfer functions are important in determining the reactivity history during a power transient. Overall nodal transfer functions have been calculated for different subassembly types in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Steady-state calculations for temperature changes and, hence, reactivities for power changes have been separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent terms. Axial nodal transfer functions separated into power and power-to-flow-dependent components are reported in this paper for a typical EBR-II fuel pin. This provides an improved understanding of the time dependence of these components in transient situations

  18. Dynamic response of the EBR-II secondary sodium system to postulated leaks of steam and water into sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, S.; Chopra, P.S.; Stone, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents evaluations of the dynamic response of a steam generator system to postulated leaks of steam and water into sodium. This work is part of a comprehensive fail-safe analysis of the EBR-II steam generator system

  19. EBR-II blanket fuel leaching test using simulated J-13 well water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J. E.

    1998-05-15

    A pulsed-flow leaching test is being conducted using three EBR-II blanket fuel segments. These samples are immersed in simulated J-13 well water. The samples are kept at a constant temperature of 90 C. Leachate is exchanged weekly and analyzed for various nuclides which are of interest from a mobility and longevity point of view. Our primary interest is in the longer-lived species such as {sup 99}Tc, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am. In addition, the behavior of U, Pu, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs are being analyzed. During the course of this experiment, an interesting observation has been made involving one of the samples which could indicate the possible rapid ''anoxic'' oxidation of uranium metal to UO{sub 2}.

  20. Potential safety enhancements to nuclear plant control: proof testing at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, R.W.; Chisholm, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Future changes in nuclear plant control and protective systems will reflect an evolutionary improvement through increased use of computers coupled with a better integration of man and machine. Before improvements can be accepted into the licensed commercial plant environment, significant testing must be accomplished to answer safety questions and to prove the worth of new ideas. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is being used as a test-bed for both in-house development and testing for others in a DOE sponsored Man-Machine Integration program. The ultimate result of the development and testing would be a control system for which safety credit could be taken in the licensing process

  1. Whole-core damage analysis of EBR-II driver fuel elements following SHRT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Koenig, J.F.; Porter, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    In the Shutdown Heat Removal Testing (SHRT) program in EBR-II, fuel element cladding temperatures of some driver subassemblies were predicted to exceed temperatures at which cladding breach may occur. A whole-core thermal analysis of driver subassemblies was performed to determine the cladding temperatures of fuel elemnts, and these temperatures were used for fuel element damage calculation. The accumulated cladding damage of fuel element was found to be very small and fuel element failure resulting from SHRT transients is unlikely. No element breach was noted during the SHRT transients. The reactor was immediately restarted after the most severe SHRT transient had been completed and no driver fuel breach has been noted to date. (orig.)

  2. EBR-II Static Neutronic Calculations by PHISICS / MCNP6 codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paolo Balestra; Carlo Parisi; Andrea Alfonsi

    2016-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Shutdown Heat Removal Tests (SHRT) performed in the '80s at the Experimental fast Breeder Reactor EBR-II, USA. The scope of the CRP is to improve and validate the simulation tools for the study and the design of the liquid metal cooled fast reactors. Moreover, training of the next generation of fast reactor analysts is being also considered the other scope of the CRP. In this framework, a static neutronic model was developed, using state-of-the art neutron transport codes like SCALE/PHISICS (deterministic solution) and MCNP6 (stochastic solution). Comparison between both solutions is briefly illustrated in this summary.

  3. Expert system applications in support of system diagnostics and prognostics at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, W.K.; Gross, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Expert systems have been developed to aid in the monitoring and diagnostics of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Systems have been developed for failed fuel surveillance and diagnostics and reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostics. A third project is being done jointly by ANL-W and EG ampersand G Idaho to develop a transient analysis system to enhance overall plant diagnostic and prognostic capability. The failed fuel surveillance and diagnosis system monitors, processes, and interprets information from nine key plant sensors. It displays to the reactor operator diagnostic information needed to make proper decisions regarding technical specification conformance during reactor operation with failed fuel. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Seventeen years of LMFBR experience: Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, W.H.; Lentz, G.L.; Richardson, W.J.; Wolz, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Operating experience at EBR-II over the past 17 years has shown that a sodium-cooled pool-type reactor can be safely and efficiently operated and maintained. The reactor has performed predictably and benignly during normal operation and during both unplanned and planned plant upsets. The duplex-tube evaporators and superheaters have never experienced a sodium/water leak, and the rest of the steam-generating system has operated without incident. There has been no noticeable degradation of the heat transfer efficiency of the evaporators and superheaters, except for the one superheater replaced in 1981. There has been no need to perform any chemical cleaning of steam-system components

  5. EBR-II Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) upgrade graphical interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staffon, J.D.; Peters, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    Technology advances in the past few years have prompted an effort at Argonne National Laboratory to replace existing equipment with high performance digital computers and color graphic displays. Improved operation of process systems can be achieved by utilizing state-of-the-art computer technology in the areas of process control and process monitoring. The Cover Gas Cleanup System (CGCS) at EBR-II is the first system to be upgraded with high performance digital equipment. The upgrade consisted of a main control computer, a distributed control computer, a front end input/output computer, a main graphics interface terminal, and a remote graphics interface terminal. This paper describes the main control computer and the operator interface control software

  6. Software engineering for the EBR-II data acquisition system conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorzman, W.

    1988-01-01

    The original data acquisition system (DAS) for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) was placed into service with state-of-the-art computer and peripherals in 1970. Software engineering principles for real-time data acquisition were in their infancy, and the original software design was dictated by limited hardware resources. The functional requirements evolved from creative ways to gather and display data. This abstract concept developed into an invaluable tool for system analysis, data reporting, and as a plant monitor for operations. In this paper the approach is outlined to the software conversion project with the restraints of operational transparency and 6 weeks for final conversion and testing. The outline is then compared with the formal principles of software engineering to show the way that bridge the gap can be bridged between the theoretical and real world by analyzing the work and listing the lessons learned

  7. EBR-II secondary sodium loop Plugging Temperature Indicator control system upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, R.B.; Gehrman, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary sodium coolant loop Plugging Temperature Indicator (PTI) control system was upgraded in 1993 to a real-time computer based system. This was done to improve control, to remove obsolete and high maintenance equipment, and to provide a graphical CRT based operator interface. A goal was to accomplish this inexpensively using small, reliable computer and display hardware with a minimum of purchased software. This paper describes the PTI system, the upgraded control system and its operator interface, and development methods and tools. The paper then assesses how well the system met its goals, discusses lessons learned and operational improvements noted, and provides some recommendations and suggestions on applying small real-time control systems of this type

  8. In-reactor cladding breach of EBR-II driver-fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, B.R.; Einziger, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Knowledge of performance and minimum useful element lifetime of Mark-II driver-fuel elements is required to maintain a high plant operating capacity factor with maximum fuel utilization. To obtain such knowledge, intentional cladding breach has been obtained in four run-to-cladding-breach Mark-II experimental driver-fuel subassemblies operating under normal conditions in EBR-II. Breach and subsequent fission-product release proved benign to reactor operations. The breaches originated on the outer surface of the cladding in the root of the restrainer dimples and were intergranular. The Weibull distribution of lifetime accurately predicts the observed minimum useful element lifetime of 10 at.% burnup, with breach ensuing shortly thereafter

  9. Comparisons of PRD [power-reactivity-decrements] components for various EBR-II configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Comparison of detailed calculations of contributions by region and component of the power-reactivity-decrements (PRD) for four differing loading configurations of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) are given. The linear components and Doppler components are calculated. The non-linear (primarily subassembly bowing) components are deduced by differences relative to measured total PRD values. Variations in linear components range from about 10% to as much as about 100% depending upon the component. The deduced non-linear components differ both in magnitude and sign as functions of reactor power. Effects of differing assumptions of the nature of the fuel-to-clad interactions upon the PRD components are also calculated

  10. EBRPOCO - a program to calculate detailed contributions of power reactivity components of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The EBRPOCO program has been developed to facilitate the calculations of the power coefficients of reactivity of EBR-II loadings. The program enables contributions of various components of the power coefficient to be delineated axially for every subassembly. The program computes the reactivity contributions of the power coefficients resulting from: density reduction of sodium coolant due to temperature; displacement of sodium coolant by thermal expansions of cladding, structural rods, subassembly cans, and lower and upper axial reflectors; density reductions of these steel components due to temperature; displacement of bond-sodium (if present) in gaps by differential thermal expansions of fuel and cladding; density reduction of bond-sodium (if present) in gaps due to temperature; free axial expansion of fuel if unrestricted by cladding or restricted axial expansion of fuel determined by axial expansion of cladding. Isotopic spatial contributions to the Doppler component my also be obtained. (orig.) [de

  11. Response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow during power operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Mohr, D.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.; Dean, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the thermal, hydraulic, and neutronic response of EBR-II to a complete loss of primary forced flow followed by a PPS-activated scram are presented. The experimental results clearly indicate a smooth transition to natural convective flow with a quite modest incore temperature transient. The accompanying calculations using the NATDEMO code agree quite well with the measured temperatures and flow rates throughout the primary system. The only region of the plant where a significant discrepancy between the measurements and calculations occurred was in the IHX. The reasons for this result could not be definitively determined, but it is speculated that the one-dimensional assumptions used in the modeling may not be valid in the IHX during buoyancy driver flows

  12. Safety related considerations for operation with defected elements in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, R.M.; Sackett, J.I.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1976-01-01

    Traditionally, EBR-II has employed the 'shutdown and remove' philosophy when breached fuel elements are encountered. This mode of operation maintained in-plant inventories of fission products at low levels and allowed certain fission product detection systems to be employed as automatic plant shutdown devices. Information from fuel failure propagation studies and fast reactor operation indicates that shutdown under these conditions is unwarranted. Analytical studies, as well as fast reactor experience, further indicate that failure propagation, if it occurs at all, will not cross adjacent subassembly boundaries. Therefore, the 'shutdown and remove' philosophy can be liberalized to allow the demonstration of safety during a run-beyond-clad-breach mode of operation. This mode of operation is essential to the demonstration of the economics of commercial LMFBR systems

  13. Benchmark analyses for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyasu, E-mail: mochizki@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Muranaka, Kohmei; Asai, Takayuki [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Rooijen, W.F.G. van, E-mail: rooijen@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The IAEA EBR-II benchmarks SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R are analyzed with a 1D system code. • The calculated result of SHRT-17 corresponds well to the measured results. • For SHRT-45R ERANOS is used for various core parameters and reactivity coefficients. • SHRT-45R peak temperature is overestimated with the ERANOS feedback coefficients. • The peak temperature is well predicted when the feedback coefficient is reduced. - Abstract: Benchmark problems of several experiments in EBR-II, proposed by ANL and coordinated by the IAEA, are analyzed using the plant system code NETFLOW++ and the neutronics code ERANOS. The SHRT-17 test conducted as a loss-of-flow test is calculated using only the NETFLOW++ code because it is a purely thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data were made available to the benchmark participants after the results of the blind benchmark calculations were submitted. Our work shows that major parameters of the plant are predicted with good accuracy. The SHRT-45R test, an unprotected loss of flow test is calculated using the NETFLOW++ code with the aid of delayed neutron data and reactivity coefficients calculated by the ERANOS code. These parameters are used in the NETFLOW++ code to perform a semi-coupled analysis of the neutronics – thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data are compared with our calculated results. In our work, the peak temperature is underestimated, indicating that the reactivity feedback coefficients are too strong. When the reactivity feedback coefficient for thermal expansion is adjusted, good agreement is obtained in general for the calculated plant parameters, with a few exceptions.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Uncertainty Parameter based on MARS-LMR Code on SHRT-45R of EBR II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seok-Ju; Kang, Doo-Hyuk; Seo, Jae-Seung [System Engineering and Technology Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sung-Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hae-Yong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to assess the uncertainty quantification of the MARS-LMR code, the code has been improved by modifying the source code to accommodate calculation process required for uncertainty quantification. In the present study, a transient of Unprotected Loss of Flow(ULOF) is selected as typical cases of as Anticipated Transient without Scram(ATWS) which belongs to DEC category. The MARS-LMR input generation for EBR II SHRT-45R and execution works are performed by using the PAPIRUS program. The sensitivity analysis is carried out with Uncertainty Parameter of the MARS-LMR code for EBR-II SHRT-45R. Based on the results of sensitivity analysis, dominant parameters with large sensitivity to FoM are picked out. Dominant parameters selected are closely related to the development process of ULOF event.

  15. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-06-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user`s perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ``comfort parameters`` and ``perspective reality`` of the user`s model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator`s perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne`s Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting.

  16. Software engineering for the EBR-II data acquisition system conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorzman, W.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline how EBR-II engineering approached the data acquisition system (DAS) software conversion project with the restraints of operational transparency and six weeks for final implementation and testing. Software engineering is a relatively new discipline that provides a structured philosopy for software conversion. The software life cycle is structured into six basic steps: 1) initiation, 2) requirements definition, 3) design, 4) programming, 5) testing, and 6) operations. These steps are loosely defined and can be altered to fit specific software applications. DAS software is encompassed from three sources: 1) custom software, 2) system software, and 3) in-house application software. A data flow structure is used to describe the DAS software. The categories are: 1) software used to bring signals into the central processer, 2) software that transforms the analog data to engineering units and then logs the data in the data store, and 3) software used to transport and display the data. The focus of this paper is to describe how the conversion team used a structured engineering approach and utilized the resources available to produce a quality system on time. Although successful, the conversion process provided some pit falls and stumbling blocks. Working through these obstacles enhanced our understanding and surfaced in the form of LESSONS LEARNED, which are gracefully shared in this paper

  17. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user's perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ''comfort parameters'' and ''perspective reality'' of the user's model of the world. In developing visual displays for the EBR-II fuel handling system, the focus would be to incorporate the comfort parameters that overlap from each of the representation systems: visual, auditory and kinesthetic then incorporate the comfort parameters of the most prominent group of the population, and last, blend in the other two representational system comfort parameters. The focus of this informal study was to use the techniques of meta-modeling and synesthesia to develop a virtual environment that closely resembled the operator's perspective of the fuel handling system of Argonne's Experimental Breeder Reactor - II. An informal study was conducted using NLP as the behavioral model in a v reality (VR) setting

  18. EBR-II blanket fuel leaching test using simulated J-13 well water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a pulsed-flow leaching test using simulated J-13 well water leachant. This test was performed on three blanket fuel segments from the ANL-W EBR-II nuclear reactor which were originally made up of depleted uranium (DU). This experiment was designed to mimic conditions which would exist if, upon disposal of this material in a geological repository, it came in direct contact with groundwater. These segments were contained in pressure vessels and maintained at a constant temperature of 90 C. Weekly aliquots of leachate were taken from the three vessels and replaced with an equal volume of fresh leachant. These weekly aliquots were analyzed for both 90 Sr and 137 Cs. The results of the pulsed-flow leach test showed the formation of uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and uranium hydride (UH 3 ) particulate with rapid release of the 137 Cs and 90 Sr to the leachant. On the fifth week of sampling, one of the vessels became over pressurized and vented gas when opened. The most reasonable explanation for the presence of gas in this vessel is that the unoxidized uranium metal in the blanket segment could have reacted with the surrounding water leachant to form hydrogen. However, an investigation is currently being undertaken to both qualify and quantify H 2 formation during uranium spent nuclear fuel corrosion in water

  19. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO 2 -PuO 2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  20. Modeling of thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of mixed oxide fuel for sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to model the irradiation behavior of UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named fuel engineering and structural analysis tool (FEAST-OXIDE). FEAST-OXIDE has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe: (1) fission gas release and swelling, (2) fuel chemistry and restructuring, (3) temperature distribution, (4) fuel-clad chemical interaction and (5) fuel-clad mechanical analysis. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST-OXIDE can analyze fuel and cladding thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis transient scenarios. The code was written in FORTRAN-90 program language. The mechanical analysis module implements the LIFE algorithm. Fission gas release and swelling behavior is described by the OGRES and NEFIG models. However, the original OGRES model has been extended to include the effects of joint oxide gain (JOG) formation on fission gas release and swelling. A detailed fuel chemistry model has been included to describe the cesium radial migration and JOG formation, oxygen and plutonium radial distribution and the axial migration of cesium. The fuel restructuring model includes the effects of as-fabricated porosity migration, irradiation-induced fuel densification, grain growth, hot pressing and fuel cracking and relocation. Finally, a kinetics model is included to predict the clad wastage formation. FEAST-OXIDE predictions have been compared to the available FFTF, EBR-II and JOYO databases, as well as the LIFE-4 code predictions. The agreement was found to be satisfactory for steady-state and slow-ramp over-power accidents.

  1. Interaction of CREDO [Centralized Reliability Data Organization] with the EBR-II [Experimental Breeder Reactor II] PRA [probabilistic risk assessment] development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.S.; Ragland, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences review of US Department of Energy (DOE) class 1 reactors recommended that the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), operated by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), develop a level 1 probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and make provisions for level 2 and level 3 PRAs based on the results of the level 1 PRA. The PRA analysis group at ANL will utilize the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to support the PRA data needs. CREDO contains many years of empirical liquid-metal reactor component data from EBR-II. CREDO is a mutual data- and cost-sharing system sponsored by DOE and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuels Development Corporation of Japan. CREDO is a component based data system; data are collected on components that are liquid-metal specific, associated with a liquid-metal environment, contained in systems that interface with liquid-metal environments, or are safety related for use in reliability/availability/maintainability (RAM) analyses of advanced reactors. The links between the EBR-II PRA development effort and the CREDO data collection at EBR-II extend beyond the sharing of data. The PRA provides a measure of the relative contribution to risk of the various components. This information can be used to prioritize future CREDO data collection activities at EBR-II and other sites

  2. Experimental study of the transition from forced to natural circulation in EBR-II at low power and flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, J.L.; Singer, R.M.; Tokar, J.V.; Sullivan, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A series of tests have been conducted in EBR-II which studied the dynamics of the transition from forced to natural circulation flow in a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Each test was initiated by abruptly tripping an electromagnetic pump which supplies 5 to 6% of the normal full operational primary flow rate. The ensuing flow coast-down reached a minimum value after which the flow increased as natural circulation was established. The effects of secondary system flow through the intermediate heat exchanger and reactor decay power level on the minimum in-core flow rates and maximum in-core temperatures were examined

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the dynamic response of EBR-II ducts under pressure pulse loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, P.S.; Srinivas, S.

    1975-01-01

    In order to assess the potential damage to hexagonal subassembly ducts (cans) that may result from rapid gas release from a failed element the EBR-II project has conducted experiments and analyses. Additional experimental and analytical investigations are now being conducted to assure fail-safety of the ducts. Fail-safety is defined as the ability of a duct to withstand pressure pulses from failed elements during all reactor conditions without damage to adjacent ducts or any other problems in fuel handling. The results of 93 EBR-II duct tests conducted primarily by Koenig have been reported previously. The results of empirical correlations of some of these tests to determine the influence of several variables on the pressure pulse experienced by a duct and on the duct deformation are presented. The variables include the type of gas contained in the simulated element (tube), the element and duct materials, the presence or absence of flow restrictors in the element, and the way gas was released. 8 references. (auth)

  4. Feedback components of a U20Pu10Zr-fueled compared to a U10Zr-fueled EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Calculated feedback components of the regional contributions of the power reactivity decrements (PRDs) and of the temperature coefficients of reactivity of a U20Pu10Zr-fueled and of a U10Zr-fueled Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are compared. The PRD components are also separated into power-to-flow dependent and solely power dependent parts. The effects of these values upon quantities useful for indicating the comparative potential inherent safety characteristics of these EBR-II loadings are presented

  5. Analysis of fuel cladding chemical interaction in mixed oxide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, J.W.; Dutt, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the observed interaction between mixed oxide 75 wt percent UO 2 --25 wt percent PuO 2 fuel and 316--20 percent CW stainless steel cladding in LMFBR type fuel pins irradiated in EBR-II. A description is given of the test pins and their operating conditions together with, metallographic observations and measurements of the fuel/cladding reaction, and a correlation equation is developed relating depth of cladding attack to temperature and burnup. Some recent data on cladding reaction in fuel pins with low initial O/M in the fuel are given and compared with the correlation equation curves

  6. Alternate form and placement of short lived reactor waste and associated fuel hardware for decommissioning of EBR-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planchon, H.P.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    Upon the termination of EBR-II operation in 1994, the mission has progressed to decommissioning and waste cleanup of the facility. The simplest method to achieve this goal is to bury the raw fuel and activated steel in an approved burial ground or deep geologic repository. While this might be simple, it could be very expensive, consume much needed burial space for other materials, and leave large amounts of fissile easily available to future generations. Also, as with any operation, an associated risk to personnel and the public from the buried waste exists. To try and reduce these costs and risks, alternatives to burial are sought. One alternative explored here for EBR-II is to condition the fuel and store the fission products and steel either permanently or temporarily in the sealed primary boundary of the decommissioned reactor. The first problem is to identify which subassemblies are going to be conditioned and their current composition and decay time. The next problem is to identify the conditioning process and determine the composition and form of the waste streams. The volume, mass, heat, and curie load of the waste streams needs to be determined so a waste-assembly can be designed. The reactor vessel and internals need to be analyzed to determine if they can handle these loads. If permanent storage is the goal, then mechanisms for placing the waste-assembly in the reactor vessel and sealing the vessel are needed. If temporary storage is the goal, then mechanisms for waste-assembly placement and retrieval are needed. This paper answers the technical questions of volume, mass, heat, and curie loads while just addressing the other questions found in a safety analysis. The final conclusion will compare estimated risks from the burial option and this option.

  7. Status of RBCB testing of LMR oxide fuel in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain, R.V.; Bottcher, J.H.; Gross, K.C.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Ukai, S.; Nomura, S.; Shikakura, S.; Katsuragawa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The status is given of the the American-Japanese collaborative program in Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 to determine the run-beyond-cladding-breach performance of (UPu)O 2 fuel pins for liquid-metal cooled reactors. Phase 1 of the collaboration involved eighteen irradiation tests over 1981--86 with 5.84-mm pins in 316 or D9 stainless steel. Emphasis in Phase 2 tests from 1989 onwards is with larger diameter (7.5mm) pins in advanced claddings. Results include delayed neutron and fission gas release data from breached pins, the impact of fuel-sodium reaction product formation on pin performance, and fuel and fission product contamination from failures. 13 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs

  8. Development of a graphical user interface allowing use of the SASSYS LMR systems analysis code as an EBR-II interactive simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, P.L.; Briggs, L.L.; Gross, K.C.; Ku, J.Y.; Staffon, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The SASSYS computer program for safety analyses of liquid-metal- cooled fast reactors has been adapted for use as the simulation engine under the graphical user interface provided by the GRAFUN and HIST programs and the Data Views software package under the X Window System on UNIX-based computer workstations to provide a high fidelity, real-time, interactive simulator of the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number II (EBR-II) plant. In addition to providing analysts with an interactive way of performing safety case studies, the simulator can be used to investigate new control room technologies and to supplement current operator training

  9. Investigations of fuel cladding chemical interaction in irradiated LMFBR type oxide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roake, W.E.; Adamson, M.G.; Hilbert, R.F.; Langer, S.

    1977-01-01

    Understanding and controlling the chemical attack of fuel pin cladding by fuel and fission products are major objectives of the U.S. LMFBR Mixed Oxide Irradiation Testing Program. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been recognized as an important factor in the ability to achieve goal peak burnups of 8% (80.MWd/kg) in FFTF and in excess of 10% (100.MWd/kg) in the LMFBR demonstration reactors while maintaining coolant bulk outlet temperatures up to ∼60 deg. C (1100 deg. F). In this paper we review pertinent parts of the irradiation program and describe recent observation of FCCI in the fuel pins of this program. One goal of the FCCI investigations is to obtain a sufficiently quantitative understanding of FCCI such that correlations can be developed relating loss of effective cladding thickness to irradiation and fuel pin fabrication parameters. Wastage correlations being developed using different approaches are discussed. Much of the early data on FCCI obtained in the U.S. Mixed Oxide Fuel Program came from capsule tests irradiated in both fast and thermal flux facilities. The fast flux irradiated encapsulated fuel pins continue to provide valuable data and insight into FCCI. Currently, however, bare pins with prototypic fuels and cladding irradiated in the fast flux Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as multiple pin assemblies under prototypic powers, temperatures and thermal gradients are providing growing quantities of data on FCCI characteristics and cladding thickness losses from FCCI. A few special encapsulated fuel pin tests are being conducted in the General Electric Test Reactor (GETR) and EBR-II, but these are aimed at providing specific information under irradiation conditions not achievable in the fast flux bare pin assemblies or because EBR-II Operation or Safety requirements dictate that the pins be encapsulated. The discussion in this paper is limited to fast flux irradiation test results from encapsulated pins and multiple pin

  10. Investigations of fuel cladding chemical interaction in irradiated LMFBR type oxide fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roake, W E [Westinghouse-Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Adamson, M G [General Electric Company, Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Pleasanton, CA (United States); Hilbert, R F; Langer, S

    1977-04-01

    Understanding and controlling the chemical attack of fuel pin cladding by fuel and fission products are major objectives of the U.S. LMFBR Mixed Oxide Irradiation Testing Program. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been recognized as an important factor in the ability to achieve goal peak burnups of 8% (80.MWd/kg) in FFTF and in excess of 10% (100.MWd/kg) in the LMFBR demonstration reactors while maintaining coolant bulk outlet temperatures up to {approx}60 deg. C (1100 deg. F). In this paper we review pertinent parts of the irradiation program and describe recent observation of FCCI in the fuel pins of this program. One goal of the FCCI investigations is to obtain a sufficiently quantitative understanding of FCCI such that correlations can be developed relating loss of effective cladding thickness to irradiation and fuel pin fabrication parameters. Wastage correlations being developed using different approaches are discussed. Much of the early data on FCCI obtained in the U.S. Mixed Oxide Fuel Program came from capsule tests irradiated in both fast and thermal flux facilities. The fast flux irradiated encapsulated fuel pins continue to provide valuable data and insight into FCCI. Currently, however, bare pins with prototypic fuels and cladding irradiated in the fast flux Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as multiple pin assemblies under prototypic powers, temperatures and thermal gradients are providing growing quantities of data on FCCI characteristics and cladding thickness losses from FCCI. A few special encapsulated fuel pin tests are being conducted in the General Electric Test Reactor (GETR) and EBR-II, but these are aimed at providing specific information under irradiation conditions not achievable in the fast flux bare pin assemblies or because EBR-II Operation or Safety requirements dictate that the pins be encapsulated. The discussion in this paper is limited to fast flux irradiation test results from encapsulated pins and multiple pin

  11. BMFT-CEA-US-DOE Exchange on KNK II-Rapsodie-EBR II operating experience, German contributions for the second expert meeting at Idaho Falls, USA, October 27 and 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The meeting at Idaho Falls was the follow-up meeting of the first expert meeting on EBR II- Rapsodie- KNK II operating experience, which took place at the Karlsruhe Research Center in March 1980. The present report compiles the ten German papers presented at the Idaho Falls meeting, discussing various aspects of experience gained by the operation of KNK II

  12. Additive action model for mixed irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, G.K.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Recent experimental results indicate that a mixture of high and low LET radiation may have some beneficial features (such as lower OER but with skin sparing) for clinical use, and interest has been renewed in the study of mixtures of high and low LET radiation. Several standard radiation inactivation models can readily accommodate interaction between two mixed radiations, however, this is usually handled by postulating extra free parameters, which can only be determined by fitting to experimental data. A model without any free parameter is proposed to explain the biological effect of mixed radiations, based on the following two assumptions: (a) The combined biological action due to two radiations is additive, assuming no repair has taken place during the interval between the two irradiations; and (b) The initial physical damage induced by radiation develops into final biological effect (e.g. cell killing) over a relatively long period (hours) after irradiation. This model has been shown to provide satisfactory fit to the experiment results of previous studies

  13. Behavior of mixed-oxide fuel elements during an overpower transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Shikakura, S.

    1993-01-01

    A slow-ramp (0.1%/s), extended overpower (∼90%) transient test was conducted in EBR-II on 19 mixed-oxide fuel elements with conservative, moderate, and aggressive designs. Claddings for the elements were Type 316, D9, or PNC-316 stainless steel. Before the transient, the elements were preirradiated under steady-state or steady-state plus duty-cycle (periodic 15% overpower transient) conditions to burnups of 2.5-9.7 at%. Cladding integrity during the transient test was maintained by all fuel elements except one, which had experienced substantial overtemperature in the earlier stedy-state irradiation. Extensive centerline fuel melting occurred in all test elements. Significantly, this melting did not cause any elements to breach, although it did have a strong effect on the other aspects of fuel element behavior. (orig.)

  14. Pyroprocessing of oxidized sodium-bonded fast reactor fuel - An experimental study of treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, S.D.; Gese, N.J. [Separations Department, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Wurth, L.A. [Zinc Air Inc., 5314-A US Hwy 2 West, Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electro-metallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. In the absence of zirconium or sodium oxide, the electrolytic reduction of MnO showed nearly complete conversion to metal. The electrolytic reduction of a blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but only 8.5% of the zirconium was found in the metal phase. The electrolytic reduction of the same blend of MnO-ZrO{sub 2} in LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O - 6.2 wt% Na{sub 2}O showed substantial reduction of manganese, but zirconium reduction was even less at 2.4%. This study concluded that ZrO{sub 2} cannot be substantially reduced to metal in an electrolytic reduction system with LiCl - 1 wt% Li{sub 2}O at 650 C. degrees due to the perceived preferential formation of lithium zirconate. This study also identified a possible interference that sodium oxide may have on the same system by introducing a parasitic and cyclic reaction of dissolved sodium metal between oxidation at the anode and reduction at the cathode. When applied to oxidized sodium-bonded EBR-II fuel (e.g., U-10Zr), the prescribed electrolytic reduction system would not be expected to substantially reduce zirconium oxide, and the accumulation of sodium in the electrolyte could interfere with the reduction of uranium oxide, or at least render it less efficient.

  15. Irradiation performance of full-length metallic IFR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.

    1992-07-01

    An assembly irradiation of 169 full-length U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel pins was successfully completed in FFTF to a goal burnup of 10 at.%. All test fuel pins maintained their cladding integrity during the irradiation. Postirradiation examination showed minimal fuel/cladding mechanical interaction and excellent stability of the fuel column. Fission-gas release was normal and consistent with the existing data base from irradiation testing of shorter metallic fuel pins in EBR-II

  16. Stability of lithium niobate on irradiation at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primak, W.; Gavin, A.P.; Anderson, T.T.; Monahan, E.

    1977-01-01

    In contrast to results obtained for neutron irradiation in a thermal reactor near room temperature, lithium niobate plates irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) did not become metamict. This is attributed to the elevated temperature of the EBR-II. Ion bombardment experiments indicate that to avoid disordering of lithium niobate on irradiation, its temperature should be maintained above 673 K. Evidence for ionic conductivity was found at 873 K, indicating that it would be inadvisable to permit the temperature to rise that high, particularly with voltage across the plate. In reactor application as a microphone transducer, it is tentatively recommended that the lithium niobate be maintained in the middle of this temperature range for a major portion of reactor operating time

  17. Irradiation creep experiments on fusion reactor candidate structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausen, H.; Cundy, M.R.; Schuele, W.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation creep rates were determined for annealed and cold-worked AMCR- and 316-type steel alloys in the high flux reactor at Petten, for various irradiation temperatures, stresses and for neutron doses up to 4 dpa. Primary creep elongations were found in all annealed materials. A negative creep elongation was found in cold-worked materials for stresses equal to or below about 100 MPa. An increase of the negative creep elongation is found for decreasing irradiation temperatures and decreasing applied stresses. The stress exponent of the irradiation creep rate in annealed and cold-worked AMCR alloys is n = 1.85 and n = 1.1, respectively. The creep rates of cold-worked AMCR alloys are almost temperature independent over the range investigated (573-693 K). The results obtained in the HFR at Petten are compared with those obtained in ORR and EBR II. The smallest creep rates are found for cold-worked materials of AMCR- and US-PCA-type at Petten which are about a factor two smaller than the creep rates obtained of US-316 at Petten or for US-PCA at ORR or for 316L at EBR II. The scatter band factor for US-PCA, 316L, US-316 irradiated in ORR and EBR II is about 1.5 after a temperature and damage rate normalization

  18. EBR-II operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.

    1978-07-01

    Operation of the EBR-2 reactor is presented concerning the performance of the heat removal system; reactor materials; fuel handling system; sodium purification and sampling system; cover-gas purification; plant diagnostics and instrumentation; recent improvements in identifying fission product sources in EBR-2; and EBR-2 safety

  19. Performance of IN-706 and PE-16 cladding in mixed-oxide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makenas, B.J.; Lawrence, L.A.; Jensen, B.W.

