WorldWideScience

Sample records for east england 1985-2004

  1. South east England renewable energy planning study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffin, A.

    1998-09-01

    This is the final report on a study into planning for renewable energy development in the South East region of the United Kingdom (UK). The study was performed by ETSU under contract to Directorate General XVII (DGXVII) of the European Commission (EC) under the ALTENER programme. Half the funding was provided by the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) through the UK`s New and Renewable Energy Programme. The study is one of a series concerned with regional assessment of and planning for renewable energies. A number of studies have already been completed by ETSU. These include ``An Assessment of the Potential Renewable Energy Resource in Scotland``, Planning and Renewable Energy in Cumbria``, An Assessment of Renewable Energy in the Southern Electric Region`` and ``Southern Region Renewable Energy Planning Study``. These reports are available through ETSU`s New and Renewable Enquiries Bureau. ETSU is also currently performing two similar studies covering Strathclyde and the East Midlands region of the UK under separate contracts and is about to begin work on two more, the first covering the Eastern region of the UK and the second Yorkshire and Lancashire. (author)

  2. Child Marriage or Forced Marriage? South Asian Communities in North East England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoli, Geetanjali; McCarry, Melanie; Razak, Amina

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the links between child marriage and forced marriage in the UK, drawing from a research study on South Asian communities in North East England. It looks at definitional issues through an analysis of UK and South Asian policies. It also analyses how these concepts are understood by service providers, survivors of child…

  3. Shooting for Lithuania: Migration, national identity and men's basketball in the East of England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Adam Brian; Piggott, David

    2016-01-01

    a figurational framework to investigate the lived experiences of basketball amongst male Lithuanian migrants in the rural east of England. Semi-structured interviews highlighted participants’ motivations to migrate, their acculturation experiences and the role that basketball played during their sojourn...

  4. The syphilis epidemics in Hungary 1985-2004, before entering the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Elyas; Nagy, Károly; Horváth, Attila

    2013-09-01

    In the decade prior to the turn of the millennium, great interest was raised, and rightly so, by the STD (syphilis and HIV/AIDS) epidemic that developed in the Eastern-Central European Region. Its coincidence with the far-reaching political and economic changes that took place at that time suggested a link between the two events.Hungary, where these infections had had low incidence before the period investigated, also experienced an increase in STD incidence. The trend in syphilis infection during the 20 years between 1985-2004, that preceded the turn of the millennium and when finally Hungary joined the European Union, have been analyzed. Due to the nature of venereological epidemiological surveillance in Hungary, syphilis prevalence data are appropriate for further analysis from socio-demographic aspects. Behavioural changes underlying the specific features of the epidemics in Hungary had developed several years earlier and cannot be linked to the political and economic changes that started in the early 90s. The only exception is the phenomenon of growing migration that appeared simultaneously with the political changes and had a decisive impact on the spread and level of infection in some areas in the country. As shown by our data, trends seen in specific demographic groups (females, rural population) preceded the suddenly occurring political changes by about 15 years.

  5. The Paradox of Progress: LGBTQ Youth Homelessness in South East England

    OpenAIRE

    Tunåker, Carin

    2017-01-01

    This thesis examines the experiences, circumstances and difficulties faced by young homeless people residing in hostels in the county of Kent, South East England, especially those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ). My research suggests that there is an increase in LGBTQ youth homelessness due to young people 'coming out' at younger ages than before and encountering difficulties in their family homes that lead to their homelessness. I refer to this as ...

  6. Unraveling the New England orocline, east Gondwana accretionary margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawood, P. A.; Pisarevsky, S. A.; Leitch, E. C.

    2011-10-01

    The New England orocline lies within the Eastern Australian segment of the Terra Australis accretionary orogen and developed during the late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic Gondwanide Orogeny (310-230 Ma) that extended along the Pacific margin of the Gondwana supercontinent. The orocline deformed a pre-Permian arc assemblage consisting of a western magmatic arc, an adjoining forearc basin and an eastern subduction complex. The orocline is doubly vergent with the southern and northern segments displaying counter-clockwise and clockwise rotation, respectively, and this has led to contrasting models of formation. We resolve these conflicting models with one that involves buckling of the arc system about a vertical axis during progressive northward translation of the southern segment of the arc system against the northern segment, which is pinned relative to cratonic Gondwana. Paleomagnetic data are consistent with this model and show that an alternative model involving southward motion of the northern segment relative to the southern segment and cratonic Gondwana is not permissible. The timing of the final stage of orocline formation (˜270-265 Ma) overlaps with a major gap in magmatic activity along this segment of the Gondwana margin, suggesting that northward motion and orocline formation were driven by a change from orthogonal to oblique convergence and coupling between the Gondwana and Pacific plates.

  7. England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, George A.

    1986-01-01

    Presents the historical background of the recognition of racism as a factor in low achievement of nonwhite students in England. Discusses reactions of various education groups towards offical reports on the education of minority children. Concludes with comparison of England's policies with United States' policies toward the education of…

  8. Water infrastructure and the making of financial subjects in the south east of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Loftus

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the last four decades the locus of economic power has shifted from industry to finance. As part of this trend, the 'financialisation' of the water sector has added a new layer of complexity to the hydrosocial cycle, witnessed in the emergence of new financial actors, logics and financing instruments. Such a shift has profoundly reshaped the relationship between water utilities and consumers in the South East of England, where the household has become, in the words of Allen and Pryke (2013, a human revenue stream for financialised utilities. In this paper, we make an argument that the water meter is one of the crucial mediators through which finance will touch the lives of individual subjects. In the South East of England, after initial opposition to universal metering – in part shaped by fears over fluctuating revenues – water companies are now embedding a metering programme within a billing and tariff structure that aims to ensure governable and predictable subjects. Drawing on Urban Political Ecology, we argue that the financialisation of the water sector in England shapes the emergence of new financial subjectivities while enabling new forms of political rule that operate at a range of spatial scales.

  9. Convergence on Policy Goals: Character Education in East Asia and England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of character building in east Asian countries is often presented as a shared cultural construct and positioned within an east-west dichotomy. However, it is not at all clear that east Asian forms of character education are identifiable and distinct or that they always transcend national and cultural values. Jeynes (2008 has cautioned us to remember that cultural differences limit the extent to which we can learn lessons from another country, but how authoritative is this caution? The English Secretary of State for Education, Nicky Morgan, announced in December 2014 that she intended to secure England’s place as a global leader by expanding the nation’s provision and evidence base for character education. In this context, this article asks whether England shares any commonalities in the so-called east-west dichotomy on character education – are they mutually exclusive or are they compatible. Is there a west–individual view and an east - collective view? Is the character education movement in east Asia more of an ideological and political movement? As the British government looks for policy solutions to new and challenging problems, including character education, what answers can it find from abroad? What can it learn, borrow or pinch from these east Asian countries and is there a convergence on policy goals for character education within and across these countries? The paper is based on the work (translated of prominent east Asian academics and builds on the author’s personal interface with officials in the Ministry of Education in Japan and Singapore as well as meetings and conferences with numerous academics in universities across east Asian countries to address these questions.

  10. The identity of the North East of England has been shaped by the rocks beneath our feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Deborah

    2017-04-01

    Geology and Geography students within England learn about the earth's processes and human processes, however it is not always easy for them to see the link between them and to their own lives. The changes to the specification within A-level Geography has seen an emphasis on how processes are linked to their own lives and the local area. I am fortunate to teach both Geography and Geology and I want my students who study both subjects to appreciate the links within the subjects. I also want them to appreciate the local geology and see how it has shaped the North East of England. I have therefore, created a series of lessons to help them to explore the local geology and place identity of the North East of England. To help them to develop an understanding of how the local geology influences place identity. I have used an enquiry based approach which uses the KWL chart and a concept map for students to demonstrate their understanding. These lessons are structured using the learning cycle. The lessons are differentiated through the use of cheat sheets, different levels of hand-outs and grouping of students. The learning objectives are:- 1. Describe the Geology of the North East of England. 2. Explain at least one process which has formed local geology. 3. Define place identity. 4. Discuss the North East of England's identity. 5. Discuss how the local Geology has influenced the North East of England's identity. The North East of England's geology mainly consists of coal and limestone. There is rich industrial heritage of the North East which is based around coal mining. Therefore, coal mining has had a great impact on the identity of the North East of England. There are also a number of different SSSIs which is due to the Magnesium limestone in the area, which has helped to shape the identity of the region. There are a number of areas of outstanding natural beauty due to the local geology and this has helped to create a positive identity for the North East of England.

  11. Avian wildlife mortality events due to salmonellosis in the United States, 1985-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A.J.; Saito, E.K.

    2008-01-01

    Infection with Salmonella spp. has long been recognized in avian wildlife, although its significance in causing avian mortality, and its zoonotic risk, is not well understood. This study evaluates the role of Salmonella spp. in wild bird mortality events in the United States from 1985 through 2004. Analyses were performed to calculate the frequency of these events and the proportional mortality by species, year, month, state, and region. Salmonellosis was a significant contributor to mortality in many species of birds; particularly in passerines, for which 21.5% of all mortality events involved salmonellosis. The proportional mortality averaged a 12% annual increase over the 20-yr period, with seasonal peaks in January and April. Increased salmonellosis-related mortality in New England, Southeastern, and Mountain-Prairie states was identified. Based on the results of this study, salmonellosis can be considered an important zoonotic disease of wild birds. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  12. Knowledge of cervical cancer and screening among women in east-central England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Z; Avis, M; Whynes, D K

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses the extent and accuracy of women's knowledge of cervical cancer, risk factors, and the efficacy of the national screening program. Data were obtained from a questionnaire survey of randomly selected women eligible for screening, drawn from a population in east-central England. The majority of women in the sample overestimated the current incidence of cervical cancer, both absolutely and relative to other cancers. Perceiving incidence to be high was associated with reporting worries about the disease. With respect to the screening process, 78.3% believe that the smear abnormality rate is higher than it actually is, and only 7.6% correctly appreciate that the abnormality rate is highest at younger ages. With respect to performance, 16.3% believed the smear test to be completely accurate, and more than half overestimated the likely number of cancer cases prevented by screening. While certain cervical cancer risk factors were correctly assigned by the majority of women, undue emphasis was placed on genetic influence, while the risks posed by human papillomavirus infection were unfamiliar to almost half of the sample. We conclude that women typically possess only a partial picture of risk factors and overestimate both the incidence of cervical cancer and the efficacy of screening.

  13. Traditional coppice in South East England: the importance of workforce engagement for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlett D

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes research into the historic importance of the coppice industry, now largely restricted to south east England and the relevance of this to current rural development policy. The economic and social contexts have altered significantly over time with product substitution and changing consumer aspirations, and particularly the availability of alternative fuel sources. Over the last fifty years the “value” attached to coppiced woodlands has shifted away from resource exploitation and towards a greater appreciation of them for wildlife, recreation, amenity and cultural heritage. This has increased wider public awareness of and appreciation for coppicing as a management technique and, consequently rising concern over the reduction in area managed. This was assumed to be due to market failure but attempts to reverse this by creating new outlets failed. The reason for this has been explored by engaging directly with the workforce, both individually and in focus groups. Coppice workers were found to be more numerous, active and enterprising than previously thought, and many were found to be working in family groups servicing traditional markets. They were unaware of concerns about decline in the area coppiced or initiatives to address it. Issues currently affecting their businesses included housing costs, rural crime, harvesting restrictions, loss of yards and training needs. It is concluded that Government policies to promote woodfuel are not likely to succeed without active engagement with the workforce to understand their perspectives and enabling them to participate in policy decisions is recommended.

  14. Certified causes of death in patients with mesothelioma in South East England

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    Peto Julian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesothelioma is a highly fatal cancer that is caused by exposure to asbestos fibres. In many populations, the occurrence of mesothelioma is monitored with the use of mortality data from death certification. We examine certified causes of death of patients who have been diagnosed with mesothelioma, and assess the validity of death certification data as a proxy for mesothelioma incidence. Methods We extracted mesothelioma registrations in the South East of England area between 2000 and 2004 from the Thames Cancer Registry database. We retained for analysis 2200 patients who had died at the time of analysis, after having excluded seven dead cases where the causes of death were not known to the cancer registry. The 2200 deaths were classified hierarchically to identify (1 mesothelioma deaths, (2 deaths certified as lung cancer deaths or (3 deaths from unspecified cancer, and (4 deaths from other causes. Results 87% of the patients had mesothelioma mentioned on the death certificate. 6% had no mention of mesothelioma but included lung cancer as a cause of death. Another 6% had no mention of mesothelioma or lung cancer, but included an unspecified cancer as a cause of death. Lastly, 2% had other causes of death specified on the death certificate. Conclusion This analysis suggests that official mortality data may underestimate the true occurrence of mesothelioma by around 10%.

  15. In-Migration, Entrepreneurship and Rural-Urban Interdependencies: The Case of East Cleveland, North East England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantaridis, Christos

    2010-01-01

    In-migration is a key influence in the process of rural economic development in England, Continental Europe and the US. New arrivals are often viewed in the literature as contributors in new venture creation, as well as catalysts in enhancing rural-urban interdependencies in the countryside. This paper sets out to explore the validity of this view…

  16. A prospective survey of blood products transferred with patients during inter-hospital transfers in the East of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, J H; O'Brien, J; Foukaneli, D; Dhesi, A

    2015-10-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken of blood products transferred with patients during inter-hospital transfers by ambulance in the East of England (population six million) There is little published information on the number and fate of blood products transferred with patients during inter-hospital transfers, although there are concerns about quality assurance and traceability of these blood products. Recent national guidance has been issued, but adherence to this guidance is uncertain. A 6-month survey was undertaken of all inter-hospital transfers of blood products with patients within the East of England using routine data captured by established transfer of blood documentation. There were 45 transfer episodes of which 44 involved the transfer of red blood cells. In total, 148 units of red blood cells were transferred, of which 6% were transfused en route, 3% transfused at the destination hospital, 35% were wasted and for 18% the fate could not be established. The remainder were transferred into the blood stock of the destination hospital. The small proportion of blood products that were transfused raises questions about the necessity of the transfer of blood products with some patients particularly considering the higher percentage of wasted or untraced products. When transfers occur, there should be better communication between hospital transfusion laboratories assisted by adherence to national and regionally agreed policies. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  17. Fuel use and emissions from non-road machinery in Denmark from 1985-2004 - and projections from 2005-2030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, M.; Nielsen, Ole-Kenneth [National Environmental Research Inst. (Denmark)

    2006-08-31

    This report documents the updated 1985-2004 fuel use and emission inventory for non road machinery and recreational craft in Denmark. The inventory comprises the emission components of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMVOC, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3} and TSP, and in addition a fuel use and emission forecast is presented from 2005-2030. The calculated results are grouped into the sub-sectors agriculture, forestry, industry, household/gardening and inland waterways, according to the structure of the CollectER database used for all Danish sources. The report explains the existing EU emission directives for non road machinery, the actual fuel use and emission factors used, sources of background and operational data, calculation methods and the calculated fuel use and emission results. (au)

  18. Forearc basin correlations from around the Texas Orocline, New England Orogen, east Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Derek; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Shaanan, Uri; Wormald, Richard

    2014-05-01

    The late Paleozoic to early Mesozoic New England Orogen occupies much of the eastern seaboard of Australia. The orogen formed by west-dipping subduction (present-day coordinates) of the paleo-Pacific plate beneath eastern Gondwana. The southern part of the orogen exhibits a series of tight bends (oroclines) that are evident in the curvature of a Devonian-Carboniferous subduction complex, in particular the forearc basin and accretionary complex. The Emu Creek Block is thought to be part of the forearc basin that is exposed in the eastern limb of the Texas Orocline, but until now the tectonostratigraphic origin of the Emu Creek Block has only been inferred from limited geological data. Here we present detrital zircon geochronology (U/Pb ICP-MS ages), a new geological map of the block, and a revised stratigraphic section. Lithological investigation of strata within the block and the age distribution of detrital zircons indicate that the sediments in the Emu Creek Block were derived from a Carboniferous magmatic arc and were most likely deposited in a forearc basin. Our new geochronological constraints indicate deposition during the late Carboniferous. We therefore propose that rocks in the Emu Creek Block are arc-distal correlatives of the forearc basin in the opposing (western) limb of the Texas Orocline, specifically the Willuri and Currabubula formations. Extensive orocline-parallel structures in the forearc basin indicate that the eastern limb of the Texas Orocline was rotated in the course of oroclinal bending by approximately 135 degrees relative to the western limb. The correlation of the forearc basin blocks on opposite limbs of the Texas Orocline provides an independent constraint on its geometry and further improves our understanding of New England Orogen tectonostratigraphy and the crustal structure of eastern Australia.

  19. Refugee Business Start-ups in the North East of England: An Impossible Dream?

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Hilary; Fitzgerald, Ian; Hudson, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and prior work - For many asylum seekers just getting to the UK is an achievement, let alone obtaining refugee status. When ‘equality’ is achieved with other immigrant workers then the settlement process begins. For some this includes starting a business but there are a number of well documented barriers to business start-up for refugees as well as black minority ethic entrepreneurs, which have been highlighted in the North East region (BRKN, 2007). Given this Northumbria Universit...

  20. FROM KNOWLEDGE-BASED ECONOMY TO ... KNOWLEDGE-BASED ECONOMY? REFLECTIONS OF CHANGES IN THE ECONOMY AND DEVELOPMENT POLICIES IN THE NORTH EAST OF ENGLAND

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Against the background of claims made about the emergence of a new Knowledge-based Economy, I explore the role of knowledge, learning and innovation in the economy and in relation to regional economic development and to successive conceptions of regional development policies through the lens of the successive transformations of a particular regional economy ? that of north east England. Rather than seeing knowledge as something that has only recently become relevant to e...

  1. East India Company and Bank of England Shareholders during the South Sea Bubble: Partitions, Components and Connectivity in a Dynamic Trading Network

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Mays; Gary S. Shea

    2011-01-01

    A new dataset, in the form of a network graph, is used to study inventory and trading behaviour amongst owners of East India Company (EIC) and Bank of England (BoE)stock around the South Sea Bubble. There was a decline in market intermediation in which the goldsmith bankers were dominant in 1720, but foreigners and Jews to some extent restored intermediation services after the Bubble. Company directors temporarily helped to sustain intermediation in 1720 itself. Whereas before and during the ...

  2. Cervical screening in HIV-positive women in the East of England: recent CD4 as the predictive risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Olubanke; Rajamanoharan, Sasikala; Balachandran, Thambiah

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between CD4 count and cervical cytological abnormality in HIV-positive women attending two district general hospital genitourinary medicine clinics in the East of England. It aims to determine whether the rate of cervical cytological abnormalities differs in HIV-positive women with CD4 count >350 cells/µl and those with CD4 count ≤350 cells/µl; and to compare the rates of abnormalities with that of the general population. We retrospectively reviewed data from a cross-sectional audit undertaken between December 2010 and December 2011 and analysed them using multivariable statistics. There was a significant association between recent CD4 count ≤350 cells/µl and cervical cytological abnormality (p 350 cells/µl had abnormal cervical smear results, compared with 6.6% of the general population in the screening period 2010-11 and 7.2% of the general population in the screening period 2009-10. In our study population of women with recent CD4 counts >350 cells/µl, the proportions of mild, moderate and severe dysplasia were also similar to national figures. This raises important questions about the cost effectiveness of blanket annual screening for HIV-positive women.

  3. Contributions of Open Air Museums in preserving heritage buildings: study of open-air museums in South East England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuraini Md Ali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Most open air museums were established to preserve and present a threatened aspect of regional or national culture and to help forge a sense of identity and achievement. Britain's open air museums have aroused controversy among both museum professionals and building conservationists. They have been praised for spearheading innovative and vivacious approaches towards heritage interpretation and saving neglected buildings, while some have criticised them for inconsistent standards of conservation especially for taking buildings out of their original settings. Such architectural issues were strongly debated in the 1970s, while recent debates focus on popular approaches towards attracting the public to the past. This paper describes the evolution of open air museums in Britain, their contribution in conserving unloved buildings and how they have become an increasingly competitive tourist attraction. Observations and lessons learned from interviews and visit to two open air museums in South East England provides some insight about the importance of such museums. Operated as registered charity organisations, they have played significant roles not only in saving various buildings and structures from demolition but also in helping visitors to appreciate the rich heritage of these regions.

  4. General practitioners' use and experiences of palliative care services: a survey in south east England

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    Higginson Irene J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of the General Practitioner (GP is central to community palliative care. Good liaison between the different professionals involved in a patient's care is extremely important in palliative care patients. In cases where GPs have previously been dissatisfied with palliative services, this may be seen as a barrier to referral when caring for other patients. The aim of this survey is to investigate the use and previous experiences of GPs of two palliative care services, with particular emphasis on barriers to referral and to explore issues surrounding the GP's role in caring for palliative patients. Methods Design: Descriptive postal survey of use and experience of palliative care services with particular emphasis on barriers to referral. Setting: One Primary Care Trust (PCT, south London, England, population 298,500. Subjects: 180 GPs in the PCT, which is served by two hospice services (A&B. Results An overall questionnaire response rate of 77% (138 was obtained, with 69% (124 used in analysis. Over 90% of GPs were satisfied with the palliative care services over the preceding two years. Two areas of possible improvement emerged; communication and prescribing practices. GPs identified some patients that they had not referred, most commonly when patients or carers were reluctant to accept help, or when other support was deemed sufficient. Over half of the GPs felt there were areas where improvement could be made; with clarification of the rules and responsibilities of the multi disciplinary team being the most common. The majority of GPs were working, and want to work with, the specialist services as part of an extended team. However, a greater number of GPs want to hand over care to the specialist services than are currently doing so. Conclusion A large number of GPs were happy with the service provision of the palliative care services in this area. They suggested that 3 out of 4 terminally ill patients needed specialist

  5. An observational study of patient characteristics associated with the mode of admission to acute stroke services in North East, England.

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    Christopher I Price

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Effective provision of urgent stroke care relies upon admission to hospital by emergency ambulance and may involve pre-hospital redirection. The proportion and characteristics of patients who do not arrive by emergency ambulance and their impact on service efficiency is unclear. To assist in the planning of regional stroke services we examined the volume, characteristics and prognosis of patients according to the mode of presentation to local services. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A prospective regional database of consecutive acute stroke admissions was conducted in North East, England between 01/09/10-30/09/11. Case ascertainment and transport mode were checked against hospital coding and ambulance dispatch databases. RESULTS: Twelve acute stroke units contributed data for a mean of 10.7 months. 2792/3131 (89% patients received a diagnosis of stroke within 24 hours of admission: 2002 arrivals by emergency ambulance; 538 by private transport or non-emergency ambulance; 252 unknown mode. Emergency ambulance patients were older (76 vs 69 years, more likely to be from institutional care (10% vs 1% and experiencing total anterior circulation symptoms (27% vs 6%. Thrombolysis treatment was commoner following emergency admission (11% vs 4%. However patients attending without emergency ambulance had lower inpatient mortality (2% vs 18%, a lower rate of institutionalisation (1% vs 6% and less need for daily carers (7% vs 16%. 149/155 (96% of highly dependent patients were admitted by emergency ambulance, but none received thrombolysis. CONCLUSION: Presentations of new stroke without emergency ambulance involvement were not unusual but were associated with a better outcome due to younger age, milder neurological impairment and lower levels of pre-stroke dependency. Most patients with a high level of pre-stroke dependency arrived by emergency ambulance but did not receive thrombolysis. It is important to be aware of easily identifiable

  6. Outcome of patent ductus arteriosus ligation in premature infants in the East of England: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sok-Leng; Samsudin, Salehuddin; Kuruvilla, Minju; Dhelaria, Anshoo; Kent, Sue; Kelsall, Wilfred A

    2013-10-01

    Surgical ligation of patent ductus arteriosus is considered when medical treatment fails or is contraindicated. This study aims to determine the mortality and morbidity of preterm neonates referred for patent ductus arteriosus ligation. A prospective study was conducted in the East of England to follow the outcome of premature infants under 37 weeks’ gestation undergoing patent ductus arteriosus ligation. A standardised proforma was used to collect information before and after the procedure. A total of 102 premature infants were recruited, and patent ductus arteriosus ligation was performed in 92. Surgical complications occurred in 8.7% (8/92), which included pneumothorax (5/8), recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (2/8), and chylothorax (1/8). Morbidity outcome data were not available for all infants. The incidence of chronic lung disease was 88% (88/99); intraventricular haemorrhage was 49% (49/100); necrotising enterocolitis 39% (39/99), and retinopathy of prematurity 42% (41/97). The overall mortality rate in our study was 7.8% (8/102). Mortality rate in infants who had patent ductus arteriosus ligation was 4.3% (4/92). The 30-day survival rate after ligation was 99% (91/92). Beyond 30 days post-ligation, three infants died from other causes that were not directly related to surgery. Patent ductus arteriosus ligation in premature infants is associated with low mortality and complication rates; however, there is a high incidence of neonatal morbidity. Surgical capacity for patent ductus arteriosus ligation needs to be carefully planned nationally as the duration of ‘‘waiting time’’ and transport to another surgical centre could adversely affect outcomes in this high-risk population.

  7. A cross-sectional questionnaire study of the rules governing pupils' carriage of inhalers for asthma treatment in secondary schools in North East England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funston, Wendy; Howard, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The primary objective of this study was to assess the rules governing secondary school pupils' carriage of inhalers for emergency treatment of asthma in the North East of England. Design. This study was based upon a postal questionnaire survey. Setting. The setting for this study was mainstream free-to-attend secondary schools which admit 16 year old pupils within the 12 Local Authority areas which make up the North East of England. Participants. All 153 schools meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the study, of which 106 (69%) took part. Main Outcome Measures. Our three main outcome measures were: whether pupils are permitted to carry inhalers on their person while at school; whether advance permission is required for pupils to carry inhalers, and from whom; and whether the school has an emergency 'standby' salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies, as permitted since October 2014 under recent amendments to The Human Medicines Regulations 2012. Results. Of 98 schools submitting valid responses to the question, 99% (n = 97) permitted pupils to carry inhalers on their person while at school; the remaining school stored pupils' inhalers in a central location within the school. A total of 22% of included schools (n = 22) required parental permission before pupils were permitted to carry inhalers. Of 102 schools submitting valid responses to the question, 44% (n = 45) had purchased a 'standby' salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies. Conclusions. Most secondary schools in North East England permit pupils to carry inhalers on their person. The requirement in a minority of schools for parental permission to be given possibly contravenes the standard ethical practices in clinical medicine for children of this age. Only a minority of schools hold a 'standby' salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies. Wider availability may improve outcomes for asthma emergencies occurring in schools.

  8. A cross-sectional questionnaire study of the rules governing pupils’ carriage of inhalers for asthma treatment in secondary schools in North East England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Funston

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The primary objective of this study was to assess the rules governing secondary school pupils’ carriage of inhalers for emergency treatment of asthma in the North East of England. Design. This study was based upon a postal questionnaire survey. Setting. The setting for this study was mainstream free-to-attend secondary schools which admit 16 year old pupils within the 12 Local Authority areas which make up the North East of England. Participants. All 153 schools meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the study, of which 106 (69% took part. Main Outcome Measures. Our three main outcome measures were: whether pupils are permitted to carry inhalers on their person while at school; whether advance permission is required for pupils to carry inhalers, and from whom; and whether the school has an emergency ‘standby’ salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies, as permitted since October 2014 under recent amendments to The Human Medicines Regulations 2012. Results. Of 98 schools submitting valid responses to the question, 99% (n = 97 permitted pupils to carry inhalers on their person while at school; the remaining school stored pupils’ inhalers in a central location within the school. A total of 22% of included schools (n = 22 required parental permission before pupils were permitted to carry inhalers. Of 102 schools submitting valid responses to the question, 44% (n = 45 had purchased a ‘standby’ salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies. Conclusions. Most secondary schools in North East England permit pupils to carry inhalers on their person. The requirement in a minority of schools for parental permission to be given possibly contravenes the standard ethical practices in clinical medicine for children of this age. Only a minority of schools hold a ‘standby’ salbutamol inhaler for use in asthma emergencies. Wider availability may improve outcomes for asthma emergencies occurring in schools.

  9. The Impact of the Free Swimming Programme in a Local Community in the South East of England: Giving with One Hand, Taking Away with the Other

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Themis Kokolakakis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the introduction of the Free Swimming Programme (FSP in a local community (not identified to preserve anonymity in the South East of England. The question has been approached in a variety of ways: by using primary quantitative data from leisure centres and logistic regressions based on the Active People Survey (APS. Problems are identified related to the introduction of the FSP in this community and suggestions are made for future policy. A brief examination of swimming participation in England enables researchers to place this community into a national context. The problems and policies of sport organisation developed in this community are not dissimilar to a more general application reflecting the English experience; in this sense it is anticipated that the findings will enable managers of sport organisations, along with public health policy makers, to focus more effectively on raising sport participation. The unique selling points of this article are the examination of FSP for adult participants, the local analysis of junior and senior participation, and the overall assessment of the policy based on APS.