    1982-05-01

    Iron-nickel base, precipitation-strengthened alloys, IN-706 and PE-16, advanced alloy cladding considered for breeder reactor applications, were irradiated in mixed-oxide fuel pins in the HEDL-P-60 subassembly in EBR-II. Initial selection of candidate advanced alloys was done using only nonfueled materials test results. However, to establish the performance characteristics of the candidate cladding alloys, i.e., dimensional stability and structural integrity under conditions of high neutron flux, elevated temperature, and applied stress, it was necessary to irradiate fuel pins under typical operating conditions. Fuel pins were clad with solution treated IN-706 and PE-16 and irradiated to peak fluences of 6.1 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > .1 MeV) and 8.8 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > .1 MeV) respectively. Fabrication and operating parameters for the fuel pins with the advanced cladding alloy candidates are summarized. Irradiation of HEDL-P-60 was interrupted with the breach of a pin with IN-706 cladding at 5.1 at % and the test was terminated with cladding breach in a pin with PE-16 cladding at 7.6 at %

  20. Irradiation creep of the mixed oxide UPuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combette, Patrick; Milet, Claude

    1976-01-01

    The irradiation creep under compression of the mixed oxide UO 2 -PuO 2 was studied up to fission yields of 6x10 13 fcm -3 s -1 , under stresses -2 , in the temperature range 700-900 deg C. The creep rate is proportional to the applied stress and fission yield, athermal in the studied temperature range and non-dependent of burnup (up to 30000MWjt -1 ). In a sample under compression, swelling is observed due to the formation of fission products during the irradiation and the swelling rate is of the same order that in a cladded fuel element [fr

  1. Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S.; Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding

  2. Performance degradation of ferrofluidic feedthroughs in a mixed irradiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Fernandes, S.; Mittig, Wolfgang; Pellemoine, Frederique; Avilov, M.; Kostin, M.; Mausner, L.; Ronningen, R.; Schein, M.; Bollen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Ferrofluidic feedthrough (FF) rotary seals containing either NdFeB or SmCo-type permanent magnets have been considered for use in the target and beam dump systems of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). To evaluate their performance under irradiation three FF seals were irradiated in a mixed field consisting of fast neutrons, protons and γ-rays to an average absorbed dose of 0.2, 2.0, and 20.0 MGy at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The radiation types and energy profiles mimic those expected at the FRIB facility. Degradation of the operational performance of these devices due to irradiation is expected to be the result of the de-magnetization of the permanent magnets contained within the seal and the changes in the ferrofluid properties. Post-irradiation performance was evaluated by determining the ferrofluidic seal vacuum tightness and torque under static and dynamic conditions. The study revealed that the ferrofluidic feedthrough seal irradiated to a dose of 0.2 MGy maintained its vacuum tightness under both static and rotational condition while the one irradiated to a dose of 2.0 MGy exhibited signs of ferrofluid damage but no overall performance loss. At 20 MGy dose the effects of irradiation on the ferrofluid properties (viscosity and particle agglomeration) were shown to be severe. Furthermore, limited de-magnetization of the annular shaped Nd2Fe14B and Sm2Co17 magnets located within the irradiated FFs was observed for doses of 0.2 MGy and 20 MGy respectively.

  3. Irradiation mixing of Al into U3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R.C.; Ding, F.R.; Kestel, B.J.; Baldo, P.M.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1995-11-01

    Thermal and irradiation induced intermixing of uranium silicide reactor fuels with the aluminum cladding is an important consideration in understanding their fission gas and fuel swelling behavior. The authors have used Rutherford backscattering to follow the behavior of an Al thin film on U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 during 1.5 MeV Kr ion irradiation at temperatures of 30 and 350 C. After an initial dose during which no intermixing occurs, the Al mixes quickly into U 3 Si. The threshold dose is believed to be associated with an oxide layer between the Al and the uranium silicide. At 300 C and doses greater than threshold, rates of mixing and aluminide phase growth are extracted

  4. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the LAMPF irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Davidson, D.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    Differential and total displacement and helium-production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760-MeV protons at LAMPF. The calculations are performed using the SPECTOR and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation-damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in the experimental breeder reactor (EBR-II) at the Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho, and in the rotating target neutron source (RTNS-II) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The neutron energy spectra for LAMPF, EBR-II, and RTNS-II and the displacement and helium-production cross sections are shown

  5. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5Fs) are presented. The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations to the measurements shows quantitative agreement with both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content

  6. Rheological evaluation of the irradiated pectin/gelatin mixed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, Patricia Y.; Mastro, Nelida L. del

    2011-01-01

    The main biopolymers used in the edible films production are polysaccharides and proteins. Pectin is a heterosaccharidic polymer derived from the vegetal cell wall. Gelatin is a heterogeneous mixture of water-soluble proteins of high average molecular mass derived by hydrolytic action from animal collagen. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on either the biopolymers alone or on the mixed systems prepared with high-and low-methoxyl pectin and gelatin in solution and mixed gel. The results showed that gelatin viscosity remained almost unaffected by the irradiation with doses from 1 to 15 kGy, with a slight increase at 3 kGy. On the other hand, there was a sharp decrease of viscosity values of all pectin solutions upon irradiation, being this behavior predominant when both polysaccharides and proteins were present in a mixed system. The gel hardness and gel brittleness of the gelatin were affected by the increase of radiation dose. (author)

  7. Estimates of time-dependent fatigue behavior of Type 316 stainless steel subject to irradiation damage in fast breeder and fusion power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Liu, K.C.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    Cyclic lives obtained from strain-controlled fatigue tests at 593 0 C of specimens irradiated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II) to a fluence of 1 to 2.63*10 26 neutrons (n)/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) were compared with predictions based on the method of strain-range partitioning. It was demonstrated that, when appropriate tensile and creep-rupture ductilities were employed, reasonably good estimates of the influence of hold periods and irradiation damage on the fully reversed fatigue life of Type 316 stainless steel could be made. After applicability of this method was demonstrated, ductility values for 20 percent cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in a mixed-spectrum fission reactor were used to estimate fusion reactor first-wall lifetime. The ductility values used were from irradiations that simulate the environment of the first wall of a fusion reactor. Neutron wall loadings ranging from 2 to 5 MW/m 2 were used. 27 refs

  8. Cesium relocation in mixed-oxide fuel pins resulting from increased temperature reirradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Woodley, R.E.; Weber, E.T.

    1976-06-01

    Mixed-oxide fuel pins from EBR-II test subassemblies PNL-3 and PNL-4 were reirradiated in the GETR to study effects of increased fuel and cladding temperatures on chemical and thermomechanical behavior. Radial and axial distributions of cesium were obtained using postirradiation nondestructive precision gamma-scanning techniques. Data presented relate to the dependence of cesium distribution and transport processes on temperature gradients which were altered after substantial steady-state operation

  9. Helium production in mixed spectrum reactor-irradiated pure elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneff, D.W.; Oliver, B.M.; Skowronski, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to apply helium accumulation neutron dosimetry to the measurement of neutron fluences and energy spectra in mixed-spectrum fission reactors utilized for fusion materials testing, and to measure helium generation rates of materials in these irradiation environments. Helium generation measurements have been made for several Fe, Cu Ti, Nb, Cr, and Pt samples irradiated in the mixed-spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results have been used to integrally test the ENDF/B-V Gas Production File, by comparing the measurements with helium generation predictions made by Argonne National Laboratory using ENDF/B-V cross sections and adjusted reactor spectra. The comparisons indicate consistency between the helium measurements and ENDF/B-V for iron, but cross section discrepancies exist for helium production by fast neutrons in Cu, Ti, Nb, and Cr (the latter for ORR). The Fe, Cu, and Ti work updates and extends previous measurements

  10. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors; Caracterisation microstructurale et modelisation du durcissement des aciers austenitiques irradies des structures internes des reacteurs a eau pressurisee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokor, C

    2003-07-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  11. Microstructural characterization and model of hardening for the irradiated austenitic stainless steels of the internals of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokor, C.

    2003-01-01

    The core internals of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) are composed of SA 304 stainless steel plates and CW 316 stainless steel bolts. These internals undergo a neutron flux at a temperature between 280 deg C and 380 deg C which modifies their mechanical properties. These modifications are due to the changes in the microstructure of these materials under irradiation which depend on flux, dose and irradiation temperature. We have studied, by Transmission Electron Microscopy, the microstructure of stainless steels SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti irradiated in a mixed flux reactor (OSIRIS at 330 deg C between 0,8 dpa et 3,4 dpa) and in a fast breeder reactor at 330 deg C (BOR-60) up to doses of 40 dpa. Moreover, samples have been irradiated at 375 deg C in a fast breeder reactor (EBR-II) up to doses of 10 dpa. The microstructure of the irradiated stainless steels consists in faulted Frank dislocation loops in the [111] planes of austenitic, with a Burgers vector of [111]. It is possible to find some voids in the solution annealed samples irradiated at 375 deg C. The evolution of the dislocations loops and voids has been simulated with a 'cluster dynamic' model. The fit of the model parameters has allowed us to have a quantitative description of our experimental results. This description of the microstructure after irradiation was coupled together with a hardening model by Frank loops that has permitted us to make a quantitative description of the hardening of SA 304, CW 316 and CW 316Ti stainless steels after irradiation at a certain dose, flux and temperature. The irradiation doses studied grow up to 90 dpa, dose of the end of life of PWR internals. (author)

  12. Transient redistribution of intragranular fission gas in irradiated mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinman, C.A.; Randklev, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    Safety analyses for an LMFBR require a knowledge of the fuel and fission gas behavior under transient conditions. Analyses of microstructural data derived from transiently heated, irradiated, mixed oxide fuel specimens have allowed the calculation of the degree of nonequilibrium of intragranular bubbles formed during the transient. It is hypothesized that the observed over-pressurization of the intragranular bubbles mechanically loads the fuel within the grain, leading to a stress gradient derived force upon near-grain-surface bubbles, driving them preferentially to the grain boundaries. Using existing models for forced diffusion it can be estimated that the stress derived forces on bubbles are within the same magnitude, and possibly greater, than the forces derived from the thermal gradient

  13. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  14. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs

  15. An overview of microstructural and experimental factors that affect the irradiation growth behavior of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidleris, V.; Tucker, R.P.; Adamson, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of factors affecting irradiation growth of zirconium alloys. Recent data obtained from irradiation programs in EBR-II, ATR, and NRU reactors are used to illustrate the effects of various microstructural and experimental factors on the growth of Zircaloy, zirconium, and zirconium-biobium alloys irradiated to fluences up to 2 X 10 26 nm -2 (E > 1 MeV) over the temperature range 330 to 720 K. Open literature results are also used to confirm or illustrate various effects. Important factors are texture, grain boundary parameters, residual stresses, original dislocation density, microstructure evolution, temperature during irradiation, solute effects, and fluence

  16. Fast neutron irradiation results on Li2O, Li4SiO4, Li2ZrO3 and LiA102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    Several ceramic solid breeder materials were irradiated in the fast neutron flux of EBR-II to a burnup of 3 x 10 20 captures/cm 3 in the 500 0 C to 900 0 C temperature range. Performance data were obtained on structural integrity, lithium transport, pellet swelling, and grain growth. The data provide a basis for more accurately forecasting the feasibility and performance limitations for these materials

  17. Survey of post-irradiation examinations made of mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    Post-irradiation examinations on mixed carbide, nitride and carbonitride fuels irradiated in fast flux reactors Rapsodie and DFR were carried out during the seventies and early eighties. In this report, emphasis was put on the fission gas release, cladding carburization and head-end gaseous oxidation process of these fuels, in particular, of mixed carbides. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs

  18. Microbiological Quality of Mixed Vegetables Salad and Insuring its Safety by Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, A.A.; Abu El-Nour, S.A.; Swailam, H.M.; Serag, M.S.; Mansour, F.A.

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen prepackaged mixed vegetables salad samples were collected from different local supermarkets. They were tested for their microbiological quality. TAPC of mix salad samples ranged from 2.5 x 10 5 to 7.0 x 10 7 cfu/g; LAB between 2.0 x 10 3 and 7.1 x 10 6 cfu/g; M and Y ranged from 1. 10 2 to 4.5 x 10 3 cfu/g. All tested mix salad samples contained coliform bacteria, E. coli and Ent. Faecalis. Staph. aureus was found in 12 (80%) samples, while A. hydrophila was found in all mix salad samples. L. monocytogenes was present in only two samples and Salmonella spp. was detected in only one sample. Mix salad samples were irradiated at 1, 2 and 3 kGy, and then stored at refrigeration temperature (4 degree C±1). Generally, all irradiation doses used reduced the initial TAPC, LAB and TM and Y and the reduction was proportional with irradiation dose. The optimum irradiation dose for irradiating mix salad was identified to be 3 kGy as no pathogens were detected in mix salad samples exposed to this irradiation dose. This irradiation dose had no adverse effect on physical and sensorial quality attributes of mix salad and extended its shelf-life to 15 days against only 7 days for unirradiated samples

  19. Experience of the irradiation method under mixed gas (95% O2 plus 5% CO2) inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Michio; Tazaki, Eio

    1978-01-01

    The irradiation method under mixed gas of 95% O 2 plus CO 2 inhalation at one atomosphere was discussed to improve therapeutic results, in malignant tumors which are not greatly sensitive to irradiation. Randomized study was done in each attending institute, with common protocols. As a result, no positive effect was recognized in irradiation method under mixed gas inhalation with daily dose of 200 rad and 5 fractions per week, which is widely used clinically. But when irradiation dose was increased up to 500 to 600 rad per fraction, effect of the mixed gas was remarkable. But against this, observing for years, results in irradiation under mixed gas inhalation were not always related to the improvement of the long term survival. (author)

  20. Effects of heat treatment and formulation on the phase composition and chemical durability of the EBR-II ceramic waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. E.; Dietz, N. L.; Janney, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II will be immobilized in a ceramic waste form (CWF). Tests are being conducted to evaluate the suitability of the CWF for disposal in the planned federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. In this report, the results of laboratory tests and analyses conducted to address product consistency and thermal stability issues called out in waste acceptance requirements are presented. The tests measure the impacts of (1) variations in the amounts of salt and binder glass used to make the CWF and (2) heat treatments on the phase composition and chemical durability of the waste form. A series of CWF materials was made to span the ranges of salt and glass contents that could be used during processing: between 5.0 and 15 mass% salt loaded into the zeolite (the nominal salt loading is 10.7%, and the process control range is 10.6 to 11.2 mass%), and between 20 and 30 mass% binder glass mixed with the salt-loaded zeolite (the nominal glass content is 25% and the process control range is 20 to 30 mass%). In another series of tests, samples of two CWF products made with the nominal salt and glass contents were reheated to measure the impact on the phase composition and durability: long-term heat treatments were conducted at 400 and 500 C for durations of 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year; short-term heat treatments were conducted at 600, 700, 800, and 850 C for durations of 4, 28, 52, and 100 hours. All of the CWF products that were made with different amounts of salt, zeolite, and glass and all of the heat-treated CWF samples were analyzed with powder X-ray diffraction to measure changes in phase compositions and subjected to 7-day product consistency tests to measure changes in the chemical durability. The salt loading had the greatest impact on phase composition and durability. A

  1. Pathfinder irradiation of advanced fuel (Th/U mixed oxide) in a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant Pinheiro, R.

    1993-01-01

    Within the joint Brazilian-German cooperative R and D Program on Thorium Utilization in Pressurized Water Reactors carried out from 1979 to 1988 by Nuclebras/CDTN, KFA-Juelich, Siemens/KWU and NUKEM, a pathfinder irradiation of Th/U mixed oxide fuel in the Angra 1 nuclear power reactor was planned. The objectives of this irradiation testing, the irradiation strategy, the work performed and the status achieved at the end of the joint Program are presented. (author)

  2. Hematologic status of mice submitted to sublethal total body irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Court, L.

    1989-01-01

    The hematologic status of mice exposed to sublethal whole body irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma radiation (mainly neutrons) is studied. A slight decrease of the blood cell count is still observed below 1 Gy. The recovery of bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitors seems to require more time than after pure gamma irradiation [fr

  3. Interaction of irradiation creep and swelling in the creep disappearance regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine the relationship between applied stresses and irradiation-induced dimensional changes in structural metals for fusion applications. Reanalysis of an earlier data set derived from irradiation of long creep tubes in EBR-II at 550 C has shown that the creep-swelling coupling coefficient is relatively independent of temperature at ∼0.6 x 10 -2 MPa -1 , but falls with increases in the swelling rate, especially at high stress levels. The action of stress-affected swelling and carbide precipitation exert different influences on the derivation of this coefficient

  4. Microstructural evolution of pure tungsten neutron irradiated with a mixed energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki, E-mail: koyanagit@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kumar, N.A.P. Kiran [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hwang, Taehyun [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Garrison, Lauren M.; Hu, Xunxiang [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Microstructures of single-crystal bulk tungsten (W) and polycrystalline W foil with a strong grain texture were investigated using transmission electron microscopy following neutron irradiation at ∼90–800 °C to 0.03–4.6 displacements per atom (dpa) in the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a mixed energy spectrum. The dominant irradiation defects were dislocation loops and small clusters at ∼90 °C. Additional voids were formed in W irradiated at above 460 °C. Voids and precipitates involving transmutation rhenium and osmium were the dominant defects at more than ∼1 dpa. We found a new phenomenon of microstructural evolution in irradiated polycrystalline W: Re- and Os-rich precipitation along grain boundaries. Comparison of results between this study and previous studies using different irradiation facilities revealed that the microstructural evolution of pure W is highly dependent on the neutron energy spectrum in addition to the irradiation temperature and dose.

  5. Irradiation performance of metallic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Porter, D.L.; Batte, G.L.; Hofman, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has been working for the past five years to develop and demonstrate the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. The concept involves a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, both designed specifically around the use of metallic fuel. The Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel for all of its 25-year life. In 1985, tests were begun to examine the irradiation performance of advanced-design metallic fuel systems based on U-Zr or U-Pu-Zr fuels. These tests have demonstrated the viable performance of these fuel systems to high burnup. The initial testing program will be described in this paper. 2 figs

  6. Post-irradiation examinations of uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuel irradiated in JMTR (89F-3A capsule)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Takashi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Kikuchi, Hironobu; Arai, Yasuo; Kimura, Yasuhiko; Nagashima, Hisao; Sekita, Noriaki

    2000-03-01

    Two helium-bonded fuel pins filled with uranium-plutonium mixed nitride pellets were encapsulated in 89F-3A and irradiated in JMTR up to 5.5% FIMA at a maximum linear power of 73 kW/m. The capsule cooled for ∼5 months was transported to Reactor Fuel Examination Facility and subjected to non-destructive and destructive post irradiation examinations. Any failure was not observed in the irradiated fuel pins. Very low fission gas release rate of about 2 ∼ 3% was observed, while the diametric increase of fuel pin was limited to ∼0.4% at the position of maximum reading. The inner surface of cladding tube did not show any signs of chemical interaction with fuel pellet. (author)

  7. Swelling in several commercial alloys irradiated to very high neutron fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Pintler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling values have been obtained from a set of commercial alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a peak fluence of 2.5 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or approx. 125 dpa covering the range 400 to 650 0 C. The alloys can be ranked for swelling resistance from highest to lowest as follows: the martensitic and ferritic alloys, the niobium based alloys, the precipitation strengthened iron and nickel based alloys, the molybdenum alloys and the austenitic alloys

  8. Correlation of fracture toughness with tensile properties for irradiated 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-08-01

    A correlation has been developed which allows an estimate to be made of the toughness of austenitic alloys using more easily obtained tensile data. Tensile properties measured on 20% cold-worked AISI 316 specimens made from ducts and cladding irradiated in EBR-II were used to predict values for the plane strain fracture toughness according to a model originally developed by Krafft. Some microstructural examination is required to determine a parameter designated as the process zone size. In contrast to the frequently employed Hahn-Rosenfeld model, this model gives results which agree with recent experimental determinations of toughness performed in the transgranular failure regime

  9. Effect of material variables on the irradiation performance of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmajian, J.A.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Boron carbide pellets were fabricated with variations in material parameters. These pellets were irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) to determine the effect of these variations on the performance. Helium release from the material and swelling of the pellets are the primary measures of performance. It was determined that material with a smaller grain size released more helium and swelled less. The pellets with boron-to-carbon ratios greater than 4 to 1 did not perform well. Iron additions improved the performance of the material while density variations had little effect

  10. Direct electrical heating of irradiated metal fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.; Johanson, E.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept proposed by Argonne National Laboratory utilizes a metal fuel core. Reactor safety analysis requires information on the potential for fuel axial expansion during severe thermal transients. In addition to a comparatively large thermal expansion coefficient, metallic fuel has a unique potential for enhanced pre-failure expansion driven by retained fission gas and ingested bond sodium. In this paper, the authors present preliminary results from three direct electrical heating (DEH) experiments performed on irradiated metal fuel to investigate axial expansion behavior. The test samples were from Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) driver fuel ML-11 irradiated to 8 at.% burnup. Preliminary analysis of the results suggest that enhanced expansion driven by trapped fission gas can occur

  11. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5 wt. % Fs) are presented. (The symbol 'Fs' designates fissium, a 'pseudo-element' which, in reality, is an alloy whose composition is representative of fission products that remain in reprocessed fuel). The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations with the measurements shows quantitative agreement in both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content. (orig.)

  12. Swelling in neutron-irradiated titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.T.

    1982-04-01

    Immersion density measurements have been performed on a series of titanium alloys irradiated in EBR-II to a fluence of 5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 450 and 550 0 C. The materials irradiated were the near-alpha alloys Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S, the alpha-beta alloy Ti-64, and the beta alloy Ti-38644. Swelling was observed in all alloys with the greater swelling being observed at 550 0 C. Microstructural examination revealed the presence of voids in all alloys. Ti-38644 was found to be the most radiation resistant. Ti-6242S and Ti-5621S also displayed good radiation resistance, whereas considerable swelling and precipitation were observed in Ti-64 at 550 0 C

  13. Helium diffusion in irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    Boron carbide has been internationally adopted as the neutron absorber material in the control and safety rods of large fast breeder reactors. Its relatively large neutron capture cross section at high neutron energies provides sufficient reactivity worth with a minimum of core space. In addition, the commercial availability of boron carbide makes it attractive from a fabrication standpoint. Instrumented irradiation experiments in EBR-II have provided continuous helium release data on boron carbide at a variety of operating temperatures. Although some microstructural and compositional variations were examined in these experiments most of the boron carbide was prototypic of that used in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The density of the boron carbide pellets was approximately 92% of theoretical. The boron carbide pellets were approximately 1.0 cm in diameter and possessed average grain sizes that varied from 8 to 30 μm. Pellet centerline temperatures were continually measured during the irradiation experiments

  14. SP-100 Fuel Pin Performance: Results from Irradiation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makenas, Bruce J.; Paxton, Dean M.; Vaidyanathan, Swaminathan; Marietta, Martin; Hoth, Carl W.

    1994-07-01

    A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pins are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

  15. Determination of melting point of mixed-oxide fuel irradiated in a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Toshimichi

    1985-01-01

    The melting point of fuel is important to set its in-reactor maximum temperature in fuel design. The fuel melting point measuring methods are broadly the filament method and the capsule sealing method. The only instance of measuring the melting point of irradiated mixed oxide (U, Pu)O 2 fuel by the filament method is by GE in the United States. The capsule sealing method, while the excellent means, is difficult in weld sealing the irradiated fuel in a capsule within the cell. In the fast reactor development program, the remotely operated melting point measuring apparatus in capsule sealing the mixed (U, Pu)O 2 fuel irradiated in the experimental FBR Joyo was set in the cell and the melting point was measured, for the first time in the world. (Mori, K.)

  16. Behavior of mixed-oxide fuel elements during the TOPI-1E transient overpower test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Neimark, L.A.; Yamamoto, K.; Hirai, K.; Shikakura, S.

    1993-12-01

    A slow-ramp, extended overpower transient test was conducted on a group of nineteen preirradiated mixed-oxide fuel elements in EBR-II. During the transient two of the test elements with high-density fuel and tempered martensitic cladding (PNC-FMS) breached at an overpower of ∼75%. Fuel elements with austenitic claddings (D9, PNC316, and PNC150), many with aggressive design features and high burnups, survived the overpower transient and incurred little or no cladding strain. Fuel elements with annual fuel or heterogeneous fuel columns also behaved well

  17. Design and fuel fabrication processes for the AC-3 mixed-carbide irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, T.W.; Chidester, K.M.; Stratton, R.W.; Ledergerber, G.; Ingold, F.

    1992-01-01

    The AC-3 test was a cooperative U.S./Swiss irradiation test of 91 wire-wrapped helium-bonded U-20% Pu carbide fuel pins irradiated to 8.3 at % peak burnup in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The test consisted of 25 pins that contained spherepac fuel fabricated by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and 66 pins that contained pelletized fuel fabricated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Design of AC-3 by LANL and PSI was begun in 1981, the fuel pins were fabricated from 1983 to 1985, and the test was irradiated from 1986 to 1988. The principal objective of the AC-3 test was to compare the irradiation performance of mixed-carbide fuel pins that contained either pelletized or sphere-pac fuel at prototypic fluence and burnup levels for a fast breeder reactor

  18. The precipitation response of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel to simulated fusion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The precipitation response of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel has been examined after irradiation in HFIR at 380-600 0 C, after irradiation in EBR-II at 500 0 C, and after thermal aging at 600 to 750 0 C. Eta phase forms during exposure to all environments. It constitutes a major portion of the precipitation response, and is rich in Ni, Si and Mo relative to M 23 C 6 after thermal aging. It is not normally reported in 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel. The eta, M 23 C 6 , Laves, sigma, and chi precipitate phases appear at similar temperatures after HFIR, EBR-II, or thermal exposure. There are, however, some differences in relative amounts, size, and distribution of phases among the various environments. Eta phase is the only carbide-type phase observed after irradiation in HFIR from 380-550 0 C. The large cavities associated with it at 380 0 C contribute significantly to swelling. Re-solution of fine M 23 C 6 , eta, and Laves particles and re-precipitation of massive particles of sigma, M 23 C 6 and chi are observed after recrystallization in HFIR. (orig.)

  19. Irradiation performance of U-Pu-Zr metal fuels for liquid-metal-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Cohen, A.B.; Billone, M.C.; Neimark, L.A.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses a fuel system utilizing metallic U-Pu-Zr alloys which has been developed for advanced liquid metal-cooled reactors (LMRs). Result's from extensive irradiation testing conducted in EBR-II show a design having the following key features can achieve both high reliability and high burnup capability: a cast nominally U-20wt %Pu-10wt %Zr slug with the diameter sized to yield a fuel smear density of ∼75% theoretical density, low-swelling tempered martensitic stainless steel cladding, sodium bond filling the initial fuel/cladding gap, and an as-built plenum/fuel volume ratio of ∼1.5. The robust performance capability of this design stems primarily from the negligible loading on the cladding from either fuel/cladding mechanical interaction or fission-gas pressure during the irradiation. The effects of these individual design parameters, e.g., fuel smear density, zirconium content in fuel, plenum volume, and cladding types, on fuel element performance were investigated in a systematic irradiation experiment in EBR-II. The results show that, at the discharge burnup of ∼11 at. %, variations on zirconium content or plenum volume in the ranges tested have no substantial effects on performance. Fuel smear density, on the other hand, has pronounced but countervailing effects: increased density results in greater cladding strain, but lesser cladding wastage from fuel/cladding chemical interaction

  20. Irradiation and examination results of the AC-3 mixed-carbide test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.E.; Hoth, C.W.; Stratton, R.W.; Botta, F.

    1992-01-01

    The AC-3 test was a cooperative Swiss/US irradiation test of mixed-carbide, (U,Pr)C, fuel pins in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The test included 25 Swiss-fabricated sphere-pac-type fuel pins and 66 U.S. fabricated pellet-type fuel pins. The test was designed to operate at prototypical fast reactor conditions to provide a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of the two fuel types. The test design and fuel fabrication processes used for the AC-3 test are presented

  1. Biological and Irradiation Treatment of Mix Industrial Wastewater in Flood Mitigation Pond at Prai Industrial Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomsaton Abu Bakar; Jamaliah Sharif; Selambakkanu, S.; Ming, T.M.; Natasha Isnin; Hasnul Nizam Osman; Khasmidatul Akma Mohd Khairul Azmi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, activated sludge process and E-Beam was used to treat mixed industrial waste water from mitigation pond A. The objectives of this study to analyze the effect of mix liquor volatile suspended solid (MLVSS) concentration on the properties of wastewater and duration of time taken to achieve steady stage condition for biological treatment. Besides that, effect of electron beam energy on the characteristic of wastewater after irradiation with electron beam machine EPS 3000 was studied as well. The result shows removal percentage of COD, suspended solid and color was linearly proportional with MLVSS. Maximum reduction values recorded for COD, suspended solid and color removal was 69.4, 73.0 and 43.7 % respectively with 3500 mg/l MLVSS at 48 h HRT. In irradiation treatment, significant reduction of COD was obtained with the increase of electron beam energy but the results for suspended solid and color was not favorable. (author)

  2. Irradiation of a 19 pin subassembly with mixed carbide fuel in KNK II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithoff, D.; Mühling, G.; Richter, K.

    1992-06-01

    The presentation deals with the fabrication, irradiation and nondestructive postirradiation examinations of LMR fuel pins with mixed (U, Pu)-carbide fuels. The mixed carbide fuel was fabricated by the European Institute of Transuranium Elements using various fabrication procedures. Fuel composition varied therefore in a wide range of tolerances with respect to oxygen and phase content and microstructure. The 19 carbide pins were irradiated in the fast neutron flux of the KNK II reactor to a burn-up of about 7 at% without any failure in the centre of a KNK "carrier element" at a maximum linear rating of 800 W/cm. After dismantling in the Hot Cells of KfK nondestructive examinations were carried out comprising dimensional controls, radiography, γ-scanning and eddy-current testing. The results indicate differences in fuel behaviour with respect to composition of the fuel.

  3. Effect of irradiation on the tensile properties of niobium-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Heestand, R.L.; Atkin, S.D.

    1986-11-01

    The alloys Nb-1Zr and PWC-11 (Nb-1Zr-0.1C) were selected as prime candidate alloys for the SP-100 reactor. Since the mechanical properties of niobium alloys irradiated to end-of-life exposure levels of about 2 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at temperatures above 1300 K were not available, an irradiation experiment (B-350) in EBR-II was conducted. Irradiation creep, impact properties, bending fatigue, and tensile properties were investigated; however, only tensile properties will be reported in this paper. The tensile properties were studied since they easily reveal the common irradiation phenomena of hardening and embrittlement. Most attention was directed to testing at the irradiation temperature. Further testing was conducted at lower temperatures in order to scope the behavior of the alloys in cooldown conditions

  4. Gamma scanning of mixed carbide and oxide fuel pins irradiated in FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraj, V.V.; Padalakshmi, M.; Ulaganathan, T.; Venkiteswaran, C.N.; Divakar, R.; Joseph, Jojo; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Fission in nuclear fuels results in a number of fission products that are gamma emitters in the energy range of 100 keV to 3 MeV. The gamma emitting fission products are therefore amenable for detection by gamma detectors. Assessment of the fission product distribution and their migration behavior through gamma scanning is important for characterizing the in reactor behavior of the fuel. Gamma scanning is an important non destructive technique used to evaluate the behavior of irradiated fuels. As a part of Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE), axial gamma scanning has been carried out on selected fuel pins of the FBTR Mark I mixed carbide fuel sub-assemblies and PFBR MOX test fuel sub-assembly irradiated in FBTR. This paper covers the results of gamma scanning and correlation of gamma scanning results with other PIE techniques

  5. Post irradiation examinations of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuels irradiated at low linear power rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Atsushi; Sasayama, Tatsuo; Iwai, Takashi; Aizawa, Sakuei; Ohwada, Isao; Aizawa, Masao; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Handa, Muneo

    1988-11-01

    Two pins containing uranium-plutonium carbide fuels which are different in stoichiometry, i.e. (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 , were constructed into a capsule, ICF-37H, and were irradiated in JRR-2 up to 1.0 at % burnup at the linear heat rate of 420 W/cm. After being cooled for about one year, the irradiated capsule was transferred to the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility where the non-destructive examinations of the fuel pins in the β-γ cells and the destructive ones in two α-γ inert gas atmosphere cells were carried out. The release rates of fission gas were low enough, 0.44 % from (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel pin and 0.09% from (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel pin, which is reasonable because of the low central temperature of fuel pellets, about 1000 deg C and is estimated that the release is mainly governed by recoil and knock-out mechanisms. Volume swelling of the fuels was observed to be in the range of 1.3 ∼ 1.6 % for carbide fuels below 1000 deg C. Respective open porosities of (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel were 1.3 % and 0.45 %, being in accordance with the release behavior of fission gas. Metallographic observation of the radial sections of pellets showed the increase of pore size and crystal grain size in the center and middle region of (U,Pu)C 1.0 pellets. The chemical interaction between fuel pellets and claddings in the carbide fuels is the penetration of carbon in the fuels to stainless steel tubes. The depth of corrosion layer in inner sides of cladding tubes ranged 10 ∼ 15 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel and 15 #approx #25 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel, which is correlative with the carbon potential of fuels posibly affecting the amount of carbon penetration. (author)

  6. Synergistic effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation in bipolar operational amplifier OP07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Liu, E-mail: liuyan@nint.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wei, Chen; Shanchao, Yang; Xiaoming, Jin [State Key Laboratory of Intense Pulsed Irradiation Simulation and Effect, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P.O.Box 69-10, Xi’an 710024 (China); Chaohui, He [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-09-21

    This paper presents the synergistic effects in bipolar operational amplifier OP07. The radiation effects are studied by neutron beam, gamma ray, and mixed neutron/gamma ray environments. The characterateristics of the synergistic effects are studied through comparison of different experiment results. The results show that the bipolar operational amplifier OP07 exhibited significant synergistic effects in the mixed neutron and gamma irradiation. The bipolar transistor is identified as the most radiation sensitive unit of the operational amplifier. In this paper, a series of simulations are performed on bipolar transistors in different radiation environments. In the theoretical simulation, the geometric model and calculations based on the Medici toolkit are built to study the radiation effects in bipolar components. The effect of mixed neutron and gamma irradiation is simulated based on the understanding of the underlying mechanisms of radiation effects in bipolar transistors. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data. The results of the experiments and simulation indicate that the radiation effects in the bipolar devices subjected to mixed neutron and gamma environments is not a simple combination of total ionizing dose (TID) effects and displacement damage. The data suggests that the TID effect could enhance the displacement damage. The synergistic effect should not be neglected in complex radiation environments.