  10. 'It's coming at things from a very different standpoint': evaluating the 'Supporting Self-Care in General Practice Programme' in NHS East of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Steve; Witty, Karl; Braybrook, Debbie; Lowcock, Diane; South, Jane; White, Alan

    2013-04-01

    To undertake a service evaluation of the NHS East of England Supporting Self-Care in General Practice programme. The number of people purported to live with long-term conditions continues to rise generating increasing policy emphasis on the importance of self-care. Previous work has highlighted barriers to implementing self-care interventions in general practice, including a lack of organisational approaches to providing self-care and limited engagement and training of healthcare professionals. In response to these barriers and policy drivers, NHS East of England Strategic Health Authority developed and commenced the Supporting Self-care in General Practice (SSCiGP) programme, which seeks to transform the relationships between people with long-term conditions and primary care practitioners. This was a mixed methods study, carried out over two phases, which included interviews, survey work and practice-based case studies. This paper focuses on findings related to clinician and practice level change. Clinicians reported changes in their perceptions and in consultation practices following attendance on the SSCiGP programme. These changes were linked to empathy and patient-centredness that mirrored what patients valued in interactions with clinicians. There were qualitative and descriptive differences, but no statistically significant differences between clinicians who had and had not attended the SSCiGP programme. Time was recognised as a significant barrier to implementing, and sustaining skills learnt from the SSCiGP programme. Greater impact at practice level could be achieved when there was whole practice commitment to values that underpinned the SSCiGP programme. There was evidence that such approaches are being incorporated to change practice systems and structures to better facilitate self-care, particularly in practices who were early programme adopters. This evaluation demonstrates that training around clinician change can be effective in shifting service

  11. "I used to be as fit as a linnet" - beliefs, attitudes, and environmental supportiveness for physical activity in former mining areas in the North-East of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Esther; Jones, Andy

    2015-02-01

    Studies of geographical variations in physical activity behaviours have suggested that activity levels are particularly low in areas that have undergone employment loss associated with the decline of industry. This is of concern given that affected populations are already at risk of poor health. Applying focus group methodology amongst 19 participants in four groups, this study aims to unpack how broader societal and environmental changes associated with industrial decline affect beliefs and attitudes towards physical activity in ex-mining communities in the North-East of England. Identified core themes comprise the direct impact of deindustrialisation on social and physical environments. Based on our findings, we provide evidence for mechanisms that operate via loss of occupational physical activity as well as the progressive development of environments that are not fit to support population activity levels. Particularly important was the loss of recreational facilities, public green spaces and sports facilities that were owned and organised by the miners themselves with support from the mining companies. Attitudes and beliefs directly related to the areas' industrial past were also seen to be key. We suggest that the development of interventions considering the socio-cultural history and socio-economic reality of communities could be a promising route to encourage more active lifestyles in deprived areas with particularly low levels of physical activity.

  12. The advantages and disadvantages of breakfast clubs according to parents, children and school staff in the North East of England, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Louise Graham

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The provision of school breakfast has become increasingly popular in the UK in recent years. However, UK based studies highlighting the views of parents, children and school staff on school breakfast clubs are lacking. The current study set out to address this dearth in the literature by investigating the views of these key user and stakeholder groups on breakfast clubs within the North East of England. Fourteen parents, 21 children and 17 school staff were recruited from 4 primary schools where breakfast clubs were available on site. Parents and school staff took part in semi-structured interviews and children participated in focus groups, through which the advantages and disadvantages of breakfast clubs were discussed. Thematic analysis revealed that breakfast clubs provided children with a settled and enjoyable start to the school day. As well as providing children with a healthy and varied breakfast meal and unique opportunities for social interaction, breakfast clubs were recognized as an integral part of the school system that offered support to parents, particularly those who worked and relied on breakfast clubs as a means of affordable and reliable childcare. The few disadvantages identified related to practical issues such as a lack of adherence to school food standards, breakfast club staff missing class preparation time and concerns that some children were being excluded from participating in breakfast clubs particularly due to costs associated with attendance. The findings are discussed in relation to the School Food Plan and areas for further investigation are proposed.

  13. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the East Coast Mesozoic basins of the Piedmont, Blue Ridge Thrust Belt, Atlantic Coastal Plain, and New England Provinces, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milici, Robert C.; Coleman, James L.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    During the early opening of the Atlantic Ocean in the Mesozoic Era, numerous extensional basins formed along the eastern margin of the North American continent from Florida northward to New England and parts of adjacent Canada. The basins extend generally from the offshore Atlantic continental margin westward beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the Appalachian Mountains. Using a geology-based assessment method, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean undiscovered natural gas resource of 3,860 billion cubic feet and a mean undiscovered natural gas liquids resource of 135 million barrels in continuous accumulations within five of the East Coast Mesozoic basins: the Deep River, Dan River-Danville, and Richmond basins, which are within the Piedmont Province of North Carolina and Virginia; the Taylorsville basin, which is almost entirely within the Atlantic Coastal Plain Province of Virginia and Maryland; and the southern part of the Newark basin (herein referred to as the South Newark basin), which is within the Blue Ridge Thrust Belt Province of New Jersey. The provinces, which contain these extensional basins, extend across parts of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts.

  14. Encouraging good antimicrobial prescribing practice: A review of antibiotic prescribing policies used in the South East Region of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayon White Richard T

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good prescribing practice has an important part to play in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. Whilst it was perceived that most hospitals and Health Authorities possessed an antibiotic policy, a review of antibiotic policies was conducted to gain an understanding of the extent, quality and usefulness of these policies. Methods Letters were sent to pharmacists in hospitals and health authorities in across the South East region of the National Health Service Executive (NHSE requesting antibiotic policies. data were extracted from the policies to assess four areas; antibiotic specific, condition specific, patient specific issues and underpinning evidence. Results Of a possible 41 hospital trusts and 14 health authorities, 33 trusts and 9 health authorities (HAs provided policies. Both trust and HA policies had a median publication date of 1998 (trust range 1993-99, HA 1994-99. Eleven policies were undated. The majority of policies had no supporting references for the statements made. All policies provided some details on specific antibiotics. Gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were the preferred aminoglycoside and quinolone respectively with cephalosporins being represented by cefuroxime or cefotaxime in trusts and cephradine or cephalexin in HAs. 26 trusts provided advice on surgical prophylaxis, 17 had meningococcal prophylaxis policies and 11 covered methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. There was little information for certain groups such as neonates or children, the pregnant or the elderly. Conclusion There was considerable variation in content and quality across policies, a clear lack of an evidence base and a need to revise policies in line with current recommendations.

  15. Motivation and values of hospital consultants in south-east England who work in the national health service and do private practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Charlotte; Russell, Jill

    2004-09-01

    In the UK, a small private health care sector has always existed alongside the national health service (NHS). The conventional assumption is that doctors who work as salaried employees of the NHS are guided in their clinical practice by professional values which encourage them to put their patients' interests first. A common suspicion is that doctors undertaking fee-for-service practice in the private sector are motivated by self-interest, with commitment to their patients compromised by consideration for their purse. The great majority of hospital consultants are salaried employees of the NHS, but most also undertake some private practice. This paper uses findings from an interview study of 60 surgeons and physicians engaged in dual practice of this kind to investigate their reasons for working in this way and look at how they reconcile their personal, professional and public sector values and responsibilities with the temptations of the market. The existence of the private sector and their own engagement in it was regarded by almost all respondents as a net benefit, not only to themselves and their private patients, but also to the NHS, so long as they handled it properly. The interviews revealed a complex range of beliefs and assumptions through which these doctors justify their activities and a variety of informal principles for dealing with such conflicts of interest as they acknowledge. Neither their values nor their actions can be adequately explained using generic concepts of professional self-interest or public service values without consideration of what such concepts represented in the specific social, economic, professional and policy context of health care in south-east England at the time of the study. Copyright 2003 Elseiver Ltd.

  16. Fort England as a military base.

    OpenAIRE

    Sampson, Sally

    1980-01-01

    • Opsomming: Tans is Fort England in Grahamstad ʼn sielsieke-inrigting. Dit het oorspronklik bekend gestaan as die East Barracks en was die brandpunt van die vroegste nedersetting op die Kaapse Oosgrens. Fort England was trouens die bakermat en vesting van die militêre eenheid wat later die Cape Mounted Rifles geword het. Ofskoon dit in werklikheid sIegs as barakke gedien het, is die naam Fort England in 1832 aan hierdie kompleks gegee. Die 'fort' was vir 'n halfeeu die militêre hoofkwartie...

  17. Portsmouth, England as seen from STS-60

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Isle of Wight, over 380 kilometers, is a diamond-shaped island located off the south coast of England. Separated from the mainland by The Solent, a narrow channel of water, the island is a popular resort area due to its scenery and mild climate. Sediment from English Lowland drainage systems, most notably the River Test, is visible entering the Solent and spilling into the English Channel. At the tip of the linear, northwestward inlet is the mouth of the Test and the city of Southampton, discernible as a small patch of lighter gray. Further east is a series of protected bays which are, from west to east; Portsmouth Harbour, Langstone Harbour, and Chichester Harbour.

  18. Educational Assessment in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Tina

    2010-01-01

    This profile explains the assessment system in England, concentrating on those aspects that are related to government policy. It begins by putting the system in context; it then describes the national educational structure, curriculum and assessment arrangements. The government agencies responsible for carrying out education policies are…

  19. Sex differentials in frailty in medieval England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2010-10-01

    In most modern populations, there are sex differentials in morbidity and mortality that favor women. This study addresses whether such female advantages existed to any appreciable degree in medieval Europe. The analyses presented here examine whether men and women with osteological stress markers faced the same risks of death in medieval London. The sample used for this study comes from the East Smithfield Black Death cemetery in London. The benefit of using this cemetery is that most, if not all, individuals interred in East Smithfield died from the same cause within a very short period of time. This allows for the analysis of the differences between men and women in the risks of mortality associated with osteological stress markers without the potential confounding effects of different causes of death. A sample of 299 adults (173 males, 126 females) from the East Smithfield cemetery was analyzed. The results indicate that the excess mortality associated with several osteological stress markers was higher for men than for women. This suggests that in this medieval population, previous physiological stress increased the risk of death for men during the Black Death to a greater extent than was true for women. Alternatively, the results might indicate that the Black Death discriminated less strongly between women with and without pre-existing health conditions than was true for men. These results are examined in light of previous analyses of East Smithfield and what is known about diet and sexually mediated access to resources in medieval England.

  20. What helps and hinders midwives in engaging with pregnant women about stopping smoking? A cross-sectional survey of perceived implementation difficulties among midwives in the North East of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beenstock Jane

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around 5,000 miscarriages and 300 perinatal deaths per year result from maternal smoking in the United Kingdom. In the northeast of England, 22% of women smoke at delivery compared to 14% nationally. Midwives have designated responsibilities to help pregnant women stop smoking. We aimed to assess perceived implementation difficulties regarding midwives’ roles in smoking cessation in pregnancy. Methods A self-completed, anonymous survey was sent to all midwives in northeast England (n = 1,358 that explores the theoretical explanations for implementation difficulties of four behaviours recommended in the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE guidance: (a asking a pregnant woman about her smoking behaviour, (b referring to the stop-smoking service, (c giving advice about smoking behaviour, and (d using a carbon monoxide monitor. Questions covering Michie et al.’s theoretical domain framework (TDF, describing 11 domains of hypothesised behavioural determinants (i.e., ‘knowledge’, ‘skills’, ‘social/professional role/identity’, ‘beliefs about capabilities’, ‘beliefs about consequences’, ‘motivation and goals’, ‘memory’, ‘attention and decision processes’, ‘environmental context and resources’, ‘social influences’, ‘emotion’, and ‘self-regulation/action planning’, were used to describe perceived implementation difficulties, predict self-reported implementation behaviours, and explore relationships with demographic and professional variables. Results The overall response rate was 43% (n = 589. The number of questionnaires analysed was 364, following removal of the delivery-unit midwives, who are not directly involved in providing smoking-cessation services. Participants reported few implementation difficulties, high levels of motivation for all four behaviours and identified smoking-cessation work with their role. Midwives were less certain about the

  1. White Tower, London, England

    OpenAIRE

    William the Conqueror; William Rufus; Henry I

    2007-01-01

    White Tower (Tower of London), London, England. Photograph taken by Terry Barry. There is restoration work being carried out on one of the towers. The White Tower is a central tower at the Tower of London. The great central keep was built by William the Conqueror and finished by his sons and successors, William Rufus and Henry I, around 1087. It is 90 feet high and is of massive construction, the walls varying from 15 feet thickness at the base to almost 11 feet in the upper parts. Above ...

  2. Historical underway surface temperature data collected aboard the ship Skelton Castle on a voyage from England to India, 28 February 1800 to 3 June 1800 (NODC Accession 0095925)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Underway surface air temperature and sea water temperature were collected aboard the Skelton Castle while in route from England to Bombay India as part of the East...

  3. 75 FR 16096 - New England Power Generators Association Inc., Complainant v. ISO New England Inc., Respondent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New England Power Generators Association Inc., Complainant v. ISO New England Inc., Respondent; ISO New England Inc. and New England Power Pool; Notice of Complaint March 24... Generators Association Inc. (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against ISO New England Inc....

  4. Threat, prejudice and the impact of the riots in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Eline A; Goodwin, Matthew J; Pickup, Mark

    2015-05-01

    This paper examines how a major outbreak of rioting in England in 2011 impacted on prejudice toward three minority groups in Britain: Muslims, Black British and East Europeans. We test whether the riots mobilized individuals by increasing feelings of realistic and symbolic threat and ultimately prejudice, or whether the riots galvanized those already concerned about minorities, thus strengthening the relationship between threat and prejudice. We conducted three national surveys - before, after and one year on from the riots - and show that after the riots individuals were more likely to perceive threats to society's security and culture, and by extension express increased prejudice toward Black British and East European minorities. We find little evidence of a galvanizing impact. One year later, threat and prejudice had returned to pre-riots levels; however, results from a survey experiment show that priming memories of the riots can raise levels of prejudice.

  5. Healthier central England or North–South divide? Analysis of national survey data on smoking and high-risk drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Emma; Brown, Jamie; West, Robert; Angus, Colin; Kaner, Eileen; Michie, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This paper compares patterns of smoking and high-risk alcohol use across regions in England, and assesses the impact on these of adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Design Population survey of 53 922 adults in England aged 16+ taking part in the Alcohol and Smoking Toolkit Studies. Measures Participants answered questions regarding their socioeconomic status (SES), gender, age, ethnicity, Government Office Region, smoking status and completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). High-risk drinkers were defined as those with a score of 8 or more (7 or more for women) on the AUDIT. Results In unadjusted analyses, relative to the South West, those in the North of England were more likely to smoke, while those from the East of England, South East and London were less likely. After adjustment for sociodemographics, smoking prevalence was no higher in North East (RR 0.97, p>0.05), North West (RR 0.98, p>0.05) or Yorkshire and the Humber (RR 1.03, p>0.05) but was less common in the East and West Midlands (RR 0.86, p0.05) Conclusions In adjusted analyses, smoking and high-risk drinking appear less common in ‘central England’ than in the rest of the country. Regional differences in smoking, but not those in high-risk drinking, appear to be explained to some extent by sociodemographic disparities. PMID:28249851

  6. Selected water-resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in New England in 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskel, Peter K.

    2017-06-22

    The New England Water Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is headquartered in Pembroke, New Hampshire, with offices in East Hartford, Connecticut; Augusta, Maine; Northborough, Massachusetts; and Montpelier, Vermont. The areas of expertise covered by the water science center’s staff of 130 include aquatic biology, chemistry, geographic information systems, geology, hydrologic sciences and engineering, and water use.

  7. Success for All in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Tracey

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the third-year findings of a longitudinal evaluation in England of Success for All (SFA, a comprehensive literacy program. Eighteen SFA schools across England and 18 control schools, matched on prior achievement and demographics, were included in this quasi-experimental study. The results of hierarchical linear modeling analysis reveal a statistically significant positive school-level effect for SFA schools compared with control schools on standardized reading measures of word-level and decoding skills, and there were directionally positive but nonsignificant school-level effects on measures of comprehension and fluency. Practical and policy implications of these findings are discussed, particularly as they relate to recent English government policies encouraging schools to implement research-proven approaches.

  8. 78 FR 32384 - New England Power Generators Association v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission New England Power Generators Association v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of...) filed a formal complaint against ISO New England Inc. (Respondent) alleging that certain newly...

  9. Environment Agency England flood warning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Chris; Walters, Mark; Haynes, Elizabeth; Dobson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Context In England around 5 million homes are at risk of flooding. We invest significantly in flood prevention and management schemes but we can never prevent all flooding. Early alerting systems are fundamental to helping us reduce the impacts of flooding. The Environment Agency has had the responsibility for flood warning since 1996. In 2006 we invested in a new dissemination system that would send direct messages to pre-identified recipients via a range of channels. Since then we have continuously improved the system and service we offer. In 2010 we introduced an 'opt-out' service where we pre-registered landline numbers in flood risk areas, significantly increasing the customer base. The service has performed exceptionally well under intense flood conditions. Over a period of 3 days in December 2013, when England was experiencing an east coast storm surge, the system sent nearly 350,000 telephone messages, 85,000 emails and 70,000 text messages, with a peak call rate of around 37,000 per hour and 100% availability. The Floodline Warnings Direct (FWD) System FWD provides warnings in advance of flooding so that people at risk and responders can take action to minimise the impact of the flood. Warnings are sent via telephone, fax, text message, pager or e-mail to over 1.1 million properties located within flood risk areas in England. Triggers for issuing alerts and warnings include attained and forecast river levels and rainfall in some rapidly responding locations. There are three levels of warning: Flood Alert, Flood Warning and Severe Flood Warning, and a stand down message. The warnings can be updated to include relevant information to help inform those at risk. Working with our current provider Fujitsu, the system is under a programme of continuous improvement including expanding the 'opt-out' service to mobile phone numbers registered to at risk addresses, allowing mobile registration to the system for people 'on the move' and providing access to

  10. EPA Region 1 - New England Towns, with Population

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The New England Town Boundary coverage is a compilation of coverages received from the six New England State GIS Offices. The EPA New England GIS Center appended the...

  11. 78 FR 928 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC428 New England Fishery Management Council... CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  12. 76 FR 70420 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA815 New England Fishery Management Council... CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  13. 75 FR 63146 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ64 New England Fishery Management Council.... Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  14. 76 FR 41216 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA561 New England Fishery Management Council... New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950;...

  15. 77 FR 27440 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management Council (Council) is... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  16. 75 FR 49466 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XY17 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  17. 76 FR 43266 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... Fisheries Service (NMFS). ACTION: Notice; Public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA582 New England Fishery Management Council.... Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  18. 78 FR 53729 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC840 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Thomas A. Nies, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  19. 78 FR 62587 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC923 New England Fishery Management Council...: Thomas A. Nies, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  20. 78 FR 48860 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meetings. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC802 New England Fishery Management Council...: Thomas A. Nies, Executive Director, ] New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978)...

  1. 76 FR 64073 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meetings. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA763 New England Fishery Management Council... locations, see SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50...

  2. Trends in colorectal cancer survival in northern Denmark: 1985-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lene Hjerrild; Nørgaard, Mette; Jepsen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    for age and gender. A total of 19,515 CRC patients were identified and linked with the Central Office of Civil Registration to ascertain survival through January 2005. Results: From 1985 to 2004, 1-year and 5-year survival improved both for patients with colon and rectal cancer. From 1995-1999 to 2000......-2004, overall 1-year survival of 65% for colon cancer did not improve, and some age groups experienced a decreasing 1-year survival probability. For rectal cancer, overall 1-year survival increased from 71% in 1995-1999 to 74% in 2000-2004. Using 1985-1989 as reference period, 30-day mortality did not decrease...... after implementation of the National Cancer Plan in 2000, neither for patients with colon nor rectal cancer. However, 1-year mortality for patients with rectal cancer did decline after its implementation. CONCLUSION: Survival and mortality from colon and rectal cancer improved before the National Cancer...

  3. Regional differences in postneonatal childhood mortality in Finland, 1985-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantto, Marjo; Renko, Marjo; Uhari, Matti

    2015-05-01

    The Finnish healthcare system will undergo a major reform in the near future. This study examined whether postneonatal childhood mortality differed between university and central hospital districts in Finland from 1985 to 2004 and whether the causes of death were preventable. We analysed postneonatal childhood mortality in Finland during two 10-year periods - 1985 to 1994 and 1995 to 2004 - analysing university and central hospital districts separately, as paediatric intensive care is centralised in university hospitals. The study looked at the main causes of death in each hospital, and the mortality rates were adjusted to demonstrate how many children were at risk of dying. Postneonatal childhood mortality decreased during the study period in university and central hospital districts. We found no significant difference in mortality rates between university hospital districts, but regional differences were notable in central hospital districts, partly because of historical differences in mortality. Accidents were the most common cause of death, with substantial regional differences. Regional postneonatal childhood mortality differed across central hospital districts, and this should be taken into account in the forthcoming restructuring of the Finnish healthcare system. Special attention is needed to prevent accidental deaths, both nationally and locally. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Rise of a Neo-Communitarian Project: A Critical Youth Work Study into the Pedagogy of the National Citizen Service in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Seán F

    2017-01-01

    This article draws upon recent empirical data from a series of in-depth qualitative interviews conducted with professional youth work practitioners. It is focused upon contemporary practice experiences of social action and youth citizenship projects across North East England. The research provides a more nuanced understanding of the National…

  5. Air Toxics in New England | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Find general information about air toxics, what EPA is doing to reduce ambient air toxics levels, information on the reductions we have seen to date from large New England manufacturing companies, as well as links to other related websites.

  6. Continuation of the New England Orogen, Australia, beneath the Queensland Plateau and Lord Howe rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, N.; Hauff, F.; Calvert, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Greywacke, argillite, greyschist and hypabyssal igneous rocks have been obtained from an Ocean Drilling Program core on the Queensland Plateau and from xenoliths in a volcanic breccia dredged from the crest of the Lord Howe Rise. Low to intermediate detrital quartz contents, 260-240 Ma K-Ar ages, and only moderately radiogenic Sr and Nd isotope compositions, suggest a correlation with the New England Orogen of eastern Australia, rather than with Australia's Lachlan Orogen or other adjacent geological provinces. Our results indicate that the New England Orogen terranes continue towards New Zealand at least as far as the southern Lord Howe Rise. The projected offshore boundaries of the major east Australian orogens are now known with more confidence, and do not appear to require any major cross-orogen offsets.

  7. Casebooks in Early Modern England:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassell, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    summary Casebooks are the richest sources that we have for encounters between early modern medical practitioners and their patients. This article compares astrological and medical records across two centuries, focused on England, and charts developments in the ways in which practitioners kept records and reflected on their practices. Astrologers had a long history of working from particular moments, stellar configurations, and events to general rules. These practices required systematic notation. Physicians increasingly modeled themselves on Hippocrates, recording details of cases as the basis for reasoned expositions of the histories of disease. Medical records, as other scholars have demonstrated, shaped the production of medical knowledge. Instead, this article focuses on the nature of casebooks as artifacts of the medical encounter. It establishes that casebooks were serial records of practice, akin to diaries, testimonials, and registers; identifies extant English casebooks and the practices that led to their production and preservation; and concludes that the processes of writing, ordering, and preserving medical records are as important for understanding the medical encounter as the records themselves. PMID:25557513

  8. Origin of the New England Oroclines, eastern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaanan, U.; Rosenbaum, G.; Li, P.

    2013-12-01

    During most of the Paleozoic, the Australian continent has occupied a tectonic position between the Tethys Ocean in its northern boundary and the Circum-Pacific (Panthalassan) subduction zones in the east. The latter has been subjected to alternating episodes of trench advance and trench retreat, as expressed, in the Australian Tasmanides, by changes from accretionary processes to rifting and S-type magmatism. Geological observations from the easternmost and youngest component of the Tasmanides, the New England Orogen, show that this orogenic belt forms a strongly contorted ear-shaped structure, delineated by a number of early Paleozoic to early Permian tectonic elements. Bending and fragmentation of the continental margin commenced in the early Permian, at ~300 Ma, and was associated with the development of extensional sedimentary basins, large vertical-axis block rotations and oroclinal bending. In this work, we constrain the geometry and kinematics of the New England Oroclines by providing new structural, geochronological and paleomagnetic data from key localities along the bent system. We show that the process of oroclinal bending was intimately linked to the development of backarc sedimentary basins, suggesting that extensional tectonics may have played a major role in the formation of the oroclines. This may indicate that the process of oroclinal bending in eastern Australia was controlled by trench retreat and slab segmentation, similarly to the modern tectonics of the SW Pacific and Mediterranean regions. In the context of Paleozoic Australia, it is possible that such complex plate boundary processes originated from the kinematic interaction between the Tethyan and circum-Pacific systems.

  9. NASA New England Outreach Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  10. Unrealistic Optimism: East and West?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Mary Sissons; Carter, Wakefield

    2013-01-01

    Following Weinstein’s (1980) pioneering work many studies established that people have an optimistic bias concerning future life events. At first, the bulk of research was conducted using populations in North America and Northern Europe, the optimistic bias was thought of as universal, and little attention was paid to cultural context. However, construing unrealistic optimism as a form of self-enhancement, some researchers noted that it was far less common in East Asian cultures. The current study extends enquiry to a different non-Western culture. Two hundred and eighty seven middle aged and middle income participants (200 in India, 87 in England) rated 11 positive and 11 negative events in terms of the chances of each event occurring in “their own life,” and the chances of each event occurring in the lives of “people like them.” Comparative optimism was shown for bad events, with Indian participants showing higher levels of optimism than English participants. The position regarding comparative optimism for good events was more complex. In India those of higher socioeconomic status (SES) were optimistic, while those of lower SES were on average pessimistic. Overall, English participants showed neither optimism nor pessimism for good events. The results, whose clinical relevance is discussed, suggest that the expression of unrealistic optimism is shaped by an interplay of culture and socioeconomic circumstance. PMID:23407689

  11. Engaging farmers to inform future diffuse pollution policy in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrain, Emilie; Lovett, Andrew; Nobel, Lister; Grant, Fiona; Blundell, Paul; Cleasby, Will

    2013-04-01

    Stakeholder knowledge and engagement is increasingly seen as a necessary ingredient for catchment management. Whilst many agricultural management options remain voluntary, the implementation of diffuse pollution mitigation measures will only be effective with the cooperation of stakeholders. Anthony et al. (2009) and Zhang et al. (2012) state the need for more information on the realistic farmer uptake of methods to enhance analyses of the potential for pollution mitigation. A study engaging farmers to understand current agricultural practices and their attitudes towards mitigation measures has formed part of the Demonstration Test Catchment (DTC) programme in England. Interviews with over seventy farmers were conducted during 2012 in three contrasting areas of the UK: the grassland dominated Eden catchment in the North West of England; the arable dominated Wensum catchment in East Anglia and the mixed farming of the Hampshire Avon catchment in southern England. Results from the farmer survey provide a baseline regarding current agricultural practices and give insight regarding attitudes to the adoption of other mitigation measures in the future. Opinions were obtained on eighty different measures taken from a recent guide to possible measures prepared for the UK government (Newell-Price et al., 2011). Analyses have been conducted examining how current use and attitudes towards future adoption of measures varies according to different characteristics of farm businesses. These findings will be of benefit to researchers, policy makers and farm advisers, particularly aiding decision making with respect to strategies for future implementation of programmes of measures. References. Anthony, S.G. et al., 2009. Quantitative assessment of scenarios for managing trade-off between the economic performance of agriculture and the environment and between different environmental media. Available at: http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Default

  12. 78 FR 31519 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: The New England Fishery Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Oversight Committee will meet to... held at the Providence Biltmore Hotel, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI 02903; telephone: (401) 421...

  13. Exporting poor health: the Irish in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Liam; Fernihough, Alan; Smith, James P

    2013-12-01

    In the twentieth century, the Irish-born population in England has typically been in worse health than both the native population and the Irish population in Ireland, a reversal of the commonly observed healthy migrant effect. Recent birth cohorts living in England and born in Ireland, however, are healthier than the English population. The substantial Irish migrant health penalty arises principally for cohorts born between 1920 and 1960. In this article, we attempt to understand the processes that generated these changing migrant health patterns for Irish migrants to England. Our results suggest a strong role for economic selection in driving the dynamics of health differences between Irish-born migrants and white English populations.

  14. East Asia Rolls On

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The economic recovery in East Asia remains unchanged on its upward trajectory despite the earthquake and devastating tsunami in Japan on March 11.Growth in East Asia slowed after a sharp rebound from the global financial crisis but is improving nonetheless.The World Bank’s East Asia and Pacific Economic Update issued on March 21 projects real GDP growth in East Asia will be smaller than that of 2010 in the following two years.Besides future East Asian economic trends,the report also discusses the impact of the Japanese catastrophe.Edited excerpts follow:

  15. 77 FR 21752 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB153 New England Fishery Management Council...: (860) 572-0328. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  16. 75 FR 43928 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX80 New England Fishery Management Council...-7200; fax: (781) 289-3176. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water...

  17. 76 FR 48807 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA623 New England Fishery Management Council...: (401) 861-8002. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  18. 78 FR 11630 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC504 New England Fishery Management Council... address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950....

  19. 75 FR 32375 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XW84 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (207) 775-5411; fax: (207) 775- 2872. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  20. 75 FR 74008 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA065 New England Fishery Management Council... address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950....

  1. 76 FR 7823 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA208 New England Fishery Management Council... (NEFSC), in cooperation with the New England Fishery Management Council (Council) will convene a webinar..., Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council; telephone: (978) 465-0492....