  7. Estimates of time-dependent fatigue behavior of type 316 stainless steel subject to irradiation damage in fast breeder and fusion power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Liu, K.C.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    Cyclic lives obtained from strain-controlled fatigue tests at 593 0 C of specimens irraidated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II) to a fluence of 1 to 2.63 x 10 26 neutrons (n)/m 2 E > 0.1 MeV) were compared with predictions based on the method of strain-range partitioning. It was demonstrated that, when appropriate tensile and creep-rupture ductilities were employed, reasonably good estimates of the influence of hold periods and irradiation damage on the fully reversed fatigue life of Type 316 stainless steel could be made. After applicability of this method was demonstrated, ductility values for 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel specimens irradiated in a mixed-spectrum fission reactor were used to estimate fusion reactor first-wall lifetime. The ductility values used were from irradations that simulate the environment of the first wall of a fusion reactor. Neutron wall loadins ranging from 2 to 5 MW/m 2 were used. Results, although conjectural because of the many assumptions, tended to show that 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel could be used as a first-wall material meeting a 7.5 go 8.5 MW-year/m 2 lifetime goal provided the neutron wall loading does not exceed more than about 2 MW/m 2 . These results were obtained for an air environment, ant it is expected that the actual vacuum environment will extend lifetime beyond 10 MW-year/m 2

  8. Dielectric changes in neutron-irradiated rf window materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, H.M.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics used for windows in ECRH heating systems for magnetically-confined fusion reactors must retain adequate properties during and after intense neutron irradiation. Of particular concern is a decrease in transmissivity, a parameter inversely related to the product of dielectric constant K and loss tangent tanδ. Samples of polycrystalline Al 2 O 3 and BeO were irradiated to 1 x 10 26 n/m 2 at 660K in the EBR-II fission reactor, and the above properties subsequently measured at 95 GHz. It was found that ktanδ for both materials doubled, implying a doubling of thermal stresses and a consequent reduction of time-to-failure from an assumed one year to 20 min for beryllia and 2 s for alumina. In the case of BeO, a large increase in reflectance of the incident millimeter-wave power results from dielectrically uncompensated swelling. This phenomenon could significantly degrade source performance

  9. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the LAMPF irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Differential and total displacement and helium production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760 MeV protons at LAMPF. The calculations are performed using the SPECTER and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in EBR-II and RTNS-II. The results indicate substantial contributions to the displacement and helium production rates due to neutrons in the high-energy tail (above 40 MeV) of the LAMPF spallation neutron spectrum. Still higher production rates are calculated for irradiations in the direct proton beam. These results will provide useful background information for research to be conducted at a new irradiation facility at LAMPF

  10. Precipitation response of annealed type 316 stainless steel in HFIR irradiations at 550 to 6800C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    Precipitation in annealed type 316 stainless steel after HFIR irradiation at 550--680 0 C to fluences producing 2000--3300 at. ppM He and 30--47 dpa is changed relative to fast reactor or thermal aging exposure to similar temperatures and times. The phases observed after HFIR irradiation are the same as those observed after aging to temperatures 70--200 0 C higher or for much longer times. There is a similar temperature shift in addition to different phases observed for HFIR irradiation compared with EBR-II. The changes observed are coincident with including simultaneous helium production to high levels in the irradiation damage products of the material

  11. Models of mixed irradiation with a 'reciprocal-time' pattern of the repair function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Shozo; Miura, Yuri; Mizuno, Shoichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology (Japan); Furusawa, Yoshiya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Suzuki presented models for mixed irradiation with two and multiple types of radiation by extending the Zaider and Rossi model, which is based on the theory of dual radiation action. In these models, the repair function was simply assumed to be semi-logarithmically linear (i.e., monoexponential), or a first-order process, which has been experimentally contradicted. Fowler, however, suggested that the repair of radiation damage might be largely a second-order process rather than a first-order one, and presented data in support of this hypothesis. In addition, a second-order repair function is preferred to an n-exponential repair function for the reason that only one parameter is used in the former instead of 2n-1 parameters for the latter, although both repair functions show a good fit to the experimental data. However, according to a second-order repair function, the repair rate depends on the dose, which is incompatible with the experimental data. We, therefore, revised the models for mixed irradiation by Zaider and Rossi and by Suzuki, by substituting a 'reciprocal-time' pattern of the repair function, which is derived from the assumption that the repair rate is independent of the dose in a second-order repair function, for a first-order one in reduction and interaction factors of the models, although the underlying mechanism for this assumption cannot be well-explained. The reduction factor, which reduces the contribution of the square of a dose to cell killing in the linear-quadratic model and its derivatives, and the interaction factor, which also reduces the contribution of the interaction of two or more doses of different types of radiation, were formulated by using a 'reciprocal-time' patterns of the repair function. Cell survivals calculated from the older and the newly modified models were compared in terms of the dose-rate by assuming various types of single and mixed irradiation. The result implies that the newly modified models for

  12. Growth of micropropagated lowbush blueberry with defined fungi in irradiated peat mix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litten, Walter; Smagula, J.M.; Dalpe, Yolande

    1992-01-01

    There is an interest in vegetative multiplication of high-yielding clones of Vaccinium angustifolium Ait. to establish or enhance blueberry production. This study evaluates mycorrhizal inoculation as an aid in such propagation from microcuttings. Shoots of Vaccinium angustifolium (clone 7062) generated in vitro were rooted in a peat-vermiculite-perlite substrate with or without ericoid mycorrhizal fungi fortification by Hymenoscyphus ericae or Scytalidium vaccinii and with or without peat sterilization by γ irradiation. Both in irradiated peat mix inoculated with S. vaccinii and in unirradiated peat mix with H. ericae, microcuttings grew taller and branched more than with the four other treatments. The profusely rooted plantlets available from all treatments of the cuttings put on significantly more total length of stems and branches after 167 days in the greenhouse when growing with either inoculant in unirradiated peat than in the unirradiated peat without inoculation. However, the magnitude of difference might be of borderline importance in commercial nursery operations. A higher level of copper and zinc in stem tissue was observed in stem tissue of plants grown with H. ericae with or without irradiation but not with S. vaccinii

  13. Optimized total body irradiation for induction of renal allograft tolerance through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimikawa, Masaaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen can induce mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance between MHC-disparate non-human primates. The basic regimen includes anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), total body irradiation (TBI, 300 cGy), thymic irradiation (TI, 700 cGy), splenectomy, donor bone marrow (DBM) infusion, and posttransplant cyclosporine therapy (CYA, discontinued after 4 weeks). To evaluate the importance and to minimize the toxicity of irradiation, kidney allografts were transplanted with various manipulations of the irradiation protocol. Monkeys treated with the basic protocol without TBI and TI did not develop chimerism or long-term allograft survival. In monkeys treated with the full protocol, all six monkeys treated with two fractionated dose of 150 cGy developed chimerism and five monkeys appeared tolerant. In contrast, only two of the four monkeys treated with fractionated doses of 125 cGy developed chimerism and only one monkey survived long term. The degree of lymphocyte depletion in all recipients was proportional to the TBI dose. The fractionated TBI regimen of 150 cGy appears to be the most consistently effective regimen for establishing donor bone marrow cell engraftment and allograft tolerance. (author)

  14. Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with WC particles in a irradiated region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuja, S. Z.; Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Karatas, C.

    2016-12-01

    Laser pulse heating of steel mixing with tungsten carbide (WC) particles is carried out. Temperature field in the irradiated region is simulated in line with the experimental conditions. In the analysis, a laser pulse parameter is introduced, which defines the laser pulse intensity distribution at the irradiated surface. The influence of the laser parameter on the melt pool size and the maximum temperature increase in the irradiated region is examined. Surface temperature predictions are compared with the experimental data. In addition, the distribution of WC particles and their re-locations in the treated layer, due to combination of the natural convection and Marangoni currents, are predicted. The findings are compared to the experimental data. It is found that surface temperature predictions agree well with the experimental data. The dislocated WC particles form a streamlining in the near region of the melt pool wall, which agree with the experimental findings. The Gaussian distribution of the laser pulse intensity results in the maximum peak temperature and the maximum flow velocity inside the melt pool. In this case, the melt pool depth becomes the largest as compared to those corresponding to other laser pulse intensity distributions at the irradiated surface.

  15. Optimized total body irradiation for induction of renal allograft tolerance through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimikawa, Masaaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen can induce mixed chimerism and renal allograft tolerance between MHC-disparate non-human primates. The basic regimen includes anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), total body irradiation (TBI, 300 cGy), thymic irradiation (TI, 700 cGy), splenectomy, donor bone marrow (DBM) infusion, and posttransplant cyclosporine therapy (CYA, discontinued after 4 weeks). To evaluate the importance and to minimize the toxicity of irradiation, kidney allografts were transplanted with various manipulations of the irradiation protocol. Monkeys treated with the basic protocol without TBI and TI did not develop chimerism or long-term allograft survival. In monkeys treated with the full protocol, all six monkeys treated with two fractionated dose of 150 cGy developed chimerism and five monkeys appeared tolerant. In contrast, only two of the four monkeys treated with fractionated doses of 125 cGy developed chimerism and only one monkey survived long term. The degree of lymphocyte depletion in all recipients was proportional to the TBI dose. The fractionated TBI regimen of 150 cGy appears to be the most consistently effective regimen for establishing donor bone marrow cell engraftment and allograft tolerance. (author)

  16. Dissolution behavior of irradiated mixed oxide fuel with short stroke shearing for fast reactor reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Sano, Yuichi; Shibata, Atsuhiro; Koizumi, Tsutomu; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2013-01-01

    An efficient dissolution process was established for future reprocessing in which mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels with high plutonium contents and dissolver solution with high heavy-metal (HM) concentrations (more than 500 g dm -3 ) will be treated. This dissolution process involves short stroke shearing of fuels (∼10 mm in length). The dissolution kinetics of irradiated MOX fuels and the effects of the Pu content, HM concentration, and fuel form on the dissolution rate were investigated. Irradiated fuel was found to dissolve as 10 2 -10 3 times fast as non-irradiated fuel, but the rate decreased with increasing Pu content. Kinetic analysis based on the fragmentation model, which considers the penetration and diffusion of nitric acid through fuel matrices prior to chemical reaction, indicated that the dissolution rate of irradiated fuel was affected not only by the volume ratio of liquid to solid (L/S ratio) but also by the exposed surface area per unit mole of nitric acid (A/m ratio). The penetration rate of nitric acid is expected to be decreased at high HM concentrations by a reduction in the L/S ratio, but enhanced by shearing the fuel pieces with short strokes and thus enlarging the A/m ratio. (author)

  17. Determination of D10 values of single and mixed cultures of bacteria after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adu-Gyamfi, A.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boatin, R.

    2009-01-01

    The D 10 value of bacteria represents the absorbed radiation dose required to inactivate 90 % of a viable population or reduce the population by a factor of 10. D 10 values of 3 bacterial isolates (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella parathyphi B) were determined using single and mixed cultures to assess the effect of microbial competition on radiosensitivity. The isolates were inoculated into wakye substrate and exposed to γ-radiation doses of 0, 100, 300, 450, 600, 750, 850 Gy from a 6O Co source at a dose rate of 2.20 kGy/h in air. Enumeration of survivors of the isolates was carried out using serial dilution and pour plate methods. The surviving fraction of isolates decreased with increased irradiation doses. D 10 values of E. coli, S. aureus and S. parathyphi B were respectively 0.27, 0.33 and 0.44 kGy when inoculated as single cultures, and 0.24, 0.28 and 0.32 kGy respectively when inoculated as mixed cultures. D 10 values were lower for mixed cultures compared to single cultures, which might indicate reduced resistance to γ-radiation as a result of competition among the isolates. Microbiological challenge tests based on the D 10 values may result in delivery of higher irradiation doses, but the extra dose could serve as safety margin to enhance the food preservative capacity of radiation processing. (au)

  18. Preparation and properties of functional mixed-lipid liposomes by γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Fumio; Omichi, Hideki; Akama, Kazuhiro; Awai, Kouji; Yano, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Yoshio

    1998-01-01

    The feature of mixed-lipid liposomes such as polymerization and polymerized liposomes stability were investigated to find means for producing red cells containing hemoglobin inside the liposomes. The surface pressure-area isotherm values of the mixed-lipid monolayer indicated 1-stearoyl-2-(2,4-octadecadienoyl)-glycero-3-phosphocholine (SOPC) to be immiscible in cholesterol (Chol) and stearic acid (SA), and each component to contain separate domains in the bilayer membrane of liposomes. Radiation induced polymerization of mixed-SOPC liposomes was carried out using γ-rays from 60 Co at 4degC to stabilize lipid bilayers. The polymer yield increased significantly by adding Chol and SA to SOPC. The rate of polymerization of SOPC liposomes increased linearly with increasing of dose rate. The molecular weight of the polymer decreased with an increase in irradiation time. Irradiated SOPC/Chol/SA liposome vesicle size was affected by freeze-thawing. The vesicle size did not change when SOPC/Chol/SA was present in the system due to the addition of immiscible saturated 1,2-dipalmitoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC). (author)

  19. Chemical states of fission products in irradiated uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    1999-01-01

    The chemical states of fission products (FPs) in irradiated uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for the light water reactor (LWR) were estimated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations on system of fuel and FPs by using ChemSage program. A stoichiometric MOX containing 6.1 wt. percent PuO 2 was taken as a loading fuel. The variation of chemical states of FPs was calculated as a function of oxygen potential. Some pieces of information obtained by the calculation were compared with the results of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of UO 2 fuel. It was confirmed that the multicomponent and multiphase thermodynamic equilibrium calculation between fuel and FPs system was an effective tool for understanding the behavior of FPs in fuel. (author)

  20. Graft copolymerization of water soluble mixed monomers onto polyethylene by the pre-irradiation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Fu; Tang Liming; Zhao Jin; Gao Zhenyong

    1993-01-01

    Grafting of water soluble mixed monomers of acrylic acid (AA)/acrylamide (Am) and acrylic acid/methacrylic acid (MA) onto polyethylene film by the pre-irradiation grafting method was investigated. The results showed that the grafting proceeded successfully with the adding of ferric salt in the solution. In the case of AA/Am system, a synergistic effect was noticed. In the case of AA/MA system, the graft percent increased with the increase in the concentration of MA in the feed ratio. Furthermore, the effects of monomer concentration, radiation dose and temperature on the grafting were also studied

  1. Unilateral irradiation of pigs in a mixed neutrons+gamma field. Early results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, Guy; Maas, Jean.

    1982-08-01

    Pigs (16-20kg) were irradiated with 60 Co gamma or in a mixed field (neutron + gamma from the pulsed reactor SILENE). Pigs were unilaterally exposed by the left side. Each experimental group was composed of twelve animals and one control. Within the dose range explored (reference dose is mid-line tissue dose): 4-9.8 Gy of gamma rays only; 4.6 - 5.7 Gy of neutrons and gamma rays, pigs presented the haematopioetic form of the acute radiation sickness. At 5 Gy mixed field was more harmful than gamma rays only. Therefore the numerical value of neutron RBE (lethality 50 p cent within 30 days) is more than one. Experiments will be carried out in order to determine RBE values more accurately. Bone marrow dose will also be determined [fr

  2. Microstructural interpretation of the fluence and temperature dependence of the mechanical properties of irradiated AISI 316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.D.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.; Fish, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of annealed and 20% cold-worked AISI 316 irradiated in EBR-II were determined for the temperature regime of 370 to 760 0 C for fluences up to 8.4 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). At irradiation temperatures below about 500 0 C, both annealed and cold-worked material exhibit a substantial increase in the flow stress with increasing fluence. Furthermore, both materials eventually exhibit the same flow stress, which is independent of fluence. At temperatures in the range of 538 to 650 0 C, the cold-worked material exhibits a softening with increasing fluence. Annealed AISI 316 in this temperature regime exhibits hardening and at a fluence of 2 to 3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) reaches the same value of flow stress as the cold-worked material

  3. Replacement of milk fat by mixed vegetable oils in manufacturing soft cheese treated by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afifi, E.A.; Anwar, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation aimed to study the possibility of substituting milk fat by using blended vegetable oils in manufacturing soft cheese with low salt content, in addition, lo utilize gamma irradiation to prolong the shelf-life of the new manufactured product. Therefore, one hundred (lOOKg) from fresh buffaloes milk containing 5 % milk fal and 3 % salt were divided into tow parts , the first part was used for manufacturing control soft cheese sample (containing milk fat ), while the second part was skimmed, blended with blended vegetable oils and homogenized. The skim homogenized milk containing 5% mixed vegetable oils used for manufacturing soft cheese ( new product filled ). The obtained soft cheese was subjected to 1, 2 and 3 kGy y-irradiation, and stored at refrigerator temperature. During cold storage, the sensory, microbial and chemical properties of control soft cheese and treated one were evaluated. The obtained results indicated that the replacement of milk fat by mixed vegetable oils in the manufacturing soft cheese had no effect on chemical composition and sensory properties except white color and slight oily flavor which have been noticed in treated filled cheese. In addition, irradiation dose of 3 kGy prolonged the shelf-life of treated filled cheese to 42 days compared to 18 days for control sample and scqueiitly, the new product high percentage of iinsaluraled fatly acid and no cholesterol compared with cheese made from natural milk and can be recommended as a healthy food especially for those who need to low or free cholesterol foods

  4. Calculation of displacement and helium production at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wechsler, M.S.; Davidson, D.R.; Greenwood, L.R.; Sommer, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    CT: Differential and total displacement and helium production rates are calculated for copper irradiated by spallation neutrons and 760 MeV protons at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). The calculations are performed using the SPECTER and VNMTC computer codes, the latter being specially designed for spallation radiation damage calculations. For comparison, similar SPECTER calculations are also described for irradiation of copper in EBR-II and RTNS-II. The results indicate substantial contributions to the displacement and helium production rates due to neutrons in the high-energy tail (above 20 MeV) of the LAMPF spallation neutron spectrum. Still higher production rates are calculated for irradiations in the direct proton beam. These results will provide useful background information for research to be conducted at a new irradiation facility at LAMPF

  5. Mechanical behavior of AISI 304SS determined by miniature test methods after neutron irradiation to 28 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabenberg, Ellen M.; Jaques, Brian J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Sencer, Bulent H. [Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Garner, Frank A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, 2003 Howell Ave., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Freyer, Paula D. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Okita, Taira [Research Into Artifacts Dept., Center for Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Butt, Darryl P., E-mail: DarrylButt@BoiseState.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd., Idaho Falls, ID 83401 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The mechanical properties of AISI 304 stainless steel irradiated for over a decade in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) were measured using miniature mechanical testing methods. The shear punch method was used to evaluate the shear strengths of the neutron-irradiated steel and a correlation factor was empirically determined to predict its tensile strength. The strength of the stainless steel slightly decreased with increasing irradiation temperature, and significantly increased with increasing dose until it saturated above approximately 5 dpa. An effective tensile strain hardening exponent was also obtained from the data which shows a relative decrease in ductility of steel with increased irradiation damage. Ferromagnetic measurements were used to observe and deduce the effects of the stress-induced austenite to martensite transformation as a result of shear punch testing.

  6. Irradiation of mixed UO2-PuO2 oxide samples for fast neutron reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikailoff, H.; Mustelier, J.; Bloch, J.; Conte, M.; Hayet, L.; Lauthier, J.C.; Leclere, J.

    1968-01-01

    Thermal flux irradiation testings of small mixed oxide pellets UPuO 2 fuel elements were performed in support of the fuel reference design for the Phenix fast reactor. The effects of different parameters (stoichiometry, pellet density, pellet clad gap). on the behaviour of the oxide (temperature distribution, microstructural changes, fission gas release) were investigated in various irradiation conditions. In particular, the effect of fuel density decrease and power rate increase on thermal performances were determined on short term irradiations of porous fuels. (authors) [fr

  7. Technical specification: Mixed-oxide pellets for the light-water reactor irradiation demonstration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.

    1997-06-01

    This technical specification is a Level 2 Document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. It is patterned after the pellet specification that was prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, for use by Los Alamos National Laboratory in fabrication of the test fuel for the Parallex Project, adjusted as necessary to reflect the differences between the Canadian uranium-deuterium reactor and light-water reactor fuels. This specification and the associated engineering drawing are to be utilized only for preparation of test fuel as outlined in the accompanying Request for Quotation and for additional testing as directed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the Department of Energy

  8. Status of steady-state irradiation testing of mixed-carbide fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The steady-state irradiation program of mixed-carbide fuels has demonstrated clearly the ability of carbide fuel pins to attain peak burnup greater than 12 at.% and peak fluences of 1.4 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Helium-bonded fuel pins in 316SS cladding have achieved peak burnups of 20.7 at.% (192 MWd/kg), and no breaches have occurred in pins of this design. Sodium-bonded fuel pins in 316SS cladding have achieved peak burnups of 15.8 at.% (146 MWd/kg). Breaches have occurred in helium-bonded fuel pins in PE-16 cladding (approx. 5 at.% burnup) and in D21 cladding (approx. 4 at.% burnup). Sodium-bonded fuel pins achieved burnups over 11 at.% in PE-16 cladding and over 6 at.% in D9 and D21 cladding

  9. Results of the irradiation of mixed UO2 - PuO2 oxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikailoff, H.; Mustelier, J.P.; Bloch, J.; Ezran, L.; Hayet, L.

    1966-01-01

    In order to study the behaviour of fuel elements used for the first charge of the reactor Rapsodie, a first batch of eleven needles was irradiated in the reactor EL3 and then examined. These needles (having a shape very similar lo that of the actual needles to be used) were made up of a stack of sintered mixed-oxide pellets: UO 2 containing about 10 per cent of PuO 2 . The density was 85 to 97 per cent of the theoretical, value. The diametral gap between the oxide and the stainless steel can was between 0,06 and 0,27 mm. The specific powers varied from 1230 to 2700 W/cm 3 and the can temperature was between 450 and 630 C. The maximum burn-up attained was 22000 MW days/tonne. Examination of the needles (metrology, radiography and γ-spectrography) revealed certain macroscopic changes, and the evolution of the fuel was shown by micrographic studies. These observations were used, together with flux measurements results, to calculate the temperature distribution inside the fuel. The volume of the fission gas produced was measured in some of the samples; the results are interpreted taking into account the temperature distribution in the oxide and the burn-up attained. Finally a study was made both of the behaviour of a fuel element whose central part was molten during irradiation, and of the effect of sodium which had penetrated into some of the samples following can rupture. (author) [fr

  10. Shelf-life extension and improving micro-biological quality of mixed peas with diced carrot by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, S. M.; Hammad, A. A.; Amal, S. M.; Gebreel, H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mixed peas with diced carrot were collected and examined for their microbiological quality. All the examined samples had high level of microbial load. All examined samples contained Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Enterococcus faecalis (Ent. faecalis). Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was detected in only 4 of samples (26.3%). The tested samples were free from Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila), Listeria monocytogenes (L monocytogenes) and Salmonella species. Gamma irradiation caused a great reduction in all microbial loads. During refrigerated storage, the counts of all microorganisms increased, but the rate of increase was slower as the irradiation dose increased. Irradiation dose of 3 kGy was the optimum dose for preservation of mixed peas with diced carrot which extended the refrigeration shelf-life up to 21 days and it was sufficient in eliminating pathogenic bacteria without affecting their sensory quality and with negligible effect on chemical quality.

  11. Simulating the ballistic effects of ion irradiation in the binary collision approximation: A first step toward the ion mixing framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demange, G.; Antoshchenkova, E.; Hayoun, M.; Lunéville, L.; Simeone, D.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding ballistic effects induced by ion beam irradiation can be a key point for controlling and predicting the microstructure of irradiated materials. Meanwhile, the ion mixing framework suggests an average description of displacement cascades may be sufficient to estimate the influence of ballistic relocations on the microstructure. In this work, the BCA code MARLOWE was chosen for its ability to account for the crystal structure of irradiated materials. A first set of simulations was performed on pure copper for energies ranging from 0.5 keV to 20 keV. These simulations were validated using molecular dynamics (MD). A second set of simulations on AgCu irradiated by 1 MeV krypton ions was then carried out using MARLOWE only, as such energy is beyond reach for molecular dynamics. MARLOWE simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental results, which suggests the predictive potential of the method.

  12. Simulating the ballistic effects of ion irradiation in the binary collision approximation: A first step toward the ion mixing framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demange, G., E-mail: gilles.demange@univ-rouen.fr [DEN/MDN/SRMA/LA2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Antoshchenkova, E. [DEN/MDN/SRMA/LA2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hayoun, M. [LSI, École Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA Saclay, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Lunéville, L. [DEN/SERMA/LLPR, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Simeone, D. [DEN/MDN/SRMA/LA2M, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2017-04-01

    Understanding ballistic effects induced by ion beam irradiation can be a key point for controlling and predicting the microstructure of irradiated materials. Meanwhile, the ion mixing framework suggests an average description of displacement cascades may be sufficient to estimate the influence of ballistic relocations on the microstructure. In this work, the BCA code MARLOWE was chosen for its ability to account for the crystal structure of irradiated materials. A first set of simulations was performed on pure copper for energies ranging from 0.5 keV to 20 keV. These simulations were validated using molecular dynamics (MD). A second set of simulations on AgCu irradiated by 1 MeV krypton ions was then carried out using MARLOWE only, as such energy is beyond reach for molecular dynamics. MARLOWE simulations are found to be in good agreement with experimental results, which suggests the predictive potential of the method.

  13. Design fix for vibration-induced wear in fuel pin bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naas, D.F.; Heck, E.N.

    1976-01-01

    In summary, results at 45,000 MWd/MTM burnup from the FFTF mixed oxide fuel pin irradiation tests in EBR-II show that reduction of the initial fuel pin bundle clearance and use of 20 percent cold-worked stainless steel ducts virtually eliminate vibration and wear observed in an initial series of 61-pin tests

  14. Visible Near-infrared Spectral Evolution of Irradiated Mixed Ices and Application to Kuiper Belt Objects and Jupiter Trojans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Michael J.; Mahjoub, Ahmed; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Blacksberg, Jordana; Brown, Michael E.; Carlson, Robert W.; Eiler, John M.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Wong, Ian

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the history of Kuiper Belt Objects and Jupiter Trojans will help to constrain models of solar system formation and dynamical evolution. Laboratory simulations of a possible thermal and irradiation history of these bodies were conducted on ice mixtures while monitoring their spectral properties. These simulations tested the hypothesis that the presence or absence of sulfur explains the two distinct visible near-infrared spectral groups observed in each population and that Trojans and KBOs share a common formation location. Mixed ices consisting of water, methanol, and ammonia, in mixtures both with and without hydrogen sulfide, were deposited and irradiated with 10 keV electrons. Deposition and initial irradiation were performed at 50 K to simulate formation at 20 au in the early solar system, then heated to Trojan-like temperatures and irradiated further. Finally, irradiation was concluded and resulting samples were observed during heating to room temperature. Results indicated that the presence of sulfur resulted in steeper spectral slopes. Heating through the 140–200 K range decreased the slopes and total reflectance for both mixtures. In addition, absorption features at 410, 620, and 900 nm appeared under irradiation, but only in the H2S-containing mixture. These features were lost with heating once irradiation was concluded. While the results reported here are consistent with the hypothesis, additional work is needed to address uncertainties and to simulate conditions not included in the present work.

  15. Postirradiation examinations of fuel pins from the GCFR F-1 series of mixed-oxide fuel pins at 5.5 at. % burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain, R.V.; Johnson, C.E.

    1978-05-01

    Postirradiation examinations were performed on five fuel pins from the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor F-1 experiment irradiated in EBR-II to a peak burnup of approximately 5.5 at. %. These encapsulated fuel pins were irradiated at peak-power linear ratings from approximately 13 to 15 kW/ft and peak cladding inside diameter temperatures from approximately 625 to 760 0 C. The maximum diametral change that occurred during irradiation was 0.2% ΔD/D 0 . The maximum fuel-cladding chemical interaction depth was 2.6 mils in fuel pin G-1 and 1 mil or less in the other three pins examined destructively. Significant migration of the volatile fission products occurred axially to the fuel-blanket interfaces. Teh postirradiation examination data indicate that fuel melted at the inner surface of the annular fuel pellets in the two highest power rating fuel pins, but little axial movement of fuel occurred

  16. Mixed logic style adder circuit designed and fabricated using SOI substrate for irradiation-hardened experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shoucai; Liu, Yamei

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposed a rail to rail swing, mixed logic style 28-transistor 1-bit full adder circuit which is designed and fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate with 90 nm gate length technology. The main goal of our design is space application where circuits may be damaged by outer space radiation; so the irradiation-hardened technique such as SOI structure should be used. The circuit's delay, power and power-delay product (PDP) of our proposed gate diffusion input (GDI)-based adder are HSPICE simulated and compared with other reported high-performance 1-bit adder. The GDI-based 1-bit adder has 21.61% improvement in delay and 18.85% improvement in PDP, over the reported 1-bit adder. However, its power dissipation is larger than that reported with 3.56% increased but is still comparable. The worst case performance of proposed 1-bit adder circuit is also seen to be less sensitive to variations in power supply voltage (VDD) and capacitance load (CL), over a wide range from 0.6 to 1.8 V and 0 to 200 fF, respectively. The proposed and reported 1-bit full adders are all layout designed and wafer fabricated with other circuits/systems together on one chip. The chip measurement and analysis has been done at VDD = 1.2 V, CL = 20 fF, and 200 MHz maximum input signal frequency with temperature of 300 K.

  17. Fabrication of uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuel pins (88F-5A) for first irradiation test at JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasufumi; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo; Sasayama, Tatsuo; Shiozawa, Ken-ichi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Handa, Muneo

    1990-07-01

    A couple of uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuel pins was fabricated for the first irradiation tests at JMTR for the purpose of understanding the irradiation behavior and establishing the feasibility of nitride fuels as advanced FBR fuels. The one of the pins was fitted with thermocouples in order to observe the central fuel temperature. In this report, the fabrication procedure of the pins such as pin design, fuel pellet fabrication and characterizations, welding of fuel pins, and inspection of pins are described, together with the outline of the new TIG welder installed recently. (author)

  18. Performance of silicon pad detectors after mixed irradiations with neutrons and fast charged hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramberger, G. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: Gregor.Kramberger@ijs.si; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Department of Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-10-11

    A large set of silicon pad detectors produced on MCz and FZ wafer of p- and n-type was irradiated in two steps, first by fast charged hadrons followed by reactor neutrons. In this way the irradiations resemble the real irradiation fields at LHC. After irradiations controlled annealing started in steps during which the evolution of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency was monitored. The damage introduced by different irradiation particles was found to be additive. The most striking consequence of that is a decrease of the full depletion voltage for n-type MCz detectors after additional neutron irradiation. This confirms that effective donors introduced by charged hadron irradiation are compensated by acceptors from neutron irradiation.

  19. Performance of silicon pad detectors after mixed irradiations with neutrons and fast charged hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Dolenc, I.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2009-01-01

    A large set of silicon pad detectors produced on MCz and FZ wafer of p- and n-type was irradiated in two steps, first by fast charged hadrons followed by reactor neutrons. In this way the irradiations resemble the real irradiation fields at LHC. After irradiations controlled annealing started in steps during which the evolution of full depletion voltage, leakage current and charge collection efficiency was monitored. The damage introduced by different irradiation particles was found to be additive. The most striking consequence of that is a decrease of the full depletion voltage for n-type MCz detectors after additional neutron irradiation. This confirms that effective donors introduced by charged hadron irradiation are compensated by acceptors from neutron irradiation.

  20. Irradiation induced precipitation in tungsten based, W-Re alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. K.; Wiffen, F. W.; Bentley, J.; Stiegler, J. O.

    1983-03-01

    Tungsten-base alloys containing 5, 11, and 25 pct Re were irradiated in the EBR-II reactor. Irradiation temperatures ranged from 600 to 1500 °C. All compositions were irradiated to fluences in the range 4.3 to 6.1 X 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), and three 25 pct Re samples were also irradiated to 3.7 X 1026 n/m2 at temperatures 700 to 900 °C. Postirradiation examination included measurement of electrical resistivity at room temperature and lower temperatures, X-ray diffraction, optical metallography, microprobe analysis, and transmission electron microscopy. Irradiation induced resistivity decreases observed in most of the samples suggested second-phase precipitation. Complete results confirmed the precipitate formation in all samples, in disagreement with existing phase diagrams for the W-Re system. Electron diffraction showed the precipitates to be consistent with the cubic, Re-rich X-phase and inconsistent with the σ-phase. Large variations in precipitate morphology and distribution were observed between the different compositions and irradiation conditions. For the 5 and 11 pct Re-alloys, spherically symmetric strain fields surrounded the equiaxed precipitate particles, and were observed even where no particles were visible. These strain fields are believed to arise from local Re enrichment. Thermoelectric data show that the precipitation can lead to decalibration of W/Re thermocouples.

  1. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  2. Steady-state irradiation testing of U-Pu-Zr fuel to >18% burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Wisner, R.S.; Billone, M.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1990-01-01

    Tests of austenitic stainless steel clad U-xP-10Zr fuel (x=o, 8, 19 wt. %) to peak burnups as high as 18.4 at. % have been completed in the EBR-II. Fuel swelling and fractional fission gas release are slowly increasing functions of burnup beyond 2 at. % burnup. Increasing plutonium content in the fuel reduces swelling and decreases the amount of fission gas which diffuses from fuel to plenum. LIFE-METAL code modelling of cladding strains is consistent with creep by fission gas loading and irradiation-induced swelling mechanisms. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction involves the ingress of rare-earth fission products. Constituent redistribution in the fuel had not limited steady-state performance. Cladding breach behavior at closure welds, in the gas plenum, and in the fuel column region have been benign events. 3 refs., 5 figs

  3. Comparison of compression properties and swelling of beryllium irradiated at various temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeston, J.M.; Miller, L.G.; Wood, E.L. Jr.; Moir, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    A beryllium cylinder irradiated in Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II) for four years at 700 to 760 K to a neutron fluence of 8.13 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (total) or 1 x 10/sup 22/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV) was cut into samples and tested. Yield strength and plastic strain was determined in compression tests at 300, 723, 823 K and after annealing at 1173 K for one hour. The immersion density and helium content were measured on samples. An equation for swelling was derived from the data by regression analysis. The microstructure showed agglomeration of helium in voids or bubbles at the grain boundaries.

  4. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydin, E-mail: karahan@mit.ed [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States); Buongiorno, Jacopo [Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

    2010-01-31

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium

  5. A new code for predicting the thermo-mechanical and irradiation behavior of metallic fuels in sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydin; Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2010-01-01

    An engineering code to predict the irradiation behavior of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metallic alloy fuel pins and UO 2 -PuO 2 mixed oxide fuel pins in sodium-cooled fast reactors was developed. The code was named Fuel Engineering and Structural analysis Tool (FEAST). FEAST has several modules working in coupled form with an explicit numerical algorithm. These modules describe fission gas release and fuel swelling, fuel chemistry and restructuring, temperature distribution, fuel-clad chemical interaction, and fuel and clad mechanical analysis including transient creep-fracture for the clad. Given the fuel pin geometry, composition and irradiation history, FEAST can analyze fuel and clad thermo-mechanical behavior at both steady-state and design-basis (non-disruptive) transient scenarios. FEAST was written in FORTRAN-90 and has a simple input file similar to that of the LWR fuel code FRAPCON. The metal-fuel version is called FEAST-METAL, and is described in this paper. The oxide-fuel version, FEAST-OXIDE is described in a companion paper. With respect to the old Argonne National Laboratory code LIFE-METAL and other same-generation codes, FEAST-METAL emphasizes more mechanistic, less empirical models, whenever available. Specifically, fission gas release and swelling are modeled with the GRSIS algorithm, which is based on detailed tracking of fission gas bubbles within the metal fuel. Migration of the fuel constituents is modeled by means of thermo-transport theory. Fuel-clad chemical interaction models based on precipitation kinetics were developed for steady-state operation and transients. Finally, a transient intergranular creep-fracture model for the clad, which tracks the nucleation and growth of the cavities at the grain boundaries, was developed for and implemented in the code. Reducing the empiricism in the constitutive models should make it more acceptable to extrapolate FEAST-METAL to new fuel compositions and higher burnup, as envisioned in advanced sodium reactors

  6. The EBR-II spent fuel treatment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lineberry, M.J.; McFarlane, H.F.

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for demonstrating a high-temperature electrometallurgical process for treating spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-11. Two waste forms will be produced and qualified for geologic disposal of the fission and activation products. Relatively pure uranium will be separated for storage. Following additional development, transuranium elements will be blended into one of the high-level waste streams. The spent fuel treatment program will help assess the viability of electrometallurgical technology as a spent fuel management option

  7. Benchmark Analysis of EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    This publication presents the results and main achievements of an IAEA coordinated research project to verify and validate system and safety codes used in the analyses of liquid metal thermal hydraulics and neutronics phenomena in sodium cooled fast reactors. The publication will be of use to the researchers and professionals currently working on relevant fast reactors programmes. In addition, it is intended to support the training of the next generation of analysts and designers through international benchmark exercises

  8. Applications of the EBR-II Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans, J.: Ragland, W.A.; Hill, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 11 (EBR-11), a Department of Energy (DOE) Category A research reactor, has recently been completed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and has been performed with close collaboration between PRA analysts and engineering and operations staff. A product of this Involvement of plant personnel has been a excellent acceptance of the PRA as a tool, which has already resulted In a variety of applications of the EBR-11 PRA. The EBR-11 has been used in support of plant hardware and procedure modifications and In new system design work. A new application in support of the refueling safety analysis will be completed in the near future

  9. Adaptive robust control of the EBR-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M.A.; Edwards, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation results are presented for an adaptive H ∞ controller, a fixed H ∞ controller, and a classical controller. The controllers are applied to a simulation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II primary system. The controllers are tested for the best robustness and performance by step-changing the demanded reactor power and by varying the combined uncertainty in initial reactor power and control rod worth. The adaptive H ∞ controller shows the fastest settling time, fastest rise time and smallest peak overshoot when compared to the fixed H ∞ and classical controllers. This makes for a superior and more robust controller

  10. Time series analysis of nuclear instrumentation in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imel, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    Results of a time series analysis of the scaler count data from the 3 wide range nuclear detectors in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II are presented. One of the channels was replaced, and it was desired to determine if there was any statistically significant change (ie, improvement) in the channel's response after the replacement. Data were collected from all 3 channels for 16-day periods before and after detector replacement. Time series analysis and statistical tests showed that there was no significant change after the detector replacement. Also, there were no statistically significant differences among the 3 channels, either before or after the replacement. Finally, it was determined that errors in the reactivity change inferred from subcritical count monitoring during fuel handling would be on the other of 20-30 cents for single count intervals

  11. EBR-II Reactor Physics Benchmark Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Chad L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Lum, Edward S [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Stewart, Ryan [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Byambadorj, Bilguun [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Beaulieu, Quinton [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2017-12-28

    This report provides a reactor physics benchmark evaluation with associated uncertainty quantification for the critical configuration of the April 1986 Experimental Breeder Reactor II Run 138B core configuration.

  12. Multifrequency tests in the EBR-II reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, E.E.; Mohr, D.; Gross, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    A series of eight multifrequency tests was conducted on the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. In half of the tests a control rod was oscillated and in the other half the controller input voltage to the intermediate-loop-sodium pump was perturbed. In each test the input disturbance consisted of several superimposed single-frequency sinusoidal harmonics of the same fundamental. The tests are described along with the theoretical and practical aspects of their development and design. Samples of measured frequency responses are also provided for both the reactor and the power plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Operating and test experience of EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackett, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    EBR-2 has operated for 27 years, the longest for any Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) power plant. During that time, much has been learned about successful LMR operation and design. The basic lesson is that conversatism in design can pay significant dividends in operating reliability. Furthermore, such conservatism need not mean high cost. The EBR-2 system emphasizes simplicity, minimizing the number of valves in the heat transport system, for example, and simplifying the primary heat-transport-system layout. Another lesson is that emphasizing reliability of the steam generating system at the sodium-water interface (by using duplex tubes in the case of EBR-2) has been well worth the higher initial costs; no problems with leakage have been encountered in EBR-2's operating history. Locating spent fuel storage in the primary tank and providing for decay heat removal by natural connective flow have also been contributors to EBR-2's success. The ability to accommodate loss of forced cooling or loss of heat sink passively has resulted in benefits for simplification, primarily through less reliance on emergency power and in not requiring the secondary sodium or steam systems to be safety grade. Also, the ''piped-pool '' arrangement minimizes thermal stress to the primary tank and enhances natural convective flow. These benefits have been realized through a history of operation that has seen EBR-2 evolve through four major phases in its test programs, culminating in its present mission as the Integral Fast Rector (IFR) prototype. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  14. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: a review of current work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G D; Madonna, G S; Elliott, T B; Moore, M M; Jackson, W E

    1991-10-01

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, we developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60[Co sources. Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections. Combined therapy with S-TDCM and ceftriaxone for K. pneumoniae infections in mice exposed to a mixed radiation field or to gamma rays was more effective than single-agent therapy. In all irradiated-wounded mice, single therapy of acquired infections with an antibiotic or S-TDCM did not increase survival. Survival of irradiated-wounded mice after topical application of gentamicin sulfate cream suggested that bacteria colonizing the wound disseminated systemically in untreated irradiated mice, resulting in death from sepsis. In lethal models of acquired infections in irradiated-wounded mice, significant increases in survival were achieved when systemic treatments with S-TDCM or gentamicin were combined with topical treatments of gentamicin cream. Therapies for sepsis in all mice exposed to a mixed field were less effective than in mice exposed to gamma rays. Nonetheless, the data show a principle by which successful therapy may be provided to individuals receiving tissue trauma in conjunction with

  15. Fuel-sodium reaction product formation in breached mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, J.H.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Strain, R.V.; Ukai, S.; Shibahara, S.

    1988-01-01

    The run-beyond-cladding-breach (RBCB) operation of mixed-oxide LMR fuel pins has been studied for six years in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as part of a joint program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan. The formation of fuel-sodium reaction product (FSRP), Na 3 MO 4 , where M = U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/, in the outer fuel regions is the major phenomenon governing RBCB behavior. It increases fuel volume, decreases fuel stoichiometry, modifies fission-product distributions, and alters thermal performance of a pin. This paper describes the morphology of Na 3 MO 4 observed in 5.84-mm diameter pins covering a variety of conditions and RBCB times up to 150 EFPD's. 8 refs., 1 fig

  16. Parotid gland pathophysiology after mixed gamma and neutron irradiation of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, M.W.; Izutsu, K.T.; Rice, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Electrolyte and protein concentrations were measured in parotid saliva samples obtained from patients receiving localized, fractionated, neutron and gamma irradiation for the treatment of cancer. Salivary sodium chloride concentration increased transiently but then usually decreased to preirradiation values after 2 weeks of therapy. There were concurrent decreases in salivary flow rate, pH, and bicarbonate concentration. The decreases in sodium chloride concentration and flow rate are inconsistent with a previously suggested, irradiation-induced ductal sodium resorption defect. The findings contribute toward understanding how salivary gland physiology is altered in irradiation injury

  17. Differences in TLD 600 and TLD 700 glow curves derived from distict mixed gamma/neutron field irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalieri, Tassio A.; Castro, Vinicius A.; Siqueira, Paulo T.D.

    2013-01-01

    In Neutron Capture Therapy, a thermal neutron beam shall impinge on a specific nuclide, such as 10 B, to promote a nuclear reaction which releases the useful therapeutic energy. A nuclear reactor is usually used as the neutron source, and therefore field contaminants such as gamma and high energy neutrons are also present in the field. However, mixed field dosimetry still stands as a challenge in some cases, due to the difficulty to experimentally discriminate the dose from each field component. For the mixed field dosimetry, the International Commission on Radiation end Units (ICRU) recommends the use of detector pairs with different responses for each beam component. The TLD 600/700 pair meets this need, because these LiF detectors have different Li isotopes concentration, with distinct thermal neutron responses because 6 Li presents a much higher neutron capture cross section than does 7 Li for low energy neutrons. TLD 600 is 6 Li enriched while TLD 700 is 7 Li enriched. However, depending on the neutron spectrum presented in the mixed field, TLD 700 response to thermal neutrons cannot be disregarded. This work aims to study the difference in TLD 600 and TLD 700 glow curves when these TLDs are submitted to mixed fields of different energy spectra and components balance. The TLDs were irradiated in a pure gamma source, and in mixed fields from an AmBe sealed source and from the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. These TLDs were read and had their two main dosimetric regions analyzed to observe the differences in the glow curves of these TLDs in each irradiation. Field components discrimination was achieved through Monte Carlo simulations run with MCNP radiation transport code. (author)

  18. Antiviral T cell competence and restriction specificity of mixed allogeneic (P1 + P2----P1) irradiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueedi, E.S.; Sykes, M.; Ildstad, S.T.; Chester, C.H.; Althage, A.; Hengartner, H.; Sachs, D.H.; Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed irradiation bone marrow chimeras were prepared by reconstituting lethally irradiated C57BL/10 (B10) or B10.D2 mice with T cell-depleted bone marrow cells of B10 plus B10.D2 origin. These chimeras were healthy and survived well under conventional housing conditions and after experimental laboratory infections. Of a total of 17 chimeras tested, 2 died spontaneously or from the injected virus. Twelve of fifteen chimeras mounted a measurable cytotoxic T cell response to virus. Despite approximately equal percentages of B10 and B10.D2 lymphocytes in chimeras, cytotoxic T cell responses to vaccinia virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus were mediated variably by either syngeneic or allogeneic donor lymphocytes; thus the H-2 type of effector T cells frequently did not correspond to the 50:50 distribution of spleen or peripheral blood lymphocytes. Cytotoxic responses were restricted exclusively to recipient H-2 type. All mixed chimeras examined were able to mount a good IgG response to vesicular stomatitis virus. These results confirm previous data suggesting that such mixed chimeras are healthy and immunocompetent and demonstrate strict recipient-determined restriction specificity of effector T cells; they also suggest that if T help is necessary for induction of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, it does not require host-restricted interactions between helper T cells and precursor cytotoxic T cells

  19. Irradiation behaviour of mixed uranium-plutonium carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides; Comportement a l'irradiation de carbures, nitrures et carbonitrures mixtes d'uranium et de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikailoff, H; Mustelier, J P; Bloch, J; Leclere, J; Hayet, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    In the framework of the research program of fast reactor fuels two irradiation experiments have been carried out on mixed uranium-plutonium carbides, nitrides and carbo-nitrides. In the first experiment carried out with thermal neutrons, the fuel consisted of sintered pellets sheathed in a stainless steel can with a small gap filled with helium. There were three mixed mono-carbide samples and the maximum linear power was 715 W/cm. After a burn-up slightly lower than 20000 MW day/tonne, a swelling of the fuel which had ruptured the cans was observed. In the second experiment carried out in the BR2 reactor with epithermal neutrons, the samples consisted of sintered pellets sodium bonded in a stainless steel tube. There were three samples containing different fuels and the linear power varies between 1130 and 1820 W/cm. Post-irradiation examination after a maximal burn-up of 1550 MW day/tonne showed that the behaviour of the three fuel elements was satisfactory. (authors) [French] Dans le cadre du programme d'etude des conibustiles pour reacteurs rapides, on a realise deux experiences d'irradiation de carbures, nitrures et carbonitrures mixtes d'uranium et de plutonium. Dans la premiere experience, faite en neutrons thermiques, le combustible etait constitue de,pastilles frittees gainees dans un tube d'acier inoxydable avec un faible jeu rempli d'helium. Il y avait trois echantillons de monocarbures mixtes, et la puissance lineaire maximale etait de 715 W/cm. Apres un taux de combustion legerement inferieur a 20 000 MWj/t, on a observe un gonflement des combustible qui a provoque, la rupture des gaines. Pans la seconde experience, realisee dans le reacteur BR2 en neutrons epithermiques, les echantillons etaient constitues de pastilles frittees gainees dans un tube d'acier avec un joint sodium. Il y avait trois echantillons contenant des combustibles differents, et la puissance lineaire variait de 1130 a 1820 W/cm. Les examens apres irradiation a un taux maximal de

  20. Depression of DNA synthesis rate following hyperthermia, gamma irradiation, cyclotron neutrons and mixed modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.J.; Muehlensiepen, H.; Porschen, W.; Feinendegen, L.E.; Dietzel, F.

    1978-01-01

    The incorporation of the thymidine analogue I-UdR is proportional to the activity of DNA synthesis. The maximum depression of 125-I-UdR incorporation occurs approximately 4 hours after all kinds of treatment. The increase which follow reflects cell processes like reoxygeneration, recovery, recycling and recruitment (although a direct relation is not yet demonstrable). The degree of depression 4 hours after treatment and the time required needs to reach control level is dependent on dose and radiation quaility but no such dependence could be clearly seen for the times of hyperthermia treatment we used. Neutron irradiation and the combination gamma irradiation + hyperthermia show a higher depression and a slower return to normal than gamma irradiation at the same dose. (orig.) [de

  1. Irradiation of inert matrix and mixed oxide fuel in the Halden test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U.

    2001-01-01

    In a new type of fuel, called Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF), plutonium is embedded in a U-free matrix. This offers advantages for more efficient plutonium consumption, higher proliferation resistance, and for inert behaviour later in a waste repository. In the fuel type investigated at PSI, plutonium is dissolved in yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation-resistant cubic phase, with addition of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ-based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden (HBWR), together with MOX fuel (Rig IFA-651.1). The experiment is described herein and results are presented of the first 120 days of irradiation with an average assembly burnup of 47 kWd/cm 3 . The results are compared with neutronic calculations performed before the experiment, and are used to model the fuel behaviour with the PSI-modified TRANSURANUS code. The measured fuel temperatures are within the expected range. An unexpectedly strong densification of the IMF during the first irradiation cycle does not alter the fuel temperatures. An explanation for this behaviour is proposed. The irradiation at higher linear heat rates during forthcoming cycles will deliver information about the fission gas release behaviour of the IMF. (author)

  2. Irradiation of inert matrix and mixed oxide fuel in the Halden test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellwig, Ch.; Kasemeyer, U

    2001-03-01

    In a new type of fuel, called Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF), plutonium is embedded in a U-free matrix. This offers advantages for more efficient plutonium consumption, higher proliferation resistance, and for inert behaviour later in a waste repository. In the fuel type investigated at PSI, plutonium is dissolved in yttrium-stabilized zirconium oxide (YSZ), a highly radiation-resistant cubic phase, with addition of erbium as burnable poison for reactivity control. A first irradiation experiment of YSZ-based IMF is ongoing in the OECD Material Test Reactor in Halden (HBWR), together with MOX fuel (Rig IFA-651.1). The experiment is described herein and results are presented of the first 120 days of irradiation with an average assembly burnup of 47 kWd/cm{sup 3}. The results are compared with neutronic calculations performed before the experiment, and are used to model the fuel behaviour with the PSI-modified TRANSURANUS code. The measured fuel temperatures are within the expected range. An unexpectedly strong densification of the IMF during the first irradiation cycle does not alter the fuel temperatures. An explanation for this behaviour is proposed. The irradiation at higher linear heat rates during forthcoming cycles will deliver information about the fission gas release behaviour of the IMF. (author)

  3. ELECTRON IRRADIATION AND THERMAL PROCESSING OF MIXED-ICES OF POTENTIAL RELEVANCE TO JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu; Brown, Michael E.; Eiler, John M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H 2 S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong and Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H 2 S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH 3 OH–NH 3 –H 2 O (“without H 2 S”) and H 2 S–CH 3 OH–NH 3 –H 2 O (“with H 2 S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H 2 S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H 2 S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H 2 S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO 2 and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs

  4. Mixed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Baya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Remenat (Catalan (Mixed, "revoltillo" (Scrambled in Spanish, is a dish which, in Catalunya, consists of a beaten egg cooked with vegetables or other ingredients, normally prawns or asparagus. It is delicious. Scrambled refers to the action of mixing the beaten egg with other ingredients in a pan, normally using a wooden spoon Thought is frequently an amalgam of past ideas put through a spinner and rhythmically shaken around like a cocktail until a uniform and dense paste is made. This malleable product, rather like a cake mixture can be deformed pulling it out, rolling it around, adapting its shape to the commands of one’s hands or the tool which is being used on it. In the piece Mixed, the contortion of the wood seeks to reproduce the plasticity of this slow heavy movement. Each piece lays itself on the next piece consecutively like a tongue of incandescent lava slowly advancing but with unstoppable inertia.

  5. ELECTRON IRRADIATION AND THERMAL PROCESSING OF MIXED-ICES OF POTENTIAL RELEVANCE TO JUPITER TROJAN ASTEROIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahjoub, Ahmed; Poston, Michael J.; Hand, Kevin P.; Hodyss, Robert; Blacksberg, Jordana; Carlson, Robert W.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Choukroun, Mathieu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brown, Michael E.; Eiler, John M., E-mail: Mahjoub.Ahmed@jpl.nasa.gov [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    In this work we explore the chemistry that occurs during the irradiation of ice mixtures on planetary surfaces, with the goal of linking the presence of specific chemical compounds to their formation locations in the solar system and subsequent processing by later migration inward. We focus on the outer solar system and the chemical differences for ice mixtures inside and outside the stability line for H{sub 2}S. We perform a set of experiments to explore the hypothesis advanced by Wong and Brown that links the color bimodality in Jupiter's Trojans to the presence of H{sub 2}S in the surface of their precursors. Non-thermal (10 keV electron irradiation) and thermally driven chemistry of CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O (“without H{sub 2}S”) and H{sub 2}S–CH{sub 3}OH–NH{sub 3}–H{sub 2}O (“with H{sub 2}S”) ices were examined. Mid-IR analyses of ice and mass spectrometry monitoring of the volatiles released during heating show a rich chemistry in both of the ice mixtures. The “with H{sub 2}S” mixture experiment shows a rapid consumption of H{sub 2}S molecules and production of OCS molecules after a few hours of irradiation. The heating of the irradiated “with H{sub 2}S” mixture to temperatures above 120 K leads to the appearance of new infrared bands that we provisionally assign to SO{sub 2}and CS. We show that radiolysis products are stable under the temperature and irradiation conditions of Jupiter Trojan asteroids. This makes them suitable target molecules for potential future missions as well as telescope observations with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also suggest the consideration of sulfur chemistry in the theoretical modeling aimed at understanding the chemical composition of Trojans and KOBs.

  6. Commercial potential of irradiated spices and dried mixes for export and domestic markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padwal-Desai, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    Indian traders who are conventionally exporting non-sterile spices and other dry mixes to several countries, receive not only low value for their produce on account of poor microbiological quality, but also lose the benefits of value addition. Development of gamma ray hygienization facility at the export points could therefore change this scenario. The economic benefits of hygienization and value addition could justifiably be accrued by the spice producing nations like India which has the necessary expertise and technology for supplying quality spices and spice mixes to the world class consumer, besides providing quality product to a huge domestic market. 10 refs

  7. Detection of irradiation history of seasoning mixes composed of dried fish and its extract. TL analysis and application considerations for mineral separation from foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Seiko; Yunoki, Syunji

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the thermoluminescence (TL) method (EN1788) was used to detect the irradiation treatment of Japanese traditional seasoning mixes mainly composed of dried fish (bonito etc.) and its extract. The Glow 1 curves of minerals separated from the seasoning mixes using a heavy liquid showed significant single peaks at temperatures between 146.5degC and 175.4degC. The peaks are typical for irradiated food, despite the samples being not irradiated. The Glow 2 curves showed single peaks at temperatures higher than that of the Glow 1 curves (175.4degC to 217.9degC). The peak temperature of Glow 2 is usually lower than that of Glow 1 because the peaks from irradiated silicate minerals shift to higher temperatures with time. The TL glow ratios (Glow1/Glow2) calculated in the temperature ranges (167-232degC) defined by means of irradiated TLD-100 were above 0.1, suggesting that the mineral samples were contaminated with organic materials such as protein or bio-inorganic materials such as bone. In order to remove the possible contaminants, acid hydrolysis and subsequent heavy liquid separation were employed. The minerals thus obtained showed no Glow 1 peaks. A significant peak was observed at 213degC instead of peaks at lower temperature for the case of irradiated seasoning mixes (2.45 kGy). These results suggest that the TL method may provide false positives for the Japanese traditional seasoning mixes because of luminescence from some components other than silicate minerals. It appears that EN1788 needs some modification to precisely detect food irradiation for the seasoning mixes. (author)

  8. Production of mixed oxide fuel for fast reactor irradiation test by co-precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todokoro, Akio; Masuda, Sumio; Naruki, Kaoru; Kaya, Akira; Koizumi, Masumichi

    1974-01-01

    Studies were made on the production of homogeneous mixed oxide by co-precipitation. Experiments were made on the effects of the addition rate of ammonia water, precipitation temperature, aging time of co-precipitate, and pH value. Plutonium refined by anion exchange was mixed with solution of uranium. The concentration of free acid in the mixed solution was adjusted to 1.5-2.0 M, and the total volume of the solution was made 3.01. The weight of Pu and U in the solution was 100g. The solution was kept at a definite temperature while being stirred. Concentrated ammonia solution was added to the solution at a definite rate. The precipitate thus formed was filtrated after aging, then dried for 24 hours at 100 +- 2 0 C. Dried co-precipitate was calcinated for 1 hr at 550 0 C. The reduction for 4 hours at 800 0 C gave the mixed powder of PuO 2 and UO 2 . After pressing, the powder was sintered for 2 hours at 1700 0 C. The shrinkage ratio decreased as the activity and tap density of the original powder increased. The activity determined by specific surface area increased as the rate of ammonia water addition increased, and as the precipitation temperature rose. Tap density was independent of the rate of addition of ammonia water. The activity of the powder increased and the tap density decreased as the aging time of precipitate increased. (Fukutomi, T.)

  9. Review of direct electrical heating experiments on irradiated mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Bandyopadhyay, G.

    1982-01-01

    Results of approximately 50 out-of-reactor experiments that simulated various stages of a loss-of-flow event with irradiated fuel are presented. The tests, which utilized the direct electrical heating technique to simulate nuclear heating, were performed either on fuel segments with their original cladding intact or on fuel segments that were extruded into quartz tubes. The test results demonstrated that the macro- and microscopic fuel behavior was dependent on a number of variables including fuel heating rate, thermal history prior to a transient, the number of heating cycles, type of cladding (quartz vs stainless steel), and fuel burnup

  10. Future proton and mixed-field irradiation facilities with slow extraction for LHC operation phase and for LHC upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Ralph Wolfgang; Brugger, Markus; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Feldbaumer, Eduard; Garrido, Mar Capeans; Glaser, Maurice; Kramer, Daniel; Linssen, Lucie; Losito, Roberto; Moll, Michael; Rembser, Christoph; Silari, Marco; Thurel, Yves; Tsesmelis, Emmanuel; Vincke, Helmut; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2010-01-01

    In the present proposal we present the need for improved proton and mixed-field irradiation facilities with slow beam extraction at CERN. Strong needs are expressed by both the detector and accelerator communities and concern the LHC operation era as well as the upgrades of machine and experiments. The current facilities and test areas have a number of limitations and drawbacks. Preliminary studies indicate that there are possibilities for a coherent and cost-effective approach towards improved facilities for the future. The aim of this document is to inform the LHCC and seek its recognition for the need of such facilities. In addition we would appreciate the support of the LHCC for pursuing further implementation studies at a PS East Hall location.

  11. Effect of fast-neutron irradiation on plastic deformation of Type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.

    1978-01-01

    Plastic deformation of EBR-II-irradiated Type 304 stainless steel was investigated by a stress-relaxation method. The stress-strain-rate relationships for the irradiated specimens at room temperature are concave upward, which are similar to those for the unirradiated specimens. However, concave downward behavior in the stress-strain-rate relationships were observed at much lower temperatures for the irradiated specimens in contrast to the unirradiated specimens. These results were analyzed succccessfully using Hart's mechanical equation-of-state concept. It was found that the hardness sigma*, which is the minimum stress necessary for the dislocation to overcome obstacles without thermal activation, increases linearly with fast-neutron fluence. This increase in sigma* is consistent with so-called ''irradiation hardening.'' In addition, resistance to dislocation glide, which is quantitatively measured in terms of sigma 0 , was observed to decrease linearly with fast-neutron fluence. The decrease in sigma 0 can be attributed to a decrease of solute drag due to irradiation-induced solute segregation

  12. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction in mixed-oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, L.A.; Weber, J.W.; Devary, J.L.

    1978-10-01

    The character and extent of fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) was established for UO 2 -25 wt% PuO 2 clad with 20% cold worked Type 316 stainless steel irradiated at high cladding temperatures to peak burnups greater than 8 atom %. The data base consists of 153 data sets from fuel pins irradiated in EBR-II with peak burnups to 9.5 atom %, local cladding inner surface temperatures to 725 0 C, and exposure times to 415 equivalent full power days. As-fabricated oxygen-to-metal ratios (O/M) ranged from 1.938 to 1.984 with the bulk of the data in the range 1.96 to 1.98. HEDL P-15 pins provided data at low heat rates, approx. 200 W/cm, and P-23 series pins provided data at higher heat rates, approx. 400 W/cm. A design practice for breeder reactors is to consider an initial reduction of 50 microns in cladding thickness to compensate for possible FCCI. This approach was considered to be a conservative approximation in the absence of a comprehensive design correlation for extent of interaction. This work provides to the designer a statistically based correlation for depth of FCCI which reflects the influences of the major fuel and operating parameters on FCCI

  13. XRD monitoring of α self-irradiation in uranium-americium mixed oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlait, Denis; Lebreton, Florent; Roussel, Pascal; Delahaye, Thibaud

    2013-12-16

    The structural evolution under (241)Am self-irradiation of U(1-x)Am(x)O(2±δ) transmutation fuels (with x ≤ 0.5) was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Samples first underwent a preliminary heat treatment performed under a reducing atmosphere (Ar/H2(4%)) aiming to recover the previously accumulated structural defects. Over all measurements (carried out over up to a full year and for integrated doses up to 1.5 × 10(18) α-decay events·g(-1)), only fluorite U(1-x)Am(x)O(2±δ) solid solutions were observed. Within a few days after the end of the heat treatment, each of the five studied samples was slowly oxidized as a consequence of their move to air atmosphere, which is evidenced by XRD by an initial sharp decrease of the unit cell parameter. For the compounds with x ≤ 0.15, this oxidation occurred without any phase transitions, but for U0.6Am0.4O(2±δ) and U0.5Am0.5O(2±δ), this process is accompanied by a transition from a first fluorite solid solution to a second oxidized one, as the latter is thermodynamically stable in ambient conditions. In the meantime and after the oxidation process, (241)Am α self-irradiation caused a structural swelling up to ∼0.8 vol %, independently of the sample composition. The kinetic constants of swelling were also determined by regression of experimental data and are, as expected, dependent on x and thus on the dose rate. The normalization of these kinetic constants by sample α-activity, however, leads to very close swelling rates among the samples. Finally, evolutions of microstrain and crystallite size were also monitored, but for the considered dose rates and cumulated doses, α self-irradiation was found, within the limits of the diffractometer used, to have almost no impact on these characteristics. Microstrain was found to be influenced instead by the americium content in the materials (i.e., by the impurities associated with americium starting material and the increase of cationic charge heterogeneity with

  14. Development of the flow control irradiation facility for JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soroi, Masatoshi; Miyakawa, Shun-ichi

    1998-05-01

    This report describes the present situation and problems with the development of the flow control irradiation facility (FLORA). The purpose of FLORA is to run the cladding breach (RTCB) irradiation test under loss of flow conditions in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. FLORA is a facility like FPTF (Fuel Performance Test Facility) plus BFTF (Breached Fuel Test Facility) in EBR-II, USA. The technical feature of FLORA is its annular linear induction pump (A-LIP), which was developed in response to a need identified through the experiences in the mechanical flow control of FPTF. We have already designed the basic system facility of FLORA for the JOYO MK-II core. However, to put FLORA to practical use in the future, we have to confirm the stability of the JOYO MK-III core condition, solve problems and improve the design. We are going to freeze and review the FLORA project, taking into consideration the fuel development situation and the research project of JOYO MK-III core. (J.P.N.)

  15. Empirical relations for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in mixed-spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment has been made of available tensile property data relevant to the design of fusion reactors, especially near term devices expected to operate at lower temperatures than power reactors. Empirical relations have been developed for the tensile properties as a functions of irradiation temperature for neutron exposures of 10-15, 20, 30, and 50 dpa. It was found that yield strength depends little on the particular austenitic alloy and little on the helium concentration. Strength depends upon initial condition of the alloy only for exposures of less than 30 dpa. Uniform elongation was found to be more sensitive to alloy and condition. It was also more sensitive than strength to helium level. However, below 500deg C, helium only appeared to have an efect at 10-15 dpa. At higher temperatures, helium embrittlement was apparent, and its threshold temperature decreased with increasing neutron exposure level. (orig.)

  16. Fractographic examination of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo Charpy specimens irradiated in the AD-2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Fracture surface topologies have been examined using scanning electron microscopy for 20 selected half sized Charpy impact specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo in order to provide improved understanding of fracture toughness degradation as a result of irradiation for Path E alloys. The specimen matrix included unirradiated specimens and specimens irradiated in EBR-II in the AD-2 experiment. Also, hardness measurements have been made on selected irradiated Charpy specimens. The results of examinations indicate that irradiation hardening due to G-phase formation at 390 0 C is responsible for the large shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) found in HT-9. Toughness degradation in HT-9 observed following higher temperature irradiations is attributed to precipitation at delta ferrite stringers. Reductions in toughness as a consequence of irradiation in Modified 9Cr-1Mo are attributed to in-reactor precipitation of (V,Nb)C and M 23 C 6 . It is shown that crack propagation rates for ductile and brittle failure modes can be measured, that they differ by over an order of magnitude and that unexpected multiple shifts in fracture mode from ductile to brittle failure can be attributed to the effect of delta ferrite stringers on crack propagation rates

  17. The recovery of bone marrow derived GM-CFU in baboons unilaterally exposed to a total body LD50/30d mixed neutron-gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herodin, F.; Orfeuvre, H.; Janodet, D.; Mestries, J.C.; Fatome, M.

    1990-01-01

    The unilateral exposure of baboons to a total body LD 50/30d mixed neutron/gamma irradiation was characterized to be non uniform in dose distribution. The pattern of recovery of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors in bone marrow samples collected from entrance and exit sides respectively is consistent with this observed heterogeneity [fr

  18. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo, H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650 0 C and to a maximum fluence of 17.6 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400 0 C to 14.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 . A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6 C, Mo 2 C, Chi, Laves, M 23 C 6 , α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation

  19. Neutron irradiation damage in Al2O3 and Y2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Bunch, J.M.; Ranken, W.A.