  2. 76 FR 44577 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; Public meeting. ] SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA598 New England Fishery Management Council...) 750-7991. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  3. 78 FR 30868 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC692 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (401) 421-0700; fax: (401) 455-3040. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  4. 76 FR 17381 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA325 New England Fishery Management Council...; fax: (508) 339- 1040. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  5. 76 FR 4870 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA181 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  6. 78 FR 48419 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC796 New England Fishery Management Council...: (978) 535-8283. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  7. 75 FR 1752 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XT67 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (603) 431-2300 and fax: (603) 433-5649. Council address: New England Fishery Management...

  8. 77 FR 19228 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB137 New England Fishery Management Council... 04101; telephone: (207) 775-2311; fax: (207) 772-4017. Council address: New England Fishery...

  9. 77 FR 5774 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA980 New England Fishery Management Council...: (603) 431-2300; fax: (603) 433-5649. Council Address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50...

  10. 78 FR 14981 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC547 New England Fishery Management Council.... Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA...

  11. 78 FR 64480 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC939 New England Fishery Management Council...: (401) 598-8000; fax: (401) 598-8200. ] Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  12. 76 FR 57718 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA706 New England Fishery Management Council... 01960; telephone: (978) 535-5000; fax: (978) 535-9610. Council address: New England Fishery...

  13. 78 FR 71565 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD006 New England Fishery Management Council... . ] Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA...

  14. 78 FR 18963 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC594 New England Fishery Management Council...: (508) 339- 2200; fax: (508) 339-1040. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50...

  15. 77 FR 15721 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN0648-XB090 New England Fishery Management Council...-4306. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport,...

  16. 75 FR 78976 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA092 New England Fishery Management Council...: (617) 569-5250; fax: (617) 561-0971. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50...

  17. 77 FR 64491 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC306 New England Fishery Management Council...-3176. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport,...

  18. 75 FR 78680 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Hearing. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management Council (Council) has rescheduled a public hearing to... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA091 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  19. 75 FR 11846 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV06 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (617) 385-4000; fax: (617) 385-4001. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  20. 75 FR 27990 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XW50 New England Fishery Management Council...) 421-8006. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  1. 78 FR 77658 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD045 New England Fishery Management Council...: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950. FOR...

  2. 77 FR 52314 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC199 New England Fishery Management Council...) 634-2001. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  3. 78 FR 13326 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce ACTION: Notice; public meeting. ] SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC520 New England Fishery Management Council... address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950....

  4. 77 FR 16540 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN: 0648-XB097 New England Fishery Management Council...-4306. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport,...

  5. 77 FR 58983 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC250 New England Fishery Management Council...) 926-6762; fax: (603) 926-2002. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50...

  6. 76 FR 32143 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a... the New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA 01950;...

  7. 76 FR 9756 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA234 New England Fishery Management Council...-2300; fax: (603) 433-5649. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water...

  8. 75 FR 11845 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV07 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (617) 385-4000; fax: (617) 385-4001. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  9. 77 FR 75614 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC411 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (207) 775-2311; fax: (207) 772-4017. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  10. 77 FR 15720 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB092 New England Fishery Management Council...-3000; fax: (401) 732-9309. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water...

  11. 78 FR 11820 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC514 New England Fishery Management Council.... Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA...

  12. 77 FR 29315 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC015 New England Fishery Management Council... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council... addressed to the New England Fishery Management Council, ] 50 Water Street, Newburyport, MA 01950;...

  13. 76 FR 28214 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA437 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (603) 436-7600; fax: (603) 436-7600. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  14. 78 FR 48420 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC788 New England Fishery Management Council.... Council Address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA...

  15. 76 FR 71939 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA837 New England Fishery Management Council...-4001. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport,...

  16. 78 FR 64199 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC936 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (401) 598-8000; fax: (401) 598-8200. Council Address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  17. 77 FR 16211 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB091 New England Fishery Management Council.... Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport, MA...

  18. 77 FR 19231 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB129 New England Fishery Management Council...: (401) 861-8002. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  19. 77 FR 75615 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC410 New England Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (207) 775-2311; fax: (207) 772-4017. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council,...

  20. 77 FR 64490 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC305 New England Fishery Management Council...-3176. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport,...

  1. 76 FR 543 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA127 New England Fishery Management Council... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul J. Howard, Executive Director, New England Fishery Management Council;...

  2. 78 FR 53730 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meetings. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC842 New England Fishery Management Council...) 431-8000; fax: (603) 501-3733. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50...

  3. 78 FR 14982 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC546 New England Fishery Management Council...-4650. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill 2, Newburyport,...

  4. 76 FR 48806 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA621 New England Fishery Management Council...; fax: (401) 861-8002. Council address: New England Fishery Management Council, 50 Water Street, Mill...

  5. A conditional model for estimating the increase in suicides associated with the 2008-2010 economic recession in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurina, Carme; Bragulat, Basili; Saez, Marc; López-Casasnovas, Guillem

    2013-09-01

    Although evidence of the effects of the economic crisis on suicides is quite low, a recent article shows that the increase in suicides in England between 2008 and 2010 could be associated with the rise in unemployment. Our study analysed whether this effect was the same for all regions of England, using a conditional model which explicitly allows estimation of regional time trends and the effects of unemployment on suicides at the regional level. Hierarchical mixed models were used to assess both, suicides attributable to the financial crisis and the association between unemployment and suicides. The number and the (age-standardised) rate of suicides, for men and women separately, were the dependent variables. We considered the nine English regions based on the NUTS 2 level. There was an (not statistically significant) increase in the number of suicides between 2008 and 2010. The variation in rates was not statistically significant in England as a whole but there were statistically significant increases and decreases in some regions. Statistically significant associations between unemployment and suicides were only found at regional level. For men, statistically significant unemployment rates were positively associated with age-standardised suicide rates in the South West (0.384), North West (0.260) and North East (0.136), and negatively associated in the East of England (-0.444), East Midlands (-0.236) and London (-0.168). The study provides evidence that, even with statistically significant associations, finding variability, but no clear pattern, between trends and associations and/or numbers and rates might in fact suggest relatively spurious relationships; this is a result of not controlling for confounders.

  6. Simulated National Identity and Ascendant Hyperreality in Julian Barnes’s England, England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Abootalebi H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper sets out to analyze Julian Barnes’s novel England, England (1998 in the light of Jean Baudrillard’s concepts of simulation and hyperreality. According to Baudrillard, what we experience in today’s world is a simulation of reality superseded by signs and images, and therefore we are living in a hyperreal world. Barnes’s book offers a representative sample of hyperreal world in which Martha, the protagonist, finds herself troubled. Although initially she is impressed by the glamour of the theme park named England, England later on she loses interest in it when she comes to realization that everything about it is fake. This condition, making her think of her own identity and true self, finally leads her to leave the theme park and settle in the village of Anglia where she hopes to discover her true nature and regain her lost happiness.

  7. 78 FR 1851 - New England States Committee on Electricity v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission New England States Committee on Electricity v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice... States Committee on Electricity (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against ISO New England...

  8. 78 FR 67357 - New England Power Generators Association, Inc. v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New England Power Generators Association, Inc. v. ISO New England Inc... Association, Inc. (NEPGA or Complainant) filed a complaint against ISO New England, Inc. (ISO-NE or Respondent). NEPGA alleges that the provisions of the ISO-NE Tariff that set capacity prices during...

  9. Emerging Models of Teacher Training in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sheila

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, changes have occurred that have had a fundamental impact on Initial Teacher Education (ITE) in England. There has been a move from a model dominated by the higher education institutions (HEIs) to a school-HEI "partnership." High stakes inspections have been given a greater role by the government and this has led to…

  10. Rural Primary School Closures in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Richard C.

    A three-phase interdisciplinary effort between educators and environmental planners is focusing on the social effects of rural primary school reorganization now occuring in England as a result of a declining birth rate and the resulting need for school closure. A questionnaire mailed nationally to rural Local Education Authorities, cross-community…

  11. Gauging the brownfield land supply in England

    OpenAIRE

    K. Williams; Sinnett, D.; Miner, P.; Carmichael, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a study that aimed to help fill the information gap left by the loss of the National Land Use Database – and asked ‘Is there enough brownfield land in England to meet housing needs?’

  12. The Field of Educational Administration in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Based on over twenty years of empirical and intellectual work about knowledge production in the field of educational administration, I examine the origins and development of the canon, methodologies and knowledge workers in England. I focus on the field as being primarily concerned with professional activity and how and why this was established…

  13. Hepatitis E in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Hannah C; Boisson, Sophie; Ijaz, Samreen; Hewitt, Kirsten; Ngui, Siew Lin; Boxall, Elizabeth; Teo, Chong Gee; Morgan, Dilys

    2008-01-01

    In 2005, 329 cases of hepatitis E virus infection were confirmed in England and Wales; 33 were confirmed indigenous infections, and a further 67 were estimated to be indigenous infections. Hepatitis E should be considered in the investigation of patients with hepatitis even if they have no history of travel.

  14. The Politics of Education Policy in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    In this appreciative discussion paper I provide an overview of the reforms made to education in England, and engage with the politics of education through examining the simultaneous and inter-related processes of politicisation, depoliticisation and repoliticisation of educational matters. I engage in a discussion of the papers in this special…

  15. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  16. Emerging Models of Teacher Training in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sheila

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, changes have occurred that have had a fundamental impact on Initial Teacher Education (ITE) in England. There has been a move from a model dominated by the higher education institutions (HEIs) to a school-HEI "partnership." High stakes inspections have been given a greater role by the government and this has led to…

  17. Comparing Teacher Roles in Denmark and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter; Dorf, Hans; Pratt, Nick; Hohmann, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a comparative study of teaching in Denmark and England. Its broader aim is to help develop an approach for comparing pedagogy. Lesson observations and interviews identified the range of goals towards which teachers in each country worked and the actions these prompted. These were clustered using the lens of…

  18. Creativity in Recent Educational Discourse in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Christine

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of creativity in educational discourse in England over the Labour government's three terms in office. It traces the changing definitions and uses of the term in relation to agendas about raising standards in schools, promoting the arts and cultural education, and developing entrepreneurialism. In particular, it offers…

  19. Whales of New England. Secondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England Aquarium, Boston, MA.

    Instructional materials and suggestions for conducting a whale watching field trip are contained in this curriculum packet for secondary science teachers. It is one unit in a series of curricular programs developed by the New England Aquarium Education Department. Activities and information are organized into three sections: (1) pre-trip…

  20. Whales of New England. Secondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England Aquarium, Boston, MA.

    Instructional materials and suggestions for conducting a whale watching field trip are contained in this curriculum packet for secondary science teachers. It is one unit in a series of curricular programs developed by the New England Aquarium Education Department. Activities and information are organized into three sections: (1) pre-trip…

  1. Mathematics Anxiety in Secondary Students in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Whatever the changes that are made to the mathematics curriculum in England, there will always remain a problem with mathematics anxiety. Maths anxiety is rarely facilitative. This study examined aspects of mathematics in secondary schools and how students rated them as sources of anxiety. Over 2000 students in independent and mainstream schools…

  2. Euro plays : Canadian companies find success in England and France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsters, S.

    1998-09-01

    A growing list of Canadian companies are searching for oil and gas onshore in England and France. Cirque Energy Corp., Vermilion Resources Ltd., Morrison Middlefield Resources Ltd., and Bow Valley Energy Ltd., are among the companies that are taking advantage of the underexplored basins, little competition, availability of land, and (in the case of the United Kingdom) a superior fiscal regime. Cirque Energy Corp. entered the U.K. in 1995 and currently has a 220,000 acre land position in the East Midlands basin, 250 km north of London. The main producing reservoirs are Permo-Carboniferous in age. The geology is similar to that in the North Sea. In November 1998, Cirque plans to build a 2,500 metre, six inch pipeline to transport up to 1,500 gross bbls of oil per day. Vermilion Resources Ltd. acquired oil and gas assets in the Paris and Aquitaine basin. The company has executed a $10.1 million workover and recompletion program on 42 wells which has increased production to more than 6,000 BOE per day from the previous 4,000 BOE per day. 3 figs.

  3. Genesis and characteristics of woodlot forms in the landscape of southern England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Fortuna-Antoszkiewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The paper is a synthesis of the research on the genesis and characteristics of woodlot forms in the traditional English landscape. Historically, their origin is related among other things to the British being inspired by the Arcadian myths popular in the 16th and 17th centuries, as a result of trips to places like Italy or the Far East, and a fascination with nature. At the same time the 16th century was characterized by a progressive and gradual deforestation of the landscape of the island. Therefore, during the 17th and 18th centuries a very particular cultural landscape of England developed, of which the specific pastoral physiognomy found some representation in the archetype of the 19th-century English park. This can be clearly stated on the example of woodlots, which very similar forms can be shown both in English agricultural landscape and in English parks. The aim of this research was to analyse forms and functions of selected examples of woodlots in southern England. Material and methods. The collection of field data took place in April 2015 during scientific workshops organized by the Polish Dendrology Society (PTD, devoted to woody plants of southern England (including Surrey and vicinity. As a result, the physiognomy of the complex system of woodlots was analysed in situ and a rich photo documentation was collected. Results and conclusions. It can be stated that the forms of woodlots occurring in the contempor­ary English landscape bear a strong resemblance to those presented in 19th-century landscape paintings. This is a phenomenon of effective protection of the physiognomy of the cultural landscape, which has survived virtually unchanged after more than two centuries. As a result, the authors characterized exceptional values of woodlots to traditional rural and parkland landscape in southern England as an example for development and protection of the cultural landscapes in Poland – both in the past and the present.

  4. Defining geo-habitats for groundwater ecosystem assessments: an example from England and Wales (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitowitz, Damiano C.; Maurice, Louise; Lewis, Melinda; Bloomfield, John P.; Reiss, Julia; Robertson, Anne L.

    2017-07-01

    Groundwater ecosystems comprising micro-organisms and metazoans provide an important contribution to global biodiversity. Their complexity depends on geology, which determines the physical habitat available, and the chemical conditions within it. Despite this, methods of classifying groundwater habitats using geological data are not well established and researchers have called for higher resolution habitat frameworks. A novel habitat typology for England and Wales (UK) is proposed, which distinguishes 11 geological habitats (geo-habitats) on hydrogeological principles and maps their distribution. Hydrogeological and hydrochemical data are used to determine the characteristics of each geo-habitat, and demonstrate their differences. Using these abiotic parameters, a new method to determine abiotic habitat quality is then developed. The geo-habitats had significantly different characteristics, validating the classification system. All geo-habitats were highly heterogeneous, containing both high quality habitat patches that are likely to be suitable for fauna, and areas of low quality that may limit faunal distributions. Karstic and porous habitats generally were higher quality than fractured habitats. Overall, 70% of England and Wales are covered by lower quality fractured habitats, with only 13% covered by higher quality habitats. The main areas of high quality habitats occur in central England as north-south trending belts, possibly facilitating dispersal along this axis. They are separated by low quality geo-habitats that may prevent east-west dispersal of fauna. In south-west England and Wales suitable geo-habitats occur as small isolated patches. Overall, this paper provides a new national-scale typology that is adaptable for studies in other geographic areas.

  5. Organic geochemistry of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillo-carbonated sedimentary series of the East of the Paris basin and of England. Variabilities and paleo-environmental implications; Geochimie organique des series argilo-carbonatees du Callovo-Oxfordien de l'Est du bassin de Paris et d'Angleterre: Variabilites et implications paleoenvironnementales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautevelle, Y

    2005-12-15

    The Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones from the East of the Paris basin are studied by ANDRA in order to test the feasibility of a possible storage of radioactive waste. The molecular analysis of their organic matter indicates that they can be considered as homogenous from their organic content point of view because they are characterized by only one molecular facies. However, the transition to the surrounding limestones is underlined by a major evolution of the molecular facies indicating a change and an increase of the variability of the deposition and diagenesis conditions. The evolution of the distribution of the plant bio-markers indicates, at the end of the Lower Oxfordian, a paleo-floristic change characterized by the increase of the proportion of Pinaceae (a conifer family) or their forerunners on the London-Brabant massif. This paleo-floristic evolution reflects a paleo-climatic change characterized by the increase of aridity at the global scale. Other complementary results get on other sedimentary series of similar ages highlight the occurrence of a period of water anoxia during the Middle Callovian which certainly happened on the major part of the Western Europe. This event could be at the origin of the crisis of the carbonate production at the Dogger/Malm transition. On the other hand, an experimental technique based on artificial maturation of extant plants has been developed and will allow the acquisition of new palaeo-chemo-taxonomic data. These data will contribute to a better interpretation of plant bio-marker assemblages in terms of palaeo-floristic composition. (author)

  6. Public awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer in England in 2015: a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buykx, Penny; Li, Jessica; Gavens, Lucy; Hooper, Lucie; Lovatt, Melanie; Gomes de Matos, Elena; Meier, Petra; Holmes, John

    2016-11-30

    Public knowledge of the association between alcohol and cancer is reported to be low. We aimed to provide up-to-date evidence for England regarding awareness of the link between alcohol and different cancers and to determine whether awareness differs by demographic characteristics, alcohol use, and geographic region. A representative sample of 2100 adults completed an online survey in July 2015. Respondents were asked to identify which health outcomes, including specific cancers, may be caused by alcohol consumption. Logistic regressions explored whether demographic, alcohol use, and geographic characteristics predicted correctly identifying alcohol-related cancer risk. Unprompted, 12.9% of respondents identified cancer as a potential health outcome of alcohol consumption. This rose to 47% when prompted (compared to 95% for liver disease and 73% for heart disease). Knowledge of the link between alcohol and specific cancers varied between 18% (breast) and 80% (liver). Respondents identified the following cancers as alcohol-related where no such evidence exists: bladder (54%), brain (32%), ovarian (17%). Significant predictors of awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer were being female, more highly educated, and living in North-East England. There is generally low awareness of the relationship between alcohol consumption and cancer, particularly breast cancer. Greater awareness of the relationship between alcohol and breast cancer in North-East England, where a mass media campaign highlighted this relationship, suggests that population awareness can be influenced by social marketing.

  7. The Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Virginia; And Others

    This sixth grade resource unit focuses on Middle East culture as seen through five areas of the social sciences: anthropology-sociology, geography, history, economics, and political science. Among objectives that the student is expected to achieve are the following: 1) given general information on the Middle East through the use of film, visuals,…

  8. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  9. Recovery in the East

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    As robust as the economic recovery in East Asia has been in recent months,attention must now be turned to managing emerging risks challenging macroeconomic stability,said World Bank’s latest East Asia and Pacific Economic Update released on October 19.Edited excerpts follow

  10. Mathematics anxiety in secondary students in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Steve

    2009-02-01

    Whatever the changes that are made to the mathematics curriculum in England, there will always remain a problem with mathematics anxiety. Maths anxiety is rarely facilitative. This study examined aspects of mathematics in secondary schools and how students rated them as sources of anxiety. Over 2000 students in independent and mainstream schools in England completed a 20-item questionnaire designed to investigate maths anxiety levels. The same questionnaire was given to over 440 dyslexic males in specialist schools within the same age range. The results showed that examinations and tests create high levels of anxiety in approximately 4% of students. The results suggest that certain aspects and topics in the maths curriculum, such as long division, cause similar levels of anxiety for students in all year groups in secondary schools.

  11. POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY SYSTEM IN ENGLAND AND WALES

    OpenAIRE

    Balcıoğlu, Ercan; Pala, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the reader with a literature review with the aim of finding out about the origin and system of police accountability in England and Wales. It is hoped that the article will help to identify some important conceptual considerations that ought to betaken into account by any professional and responsible police departments seeking to embrace accountability in its policing procedures.This article explores the sensitive issue of police accountability to civilian oversight bodi...

  12. The New England Healthcare EDI Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, John P; DeBor, Greg; Stuntz, Laurance

    2003-01-01

    The New England Healthcare EDI Network (NEHEN) is a collaborative of providers and payers in eastern Massachusetts that created, manages, and operates a shared insurance EDI infrastructure. NEHEN currently has 12 provider and three payer members, and supports over 1,000,000 insurance EDI transactions per month. This paper describes the philosophies that define the NEHEN business model and discusses its governance structure, technology, operational issues associated with its implementation, and its current status, along with lessons learned from the NEHEN undertaking.

  13. Valanginian ammonites in East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsen, Peter

    2001-01-01

    ammonites, Boreal, Tethys, bed-by-bed collection, Valanginian, Wollaston Forland, East Greenland......ammonites, Boreal, Tethys, bed-by-bed collection, Valanginian, Wollaston Forland, East Greenland...

  14. Scribal Authorship and the Writing of History in Medieval England

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, M.

    2012-01-01

    Based on new readings of some of the least-read texts by some of the best-known scribes of later medieval England, Scribal Authorship and the Writing of History in Medieval England reconceptualizes medieval scribes as authors, and the texts surviving in medieval manuscripts as authored. Culling evidence from history writing in later medieval England, Matthew Fisher concludes that we must reject the axiomatic division between scribe and author. Using the peculiarities of authority and intertex...

  15. Protecting Geoheritage - Geodiversity Charter for England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    The Geodiversity Charter for England, launched in 2014, sets out the clear vision that England's 'geodiversity is recognised as an integral and vital part of our environment, economy and heritage that must be safeguarded and managed for current and future generations'. England is privileged to be among the most geodiverse places in the world with 700 million years of geological history revealed by our rocks. The white cliffs of Dover, honey coloured Cotswold limestone, granite Dartmoor Tors, are examples of this geodiversity. To maintain and enhance our geodiversity it is important to recognise its role in: • the understanding of England's geological history and global geosciences • natural heritage, both terrestrial and marine, and landscapes in all their diversity • supporting habitats and species and the many essential benefits they provide for society • adaptation to changes in climate and sea-level through sustainable management of land and water and working with natural processes • sustainable economic development • the history, character and cultural development of our society through intellectual growth and creative expression alongside industrial and technological development • public health, quality of life and national well-being and connecting people with the natural environment including active promotion of geotourism. Geodiversity, however, is an often overlooked environmental asset. The vision of the Charter and the work of the English Geodiversity Forum is to encourage good practice and to act as a focus in order to: • raise awareness of the importance, value and relevance of geodiversity to our economic prosperity and comfort and its wider links with the natural environment, landscape, cultural and historical heritage and sense of place • encourage a sense of pride through education and learning, promotion and interpretation • promote careful management of geodiversity through conservation and enhancement of its special

  16. Simulated National Identity and Ascendant Hyperreality in Julian Barnes’s England, England

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Abootalebi H.; Niazi N.

    2015-01-01

    The paper sets out to analyze Julian Barnes’s novel England, England (1998) in the light of Jean Baudrillard’s concepts of simulation and hyperreality. According to Baudrillard, what we experience in today’s world is a simulation of reality superseded by signs and images, and therefore we are living in a hyperreal world. Barnes’s book offers a representative sample of hyperreal world in which Martha, the protagonist, finds herself troubled. Although initially she is impressed by the glamour o...

  17. Fluxus East / Petra Stegmann

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Stegmann, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Näitusest "Fluxus East" Kumu Kunstimuuseumis. Fluxuse liikumisest leedu kunstniku George Maciunase (1931-1978) eestvedamisel. Liikumise ilmingutest Eestis (happeningid, muusikaaktsioonid, visuaalne poeesia, mail art). Kuraator Petra Stegmann, kujundaja Andrea Pichl

  18. East- African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol 83 No. 8 August 2006 ... urology, ENT and orthopaedic groups and these ... no significant difference in orthopaedic patients mortality' with standard; we .... applying TRISS analysis to pediatric blunt trauma.

  19. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-12-01

    Dec 1, 2001 ... DIETARY PATTERNS AND DENTAL CARIES IN NURSERY SCHOOL CHILDREN IN NAIROBI ..... bottle act as a bacterial substrate and especially when the ... children for their co-operation, Colgate Palmolive (East Africa) for.

  20. The potential for measles transmission in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Graham

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the schools vaccination campaign in 1994, measles has been eliminated from England. Maintaining elimination requires low susceptibility levels to keep the effective reproduction number R below 1. Since 1995, however, MMR coverage in two year old children has decreased by more than 10%. Methods Quarterly MMR coverage data for children aged two and five years resident in each district health authority in England were used to estimate susceptibility to measles by age. The effective reproduction numbers for each district and strategic health authority were calculated and possible outbreak sizes estimated. Results In 2004/05, about 1.9 million school children and 300,000 pre-school children were recorded as incompletely vaccinated against measles in England, including more than 800,000 children completely unvaccinated. Based on this, approximately 1.3 million children aged 2–17 years were susceptible to measles. In 14 of the 99 districts, the level of susceptibility is sufficiently high for R to exceed 1, indicating the potential for sustained measles transmission. Eleven of these districts are in London. Our model suggests that the potential exists for an outbreak of up to 100,000 cases. These results are sensitive to the accuracy of reported vaccination coverage data. Conclusion Our analysis identified several districts with the potential for sustaining measles transmission. Many London areas remain at high risk even allowing for considerable under-reporting of coverage. Primary care trusts should ensure that accurate systems are in place to identify unimmunised children and to offer catch-up immunisation for those not up to date for MMR.

  1. Comparing teacher roles in Denmark and England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Peter; Dorf, Hans; Pratt, Nick;

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a comparative study of teaching in Denmark and England. Its broader aim is to help develop an approach for comparing pedagogy. Lesson observations and interviews identified the range of goals towards which teachers in each country worked and the actions...... was the ease with which competent English teachers moved between roles. The English teachers observed adopted roles consistent with a wider techno-rationalist discourse. There was a greater subject emphasis by Danish teachers, whose work was set predominantly within a democratic humanist discourse, whilst...... the English teachers placed a greater emphasis on applied skills....

  2. Comparative list of the Birds of Holland and England

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, F.E.

    1893-01-01

    In the following paper a list as possible complete is given of the birds of Holland and England, whilst a few lines are added to each species, to state when and where the birds occur in both countries. It is worth of being noticed that, although Holland and England are so near each other, a great di

  3. Religious Control of Schooling in England: Diversity and Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Britain is a multicultural, multi-faith and multiracial society overlaid by white institutional racism. The race riots in the northern cities of England in 2001 and in 2005 signal that social and ethnic divisions are prominent. This article considers the state schooling in England and the role which state-funded faith schools play in government…

  4. 75 FR 70722 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN: 0648-XA044 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... at 9:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Sheraton Harborside Hotel, 250 Market Street...

  5. 75 FR 78680 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA090 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... held at the Radisson Airport Hotel, 2081 Post Road, Warwick, RI 02886: telephone: (401) 739-3000; fax...

  6. 76 FR 77492 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA864 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... will be held at the Hotel Providence, 139 Mathewson Street, Providence, RI 02903: telephone: (401) 861...

  7. 75 FR 80796 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA107 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Clarion Hotel, 1230 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04102...

  8. 75 FR 63147 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ63 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... held at the Providence Biltmore Hotel, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI 02903; telephone: (401) 421...

  9. 78 FR 25256 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC648 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management...: Meeting address: The meeting will be held at the Sheraton Harborside Hotel, 250 Market Street, Portsmouth...

  10. 75 FR 80798 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA106 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Clarion Hotel, 1230 Congress Street, Portland, ME...

  11. 77 FR 42278 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management Council's (Council... meeting will be held at the Sheraton Harborside Hotel, 250 Market Street, Portsmouth, NH 03801; telephone...

  12. 78 FR 30869 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC693 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... 10 a.m. ADDRESSES: Meeting address: The meeting will be held at the Providence Biltmore Hotel, 11...

  13. 75 FR 78681 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA089 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... held at the Clarion Hotel, 1230 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04102; telephone: (207) 774-5611; fax...

  14. 77 FR 14351 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB073 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... will be held at the Providence Biltmore Hotel, 11 Dorrance Street, Providence, RI 02903; telephone...

  15. 78 FR 70282 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC993 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meetings. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. ADDRESSES: Meeting address: These meetings will be held at the Omni Providence Hotel...

  16. 77 FR 58982 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC256 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Ashworth by the Sea Hotel, 295 Ocean Boulevard...

  17. 76 FR 77214 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA862 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... held at the Hotel Providence, 139 Mathewson Street, Providence, RI 02903; telephone: (401) 861-8000...

  18. Energy in New England | Energy and Global Climate Change ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    EPA Region 1's Energy and Climate Unit provides information, technical assistance, and training on energy efficiency, renewable energy, energy use and transmission in New England. In addition, the unit works with the New England States to regulate and inventory greenhouse gas emissions.

  19. 77 FR 20613 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB129 New England Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management Council (Council) has cancelled the public meeting of its Scientific and...

  20. 77 FR 8809 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public hearings. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB006 New England Fishery Management Council... Herring Fishery Management Plan (FMP). DATES: Written public comments must be received on or before 5...

  1. 77 FR 27440 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration New England Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings...), Commerce. ACTION: Public Hearing; Request for Comments. SUMMARY: The New England Fishery Management Council... Northeast Small-Mesh Multispecies Fishery Management Plan (FMP). DATES: The public hearing will be held...

  2. Bright Futures?: Human Capital Dilemmas Cloud New England Outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Neal R.; Johnson, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the problematic trends affecting New England's human capital. These trends include migration to other states of New England's graduates due to high cost of living; more than 60 percent of college dropouts; and the decision of most companies to outsource jobs in India and other countries.