    1975-01-01

    Two ceramics under consideration for use in fusion reactors, Al 2 O 3 and Y 2 O 3 , were irradiated in the EBR-II fission reactor at 650, 875, and 1025 0 K to fluences between 2 and 6 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Samples evaluated include sapphire, Lucalox, alumina, Y 2 O 3 , and Y 2 O 3 -10 percent ZrO 2 (Yttralox). All Al 2 O 3 specimens swelled significantly (1 to 3 percent), with most of the growth observed in sapphire along the c-axis at the higher temperatures. Al 2 O 3 samples irradiated at 875 to 1025 0 K contained a high density of small aligned ''pores''. Irradiated Y 2 O 3 -based ceramics exhibited dimensional stability and a defect content consisting primarily of unresolved damage and/or dislocation loops. The behavior of these ceramics under irradiation is discussed, and the relevance of fission neutron damage studies to fusion reactor applications is considered. (auth)

  20. Microstructural examination of several commercial ferritic alloys irradiated to high fluence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    Microstructural observations are reported for a series of five commercial ferritic alloys, 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo , H-11, EM-12, 416, and 430F, covering the composition range 2.25 to 17% chromium, following EBR-II irradiation over the temperature range 400 to 650°C and to a maximum fluence of 1.76 × 10 23 n/cm 2 (E >0.1 MeV). These materials were confirmed to be low void swelling with maximum swelling of 0.63% measured in EM-12 following irradiation at 400°C to 1.40 × 10 23 n/cm 2. A wide range of precipitation response was found both as a function of alloy and irradiation temperature. Precipitates observed included M 6C, Mo 2C, Chi, Laves, M 23C 6, α' and a low temperature phase as yet unidentified. It is predicted, based on these results, that the major impact of irradiation on the ferritic alloy class will be changes in postirradiation mechanical properties due to precipitation.

  1. Irradiation Testing Vehicles for Fast Reactors from Open Test Assemblies to Closed Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-15

    A review of irradiation testing vehicle approaches and designs that have been incorporated into past Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) or envisioned for incorporation has been carried out. The objective is to understand the essential features of the approaches and designs so that they can inform test vehicle designs for a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Fast test reactor designs examined include EBR-II, FFTF, JOYO, BOR-60, PHÉNIX, JHR, and MBIR. Previous designers exhibited great ingenuity in overcoming design and operational challenges especially when the original reactor plant’s mission changed to an irradiation testing mission as in the EBRII reactor plant. The various irradiation testing vehicles can be categorized as: Uninstrumented open assemblies that fit into core locations; Instrumented open test assemblies that fit into special core locations; Self-contained closed loops; and External closed loops. A special emphasis is devoted to closed loops as they are regarded as a very desirable feature of a future U.S. Fast Test Reactor. Closed loops are an important technology for irradiation of fuels and materials in separate controlled environments. The impact of closed loops on the design of fast reactors is also discussed in this report.

  2. Irradiation effects on reactor structural materials. Semi-annual progress report, August 1974--February 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudson, T.T.

    1975-03-01

    Data are reported on: effects of cold work on creep-fatigue of irradiated 304 and 316 stainless steel (ss); swelling of 304 and 316 ss irradiated with protons and fast neutrons; effects of hold time on fatigue crack propagation in neutron-irradiated 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; radiation resistance of 0.03 percent Cu A533-B steel; microstructure of irradiated Inconel 718, Incoloy 800, PH13-8Mo, Mo, and Nb; dose dependence of 2.8-MeV Ni + ion damage (swelling) in Ni; notch ductility and strength of 316 ss submerged arc weld deposits; effects of microstructure of 316 ss on its irradiation response; in-reactor deformation of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; microstructure of HFIR-irradiated 316 ss; void microstructures of V bombarded by 46-MeV Ni 6+ ions (with and without preinjected helium) or 7.5-MeV Ta 3+ ions; swelling of Mo, Mo--0.5 Ti, Nb, Nb--1 Zr, W, and W--25 Re after fast neutron irradiation; swelling of V ion-irradiated Mo; creep of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss at 850, 1000, and 1100 0 F; effects of fast neutrons on mechanical properties of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; notch effects in tensile behavior of irradiated, annealed 304 ss (EBR-II duct thimbles); equations for thermal creep in pressurized tubes of 20 percent cold-worked 316 ss; irradiation creep in cold-worked 316 ss; helium production cross sections in neutron-irradiated elements; and radiation effects on various alloys. (U.S.)

  3. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation of irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  4. Effects of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senor, D.J.; Youngblood, G.E.; Moore, C.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Woods, J.J.

    1997-05-01

    A variety of SiC-based composites and monolithic ceramics were characterized by measuring their thermal diffusivity in the unirradiated, thermal annealed, and irradiated conditions over the temperature range 400 to 1,000 C. The irradiation was conducted in the EBR-II to doses of 33 and 43 dpa-SiC (185 EFPD) at a nominal temperature of 1,000 C. The annealed specimens were held at 1,010 C for 165 days to approximately duplicate the thermal exposure of the irradiated specimens. Thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method, and was converted to thermal conductivity using density data and calculated specific heat values. Exposure to the 165 day anneal did not appreciably degrade the conductivity of the monolithic or particulate-reinforced composites, but the conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composites was slightly degraded. The crystalline SiC-based materials tested in this study exhibited thermal conductivity degradation after irradiation, presumably caused by the presence of irradiation-induced defects. Irradiation-induced conductivity degradation was greater at lower temperatures, and was typically more pronounced for materials with higher unirradiated conductivity. Annealing the irradiated specimens for one hour at 150 C above the irradiation temperature produced an increase in thermal conductivity, which is likely the result of interstitial-vacancy pair recombination. Multiple post-irradiation anneals on CVD β-SiC indicated that a portion of the irradiation-induced damage was permanent. A possible explanation for this phenomenon was the formation of stable dislocation loops at the high irradiation temperature and/or high dose that prevented subsequent interstitial/vacancy recombination

  5. The influence of nickel content on microstructures of Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys irradiated with nickel ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.; Garner, F.A.

    1990-11-01

    The objectives of this effort is to identify the mechanisms involved in the radiation-induced evolution of microstructure in materials intended for fusion applications. The results of this study are useful in interpreting the results of several other ongoing experiments involving either spectral or isotopic tailoring to study the effects of helium on microstructure evolution. Ion-irradiated Fe-15Cr-XNi (X = 20, 35, 45, 60, 75) ternary alloys and a 15Cr-85Ni binary alloy were examined after bombardment at 675 degree C and compared to earlier observations made on these same alloys after irradiation in EBR-II at 510 or 538 degree C. The response of the ion-irradiated microstructures to nickel content appears to be very consistent with that of neutron irradiation even though there are four orders of magnitude difference in displacement rate and over 200 degree C difference in temperature. It appears that the transition to higher rates of swelling during both types of irradiation is related to the operation of some mechanisms that is not directly associated with void nucleation. 6 refs., 8 figs

  6. Effects of mixed neutron-γ total-body irradiation on physical activity performance of rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franz, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    Behavioral incapacitation for a physical activity task and its relationship to emesis and survival time following exposure to ionizing radiation were evaluated in 39 male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Subjects were trained to perform a shock avoidance activity task for 6 hr on a 10-min work/5-min rest schedule in a nonmotorized physical activity wheel. Following stabilization of performance, each subject received a single, pulsed dose of mixed neutron-γ, whole-body radiation (n/γ = 3.0) ranging between 1274 and 4862 rad. Performance testing was started 45 sec after exposure. A dose-response function for early transient incapacitation (ETI) during the first 2 hr after irradiation was fitted, and the median effective dose (ED 50 ) was calculated to be 1982 rad. Analysis done on the relationship of dose to ETI, emesis, and survival time found (a) a significant relationship between the radiation dose and the number and duration of ETIs; (b) no correlation between emesis and dose, survival time, or ETI; (c) no relation between survival time and ETI at any dose; and (d) no significant difference in survival time for dose groups between 1766 +/- 9 (SEM) and 2308 +/- 23 rad

  7. Irradiation effects on low-friction coatings for LMFBR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.L.; Johnson, R.N.; Guthrie, G.L.; Aungst, R.C.

    1975-11-01

    A variety of wear-resistant low-friction materials has been irradiated in the EBR-II in order to assess their reponse to LMFBR environments. Pre- and postirradiation testing and examination efforts have concentrated on candidate materials for application to the wear pads on FTR ducts (fuel, control, and reflector assemblies), and a significant result has been qualification of a proprietary detonation-gun-applied chromium carbide coating which employs a Ni Cr binder. Additional materials such as Inconel-718, Haynes-273, aluminides, and various chromium carbide/binder combinations, and other application processes such as plasma-spray, weld-overlays, diffusion bonding and explosive bonding, have also been studied. The most detailed examinations were conducted on selected chromium carbide coatings and included visual inspection, weight and dimensional measurements, metallography, electron microprobe, epoxy-lift-off, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Chromium carbide coatings applied by the detonation-gun process have demonstrated a marked superiority to those applied by plasma-spray techniques

  8. On the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of martensitic alloys neutron irradiated to 26 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on specimens made of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo in various heat treatment conditions which were irradiated in EBR-II to 26 dpa at 390 to 500 0 C. The results are compared with previous results on specimens irradiated to 13 dpa. HT-9 base metal irradiated at low temperatures showed a small additional increase in ductile brittle transition temperature and a decrease in upper shelf energy from 13 to 26 dpa. No fluence effect was observed in 9Cr-1Mo base metal. The 9Cr-1Mo weldment showed degraded DBTT but improved USE response compared to base metal, contrary to previous findings on HT-9. Significant differences were observed in HT-9 base metal between mill annealed material and normalized and tempered material. The highest DBTT for HT-9 alloys was 50 0 C higher than for the worst case in 9Cr-1Mo alloys. Fractography and hardness measurements were also obtained. Significant differences in fracture appearance were observed in different product forms, although no dependence on fluence was observed. Failure was controlled by the preirradiation microstructure

  9. Tensile properties of vanadium alloys irradiated at <430{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Recent attention to vanadium alloys has focused on significant susceptibility to loss of work-hardening capability in irradiation experiments at <430{degrees}C. An evaluation of this phenomenon was conducted on V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti, and V-Ti-Si alloys irradiated in several conventional and helium-charging irradiation experiments in the FFTF-MOTA, HFIR, and EBR-II. Work hardening capability and uniform tensile elongation appear to vary strongly from alloy and heat to heat. A strong heat-to-heat variation has been observed in V-4Cr-4Ti alloys tested, i.e., a 500-kg heat (No. 832665), a 100-kg heat (VX-8), and a 30-kg heat (BL-47). The significant differences in susceptibility to loss of work-hardening capability from one heat to another are estimated to correspond to a difference of {approx}100{degrees}C or more in minimum allowable operating temperature (e.g., 450 versus 350{degrees}C).

  10. Effect of water treatment under ultrasonic irradiation on the solubilities of coals in a CS{sub 2}/NMP mixed solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan-Min Liu; Zhi-Min Zong; Ji-Xian Jia; Yao-Guo Huang; Hong Zhang; Bin Huang; Xian-Yong Wei [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou (China). School of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Five Chinese coals were subject to water treatment (WT) at 75{sup o}C under ultrasonic irradiation (UI). The resulting water-extractable fraction (WEF) in the aqueous solution was extracted with benzene. The treated and untreated coals were extracted with a CS{sub 2}/NMP mixed solvent (1:1 by vol) under UI at room temperature. The results show that only small amount of WEF is extractable with benzene and that WT increases coal solubility in the CS{sub 2}/NMP mixed solvent only to small extent. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Thermal annealing behaviour of sulphur-35 produced in pile-irradiated mixed crystals AlCl/sub 3/-FeCl/sub 3/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyakovich, V; Todorovski, D S; Kostadinova, Z D [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Khimicheski Fakultet

    1983-12-19

    The regression analysis of the experimental results on the thermal annealing behaviour of /sup 35/S produced in pile-irradiated mixed crystals AlCl/sub 3/-FeCl/sub 3/ confirms some suppositions made in a previous paper. The chemical state of /sup 35/S is defined by the target prehistory and the iron concentration. The influence of Fe/sup 3 +/ can be observed indirectly through its influence on the defect structure formed.

  12. The influence of the UV irradiation intensity on photocatalytic activity of ZnAl layered double hydroxides and derived mixed oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadnađev-Kostić Milica S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Layered double hydroxides (LDHs have been studied to a great extent as environmental-friendly complex materials that can be used as photocatalysts or photocatalyst supports. ZnAl layered double hydroxides and their derived mixed oxides were chosen for the investigation of photocatalytic performances in correlation with the UV intensities measured in the South Pannonia region. Low supersaturation coprecipitation method was used for the ZnAl LDH synthesis. For the characterization of LDH and thermal treated samples powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, nitrogen adsorption-desorption were used. The decomposition of azodye, methylene blue was chosen as photocatalytic test reaction. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by thermal decomposition of ZnAl LDH has stable activity in the broader UV light irradiation range characterizing the selected region. Photocatalytic activity could be mainly attributed to the ZnO phase, detected both in LDH and thermally treated samples. The study showed that the ZnAl mixed oxide obtained by the calcination of ZnAl LDH has a stable activity within the measured UV light irradiation range; whereas the parent ZnAl LDH catalyst did not perform satisfactory when low UV irradiation intensity is implied.

  13. Tritium and helium retention and release from irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Oates, M.A.; Pawelko, R.J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental effort to anneal irradiated beryllium specimens and characterize them for steam-chemical reactivity experiments. Fully-dense, consolidated powder metallurgy Be cylinders, irradiated in the EBR-II to a fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) fluence of {approx}6 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, were annealed at temperatures from 450degC to 1200degC. The releases of tritium and helium were measured during the heat-up phase and during the high-temperature anneals. These experiments revealed that, at 600degC and below, there was insignificant gas release. Tritium release at 700degC exhibited a delayed increase in the release rate, while the specimen was at 700degC. For anneal temperatures of 800degC and higher, tritium and helium release was concurrent and the release behavior was characterized by gas-burst peaks. Essentially all of the tritium and helium was released at temperatures of 1000degC and higher, whereas about 1/10 of the tritium was released during the anneals at 700degC and 800degC. Measurements were made to determine the bulk density, porosity and specific surface area for each specimen before and after annealing. These measurements indicated that annealing caused the irradiated Be to swell, by as much as 14% at 700degC and 56% at 1200degC. Kr gas adsorption measurements for samples annealed at 1000degC and 1200degC determined specific surface areas between 0.04 m{sup 2}/g and 0.1 m{sup 2}/g for these annealed specimens. The tritium and helium gas release measurements and the specific surface area measurements indicated that annealing of irradiated Be caused a porosity network to evolve and become surface-connected to relieve internal gas pressure. (author)

  14. Radiation Treatment for Recycling of Industrial Wastewater for Industrial Usage - Biological and Irradiation Treatment of Mix Industrial Wastewater in Flood Mitigation Pond at Prai Industrial Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Sharif, Jamaliah; Selambakkanu, Sarala; Ming, Ting Teo; Isnin, Natsha; Osman, Hasnul Nizam; Azmi, Khasmidatul Akma M.K; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Yahya, Nasehir khan Em [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-07-01

    In this research, activated sludge system and E-Beam was used to treat mixed industrial waste water from mitigation pond A. The objectives are to study the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) in activated sludge and effect of absorbed dose, current and energy to the characteristic of mix industrial wastewater and Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate(DEHP) added in the wastewater. DEPH is a type of plasticizer and quantified by GC-MS. Microbe identification in activated sludge was also carried out in this study. At 48hrs HRT, percentage reduction for COD, color, suspended solid were 62.3%, 36.7% and 67.1% respectively. While at 24hrs HRT, COD, color and suspended solid were reduce by 26.0%, 14.9% and 61.3% respectively. Microbial analysis showed six bacteria present in the activated sludge based on 16SrRNA gene sequences. Mixed industrial wastewater was irradiated using electron beam at 1Mev, 5mA and 10mA in a batch system with 3, 6, 8,10 and 12kGy doses. COD, color and suspended solid reduced with the increasing of absorbed dose. Mixed industrial wastewater added with DEPH in the second batch was irradiated with dose up to 300kGy. Concentration of DEHP also reduced with increasing of dose and more effectively decreased in acidic and aerated condition. (author)

  15. Radiation Treatment for Recycling of Industrial Wastewater for Industrial Usage - Biological and Irradiation Treatment of Mix Industrial Wastewater in Flood Mitigation Pond at Prai Industrial Zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Sharif, Jamaliah; Selambakkanu, Sarala; Ming, Ting Teo; Isnin, Natsha; Osman, Hasnul Nizam; Azmi, Khasmidatul Akma M.K; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Yahya, Nasehir khan Em

    2012-01-01

    In this research, activated sludge system and E-Beam was used to treat mixed industrial waste water from mitigation pond A. The objectives are to study the effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) in activated sludge and effect of absorbed dose, current and energy to the characteristic of mix industrial wastewater and Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate(DEHP) added in the wastewater. DEPH is a type of plasticizer and quantified by GC-MS. Microbe identification in activated sludge was also carried out in this study. At 48hrs HRT, percentage reduction for COD, color, suspended solid were 62.3%, 36.7% and 67.1% respectively. While at 24hrs HRT, COD, color and suspended solid were reduce by 26.0%, 14.9% and 61.3% respectively. Microbial analysis showed six bacteria present in the activated sludge based on 16SrRNA gene sequences. Mixed industrial wastewater was irradiated using electron beam at 1Mev, 5mA and 10mA in a batch system with 3, 6, 8,10 and 12kGy doses. COD, color and suspended solid reduced with the increasing of absorbed dose. Mixed industrial wastewater added with DEPH in the second batch was irradiated with dose up to 300kGy. Concentration of DEHP also reduced with increasing of dose and more effectively decreased in acidic and aerated condition. (author)

  16. Effect on fast neutron irradiation to 4 dpa at 400{degrees}C on the properties of V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Alexander, D.J.; Robertson, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Tensile, Charpy impact and electrical resistivity measurements have been performed at ORNL on V-4Cr-4Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti specimens that were prepared at ANL and irradiated in the lithium-bonded X530 experiment in the EBR-II fast reactor. All of the specimens were irradiated to a damage level of about 4 dpa at a temperature of {approximately}400{degrees}C. A significant amount of radiation hardening was evident in both the tensile and Charpy impact tests. The irradiated V-4Cr-4Ti yield strength measured at {approximately}390{degrees}C was >800 MPa, which is more than three times as high as the unirradiated value. The uniform elongations of the irradiated tensile specimens were typically {approximately}1%, with corresponding total elongations of 4-6%. The ductile to brittle transition temperature of the irradiated specimens was less than the unirradiated resistivity, which suggests that hardening associated with interstitial solute pickup was minimal.

  17. The effect of low dose rate irradiation on the swelling of 12% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T. R.

    1999-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), stainless steel components are irradiated at temperatures that may reach 400 C due to gamma heating. If large amounts of swelling (>10%) occur in these reactor internals, significant swelling related embrittlement may occur. Although fast reactor studies indicate that swelling should be insignificant at PWR temperatures, the low dose rate conditions experienced by PWR components may possibly lead to significant swelling. To address these issues, JNC and ANL have collaborated to analyze swelling in 316 stainless steel, irradiated in the EBR-II reactor at temperatures from 376-444 C, at dose rates between 4.9 x 10 -8 and 5.8 x 10 -7 dpa/s, and to doses of 56 dpa. For these irradiation conditions, the swelling decreases markedly at temperatures less than approximately 386 C, with the extrapolated swelling at 100 dpa being around 3%. For temperatures greater than 386 C, the swelling extrapolated to 100 dpa is around 9%. For a factor of two difference in dose rate, no statistically significant effect of dose rate on swelling was seen. For the range of dose rates analyzed, the swelling measurements do not support significant (>10%) swelling of 316 stainless steel in PWRs

  18. An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K. NNL

    2011-01-13

    Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/ or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

  19. Non-equilibrium surface conditions and microstructural changes following pulsed laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, K.L.; Davis, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of thin Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC have been investigated as potential surface modification techniques for the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the SiC. Each of these surface processing methods are nonequilibrium techniques; materials interactions can be induced at the specimen surface which are not possible with conventional thermal techniques. As a result of the surface modification, the physical properties of the ceramic can be altered under the correct processing conditions. Following laser irradiation using a pulsed ruby or krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser, the fracture strength of the SiC was increased by approximately 50 percent and 20 percent, respectively. However, ion-beam mixing of Ni on SiC resulted in no change in fracture strength. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering techniques, have been used to characterize the extent of mixing between the Ni and SiC as a result of the surface modification and to determine the reason(s) for the observed changes in fracture strength. 19 references

  20. Biological synthesis of very small silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia: The effects of visible-light irradiation and the liquid mixing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, Narges; Daneshpajouh, Shahram; Seyedbagheri, Seyedali; Atashdehghan, Reza; Abdi, Khosro; Sarkar, Saeed; Minaian, Sara; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2009-01-01

    This study has investigated different visible-light irradiation's effect on the formation of silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate using the culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia. Our study shows that visible-light emission can significantly prompt the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Also, the study experimentally investigated the liquid mixing process effect on silver nanoparticle synthesis by visible-light irradiation. This study successfully synthesized uniformly dispersed silver nanoparticles with a uniform size and shape in the range of 1-6 nm with an average size of 3 nm. Furthermore, the study investigated the mechanism of the reduction of silver ions by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia, and used X-ray diffraction to characterize silver chloride as an intermediate compound. Silver chloride was prepared synthetically and used as a substrate for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia. The silver nanoparticles have been prepared from silver chloride during this investigation for the first time.

  1. Performance of a sphere-pac mixed carbide fuel pin irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR 527/1 experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, K.; Smith, L.; Stratton, R.W.

    1980-10-01

    The DFR 527/1 experiment was the first irradiation of EIR sphere-pac uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel in a fast flux. The experiment has been successfully irradiated to a burn-up of 7.3% FIMA at ratings between 45 and 62 kW m - 1 and clad temperatures between 300 and 600 0 C. Restructuring and elemental redistribution has been found to be similar to the pattern established for pellet type fuel and follows effects seen in earlier sphere-pac carbide tests. Gas release of 12-14% has been measured. A preliminary comparison of radial temperature distribution calculations using a first version of the fuel behaviour modelling code SPECKLE with the actual metallography has been attempted. (Auth.)

  2. Biological synthesis of very small silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia: The effects of visible-light irradiation and the liquid mixing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari, Narges [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Daneshpajouh, Shahram; Seyedbagheri, Seyedali; Atashdehghan, Reza [Hydrometallurgy Research Unit, Research and Development Center, National Iranian Copper Industries Company, Sarcheshmeh, Rafsanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdi, Khosro [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, Saeed [Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Minaian, Sara [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Hamid Reza [Department of Material Science, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza, E-mail: shahverd@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-03

    This study has investigated different visible-light irradiation's effect on the formation of silver nanoparticles from silver nitrate using the culture supernatant of Klebsiella pneumonia. Our study shows that visible-light emission can significantly prompt the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Also, the study experimentally investigated the liquid mixing process effect on silver nanoparticle synthesis by visible-light irradiation. This study successfully synthesized uniformly dispersed silver nanoparticles with a uniform size and shape in the range of 1-6 nm with an average size of 3 nm. Furthermore, the study investigated the mechanism of the reduction of silver ions by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia, and used X-ray diffraction to characterize silver chloride as an intermediate compound. Silver chloride was prepared synthetically and used as a substrate for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by culture supernatant of K. pneumonia. The silver nanoparticles have been prepared from silver chloride during this investigation for the first time.

  3. Effect of microwave irradiation on hydrogen sorption properties of hand mixed MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awad, A.S. [Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB-CNRS, 87 Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France); LCPM/PR2N, Université Libanaise, Faculté des Sciences 2, 90656 Jdeidet El Matn (Lebanon); Nakhl, M.; Zakhour, M. [LCPM/PR2N, Université Libanaise, Faculté des Sciences 2, 90656 Jdeidet El Matn (Lebanon); Santos, S.F.; Souza, F.L. [Universidade Federal do ABC, Avenida dos Estados 5001, 09210-580 Santo André – SP (Brazil); Bobet, J.-L., E-mail: jean-louis.bobet@u-bordeaux.fr [Université de Bordeaux, ICMCB-CNRS, 87 Avenue du Dr Schweitzer, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2016-08-15

    The effect of microwave (MW) irradiation on the hydrogen sorption properties of magnesium powder is explored in the present work. MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs (CFs = Carbons Fibers) was prepared by hand mixing, dehydrogenated under microwave irradiation for 20 s and then hydrogenated/dehydrogenated at about 300 °C – 1 MPa and 330 °C–0.03 MPa to investigate the effect of microwave irradiation on the solid/gas sorption properties. It has to be noted that the hydrogen absorption capacity and sorption kinetics of the MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture increased after dehydriding under MW irradiation. The MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture dehydrogenated by microwave irradiation can absorb about 5.8 wt.% and 5.3 wt.% H at 330 and 300 °C, respectively, within 2 h while the as-prepared MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture absorb only 4.6 wt.% H within the same duration. It is also demonstrated that MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture dehydrogenated by microwave irradiation exhibited good hydrogen desorption properties and, as an example, a microwave irradiated sample could release 5.8 wt.% H within 1 h at 330 °C in comparison to the as-prepared MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture which desorbed 4.4 wt.% H within 3 h. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed that the particle sizes of the MW dehydrogenated mixture decreased after several solid/gas sorption cycles. This contribute to the improvement of hydrogen storage properties of the microwaves dehydrogenated MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture. In addition, the hydrogenated MgH{sub 2} – 10 wt.% CFs mixture show reproducible and better microwave-assisted dehydriding reaction during second microwaves cycle. - Highlights: • Dehydriding reaction of MgH{sub 2} by microwave method. • Effect of microwaves treatment on the hydrogen sorption properties of Mg. • Effect of discontinuous microwaves irradiation.

  4. Microstructural examination of 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel after irradiation at elevated temperatures in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Chen-Yih; Gelles, D.S.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-06-01

    A remelted 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel (HT-9) has been examined by transmission electron microscopy before and after irradiation in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The irradiation temperatures were 365,420, 520, and 600 degree C with the fluences as high as 7.3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 34 dpa. The extracted precipitates from each specimen were identified using x-ray microanalysis and selected area diffraction. The precipitates in the unirradiated condition were primarily M 23 C 6 carbides, which formed at martensite lath and prior austenite grain boundaries. During irradiation at elevated temperatures, small amounts of other phases formed, which were tentatively identified as the chromium-rich α', the nickel-silicon rich G-phase, and the intermetallic Chi phase. Irradiation-induced voids were observed only in specimens irradiated at 420 degree C to a dose of 34 dpa; no voids were found for specimens irradiated at 365, 520, and 600 degree C (∼11, ∼34, and ∼34 dpa). These results are not in agreement with previous experiments in that voids have not been reported in this alloy at relatively high fluence level (∼67 dpa) following irradiation in another fast-spectrum reactor (EBR.II). This is, however, the first observation following FFTF irradiation. The present results indicate that cavities can form in HT-9 at modest fluence levels even without significant generation of helium. Hence, the cavity formation in this class of ferritic alloys is not simply caused by helium generation but rather more complex mechanisms. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Study of a High-Yield Cellulase System Created by Heavy-Ion Irradiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger and Mixed Fermentation with Trichoderma reesei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Hong; Li, Wen-Jian; Liu, Jing; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Dong, Miao-Yin; Wang, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the efficiency of 12C6+ irradiation of Aspergillus niger (A. niger) or mutagenesis via mixed Trichoderma viride (T. viride) culturing as well as a liquid cultivation method for cellulase production via mixed Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) and A. niger culture fermentation. The first mutagenesis approach was employed to optimize yield from a cellulase-producing strain via heavy-ion mutagenesis and high-throughput screening, and the second was to effectively achieve enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulase from a mixed culture of mutant T. viride and A. niger. We found that 12C6+-ion irradiation induced changes in cellulase biosynthesis in A. niger but had no effect on the time course of the synthesis. It is notable that the exoglucanases (CBH) activities of A. niger strains H11-1 and H differed (6.71 U/mL vs. 6.01 U/mL) and were significantly higher than that of A. niger mutant H3-1. Compared with strain H, the filter paper assay (FPA), endoglucanase (EG) and β-glucosidase (BGL) activities of mutant strain H11-1 were increased by 250.26%, 30.26% and 34.91%, respectively. A mixed culture system was successfully optimized, and the best ratio of T. reesei to A. niger was 5:1 for 96 h with simultaneous inoculation. The BGL activity of the mixed culture increased after 72 h. At 96 h, the FPA and BGL activities of the mixed culture were 689.00 and 797.15 U/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of monocultures, which were 408.70 and 646.98 U/mL for T. reesei and 447.29 and 658.89 U/mL for A. niger, respectively. The EG activity of the mixed culture was 2342.81 U/mL, a value that was significantly higher than that of monocultures at 2206.57 U/mL for T. reesei and 1727.62 U/mL for A. niger. In summary, cellulose production and hydrolysis yields were significantly enhanced by the proposed combination scheme. PMID:26656155

  6. Study of a High-Yield Cellulase System Created by Heavy-Ion Irradiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger and Mixed Fermentation with Trichoderma reesei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yang Wang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the efficiency of 12C6+ irradiation of Aspergillus niger (A. niger or mutagenesis via mixed Trichoderma viride (T. viride culturing as well as a liquid cultivation method for cellulase production via mixed Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei and A. niger culture fermentation. The first mutagenesis approach was employed to optimize yield from a cellulase-producing strain via heavy-ion mutagenesis and high-throughput screening, and the second was to effectively achieve enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulase from a mixed culture of mutant T. viride and A. niger. We found that 12C6+-ion irradiation induced changes in cellulase biosynthesis in A. niger but had no effect on the time course of the synthesis. It is notable that the exoglucanases (CBH activities of A. niger strains H11-1 and H differed (6.71 U/mL vs. 6.01 U/mL and were significantly higher than that of A. niger mutant H3-1. Compared with strain H, the filter paper assay (FPA, endoglucanase (EG and β-glucosidase (BGL activities of mutant strain H11-1 were increased by 250.26%, 30.26% and 34.91%, respectively. A mixed culture system was successfully optimized, and the best ratio of T. reesei to A. niger was 5:1 for 96 h with simultaneous inoculation. The BGL activity of the mixed culture increased after 72 h. At 96 h, the FPA and BGL activities of the mixed culture were 689.00 and 797.15 U/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of monocultures, which were 408.70 and 646.98 U/mL for T. reesei and 447.29 and 658.89 U/mL for A. niger, respectively. The EG activity of the mixed culture was 2342.81 U/mL, a value that was significantly higher than that of monocultures at 2206.57 U/mL for T. reesei and 1727.62 U/mL for A. niger. In summary, cellulose production and hydrolysis yields were significantly enhanced by the proposed combination scheme.

  7. Microstructure of irradiated Inconel 706 fuel pin cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.J.S.; Makenas, B.J.

    1983-08-01

    A fuel pin from the HEDL-P-60 experiment with a cladding of solution-annealed Inconel 706 breached in an apparently brittle manner at a position 12.7 cm above the bottom of the fuel column with a crack of 5.72 cm in length after 5.0 atomic percent burnup in EBR-II. Temperatures (time-averaged midwall) and fast fluences for the fractured area range from 447 0 C and 5.5 x 10 22 n/cm 2 to 526 0 C and 6.1 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Specimens of the fractured fuel pin section were successfully prepared and examined in both a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The fracture surfaces of the breached section showed brittle intergranular fracture characteristics for both the axial and circumferential cracks. Formation of γ' in the matrix near the breach confirmed that the irradiation temperature at the breached area was below 500 0 C, in agreement with other estimates of the temperature for the area, 447 to 526 0 C. A hexagonal eta-phase, Ni 3 (Ti,Nb), precipitated at boundaries near the breach. A more extensive eta-phase coating at grain boundaries was found in a section irradiated at 650 0 C. The eta-phase plates at grain boundaries are expected to have a detrimental effect on alloy ductility. A plane of weakness in this region along the (111) slip planes will develop in Inconel 706 because the eta-plates have a (111) habit relationship with the matrix

  8. Observation of oscillatory radiation induced segregation profiles at grain boundaries in neutron irradiated 316 stainless steel using atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Christopher M.; Felfer, Peter J.; Cole, James I.; Taheri, Mitra L.

    2018-06-01

    Radiation induced segregation in austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr stainless steels is a key detrimental microstructural modification experienced in the current generation of light water reactors. In particular, Cr depletion at grain boundaries can be a significant factor in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, having a complete knowledge and mechanistic understanding of radiation induced segregation at high dose and after a long thermal history is desired for continued sustainability of existing reactors. Here, we examine a 12% cold worked AISI 316 stainless steel hexagonal duct exposed in the lower dose, outer blanket region of the EBR-II reactor, by using advanced characterization and analysis techniques including atom probe tomography and analytical scanning transmission electron microscopy. Contrary to existing literature, we observe an oscillatory w-shape Cr and M-shape Ni concentration profile at 31 dpa. The presence and characterization through advanced atom probe tomography analysis of the w-shape Cr RIS profile is discussed in the context of the localized GB plane interfacial excess of the other major and minor alloying elements. The key finding of a co-segregation phenomena coupling Cr, Mo, and C is discussed in the context of the existing solute segregation literature under irradiation with emphasis on improved spatial and chemical resolution of atom probe tomography.

  9. Fabrication, inspection, and test plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel irradiation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachs, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of MOX fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the ATR to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. In addition, the test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the data base required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues (ORNL/MD/LTR-76). This Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan (FITP) is a level 2 document as defined in the FMDP LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-78)

  10. A coupled RL and transport model for mixed-field proton irradiation of Al2O3:C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Jain, Mayank

    2008-01-01

    effects and inelastic hadronic scattering occur in proton therapy dosimetry. To investigate these aspects in relation to our system, we have combined simulation of particle transportation with a luminescence generation code based on track structure theory. The model was found to qualitatively reproduce...... the main features in experimental data from proton irradiations. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Microstructural evolution in modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated with mixed high-energy proton and neutron spectra at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sencer, B.H.; Garner, F.A.; Gelles, D.S.; Bond, G.M.; Maloy, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel was exposed at 32-57 deg. C to a mixed proton/neutron particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The microstructure of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo consists of laths, dislocations and carbides. Examination of electron diffraction patterns obtained from extraction replicas of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo revealed that the precipitate microstructure was primarily dominated by M 23 C 6 carbides. The post-irradiation microstructure contained black-spot damage in addition to precipitates and dislocations. Examination of electron diffraction patterns revealed diffuse rings from M 23 C 6 carbides, indicating amorphization and/or nanocrystallinity. Crystalline MC carbides were also found. No cavity formation was found although a significant amount of helium and hydrogen generation had been generated. TEM-EDS examination of extraction replicas for carbides from unirradiated and irradiated samples did not show any detectable changes in composition of either M 23 C 6 or MC carbides. There was also no evident change in carbide size. Lattice images of M 23 C 6 carbides revealed an amorphous microstructure following irradiation, but MC carbides were still crystalline

  12. The anti emetic effect of oral administration of ondansetron or granisetron in macacus cynomolgus exposed to mixed neutron-gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Roman, V.; Martin, S.; Janodet, D.; Fatome, M.

    1995-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most often observed symptoms in the course of the early radiation syndrome. Their prevention has long been difficult because of the low effectiveness and side-effects of most antiemetics. There is a clear evidence that 5HT 3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron and granisetron are highly effective to prevent radiation-induced emesis without any side-effect. We studied the prophylactic effectiveness of their oral administration to macacus cynomolgus, for mixed neutron-gamma whole-body exposure, tat high dose rates. Doses of 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron were administered before, or after, or both before and after irradiation. The treatment was effective when administered both before and after radiation exposure. It was significant but incomplete if administered once. Post-irradiation administration is interesting, particularly in case of accident. Both antiemetic drugs were well tolerated. Their effectiveness and tolerance are apparently comparable. The 5HT 3 receptor antagonists represent a much improved treatment for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting by completely inhibiting emesis, if administered before and after irradiation. Unwanted sedation and extra-pyramidal side-effects, usually associated with the clinical use of D 2 receptor antagonists, were not observed. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs

  13. Structural evaluation of fast reactor core restraint with irradiation creep-swelling opposition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinowski, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiation creep and swelling correlations are derived from primary loading in-reactor experiments in which irradiation creep and swelling act in the same direction. When correlation uncertainty bands are applied in core restraint evaluations, significant variability in sub-assembly behavior is predicted. For example, sub-assemblies in the outer core region where neutron flux and duct temperature gradients are significant exhibit bowing responses ranging from a creep dominated outward bow to a swelling dominated inward bow. Furthermore, solutions based on upper bound and lower bound correlation uncertainty combinations are observed to cross-over indicating that such combinations are physically unrealistic in the assessment of creep-swelling opposition effects. In order to obtain realistic upper and lower bound sub-assembly responses, judgement must be applied in the selection of creep-swelling equation uncertainty combinations. Experimental programs have been defined which will provide the needed basic as well as prototypic creep-swelling opposition data for reference and advanced sub-assembly duct alloys. The first of these is an irradiation of cylindrical capsules subjected to a through-wall temperature gradient. This test which is presently underway in the EBR-II reactor will provide the data needed to refine irradiation creep and swelling correlations and their associated uncertainties when applied to core restraint evaluations. Restrained pin and duct bowing experiments in FFTF have also been defined. These will provide the prototypic data necessary to verify irradiated duct bowing methodology. The results of this experimental program are expected to reduce creep and swelling uncertainties and permit better definition of the design window for load plane gaps. (orig.)

  14. Irradiation-induced creep in 316 and 304L stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, L.C.; McVay, G.L.; Hudman, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    Recent results are presented from the in-reactor creep experiments that are being conducted by Argonne National Laboratory. The experiments consist of four subassemblies that contain helium-pressurized as well as unstressed capsules of 316 and 304L stainless steels in several metallurgical conditions. Experiments are being irradiated in row 7 of the EBR-II sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Three of the subassemblies are being irradiated at temperatures near 400 0 C, and the fourth subassembly is being irradiated at a temperature of 550 0 C. Creep and swelling strains were determined by profilometer measurements on the full length of the capsules after each irradiation cycle. The accumulated neutron dose on the 304L capsules at 385 0 C was 45 dpa; on the 316 capsules at 400 0 C, 40 dpa; and on the 316 capsules at 550 0 C, 25 dpa. It was found that the in-reactor creep rates were linearly dependent on hoop stress, with the exception being capsules of 316 stainless steel that had been given long-term carbide aging treatment and then irradiated at 550 0 C. Those capsules exhibited much higher creep and swelling rates than their unaged counterparts. For the metallurgical conditions where significant swelling was observed (solution-annealed 304L and aged 316 stainless steels), it was found that the in-reactor creep rates were readily fit to a model that related the creep rates to accumulated swelling. Additionally, it was found that the stress-normalized creep rate for 20%-cold-worked 316 stainless steel at a temperature of 550 0 C was 1.6 times that observed at 400 0 C

  15. Grain boundary sinks in neutron-irradiated Zr and Zr-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Gilbert, R.W.; Coleman, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of annealed sponge and crystal-bar Zr and Zircaloy-2 have been examined following irradiation in EBR-II at temperatures ≅ 700 K. Loop analysis shows that there is selective denuding of interstitial loops near to some grain boundaries indicating that such boundaries are net sinks for interstitial point defects. Furthermore, in sponge Zr and Zircaloy-2, vacancy c-component loops are observed running into the grain boundaries showing that the grain boundaries are not preferred sinks for vacancies. Cavities are observed in all samples. In crystal-bar Zr and sponge Zr they are mostly observed adjacent to grain boundaries. They are also sometimes found within grains associated with precipitates. The cavities are more common in the crystal-bar Zr and this is probably because both the sponge Zr and Zircaloy-2 contain vacancy c-component loops which compete for vacancies (assuming that the cavities are vacancy sinks). Only some of the grain boundaries have cavities adjacent to them and this may be related to the orientation of the boundary. (orig.)

  16. Swelling of austenitic iron-nickelchromium ternary alloys during fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling data are now available for 15 iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys irradiated to exposures as high as 110 displacements per atom (dpa) in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) between 400 and 650 0 C. These data confirm trends observed at lower exposure levels and extend the generality of earlier conclusions to cover a broader range of composition and temperature. It appears that all austenitic iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys eventually approach an intrinsic swelling rate of about1%/dpa over a range of temperature even wider than studied in this experiment. The duration of the transient regime that precedes the attainment of this rate is quite sensitive to nickel and chromium content, however. At nickel and chromium levels typical of 300 series steels, swelling does not saturate at engineering-relevant levels. However, there appears to be a tendency toward saturation that increases with declining temperature, increasing nickel and decreasing chromium levels. Comparisons of these results are made with those of similar studies conducted with charged particles. Conclusions are then drawn concerning the validity of charged particle simulation studies to determine the compositional and temperature dependence of swelling

  17. Postirradiation examinations of fuel pins from the GCFR F-1 series of mixed-oxide fuel pins at 5. 5 at. % burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R V; Johnson, C E

    1978-05-01

    Postirradiation examinations were performed on five fuel pins from the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor F-1 experiment irradiated in EBR-II to a peak burnup of approximately 5.5 at. %. These encapsulated fuel pins were irradiated at peak-power linear ratings from approximately 13 to 15 kW/ft and peak cladding inside diameter temperatures from approximately 625 to 760/sup 0/C. The maximum diametral change that occurred during irradiation was 0.2% ..delta..D/D/sub 0/. The maximum fuel-cladding chemical interaction depth was 2.6 mils in fuel pin G-1 and 1 mil or less in the other three pins examined destructively. Significant migration of the volatile fission products occurred axially to the fuel-blanket interfaces. Teh postirradiation examination data indicate that fuel melted at the inner surface of the annular fuel pellets in the two highest power rating fuel pins, but little axial movement of fuel occurred.

  18. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  19. Precipitate evolution in low-nickel austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at very low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Y.; Sagisaka, M.; Garner, F.; Okita, T.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Not all components of a fusion reactor will be subjected to high atomic displacement rates. Some components outside the plasma containment may experience relatively low displacement rates but data generated under long-term irradiation at low dpa rates is hard to obtain. In another study the neutron-induced microstructural evolution in response to long term irradiation at very low dose rates was studied for a Russian low-nickel austenitic stainless steel that is analogous to AISI 304. The irradiated samples were obtained from an out-of-core anti-crush support column for the BN-600 fast reactor with doses ranging from 1.5 to 22 dpa generated at 3x10 -9 to 4x10 -8 dpa/s. The irradiation temperatures were in a very narrow range of 370-375 deg. C. Microstructural observation showed that in addition to voids and dislocations, an unexpectedly high density of small carbide precipitates was formed that are not usually observed at higher dpa rates in this temperature range. These results required us to ask if such unexpected precipitation was anomalous or was a general feature of low-flux, long-term irradiation. It is shown in this paper that a similar behavior was observed in a western stainless steel, namely AISI 304 stainless steel, irradiated at similar temperatures and dpa rates in the EBR-II fast reactor, indicating that irradiation at low dpa rates for many years leads to a different precipitate microstructure and therefore different associated changes in matrix composition than are generated at higher dpa rates. One consequence of this precipitation is a reduced lattice parameter of the alloy matrix, leading to densification that increases in strength with increasing temperature and dose. A. non-destructive method to evaluate these precipitates is under development and is also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  20. Tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to a very high dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Shack, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20-100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. Our databases and mechanistic understanding of the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high doses, i.e. is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-corrosion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-II reactor after irradiation to ∼50 dpa at ∼370 deg. C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 degree sign C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at a low ECP, and this susceptibility led to a poor work-hardening capability and low ductility

  1. Isotopic exchange in a neutron-irradiated mixed-valence compound: Tl3(I) Tl(III)Cl6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Valverde, S.; Duplatre, G.

    1977-01-01

    The initial distribution of Tl(I) and Tl(III) species, and its change on heating, have been investigated in solid thermal neutron-irradiated Th 4 Cl 6 . An initial ratio of 5/1 for 204 Tl(I)/ 204 Tl(III) is found and this remains constant for integral gamma-doses of 3 to 12 MRad. The variation of the 204 Tl(III) fraction with temperature is found identical to that observed in labelled Tl 4 Cl 6 for which a genuine isotopic exchange has previously been described. It is concluded that the recoil species are rapidly converted, after the recoil processes, into stable ions

  2. A case of mesodermic mixed tumor of the uterus developing after the treatment of myoma with x-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiura, Masamichi; Mano, Atsuo; Egawa, Kenshi; Katsube, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Takahiro

    1975-01-01

    A case of mesodermic mixed tumor primarily developing in the endometrium was reported with some discussion. The anamnesis was interesting that the patient had been exposed to the secondary radioactivity of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and to X-ray for the treatment of myoma. Histological examination revealed adenoma as the epithelial element and fibromyxoma-like tissues, cartilage tissues, vascular tissues, and endometrial interstitium-like tissues as the non-epithelial elements. (Chiba, N.)

  3. Case of mesodermic mixed tumor of the uterus developing after the treatment of myoma with x-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiura, M; Mano, A; Egawa, K; Katsube, Y; Sasaki, T [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-06-01

    A case of mesodermic mixed tumor primarily developing in the endometrium was reported with some discussion. The anamnesis was interesting that the patient had been exposed to the secondary radioactivity of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima and to X-ray for the treatment of myoma. Histological examination revealed adenoma as the epithelial element and fibromyxoma-like tissues, cartilage tissues, vascular tissues, and endometrial interstitium-like tissues as the non-epithelial elements.

  4. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo

    1996-01-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  5. Studies of tolerance induction through mixed chimerism in cynomolgus monkeys. Method for detection of chimeric cells and effect of thymic irradiation on induction of tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Tomoaki; Kawai, Tatsuo; Ota, Kazuo [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    To establish the method for the detection of chimerism in cynomologus monkeys, we tested cross reactivity of various anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to cynomolgus monkeys. In 29 mAb we tested, only three monoclonal anti-HLA antibodies crossreacted with lymphocytes of monkeys. With these mAb, chimeric cell can be detected up to 1% by flow cytometric analysis (study 1). Utilizing the method we developed in study 1, we applied the regimen that induces mixed chimerism and skin graft tolerance in mice to renal allotransplantation of cynomolgus monkey. Regimen A includes non-lethal dose of total body irradiation (TBI), administration of anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) for 3 days, donor bone marrow infusion and 45 days course of cyclosporine (CYA) administration. We added 7 Gy of thymic irradiation on day-6 in regimen B and on day-1 in regimen C. Although all monkeys in regimen A and B consistently developed chimerism, they rejected kidney allografts soon after stopping CYA. In contrast, 4 monkeys out of 5 failed to develop chimerism in regimen C, but renal allograft tolerance was induced in one monkey who developed chimerism in regimen C. In conclusion, the induction of chimerism is considered necessary but not sufficient for tolerance induction. (author)

  6. Enhanced Ga2O3-photocatalyzed and photochemical degradation of the Fipronil insecticide by UVC irradiation in mixed aqueous/organic media under an inert atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Hisao; Tsukamoto, Tohru; Mitsutsuka, Yoshihiro; Oyama, Toshiyuki; Serpone, Nick

    2015-05-01

    Agrochemicals such as the insecticide Fipronil that bear fluoro groups are generally fat-soluble and nearly insoluble in water, so that their photodegradation in a heterogeneous aqueous gallium oxide dispersion presents some challenges. This article examined the photodegradation of this insecticide by solubilizing it through the addition of organic solvents (EtOH, MeOH, THF, 1,4-dioxane and ethylene glycol) to an aqueous medium and then subjecting the insecticide to 254 nm UVC radiation under photocatalytically inert (Ga2O3/N2) and air-equilibrated (Ga2O3/O2) conditions, as well as photochemically in the absence of Ga2O3 but also under inert and air-equilibrated conditions. Defluorination, dechlorination, desulfonation and denitridation of Fipronil were examined in mixed aqueous/organic media (10, 25 and 50 vol% in organic solvent). After 3 h of UVC irradiation (50 vol% mixed media) defluorination with Ga2O3/N2 was ∼65% greater than in aqueous media, and ca. 80% greater than the direct photolysis of Fipronil under inert (N2) conditions; under air-equilibrated conditions both Ga2O3-photocatalyzed and photochemical defluorination were significantly lower than in aqueous media. Dechlorination of Fipronil was ∼160% (Ga2O3/N2) and 140% (photochemically, N2) greater than in aqueous media; under air-equilibrated conditions, both photocatalyzed and photochemical formation of Cl(-) ions in mixed media fell rather short relative to aqueous media. The photocatalyzed (Ga2O3/N2) and photochemical (N2) conversion of the sulfur group in Fipronil to SO4(2(-)) ions was ca. 20% and 30% greater, respectively, in mixed media, while under air-equilibrated conditions photocatalyzed desulfonation was nearly twofold less than in the aqueous phase; direct photolysis showed little variations in mixed media. Denitridation of the nitrogens in Fipronil occurred mostly through the formation of ammonia (as NH4(+)) under all conditions with negligible quantities of NO3(-); again mixed media

  7. Radiation decontamination of three local spices and khebab spice-mix and some aspects of their physiochemical and nutritional properties before and after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottoh, D. I

    2011-07-01

    test samples were as follows: Pepre (15 species), whentia (10 species), fom wisa (9 species), and khebab spice - mix (10 species). In all instances, Aspergillus species predominated followed by penicillum species. Many potential toxin-producing species were isolated: A alutaceus (Ochratoxins), A. flavus (Aflatoxins) A. sulphureus (Penicillic acid, Octratoxins), P. expansum (patulin). Rhodotorula sp. was isolated in very high proportions (30-60%) in all samples. The moisture isotherms followed a sigmoid curve with equilibration attained within 8-10 days, only the khebab spice - mix showed irregular sorption and desorption isotherms presumably due to its composition. Gamma irradiation at 10 - 20kGy reduced the total bacteria count and total fungal population by 3-4 log cycles. There were variable significant (P<0.05) interactions between dose applied, packaging material and storage period in some instances when the pH, % moisture, ash, fat contents, crude protein and total carbohydrates of the spices were examined before and after irradiation treatment. L.D.P.E pouches enfolding Brown paper was the best packaging material followed by dense polyethylene pouches. The spices contained variable amount of micronutrients (Ca, Mg, K, Cl, Na etc) and micronutrients (Mn, Ca, Al, Va). This indicates the rich nutrient source of these spices. Untrained taste panelists who scored for the khebab spice-mix after (0-20kGy) irradiation could not detect significant differences. (au)

  8. The uranium and thorium separation in the chemical reprocessing of the irradiated fuel of thorium and uranium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, E.F. de.

    1984-09-01

    A bibliographic research has been carried out for reprocessing techniques of irradiated thorium fuel from nuclear reactors. The Thorex/Hoechst process has been specially considered to establish a method for reprocessing thorium-uranium fuel from PWR. After a series of cold tests performed in laboratory it was possible to set the behavior of several parameters affecting the Thorex/Hoechst process. Some comments and suggestions are presented for modifications in the process flosheet conditions. A discussion is carried out for operational conditions such as the aqueous to organic flow ratio the acidity of strip and scrub solutions in the process steps for thorium and uranium recovery. The operation diagrams have been constructed using equilibrium experimental data which correspond to conditions observed in laboratory. (Author) [pt

  9. Advanced fast reactor fuels program. Second annual progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.D.

    1978-12-01

    Results of steady-state (EBR-II) irradiation testing, off-normal irradiation design and testing, fuel-cladding compatibility, and chemical stability of uranium--plutonium carbide and nitride fuels are presented

  10. The open-quotes synergisticclose quotes action of mixed irradiation with high-LET and low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shozo

    1994-01-01

    The combined modalities of various agents such as radiation, chemicals and physical agents are often used, and exposure to mixture of agents sometimes occurs in nature. However, it is not clear whether these combined effects are synergistic, partly because definition of the term open-quotes synergismclose quotes is confusing, as pointed out by Streffer and Mueller. It is, of course, desirable that the definition should be simple and widely applicable to all agents. Yet the underlying mechanisms of the effects of different agents are probably different, and the mechanisms of combined effects are different and more complicated than those of a single agent. It is therefore important to define synergism taking each underlying mechanism into consideration. From this viewpoint, the definitions of synergism which have been used to date are examined with respect to the effect of a mixture of different types of radiation on cells, and they are shown to be inappropriate and misleading. This is probably attributable to simply treating the resulting phenomena (cell survival in most cases) without adequately taking into consideration the knowledge of underlying biological mechanisms in defining the synergism that may occur with irradiation. This commentary discusses the inappropriateness of current definitions and proposes a new definition in terms of biological mechanisms as a counterproposal. 16 refs., 6 figs

  11. Differential effect of gamma-irradiated and heat-treated lymphocytes on T cell activation, and interleukin-2 and interleukin-3 release in the human mixed lymphocyte reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loertscher, R.; Abbud-Filho, M.; Leichtman, A.B.; Ythier, A.A.; Williams, J.M.; Carpenter, C.B.; Strom, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    Heat-inactivated (45 degrees C/1 hr) lymphocytes selectively activate suppressor T cells in the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), while no significant proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation can be detected. It is not well understood why hyperthermic treatment abolishes the stimulatory capacity of lymphocytes since HLA-DR molecules remain detectable immediately following heat exposure. In order to further characterize the requirements for Ts activation we studied the effects of hyperthermic treatment on cellular protein and DNA synthesis and cell surface protein expression in proliferating T and B cells; interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, and IL-3 release following allogeneic stimulation with heat treated cells (HMLR); and IL-2 receptor expression as an indicator of T cell activation in the HMLR. Hyperthermic treatment reduced cellular protein synthesis as estimated by 14 C-leucine uptake to about 15%, and DNA synthesis ( 3 H-thymidine incorporation) to about 5% of untreated control cells. In contrast to y-irradiated cells, viability of heated cells rapidly declined within the first 24 hr. Hyperthermic treatment doubled binding of mouse immunoglobulin paralleled by an increased expression of IL-2 and transferrin receptors, while expression of HLA-DR and 4F2 proteins appeared unchanged. Stimulation with heated cells triggered the release of IL-1- and an IL-3-like bioactivity but did not induce IL-2 synthesis and/or release, thus explaining the lack of proliferation in the HMLR. Addition of exogenous IL-2 but not IL-1 restored HMLR proliferation. A comparison of allostimulation with y-irradiated and heat-treated cells revealed that significantly fewer T cells were induced to express IL-2 receptors at day 3 (14% vs. 8%, P less than 0.001) and at day 6 (42% vs. 21%, P less than 0.05) with heat-inactivated stimulators

  12. Factors affecting ultraviolet irradiation/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) degradation of mixed N-nitrosamines in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Chao; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Chu, Wenhai; Rong, Wenlei; Zhou, Shengdong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NAms with three-induced toxicity, as emerging DBPs, has caused a great public attention. ► No paper regards UV/H 2 O 2 oxidation of mixed NAms in an aquatic environment. ► The treatment effect is typically affected by a few factors in water. ► NPIP and NDPhA are the most readily and difficult to be degraded due to unique structure. ► All the NAms degradation exhibited a pseudo-first-order kinetics pattern. - Abstract: Disinfection by-products (DBPs) are a great challenge to our drinking water security. Particularly, nitrosamines (NAms), as emerging DBPs, are potently carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic, and have increasingly attained public attention. This study was to evaluate the performance of the NAms degradation by the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (253.7 nm) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). In the UV/H 2 O 2 system, hydroxyl radicals (OH·), a type of nonselective and powerful oxidant, was produced to attack the molecules of NAms. Factors affecting the treatment efficiency, including the H 2 O 2 dosage, initial NAms concentration, UV irradiation intensity, initial solution pH, and inorganic anions present in water, were evaluated. All the NAms degradation exhibited a pseudo-first-order kinetics pattern. Within 60 min, 0.1 mg/L of any NAms could be almost decomposed except NDPhA that required 120 min for complete removal, at 25 μmol/L H 2 O 2 and at initial pH 7. Results demonstrate that the UV/H 2 O 2 treatment is a viable option to control NAms in water.

  13. ANL calculational methodologies for determining spent nuclear fuel source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last decade Argonne National Laboratory has developed reactor depletion methods and models to determine radionuclide inventories of irradiated EBR-II fuels. Predicted masses based on these calculational methodologies have been validated using available data from destructive measurements--first from measurements of lead EBR-II experimental test assemblies and later using data obtained from processing irradiated EBR-II fuel assemblies in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Details of these generic methodologies are described herein. Validation results demonstrate these methods meet the FCF operations and material control and accountancy requirements

  14. Detection of irradiated spice in blend of irradiated and un-irradiated spices using thermoluminescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Michiko; Yamazaki, Masao; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Todoriki, Setsuko; Miyahara, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Five blended spice sample were prepared by mixing irradiated and un-irradiated black pepper and paprika at different ratios. Blended black pepper containing 2%(w/w) of 5.4 kGy-irradiated black pepper showed no maximum at glow1. Irradiated black pepper samples, mixed to 5 or 10%(w/w), were identified as 'irradiated' or 'partially irradiated' or 'un-irradiated'. All samples with un-irradiated pepper up to 20%(w/w) were identified as irradiated'. In the case 5.0 kGy-irradiated paprika were mixed with un-irradiated paprika up to 5%(w/w), all samples were identified as irradiated'. The glow1 curves of samples, including irradiated paprika at 0.2%(w/w) or higher, exhibited a maximum between 150 and 250degC. The results suggest the existence of different critical mixing ratio for the detection of irradiation among each spices. Temperature range for integration of the TL glow intensity were compared between 70-400degC and approximate 150-250degC, and revealed that the latter temperature range was determined based on the measurement of TLD100. Although TL glow ratio in 150-250degC was lower than that of 70-400degC range, identification of irradiation was not affected. Treatment of un-irradiated black pepper and paprika with ultraviolet rays had no effect on the detection of irradiation. (author)

  15. Visual imagery and the user model applied to fuel handling at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    The material presented in this paper is based on two studies involving visual display designs and the user's perspective model of a system. The studies involved a methodology known as Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP), and its use in expanding design choices which included the ''comfort parameters'' and ''perspective reality'' of the user's model of the world. (author)

  16. Method for the determination of technical specifications limiting temperature in EBR-II operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Hill, D.J.; Ku, J.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The methodology and analysis procedure to qualify the Mark-V and Mark-VA fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II are summarized in this paper. Fuel performance data and design safety criteria are essential for thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety evaluations. Normal and off-normal operation duty cycles and transient classifications are required for the safety assessment of the fuels. The temperature limits of subassemblies were first determined by a steady-state thermal-structural and fuel damage analysis, in which a trial-and-error approach was used to predict the maximum allowable fuel pin temperature that satisfies the design criteria for steady-state normal operation. The steady-state temperature limits were used as the basis of the off-normal transient analysis to assess the safety performance of the fuel for anticipated, unlikely and extremely unlikely events. If the design criteria for the off-normal events are not satisfied, then the subassembly temperature limit is reduced and an iterative procedure is employed until all design criteria are met

  17. Studies of axial-leakage simulations for homogeneous and heterogeneous EBR-II core configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1985-08-01

    When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, leakage-absorption cross sections are normally used to model leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. Since the neutron flux is axially dependent, the leakages, and hence the leakage-absorption cross sections, are also axially dependent. Therefore, to obtain axial flux profiles (or reaction rates) for individual subassemblies, an XY-geometry calculation delineating each subassembly has to be done at several axial heights with space- and energy-dependent leakage-absorption cross sections that are appropriate for each height. This report discusses homogeneous and heterogeneous XY-geometry calculations at various axial locations and using several differing assumptions for the calculation of the leakage-absorption cross section. The positive (outward) leakage-absorption cross sections are modeled as actual leakage absorptions, but the negative (inward) leakage-absorption cross sections are modeled as either negative leakage absorptions (+-B 2 method) or positive downscatter cross sections [the Σ/sub s/(1 → g) method]. 3 refs., 52 figs., 10 tabs

  18. Initial results for electrochemical dissolution of spent EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S. X.

    1998-01-01

    Initial results are reported for the anode behavior of spent metallic nuclear fuel in an electrorefining process. The anode behavior has been characterized in terms of the initial spent fuel composition and the final composition of the residual cladding hulls. A variety of results have been obtained depending on the experimental conditions. Some of the process variables considered are average and maximum cell voltage, average and maximum anode voltage, amount of electrical charge passed (coulombs or amp-hours) during the experiment, and cell resistance. The main goal of the experiments has been the nearly complete dissolution of uranium with the retention of zirconium and noble metal fission products in the cladding hulls. Analysis has shown that the most indicative parameters for determining an endpoint to the process, recognizing the stated goal, are the maximum anode voltage and the amount of electrical charge passed. For the initial experiments reported here, the best result obtained is greater than 98% uranium dissolution with approximately 50% zirconium retention. Noble metal fission product retention appears to be correlated with zirconium retention

  19. Recent advances during the treatment of spent EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Mariani, R.D.; Vaden, D.E.; Sherman, S.R.; Li, S.X.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Several recent advances have been achieved for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. In anticipation of production operations at Argonne National Laboratory-West, development of both electrorefining and metal processing has been ongoing in the post-demonstration phase in order to further optimize the process. These development activities show considerable promise. This paper discusses the results of recent experiments as well as plans for future investigations

  20. Non-destructive assay of EBR-II blanket elements using resonance transmission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klann, R.T.; Poenitz, W.P.

    1998-01-01

    Resonance transmission analysis utilizing a faltered reactor beam was examined as a means of determining the 239 Pu content in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II depleted uranium blanket elements. The technique uses cadmium and gadolinium falters along with a 239 Pu fission chamber to isolate the 0.3 eV resonance in 239 Pu. In the energy range of this resonance (0.1 eV to 0.5 ev), the total microscopic cross-section of 239 Pu is significantly greater than the cross-sections of 238 U and 235 U. This large difference allows small changes in the 239 Pu content of a sample to result in large changes in the mass signal response. Tests with small stacks of depleted uranium and 239 Pu foils indicate a significant change in response based on the 239 Pu content of the foil stack. In addition, the tests indicate good agreement between the measured and predicted values of 239 Pu up to approximately two weight percent

  1. Procedures and instrumentation for sodium boiling experiments in EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, R.D.

    1976-01-01

    The development of instrumentation capable of detecting localized coolant boiling in a liquid metal cooled breeder reactor (LMFBR) has a high priority in fast reactor safety. The detection must be rapid enough to allow corrective action to be taken before significant damage occurs to the core. To develop and test a method of boiling detection, it is desirable to produce boiling in a reactor and thereby introduce a condition in the reactor the original design concepts were chosen to preclude. The proposed boiling experiments are designed to safely produce boiling in the subassembly of a fast reactor and provide the information to develop boiling detection instrumentation without core damage or safety compromise. The experiment consists of the operation of two separate subassemblies, first, a gamma heated boiling subassembly which produces non-typical but highly conservative boiling and then a fission heated subassembly which simulates a prototypical boiling event. The two boiling subassemblies are designed to operate in the instrumentation subassembly test facility (INSAT) of Experiment Breeder Reactor II

  2. Validation of the REBUS-3/RCT methodologies for EBR-II core-follow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    One of the many tasks to be completed at EBR-2/FCF (Fuel Cycle Facility) regarding fuel cycle closure for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is to develop and install the systems to be used for fissile material accountancy and control. The IFR fuel cycle and pyrometallurgical process scheme determine the degree of actinide of actinide buildup in the reload fuel assemblies. Inventories of curium, americium and neptunium in the fuel will affect the radiation and thermal environmental conditions at the fuel fabrication stations, the chemistry of reprocessing, and the neutronic performance of the core. Thus, it is important that validated calculational tools be put in place for accurately determining isotopic mass and neutronic inputs to FCF for both operational and material control and accountancy purposes. The primary goal of this work is to validate the REBUS-2/RCT codes as tools which can adequately compute the burnup and isotopic distribution in binary- and ternary-fueled Mark-3, Mark-4, and Mark-5 subassemblies. 6 refs

  3. Method for the determination of technical specifications limiting temperature in EBR-II operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Hill, D.J.; Ku, J.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The methodology and analysis procedure to qualify the Mark-V and Mark-VA fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II are summarized in this paper. Fuel performance data and design safety criteria are essential for thermal-hydraulic analyses and safety evaluations. Normal and off-normal operation duty cycles and transient classifications are required for the safety assessment of the fuels. Design safety criteria for steady-state normal and transient off-normal operations were developed to ensure structural integrity of the fuel pin. The maximum allowable coolant outlet temperatures and powers of subassemblies for steady-state normal operation conditions were first determined in a row-by-row basis by a thermal-hydraulic and fuel damage analysis, in which a trial-and-error approach was used to predict the maximum subassembly coolant outlet temperatures and powers that satisfy the design safety criteria for steady-state normal operation conditions. The limiting steady-state temperature and power were then used as the initial subassembly thermal conditions for the off-normal transient analysis to assess the safety performance of the fuel pin for anticipated, unlikely and extremely unlikely events. If the design safety criteria for the off-normal events are not satisfied, then the initial steady-state subassembly temperatures and/or powers are reduced and an iterative procedure is employed until the design safety criteria for off-normal conditions are satisfied, and the initial subassembly outlet coolant temperature and power are the technical specification limits for reactor operation. (author)

  4. Surveillance application using patten recognition software at the EBR-II Reactor Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The System State Analyzer (SSA) is a software based pattern recognition system. For the past several year this system has been used at Argonne National Laboratory's Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 (EBR-2) reactor for detection of degradation and other abnormalities in plant systems. Currently there are two versions of the SSA being used at EBR-2. One version of SSA is used for daily surveillance and trending of the reactor delta-T and startups of the reactor. Another version of the SSA is the QSSA which is used to monitor individual systems of the reactor such as the Secondary Sodium System, Secondary Sodium Pumps, and Steam Generator. This system has been able to detect problems such as signals being affected by temperature variations due to a failing temperature controller

  5. EBR-II in-vessel natural circulation experiments on hot and cold pool stratification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragland, W.A.; Feldman, E.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II is located in a cylindrical pool of liquid sodium which is part of the cold-leg of the primary flow circuit. A vertical string of 32 thermocouples spans the 8 m tank height, at each of two diametrically opposed locations in the primary tank. Local temperatures were measured with these 64 thermocouples during dynamic tests. The instantaneous spacial temperature distribution obtained from a string of thermocouples can be viewed on a personal computer. The animation which results from displaying successive spacial distributions provide a very effective way to quickly obtain physical insights. The design of the two strings of thermocouples, the software used to create the animation, measured data from three different types of tests--two unprotected reactor transients, and one with the reactor at decay power levels and the reactor cover lifted, are discussed. 5 refs., 3 figs

  6. Effect of stress during neutron irradiation on the microstructure of type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brager, H.R.; Garner, F.A.; Guthrie, G.L.