  3. Maritza East 1 presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M.; Haillet, J.-M.; Casier, F. [ALSTOM Power (Italy). Enviornmental Control Systems

    2007-07-01

    The paper describes the project to develop a 670 MW gross and 600 MW net lignite-fired power plant, the AES-3C Maritza East 1, to be realised adjacent to the site of the existing Maritza East 1 power plant. The site is 40 kilometres south-east of Stara Zagora and 250 km south-east of Sofia, Bulgaria. The project will be more efficient and have lower emissions of sulphur dioxide per MW of electricity generated than the existing Maritza East 1 facility. The facility will have low NOx emissions, an electrostatic precipitator to control the emissions of particular matter and a flue gas desulfurization system to control emissions of sulphur dioxide. The AES 3-C Maritza East 1 plant meets all emissions criteria as defined by the Bulgarian Government, the EU and all other relevant authorities unlike the plants at Maritza East 2 and 1 which will either have to retrofit abatement technology in the next few years or face the prospect of limited hours operation and eventual closure after 2008. The new facility will have zero discharge of waste water. Condenser cooling will be provided by a natural draught cooling tower fed in part by process waters. This recycling of water for the cooling tower will significantly reduce the amount of water withdrawn from the lake. In addition, cooling tower blowdown and other potential facility discharges will be used within the wet limestone flue gas desulfurization system. ALSTOM has paid careful attention to all the different aspects involved: minimisation of environmental impact for both air, water and soil by applying state of the art technologies in all the different areas of the project and, at the same time, delivering an economically profitable installation. 2 ills.

  4. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori isolates recovered from ulcer disease patients in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Aleem A

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic diversity of H. pylori from many different human populations is largely unknown. We compared genomes of 65 H. pylori strains from Nottingham, England. Molecular analysis was carried out to identify rearrangements within and outside the cag-pathogenicity-island (cag PAI and DNA sequence divergence in candidate genes. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out based on various high-resolution genotyping techniques. Results Analyses of virulence genes (cagT, cagE, cagA, vacA, iceA, oipA and babB revealed that H. pylori strains from England are genetically distinct from strains obtained from other countries. The toxigenic vacA s1m1 genotype was found to be less common and the plasticity region cluster was found to be disrupted in all the isolates. English isolates showed a predominance of iceA1 alleles and a functional proinflammatory oipA gene. The English H. pylori gene pool revealed several Asian/oriental features. This included the predominance of cagA – glr (cagA right junction motif types III and II (up to 42%, presence of vacA m1c alleles and phylogenetic affinity towards East Asian / Amerindian gene pools based on fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP analysis and glmM sequence analysis. Conclusion Overall, our results demonstrated genetic affinities of H. pylori in England with both European and the Asian gene pools and some distinctive genetic features of virulence genes that may have evolved in this important European population.

  5. Molybdenum distributions and variability in drinking water from England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, P L; Cooper, D M; Lapworth, D J

    2014-10-01

    An investigation has been carried out of molybdenum in drinking water from a selection of public supply sources and domestic taps across England and Wales. This was to assess concentrations in relation to the World Health Organization (WHO) health-based value for Mo in drinking water of 70 μg/l and the decision to remove the element from the list of formal guideline values. Samples of treated drinking water from 12 water supply works were monitored up to four times over an 18-month period, and 24 domestic taps were sampled from three of their supply areas. Significant (p  0.05) were detected. Tap water samples collected from three towns (North Wales, the English Midlands, and South East England) supplied uniquely by upland reservoir water, river water, and Chalk groundwater, respectively, also showed a remarkable uniformity in Mo concentrations at each location. Within each, the variability was very small between houses (old and new), between pre-flush and post-flush samples, and between the tap water and respective source water samples. The results indicate that water distribution pipework has a negligible effect on supplied tap water Mo concentrations. The findings contrast with those for Cu, Zn, Ni, Pb, and Cd, which showed significant differences (p water samples. In two pre-flush samples, concentrations of Ni or Pb were above drinking water limits, although in all cases, post-flush waters were compliant. The high concentrations, most likely derived from metal pipework in the domestic distribution system, accumulated during overnight stagnation. The concentrations of Mo observed in British drinking water, in all cases less than 2 μg/l, were more than an order of magnitude below the WHO health-based value and suggest that Mo is unlikely to pose a significant health or water supply problem in England and Wales.

  6. Translation and Manipulation in Renaissance England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Denton

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This supplementary volume to JEMS is part of an ongoing research project which began with a series of articles published by the author in the 1990s on the translation of Classical historical texts in Renaissance England. The methodology followed is that of Descriptive Translation Studies as developed by scholars such as Lefevere and Hermans with the accent on manipulation of the source text in line with the ideological stance of the translator and the need to ensure that readers of the translation received the ‘correct’ moral lessons.  Particular attention is devoted to a case study of the strategies followed in Thomas North’s domesticating English translation of Jacques Amyot’s French translation of Plutarch’s Lives and the consequences for Shakespeare’s perception of Plutarch.Biography John Denton was associate professor of English Language and Translation at the University of Florence until retirement in 2015. He  has published on contrastive analysis, history of translation (with special reference to the Early Modern England, religious discourse, literary and audiovisual translation. 

  7. Anthropocene Survival of Southern New England's Salt ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In southern New England, salt marshes are exceptionally vulnerable to the impacts of accelerated sea level rise. Regional rates of sea level rise have been as much as 50 % greater than the global average over past decades, a more than fourfold increase over late Holocene background values. In addition, coastal development blocks many potential marsh migration routes, and compensatory mechanisms relying on positive feedbacks between inundation and sediment deposition are insufficient to counter inundation increases in extreme low-turbidity tidal waters. Accordingly, multiple lines of evidence suggest that marsh submergence is occurring in southern New England. A combination of monitoring data, field re-surveys, radiometric dating, and analysis of peat composition have established that, beginning in the early and mid-twentieth century, the dominant low-marsh plant, Spartina alterniflora, has encroached upward in tidal marshes, and typical high-marsh plants, including Juncus gerardii and Spartina patens, have declined, providing strong evidence that vegetation changes are being driven, at least in part, by higher water levels. Additionally, aerial and satellite imagery show shoreline retreat, widening and headward extension of channels, and new and expanded interior depressions. Papers in this special section highlight changes in marsh-building processes, patterns of vegetation loss, and shifts in species composition. The final papers turn to strategies for minimiz

  8. Weight charts of infants dying of sudden infant death in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheimberg, Irene; Ashal, Husna; Kotiloglu-Karaa, Esin; French, Paul; Kay, Philippa; Cohen, Marta C

    2014-01-01

    The organ weights in cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and undetermined deaths in previously healthy infants do not correspond to "the normal range" of organ weights in international standard charts for infants currently in use in some institutions. The aim of our study was to ascertain the organ weights of infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly in England and for whom a cause of death was not found, therefore falling under the category of SIDS or undetermined. We collated the organs weights from 2 institutions covering between them the South East and North of England including London, Yorkshire, and Derbyshire. The cases from The Royal London Hospital were autopsied between 1997 and 2013, and the cases from Sheffield Children's Hospital were autopsied between 2006 and 2013. There were 188 babies who had been born at term (62 female and 126 male) and 26 ex-premature babies (15 female and 11 male). Organs of male babies were slightly heavier than those of female babies but as there was no significant differences male and female babies were considered together. Comparison with standard charts (from 1932 and 1962) and with more recent charts confirmed the discrepancy between the older charts commonly in use with more recent measurements, including ours. The main reason for these differences is that babies in the recent charts were previously healthy babies with no long term disease and improved in the health of the population.

  9. Groundwater vulnerability to onshore unconventional and conventional hydrocarbon activities in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Sian; Bloomfield, John; Ward, Rob; Davey, Ian; Hart, Alwyn

    2016-04-01

    In the last five years there has been a renewed interest in onshore oil and gas in England as new extraction technologies and continued energy demand have allowed for the development of less accessible resources. Until now, shale gas has received most attention in England although exploration licences have also been granted for coal bed methane and mine gas in addition to more conventional hydrocarbon resources. While there is some interest in underground coal gasification there are currently no licences granted. Potential impacts on groundwater from shale gas operations have been well publicised. Hazards include contamination from spills or leaks of frack-fluids and returned water, at the surface, through leaky wells or via subsurface pathways from the source rock, and the availability of water resources. Groundwater is an important resource in England, providing an average of 31% of water resources in England and Wales, and up to 100% in some areas of south-east England. In its role as the environmental regulator the Environment Agency must manage the risks associated with these hazards, and those associated with other onshore oil and gas activities, so that they are minimised. Here we focus on the groundwater contamination risk from source rocks though subsurface pathways. Despite the abundant literature emerging from the North American continent there remain great uncertainties as to the risk. These uncertainties are amplified when translated to Europe due to significant policy and geological differences. Research from North America indicates that risk is influenced by the exploitation and well completion methods and the geological setting, including: pre-existing fracture and fault networks; stress regime; petrological and rheological properties of the rock between the source and groundwater receptor and the distance between the source and receptors. A joint British Geological Survey/ EA project - iHydrogeology (http://www.bgs

  10. Self-reported Perceptions of Weight and Eating Behavior of School Children in Sunderland, England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Alison; Blackwell, David

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the self-reported perceptions of weight and eating behaviors of school-age children in Sunderland in the North East of England. The results presented are derived from data collected by a Health-Related Behaviour Survey developed by Schools and Students Health Education Unit at Exeter University, and this study is based on analysis of the data set collected for Sunderland. A total of 12,213 pupils from nine secondary schools completed the questionnaire biennially from 1996 to 2012. The sample included 12 and 13 year olds and 14 and 15 year olds. Various health and social issues related to perceptions of weight and eating behaviors were determined. Trends related to these issues were identified according to age and gender of respondents, and differences between the groups were highlighted. From the analysis, some interesting findings relating to eating patterns and weight perception amongst young people were ascertained. Females of both age groups reported a greater desire to lose weight than their male counterparts. The percentage of school children who reported having breakfast at home has increased progressively, as have those having lunch at school. The percentage of school children purchasing lunch from takeaway outlets has dramatically decreased. This is pleasing since health policy of limiting take out provision is high on government agenda and these trends can be used by policy makers to focus on continuing to improve school meals. The findings partly support other national data but also contradict the widely held beliefs around food and obesity in the North East of England.

  11. A 150-year record of coastline dynamics within a sediment cell: Eastern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montreuil, Anne-Lise; Bullard, Joanna E.

    2012-12-01

    Coastal sediment cells reflect processes operating at a range of scales, but it is the medium spatial and temporal scales (decades to centuries) that are of greatest interest for coastal management. This paper focuses on coastline position change within a single sediment cell over 150 years where the geomorphology includes cliffs, beaches and saltmarshes. The focus is the east coast of England from Flamborough Head to Gibraltar Point. Although the updrift sector of this sediment cell has been studied for well over a century, the downdrift sector has attracted significantly less attention. Using topographic profiles, bathymetric profiles, aerial photographs and historical maps we mapped coastline erosion and accretion using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) and calculated volumetric changes for different morphometric units. Rapid erosion of the updrift Holderness cliffs has been counterbalanced with accretion on beaches along the downdrift Lincolnshire coast. The amount of accretion in Lincolnshire corresponds to around 29% of the volume of sediment eroded from Holderness. Much of the eroded cliff material is likely to be deposited temporarily into nearshore and offshore sand banks before being redistributed by cross-shore currents. An exploration of storm surge impact on long-term erosion and accretion rates showed no clear relationship between storm surge frequency and change in coastline position, however this may be in part due to the relative timing of storm occurrence and data acquisition. The Jenkinson daily weather type classification was found to be a reasonable proxy for the occurrence of strong onshore winds which may offer scope for further investigation of the role of forcing factors over time periods beyond the length of the meteorological and tidal station records. Winter North Atlantic Oscillation phase was not a good indicator of storminess on the east coast of England but may be a useful proxy for quiescence.

  12. An Outbreak of Human Listeriosis in England between 2010 and 2012 Associated with the Consumption of Pork Pies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofisayo-Okuyelu, A; Arunachalam, N; Dallman, T; Grant, K A; Aird, H; McLauchlin, J; Painset, A; Amar, C

    2016-05-01

    An outbreak of listeriosis in England affecting 14 people between 2010 and 2012 and linked to the consumption of pork pies was investigated. All 14 individuals were older than 55 years, 12 were men, and 10 reported the presence of an underlying condition. All were resident in or had visited either of two English regions and were infected with the same strain of Listeria monocytogenes. In interviews with 12 patients, 9 reported eating pork pies, and individuals that consumed pork pies were significantly more likely to be infected with an outbreak strain than were individuals with sporadic cases of listeriosis infections in England from 2010 to 2012. Pork pies were purchased from seven retailers in South Yorkshire or the East Midlands, and the outbreak strain was recovered from pork pies supplied by only the producer in South Yorkshire. The outbreak strain was also recovered from samples of finished product and from environmental samples collected from the manufacturer. The likely source of contamination was environmental sites within the manufacturing environment, and the contamination was associated with the process of adding gelatin to the pies after cooking. Inadequate temperature control and poor hygienic practices at one of the retailers were also identified as possible contributory factors allowing growth of the pathogen. Following improvements in manufacturing practices and implementation of additional control measures at the retailers' premises, L. monocytogenes was not recovered from subsequent food and environmental samples, and the outbreak strain was not detected in further individuals with listeriosis in England.

  13. Modelling soil moisture for a grassland and a woodland site in south-east England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Blyth

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison between two soil moisture prediction models. One is MORECS (Met Office Rainfall and Evaporation Calculation Scheme, the Met Office soil moisture model that is used by agriculture, flood modellers and weather forecasters to initialise their models. The other is MOSES (Met Office Surface Exchange Scheme, modified with a runoff generation module. The models are made compatible by increasing the vegetation information available to MOSES. Both models were run with standard parameters and were driven using meteorological observations at Wallingford (1995-1997. Detailed soil moisture measurements were available at a grassland site and a woodland site in this area. The comparison between the models and the observed soil moisture indicated that, for the grassland site, MORECS dried out too quickly in the spring and, for the woodland site, was too wet. Overall, the performance of MOSES was superior. The soil moisture predicted by the new, modified MOSES will be included as a product of Nimrod - the 5 km x 5km gridded network of observed meteorological data across the UK. Keywords: Soil moisture, model, observation, field capacity

  14. Water infrastructure and the making of financial subjects in the south east of England

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alex Loftus; Hug March; Fiona Nash

    2016-01-01

    .... As part of this trend, the 'financialisation' of the water sector has added a new layer of complexity to the hydrosocial cycle, witnessed in the emergence of new financial actors, logics and financing instruments...

  15. Mortality due to trauma in cats attending veterinary practices in central and south-east England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J L; Cleasby, I R; Brodbelt, D C; Church, D B; O'Neill, D G

    2017-08-01

    To identify important demographic and spatial factors associated with the risk of trauma and, more specifically, road traffic accident-related mortality, relative to other diagnoses in cats. A sample of 2738 cats with mortality data derived from the VetCompass primary-care veterinary database was selected for detailed study. Generalised linear models investigated risk factors for mortality due to trauma and due to road traffic accidents versus other causes. A greater proportion of younger cats died through traumatic and road traffic accident-attributed causes relative to other causes of mortality. There was no apparent association of trauma- or road traffic accident-related death with urban environments or areas where there is increased human population density. These findings highlight that veterinary advice which aims to reduce the likelihood of death through trauma, and specifically road traffic accidents, should focus on demographic attributes including age. All geographical locations should be considered as of equal risk. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  16. Constraining the vertical surface motions of the Hampshire Basin, south England During the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip; England, Richard; Zalasiewicz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The potential effect of rising sea level on the UK has received considerable attention in recent years. However, the ongoing long-term changes in surface topography of the UK driven by regional tectonics and the mechanisms responsible are not fully understood. It is thought that glacial loading/unloading is the primary influence. However, this is inconsistent with present-day vertical surface motions recorded from Continuous Global Positioning Stations (CGPS) across the UK. The lateral variations in the present day motions are too complex to be explained by glacial isostatic rebound. We are investigating the hypothesis that the vertical motions of SE England also reflect the long term tectonic history by backstripping the Cenozoic geological record. So far the Paleogene stratigraphic record of the Hampshire basin in southern England has been investigated and using a series of deep boreholes that reach the chalk basement, a 2-D backstripping method has been applied. Subsidence analysis of cliff sections and boreholes reveal the Hampshire Basin was tectonically subsiding at a steady rate from 56.5Ma and any major periods of uplift and denudation to the present day state must have occurred from the mid Oligocene onwards. At this time the northern and western regions of the UK were believed to be uplifting as evidenced by heavy mineral transport directionns and sediment drainage patterns. A rapid increase in tectonic subsidence from 42Ma recorded by the three Isle of Wight sections in close proximity to an existing Variscan fault, thought to reactivate as a thrust during the Cenozoic, suggests a compressional stress regime in this region. The stress pattern observed from the tectonic subsidence data and evidence from drainage patterns supports a model in which the UK was uplifting in the north and west while the south east was subsiding. As this pattern is similar to the present day vertical surface motions and pre-dates glaciation, we propose glacial unloading as a

  17. Seasonal distribution of psychiatric births in England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Disanto

    Full Text Available There is general consensus that season of birth influences the risk of developing psychiatric conditions later in life. We aimed to investigate whether the risk of schizophrenia (SC, bipolar affective disorder (BAD and recurrent depressive disorder (RDD is influenced by month of birth in England to a similar extent as other countries using the largest cohort of English patients collected to date (n = 57,971. When cases were compared to the general English population (n = 29,183,034 all diseases showed a seasonal distribution of births (SC p = 2.48E-05; BAD p = 0.019; RDD p = 0.015. This data has implications for future strategies of disease prevention.

  18. Pregnant Wit: ingegno in Renaissance England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Marr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the protean nature of ingegno in Renaissance England. Beginning with dictionary definitions and period translations, it traces the semantics of ingegno in writings by Haydocke, Hilliard, Sidney, Harington, and Dee, and in images by Gheeraerts the elder and Hilliard. The term’s semantic elasticity carried over into English, changing shape to denote variously “wit”, “inborn talent”, “sharpness”, “swiftness”, “nobility”, “freedom”, and “ingenuity”. The article concludes by considering the socio-economics of ingenuity, and how the slippage between “ingenious” and “ingenuous” speaks to a newly emerging understanding of the liberal status of the artist and his craft.

  19. New England Wind Energy Education Project (NEWEEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, Robert C.; Craddock, Kathryn A.; von Allmen, Daniel R.

    2012-04-25

    Project objective is to develop and disseminate accurate, objective information on critical wind energy issues impacting market acceptance of hundreds of land-based projects and vast off-shore wind developments proposed in the 6-state New England region, thereby accelerating the pace of wind installation from today's 140 MW towards the region's 20% by 2030 goals of 12,500 MW. Methodology: This objective will be accomplished by accumulating, developing, assembling timely, accurate, objective and detailed information representing the 'state of the knowledge' on critical wind energy issues impacting market acceptance, and widely disseminating such information. The target audience includes state agencies and local governments; utilities and grid operators; wind developers; agricultural and environmental groups and other NGOs; research organizations; host communities and the general public, particularly those in communities with planned or operating wind projects. Information will be disseminated through: (a) a series of topic-specific web conference briefings; (b) a one-day NEWEEP conference, back-to-back with a Utility Wind Interest Group one-day regional conference organized for this project; (c) posting briefing and conference materials on the New England Wind Forum (NEWF) web site and featuring the content on NEWF electronic newsletters distributed to an opt-in list of currently over 5000 individuals; (d) through interaction with and participation in Wind Powering America (WPA) state Wind Working Group meetings and WPA's annual All-States Summit, and (e) through the networks of project collaborators. Sustainable Energy Advantage, LLC (lead) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory will staff the project, directed by an independent Steering Committee composed of a collaborative regional and national network of organizations. Major Participants - the Steering Committee: In addition to the applicants, the initial collaborators committing

  20. East Europe Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Plan Progress Report for CEMA Agriculture (Ngok Bin, Petr Ivashov; INTERNATIONALE ZEITSCHRIFT DER LANDWIRTSCHAFT, No 6, 1985) 1 ECONOMY...INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS CEMA Civil Air Transport Pilot Training School Described (Dmitri Zassorov; VOLKSARMEE, No 47, 1985) 12 CZECHOSLOVAKIA Former...AFFAIRS CURRENT 5-YEAR PLAN PROGRESS REPORT FOR CEMA AGRICULTURE Moscow/East Berlin INTERNATIONALE ZEITSCHRIFT DER LANDWIRTSCHAFT in German No 6, 1985 pp

  1. JPRS Report East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Radio Broadcasts for Baltic, Ukrainian Polonia Begin [TRYBUNA 8 May] .................................... 2 YUGOSLAVIA Reasons for Tudjman’s...for Baltic, Ukrainian Polonia Elena Lagadinova, deputy chairman; Begin Khristina Pepeldzhiyska, deputy chairman; 90P20027A Warsaw TR YBUNA in Polish 8...Commission for [Text] On 7 May, Polish Radio began broadcasting Socioeconomic Development; special programs for Poles [ Polonia ] residing in the East. 2

  2. Middle East Reform Halts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The chaos in Iraq poses a great threat to the U.S. plan in the Middle East While the fighting between Israel and Lebanon-based Hezbollah becomes fiercer, security in Iraq also keeps deteriorating, making the region a petrol can that may blow up anytime.

  3. JPRS Report, East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-02

    10 Su-22/FITTER K and 15 L-29 " Delfin " (NATO desig- nation: MAYA) from CSSR production as photo-recon- naissance aircraft. The 2 transport aircraft...aircraft within the East Bloc as well: Its trainers, the older L-29 " Delfin " (NATO code name MAYA) and the modern L-39 "Albatros," are being used by the

  4. JPRS Report, East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-05

    isolationism. Its leadership ignored the maturing thinking and the social movement in the East and in the [Interview with Cestmir Cisar by Jan Kaspar ...away into archives of erization, robotization , prognostics, cybernetics and philosophy like a fossil from an era in which we no other achievements of

  5. The East Pacific Rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1961-01-01

    Evidence gathered by expeditions of the University of California’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography during the International Geophysical Year suggests that the East Pacific Rise is one of the largest physical structures on earth. It runs in a sickle-shaped curve from near New Zealand 8,000 miles

  6. East African institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, Johannes Riber; Jacobsen, Katja

    For the past decade security in East Africa has gained focus internationally. However there is a growing ambition among African states to handle such issues by themselves, sometimes through regional institutions. This has been supported by many Western states but potential risks are often forgotten....

  7. The East Pacific Rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1961-01-01

    Evidence gathered by expeditions of the University of California’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography during the International Geophysical Year suggests that the East Pacific Rise is one of the largest physical structures on earth. It runs in a sickle-shaped curve from near New Zealand 8,000 miles

  8. JPRS Report, East Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-17

    EAST EUROPE CONTENTS POLITICAL ALBANIA Alia’s Views on Links to Masses Stressed ( Guro Zeneli; BASHKIMI, 8 Jul 87) , 1 Party Control Over Army...ALIA’S VIEWS ON LINKS TO MASSES STRESSED Tirana BASHKIMI in Albanian 8 Jul 87 p 2 [Article by Guro Zeneli: "Always with the Rhythm, the Vigor, the Will

  9. A synthetic Longitudinal Study dataset for England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Adam; Norman, Paul; Shelton, Nicola; Stuchbury, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the new synthetic England and Wales Longitudinal Study 'spine' dataset designed for teaching and experimentation purposes. In the United Kingdom, there exist three Census-based longitudinal micro-datasets, known collectively as the Longitudinal Studies. The England and Wales Longitudinal Study (LS) is a 1% sample of the population of England and Wales (around 500,000 individuals), linking individual person records from the 1971 to 2011 Censuses. The synthetic data presented contains a similar number of individuals to the original data and accurate longitudinal transitions between 2001 and 2011 for key demographic variables, but unlike the original data, is open access.

  10. New England Wind Forum, Volume 1, Issue 1 -- January 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-01-01

    The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 1 features an interview with Brother Joseph of Portsmouth Abbey. A commercial-scale Vestas V47 wind turbine will soon be installed on the grounds of the Benedictine monastery and prep school in Rhode Island, with the assistance of a grant from the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund. This will be the first large-scale turbine located behind the customer meter in the region.

  11. Using the politicized institutional analysis and development framework to analyze (adaptive comanagement: farming and water resources in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Whaley

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of managing water resources in England is becoming increasingly complex and uncertain, a situation reflected in many countries around the world. Cooperative and participatory forms of governance are now seen as one way of addressing this challenge. We investigated this assertion by focusing on five farmer irrigator groups in the low-lying east of England. The groups' relationship with water resources management was interpreted through the lens of comanagement, which over the past decade has increasingly merged with the field of adaptive management and related concepts that derive from resilience thinking and complex adaptive systems theory. Working within a critical realist paradigm, our analysis was guided by the politicized institutional analysis and development (IAD framework. Two previous studies concerned with the broader context surrounding farming and water governance in lowland England revealed low levels of trust between farmers, and between farmers and water managers, as well as a power dynamic that stands in the way of farmer cooperation and participation. Within this context, our findings pointed to a number of mechanisms and structural conditions that appear to generate or facilitate comanagement. Of these, institution building through the specific group strategy of adopting a company structure and the "stationarity" of the resource group members extract from were seen to be the most crucial. These and other key findings were used to inform a discussion of farming and water resources management in England going forward. In doing so, we also reflected on the relationship between comanagement and market-based approaches to managing water resources. Beyond this, the research serves as a practical demonstration of how the politicized IAD framework can be used to analyze potential (adaptive comanagement situations and the related benefits. The analysis complements a previous submission to this journal, in which we discussed

  12. Ocean and Coastal Acidification off New England and Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England coastal and adjacent Nova Scotia shelf waters have a reduced buffering capacity because of significant freshwater input, making the region’s waters potentially more vulnerable to coastal acidification. Nutrient loading and heavy precipitation events further acid...

  13. 76 FR 64901 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... meeting is physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or..., in which the New England and Mid-Atlantic Councils are considering the inclusion of catch...

  14. Ocean and Coastal Acidification off New England and Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England coastal and adjacent Nova Scotia shelf waters have a reduced buffering capacity because of significant freshwater input, making the region’s waters potentially more vulnerable to coastal acidification. Nutrient loading and heavy precipitation events further acid...

  15. New York and New England carbonate-rock aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the New York and New England carbonate-rock aquifers in the states of New York, Vermont, Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut,...

  16. New England Energy Congress: progress report - a descriptive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Robert L.; Mayer, Jean; Buckley, John G.; Spencer, Bailey; Alford, Zeb D.; Keating, Jr., Stephen J.; Aubin, Elmer B.

    1978-09-01

    New England's dependence on oil (about 80%) is posing a double threat to the region and its economic prosperity, as oil dependency means extreme supply vulnerability and substantially higher prices than the national average. The New England Energy Congress, sponsored by the New England Congressional Caucus and Tufts Univ., represents the concerted effort of a highly diverse group of New Englanders to address these problems. The work of the six committees of the Congress is reviewed in this report. The committees are the Supply Committee, Energy Demand Committee, Energy Conservation Committee, Regulatory and Institutional Processes Committee, Economic Development through Alternative Sources of Energy Committee, and Energy Economics and Financing Committee. (MCW)

  17. Snapshots of language and literature teaching in Denmark and England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To illustrate differences in lower secondary-level language and literature teaching, we contrast a typical teaching episode in Denmark with one in England. Both reflect the dominant discourses in each country alongside recent policy initiatives, and each exemplifies a different orientation...... to language and literature teaching focussing on performance in England and a personal formation in Denmark. Descriptions of the episodes are linked to wider debates and potential areas for further consideration are identified....

  18. Interconnection France-England; Interconnexion France-Angleterre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    These documents defines the interconnection France-England rules for the 2000 MW DC submarine cable directly linking the transmission networks of England and Wales and France. Rights to use Interconnector capacity from 1 April 2001 are to be offered through competitive tenders and auctions, full details of which are set out in the Rules. The contract and a guide to the application form are provided. (A.L.B.)

  19. Building the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Donna Kafel; Andrew T. Creamer; Martin, Elaine R

    2014-01-01

    The need for a curriculum designed for librarians to use for teaching STEM research data management skills to their constituents from diverse STEM disciplines has been widely identified. (Qin and D’Ignazio 2010). From 2012-2014, a collaborative group of New England librarians, led by a project team from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, developed lecture notes, presentation slides, assignments, readings, and case studies for teaching research data management. The New England Col...

  20. The First World War and perceptions of Catholicism in England

    OpenAIRE

    Soane, A. (Andrew)

    2014-01-01

    After the First World War there was a changed, more positive, attitude in England towards Catholicism in England. It was perceived to have risen to the test of the War where other forms of religion had failed. The newly acquired optimism of Catholics found expression in the apologetics of the era. New doubts about Protestantism – tainted by imaginary association with Germany - gave Catholic apologists the opportunity to mount a largely successful polemic against the hitherto accepted biased ...