    1976-04-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination was performed on solution annealed and 20 percent cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel specimens stressed during irradiation at 500 0 C in EBR-II. Hoop stress levels ranged from 0 to 327 MN/m 2 (47,300 psi) and fluences between 2.0 and 3.0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Data confirm that applied tensile stresses enhance swelling in the solution annealed steel. The number densities of both voids and Frank loops were sensitive to the stress environment. Total swelling in the annealed material increased with stress, but not in direct proportion to the increased void nucleation. While the effect of cold working was to suppress swelling, the nucleation and growth of Frank loops was unaffected by the cold worked microstructure. The individual planar loop densities within any one specimen were quite sensitive to the magnitude of the stress component normal to the loop plane, while the total loop number density was sensitive to a smaller degree of the magnitude of the hydrostatic stress level. The number and size distribution of the loop populations were unaffected by the planar shear stress components, but the mean loop sizes were found to be limited by the probability of loop intersection with dislocations and loops. The stress dependence of void and loop densities allowed determination of the critical nuclei sizes, approximately sixteen vacancies for voids and six atoms for loops. Many observations were made on the probable creep mechanisms. Both dislocation and void microstructures evolved in a consistent stress-dependent manner, giving support to models which predict a coupling of the swelling and irradiation creep phenomena through the stress environment. 13 figures, 3 tables

  7. Results of the irradiation of mixed UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2} oxide fuel elements; Resultats d'irradiation d'elements combustibles en oxyde mixte UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikailoff, H.; Mustelier, J.P.; Bloch, J.; Ezran, L.; Hayet, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    In order to study the behaviour of fuel elements used for the first charge of the reactor Rapsodie, a first batch of eleven needles was irradiated in the reactor EL3 and then examined. These needles (having a shape very similar lo that of the actual needles to be used) were made up of a stack of sintered mixed-oxide pellets: UO{sub 2} containing about 10 per cent of PuO{sub 2}. The density was 85 to 97 per cent of the theoretical, value. The diametral gap between the oxide and the stainless steel can was between 0,06 and 0,27 mm. The specific powers varied from 1230 to 2700 W/cm{sup 3} and the can temperature was between 450 and 630 C. The maximum burn-up attained was 22000 MW days/tonne. Examination of the needles (metrology, radiography and {gamma}-spectrography) revealed certain macroscopic changes, and the evolution of the fuel was shown by micrographic studies. These observations were used, together with flux measurements results, to calculate the temperature distribution inside the fuel. The volume of the fission gas produced was measured in some of the samples; the results are interpreted taking into account the temperature distribution in the oxide and the burn-up attained. Finally a study was made both of the behaviour of a fuel element whose central part was molten during irradiation, and of the effect of sodium which had penetrated into some of the samples following can rupture. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier le comportement des elements combustibles destines a la premiere charge du reacteur Rapsodie, une premiere serie de onze aiguilles a ete irradiee dans le reacteur EL3 et examinee apres irradiation. Ces aiguilles (aux caracteristiques geometriques tres proches de celles des aiguilles definitives) etaient constituees d'un empilement de pastilles frittees en oxyde mixte UO{sub 2} a 10 pour cent environ de PuO{sub 2}, dont la densite etait comprise entre 85 et 97 pour cent de la densite theorique. Le jeu diametral entre l'oxyde et la

  8. Results of the irradiation of mixed UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2} oxide fuel elements; Resultats d'irradiation d'elements combustibles en oxyde mixte UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikailoff, H; Mustelier, J P; Bloch, J; Ezran, L; Hayet, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    In order to study the behaviour of fuel elements used for the first charge of the reactor Rapsodie, a first batch of eleven needles was irradiated in the reactor EL3 and then examined. These needles (having a shape very similar lo that of the actual needles to be used) were made up of a stack of sintered mixed-oxide pellets: UO{sub 2} containing about 10 per cent of PuO{sub 2}. The density was 85 to 97 per cent of the theoretical, value. The diametral gap between the oxide and the stainless steel can was between 0,06 and 0,27 mm. The specific powers varied from 1230 to 2700 W/cm{sup 3} and the can temperature was between 450 and 630 C. The maximum burn-up attained was 22000 MW days/tonne. Examination of the needles (metrology, radiography and {gamma}-spectrography) revealed certain macroscopic changes, and the evolution of the fuel was shown by micrographic studies. These observations were used, together with flux measurements results, to calculate the temperature distribution inside the fuel. The volume of the fission gas produced was measured in some of the samples; the results are interpreted taking into account the temperature distribution in the oxide and the burn-up attained. Finally a study was made both of the behaviour of a fuel element whose central part was molten during irradiation, and of the effect of sodium which had penetrated into some of the samples following can rupture. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier le comportement des elements combustibles destines a la premiere charge du reacteur Rapsodie, une premiere serie de onze aiguilles a ete irradiee dans le reacteur EL3 et examinee apres irradiation. Ces aiguilles (aux caracteristiques geometriques tres proches de celles des aiguilles definitives) etaient constituees d'un empilement de pastilles frittees en oxyde mixte UO{sub 2} a 10 pour cent environ de PuO{sub 2}, dont la densite etait comprise entre 85 et 97 pour cent de la densite theorique. Le jeu diametral entre l'oxyde et la gaine en acier

  9. The development of fuel pins and material specimens mixed loading irradiation test rig in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. The development of the fuel-material hybrid rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, Yasuko; Someya, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, there were many tests using the irradiation rigs that it was possible to be set irradiation conditions for each compartment independently. In case of no alternative fuel element to irradiate after unloading the irradiated compartments, the irradiation test was restarted with the dummy compartment which the fuel elements was not mounted. If the material specimens are mounted in this space, it is possible to use the irradiation space effectively. For these reasons, the irradiation rig (hybrid rig) is developed that is consolidated with material specimens compartment and fuel elements compartment. Fuel elements and material specimens differ greatly with heat generation, so that the most important issue in developing of hybrid rig is being able to distribute appropriately the coolant flow which satisfies irradiation conditions. The following is described by this report. (1) It was confirmed that the flow distribution of loading the same irradiation rig with the compartment from which a flow demand differs could be satisfied. (2) It was confirmed that temperature setting range of hybrid rig could be equivalent to that of irradiation condition. (3) By standardizing the coolant entrance structure of the compartment lower part, the prospect which can perform easily recombination of the compartment from which a type differs between irradiation rigs was acquired. (author)

  10. Results of the post-irradiation examination of a highly-rated mixed oxide fuel rod from the Mol 7B experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, M.; Walker, C.T.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1980-01-01

    The experiment MOL 7B was carried out in a epithermal flux in the Belgian reactor BR2. The pin examined contained fuel of initial composition (Usub(0.7)Pusub(0.3))Osub(1.98). It had been irradiated to a maximum burn-up of 13.2 at% at a maximum linear power of 568Wcm -1 . The fuel was clad with coldworked stainless steel. Electron microprobe analysis indicated that a Cr 2 O 3 type oxide was the main constituent of the grey phases in the gap. A metallic phase on the fuel surface had apparently resulted from the mechanical compaction of fragments of cladding that had been depleted in chromium by oxidation. Thus the main components of the phase were iron and nickel. Chromium loss from the inner cladding surface was significant only in the upper regions of the pin. In pin sections that were metallographically examined sigma phase and carbides of the type M 23 C 6 were present at the grain boundaries of the cladding. Cladding corrosion was not an Arrhenius function of the cladding temperature: the amount of metal lost from the inner cladding surface decreased with rise in cladding temperature above 910 K. A contributor to metal loss was the mechanical detachment of fragments of cladding which reformed as a metallic layer on the surface of the fuel. Chromium depletion and sigma phase formation at grain boundaries lowered the cohesive forces between grains which were then mechanically detached. Chromium loss from grain boundaries is mainly the results of oxidation of the cladding by the mixed oxide fuel. Data are presented to support the view that the local average O/M of the fuel determined the rate of oxidation and consequently the extent of chromium depletion. Fuel-cladding mechanical interactions were weak in the upper regions of the pin where metal loss was small

  11. Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Efforts. An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandy, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    • ARC-AFR Program is involved in a number of knowledge preservation activities; • Recovery of Information from EBR-II, FFTF, and TREAT is very important; • Recovery of Information from Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and conversion to electronic format; • Organizing some data into electronic databases – EBR-II Plant Testing Data, FFTF Plant Testing Data, TREAT Test Data, SFR Fuels and Materials Irradiation Data, etc.; • Information is being used to support existing U.S. SFR programs along with international programs such as the IAEA CRP EBR-II Safety Benchmark

  12. Swelling and swelling resistance possibilities of austenitic stainless steels in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fusion reactor helium generation rates in stainless steels are intermediate to those found in EBR-II and HFIR, and swelling in fusion reactors may differ from the fission swelling behavior. Advanced titanium-modified austenitic stainless steels exhibit much better void swelling resistance than AISI 316 under EBR-II (up to approx. 120 dpa) and HFIR (up to approx. 44 dpa) irradiations. The stability of fine titanium carbide (MC) precipitates plays an important role in void swelling resistance for the cold-worked titanium-modified steels irradiated in EBR-II. Futhermore, increased helium generation in these steels can (a) suppress void conversion, (b) suppress radiation-induced solute segregation (RIS), and (c) stabilize fine MC particles, if sufficient bubble nucleation occurs early in the irradation. The combined effects of helium-enhanced MC stability and helium-suppressed RIS suggest better void swelling resistance in these steels for fusion service than under EBR-II irradiation

  13. Effects of mixed neutron-gamma beams in both sequential and simultaneous irradiation modalities on chromosomal aberrations of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in-vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, P.K.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Meisner, L.F.; Gould, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    Initial irradiations have been performed in preparation for testing the independent action hypothesis for chromosomal abnormality production between low- and high-LET radiation. Results of these irradiations are compared with typical dose response curves. Lessons learned and proposed experiments for the future are discussed. 25 refs., 3 figs

  14. Skin Inqjuries Reduce Survival and Modulate Corticosterone, C-Reactive Protein, Complement Component 3, IgM, and Prostaglandin E2 after Whole-Body Reactor-Produced Mixed Field (n + γ-Photons Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliann G. Kiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin injuries such as wounds or burns following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury (RCI increase mortality more than whole-body γ-irradiation alone. Wound-induced decreases in survival after irradiation are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to systemic bacterial infection. Among these factors, radiation-induced increases in interleukin-6 (IL-6 concentrations in serum were amplified by skin wound trauma. Herein, the IL-6-induced stress proteins including C-reactive protein (CRP, complement 3 (C3, immunoglobulin M (IgM, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were evaluated after skin injuries given following a mixed radiation environment that might be found after a nuclear incident. In this report, mice received 3 Gy of reactor-produced mixed field (n+γ-photons radiations at 0.38 Gy/min followed by nonlethal skin wounding or burning. Both wounds and burns reduced survival and increased CRP, C3, and PGE2 in serum after radiation. Decreased IgM production along with an early rise in corticosterone followed by a subsequent decrease was noted for each RCI situation. These results suggest that RCI-induced alterations of corticosterone, CRP, C3, IgM, and PGE2 cause homeostatic imbalance and may contribute to reduced survival. Agents inhibiting these responses may prove to be therapeutic for RCI and improve related survival.

  15. Measurement of void swelling in thick non-uniformly irradiated 304 stainless steel blocks using nondestructive ultrasonic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Okita, T.; Isobe, Y.; Etoh, J.; Sagisaka, M.; Matsunaga, T.; Freyer, P.D.; Huang, Y.; Wiezorek, J.M.K.; Porter, D.L.

    2015-01-01

    Void swelling is of potential importance in PWR austenitic internals, especially in components that will see higher doses during plant lives beyond 40 years. Proactive surveillance of void swelling is required to identify its emergence before swelling reaches levels that cause high levels of embrittlement and distortion. Non-destructive measurements of ultrasonic velocity can measure swelling at fractions of a percent. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for PWR application we have investigated five blocks of 304 stainless steel that were irradiated in the EBR-II fast reactor. These blocks were of hexagonal cross-section, with thickness of about 50 mm and lengths of about 218-245 mm. They were subjected to significant axial and radial gradients in gamma heating, temperature and dpa rate, producing complex internal distributions of swelling, reaching about 3.5% maximum at an off-center mid-core position. Swelling decreases both the density and the elastic moduli, thereby impacting the ultrasonic velocity. Concurrently, carbide precipitates form, producing increases in density and decreases in elastic moduli. Using blocks from both low and high dpa levels it was possible to separate the ultrasonic contributions of voids and carbides. Time-of-flight ultrasonic measurements were used to non-destructively measure the internal distribution of void swelling. These distributions were confirmed using non-destructive profilometry followed by destructive cutting to provide density change and electron microscopy data. It was demonstrated that the four measurement types produce remarkably consistent results. Therefore ultrasonic measurements offer great promise for in-situ surveillance of voids in PWR core internals. (authors)

  16. Atomic mixing of metallic bilayers Ni/Ti irradiated with high energy heavy ions; Etude du melange ionique de bicouches metalliques Ni/Ti irradiees avec des ions lourds de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguay, R

    1994-09-26

    We have studied the ionic mixing of Nl(105 angstrom) bilayers irradiated, at 80 and 300 K. with GeV heavy ions. In this energy range, the energy transfer from the incident ions to the target occurs mainly through electronic excitations. We have shown that this energy transfer induces a strong ionic mixing at the Nl/Ti interface. The thickness of the mixed interlayer increases with the fluence. At low fluences (10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}), the Nl/Ti interface is rough ; at higher fluences (10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) a homogeneous mixed interlayer appears ; and at even higher fluences (some 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}) a preferential diffusion of Ni into Ti is clearly seen. The characterization techniques used are: (1) electrical resistivity measurements which allow to follow in situ the damage kinetic. (II) neutron and X-ray reflectometry. (III) elaboration of transverse cuts on which was performed energy loss spectroscopy. (II) and (III) allow the determination of the concentration profiles of the different species present in the sample. (IV) transmission electron microscopy on the transverse cuts which gives a direct image of the different layers. (author). 11 refs., 103 figs., 23 tabs., 2 appends.

  17. A comparison of the doppler-broadened positron annihilation spectra of neutron irradiated Al 2O 3 and MgAl 2O 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. L.; Schaffer, J. P.; Cocks, F. H.; Clinard, F. W.; Hurley, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation damage studies of oxides and ceramics have become of increasing importance due to the projected use of these materials in thermonuclear fusion reactors as electronic insulators and first wall materials. In addition these materials are important in RAD waste disposal. As part of a study of the defect structure in radiation damaged ceramics Doppler-broadened positron annihilation spectra have been obtained for a series of single crystal sapphire (α-Al 2O 3) and polycrystal (1:1) and (1:2) magnesium aluminate spinel (MgO·Al 2O 3 and MgO-2Al 2O 3) samples. These samples were irradiated in EBR-II to a fluence of 3 × 10 25 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 740°C, and 2 × 10 26 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at ~ 550°C respectively. Positron annihilation spectra lineshapes for the irradiated, annealed, and as-received samples of both materials were compared using S parameter analysis. These calculations were made on deconvoluted gamma ray spectra that were free of any instrumental broadening effects. In this way, absolute S parameter changes could be calculated. The observed changes in the S parameter are consistent with independent volume swelling measurements for both the α-A1 2O 3 and the (1:2) MgAl 2O 4 samples. However, the change in S parameter measured for the (1:1) spinel is contrary to the measured volume change. This apparent anomaly indicates a predominence of interstitial as opposed to vacancy type defects in this material.

  18. The anti emetic effect of oral administration of ondansetron or granisetron in macacus cynomolgus exposed to mixed neutron-gamma irradiation; Effet antiemetique de l`ondansetron ou du granisetron administres oralement chez le macaque soumis a une irradiation mixte neutron-gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.; Roman, V.; Martin, S.; Janodet, D.; Fatome, M. [Centre de Recherches du Service de Sante des Armees, 38 - La Tronche (France)

    1995-10-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most often observed symptoms in the course of the early radiation syndrome. Their prevention has long been difficult because of the low effectiveness and side-effects of most antiemetics. There is a clear evidence that 5HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists such as ondansetron and granisetron are highly effective to prevent radiation-induced emesis without any side-effect. We studied the prophylactic effectiveness of their oral administration to macacus cynomolgus, for mixed neutron-gamma whole-body exposure, tat high dose rates. Doses of 4 mg of ondansetron or 1 mg of granisetron were administered before, or after, or both before and after irradiation. The treatment was effective when administered both before and after radiation exposure. It was significant but incomplete if administered once. Post-irradiation administration is interesting, particularly in case of accident. Both antiemetic drugs were well tolerated. Their effectiveness and tolerance are apparently comparable. The 5HT{sub 3} receptor antagonists represent a much improved treatment for radiation-induced nausea and vomiting by completely inhibiting emesis, if administered before and after irradiation. Unwanted sedation and extra-pyramidal side-effects, usually associated with the clinical use of D{sub 2} receptor antagonists, were not observed. (authors). 40 refs., 5 tabs.

  19. Fluorescence of RbH and RbD formed by irradiating the mixed gases Rb + H2 and Rb + D2 with laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hajime; Toyosaka, Yukiko; Suzuki, Tomonari

    1985-01-01

    When a mixture of 85 Rb, 85 Rb 2 , and D 2 was irradiated by laser light at 5145 or 4880 A, small visible particles appeared and the fluorescence spectra were observed. By analyzing these spectra, we determined the rotational constants B v and the centrifugal distortion constants D v and H v for the X 1 Σ + and A 1 Σ + states of 85 RbD. By considering the isotopic dependence of the Dunham coefficients, we determined various molecular constants of 85 RbH whose values were in good agreement with the observed fluorescence spectra of 85 RbH excited by laser lines at 4762, 4765, and 4880 A. The process of RbH formation is discussed. (author)

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  1. CSER 94-014: Storage of metal-fuel loaded EBR-II casks in concrete vault on PFP grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    A criticality safety evaluation is presented to permit EBR-2 spent fuel casks loaded with metallic fuel rods to be stored in an 8-ft diameter, cylindrical concrete vault inside the PFP security perimeter. The specific transfer of three casks with Pu alloy fuel from the Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiment from the burial grounds to the vault is thus covered. Up to seven casks may be emplaced in the casing with 30 inches center to center spacing. Criticality safety is assured by definitive packaging rules which keep the fissile medium dry and at a low effective volumetric density

  2. Impact properties of 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel after ten years EBR-II service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shields, J.A.; Server, W.L.; Sheckherd, J.W.; Longua, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    The material studied in this investigation was obtained from a 2 1 / 4 Cr--1 Mo steel superheated steam line which had been in service for approximately 90,000 hours. Of that 90,000 hours, approximately 40,000 hours were at a temperature of approximately 820 0 F and a pressure of 1250 psi, and 35,000 hours were at a temperature of 500 0 F and 1250 psi. The results of optical metallography and instrumented impact testing performed on the materials are presented

  3. Alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Bellon, P.; Soisson, F.

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, some effort has been devoted to establishing a phenomenology for alloys under irradiation. Theoretically, the effects of the defect supersaturation, sustained defect fluxes and ballistic mixing on solid solubility under irradiation can now be formulated in a unified manner, at least for the most simple cases: coherent phase transformations and nearest-neighbor ballistic jumps. Even under such restrictive conditions, several intriguing features documented experimentally can be rationalized, sometimes in a quantitative manner and simple qualitative rules for alloy stability as a function of irradiation conditions can be formulated. A quasi-thermodynamic formalism can be proposed for alloys under irradiation. However, this point of view has limits illustrated by recent computer simulations. (orig.)

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  5. Assessment of the potential implementation of the Fricke dosimetric system to measure the gamma dose rate in a mixed field at the Central Irradiation Facility of the Thermal Column at RA-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curotto, P.; Pozzi, E.C.C.; Thorp, S.I.; Casal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The characterization of the mixed field, i.e. neutron and gamma radiation, at the Central Irradiation Facility of the Thermal Column (FCCT) at RA-3 is pivotal to the radiobiology experiments carried out there. One of the greatest difficulties of gamma dosimetry in a mixed field such as the FCCT field is to discriminate the perturbation induced by the high neutron flux. Given that the neutron spectrum of the source is very well characterized, it is of interest to have an alternative way of measuring gamma dose rate to be able to compare the results with those currently derived from an ionization chamber (IC). The Fricke dosimetric system is widely used as an absolute dosimeter in pure, very high dose radiation fields. The experimental set-up of these dosimeters exhibits advantages compared to instrumentation with IC. The aim of the present study was to adapt the system to use it as a measuring method at FCCT and perform a comparative analysis. Materials and Methods: Once the technique to prepare the dosimeters was adapted at our laboratory the following irradiations were carried out: one in a pure, known, gamma field, and four in the mixed FCCT field in the same position, employing 3 different configurations to obtain different relations between the radiation components in the field. The following configurations were employed: a) with closed neutron shielding, b) with open neutron shielding and c) no shielding. The results were compared with those derived from measurements with the IC. Results: In pure gamma field experience the following results were obtained: the dose measured by the IC was (44.6 ± 0.5) Gy (in air) and Fricke dose was (48.2 ± 1.1) Gy. Comparing the configurations with closed and open neutron shielding, the IC signal rose by 4% (considered not significant) whereas the Fricke dose rate increased by 15%. Comparing the configurations with closed shielding and no shielding, the gamma dose rate measured with the Fricke system rose by 153

  6. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  7. Fission-fusion correlations for swelling and microstructure in stainless steels: effect of the helium-to-displacement-per-atom ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, G.R.; Maziaz, P.J.; Spitznagel, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The initial irradiated structural materials data base for fusion applications will be developed in fission reactors. Hence, this data may need to be adjusted using physically-based procedures to represent behavior in fusion environments, viz. - fission-fusion correlations. Such correlation should reflect a sound mechanistic understanding, and be verified in facilities which most closely simulate fusion conditions. In this paper we review the effects of only one of a number of potentially significant damage variables, the helium to displacement per atom ratio, on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels. Dual-ion and helium preinjection data are analyzed to provide mechanistic guidance; these results appear to be qualitatively consistent with a more detailed comparison made between fast (EBR-II) and mixed (HFIR) spectrum neutron data for a single heat of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel. These two fission environments bound fusion (He/dpa ratios. A model calibrated to the fission reactor data is used to extrapolate to fusion conditions. Both the theory and broad empirical observation suggest that helium to dpa ratios have both a qualitative and quantitative influence on microstructural evolution; and that the very high and low ratios found in HFIR and EBR-II may not result in behavior which brackets intermediate fusion conditions

  8. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  9. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  11. Data package addendum for COBRA-1A2 life extension to 400 EFPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, S.L.; Ermi, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The COBRA-1A experiment was originally designed for irradiations up to 350 effective full power days (EFPD) in EBR-II. Three of the seven B7A test capsules were discharged after 88.6 EFPD (COBRA-1A1; EBR-II designation X516), while the remaining four capsules continued to be irradiated to a goal exposure of 300 EFPD (COBRA-1A2; EBR-II designation X516A). However, it was recently decided that COBRA-1A2 was to remain in the reactor during Run 170, giving and nominal end-of-life (EOL) exposure of 375 EFPD. Since the revised test exposure exceeds the design basis given in supporting analyses, amended analyses are provided herein, giving the technical bases for the extended irradiation. This report describes the safety analysis for the extension of the COBRA-1A2 test (X516A) to 400 effective full power days in FBR-II

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  15. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  16. Correlation of creep and swelling with fuel pin performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Washburn, D.F.; Garner, F.A.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1975-09-01

    The HEDL PNL-11 experiment described was one in a series of fueled subassemblies irradiated in EBR-II to demonstrate the adequacy of the FFTF fuel pin design. The cladding material, dimensions, and fuel density are prototypic of FFTF. Because neutron flux in EBR-II is lower than in FFTF, the uranium enrichment is higher in these experimental fuel pins, irradiated in EBR-II, than the FFTF enrichment for comparable linear heat rates. Some pertinent oprating conditions for the center fuel pin in this experiment are listed. This 37-pin subassembly represents, at 110,000 MWd/MTM, the highest burnup yet attained by a prototypic FFTF subassembly. Similarly, this is the highest fluence presently attained by prototypic fuel pins. A cladding breach occurred in one fuel pin which is presently being examined. Results are presented and discussed

  17. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  18. Post-irradiation diarrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerwaldt, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    In radiotherapy of pelvic cancers, the X-ray dose to be delivered to the tumour is limited by the tolerance of healthy surrounding tissue. In recent years, a number of serious complications of irradiation of pelvic organs were encountered. Modern radiotherapy necessitates the acceptance of a calculated risk of complications in order to achieve a better cure rate. To calculate these risks, one has to know the radiation dose-effect relationship of normal tissues. Of the normal tissues most at risk when treating pelvic tumours only the bowel is studied. In the literature regarding post-irradiation bowel complications, severe and mild complications are often mixed. In the present investigation the author concentrated on the group of patients with relatively mild symptoms. He studied the incidence and course of post-irradiation diarrhea in 196 patients treated for carcinoma of the uterine cervix or endometrium. The aims of the present study were: 1) to determine the incidence, course and prognostic significance of post-irradiation diarrhea; 2) to assess the influence of radiotherapy factors; 3) to study the relation of bile acid metabolism to post-irradiation diarrhea; 4) to investigate whether local factors (reservoir function) were primarily responsible. (Auth.)

  19. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  20. Longevity of irradiated burros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushbaugh, C.C.; Brown, D.G.; Frome, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    During the course of external radiation exposures of burros to establish a dose-response curve for acute mortality after total irradiation, some of the animals at the three lowest exposures to gamma photons survived. These groups of 10, 9, and 10 burros were exposed to 320, 425, and 545 R, respectively. There were 10 unirradiated controls. In 1953, 20 burros were exposed to 375 R (gamma) in 25-R/week increments without acute mortality and were added to the life-span study. In 1957, 33 burros were exposed to mixed neutron-gamma radiation from nuclear weapons, and 14 controls were added. The total number of irradiated burros in the study was increased to 88 by the addition of 6 animals irradiated with 180 rads of neutron and gamma radiation (4:1) in a Godiva-type reactor in 1959. In this experiment two acute deaths occurred which were not included in the analysis. In the first 4 years after the single gamma exposures, there were deaths from pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia, obviously related to radiation-induced bone-marrow damage. After that period, however, deaths were from common equine diseases; no death has resulted from a malignant neoplasm. Of the original 112 burros, 15 survive (10 irradiated and 5 controls). Survival curves determined for unirradiated and neutron-gamma- and gamma-irradiated burros showed significant differences. The mean survival times were: controls, 28 years; gamma irradiation only, 26 years; and neutron-gamma irradiation, 23 years. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Sneutrino mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, Y.

    1997-10-01

    In supersymmetric models with nonvanishing Majorana neutrino masses, the sneutrino and antisneutrino mix. The conditions under which this mixing is experimentally observable are studied, and mass-splitting of the sneutrino mass eigenstates and sneutrino oscillation phenomena are analyzed

  2. Consequences of metallic fuel-cladding liquid phase attack during over-temperature transient on fuel element lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Metallic fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II at temperatures significantly higher than design, causing liquid phase attack of the cladding, were subsequently irradiated at normal operating temperatures to first breach. The fuel element lifetime was compared to that for elements not subjected to the over-temperature transient and found to be equivalent. 1 ref., 3 figs

  3. Fabrication of ThO2, UO2, and PuO2-UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Jentzen, W.R.; McCord, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Fabrication of ThO pellets for EBR-II irradiation testing and fabrication of UO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets for United Kingdom Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) irradiation testing is discussed. Effect of process parameters on density and microstructure of pellets fabricated by the cold press and sinter technique is reviewed

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  6. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  7. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  8. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  9. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  10. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, M.

    1989-01-01

    This popular-level article emphasizes that the ultimate health effects of irradiated food products are unknown. They may include vitamin loss, contamination of food by botulism bacteria, mutations in bacteria, increased production of aflatoxins, changes in food, carcinogenesis from unknown causes, presence of miscellaneous harmful chemicals, and the lack of a way of for a consumer to detect irradiated food. It is claimed that the nuclear industry is applying pressure on the Canadian government to relax labeling requirements on packages of irradiated food in order to find a market for its otherwise unnecessary products

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecher, O.

    1979-01-01

    Limitations of existing preserving methods and possibilities of improved food preservation by application of nuclear energy are explained. The latest state-of-the-art in irradiation technology in individual countries is described and corresponding recommendations of FAO, WHO and IAEA specialists are presented. The Sulzer irradiation equipment for potato sprout blocking is described, the same equipment being suitable also for the treatment of onions, garlic, rice, maize and other cereals. Systems with a higher power degree are needed for fodder preserving irradiation. (author)

  13. Rekindled interest in pyrometallurgical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.

    1986-01-01

    The IFR with its integral, on-site fuel recycle revived a concept pioneered at EBR-II. The reactor concept has become very attractive due to the advances in metal fuel performance over the past 15 years and in the understanding of the safety of metal-fueled reactors. The proposed fuel cycle carries out Lawroski's call for development of a low-cost fuel cycle for fast reactors to help them become economically competitive. The IFR represents a new direction in breeder developments. The next two years will be devoted to establishing experimentally the chemical feasibility of the pyrometallurgical process. Once it becomes feasible, the EBR-II fuel cycle facility can be refurbished and the process using IFR-type fuel irradiated in EBR-II

  14. Longevity of irradiated burros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushbaugh, C.C.; Brown, D.G.; Frome, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The unique radioresistance of burros has resulted in a large-animal life-span study that began in 1951. During the course of radiation exposures, some animals at three low exposures to gamma photons survived (10, 10, and 9 exposed to 320, 425, and 545 R, respectively). In 1953, 20 burros exposed to 375 R (gamma) in 25-R/wk increments were added to this life-span study. In 1957, 33 burros exposed to mixed neutron-gamma radiation from nuclear weapons were added. Six burros exposed to 180 rads of neutron and gamma radiation (4:1) in a ''Godiva-type'' reactor were added in 1959 along with 22 controls. In the first 4 years after the single gamma exposures (320-545 R), there were deaths from pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia). Afterward, however, all deaths have been attributable to common equine diseases; none from malignancies. Today, 20 of the original 112 burros in these studies survive (13 irradiated and 7 controls). Survival curves determined for unirradiated and neutron-gamma and gamma-only irradiated burros show significant differences. Median survival time: controls, 28 yrs; gamma irradiation, 26 yrs; neutron-gamma irradiation, 23 yrs. A Weibull probability analysis predicts maximum life-span to be 42 yrs

  15. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  17. Observations of in-reactor endurance and rupture life for fueled and unfueled FTR cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovell, A.J.; Christensen, B.Y.; Chin, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor component endurance limits are important to nuclear experimenters and operators. This paper investigates endurance limits of 316 CW fuel pin cladding. The objective of this paper is to compare and analyze two different sets of FTR fuel pin cladding data. The first data set is from unfueled pressurized cladding irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II). This data set was generated in an assembly in which the temperature was monitored and controlled. The second data set contains observations of breached and unbreached EBR-II test fuel pins covering a large range of temperature, power and burnup conditions

  18. Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  19. A proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

    1984-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps -- a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented

  20. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  1. SIEX: a correlated code for the prediction of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel thermal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, D.S.; Baker, R.B.

    1975-06-01

    The SIEX computer program is a steady state heat transfer code developed to provide thermal performance calculations for a mixed-oxide fuel element in a fast neutron environment. Fuel restructuring, fuel-cladding heat conduction and fission gas release are modeled to provide assessment of the temperature. Modeling emphasis has been placed on correlations to measurable quantities from EBR-II irradiation tests and the inclusion of these correlations in a physically based computational scheme. SIEX is completely modular in construction allowing the user options for material properties and correlated models. Required code input is limited to geometric and environmental parameters, with a ''consistent'' set of material properties and correlated models provided by the code. 24 references. (U.S.)

  2. SIFAIL: a subprogram to calculate cladding deformation and damage for fast reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.R.; Dutt, D.S.

    1979-05-01

    SIFAIL is a series of subroutines used in conjunction with the thermal performance models of SIEX to assist in the evaluation of mechanical performance of mixed uranium plutonium oxide fuel pins. Cladding deformations due to swelling and creep are calculated. These have been compared to post-irradiation data from fuel pin tests in EBR-II. Several fuel pin cladding failure criteria (cumulative damage, total strain, and thermal creep strain) are evaluated to provide the fuel pin designer with a basis to select design parameters. SIFAIL allows the user many property options for cladding material. Code input is limited to geometric and environmental parameters, with a consistent set of material properties provided by the code. The simplified, yet adequate, thin wall stress--strain calculations provide a reliable estimate of fuel pin mechanical performance, while requiring a small amount of core storage and computer running time

  3. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  4. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  5. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  7. Mixing Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandzia, Claudia; Kosonen, Risto; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    In this guidebook most of the known and used in practice methods for achieving mixing air distribution are discussed. Mixing ventilation has been applied to many different spaces providing fresh air and thermal comfort to the occupants. Today, a design engineer can choose from large selection...