  1. Organizational models of emerging academic health science centers in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Davies, Stephen M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2010-08-01

    Recent government policy initiatives to foster medical innovation and high-quality care in England have prompted academic and clinical leaders to develop new organizational models to support the tripartite Flexnerian mission of academic medicine. Medical schools and health care providers have responded by aligning their missions and creating integrated governance structures that strengthen their partnerships. In March 2009, the government officially designated five academic-clinical partnerships as England's first academic health science centers (AHSCs). As academic-clinical integration is likely to continue, future AHSC leaders could benefit from an analysis of models for organizing medical school-clinical enterprise relationships in England's emerging AHSCs. In addition, as the United States ponders health systems reform and universal coverage, U.S. medical leaders may benefit from insight into the workings of academic medicine in England's universal health system. In this article, the authors briefly characterize the organization and financing of the National Health Service and how it supports academic medicine. They review the policy behind the designation of AHSCs. Then, the authors describe contrasting organizational models adopted in two of the newly designated AHSCs and analyze these models using a framework derived from U.S. literature. The authors conclude by outlining the major challenges facing academic medicine in England and offer suggestions for future research collaborations between leaders of AHSCs in the United States and England.

  2. Growing East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ It was a busy exchanging period of East Asia in recent days. From October 28 to 31, 2007 the fourth China-ASEAN Expo (CAEXPO) and the fourth China-ASEAN Business and Investment Summit (CABIS) were held concurrently in Nanning, capital city of Guangxi Province in China. In the Expo,China witnessed a turnout of over 33,000 trade visitors and over 180 investment cooperation projects with ASEAN.

  3. Near East & South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    matriculate them into the Air College as pilot candidates, after they have obtained the general sec- ondary "scientific department" diploma. 52 NEAR EAST...Islamic training, Arabic, mathematics , physics, chemistry, biology, geology, history, geography, computer science, and English. Additional material will...This will help prepare the student for military life. The student will continue to advance gradually through the program until he matriculates as a

  4. New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Louis R; Wityk, Robert J; Glass, Thomas A; Tapia, Jorge; Pazdera, Ladislav; Chang, Hui-Meng; Teal, Phillip; Dashe, John F; Chaves, Claudia J; Breen, Joan C; Vemmos, Kostas; Amarenco, Pierre; Tettenborn, Barbara; Leary, Megan; Estol, Conrad; Dewitt, L Dana; Pessin, Michael S

    2004-09-01

    Among 407 New England Medical Center Posterior Circulation registry patients, 59% had strokes without transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), 24% had TIAs then strokes, and 16% had only TIAs. Embolism was the commonest stroke mechanism (40% of patients including 24% cardiac origin, 14% intraarterial, 2% cardiac and arterial sources). In 32% large artery occlusive lesions caused hemodynamic brain ischemia. Infarcts most often included the distal posterior circulation territory (rostral brainstem, superior cerebellum and occipital and temporal lobes); the proximal (medulla and posterior inferior cerebellum) and middle (pons and anterior inferior cerebellum) territories were equally involved. Severe occlusive lesions (>50% stenosis) involved more than one large artery in 148 patients; 134 had one artery site involved unilaterally or bilaterally. The commonest occlusive sites were: extracranial vertebral artery (52 patients, 15 bilateral) intracranial vertebral artery (40 patients, 12 bilateral), basilar artery (46 patients). Intraarterial embolism was the commonest mechanism of brain infarction in patients with vertebral artery occlusive disease. Thirty-day mortality was 3.6%. Embolic mechanism, distal territory location, and basilar artery occlusive disease carried the poorest prognosis. The best outcome was in patients who had multiple arterial occlusive sites; they had position-sensitive TIAs during months to years.

  5. Online chilling effects in England and Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Townend

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Open and free internet-based platforms are seen as an enabler of global free expression, releasing writers from commercial and space constraints. However, many are working without the assistance of an in-house lawyer, or other legal resources. This may lead to undue suppression of public interest material, with important implications for freedom of expression and the democratic function of media. Two online surveys among digital and online journalists in England and Wales in 2013 indicated that the majority of encounters with defamation and privacy law take place outside the courts, with few formally recorded legal actions. This was particularly evident in a sample of ‘hyperlocal’ and local community publishers. In light of the results, this paper calls for a reappraisal of overly simplistic judicial and media applications of the ‘chilling effect’ doctrine, in order to expose its subjectivities and complexities. Additionally, attention needs to be paid to global and cross-jurisdictional media-legal environments, in order to help develop better internet policy and legal frameworks for protecting legitimate expression.

  6. Drugs in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, J; Müller, E

    1997-09-01

    Germany was divided into two parts after World War II. The closed border and a nonconvertible currency in the Eastern part were the factors that did not allow a drug market to develop. Alcohol and medicaments were used as substitute drugs. Since Germany was reunified 5 years ago, there are now the same conditions prevailing for the procurement and sale of drugs in East Germany as there are in the Western German states. This report describes the current state of drug traffic, especially in Saxony, under the new social conditions.

  7. East Asian welfare regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    . Political science studies tend to conclude that the region has left the old legacies behind and are now welfare states comparable to European states including them either in the conservative type (e.g. Japan), the liberal type (e.g. Korea) or even as a tendency in the Nordic type (e.g. China), while studies......The paper asks if East Asian welfare regimes are still productivist and Confucian? And, have they developed public care policies? The literature is split on the first question but (mostly) confirmative on the second. Care has to a large, but insufficient extent, been rolled out in the region...

  8. Prevalence of disorders recorded in cats attending primary-care veterinary practices in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, D G; Church, D B; McGreevy, P D; Thomson, P C; Brodbelt, D C

    2014-11-01

    Improved understanding of absolute and relative prevalence values for common feline disorders could support clinicians when listing differential diagnoses and also assist prioritisation of breeding, research and health control strategies. This study aimed to analyse primary-care veterinary clinical data within the VetCompass project to estimate the prevalence of the most common disorders recorded in cats in England and to evaluate associations with purebred status. It was hypothesised that common disorders would be more prevalent in purebred than in crossbred cats. From a study population of 142,576 cats attending 91 clinics across Central and South-East England from 1 September 2009 to 15 January 2014, a random sample of 3584 was selected for detailed clinical review to extract information on all disorders recorded. The most prevalent diagnosis-level disorders were periodontal disease (n = 499; prevalence, 13.9%, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 12.5-15.4), flea infestation (n = 285; prevalence, 8.0%; 95% CI, 7.0-8.9) and obesity (n = 239; prevalence, 6.7%; 95% CI, 5.7-7.6). The most prevalent disorder groups recorded were dental conditions (n = 540; prevalence, 15.1%, 95% CI, 13.6-16.6), traumatic injury (n = 463; prevalence, 12.9%; 95% CI, 11.6-14.3) and dermatological disorders (n = 373; prevalence, 10.4%; 95% CI, 9.2-11.7). Crossbred cats had a higher prevalence of abscesses (excluding cat bite abscesses) (P = 0.009) and hyperthyroidism (P = 0.002) among the 20 most common disorders recorded. Purebreds had a higher prevalence for coat disorders (P cats compared with crossbred cats. Primary-care veterinary clinical data were versatile and useful for demographic and clinical feline studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. East African ROAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekle, Kelali

    2016-10-01

    In the developing world astronomy had been treated as the science of elites. As a result of this overwhelming perception, astronomy compared with other applied sciences has got less attention and its role in development has been insignificant. However, the IAU General Assembly decision in 2009 opened new opportunity for countries and professionals to deeply look into Astronomy and its role in development. Then, the subsequent establishment of regional offices in the developing world is helping countries to integrate astronomy with other earth and space based sciences so as to progressively promote its scientific and development importance. Gradually nations have come to know that space is the frontier of tomorrow and the urgency of preeminence on space frontier starts at primary school and ascends to tertiary education. For this to happen, member nations in east African region have placed STEM education at the center of their education system. For instance, Ethiopian has changed University enrollment strategy to be in favor of science and engineering subjects, i.e. every year seventy percent of new University entrants join science and engineering fields while thirty percent social science and humanities. Such bold actions truly promote astronomy to be conceived as gateway to science and technology. To promote the concept of astronomy for development the East African regional office has actually aligned it activities to be in line with the focus areas identified by the IAU strategy (2010 to 2020).

  10. Climate Change Science Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, Robert M.

    2016-03-23

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has actively pursued research in the effects of climate change on the hydrology of New England. Ongoing focus areas of climate change science activities of the USGS in New England include the following:

  11. New England Energy Congress: preliminary report for public review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Robert L.; Mayer, Jean; Buckley, John G.; Spencer, Bailey

    1978-11-01

    The New England Energy Congress represents the concerted effort of a group of New Englanders to address the energy problem of the area. New England is dependent on oil, with fully 80% of its energy requirements derived from this single source. Detailed reports are presented by the Supply Committee (fossil fuels, nuclear, and alternative sources); the Committee on Economic Development Through Alternative Sources of Energy (defining the state of the art and future directions of the technologies applicable to renewable energy resources, specifically, biomass, direct solar, and wind/hydroelectric/tidal/wave energy; identifying, and formulating policies to reduce the institutional impediments and adverse environmental impacts of developing these resources; and evaluationg the relationship between renewable energy systems and regional economic development); Energy Demand Committee; Energy Conservation Committee; Regulatory and Institutional Processes Committee; and Energy Economics and Financing Committee.

  12. Social Policy and Governance: Conceptual Reflections on Ageing in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L. Powell

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks in more detail at the incidence and consequence of social policies for older people through the conceptual lens of governmentality (Foucault, 1977 in England. This international paper with focus on England will enable us to consider the implications of the re-figuring of the relationship between the state, older people and helping professions. In many ways, policy provides three trajectories for older people: first, as independent self-managing consumers with private means and resources; second, as people in need of some support to enable them to continue to self-manage; and third, as dependent and unable to commit to self-management. Governmentality provides the theoretical framework through which to view policy and practice that is largely governed by discourses of personalisation, safeguarding, capability and risk for older people in England.

  13. Women Priests in the Church of England: Psychological Type Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Robbins

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study employed psychological type theory and measurement to explore the psychological profile of women priests ordained in the Church of England. A sample of 83 Anglican clergywomen in England completed the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI. The data demonstrated clear preferences for introversion (63% over extraversion (37%, for intuition (60% over sensing (40%, for feeling (76% over thinking (24%, and for judging (55% over perceiving (45%. In terms of dominant types, 37% were dominant feelers, 31% dominant intuitives, 23% dominant sensers, and 8% dominant thinkers. These findings are discussed to illuminate the preferred ministry styles of Anglican clergywomen in England and to highlight the significant differences between the psychological type profile of clergywomen and the UK female population norms.

  14. East Candor Chasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    During its examination of Mars, the Viking 1 spacecraft returned images of Valles Marineris, a huge canyon system 5,000 km long, up to 240 km wide, and 6.5 km deep, whose connected chasma or valleys may have formed from a combination of erosional collapse and structural activity. The view shows east Candor Chasma, one of the connected valleys of Valles Marineris; north toward top of frame; for scale, the impact crater in upper right corner is 15 km (9 miles) wide. The image, centered at latitude 7.5 degrees S., longitude 67.5 degrees, is a composite of Viking 1 Orbiter high-resolution (about 80 m/pixel or picture element) images in black and white and low-resolution (about 250 m/pixel) images in color. The Viking 1 craft landed on Mars in July of 1976. East Candor Chasma occupies the eastern part of the large west-northwest-trending trough of Candor Chasma. This section is about 150 km wide. East Candor Chasma is bordered on the north and south by walled cliffs, most likely faults. The walls may have been dissected by landslides forming reentrants; one area on the north wall shows what appears to be landslide debris. Both walls show spur-and-gully morphology and smooth sections. In the lower part of the image northwest-trending, linear depressions on the plateau are younger graben or fault valleys that cut the south wall. Material central to the chasma shows layering in places and has been locally eroded by the wind to form flutes and ridges. These interior layered deposits have curvilinear reentrants carved into them, and in one locale a lobe flows away from the top of the interior deposit. The lobe may be mass-wasting deposits due to collapse of older interior deposits (Lucchitta, 1996, LPSC XXVII abs., p. 779- 780); this controversial idea requires that the older layered deposits were saturated with ice, perhaps from former lakes, and that young volcanism and/or tectonism melted the ice and made the material flow.

  15. The Danish East India Company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2005-01-01

    The article analysis the first Danish East India Company incorporated in 1616, which was the first Danish Stock Company and which has impacts even on modern Danish company la......The article analysis the first Danish East India Company incorporated in 1616, which was the first Danish Stock Company and which has impacts even on modern Danish company la...

  16. New England Energy Congress: A Blueprint for Energy Action. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Robert L.; Mayer, Jean; Buckley, John G.; Connolly, Patrick F.; Spencer, Bailey

    1979-05-01

    The New England Energy Congress consists of six committees, with members from each of the six New England states. Since May 1978, the Congress has been working to frame and substantiate energy action recommendations. Committee jurisdictions include New England Energy Supply, Economic Development through Alternative Sources of Energy, New England Energy Demand, Energy Conservation, Regulatory and Institutional Processes, and Energy Economics and Financing. The findings and recommendations that have resulted from their work are summarized. (MCW)

  17. Standardised testing in compulsory schooling in England and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Kelly, Peter; Kousholt, Kristine;

    2015-01-01

    Within education, national testing is flourishing and, considering the important role which assessment plays in the production and reproduction of culture, it is important to examine further the possible impact of such practice. While England has a long tradition of national educational testing...... have on pupils´ perceptions of their potential academic skills. This article draws on research into the national testing of reading conducted in England and Denmark in Spring 2013 and draws on the work of Basil Bernstein to compare and contrast both sets of national assessment practices....

  18. Plague mortality and demographic depression in later medieval England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poos, L R

    1981-01-01

    Both direct and indirect evidence implies that England experienced a lengthy period of stagnant or declining population during the later fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The Black Death of 1348-1349 had brought about profound changes in England's agrarian economy, and this subsequent demographic depression is most commonly interpreted by historians as the result of plague mortality, recurring in severe outbreaks after the disease's introduction into the country. This paper reviews the evidence and assumptions behind this interpretation, in light of recent research by historical demographers and epidemiologists into bubonic plague epidemics and general mortality crises during the post-medieval period.

  19. Nocturnal Oviposition Behavior of Forensically Important Diptera in Central England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kate M; Grace, Karon A; Bulling, Mark T

    2015-11-01

    Timing of oviposition on a corpse is a key factor in entomologically based minimum postmortem interval (mPMI) calculations. However, there is considerable variation in nocturnal oviposition behavior of blow flies reported in the research literature. This study investigated nocturnal oviposition in central England for the first time, over 25 trials from 2011 to 2013. Liver-baited traps were placed in an urban location during control (diurnal), and nocturnal periods and environmental conditions were recorded during each 5-h trial. No nocturnal activity or oviposition was observed during the course of the study indicating that nocturnal oviposition is highly unlikely in central England.

  20. Exploratory mapping of commuter flows in England and Wales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Hovgesen, Henrik Harder; Lassen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    within England and Wales and in more details around a number of cities. In the city “cases” specific attention is given to the “range of influence” of each metropolitan area, measured through the variation in commute distances and the directionality of commuting. The cities are London, Manchester...... and Birmingham. These are chosen for their size and differences in regional context. In the general analysis – at the country-wide scale - special emphasis is put on deriving a representation of the scale and the corridors of interaction from the relatively disaggregate data. A map of commuter flows in England...

  1. 78 FR 38027 - ISO New England Inc.; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund Effective Date

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission ISO New England Inc.; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund... determine the justness and reasonableness of section III.A.15 of Appendix A of ISO New England Inc.'s existing tariff. Dominion Energy Marketing, Inc. and ISO New England Inc., 143 FERC ] 61,233 (2013)....

  2. 77 FR 11532 - Notice of Attendance at ISO New England and NEPOOL Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Attendance at ISO New England and NEPOOL Meetings The... Commission staff may attend upcoming ISO New England Inc. (ISO-NE) and New England Power Pool (NEPOOL... Commission staff may monitor the various meetings posted on the ISO-NE Web site. NEPOOL...

  3. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project, Volume 1, Issue 3 -- October 2007 (Newsletter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

    2007-10-01

    The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education, and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 3 features an interview with Andrew Dzykewicz, Commissioner of the Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources.

  4. Ten Years of Reform in Primary Mathematics Education in England: A Review of Effectiveness. Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollaard, Ben A.; Rabinovich, Lila; Bowman, Richard; van Stolk, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The UK National Audit Office (NAO) commissioned RAND Europe to look at the evidence showing the effectiveness of reform of mathematics teaching in primary schools in England. This study looked at government-sponsored evaluations of mathematics reform in England, independent evaluations of the educational outcomes of mathematics reforms in England,…

  5. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project, Volume 1, Issue 4 -- May 2008 (Newsletter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

    2008-05-01

    The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education, and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 4 features an interview with Brian Fairbank, president and CEO of Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort.

  6. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project - Newsletter #6 - September 2010, (NEWF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, R.; Gifford, J.; Leeds, T.; Bauer, S.

    2010-09-01

    Wind Powering America program launched the New England Wind Forum (NEWF) in 2005 to provide a single comprehensive source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind energy issues pertaining to New England. The NEWF newsletter provides New England stakeholders with updates on wind energy development in the region.

  7. Grammar Teaching in Secondary School Foreign Language Learning in England: Teachers' Reported Beliefs and Observed Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liviero, Sara

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates teachers' beliefs relating to grammar teaching in modern foreign language (MFL) learning in England. Focus on grammatical form has been consistently supported by linguistic research and teacher practice, and has progressively been reinstated in England's National Curriculum. However, MFL learning assessment in England has…

  8. Grammar Teaching in Secondary School Foreign Language Learning in England: Teachers' Reported Beliefs and Observed Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liviero, Sara

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates teachers' beliefs relating to grammar teaching in modern foreign language (MFL) learning in England. Focus on grammatical form has been consistently supported by linguistic research and teacher practice, and has progressively been reinstated in England's National Curriculum. However, MFL learning assessment in England has…

  9. Neo-Liberalism and Change in Higher Education Policy: England and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keiko

    2008-01-01

    The study scrutinizes the rationale behind higher education policy change in England and Japan, giving attention to stakeholders' perspective and legitimacy, policy network, and policy sphere. It argues that change in higher education policy in England and Japan towards being more market-oriented in the 1980s (England) and the 1990s (Japan) can…

  10. 78 FR 2988 - New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... December 28, 2012, the New England Hydropower Company, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit... Protection. Applicant Contact: Mr. Michael C. Kerr, New England Hydropower Company, LLC, P.O. Box 5524...

  11. 78 FR 61958 - New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... August 20, 2013, the New England Hydropower Company, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit.... Michael C. Kerr, New England Hydropower Company, LLC, P.O. Box 5524, Beverly Farms, Massachusetts 01915...

  12. 77 FR 71590 - New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... November 9, 2012, the New England Hydropower Company, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit.... Michael C. Kerr, New England Hydropower Company, LLC, P.O. Box 5524, Beverly Farms, Massachusetts 01915...

  13. Pupils' Fear in the Classroom: Portraits from Palestine and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Eleanore; Affouneh, Saida

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the concept of fear related to the authoritarian classroom and how children express its influence on their learning. Its investigations draw on the comments of four classes of primary-age pupils, two from a school near London, England, and two from boys' and girls' schools in the West Bank, Palestine. It is written by one…

  14. Gender, Science and Modernity in Seventeenth-Century England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    The seventeenth century in England, bounded by the scientific stimulus of Francis Bacon at the beginning and Isaac Newton at the end, seemingly saw a huge leap from the Aristotelian dialectic of the past to a reconstruction of knowledge based on inductive methods, empirical investigation and cooperative research. In mid-century, Puritan reformers…

  15. Policy Perspective: School Turnaround in England. Utilizing the Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper, written by strategic partner of the Center on School Turnaround (CST), Julie Corbett, provides research and examples on England's approach to turning around its lowest performing schools. The English education system utilizes private vendors to support chronically low-performing schools and districts. The introduction is followed by…

  16. Campus-Based Policy Institute Poised to Reinvent New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    Campus-based public policy institutes with local, state, and regional orientations may play a profound role in shaping New England's future by addressing a variety of issues, including achieving quality in public schools, access to health care and other social services, job creation, environmental protection and creation of livable communities,…

  17. A Possibilist Analysis of the Geography National Curriculum in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David; Hopkin, John

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the national curriculum for geography as it has evolved in England since its inception in 1991 following the Education Reform Act of 1988. Whilst the main contents of our original analysis are provided by way of a table, enabling the reader ready access to the broad trends we identify in how geography has been…

  18. Responses of England, Germany and Switzerland to Declining School Enrolments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Catherine

    Results of interviews with educators in England, Germany, and Switzerland are combined with statistical data in this study of the effects of declining enrollment and the development of multicultural programs in those countries. In all three countries, the author encountered a prevailing resistance to program change in the face of declining…

  19. Psychological Type Preferences of Female Bible College Students in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, William K.; Francis, Leslie J.

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 122 female students attending a Pentecostal Bible College in England completed Form G (Anglicised) of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The data demonstrated preferences for extraversion over introversion, for sensing over intuition, for feeling over thinking, and for judging over perceiving. The predominant type was ISFJ (16%),…

  20. The New England Spruce-Fir Seed Orchard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter B. Gibbs; James B. Carlaw

    1973-01-01

    I once heard it said that if you want to know how something was organized, ask a man who had nothing to do with it. I suspect this may be one of the reasons I was asked to collaborate on this report of the development of the New England Spruce-Fir Seed Orchard Program.

  1. Educational Inclusion in England: Origins, Perspectives and Current Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauchlan, Fraser; Greig, Susan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we examine different aspects of the inclusion debate, including how it has been shaped by the political context in England over the past 30 years. We then give consideration to the key argument that has dominated the inclusion agenda over the last decade: should effective inclusion be considered only as placement in mainstream school…

  2. Changing Landscapes in Safeguarding Babies and Young Children in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Eunice

    2014-01-01

    The importance of safeguarding children from violence is internationally recognised. However, detecting, intervening and protecting children from abuse both within the family and in institutions is complex. This paper specifically focuses on safeguarding in England and how workforce reform in the early years offers the opportunity to forge new…

  3. Achievement, Poverty and Privatization in England: Policy and Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Terry

    2012-01-01

    For many years, England has been the epitome of high-stakes accountability, often playing leapfrog with the USA. It represents an extreme of centralized surveillance, with schools organized as a quasi-market and supervised through a punitive combination of external inspection, the use of test data to name and shame schools, and ultimately closure…

  4. Teachers' Reported Practices for Teaching Writing in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Julie E.; Marshall, Chloë R.; Wyse, Dominic

    2016-01-01

    To date there have been no systematic studies examining the ways in which teachers in England focus and adapt their teaching of writing. The current study addresses this gap by investigating the nature and frequency of teachers' approaches to the teaching of writing in a sample of English primary schools, using the "simple view of…

  5. Privatizing Education: Free School Policy in Sweden and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiborg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate why Sweden, the epitome of social democracy, has implemented education reforms leading to an extraordinary growth in Free Schools in contrast to liberal England, where Free School policy has been met with enormous resistance. Conventional wisdom would predict the contrary, but as a matter of fact Sweden…

  6. Critical Citizenship Education in England and France: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Laura; Morris, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The promotion of "critical citizenship" has become a key objective of official school curricula around the world. Using an analytic framework developed by the authors, this paper identifies the diverse conceptions of critical citizenship that are promoted, by comparing the official school curricula for citizenship in England and France.…

  7. Standardised testing in compulsory schooling in England and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Kelly, Peter; Kousholt, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    have on pupils´ perceptions of their potential academic skills. This article draws on research into the national testing of reading conducted in England and Denmark in Spring 2013 and draws on the work of Basil Bernstein to compare and contrast both sets of national assessment practices....

  8. Implementing and Evaluating the National Healthy School Program in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklander, Molly K.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to trace development of the National Healthy School Program (NHSP) from a global concept to implementation at the local school level in England with a view toward clarifying and, more importantly, determining if implementation is proceeding as planned, as evidenced by the presence of process evaluation. The NHSP is…

  9. England's Civic Universities and the Triumph of the Oxbridge Ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sarah V.

    1996-01-01

    Traces the changes in educational philosophy and practices that occurred within England's civic universities. The original intent of the state supported public universities was to provide professional and technical training for the growing middle class. Discusses the reasons that the civics eventually adopted the curriculum of the elite private…

  10. 77 FR 14735 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB078 New England Fishery Management Council... Management Council's (Council) Groundfish Oversight Committee will meet to consider actions affecting New... 29, 2012 at 8:30 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Providence Biltmore Hotel, 11...

  11. Schooling of Immigrant Children in West Germany, Sweden, England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willke, I.

    1975-01-01

    The focus of this article is on children of migrant workers and immigrants in the schools of West Germany, Sweden and England. One central problem, that of language, is considered both as it is dealt with in policy, i. e., in curricula, and as it is actually implemented in some programs, which are typical for the actions in these countries.…

  12. Teacher Education in Italy, Germany, England, Sweden and Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostinelli, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a brief analysis of teacher education in five European countries: Italy, Germany, England, Sweden and Finland. In the post-industrial world, the sense of teaching has profoundly changed, influenced by a rapidly evolving socio-economic context. The responses given by each country are different, but two tendencies emerge: on…

  13. Public Perceptions of Reliability in Examination Results in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingping; Boyle, Andrew; Opposs, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Building on findings from existing qualitative research into public perceptions of reliability in examination results in England, a questionnaire was developed and administered to samples of teachers, students and employers to study their awareness of and opinions about various aspects of reliability quantitatively. Main findings from the study…

  14. Comparing Pedagogy in Mathematics in Denmark and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter; Pratt, Nick; Dorf, Hans; Hohmann, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a comparative study of pedagogy in lower-secondary school mathematics in Denmark and England. Lesson observations and interviews identified the range of goals towards which teachers in each country worked and the actions these prompted. These were clustered using the lens of Bernstein's pedagogic discourse to…

  15. Introducing ICT in Schools in England: Rationale and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a critical perspective on the attempts to promote the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in teaching and learning in England. It describes the rationale given for the introduction of ICT in terms of its potential to impact on educational standards to contribute to developing a curriculum which has more…

  16. The Effects of Social Service Contact on Teenagers in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Morag; Scourfield, Jonathan; Cheung, Sin Yi; Sharland, Elaine; Sloan, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated outcomes of social service contact during teenage years. Method: Secondary analysis was conducted of the Longitudinal Survey of Young People in England (N = 15,770), using data on reported contact with social services resulting from teenagers' behavior. Outcomes considered were educational achievement and…

  17. Snapshots of Language and Literature Teaching in Denmark and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter; Dorf, Hans

    2016-01-01

    To illustrate differences in lower secondary-level language and literature teaching, we contrast a typical teaching episode in Denmark with one in England. Both reflect the dominant discourses in each country alongside recent policy initiatives, and each exemplifies a different orientation to language and literature teaching focussing on…

  18. Educational Expansion, Economic Growth and Antisocial Behaviour: Evidence from England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabates, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the increase in post-compulsory schooling and economic growth on conviction rates for antisocial behaviour in England. I hypothesise that both educational and employment opportunities should lead to greater reductions in antisocial behaviour when they are combined than when they exist in isolation. I test this…

  19. CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISONS OF PERSONALITY - THE NETHERLANDS AND ENGLAND

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDERMAN, R; EYSENCK, SBG; ARRINDELL, WA

    1991-01-01

    401 men and 475 women completed the Dutch version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Factor comparisons all exceeded 0.97 so that the factors of Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Social Desirability are deemed to be identical in the two countries, England and The Netherlands. Sex d

  20. Cross-cultural comparisons of personality : the Netherlands and England

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDERMAN, R; EYSENCK, SBG; ARRINDELL, W A

    1991-01-01

    401 men and 475 women completed the Dutch version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Factor comparisons all exceeded 0.97 so that the factors of Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Social Desirability are deemed to be identical in the two countries, England and The Netherlands. Sex d

  1. 78 FR 13868 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ...; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... Hotel, 18 Washington Square W, Salem, MA 01970; telephone: (978) 744-4080 or (800) 729-7829; or email.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Wednesday, March 20, 2013 and Thursday, March 21, 2013 The New England...

  2. Education governance and standardised tests in Denmark and England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Karen Egedal; Ydesen, Christian; Kelly, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In this study we identify and compare the impact of standardised student assessment in England, an established neoliberal context, and in Denmark where a neoliberal education reform agenda is emerging in response to both national concerns and international governance. National reading tests...

  3. Psychological Type Preferences of Female Bible College Students in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, William K.; Francis, Leslie J.

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 122 female students attending a Pentecostal Bible College in England completed Form G (Anglicised) of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The data demonstrated preferences for extraversion over introversion, for sensing over intuition, for feeling over thinking, and for judging over perceiving. The predominant type was ISFJ (16%),…

  4. Cross-cultural comparisons of personality : the Netherlands and England

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDERMAN, R; EYSENCK, SBG; ARRINDELL, W A

    1991-01-01

    401 men and 475 women completed the Dutch version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Factor comparisons all exceeded 0.97 so that the factors of Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Social Desirability are deemed to be identical in the two countries, England and The Netherlands. Sex

  5. Governing obesity policies from England, France, Germany and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Signild

    2015-01-01

    , I present a study of four plans from four Western European countries: England, France, Germany and Scotland, identifying how obesity is defined as a political issue. The questions addressed are: How is the development in the obesity prevalence explained and who is considered responsible...

  6. Changing Patterns of Educational Accountability in England and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadfoot, Patricia

    1985-01-01

    Uses France and England--because of their radically different institutional and ideological traditions in education--to illustrate common trends in educational accountability. Explains general trends affecting advanced capitalist societies at the present time, e.g., the use of corporate management approaches in education and the adoption of…

  7. Inclusion and the Standards Agenda: Negotiating Policy Pressures in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainscow, Mel; Booth, Tony; Dyson, Alan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on some aspects of a collaborative action research project involving teams from 25 schools in England working with researchers from three universities in an attempt to understand how schools can develop more inclusive cultures, policies and practices. Unusually in this field, the schools were not selected because of any…

  8. Doing transformational change in the English NHS in the context of “big bang” redisorganisation : findings from the North East transformation system.

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, D.J.; Erskine, J; A. Small; McGovern, T.; Hicks, C.; Whitty, P.; Lugsden, E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine a bold and ambitious scheme known as the North East transformation system (NETS). The principal aim of the NETS is the achievement of a step-change in the quality of health services delivered to people living in the North East region of England. The paper charts the origins of the NETS and its early journey before describing what happened to it when the UK coalition government published its proposals for unexpected major structural change i...

  9. Fish Remains from Excavations near the Riverfront at Newcastle upon Tyne, England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Nicholson

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The City of Newcastle, situated some 10 miles inland on the River Tyne in north-east England, is not now an important fishing port. Most of the fresh fish marketed in the city has been landed at the nearby coastal ports of North and South Shields. Excavations at two sites behind the present Quayside in Newcastle, however, have yielded quantities of fish bones, representing a wide variety of species. This is in contrast to excavations in other parts of the city, where few fish remains have been recovered, and suggests that the quayside in Newcastle was an important centre for the fishing industry during the medieval period. It seems likely that most of the fish remains represent waste from landing and processing fish on or near the quayside. Yet, when taphonomic factors are taken into account, the limitations of using even large bone assemblages to interpret processing activities is demonstrated. As always, the need for a programme of on-site sieving to obtain representative samples of fish bone is evident.

  10. East of Eden / M. A.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Palmses toimub sel nädalal rahvusvahelise stsenaariumikoolituse East of Eden seminar. Koolituse koordinatsioonikeskus tegutseb alates 2005.aastast Eesti Filmi Sihtasutuse juures, Eesti--poolseks koordinaatoriks Anu Ernits

  11. Discourse Between East and West

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The first Chinese-hosted cultural dialogue between the East and the West was held in Nishan, Shandong Province The first Nishan Forum on World Civilizations kicked off on September 26 at Nishan Mountain, 25 km southeast

  12. East of Eden / M. A.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    M. A.

    2005-01-01

    Palmses toimub sel nädalal rahvusvahelise stsenaariumikoolituse East of Eden seminar. Koolituse koordinatsioonikeskus tegutseb alates 2005.aastast Eesti Filmi Sihtasutuse juures, Eesti--poolseks koordinaatoriks Anu Ernits

  13. East India Company Logbooks - Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection consists of images of 1,235 ship logbooks created during British East India Company voyages. Period of record 1786-1834, peaking in 1804. The...

  14. Regions. [Africa, Middle East].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    This discussion of population focuses on the regions of Africa and the Middle East. In South Africa more white women are working but fewer black women work. The overall result is that the percentage of women who work is declining. Marita de Beer, research liaison executive at the South African Advertising Research Foundation, reports that the female population grew by 31% in the past 10 years while the number of working women has grown by only 11%. Among blacks the female population rose by 36%, but the number of workers among them declined by about 1%. Married women are among the fastest growing groups of working women in South Africa. The most recent estimate of the population of Nigeria is 92 million. According to Professor Vremudia Diejomaoh, Nigeria's population will probably reach 155 million by 2000 with 33% living in urban areas. In Saudi Arabia the Pan Arab Research Center recently completed a census of retail outlets in 3 metropolitan areas: Jeddah, Riyadh, and Dammam. The types of outlets surveyed include large supermarkets, small supermarkets, groceries with and without deep freeze, tobacco shops, meat shop/delis, small cafeterias, large restaurants/hotels, cosmetics shops or perfumeries, camera stores, toy shops, pharmacies, watch and gift shop, newsstands, department store, and appliance outlets. Using the Census of Retail Outlets as a base, Pan Arab Research Center also has a new distribution audit system that will cover 500 outlets. By plotting Arab countries according to their population policies and their current growth rates, it is possible to project where the middle class will grow fastest in the Arab world. The countries that have declining growth rates and strong population programs designed to encourage lower fertility rates among women are Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, and Lebanon. The countries most likely to have a better per capita distribution of resources within this decade are those where governments encourage reductions in

  15. Challenges in tuberculosis management in Peru and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivany, Elena; Boulton, Jacqueline

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious but preventable and largely treatable disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although there is evidence that the UK incidence remains stable, rates of the disease, particularly in some London boroughs, remain high, earning it the unenviable title of the 'tuberculosis capital of Europe'. In March 2014 Public Health England published a consultation document on a collaborative strategy for tackling tuberculosis in England. This highlights a growing concern surrounding the issue. In the 1990s, Peru's tuberculosis epidemic saw the country listed among the Pan-American Health Organisation's top 23 countries of heaviest burden. Since then overall rates, although remaining significantly higher than those of the UK, have fallen dramatically. This article uses the observations of a BSc Nursing student undertaking an international elective in Peru to highlight some of the challenges faced by nurses in managing TB and draws parallels with those faced in the UK.

  16. Concurrent conditions and human listeriosis, England, 1999-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, Piers; O'Brien, Sarah J; Gillespie, Iain A

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of listeriosis in England and Wales changed during 2001-2008; more patients ≥60 years of age had bacteremia than in previous years. To investigate these changes, we calculated risk for listeriosis by concurrent condition for non-pregnancy-associated listeriosis cases reported to the national surveillance system in England during 1999-2009. Conditions occurring with L. monocytogenes infection were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, and compared with appropriate hospital episode statistics inpatient denominator data to calculate incidence rates/million consultations. Malignancies (especially of the blood), kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, alcoholism, and age ≥60 years were associated with an increased risk for listeriosis. Physicians should consider a diagnosis of listeriosis when treating patients who have concurrent conditions. Providing cancer patients, who accounted for one third of cases, with food safety information might help limit additional cases.

  17. Building the New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Kafel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for a curriculum designed for librarians to use for teaching STEM research data management skills to their constituents from diverse STEM disciplines has been widely identified. (Qin and D’Ignazio 2010. From 2012-2014, a collaborative group of New England librarians, led by a project team from the University of Massachusetts Medical School, developed lecture notes, presentation slides, assignments, readings, and case studies for teaching research data management. The New England Collaborative Data Management Curriculum (NECDMC is unique in its flexibility; providing subject agnostic instructional materials in a modular format for teaching common data management best practices along with a suite of teaching cases illustrating data management in disciplinary contexts. This article is a follow-up to the “Teaching Research Data Management: An Undergraduate/Graduate Curriculum (Piorun et al. 2012 that was published in the Journal of eScience Librarianship.

  18. Home visitors and child health in England: advances and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Cowley

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the early years as a focus for reducing health inequalities as well as one that is important for the children themselves. This paper describes the introduction in England of Sure Start Local Programmes, which included home visiting within a community development approach, and an intensive home visiting programme, the Nurse-Family partnership, for disadvantaged teenage mothers. It reflects on changes and challenges in service provision to mothers and their pre-school children in England, explaining that a long tradition of home visiting was, paradoxically, reduced as attention focused on the newer initiatives. This is now being addressed, with attention to a range of evidence based programmes and a specific focus on heath visitor provision.

  19. Wetland conservation and sustainable coastal governance in Japan and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephen; Kawabe, Midori; Rewhorn, Sonja

    2011-05-01

    Coastal wetlands present particular challenges for coastal governance and for the implementation of the Ramsar Convention, not least because coastal areas are focal points of human activity and of governance ambiguity. Through the evaluation of Ramsar delivery at both national and local levels in Japan and England, the relationship between Ramsar implementation and coastal governance was examined. In England, Ramsar status is primarily treated as a nature conservation designation which limits the wider opportunities inherent in the designation. In contrast, in Japan, the Ramsar Convention is used as a policy driver at the national level and as a leverage to encourage citizen engagement, economic benefit, and wetland conservation at the local level. It was concluded that through the implementation of the Ramsar Convention in important coastal wetland areas, significant steps can be taken towards delivering integrated approaches to coastal governance.

  20. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, England and Wales, 1945-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Christopher R; LeBaigue, Susan; Esan, Oluwaseun B; Awofisyo, Adedoyin A; Adams, Natalie L; Fisher, Ian S T; Grant, Kathie A; Peters, Tansy M; Larkin, Lesley; Davies, Robert H; Adak, Goutam K

    2014-07-01

    In England and Wales, the emergence of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis resulted in the largest and most persistent epidemic of foodborne infection attributable to a single subtype of any pathogen since systematic national microbiological surveillance was established. We reviewed 67 years of surveillance data to examine the features, underlying causes, and overall effects of S. enterica ser. Enteritidis. The epidemic was associated with the consumption of contaminated chicken meat and eggs, and a decline in the number of infections began after the adoption of vaccination and other measures in production and distribution of chicken meat and eggs. We estimate that >525,000 persons became ill during the course of the epidemic, which caused a total of 6,750,000 days of illness, 27,000 hospitalizations, and 2,000 deaths. Measures undertaken to control the epidemic have resulted in a major reduction in foodborne disease in England and Wales.

  1. Multiculturalism and England’s Muslim Minority: Solution or Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    Theories of Hannah Arendt and John Rex.” in Rethinking Nationalism and Ethnicity. ed. Hans-Rudolf Wicker. (Oxford, England: Berg Publishing, 1997). 26...Hans-Rudolph Wicker. “Multiculturalism and the Sphere Theories of Hannah Arendt and John Rex.” in Rethinking Nationalism and Ethnicity. ed. Hans...multiculturalism can be applied was first articulated by the social philosopher Hannah Arendt who developed a model that divided society into three spheres

  2. Empirical determinants of measles metapopulation dynamics in England and Wales.

    OpenAIRE

    Finkenstädt, B; Grenfell, B.

    1998-01-01

    A key issue in metapopulation dynamics is the relative impact of internal patch dynamics and coupling between patches. This problem can be addressed by analysing large spatiotemporal data sets, recording the local and global dynamics of metapopulations. In this paper, we analyse the dynamics of measles meta-populations in a large spatiotemporal case notification data set, collected during the pre-vaccination era in England and Wales. Specifically, we use generalized linear statistical models ...

  3. Variations in prison mental health services in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Andrew; Exworthy, Tim; Olumoroti, Olumuyiwa; Sessay, Mohammed; Parrott, Janet; Spencer, Sarah-Jane; Whyte, Sean

    2013-01-01

    In responding to high levels of psychiatric morbidity amongst prisoners and recognising earlier poor quality prison mental health care, prison mental health in-reach teams have been established in England and Wales over the last decade. They are mostly provided by the National Health Service (NHS), which provides the majority of UK healthcare services. Over the same period, the prison population has grown to record levels, such that prisons in England and Wales now contain almost 90,000 of the world's overall prison population of over 10 million people (roughly the size of Paris or Istanbul). This study provides an overview of mental health in-reach services in prisons in England and Wales, including variations between them, through a telephone survey of senior staff in all prisons and young offender institutions in England and Wales. 73% of prisons took part; of them 13% had no in-reach team at all (usually low security establishments) and the majority of services were run by NHS teams, usually according to a generic community mental health team (CMHT) model rather than other specialist models. Team size was unrelated to prison size. Each nurse covered around 500 prisoners, each doctor over 3700. Many provided few or no healthcare cells and 24-h psychiatric cover (including on-call cover) was uncommon. Despite developments in recent years, mental health in-reach services still fall short of community equivalence and there is wide variation in service arrangements that cannot be explained by prison size or function. The aim of community equivalence has not yet been reached in prison healthcare and a more sophisticated measure of service improvement and standardisation would now be useful to drive and monitor future development.

  4. Euthanasia: a summary of the law in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simillis, Constantinos

    2008-07-01

    When medical treatment becomes futile, or the patient's suffering is intractable, doctors face the agonising dilemma of whether to proceed with euthanasia. It is important for a doctor to be familiar with the law surrounding euthanasia, in order to avoid prosecution. This paper explores the law in England and Wales regarding the different categories of euthanasia: voluntary euthanasia, nonvoluntary euthanasia, passive euthanasia, and active euthanasia.

  5. Treatment approaches for dual diagnosis clients in England

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, S.; Meier, P.S.; Stirling, J.; Berry, M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction - Dual diagnosis (DD, co-occurrence of substance use and mental health problems) prevalence data in England are limited to specific regions and reported rates vary widely. Reliable information on actual service provision for dual diagnosis clients has not been collated. Thus a national survey was carried out to estimate dual diagnosis prevalence in treatment populations and describe the service provision available for this client population in drug/alcohol (DAS) and mental health...

  6. Myxomatosis in farmland rabbit populations in England and Wales.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, J; Tittensor, A. M.; Fox, A. P.; Sanders, M. F.

    1989-01-01

    The overall pattern and consequences of myxomatosis in wild rabbit populations were studied at three farmland sites in lowland southern England and upland central Wales between 1971 and 1978. When results from all years were combined, the disease showed a clear two-peaked annual cycle, with a main autumn peak between August and January, and a subsidiary spring peak during February to April. Rabbit fleas, the main vectors of myxomatosis in Britain, were present on full-grown rabbits in suffici...

  7. Screening for neuroblastoma in the north of England.

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, L.; Craft, A W; G. Dale; Bell, S.; M Cole; McGill, A C; Seviour, J. A.; Smith, J.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the feasibility of establishing a system of screening for neuroblastoma. DESIGN--Prospective study of mass screening in four clearly defined geographical areas. SETTING--Four health districts of the Northern region of England. SUBJECTS--20,829 babies aged 6 months, 92% of target population. INTERVENTIONS--Collection of urine on filter paper for analysis of content of homovanillic and vanillylmandelic acid in relation to urinary creatinine concentrations. MAIN OUTCOME M...

  8. Physical fitness of 9 year olds in England: related factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, S; Rona, R J; Chinn, S

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To examine the influence of social factors, passive smoking, and other parental health related factors, as well as anthropometric and other measurements on children's cardiorespiratory fitness. DESIGN--This was a cross sectional study. SETTING--The analysis was based on 22 health areas in England. PARTICIPANTS--The subjects were 299 boys and 282 girls aged 8 to 9 years. Parents did not give positive consent for 15% of the eligible sample. A further 25% of the eligible sample ...

  9. The child health/family income gradient: Evidence from England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Alison; Shields, Michael A; Price, Stephen Wheatley

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies using Canadian and US data have documented a positive relationship between family income and child health, with the slope of the gradient being larger for older than younger children [Case, A., Lubotsky, D., Paxson, C., 2002. Economic status and health in childhood: the origins of the gradient. American Economic Review 92, 1308-1334; Currie, J., Stabile, M., 2003. Socioeconomic status and child health: why is the relationship stronger for older children? American Economic Review 93, 1813-1823]. In this paper we explore whether or not these findings hold for England, analysing a sample of over 13,000 children (and their parents) drawn from the Health Survey for England. While we find consistent and robust evidence of a significant family income gradient in child health, using the subjective general health status measure, the slope of the gradient is very small. Moreover, we find no evidence that the slope of the gradient increases with child age. Furthermore, we find no evidence of such a gradient with more objective measures, based on nurse examinations and blood test results. Together these results suggest that family income is not a major determinant of child health in England. Finally, we provide some evidence that nutrition and family lifestyle choices have an important role in determining child health and that child health is highly correlated within the family.

  10. MONITORING THE DISTRIBUTION OF CRAYFISH IN ENGLAND AND WALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIBLEY P. J.

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of crayfish in England and Wales is described for the period 1997 to 2001 inclusive and is illustrated using a catchment based classification scheme and 10-km square maps. Comparison with previous data from the period 1990 to 1996 shows a decrease in the number of catchments where the native crayfish, Austropotamobius pallipes, is present. Conversely there has been an increase in the distribution of non-native species, notably Pacifastacus leniusculus, which is now more widely distributed than A. pallipes (according to presence within 10-km squares of the Ordnance Survey National Grid of England and Wales. The Environment Agency is the main environmental regulator in England and Wales, and plays a key role in gathering crayfish survey data. A co-ordinated programme of monitoring and reporting, ideally involving partner organisations, should be utilised to accurately reflect the changing status of crayfish in these countries. Crayfish survey data is currently recorded on a series of local databases within the Agency, and records are also stored on a national freshwater invertebrate archive used primarily for water quality monitoring purposes. Records generated by other groups and individuals are collated by the Biological Records Centre, with whom the Environment Agency has established links, and the need for a dedicated national database has been expressed by many workers. One area currently under development involves the National Biodiversity Network, a medium for sharing wildlife information via the internet, founded by a consortium of statutory and conservation organisations.

  11. Urban and rural mortality and survival in Medieval England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Brittany S; DeWitte, Sharon N

    2017-06-01

    Late medieval England underwent intensive urbanisation, particularly in its largest city: London. Urban dwellers were exposed to factors such as high population density, elevated risk of infection, unsanitary living conditions and precarious food supplies. To assess whether the urban environment was more detrimental to health than the rural environment, this study compares risks of mortality and survival, as proxies for health, in medieval urban vs rural England. This study uses samples from rural St. Peter's cemetery in Barton-upon-Humber, Lincolnshire (c. 1150-1500) and urban St. Mary Spital cemetery in London (c. 1120-1539). Cox proportional hazards analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis are used to assess differences in mortality and survival between urban and rural environments, including differences between sexes. The results indicate that urban adults faced elevated risks of dying and reductions in survivorship. Specifically, urban females faced elevated risks of dying and reductions in survivorship, while the risks for males were similar in both environments. These results suggest that the effects of urbanisation in medieval England varied by sex. Deleterious conditions associated with urbanisation in London were hazardous for adults, particularly females who may have migrated into London from rural areas for labour opportunities.

  12. Briefing book on the energy situation in New England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brainard, J P; Munson, J S; Palmedo, P F

    1976-10-01

    This briefing book is designed to give a concise overview of the facts of the energy situation in New England and of attitudes within the region towards current energy issues. Many of the central problems of U.S. energy policy are manifested in the region in a magnified form. The region entered the period of energy shortages and increasing prices in an economically declining condition. Energy prices were already high in 1970, 30% higher than the rest of the country; the difference increased to 38% by 1974. With essentially no indigenous energy resources, New England is an energy-importing region. For various reasons it is also more dependent on petroleum than other regions of the country and, at the same time, distant from domestic petroleum-producing regions. The result is that over 60% of the fuels it consumes is imported from abroad. Although the future supply of energy to the region is critically dependent on energy-resource policies, policies related for example to coal and oil shale development, the region's concerns cluster around policies and technologies that are perceived to have a more direct impact on its energy welfare. Thus, energy conservation, solar energy, nuclear power, offshore oil development and, in general, the price of energy to the region are paramount issues of concern and debate. Following the Introductory chapter, these issues are discussed in four additional chapters: The Energy Situation in New England; Regional Energy Issues; Energy-Related Institutions; and State Legislation.

  13. Politeness: West and East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Джеффри Лич

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper was planned for this issue of our journal, which Geoffrey Leech and I intended to devote to Politeness phenomena across cultures. It is based on his article titled “Politeness: Is there an East-West Divide?” (2005 which he suggested as a theoretical framework and includes results of our discussions held during our personal meetings and our epistolary exchange. Unfortunately the final version of the paper was never read by Geoffrey Leech for the reasons we all sadly know. Nevertheless I decided to publish it as a tribute to him in the knowledge that the result was not going to have the degree of excellence it would have had if he were still with us today. I therefore apologise for any mistakes or misinterpretations of his thoughts that might be found in the paper. The aim of this article is to sum up the main ideas of Politeness Theory presented earlier in Leech 1983, 2003, 2005, and other publications and discuss how that theory applies (or fails to apply to other languages, with the main emphasis on the Russian language and culture. The term ‘maxim’ used in Principles of Pragmatics (Leech 1983 is avoided here as much as possible, as it implies some kind of moral imperative, rather than a pragmatic constraint. Instead, a single constraint, which comprehends all the maxims (the Maxims of Tact, Generosity, Approbation, Modesty, Agreement, Sympathy, and is called the Grand Strategy of Politeness (GSP, is used. The GSP says: In order to be polite, S expresses or implies meanings which place a high value on what pertains to O- his/her wants, qualities, obligation, opinion, feelings (O = other person[s], [mainly the addressee, i.e. H = hearer] or place a low value on what pertains to S (S = self, speaker. The essential point is that these are not separate, independent constraints or maxims: they are instances of the operation of the GSP as ‘super-maxim’ which is an overarching framework for studying linguistic politeness

  14. U.S. and East Asian Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Limin

    2008-01-01

    the U.S. is directly impacting on the future of the East Asian community. Therefore, finding ways to get along with the U.S. is crucial to the speed, direction, configuration and character of the East Asian community. In this paper, the author has analyzed the interests of the United States in East Asia and its stands towards the East Asian integration. The author concludes that it is to the interest of the United States to make more efforts to further join in the East Asian integration.And East Asia should accept and welcome the American participation.

  15. Big Prospects in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    After bottoming out last year, the emerging economies of East Asia are recouping their losses and setting out onto the fast growth track.But short-term growth does not necessarily indicate a prosperous future-the region still needs to rebalance its economies and precipitate a massive shift to green technologies and energy efficiency. The World Bank discussed this issue in the latest EastAsia & Pacific Economic Update,a biannual assessment of economies in the region.Edited excerpts follow:

  16. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project; Volume 1, Issue 2 -- December 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

    2006-12-01

    The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education, and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 2 features an interview with John MacLeod of Hull Municipal Light Plant. Hull 2, a 1.8-MW Vestas turbine installed in the Town of Hull in Massachusetts in 2006, is the largest wind turbine in New England and the first U.S. installation on a capped landfill.

  17. Interviewee and Vessel Characteristics from Ethnographic Interviews of New England Groundfish Fishermen on Adaptation and Transition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Database of fisherman and vessel characteristics selected from ethnographic interviews of New England groundfish fishermen on adaptation and transition

  18. East Man,Global Winner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wind Blew; Bai Yifeng

    2007-01-01

    @@ "The Global Human Settlement Environment Green Building Materials Award is a special award with a special significance.My staff and I feel so excited with this award.It is a special honor that means our independent brand,East Man Heath Paint,has received recognition in the international community.

  19. Forests of East Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Brandeis

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas derived from an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. These estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are...

  20. Forests of east Texas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry J.W. Dooley

    2017-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station (SRS) in cooperation with Texas A&M Forest Service. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—Southeast (unit 1),...

  1. Forests of east Texas, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.J.W. Dooley; T.J. Brandeis

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. Forest resource estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and...

  2. Great Explorers to the East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rosalie F., Ed.; Baker, Charles F. III, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This issue of "Calliope," a world history magazine for young people is devoted to "Great Explorers of the East" and features articles on famous explorers of the eastern hemisphere. The following articles are included: "Ancient Egyptian Mariners"; "Alexander: The Great Reconciler"; "Marco Polo:…

  3. Great Explorers to the East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rosalie F., Ed.; Baker, Charles F. III, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This issue of "Calliope," a world history magazine for young people is devoted to "Great Explorers of the East" and features articles on famous explorers of the eastern hemisphere. The following articles are included: "Ancient Egyptian Mariners"; "Alexander: The Great Reconciler"; "Marco Polo: Describing the World"; "By Water to India";…

  4. East African odontopygid millipedes 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Sara B.; Enghoff, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Five new species of the endemic East African genus Xystopyge are described: X. pelecys, X. frontieri, X. proplicatus, X. biacanthus, and X. zanzibarensis. Three are from the Eastern Arc Mountains, Tanzania, two are from the Usambara Mtns. and one is from the Uluguru Mtns. One further species is f...

  5. Funding problems threaten Middle East's synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    McCabe, H

    1999-01-01

    Scientists will tour the Middle East to try to raise support for the Synchrotron radiation for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East project. The plan is to dismantle and move a decommissioned synchrotron from Berlin to the Middle East where scientists of any nationality would be able to use it (3 paragraphs).

  6. Karaoke and Interpersonal Communication in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ringo

    An exploratory study investigated the interpersonal meaning of karaoke to its participants in East Asia. Current research suggests that the popularity of karaoke in East Asia is associated with the cultural value of harmony and the indirect mode of communication in this region. Subjects, 51 East Asian undergraduate-level students who had…

  7. Experiencing the New Geography in East Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Uli; Burpee, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Considers the difficulties experienced by the East German School system adjusting to a more progressive educational philosophy. Specifically, contrasts the traditional East German geography instruction (focused solely on physical geography) with the West German emphasis on social issues and problem solving. Many East German instructors distrust…

  8. Characterizing tobacco control mass media campaigns in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Tessa; Lewis, Sarah; McNeill, Ann; Gilmore, Anna; Szatkowski, Lisa; West, Robert; Sims, Michelle

    2013-11-01

    To characterize publically funded tobacco control campaigns in England between 2004 and 2010 and to explore if they were in line with recommendations from the literature in terms of their content and intensity. International evidence suggests that campaigns which warn of the negative consequences of smoking and feature testimonials from real-life smokers are most effective, and that four exposures per head per month are required to reduce smoking prevalence. Characterization of tobacco control advertisements using a theoretically based framework designed to describe advertisement themes, informational and emotional content and style. Study of the intensity of advertising and exposure to different types of advertisement using data on population-level exposure to advertisements shown during the study period. England. Television Ratings (TVRs), a standard measure of advertising exposure, were used to calculate exposure to each different campaign type. A total of 89% of advertising was for smoking cessation; half of this advertising warned of the negative consequences of smoking, while half contained how-to-quit messages. Acted scenes featured in 72% of advertising, while only 17% featured real-life testimonials. Only 39% of months had at least four exposures to tobacco control campaigns per head. A theory-driven approach enabled a systematic characterization of tobacco control advertisements in England. Between 2004 and 2010 only a small proportion of tobacco control advertisements utilized the most effective strategies-negative health effects messages and testimonials from real-life smokers. The intensity of campaigns was lower than international recommendations. © 2013 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Prevalence study of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horga, Alejandro; Raja Rayan, Dipa L; Matthews, Emma; Sud, Richa; Fialho, Doreen; Durran, Siobhan C M; Burge, James A; Portaro, Simona; Davis, Mary B; Haworth, Andrea; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-04-16

    To obtain minimum point prevalence rates for the skeletal muscle channelopathies and to evaluate the frequency distribution of mutations associated with these disorders. Analysis of demographic, clinical, electrophysiologic, and genetic data of all patients assessed at our national specialist channelopathy service. Only patients living in the United Kingdom with a genetically defined diagnosis of nondystrophic myotonia or periodic paralysis were eligible for the study. Prevalence rates were estimated for England, December 2011. A total of 665 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 593 were living in England, giving a minimum point prevalence of 1.12/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.21). Disease-specific prevalence figures were as follows: myotonia congenita 0.52/100,000 (95% CI 0.46-0.59), paramyotonia congenita 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), sodium channel myotonias 0.06/100,000 (95% CI 0.04-0.08), hyperkalemic periodic paralysis 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), hypokalemic periodic paralysis 0.13/100,000 (95% CI 0.10-0.17), and Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) 0.08/100,000 (95% CI 0.05-0.10). In the whole sample (665 patients), 15 out of 104 different CLCN1 mutations accounted for 60% of all patients with myotonia congenita, 11 out of 22 SCN4A mutations for 86% of paramyotonia congenita/sodium channel myotonia pedigrees, and 3 out of 17 KCNJ2 mutations for 42% of ATS pedigrees. We describe for the first time the overall prevalence of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England. Despite the large variety of mutations observed in patients with nondystrophic myotonia and ATS, a limited number accounted for a large proportion of cases.

  10. Importance of long-term monitoring for detecting environmental change: lessons from a lowland river in south east England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Burt

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Rising nitrate concentrations in rivers and groundwater in regions with intensive agriculture have been of concern for several decades. Long records of nitrate concentration are rare; in the UK, few pre-date 1974. Records from the River Stour from 1937 are analysed using "moving-windows", to explore the effects of window width on trend detection and process inference. Nitrate concentrations rose sharply from the late 1950s in response to widespread ploughing of grassland, but have fallen since the early 1980s, suggesting that widespread nitrogen control measures, which were introduced after the start of the downward trend, may not be the principal driver for recent change. Short windows (5 years are too noisy; longer windows (10, 15 and 30 years identify signals (i.e. trends more reliably. Since system response times can be of the order of 20–30 years, management decisions made on shorter data sets (even up to 15 years could be misleading.

  11. Importance of long-term monitoring for detecting environmental change: lessons from a lowland river in south east England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Burt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Rising nitrate concentrations in rivers and groundwater in regions with intensive agriculture have been of concern for several decades. Long records of nitrate concentration are rare; in the UK, few pre-date 1974. Records from the River Stour from 1937 are analysed using moving-windows to explore the effects of window width on trend detection and process inference. Nitrate concentrations rose sharply from the late 1950s in response to widespread ploughing of grassland, but have fallen since the early 1980s, suggesting that widespread nitrogen control measures, which were introduced after the start of the downward trend, may not be the principal driver for recent change. Short windows (5 years are too noisy; longer windows (10, 15 and 30 years identify signals (i.e. trends more reliably. Since system response times can be of the order of 20–30 years, management decisions made on shorter data sets (even up to 15 years could be misleading.