  8. Design of a reactor inlet temperature controller for EBR-2 using state feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilim, R.B.; Planchon, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new reactor inlet temperature controller for pool type liquid-metal reactors has been developed and will be tested in EBR-II. The controller makes use of modern control techniques to take into account stratification and mixing in the cold pool during normal operation. Secondary flowrate is varied so that the reactor inlet temperature tracks a setpoint while reactor outlet temperature, primary flowrate and secondary cold leg temperature are treated as exogenous disturbances and are free to vary. A disturbance rejection technique minimizes the effect of these disturbances on inlet temperature. A linear quadratic regulator improves inlet temperature response. Tests in EBR-II will provide experimental data for assessing the performance improvements that modern control can produce over the existing EBR-II analog inlet temperature controller. 10 refs., 8 figs

  9. Bacterial spoilage profiles to identify irradiated fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alur, M.D.; Venugopal, V.; Nerkar, D.P.; Nair, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    Effects of low dose gamma-irradiation of fish product on spoilage potentials of bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila, Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus megaterium, and Pseudomonas marinoglutinosa) and mixed flora were examined for ability to proliferate in radurized fish and produce volatile acids (TVA) and bases (TVBN). Bacteria proliferated well in unirradiated and irradiated fish, but formation of VA and VB were lower in irradiated than unirradiated counterparts. This was found in Bombay duck, Indian mackerel, white pomfret, seer and shrimp gamma-irradiated at 0 to 5 kGy under ice. TVA and TVBN produced by the organisms or mixed flora from fish were only 30-50% those of controls. A method for identifying radiation-processed fish could evolve based on lower susceptibility of irradiated fish to bacterial spoilage

  10. Effect of helium irradiation on fracture modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanamura, T.; Jesser, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the crack opening mode during in-situ HVEM tensile testing and how it is influenced by test temperature and helium irradiation. Most cracks were mixed mode I and II. However, between 250 0 C and room temperature the effect of helium irradiation is to increase the amount of mode I crack propagation. Mode II crack opening was observed as grain boundary sliding initiated by a predominantly mode I crack steeply intersecting the grain boundary. Mode II crack opening was absent in irradiated specimens tested between 250 0 C and room temperature, but could be restored by a post irradiation anneal

  11. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beishon, J.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation has been the subject of concern and controversy for many years. The advantages of food irradiation include the reduction or elimination of dangerous bacterial organisms, the control of pests and insects which destroy certain foods, the extension of the shelf-life of many products, for example fruit, and its ability to treat products such as seafood which may be eaten raw. It can also replace existing methods of treatment which are believed to have hazardous side-effects. However, after examining the evidence produced by the proponents of food irradiation, the author questions whether it has any major contribution to make to the problems of foodborne diseases or world food shortages. More acceptable solutions, he suggests, may be found in educating food handlers to ensure that hygienic conditions prevail in the production, storage and serving of food. (author)

  13. Vinca irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, R.

    1976-10-01

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool [fr

  14. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  15. Breached-pin testing in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahagin, D.E.; Lambert, J.D.B.

    1981-04-01

    Experience gained at EBR-II by the late 1970's from a significant number of failures in experimental fuel-pin irradiations forms the basis of a program directed towards the characterization of breached pins. The questions to be answered and the issues raised by further testing are discussed

  16. Microstructure characterizaton of advanced oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, D.E.; Gerber, E.W.; McCord, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Preirradiation porosity, grain size, and microcomposition characteristics are presented for selected advanced oxide (PuO 2 -UO 2 ) LMFBR developmental fuels fabricated for irradiation testing in EBR-II. Quantitative microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and a recently developed quantitative autoradiographic technique are utilized to relate microstructure characteristics to fabrication parameters

  17. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  18. Surface segregation during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Lam, N.Q.

    1985-10-01

    Gibbsian adsorption is known to alter the surface composition of many alloys. During irradiation, four additional processes that affect the near-surface alloy composition become operative: preferential sputtering, displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation. Because of the mutual competition of these five processes, near-surface compositional changes in an irradiation environment can be extremely complex. Although ion-beam induced surface compositional changes were noted as long as fifty years ago, it is only during the past several years that individual mechanisms have been clearly identified. In this paper, a simple physical description of each of the processes is given, and selected examples of recent important progress are discussed. With the notable exception of preferential sputtering, it is shown that a reasonable qualitative understanding of the relative contributions from the individual processes under various irradiation conditions has been attained. However, considerably more effort will be required before a quantitative, predictive capability can be achieved. 29 refs., 8 figs

  19. Fish irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Tengumnuay, C.; Juangbhanich, C.

    1970-01-01

    Chub-mackerel was chosen for the study because they are the most common fish in Thailand. Preliminary investigations were conducted to determine the maximum radiation dose of gamma-rays by organoleptic tests. The samples were subjected to radiation at various doses up to 4 Mrad. Many experiments were conducted using other kinds of fish. The results showed that 1 Mrad would be the maximum acceptable dose for fish. Later, the influence of the radiation dose from 0.1-1 Mrad was studied in order to find the optimum acceptable dose for preservation of fish without off-flavour. For this purpose, the Hedonic scale was used. It was found that 0.2 and 0.5 Mrad gave the best result on Chub mackerel. The determinations of optimum dose, organoleptic, microbiological and trimethylamine content changes were done. The results showed that Chub mackerel irradiated at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 Mrad stored at 3 0 C for 71 days were still acceptable, on the contrary the untreated samples were found unacceptable at 14 days. The trimethylamine increment was significantly higher in the untreated samples. At 15 days storage, trimethylamine in the non-irradiated Chub-mackerel was about 10 times higher than the irradiated ones. At 51 and 79 days storage, about 13 times higher in the control samples than the irradiated samples except 0.1 Mrad. Only 2 times higher was found for the 0.1 Mrad. The microbiological results showed that the irradiation above 0.2 Mrad gave favorable extension of shelf-life of fish

  20. Chapter 2: Irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 2 presents the subjects: 1) gamma irradiators which includes: Category-I gamma irradiators (self-contained); Category-II gamma irradiators (panoramic and dry storage); Category-III gamma irradiators (self-contained in water); Category-IV gamma irradiators (panoramic and wet storage); source rack for Category-IV gamma irradiators; product transport system for Category-IV gamma irradiators; radiation shield for gamma irradiators; 2) accelerators which includes: Category-I Accelerators (shielded irradiator); Category-II Accelerators (irradiator inside a shielded room); Irradiation application examples.

  1. Food irradiation: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Rosanna M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  2. Industrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Production lines for rubber gloves would not appear to have much in common with particle physics laboratories, but they both use accelerators. Electron beam irradiation is often used in industry to improve the quality of manufactured goods or to reduce production cost. Products range from computer disks, shrink packaging, tyres, cables, and plastics to hot water pipes. Some products, such as medical goods, cosmetics and certain foodstuffs, are sterilized in this way. In electron beam irradiation, electrons penetrate materials creating showers of low energy electrons. After many collisions these electrons have the correct energy to create chemically active sites. They may either break molecular bonds or activate a site which promotes a new chemical linkage. This industrial irradiation can be exploited in three ways: breaking down a biological molecule usually renders it useless and kills the organism; breaking an organic molecule can change its toxicity or function; and crosslinking a polymer can strengthen it. In addition to traditional gamma irradiation using isotopes, industrial irradiation uses three accelerator configurations, each type defining an energy range, and consequently the electron penetration depth. For energies up to 750 kV, the accelerator consists of a DC potential applied to a simple wire anode and the electrons extracted through a slot in a coaxially mounted cylindrical cathode. In the 1-5 MeV range, the Cockcroft-Walton or Dynamitron( R ) accelerators are normally used. To achieve the high potentials in these DC accelerators, insulating SF6 gas and large dimension vessels separate the anode and cathode; proprietary techniques distinguish the various commercial models available. Above 5 MeV, the size of DC accelerators render them impractical, and more compact radiofrequency-driven linear accelerators are used. Irradiation electron beams are actually 'sprayed' over the product using a magnetic deflection system. Lower energy beams of

  3. Mixed parentage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Appel, Helene; Singla, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increase in cross border intimate relationships and children of mixed parentage, there is little mention or scholarship about them in the area of childhood and migrancy in the Nordic countries. The international literature implies historical pathologisation, contestation and current...... of identity formation in the . They position themselves as having an “in-between” identity or “ just Danes” in their every day lives among friends, family, and during leisure activities. Thus a new paradigm is evolving away- from the pathologisation of mixed children, simplified one-sided categories...

  4. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khericha, S.T.

    2002-06-30

    This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

  5. Effectiveness of thermoluminescence analysis to detect low quantity of gamma-irradiated component in non-irradiated mushroom powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Shahbaz, Hafiz Muhammad; Jo, Deokjo; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-irradiated (0–10 kGy) dried mushrooms (Lentinus edodes) powders were mixed at different ratios (1–10%) in the non-irradiated samples and investigated using photostimulated-luminescence (PSL), electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. The PSL results were negative for all samples at 1% mixing ratio, whereas intermediate results were observed for the samples containing 5% or 10% irradiated component with the exception (positive) of 10% mixing of 10 kGy-irradiated sample. The ESR analysis showed the presence of crystalline sugar radicals in the irradiated samples but the radiation-specific spectral features were absent in the mixed samples. TL analysis showed the radiation-specific TL glow curves; however, the complicated results were observed at 1% mixing of 2 and 5 kGy-irradiated samples, which required careful evaluations to draw the final conclusion about the irradiation status of the samples. TL ratios could only confirm the results of samples with 5% and 10% mixing of 10 kGy, and 10% mixing of 5 kGy-irradiated components. SEM-EDX analysis showed that feldspar and quartz were major contaminating minerals, responsible for the radiation-specific luminescence characteristics. -- Highlights: ► Detection of irradiated food is important to enforce the applied regulations. ► The effectiveness of TL analysis was investigated to detect irradiated component. ► The TL results were compared with those from PSL and ESR analysis. ► TL analysis was most effective to characterize the irradiation status of samples. ► SEM-EDX analysis showed feldspar and quartz as the main source of TL properties

  6. Effectiveness of thermoluminescence analysis to detect low quantity of gamma-irradiated component in non-irradiated mushroom powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Kashif [School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100 (Pakistan); Ahn, Jae-Jun [School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shahbaz, Hafiz Muhammad [School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100 (Pakistan); Jo, Deokjo [School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Joong-Ho, E-mail: jhkwon@knu.ac.kr [School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Gamma-irradiated (0–10 kGy) dried mushrooms (Lentinus edodes) powders were mixed at different ratios (1–10%) in the non-irradiated samples and investigated using photostimulated-luminescence (PSL), electron spin resonance (ESR) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques. The PSL results were negative for all samples at 1% mixing ratio, whereas intermediate results were observed for the samples containing 5% or 10% irradiated component with the exception (positive) of 10% mixing of 10 kGy-irradiated sample. The ESR analysis showed the presence of crystalline sugar radicals in the irradiated samples but the radiation-specific spectral features were absent in the mixed samples. TL analysis showed the radiation-specific TL glow curves; however, the complicated results were observed at 1% mixing of 2 and 5 kGy-irradiated samples, which required careful evaluations to draw the final conclusion about the irradiation status of the samples. TL ratios could only confirm the results of samples with 5% and 10% mixing of 10 kGy, and 10% mixing of 5 kGy-irradiated components. SEM-EDX analysis showed that feldspar and quartz were major contaminating minerals, responsible for the radiation-specific luminescence characteristics. -- Highlights: ► Detection of irradiated food is important to enforce the applied regulations. ► The effectiveness of TL analysis was investigated to detect irradiated component. ► The TL results were compared with those from PSL and ESR analysis. ► TL analysis was most effective to characterize the irradiation status of samples. ► SEM-EDX analysis showed feldspar and quartz as the main source of TL properties.

  7. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerens, H [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Saint-Lebe, L

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment.

  8. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransohoff, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Carriers, after being loaded with product to be irradiated, are transported by an input-output conveyor system into an irradiation chamber where they are received in a horizontal arrangement on racks which may support different sizes and numbers of carriers. The racks are moved by a chamber conveyor system in an endless rectangular path about a radiation source. Packers shift the carriers on the racks to maintain nearest proximity to the radiation source. The carriers are shifted in position on each rack during successive rack cycles to produce even radiation exposure. The carriers may be loaded singly onto successive racks during a first cycle of movement thereof about the source, with loading of additional carriers, and/or unloading of carriers, onto each rack occurring on subsequent rack cycles of movement

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Food can be provided with extra beneficial properties by physical processing. These benefits include a reduced possibility of food poisoning, or an increased life of the food. We are familiar with pasteurisation of milk, drying of vegetables, and canning of fruit. These physical processes work because the food absorbs energy during treatment which brings about the changes needed. The energy absorbed in these examples is heat energy. Food irradiation is a less familiar process. It produces similar benefits to other processes and it can sometimes be applied with additional advantages over conventional processing. For example, because irradiation causes little heating, foods may look and taste more natural. Also, treatment can take place with the food in its final plastic wrappers, reducing the risk of re-contamination. (author). 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  11. Endolymphatic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, M.M.; Ianhez, L.E.; Sabbaga, E.

    1982-01-01

    The authors analysed the clinical evolution and the result of renal transplantation some years after irradiation in 24 patients (group I) who received endolymphatic 131 I as a pre-transplantation immunesuppresive measure. The control group (group II) consisted of 24 non-irradiated patients comparable to group I in age, sex, primary disease, type of donor and immunesuppressive therapy. Significant differences were observed between the two groups regarding such factors a incidence and reversibility of rejection crises in the first 60 post-transplantation days, loss of kidney due to rejection, and dosage of azathioprine. The authors conclude that this method, besides being harmless, has prolonged immunesuppressive action, its administration being advised for receptores of cadaver kidneys, mainly those who show positive cross-match against HLA antigens for painel. (Author) [pt

  12. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  13. Lateral Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    negative (right panel c) and the kinetic energy dissipation is larger than that expected from meterological forcing alone (right panel a). This is...10.1002/grl.50919. Shcherbina, A. et al., 2014, The LatMix Summer Campaign: Submesoscale Stirring in the Upper Ocean., Bull. American Meterological

  14. Parity mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.

    1975-01-01

    The field of parity mixing in light nuclei bears upon one of the exciting and active problems of physics--the nature of the fundamental weak interaction. It is also a subject where polarization techniques play a very important role. Weak interaction theory is first reviewed to motivate the parity mixing experiments. Two very attractive systems are discussed where the nuclear physics is so beautifully simple that the experimental observation of tiny effects directly measures parity violating (PV) nuclear matrix elements which are quite sensitive to the form of the basic weak interaction. Since the measurement of very small analyzing powers and polarizations may be of general interest to this conference, some discussion is devoted to experimental techniques

  15. Power-to-melt evaluation of fresh mixed-oxide fast reactor fuel. Technical improvements of the post-irradiation-experiment and the evaluation of the results for the power-to-melt test PTM-2 in 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kushida, Naoya; Koizumi, Atsuhiro

    1999-11-01

    The second Power-To-Melt (PTM) test, PTM-2, was performed in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. All of the twenty-four fuel pins of the irradiation vehicle, B5D-2, for the PTM-2 test, were provided for post-irradiation-experiment (PIE) to evaluate the PTM values. In this study, the PIE technique for PTM test was established and the PTM results were evaluated. The findings are as follows: The maximum fuel-melting ratio on the transverse section was 10.7%, and was within the limit of fuel-melting in this PTM test enough. Unexpected fuel-melting amount to a ratio of 11.8% was found at ∼24 mm below the peak power elevation in a test fuel pin. It is possible that this arose from secondary fuel-melting. Combination of metallographical observation with X-ray microanalysis of plutonium distribution was very effective for the identification of once-molten fuel zone. The PTM evaluation suggested that dependence of the PTM on the fuel pellet density was stronger than that of previous foreign PTM tests, while the dependence on the pellet-cladding gap and the oxygen-to-metal ratio was indistinctly. The dependence on the cladding temperature and the fill gas composition was not shown as well. (author)

  16. Experimental investigation into the effects of irradiation with mixed neutron-gamma-rays on the immune system as demonstrated by the model of immunity to Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, W.

    1984-01-01

    Using the model of immunisation of rabbits with Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B the influence of neutron radiation on the antibody response was investigated. Four groups were formed, which differed by the moment of irradiation with regard to the moment of immunisation and re-immunisation, and were irradiated with neutron-rays of 200 rad and 300 rad doses. Both doses were each given before and after vaccination, respectively before and after re-vaccination. The antibody response has been evaluated by the Radio-Immuno-Assay (RIA): Neutron-radiation given 24 hours before vaccination effects a stronger immune suppression than given 24 hours after vaccination. By pre-antigenic radiation a secondary immune response is more suppressed than by radiation following the antigen; the recovery of lymphoid tissue, however, takes place in a shorter time than in case of radiation before or after a primary vaccination. The secondary antibody response to a re-vaccination is not influenced by a subsequent neutron-radiation. The formation of secondary antibodies is not as radiosensitive as the formation of primary ones. By a neutron-radiation preformed antibodies are hardly damaged. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Production of modified starches by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Il-Jun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Yook, Hong-Sun; Bae, Chun-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Soo; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Cha-Kwon

    1999-01-01

    As a new processing method for the production of modified starch, gamma irradiation and four kinds of inorganic peroxides were applied to commercial corn starch. The addition of inorganic peroxides without gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation without the addition of inorganic peroxides effectively decreased initial viscosity, but did not sufficiently keep viscosity stable. The combination of adding ammonium persulfate (APS) and gamma irradiation showed the lowest initial viscosity and the best stability out of the tested four kinds of inorganic peroxides. Among the tested mixing methods of APS, soaking was found to be more effective than dry blending or spraying. Therefore, the production of modified starch with low viscosity as well as with sufficient viscosity stability became feasible by the control of gamma irradiation dose levels and the amount of added APS to starch

  18. Presence of interleukin 6 at the cutaneous level after in vivo neutron irradiation; Presence d`interleukine 6 au niveau cutane apres irradiation neutronique in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agay, D.; Pradeau, P.; Edgard, L.; Van Uye, A.; Mestries, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    In this study we investigated the in situ localization of IL-6 in mixed neutron-gamma irradiated baboons belly skin. Using immunohistochemical methods, we demonstrated the presence of IL-6 as early as the first day after the irradiation day. However experimental conditions did not allow us to conclude to a causality relation between irradiation and IL-6 cutaneous presence. (author). 4 refs.

  19. Initial stages of the ion beam mixing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traverse, A.; Le Boite, M.G.; Nevot, L.; Pardo, B.; Corno, J.

    1987-01-01

    The grazing x-ray reflectometry technique, performed on irradiated periodic multilayers, was used to study the early stages of the ion beam mixing process. We present our first results, obtained on NiAu samples irradiated with He ions. The experimental fluence dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient is in good agreement with a calculation based on a purely ballistic process

  20. Biology of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The author presents his arguments for food scientists and biologists that the hazards of food irradiation outweigh the benefits. The subject is discussed in the following sections: introduction (units, mutagenesis, seed viability), history of food irradiation, effects of irradiation on organoleptic qualities of staple foods, radiolytic products and selective destruction of nutrients, production of microbial toxins in stored irradiated foods and loss of quality in wheat, deleterious consequences of eating irradiated foods, misrepresentation of the facts about food irradiation. (author)

  1. Utilization of irradiation on food preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Han Ok; Byun, Myung Woo; Kwon, Joong Ho; Kim, Suk Won; Yang, Jae Sung; Cha, Bo Sook; Park, Ki Bum

    1987-12-01

    The present project was intended to ascertain the efficacy of irradiation both in the decontamination and storeability of mixed condiments for convenience food and in the long-term preservation of a Kimchi. Based upon the preliminary studies, irradiated sample with doses at 1-3 kGy were evaluated during the storage for 30 days at 10 deg C from the points of view of microbiological (total aerobic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, yeasts and molds, and coliforms), physicochemical (pH, total acidity, volatile acid, reducing sugar, ascorbic acid, and texture) and organoleptic qualities. Besides, the combined effect of irradiation with heating on the storeability was investigated for five species of the lactic acid bacteria associated with the Kimchi fermentation. Under the room temperature storage conditions, physicochemical qualities of the irradiated samples were evaluated by determining pH, rancidity (TBA number), proximate composition, amino nitrogen, amino acid, and color changes. In the overall evaluation of sensory quality for the irradiated Kimchi, the nonirradiated control group was inedible after 15 days of storage, whereas 2-3 kGy irradiation could prolong the storage-life of the Kimchi over 2 times compared with the nonirradiated control, showing the good sensory quality even after 30 days of storage. In comparative effects of irradiation and ethylene oxide both treatments affected more or less rancidity, color, and amino acid content, but less than 10 kGy irradiation was shown to be safer than ethylene oxide fumigation. Form the foregoing results, it can be concluded that if a selective method could be applied to the radiation sterilization of minor ingredients capable of mainly contaminating the mixed condiments, even lower doses of irradiation should be effective for the microbial control. (Author)

  2. Mixing of Al into uranium silicides reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, F.R.; Birtcher, R.C.; Kestel, B.J.; Baldo, P.M.

    1996-11-01

    SEM observations have shown that irradiation induced interaction of the aluminum cladding with uranium silicide reactor fuels strongly affects both fission gas and fuel swelling behaviors during fuel burn-up. The authors have used ion beam mixing, by 1.5 MeV Kr, to study this phenomena. RBS and the 27 Al(p, γ) 28 Si resonance nuclear reaction were used to measure radiation induced mixing of Al into U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 after irradiation at 300 C. Initially U mixes into the Al layer and Al mixes into the U 3 Si. At a low dose, the Al layer is converted into UAl 4 type compound while near the interface the phase U(Al .93 Si .07 ) 3 grows. Under irradiation, Al diffuses out of the UAl 4 surface layer, and the lower density ternary, which is stable under irradiation, is the final product. Al mixing into U 3 Si 2 is slower than in U 3 Si, but after high dose irradiation the Al concentration extends much farther into the bulk. In both systems Al mixing and diffusion is controlled by phase formation and growth. The Al mixing rates into the two alloys are similar to that of Al into pure uranium where similar aluminide phases are formed

  3. Irradiation tests report of the 32nd cycle in 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the operating and irradiation data of the experimental reactor 'JOYO' 32nd cycle, and estimates the 33rd cycle irradiation condition. Irradiation tests in the 31st cycle are as follows: (1) B-type irradiation rig (B9). (a) High burn up performance tests of MONJU' fuel pins, advanced austenitic steel cladding fuel pins, large diameter fuel pins, ferrite steel cladding fuel pins (in collaboration with the USA) and large diameter annular pellet fuel pins. (b) Mixed carbide and nitride fuel pins irradiation tests (in collaboration with JAERI). (2) C-type irradiation rig (C4F). (a) High burn up performance test of advanced austenitic steel cladding fuel pins (in collaboration with France). (3) C-type irradiation rig (C6D). (a) Large diameter fuel pins irradiation test. (4) Absorber Materials Irradiation Rig (AMIR-6). (a) Run to absorber pin's cladding breach. (5) Absorber Materials Irradiation Rig (AMIR-8). (a) High-temperature shroud and Na-bond elements tests. (6) Core Materials Irradiation Rig (CMIR-5-1). (a) Core materials irradiation tests. (7) Structure Materials Irradiation Rigs (SMIR). (a) Material irradiation tests (in collaboration with universities). (b) Surveillance back up tests for MONJU'. (8) MAterial testing RIg with temperature COntrol (MARICO-1). (a) Material irradiation tests (in collaboration with universities), (b) Creep rupture tests of the core materials for the demonstration reactor. (9) Upper core structure irradiation Plug Rig (UPR-1-5). (a) Upper core neutron spectrum effect and accelerated irradiation effect. The maximum burn-up driver assembly 'PFD503' reached 65,600 MWd/t (pin average). (author)

  4. Prolongation of rat islet allograft survival by direct ultraviolet irradiation of the graft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, H.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Ultraviolet irradiation of rat dendritic cells completely abrogated their allostimulatory capacity in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Rat islets of Langerhans similarly irradiated remained hormonally functional when transplanted into syngeneic diabetic rats. Allogeneic transplantation across a major histocompatibility barrier of islets initially treated in vitro with ultraviolet irradiation resulted in prolonged allograft survival without the use of any immunosuppressive agents

  5. Presence of interleukin 6 at the cutaneous level after in vivo neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agay, D.; Pradeau, P.; Edgard, L.; Van Uye, A.; Mestries, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    In this study we investigated the in situ localization of IL-6 in mixed neutron-gamma irradiated baboons belly skin. Using immunohistochemical methods, we demonstrated the presence of IL-6 as early as the first day after the irradiation day. However experimental conditions did not allow us to conclude to a causality relation between irradiation and IL-6 cutaneous presence. (author)

  6. Perspective on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review summarizes current scientific information on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of foods. Attention is focused on: specifics of the irradiation process and its effectiveness in food preservation; the historical development of food irradiation technology in the US; the response of the Institute of Food Technologists to proposed FDA guidelines for food irradiation; the potential uses of irradiation in the US food industry; and the findings of the absence of toxins and of unaltered nutrient density (except possibly for fats) in irradiated foods. The misconceptions of consumers concerning perceived hazards associated with food irradiation, as related to consumer acceptance, also are addressed

  7. A multipurpose irradiation plant for simultaneous treatment of different foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carassiti, F.; Tata, A.

    1982-01-01

    An industrial multipurpose irradiation plant with a particularly high effectiveness of radiation utilization is presented. The originality of this conceptual design consists of the simultaneous treatment of two products, which are separately irradiated to either high or low absorbed doses. A pneumatical transport system into appropriate channels with air mixing during irradiation has been proposed for the radappertization of granular animal feed, meanwhile a conventional truck-conveyor system has been suggested for the sprout inhibition treatment of potatoes. Moreover, potatoes pass through the irradiation cell twice at high and low level respectively. (author)

  8. Recoil mixing in high-fluence ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littmark, U.; Hofer, W.O.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of recoil mixing on the collection and depth distribution of implanted projectiles during high-fluence irradiation of a random solid is investigated by model calculations based on a previously published transport theoretical approach to the general problem of recoil mixing. The most pronounced effects are observed in the maximum implantable amount of projectiles and in the critical fluence for saturation. Both values are significantly increased by recoil mixing. (Auth.)

  9. Effect of low dose x-irradiation on alloantigen sensitized and unsensitized lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohi, Kiyohiko; Yahata, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Yasuhiko; Asahara, Toshimasa; Ono, Eiji; Ezaki, Haruo

    1984-12-01

    The effect of local graft irradiation on immune response in allograft in which acute rejection occurs was studied using an in vitro model. Unidirectional mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) was used as the in vitro model of acute rejection. 150 and 300 rad x-irradiation suppressed mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) but did not cell-mediated-lympholysis (CML) of unsensitized lymphocytes. X-irradiated alloantigen sensitized cells (ASC) generated in 6-day MLC suppressed MLR and CML of unsensitized lymphocytes. Suppressive effects of x-irradiated ASC were of the same degree by x-irradiation doses of 150-500 rad. Suppressive effect of x-irradiation was maintained for only a short period after x-irradiation. Potential function of suppressor precursor cells among unsensitized lymphocytes was abolished by x-irradiation of 300 rad. (author).

  10. Investigations of Atomic Transport Induced by Heavy Ion Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, Thomas Clyde

    The mechanisms of atomic transport induced by ion irradiation generally fall into the categories of anisotropic or isotropic processes. Typical examples of these are recoil implantation and cascade mixing, respectively. We have measured the interaction of these processes in the mixing of Ti/SiO(,2)/Si, Cr/SiO(,2)/Si and Ni/SiO(,2)/Si multi-layers irradiated with Xe at fluences of 0.01 - 10 x 10('15)cm('-2). The fluence dependence of net metal transport into the underlying layers was measured with different thicknesses of SiO(,2) and different sample temperatures during irradiation (-196 to 500C). There is a linear dependence at low fluences. At high fluences, a square-root behavior predominates. For thin SiO(,2) layers (primary recoils is quite pronounced since the gross mixing is small. A significant correlation exists between the mixing and the energy deposited through elastic collisions F(,D ). Several models are examined in an attempt to describe the transport process in Ni/SiO(,2). It is likely that injection of Ni by secondary recoil implantation is primarily responsible for getting Ni into the SiO(,2). Secondary recoil injection is thought to scale with F(,D). Trends in the mixing rates indicate that the dominant mechanism for Ti and Cr could be the same as for Ni. The processes of atomic transport and phase formation clearly fail to be separable at higher temperatures. A positive correlation with chemical reactivity emerges at higher irradiation temperatures. The temperature at which rapid mixing occurs is not much below that for spontaneous thermal reaction. Less Ni is retained in the SiO(,2) at high irradiation temperatures. Ni incorporated in the SiO(,2) by low temperature irradiation is not expelled during a consecutive high temperature irradiation. The Ni remains trapped within larger clusters during a sequential 500C irradiation. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  11. Electron beam irradiating device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, K

    1969-12-20

    The efficiency of an electron beam irradiating device is heightened by improving the irradiation atmosphere and the method of cooling the irradiation window. An irradiation chamber one side of which incorporates the irradiation windows provided at the lower end of the scanner is surrounded by a suitable cooling system such as a coolant piping network so as to cool the interior of the chamber which is provided with circulating means at each corner to circulate and thus cool an inert gas charged therewithin. The inert gas, chosen from a group of such gases which will not deleteriously react with the irradiating equipment, forms a flowing stream across the irradiation window to effect its cooling and does not contaminate the vacuum exhaust system or oxidize the filament when penetrating the equipment through any holes which the foil at the irradiation window may incur during the irradiating procedure.

  12. Reassessment of the swelling behavior of AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Porter, D.L.

    1982-03-01

    Published swelling data derived from EBR-II irradiations of AISI 304 and 304L have been reanalyzed in light of insights gained from irradiation of AISI 316 and Fe-15Cr-25Ni. The primary influence of temperature, displacement rate and compositional variations in the 300 series stainless steels lies in the duration of the transient regime of swelling and not in the steady-state or constant swelling rate regime

  13. Irradiation of goods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, G.

    1992-01-01

    The necessary dose and the dosage limits to be observed depend on the kind of product and the purpose of irradiation. Product density and density distribution, product dimensions, but also packaging, transport and storage conditions are specific parameters influencing the conditions of irradiation. The kind of irradiation plant - electron accelerator or gamma plant - , its capacity, transport system and geometric arrangement of the radiation field are factors influencing the irradiation conditions as well. This is exemplified by the irradiation of 3 different products, onions, deep-frozen chicken and high-protein feed. Feasibilities and limits of the irradiation technology are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  14. Development of food irradiation technology and consumer attitude toward irradiated food in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Byun, Myung-Woo; Cho, Han-Ok

    1992-01-01

    In Korea, the well-integrated research of biological effects of radiation has been launched from the late 1960s. As research activities, the following food items have been dealt with: sprouting foods, fruits, mushrooms, grains, spices or mixed condiments, fish or fishery products, meat or meat products, and fermented foods. The usage of gamma radiation from 60 Co source is now authorized for food irradiation of the following items: potato, onion, garlic, chestnut, mushroom, dried mushroom, dried spices (including red pepper, garlic, black pepper, onion, ginger, and green onion), dried meat, powdered fish and shellfish, soybean paste powder, hot pepper paste powder, soybean sauce powder, and starch. Since the authorization of food irradiation in 1985, consumers' acceptance has been considered the most important. The survey evaluating the basic perception and attitule toward food irradiation revealed the following results. Consumers' awareness of food irradiation was 82%, with significantly higher in radiation workers than the general public (p<0.0001). Seventy-five percent distinguished the contaminated food by radionuclides from irradiated food. In purchasing irradiated foods, 50.9% required more information. The contribution of irradiated foods to wholesomeness was suspicious in 51%, acceptable in 33%, and uncertain in 16%. If information about the benefits of irradiation is provided to consumers, positive response was increased to 60%. The most critical impediment in the commercial application of food irradiation was found to have resulted from the general consumers' slow acceptance; however, consumers' attitude to irradiated food became positive if they understood the safety and advantages of this technology. The most important task is to overcome consumers' psychological resistance and transporting matters of the products to be irradiated. (N.K.)

  15. Facts about food irradiation: Food irradiation costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This fact sheet gives the cost of a typical food irradiation facility (US $1 million to US $3 million) and of the food irradiation process (US $10-15 per tonne for low-dose applications; US $100-250 per tonne for high-dose applications). These treatments also bring consumer benefits in terms of availability, storage life and improved hygiene. 2 refs

  16. Evolution of phase microstructure during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1985-11-01

    The phase microstructure of alloys is frequently severely altered during irradiation. Sluggish precipitation reactions including precipitation coarsening are accelerated by irradiation-enhanced diffusion. Radiation-induced segregation redistributes existing precipitate phases within the microstructure, induces precipitation of nonequilibrium phases and affects the composition of phases in multicomponent alloys. The displacement process causes disordering of ordered alloys and frequently amorphization, especially in intermetallic compounds, at low temperature. Although a good qualitative understanding of the basic process involved, i.e., displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation exists, methods for detailed quantitative modeling of the evolution of the microstructure of alloys remain to be developed

  17. Food irradiation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Jiang

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the author discussed the recent situation of food irradiation in China, its history, facilities, clearance, commercialization, and with emphasis on market testing and public acceptance of irradiated food. (author)

  18. Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixed connective tissue disease Overview Mixed connective tissue disease has signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders — primarily lupus, scleroderma and polymyositis. For this reason, mixed connective tissue disease ...

  19. Fluid mixing III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnby, N.

    1988-01-01

    Covering all aspects of mixing, this work presents research and developments in industrial applications, flow patterns and mixture analysis, mixing of solids into liquids, and mixing of gases into liquids

  20. Neutron irradiation of bacteriophage λ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozin, D.; Milosevic, M. . E-mail address of corresponding author: bozinde@vin.bg.ac.yu

    2005-01-01

    Double strand breaks (DSB) are the most dangerous lesions in DNA caused by irradiation, but many other lesions, usually called mutations, have not been clearly identified. These lesions, like DSB, can be the source of serious chromosomal damages and finally - cell death. Growing interest in heavy particles for radiotherapy and radioprotection encourages the search of the molecular basis of their action. In this respect, we chose bacteriophage λ1390 as the model system for the study of consequences of neutron irradiation. This derivative of λ phage possesses an unique ability to reversibly reorganize their genome in response to various selective pressures. The phages were irradiated with 13 Gy of mixed neutrons (7.5 Gy from fast and 5.6 Gy from thermal neutrons) and phages genomes were tested to DSB and mutations. Additionally, the stability of λ capsid proteins were tested. After all tests, we can conclude that, under our conditions, low flux of neutrons does not induce neither DNA strand break or DNA mutation nor the stability of λ capsid proteins. (author)