  12. Trends in the epidemiology of larynx and lung cancer in south-east England, 1985–2004

    OpenAIRE

    Coupland, VH; Chapman, P; Linklater, KM; Sehgal, A; Møller, H; Davies, EA

    2008-01-01

    We analysed data on 8987 larynx and 174060 lung cancer patients diagnosed between 1985 and 2004, of which 17.3% of larynx and 35.5% of lung cancers were in females. The age-standardised rates for each cancer declined in both sexes, but since the 1990s, the rates in females over 70 years of age have been diverging.

  13. Non-Disabled Secondary School Children's Lived Experiences of a Wheelchair Basketball Programme Delivered in the East of England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A. B.; Bright, J. L.; Brown, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Frequently an unquestioned belief is held in British schools in the value of "normalized" ability in physical education (PE). Consequently inclusion of disabled students can be problematic. Negative perceptions of disability are rarely challenged. This study investigated the embodied experiences of 49 non-disabled secondary school pupils…

  14. A Study of 279 General Outbreaks of Gastrointestinal Infection in the North-East Region of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahame M. Tebbutt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available All outbreaks of infectious intestinal disease reported to the authorities were entered on a computer database with outbreak control teams being established to investigate larger or more significant incidents. The outbreak database and, when set up, the notes of outbreak team meetings were examined for the 279 outbreaks reported in a three-year period (2003-2005. Faeces specimens submitted as part of an outbreak were examined for microbial pathogens and the results cross-matched to the outbreak number. Almost half of the general outbreaks reported (137 occurred in long-term care facilities for the elderly, 51 outbreaks were recorded in hospitals and 31 occurred in the wider community. In 76 outbreaks no specimen was logged. A microbial cause was confirmed in about one-third of outbreaks, with noroviruses being the most common (19%. Salmonellas accounted for 12 of the 21 community outbreaks linked to social events and all were foodborne. Suggestions for improving notification and surveillance are discussed.

  15. Audit of internal quality control practice and processes in the south-east of England and suggested regional standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housley, David; Kearney, Edward; English, Emma; Smith, Natalie; Teal, Teresa; Mazurkiewicz, Janina; Freedman, Danielle B

    2008-03-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) has a long and well-established role in clinical biochemistry laboratories. However, despite the duration of use, and the publication of several articles detailing best practice, the implementation and use of IQC vary significantly between institutions. Consequently, the North Thames Audit and Quality Assurance Group undertook a region-wide audit of current IQC practice in 2006. On aspects of IQC testing, interpretation and laboratory processes, 54 laboratories in the region were audited. Audit data showed significant variability in all aspects of practice, including IQC frequency, use of appropriate material, statistical processing and grades of staff involved. Some of the variation in practice may affect the effectiveness of laboratory IQC, and thus the adequacy of a laboratory to monitor system performance. Consequently, a set of proposed regional standards have been developed and disseminated, prior to re-audit at a future date.

  16. Diversity and distribution of epiphytic bryophytes on Bramley’s Seedling trees in East of England apple orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Whitelaw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytic bryophytes on apple trees were investigated in relation to a selection of tree characteristics. Management of orchard trees for fruit production affects the habitats available for colonisation and growth of epiphytes on trunks and branches. Bryophytes recorded on Bramley’s Seedling apple trees in orchards in Hertfordshire and Cambridgeshire showed a high level of similarity in species composition between the orchards. The similarity between orchards was, however, much reduced when relative species cover on the trees was taken into account. Twenty three species were recorded on the 71 trees sampled for detailed investigation. Tree structure, as determined by management, explained about 10% of the observed variation in bryophyte cover. Within that, trunk girth and distance to nearest neighbouring orchard trees were the most important factors. This information is of value to orchard managers aiming to become more proactive in managing their habitats for the benefit of biodiversity.

  17. Leadership and transformational change in healthcare organisations: a qualitative analysis of the North East Transformation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, Jonathan; Hunter, David J; Small, Adrian; Hicks, Chris; McGovern, Tom; Lugsden, Ed; Whitty, Paula; Steen, Nick; Eccles, Martin Paul

    2013-02-01

    The research project 'An Evaluation of Transformational Change in NHS North East' examines the progress and success of National Health Service (NHS) organisations in north east England in implementing and embedding the North East Transformation System (NETS), a region-wide programme to improve healthcare quality and safety, and to reduce waste, using a combination of Vision, Compact, and Lean-based Method. This paper concentrates on findings concerning the role of leadership in enabling tranformational change, based on semi-structured interviews with a mix of senior NHS managers and quality improvement staff in 14 study sites. Most interviewees felt that implementing the NETS requires committed, stable leadership, attention to team-building across disciplines and leadership development at many levels. We conclude that without senior leader commitment to continuous improvement over a long time scale and serious efforts to distribute leadership tasks to all levels, healthcare organisations are less likely to achieve positive changes in managerial-clinical relations, sustainable improvements to organisational culture and, ultimately, the region-wide step change in quality, safety and efficiency that the NETS was designed to deliver.

  18. Tree rings and time: recent historical studies in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Bridge

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available By studying the annual growth rings of long-lived trees, and those preserved in ancient timbers that have survived in waterlogged or very dry conditions, it is possible to date past events in calendar years and to investigate climatic and other environmental changes. Dendrochronology has many applications, including the dating of buildings and ships and the calibration of the radiocarbon timescale that is so widely used in archaeology. Here the technique is outlined and some recent applications of it in England are described.

  19. Changing market for renewable energy in New England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, M. [Second Wind Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The author discusses the rapidly changing power market in New England in the face of deregulation of the electric power industry. Utilities are moving to sell their generation assets, and the new players in the market are striving to present themselves as active in a green market. But there is little knowledge about renewable energy sources on the part of the new marketers, and little capacity available, while there does appear to be customer demand. Legislative action seems to be putting in place policies making renewable energy a more attractive option. The author looks at the disparity between demand and availability at this time.

  20. Estimation of migration profiles in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J; Bracken, I

    1982-07-01

    "Migration profiles by age have been increasingly used in the analysis of migration data, and a theoretical function has been developed by researchers at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA). This paper refines the approach by applying the principles of maximum likelihood to the estimation of the coefficients for the function. This enhances the statistical basis and in particular enables [the authors] to carry out tests of similarity between different areas on the basis of the calibrated coefficients. The method is applied to 1971 Census data for the local authorities of England and Wales."

  1. Kreditní riziko - rating Bank of England

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo Thi Ngoc, Anh

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor thesis is focused on theoretical interpretation of credit risk measurement and management. The goal of this thesis is to figure out the overview of financial risks, their definition, with big aim on credit risk and risk management, the way to approach credit risk with credit models and the impact of Basel II on credit risk management (STA, FIRB, AIRB). The thesis will concern with rating as one of tools to deal with credit risk a particularly the impact of rating on Bank of England.

  2. The abortion-crime link: evidence from England and Wales

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    We use panel data from 1983 to 1997 for the 42 police force areas in England and Wales to test the hypothesis that legalizing abortion contributes to lower crime rates. We provide an advance on previous work by focusing on the impact of possible endogeneity of effective abortion rates with respect to crime. Our use of U.K. data allows us to exploit regional differences in the provision of free abortions to identify abortion rates. When we use a similar model and estimation methodology, we are...

  3. Physiological Profile of Senior and Junior England International Amateur Boxers

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Marcus S

    2006-01-01

    Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days) and rapid (0 to 7-days) phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (...

  4. Comparing pedagogy in mathematics in Denmark and England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike;

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a comparative study of pedagogy in lower-secondary school mathematics in Denmark and England. Lesson observations and interviews identified the range of goals towards which teachers in each country worked and the actions these prompted. These were clustered using...... the lens of Bernstein’s pedagogic discourse (1990; 1996) to construct mathematics teacher roles which provided a view of pedagogy. Comparison allowed variations in pedagogy across the two countries to be identified and implications drawn. Of particular interest were the differences in experience of lower...... attaining pupils, and some of the advantages and disadvantages of mathematics pedagogy in each country for this group are indicated....

  5. Prices, Wages and Fertility in Pre-Industrial England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemp, Marc

    A two-sector Malthusian model is formulated in terms of a cointegrated vector autoregressive (CVAR) model on error correction form. The model allows for both agricultural product wages and relative prices to affect fertility. The model is estimated using new data for the pre-industrial period...... in England, and the analysis reveals a strong, positive effect of agricultural wages as well as a small and, surprisingly, positive effect of real agricultural prices on fertility. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that there is constant returns to scale with respect to labour in the manufacturing sector...... and strongly decreasing returns to scale in the agricultural sector....

  6. 77 FR 71585 - Brookfield Energy Marketing LP v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Brookfield Energy Marketing LP v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of...) filed a formal complaint against ISO New England Inc. (Respondent) alleging that the...

  7. 78 FR 28838 - New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... April 29, 2013, the New England Hydropower Company, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit... of Engineers. The existing Lensdale Pond Dam and appurtenant works, including an existing powerhouse...

  8. 77 FR 75630 - New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission New England Hydropower Company, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... December 7, 2012, the New England Hydropower Company, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit... Mill Dam and appurtenant works, including a former powerhouse foundation and intake structures, are...

  9. The Social Structure of the 14-16 Curriculum in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Alice; Zimdars, Anna; Heath, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the stratification of the curriculum according to parents' education, gender, ethnicity and school sector in England, focusing on year 10 subject choices. Using the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England, we analyse both year 10 subject choices and the factors that may motivate these choices, such as liked and disliked…

  10. Towards "Languages for All" in England: The State of the Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagger-Vaughan, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    Whether the study of languages should be a core element of a balanced and broadly based curriculum for all pupils in England's 11-16 state-funded secondary schools is also part of a wider debate concerning how to harness England's rich linguistic and cultural diversity and improve the quality and range of language skills of the country. While…

  11. Market Accountability in Schools: Policy Reforms in England, Germany, France and Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Paola

    2012-01-01

    This article concentrates on the policy reforms of schools in England, Germany, France and Italy, from 1988 to 2009, with a focus on the introduction of market accountability. Pressing demands for organisational change in schools, shaped by the objectives of "efficiency" and competition, which were introduced in England in the 1980s,…

  12. New England's travel and recreation markets: trends in the geographic target markets beyond 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick; David C. Bojanic

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to re-examine and update geographic travel and lifestyle activity market trends for those areas targeted by New England destinations beyond the year 2000. The central theme was to examine in detail the primary, secondary and tertiary geographic markets targeted by New England destinations through both travel behavior and lifestyle behavior...

  13. Mortality of People with Intellectual Disabilities in England: A Comparison of Data from Existing Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Pauline; Glover, Gyles

    2015-01-01

    Background: At present, there is limited statistical information about mortality of people with intellectual disabilities in England. This study explores the data that are currently available. Materials and Methods: Four recent sources of data about mortality of people with intellectual disabilities in England are reviewed: the Confidential…

  14. New England's travel & tourism markets: trends in the geographic target markets in the 90's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney B. Warnick

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine the travel and lifestyle activity market trends to New England in the 90s. The central theme was to fully examine in detail the primary, secondary and tertiary geographic markets targeted by New England destinations.

  15. International Student Recruitment to Universities in England: Discourse, Rationales and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsmann, Chris; Miller, Henry

    2008-01-01

    The recruitment of international students to universities in England has become a central issue in an era of globalisation for university administrators, senior managers, international offices and heads of schools and faculties. We examine the policy rationales for the recruitment of international students to England. Through the use of in-depth…

  16. Early Learning Experience and Adolescent Anxiety: A Cross-Cultural Comparison between Japan and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Sasagawa, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the frequency of anxiety symptoms among adolescents in Japan and England, and to examine the association between early learning experiences and anxiety symptoms. A total of 299 adolescents (147 from England and 152 from Japan), aged 12 to 17 years were investigated. Results showed that adolescents in…

  17. The Higher Cost of a Higher Education: New England Trends 1970-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melican, Robert L.; Weinstein, Jeffrey L.

    This document examines the patterns and statistical data concerning the rising costs of undergraduate education in New England. Chapter 1, higher education costs in New England, concerns comparative costs, student costs and the Consumer Price index, and a definition of costs. Chapter 2, total student costs 1970-80, reviews trends and projections…

  18. Trendsetting: A New Way to Keep up with Trends & Indicators in New England's Education and Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, John O.

    2013-01-01

    For more than half a century, the "New England Journal of Higher Education" ("NEJHE") has been publishing tables and charts exploring "Trends & Indicators" (T&I) in New England's demography, high school performance and graduation, college enrollment, college graduation rates and degree production, higher education financing and university…

  19. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual...

  20. A Survey of Young People's Reading in England: Borrowing and Choosing Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Sally; MacKay, Sophie; Smyth, Fiona

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on selected results of a comprehensive survey of children's reading in England, carried out online in 2005 by the National Centre for Research in Children's Literature at Roehampton University. With 4182 responses from children living in England aged from 4 to 16 years, the survey is a follow-up to a similar study completed in…

  1. Special Deliveries: Certified Nurse-Midwifery Programs Lacking in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzosa, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    With Boston serving as a hub of both educational and medical excellence, it's no wonder that New England has a high reputation to uphold in both of these areas. However, Boston and the rest of the region lack a specific degree program that is putting New England below the radars of potential midwives. Certified nurse-midwifery is a popular field…

  2. Islamist Extremism in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    relations, and disregards many basic human rights , particularly for women. While Wahhabism does not on principle denounce other faiths, many Wahhabi...Islamic Foundation, for example, which had a large presence in refugee camps and supported many madrassas in East Africa, including some linked to Ansaar...often have poorly defined property rights , hindering economic opportunities and paving the way for occasional land seizures by the government or large

  3. The East Anglian Eye Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights, P

    1991-07-01

    The first Corneal Bank in East Anglia is located at the BUPA Hospital in Norwich, a joint venture between NHS, BUPA and the Lions Clubs International (District 101 EA). There was insufficient space to accommodate the Bank at the West Norwich Hospital where the Ophthalmic Department is situated and so, at the suggestion of the BUPA Hospital Manager, Mr Paul Hanke, It came to the BUPA Colney Lane site.

  4. Possible windborne spread of myxomatosis to England in 1953.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, R F

    1987-02-01

    An analysis of the meterological conditions showed that the first outbreaks of myxomatosis in S.E. England in 1953 could have resulted from wind carriage of insects infected with myxoma virus from northern France. South-easterly winds on the night 11-12 August would have carried the insects 120-160 km from the Départements of Nord, Pas de Calais and Somme across the English Channel to near Edenbridge, Kent. The flight would have taken 6.5-8.5 h at wind speeds of 15-22 km h-1. On the night 11-12 August, temperatures increased with height (inversion) up to 500 m; at ground level temperature was around 19 degrees C and at 500 m was 25 degrees C. Insects would have travelled up to the top of the inversion arriving on 12 August as the inversion declined. Two or possibly three generations of infection would have taken place before the disease was seen around the middle of September 1953. The most likely insect was the mosquito Anopheles atroparvus which breeds along the coastal marshes of England and northern France and which has been shown experimentally and in the field to transmit myxoma virus mechanically.

  5. Policy Variation among Japan, Korea, England and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaekyung Lee

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available School reform initiatives during the last two decades in Japan, Korea, England, and the United States can be understood as balancing acts. Because policymakers in England and the United States saw their school systems fragmented and student outcomes mediocre, they focused reform efforts on raising educational standards, tightening curriculum and assessment, and improving academic achievement. In contrast, policymakers in Japan and Korea, who saw their school systems overstandardized and educational processes deficient, focused their reform efforts on deregulating schools, diversifying curriculum and assessment, and enhancing whole-person education. While school reform policies were formulated and adopted in response to each country’s unique problems, they also were driven by globalization forces that fostered an international perspective. If implemented successfully, such cross-cultural policy variations (i.e., standardization vs. differentiation in curriculum, unification vs. diversification in assessment, and privatization vs. democratization in governance would make distinctive educational systems more alike. Cultural and institutional barriers to educational convergence between the Eastern and Western school systems are discussed.

  6. Enhancing the conservation of crop wild relatives in England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Fielder

    Full Text Available Humans require resilient, rapidly renewable and sustainable supplies of food and many other plant-derived supplies. However, the combined effects of climate change and population growth compromise the provision of these supplies particularly in respect to global food security. Crop wild relatives (CWR contain higher genetic diversity than crops and harbour traits that can improve crop resilience and yield through plant breeding. However, in common with most countries, CWR are poorly conserved in England. There is currently no provision for long-term CWR conservation in situ, and comprehensive ex situ collection and storage of CWR is also lacking. However, there is a commitment to achieve their conservation in England's Biodiversity Strategy and the UK has international commitments to do so as part of the Global Plant Conservation Strategy. Here, we identify a series of measures that could enhance the conservation of English CWR, thereby supporting the achievement of these national and international objectives. We provide an inventory of 148 priority English CWR, highlight hotspots of CWR diversity in sites including The Lizard Peninsula, the Dorset coast and Cambridgeshire and suggest appropriate sites for the establishment of a complementary network of genetic reserves. We also identify individual in situ and ex situ priorities for each English CWR. Based on these analyses, we make recommendations whose implementation could provide effective, long-term conservation of English CWR whilst facilitating their use in crop improvement.

  7. Origins of modern economic system: England or Holland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozinskaya Natalia, A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper, following the approach of the Dutch scholars de Vries and vab der Woude, claims that the Netherlands, rather than England (as it is generally assumed, were the first country, which performed the transition from the traditional society to modern one. Identification of criteria distinguishing traditional and modern societies follows the works of W. Rostow, S. Kuznets and other authors who studied the issue. In order to prove the thesis, author compares urbanization level in Holland and in England, as well as degree of commercialization of those economies, and considers the process of commercial and productive specialization in the United Provinces. Besides that, the formation of modern-type institutional system in Holland is analyzed: the genesis of the markets of factors of production, development of monetary and credit systems and of institutional and technological basis of the industry, strengthening of competitive forces in the economy. Land ownership structure in Holland is considered and its role in genesis of the markets of factors of production. Attention is paid to technological basis of the industry, examined is the impact of immigration. It concludes that the Netherlands were the first country where modern economic growth, as defined by S. Kuznets, started. It was Holland where for the first time the markets of factors of production were formed and, what is particularly important, the industry began to operate on a competitive basis.

  8. A qualitative study of uptake of free vitamins in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessiman, Tricia; Cameron, Ailsa; Wiggins, Meg; Lucas, Patricia J

    2013-08-01

    To identify reasons why eligible families are not accessing free 'Healthy Start' vitamin supplementation (providing vitamins A, C and D) in England. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. 13 primary care trusts in England. Purposive sample of 15 Healthy Start coordinators, 50 frontline health and children's professionals and 107 parents. Vitamin take-up was low across all research sites, reported as below 10% of eligible beneficiaries for free vitamins. Reasons identified by both parents and professionals included (1) poor accessibility of vitamins, (2) low promotion of the scheme by health professionals, (3) a lack of awareness among eligible families, and (4) low motivation among mothers to take vitamins for themselves during pregnancy or for children under 4 years old. Low uptake rates can be explained by poor accessibility of vitamins and lack of awareness and motivation to take vitamin supplements among eligible families. Universal provision (at least for pregnant women) and better training for health professionals are identified as potential solutions worthy of further research and evaluation.

  9. Integrated mental health services in England: a policy paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth England

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of health care policy on the development of integrated mental health services in England. Data sources: Drawing largely from a narrative review of the literature on adult mental health services published between January 1997 and February 2003 undertaken by the authors, we discuss three case studies of integrated care within primary care, secondary care and across the primary/secondary interface for people with serious mental illness. Conclusion: We suggest that while the central thrust of a raft of recent Government policies in England has been towards integration of different parts of the health care system, policy waterfalls and implementation failures, the adoption of ideas before they have been thoroughly tried and tested, a lack of clarity over roles and responsibilities and poor communication have led to an integration rhetoric/reality gap in practice. This has particular implications for people with serious mental health problems. Discussion: We conclude with suggestions for strategies that may facilitate more integrated working.

  10. Association between obesity and prescribed medication use in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinge, Jonas Minet; Morris, Stephen

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the association between obesity and use of prescribed medications in England. Data were taken from fourteen rounds of the Health Survey for England (1999-2012), which has measures of current prescribed medication use based on therapeutic classifications in the British National Formulary, and nurse-measured height and weight. We find that obesity has a statistically significant and positive association with use of a range of medicines for managing diseases associated with obesity. The mean probability of using any type of medication is 0.40 in those of normal weight, 0.44 in the overweight, 0.52 in obesity class I and 0.60 in obesity class II/III. Significant positive associations were found between obesity and the use of medication for diseases of the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, respiratory system, and central nervous system, as well as for infections, endocrine system disorders, gynaecological/urinary disorders and musculoskeletal and joint disorders. Use of anti-obesity medication is low, even among those with class II/III obesity.

  11. Physiological profile of senior and junior England international amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marcus S

    2006-01-01

    Despite worldwide popularity of amateur boxing, research focussed on the physiological demands of the sport is limited. The physiological profile of Senior and Junior England international amateur boxers is presented. A gradual (8 to 21-days) and rapid (0 to 7-days) phase of body weight reduction was evident with 2.2 ± 0.3 % of the 7.0 ± 0. 8 % weight loss occurring over the final 24-hours. An increase in body weight >4% was observed following a recovery period. High urine osmolality values (> 1000 mOsm·kg(-1)) were recorded during training and competition. High post-competition blood lactate values (>13.5 mmol·l(-1)) highlighted the need for a well-developed anaerobic capacity and the importance of not entering the ring in a glycogen depleted state. The aerobic challenge of competition was demonstrated by maximum heart rate values being recorded during 'Open' sparring. Mean body fat values of 9-10% were similar to those reported for other weight classified athletes. Normal resting values were reported for hematocrit (Senior 48 ± 2 % and Junior 45 ± 2 %), haemoglobin (Senior 14.7 ± 1.0 g·dl(-1) and Junior 14.5 ± 0.8 g·dl(-1)), bilirubin (Senior 15.3 ± 6.2 µmol·l-1(-1)) and ferritin (Senior 63.3 ± 45.7 ng·ml(-1)). No symptoms associated with asthma or exercise-induced asthma was evident. A well- developed aerobic capacity was reflected in the Senior VO2max value of 63.8 ± 4.8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1). Senior lead hand straight punching force (head 1722 ± 700 N and body 1682 ± 636 N) was lower than the straight rear hand (head 2643 ± 1273 N and body 2646 ± 1083 N), lead hook (head 2412 ± 813 N and body 2414 ± 718 N) and rear hook (head 2588 ± 1040 N and body 2555 ± 926 N). It was concluded that amateur boxing performance is dependent on the interplay between anaerobic and aerobic energy systems. Current weight making methods may lead to impaired substrate availability, leading to reduced competitive performance and an increased risk to a boxers

  12. Time trends in socio-economic factors and risk of hospitalisation with infectious diseases in pre-school children 1985-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Søndergaard, Grethe; Vitting Andersen, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine socio-economic differences in the risk of hospitalisation among children aged 0-5 years in Denmark from 1985 to 2004. All children born between 1985 and 2004 (n=1,278,286) were followed for hospital admissions for infectious diseases from the 29th day...... of life until the children reached the age of 6 years or the end of 2004, whichever came first. Information on parental socio-economic position (education, labour market attachment and household income) was gathered through record linkage with administrative registries. Infections were grouped into upper....... The association between socio-economic status and hospitalisation was strongest for lower respiratory, gastrointestinal and ear infections. This study documented a socially patterned hospitalisation of pre-school children in Denmark. Future studies should investigate possible explanations for the increased risk...

  13. Situación de la mortalidad por causas reducibles en menores de cinco años, Colombia, 1985-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albenia Lurán

    2009-03-01

    Conclusiones. La tasa de mortalidad por causas reducibles en menores de cinco años ha disminuido. Sin embargo, entre 77% y 80% se podría reducir; situación que amerita un análisis más profundo de las estrategias utilizadas en salud pública, especialmente frente a las enfermedades prevenibles de la infancia.

  14. Report to the Pacific Flyway Committee on 1985-2004 Coastal Zone Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Goose Survey of geese, swans and sandhill cranes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys of geese, tundra swans and sandhill cranes were conducted in the coastal zone of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) for the 20th consecutive year. The...

  15. Validation of precipitation over Japan during 1985-2004 simulated by three regional climate models and two multi-model ensemble means

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizaki, Yasuhiro [Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan); Nakaegawa, Toshiyuki; Takayabu, Izuru [Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    We dynamically downscaled Japanese reanalysis data (JRA-25) for 60 regions of Japan using three regional climate models (RCMs): the Non-Hydrostatic Regional Climate Model (NHRCM), modified RAMS version 4.3 (NRAMS), and modified Weather Research and Forecasting model (TWRF). We validated their simulations of the precipitation climatology and interannual variations of summer and winter precipitation. We also validated precipitation for two multi-model ensemble means: the arithmetic ensemble mean (AEM) and an ensemble mean weighted according to model reliability. In the 60 regions NRAMS simulated both the winter and summer climatological precipitation better than JRA-25, and NHRCM simulated the wintertime precipitation better than JRA-25. TWRF, however, overestimated precipitation in the 60 regions in both the winter and summer, and NHRCM overestimated precipitation in the summer. The three RCMs simulated interannual variations, particularly summer precipitation, better than JRA-25. AEM simulated both climatological precipitation and interannual variations during the two seasons more realistically than JRA-25 and the three RCMs overall, but the best RCM was often superior to the AEM result. In contrast, the weighted ensemble mean skills were usually superior to those of the best RCM. Thus, both RCMs and multi-model ensemble means, especially multi-model ensemble means weighted according to model reliability, are powerful tools for simulating seasonal and interannual variability of precipitation in Japan under the current climate. (orig.)

  16. Time trends in incidence and prognosis of primary liver cancer and liver metastases of unknown origin in a Danish region, 1985-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Rune; Jepsen, Peter; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Changes, over the last 20 years, in the diagnostic procedures and treatment of primary liver cancer (PLC) and liver metastases of unknown origin (LMUO) may have affected the clinical course of both cancers. Few longitudinal studies examined this issue. In a population-based setting, we...... studied changes in the incidence and prognosis of PLC and LMUO over time. METHODS: Between 1985 and 2004, we identified 2675 patients with PLC and LMUO in three Danish counties, with a population of 1.4 million. We computed the standardized incidence rate (SIR), ratio of PLC to LMUO diagnoses, median...... survival, and estimated mortality rate ratio adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidity. RESULTS: The SIR of PLC increased from 3.2 in 1985 to 5.0 in 2003, and the SIR of LMUO increased from 3.7 to 6.4. No increase was noted in the PLC-to-LMUO ratio over time (P=0.1 for trend). From 1985 to 2004, the median...

  17. Effect of Soil Erosion on Spring Barley Growth in East Anglia,England:Preliminary Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUXI-XI; Y.BIOT

    1994-01-01

    The effect of soil erosion on spring barley growth was studied on a deep loamy soil in East Anglia,England,in 1992,Soil erosion was simulated by three levels of soil desurfacing,7.5,18and 30cm with three replicates.Significant differences in crop height,ground cover and crop yield were observed between the three levels of desurfacing.Soil desurfacing also has a singnificant effect on soil moisture at the 20cm depth.The interaction between soil removal and crop performance affected soil moisture at the depths of 50 and 100cm,No significant differences were found in runoff and sediment etween the three topsoil removals due to very dry growing season.Regression equations were developed between spring barley yield and soil desurfacing Spring barley grain yield declined by 97.6kg/ha per cm soil desurfacing.

  18. Have the bioavailabilities of trace metals to a suite of biomonitors changed over three decades in SW England estuaries historically affected by mining?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow, P S; Kriefman, S; Smith, B D; Luoma, S N

    2011-03-15

    Many estuaries of southwest England were heavily contaminated with toxic metals associated with the mining of copper and other metals, particularly between 1850 and 1900. The question remains whether the passage of time has brought remediation to these estuaries. In 2003 and 2006 we revisited sites in 5 metal-contaminated estuaries sampled in the 1970s and 1980s - Restronguet Creek, Gannel, West Looe, East Looe and Tavy. We evaluate changes in metal contamination in sediments and in metal bioavailabilities in sediments and water to local organisms employed as biomonitors. We find that the decline in contamination in these estuaries is complex. Differences in bioavailable contamination in the water column were detectable, as were significant detectable changes in at least some estuaries in bioavailable metal contamination originating from sediments. However, in the 100 years since mining activities declined, bioavailable contamination has not declined to the regional baseline in any estuary affected by the mine wastes. The greatest decline in contamination occurred in the one instance (East Looe) where a previous industrial source of (Ag) contamination was considered. We used the macroalgae Fucus vesiculosus and Ascophyllum nodosum as biomonitors of dissolved metal bioavailabilities and the deposit feeders Nereis diversicolor and Scrobicularia plana as biomonitors of bioavailable metal in sediments. We found no systematic decrease in the atypically high Ag, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations in the estuarine sediments over a 26 year period. Accumulated metal (Ag, As, Cu, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in the deposit feeders are similarly still atypically high in at least one estuary for each metal, and there is no consistent evidence for general decreases in sediment metal bioavailabilities over time. We conclude that the legacy of mining in sheltered estuaries of southwest England is the ongoing presence of sediments rich in metals bioavailable to deposit feeders, while

  19. Structural inversion of the Tamworth Belt: Insights into the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, G.; Robinson, J.; Glen, R.; Roberts, J.

    2016-05-01

    The middle to late Permian Hunter Bowen Event is credited with the development of orogenic curvature in the southern New England Orogen, yet contention surrounds the structural dynamics responsible for the development of this curvature. Debate is largely centred on the roles of orogen parallel strike-slip and orogen normal extension and contraction to explain the development of curvature. To evaluate the dynamic history of the Hunter Bowen Event, we present new kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt. The Tamworth Belt formed as a Carboniferous forearc basin and was subsequently inverted during the Hunter Bowen Event. Kinematic reconstructions of the Tamworth Belt are based on new maps and cross-sections built from a synthesis of best-available mapping, chronostratigraphic data and new interpretations of depth-converted seismic data. The following conclusions are made from our study: (i) the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly driven by margin normal contraction (east-west shortening; present-day coordinates), and; (ii) variations in structural style along the strike of the Tamworth Belt can be explained by orthogonal vs. oblique inversion, which reflects the angular relationship between the principal shortening vector and continental-arc margin. Given these conclusions, we suggest that curvature around the controversial Manning Bend was influenced by the presence of primary curvature in the continental margin, and that the Hastings Block was translated along a sinistral strike-slip fault system that formed along this oblique (with respect to the regional east-west extension and convergence direction) part of the margin. Given the available temporal data, the translation of the Hastings Block took place in the Early Permian (Asselian) and therefore preceded the Hunter Bowen Event. Accordingly, we suggest that the Hunter Bowen Event was dominantly associated with enhancing curvature that was either primary in origin, or associated with fault block translation

  20. Effects of management thinning on CO2 exchange by a plantation oak woodland in south-eastern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, M.; Crow, P.; Eaton, E. L.; Morison, J. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Forest thinning, which removes some individual trees from a forest stand at intermediate stages of the rotation, is commonly used as a silvicultural technique and is a management practice that can substantially alter both forest canopy structure and carbon storage. Whilst a proportion of the standing biomass is removed through harvested timber, thinning also removes some of the photosynthetic leaf area and introduces a large pulse of woody residue (brash) to the soil surface which potentially can alter the balance of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. Using a combination of eddy covariance (EC) and aerial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data, this study investigated the effects of management thinning on the carbon balance and canopy structure in a commercially managed oak plantation in the south-east of England. Whilst thinning had a large effect on the canopy structure, increasing canopy complexity and gap fraction, the effects of thinning on the carbon balance were not as evident. In the first year post thinning, Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) was unaffected by the thinning, suggesting that the better illuminated ground vegetation and shrub layer partially compensated for the removed trees. NEE was reduced in the thinned area but not until two years after the thinning had been completed (2009); initially this was associated with an increase in ecosystem respiration (Reco). In subsequent years, NEE remained lower with reduced carbon sequestration in fluxes from the thinned area, which we suggest was in part due to heavy defoliation by caterpillars in 2010 reducing GPP in both sectors of the forest, but particularly in the east.

  1. 77 FR 16810 - New England Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ...; Public Hearings AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...; Tuesday, April 10, 2012 at 5 p.m.--Hotel Indigo East End, 1830 West Main Street, Route 25, Riverhead, NY 11901; telephone: (631) 369-2200; Wednesday, April 11, 2012 at 5 p.m.--Radisson Hotel, 180 Water Street...

  2. Improving dynamical downscaling of thunderstorms in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frediani, M. E.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hopson, T. M.; Hacker, J.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to quantify the variability of wind speed and precipitation during summer storms events in New England by using standard verification metrics along with the Method For Object-Based Diagnostic Evaluation technique (MODE). Using WRF-ARW to dynamically downscale a set of storm events, the first approach investigates potential errors propagated from global analysis products used as initial and boundary conditions. The second approach evaluates the significance of applying a topographic wind parametrization scheme in order to obtain more realistic wind speeds. This fundamental study is born out of the necessity of developing a model for power outage prediction caused by severe storms. In New England, a densely forested region of the US, severe winds and precipitation are key weather factors that cause vulnerability in the power grid infrastructure. During storms, trees are uprooted and branches break, resulting in significant interruptions to electricity distribution. The power outage prediction framework utilizes simulated values of meteorological parameters from storms that have caused outages in the past; and the geographic coordinates of the trouble spots recorded by local utilities during these storms. These two components are used as input for a generalized multi-linear regression that estimate the coefficients for these meteorological parameters, which are then applied to weather forecasts of potential hazardous events, providing an estimate of the number and spatial distribution of power outages over the region for the approaching weather system. Given that the count and location of the predicted outages rely on the weather description of past events, the accuracy of spatial patterns and intensity of meteorological fields are crucial to developing an unbiased database for the regression. With that in mind, it is important to quantify the influence that a particular global analysis product can impose to the dynamical downscaling of precipitation

  3. Care delivery pathways for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in England and the Netherlands: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile MA Utens

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction':' A remarkable difference in care delivery pathways for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is the presence of hospital-at-home for COPD exacerbations in England and its absence in the Netherlands. The objective of this paper is to explain this difference. Methods':' Descriptive COPD statistics and care delivery pathways on all care levels within the institutional context, followed by a comparison of care delivery pathways and an explanation of the difference with regard to hospital-at-home. Results: The Netherlands and England show broad similarities in their care delivery pathways for COPD patients. A major difference is the presence of hospital-at-home for COPD exacerbations in England and its absence in the Netherlands. Three possible explanations for this difference are presented: differences in the urgency for alternatives (higher urgency for alternative treatment models in England, the differences in funding (funding in England facilitated the development of hospital-at-home and the differences in the substitution of tasks to nurses (substitution to nurses has taken place to a larger extent in England. Discussion and Conclusion: The difference between the Netherlands and England regarding hospital-at-home for COPD exacerbations can be explained in three ways. Hospital-at-home has proved to be a safe alternative for hospital care for selected patients, and should be considered as a treatment option for COPD exacerbations in the Netherlands.

  4. East Indians in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Schnepel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Transients to Settlers: The Experience of Indians in Jamaica 1845-J950. VERENE SHEPHERD. Leeds, U.K.: Peepal Tree Books, 1993. 281 pp. (Paper £12.95 Survivors of Another Crossing: A History of East Indians in Trinidad, 1880-1946. MARIANNE D. SOARES RAMESAR. St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago: U.W.I. School of Continuing Education, 1994. xiii + 190 pp. (Paper n.p. Les Indes Antillaises: Presence et situation des communautes indiennes en milieu caribeen. ROGER TOUMSON (ed.. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1994. 264 pp. (Paper 140.00 FF Nation and Migration: The Politics of Space in the South Asian Diaspora. PETER VAN DER VEER (ed.. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. vi + 256 pp. (Cloth US$ 39.95, Paper US$ 17.95 In the decade since 1988, Caribbean nations with Indian communities have commemorated the 150th anniversary of the arrival of East Indians to the West Indies. These celebrations are part of local revitalization movements of Indian culture and identity stretching from the French departement of Guadeloupe in the Windward Islands to Trinidad and Guyana in the south. Political changes have mirrored the cultural revival in the region. While the debate so often in the past centered on the legitimacy of East Indian claims to local nationality in these societies where African or Creole cultures dominate, in the 1990s leaders of Indian descent were elected heads of government in the two Caribbean nations with the most populous East Indian communities: Cheddi Jagan as President of Guyana in October 1992 (after a 28-year hiatus and Basdeo Panday as Prime Minister of Trinidad in November 1995. Both men have long been associated with their respective countries' struggles for economic, political, and social equality. Outside the region during the summer of 1997, fiftieth-anniversary celebrations marking the independence of India and Pakistan from Britain confirmed that Indo chic — or "Indofrenzy" as anthropologist

  5. The Middle East population puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, A R; Roudi, F

    1993-07-01

    An overview is provided of Middle Eastern countries on the following topics; population change, epidemiological transition theory and 4 patterns of transition in the middle East, transition in causes of death, infant mortality declines, war mortality, fertility, family planning, age and sex composition, ethnicity, educational status, urbanization, labor force, international labor migration, refugees, Jewish immigration, families, marriage patterns, and future growth. The Middle East is geographically defined as Bahrain, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Gaza and the West Bank, Iran, Turkey, and Israel. The Middle East's population grew very little until 1990 when the population was 43 million. Population was about doubled in the mid-1950s at 80 million. Rapid growth occurred after 1950 with declines in mortality due to widespread disease control and sanitation efforts. Countries are grouped in the following ways: persistent high fertility and declining mortality with low to medium socioeconomic conditions (Jordan, Oman, Syria, Yemen, and the West Bank and Gaza), declining fertility and mortality in intermediate socioeconomic development (Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey, and Iran), high fertility and declining mortality in high socioeconomic conditions (Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates), and low fertility and mortality in average socioeconomic conditions (Israel). As birth and death rates decline, there is an accompanying shift from communicable diseases to degenerative diseases and increases in life expectancy; this pattern is reflected in the available data from Egypt, Kuwait, and Israel. High infant and child mortality tends to remain a problem throughout the Middle East, with the exception of Israel and the Gulf States. War casualties are undetermined, yet have not impeded the fastest growing population growth rate in the world. The average fertility is 5 births

  6. Effects of management thinning on CO2 exchange by a plantation oak woodland in south-eastern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Matthew; Crow, Peter; Eaton, Edward L.; Morison, James I. L.

    2016-04-01

    Forest thinning, which removes some individual trees from a forest stand at intermediate stages of the rotation, is commonly used as a silvicultural technique and is a management practice that can substantially alter both forest canopy structure and carbon storage. Whilst a proportion of the standing biomass is removed through harvested timber, thinning also removes some of the photosynthetic leaf area and introduces a large pulse of woody residue (brash) to the soil surface, which potentially can alter the balance of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. Using a combination of eddy covariance (EC) and aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data, this study investigated the effects of management thinning on the carbon balance and canopy structure in a commercially managed oak plantation in the south-east of England. Whilst thinning had a large effect on the canopy structure, increasing canopy complexity and gap fraction, the effects of thinning on the carbon balance were not as evident. In the first year post thinning, the peak summer photosynthetic rate was unaffected by the thinning, suggesting that the better illuminated ground vegetation and shrub layer compensated for the removed trees. Peak summer photosynthetic rate was reduced in the thinned area between 2009 and 2011, but there was no significant difference between sectors. Ecosystem respiration fluxes increased in the thinned relative to the unthinned area in the post-thinning phase.

  7. JPRS Report, East Asia, Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    volumes: China, East Europe, Soviet Union, East Asia, Near East & South Asia, Sub- Saharan Africa, Latin America , and West Europe. Supplements to...Foreign Aid, Corporate Acceptance of Land Reform Law [WEEKLY AGRIBUSINESS 18-24 Nov] ... 9 10 THAILAND Commerce Ministry Official Views...Land Reform Law 42000042 Manila WEEKLY AGRIBUSINESS in English 18-24 Nov 88 p 15 [Article under the rubric "ON THE BEAT" by Jake Espino] [Text

  8. Communicable disease control in England; recommendations from an American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detels, R

    1994-12-01

    The problems associated with the Wakefield salmonella and the Stafford Legionnaires' disease outbreaks and the recommendations of the Acheson Committee formed in response led to the creation of the position of Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (CCDC) within the District Health Authorities. The reality of the position as implemented differs from that envisaged by the Acheson Committee and has resulted in ambiguities about the role of the CsCDC, the source of their support, and the range of their responsibilities. This paper, by an American invited to review the position, outlines the history of the position, the current status of CsCDC, and the barriers to effective performance of the position. It ends with a series of recommendations for improving disease control within England by solidifying the position, establishing its role in disease control within the National Health Service and recommending an educational/training pathway to attract and prepare physicians for the position.

  9. Pregnancy-associated listeriosis in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofisayo, A; Amar, C; Ruggles, R; Elson, R; Adak, G K; Mook, P; Grant, K A

    2015-01-01

    Listeriosis is a rare but severe foodborne disease with low morbidity and high case-fatality rates. Pregnant women, unborn and newborn babies are among the high-risk groups for listeriosis. We examined listeriosis cases reported to the enhanced surveillance system in England and Wales from 1990 to 2010 to identify risk factors influencing outcome. Cases were defined as pregnancy-associated if Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a pregnant woman or newborn infants aged listeriosis accounted for 462 (15%) cases and 315 cases resulted in a live birth. Several factors were identified as affecting the severity and outcome of listeriosis in pregnancy in both mother and child including: presence or absence of maternal symptoms, gestational age at onset of symptoms, and clinical presentation in the infant (meningitis or septicaemia). Deprivation, ethnicity and molecular serotype had no effect on outcome.

  10. The Pollution Prevention and Control (England and Wales) Regulations 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The Pollution Prevention and Control (England and Wales) Regulations 2000 come into force on the 1st August 2000. They define the maximum permissible release into the environment from activities, mobile and stationary installations of a range of pollutants including sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon oxides, organic compounds and partial oxidation products, metals, metalloids and their compounds, asbestos, glass and mineral fibres; halogens and phosphorus and their compounds, and particulate matter. The Regulations apply to activities in the following industries: energy, metal, mineral, ceramics, chemical, paper, timber, rubber, carbon, bitumen, coating, printing and textiles, intensive farming and waste processing. The Regulations define procedures for permits, enforcement, appeals, information and publicity and offences, and define the Secretary of State's powers. Details are contained in Schedule 1 to 10.

  11. Pollution Prevention and Control (England and Wales) Regulation 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The Pollution Prevention and Control (England and Wales) Regulations 2000 come into force on the 1st August 2000. They define the maximum permissible release into the environment from activities, mobile and stationary installations of a range of pollutants including sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides, carbon oxides, organic compounds and partial oxidation products, metals, metalloids and their compounds, asbestos, glass and mineral fibres; halogens and phosphorus and their compounds, and particulate matter. The Regulations apply to activities in the following industries: energy, metal, mineral, ceramics, chemical, paper, timber, rubber, carbon, bitumen, coating, printing and textiles, intensive farming and waste processing. The Regulations define procedures for permits, enforcement, appeals, information and publicity and offences, and define the Secretary of State's powers. Details are contained in Schedule 1 to 10.

  12. Newspaper coverage of mental illness in England 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, Amalia; Goulden, Robert; Shefer, Guy; Rhydderch, Danielle; Rose, Diana; Williams, Paul; Thornicroft, Graham; Henderson, Claire

    2013-04-01

    Better newspaper coverage of mental health-related issues is a target for the Time to Change (TTC) anti-stigma programme in England, whose population impact may be influenced by how far concurrent media coverage perpetuates stigma and discrimination. To compare English newspaper coverage of mental health-related topics each year of the TTC social marketing campaign (2009-2011) with baseline coverage in 2008. Content analysis was performed on articles in 27 local and national newspapers on two randomly chosen days each month. There was a significant increase in the proportion of anti-stigmatising articles between 2008 and 2011. There was no concomitant proportional decrease in stigmatising articles, and the contribution of mixed or neutral elements decreased. These findings provide promising results on improvements in press reporting of mental illness during the TTC programme in 2009-2011, and a basis for guidance to newspaper journalists and editors on reporting mental illness.

  13. Tectonic model for the Late Paleozoic of southeastern New England

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintsch, R.P.; Sutter, J.F.

    1986-07-01

    Hornblende and biotite /sup 40/Ar//sup 39/Ar age spectra from rocks in south-central Connecticut help define a Permian-Triassic cooling curve for the area. Together with petrologic and structural information, a time-temperature-pressure-strain path is established. Similar data for the Narragansett basin in Rhode Island and Massachusetts allow correlation of the late Paleozoic histories of the two areas. Together, these data suggest that in the late Paleozoic, south-central New England was part of a fold-thrust belt, and the Narragansett basin was a retroarc foreland basin. NW-SE compression during the final assembly of Pangaea resulted in SE directed thrusting, causing the development of clastic wedges in adjacent Rhode Island and Massachusetts in the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian. A clockwise rotation of this deformation from NW to NNE led to northward underthrusting and concomitant uplift of both eastern Connecticut and Rhode Island in the Permian and Triassic.

  14. Neonatal mortality and stillbirths in early twentieth century Derbyshire, England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, A

    2001-11-01

    Neonatal mortality and stillbirths are recognised to be subject to similar influences, but survival after a successful live birth is usually considered in isolation of foetal wastage. Moreover, individual-level data on age-specific influences and causes of death in a historical context are rare. This paper uses an unusual data set to compare the influences on neonatal mortality and stillbirths in early twentieth century Derbyshire, England. Multivariate hazard and logistic analyses are performed to examine the relative roles of various social, environmental, and demographic factors. The influences on and causal structures of neonatal mortality and stillbirths emerge as broadly similar, with previous reproductive history linked to a considerable amount of variation. The clustering of endogenous deaths was much greater than the clustering of exogenous and post-neonatal deaths, probably reflecting the cause-of-death structure and the relatively healthy social and environmental position of early twentieth century Derbyshire.

  15. VIOLENCE MANAGEMENT IN FOOTBALL?: CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON ENGLAND AND BELGIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Segura M. Trejo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article arises from the need to review and think approaches of regulation and management of violence in football spectacle regarding the installed complaining standpoint of heavy-hand. Taking into consideration the Mexican and the Argetinian contexts, it is possible to observe how media as well as other actors involved in the business quote time and again England´s success regarding their hooligans. In opposition to this vision that has been translated into security arrangements. Two management approaches are here compared: the commercial transformation of the British football and the Belgic experience of sanctions combined with social prevention schemas. The objective aims at generating public policy discussion in order to find useful and discernible tools for other contexts.

  16. Automated biosurveillance data from England and Wales, 1991-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enki, Doyo G; Noufaily, Angela; Garthwaite, Paul H; Andrews, Nick J; Charlett, André; Lane, Chris; Farrington, C Paddy

    2013-01-01

    Outbreak detection systems for use with very large multiple surveillance databases must be suited both to the data available and to the requirements of full automation. To inform the development of more effective outbreak detection algorithms, we analyzed 20 years of data (1991-2011) from a large laboratory surveillance database used for outbreak detection in England and Wales. The data relate to 3,303 distinct types of infectious pathogens, with a frequency range spanning 6 orders of magnitude. Several hundred organism types were reported each week. We describe the diversity of seasonal patterns, trends, artifacts, and extra-Poisson variability to which an effective multiple laboratory-based outbreak detection system must adjust. We provide empirical information to guide the selection of simple statistical models for automated surveillance of multiple organisms, in the light of the key requirements of such outbreak detection systems, namely, robustness, flexibility, and sensitivity.

  17. Port Development and Town Planning in North West England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Richard

    2013-12-01

    This paper examines the links between the development of harbour facilities and planned towns, especially in the head port area of Carlisle in North West England. Largely based on documentary research and field observation it examines the development of Whitehaven and other Atlantic ports it influenced in Cumberland, Westmorland and north Lancashire. It examines these developments in their international context and shows how they were initiated by local landowners to maximise the output of their estates and to enhance their personal prestige. Beginning in the seventeenth century the paper demonstrates how this tradition of town and harbour foundation continued on into the nineteenth century when it was adopted by corporate concerns, especially railway companies. The paper concludes by highlighting how harbour developments associated with town planning helped to urbanise and stimulate the economy of a previously under-developed area. Two maps identify the locations of the places discussed.

  18. The geography of recreational physical activity in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, Esther; Jones, Andy P

    2011-01-01

    Levels of physical activity have declined considerably over recent decades in England, and there is evidence that activity patterns vary across areas. Previous studies of the geography of physical activity have frequently relied on model based synthetic estimates. Using data from a large population survey this study develops a direct measure of recreational physical activity and investigates variations in activity patterns across English Local Authorities. For both sexes the results show a distinct geography of recreational physical activity associated with north/south variations and urban/rural status. The environmental and behavioural factors driving those patterns are still poorly understood. We conclude that the variations observed might reflect recreational opportunities and the socio-cultural context of areas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prices, wages and fertility in pre-industrial England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemp, Marc Patrick Brag

    2012-01-01

    that there is strongly decreasing returns to scale with respect to labour in the agricultural sector and approximately constant returns to scale in the manufacturing sector. The analysis provides evidence in favour of the usual Malthusian model, as invoked by unified growth theories such as e.g. Galor and Weil (Am Econ......To shed light on the economic-demographic mechanisms operating in the epoch of pre-industrial economic stagnation, a two-sector Malthusian model is formulated in terms of a cointegrated vector autoregressive model on error correction form. The model allows for both agricultural product wages...... and relative prices to affect fertility. The model is estimated using new data for the pre-industrial period in England, and the analysis reveals a strong, positive effect of agricultural wages as well as a nonnegative effect of real agricultural prices on fertility. Furthermore, it is demonstrated...

  20. Nutrition practices of nurseries in England. Comparison with national guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelon, Sara E Benjamin; Burgoine, Thomas; Hesketh, Kathryn R; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    Recent national guidelines call for improved nutrition within early years settings. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe foods and beverages served in nurseries, assess provider behaviors related to feeding, and compare these practices to national guidelines. We administered a mailed survey to a random sample of nurseries across England, stratifying by tertile of deprivation. A total of 851 nurseries returned the survey (54.3% response rate). We fitted separate multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the association of deprivation with each of the 13 food and beverage guidelines and the seven provider behavior guidelines. We also conducted a joint F-test for any deprivation effect, to evaluate the effect of the guidelines combined. After adjusting for confounders, we observed differences in the frequency of nurseries that reported serving healthier foods across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.02 for joint F test). These adjusted results were driven mainly by nurseries in more deprived areas serving more whole grains (OR 1.57 (95% CI 1.00, 2.46)) and legumes, pulses, and lentils (1.40 (1.01, 2.14)). We also observed differences in the frequency of nurseries reporting more provider behaviors consistent with national guidelines across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.01 for joint F test). Nurseries in more deprived areas were more likely to dilute juice with water (2.35 (1.48, 3.73)), allow children to select their own portions (1.09 (1.06, 1.58)), and sit with children during meals (1.84 (1.07, 3.15)). While nurseries in the most deprived areas reported serving more healthy foods, a large percentage were still not meeting national guidelines. Policy and intervention efforts may increase compliance with national guidelines in nurseries in more deprived areas, and across England. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. New England Energy Congress: a blueprint for energy action. Executive summary and recommendations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Robert L.; Mayer, Jean; Buckley, John G.; Connolly, Patrick F.; Spencer, Bailey

    1979-05-01

    The task of the New England Congress deals with reducing the region's dependence on foreign oil and its cost disadvantage compared to the rest of the country. The work of the Congress is summarized. Recommendations address the demand side of the energy equation and then analysis and recommendations address supply options. Reports from the following committees are included: New England Energy Supply; Alternatives; Economic Development Through Alternative Sources of Energy; New England Energy Demand; Conservation; Demand Transportation; Energy Conservation; Residential Energy Package; Regulatory and Institutional Processes; and Energy Economics and Financing.

  2. Modeling Water Utility Investments and Improving Regulatory Policies using Economic Optimisation in England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, S.; Harou, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    additional constraints. User-defined annual water saving profiles are used for DM schemes so that water conservation 'yields' can follow observed patterns. A two-stage optimization procedure is applied to deal with network infeasibilities which appear in large applications. We apply the model to a regional system of seven water companies in the South East of England, the driest part of the UK with its largest and fastest growing population. The model's spatial units are water supply zones, i.e. interconnected zones of equal supply reliability; each company contains between 3 and 8 of these. Economic benefits of greater sharing of resources among water companies (regional water transfers) are evaluated by considering bi-directional interconnections between all neighboring supply zones. Next we describe an extension of the model to investigate how current regulations incentivize companies to invest in an attempt to understand how better regulations can incentivize more water transfers. Finally, an attempt is made to change from the current model assumption of perfect cooperation between companies to one that represents the fact that each company is a private company seeking to maximize its own benefits. Limitations and advantages of the formulations are discussed and recommendations for capacity expansion modeling are made.

  3. 2008 East Asia Investment Forum Investment Cooperation in East Asia Facing Global Financial Fluctuations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ 2008 East Asia Investment Forum was held from May 10 to May 11 in Beijing with the theme of"Investment Cooperation in East Asia Facing Global Financial Fluctuations".It shed light on investment challenges and opportunities in Vietnam,Lao,Cambodia and Burma which are the four emerging markets in East Asia,and investment hotspots in Vietnam as well as the potential for investment cooperation in East Asia.

  4. New England Organizations Step Up for EPAs Food Recovery Challenge and Help to Reduce Food Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirteen New England organizations have backed a national effort led by the US Environmental Protection Agency to help cut down on the nearly 35 million tons of food wasted in the United States each year.

  5. New England observed and predicted median August stream/river temperature points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted median August stream/river temperatures in New England based on a spatial statistical network...

  6. Contaminant sampling to facilitate dam removals/habitat restoration in New England

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In a screening level survey of sediments impounded by New England dams that were being investigated for possible removal, only one of nine sites had contaminant...

  7. Predicted median July stream/river temperature regime in New England

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This shapefile includes the predicted thermal regime for all NHDPlus version 1 stream and river reaches in New England within the model domain based on the spatial...

  8. Recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in the Law of Iran and England: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abasat Pour Mohammad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in the Law of Iran and England: A Comparative Study. There are a lot of similarities and commonalities between the legal system of Iran and England in the field of recognition and enforcement of the foreign judgments including public discipline and conflicting judgments. Public discipline in England Law is more specific than that of Iran. Being a civil case of the judgment, impossibility of recognition, enforcement of tax and criminal judgments are among the similarities of the two systems. On the other hand, reciprocity, precise of the foreign court, and the jurisdiction governing the nature of the claim are among instances which are different in Iran and England legal systems on the recognizing of the enforcement of foreign judgments.

  9. Vaccination of risk groups in England using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine : economic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, Mark H.; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Fleming, Douglas; Trotter, Caroline L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Edmunds, W. John

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost effectiveness of vaccinating people with high risk conditions against invasive pneumococcal disease using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Design Economic evaluation using a cohort model from the perspective of healthcare providers. Setting England. Partic

  10. Vaccination of risk groups in England using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine : economic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozenbaum, Mark H.; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Fleming, Douglas; Trotter, Caroline L.; Miller, Elizabeth; Edmunds, W. John

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost effectiveness of vaccinating people with high risk conditions against invasive pneumococcal disease using the 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Design Economic evaluation using a cohort model from the perspective of healthcare providers. Setting England.

  11. Critical care paramedics in England: a national survey of ambulance services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vopelius-Feldt, Johannes; Benger, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    Critical care paramedics (CCPs) have been introduced by individual ambulance trusts in England, but there is a lack of national coordination of training and practice. We conducted an online survey of NHS ambulance services to provide an overview of the current utilization and role of CCPs in England. The survey found significant variations in training, competencies and the working patterns of the ∼90 CCPs working in five ambulance services. All ambulance trusts currently employing CCPs are planning on increasing CCP numbers, whereas 'insufficient financial means' and 'insufficient scientific evidence' are the two major barriers to CCP utilization. The CCP model established in five ambulance services in England is unique within Europe. With increasing numbers of CCPs, concerns about lack of supportive scientific evidence and clinical need should be addressed. Optimal delivery of prehospital critical care in England remains controversial.

  12. PETROCHINA WEST EAST GAS PIPELINE & SALES COMPANY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ PetroChina West East Gas Pipeline & Sales Company, a regional company directly under PetroChina Company Limited (PetroChina), is responsible for the construction and operation of the West-East Gas Pipeline Project, and the gas marketing and sales of the natural gas market in China.

  13. East German Teacher Reactions to Reunification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Robert F.

    1996-01-01

    Maintains that reunification allowed teacher unions of the former West Germany to move into the former East Germany, filling a structural void left by the dissolution of the Communist Party. Specifically examines the reactions of newly elected teacher union leaders from the former East Germany to subsequent events in the education and political…

  14. Massive job cuts threaten East German science

    CERN Multimedia

    Hamer, M

    1990-01-01

    German reunification could result in thousands of scientists losing their jobs. At the end of this year the East German state budget for science will run out. Scientists in the East are keen to find Western support to protect their research (1 page).

  15. Green chemistry education in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolopajlo, Larry

    2017-06-01

    The Middle East once dominated the age of alchemy, and today it is experiencing a resurgence by transforming the age of petroleum chemicals into a greener science through Estidama. This green conversion is taking place through green chemical research and education. This report examines and reviews the understudied subject of green chemical education in the Middle East through the lens of context and history.

  16. In Search of the English Sabbat: Popular Conceptions of Witches’ Meetings in Early Modern England

    OpenAIRE

    James Sharpe

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the evidence for belief in the witches’ sabbat in early modern England. England is generally thought of as a country where the concept of the sabbat did not exist, and it was certainly largely absent from elite thinking on witchcraft, as displayed in the witchcraft statutes of 1563 and 1604 and Elizabethan and Jacobean demonological writings. But evidence entering the historical record mainly via deposi- tions taken by justices of the peace suggests that there was a wide...

  17. Comparative study of international commercial arbitration in England, Japan and Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Ikko

    2000-01-01

    This thesis examines the law on international commercial arbitration in England, Japan and Russia with a view to identify those areas for which harmonisation is of the greatest practical importance. This study is a timely one, since the Arbitration Act 1996 came into effect on 1st January 1997 in England. In Japan, the Committee of Arbitration formed by Japanese experts on arbitration prepared the Draft Text of the Law of Arbitration in 1989, and preparation for amendment based...

  18. Assessment in Child Protection : social workers' voices in England and Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Samsonsen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Good quality assessment in Child Protection is crucial to ensure adequate protection and provision. This article explores social workers` experiences with two different Child Protection assessment models: the “professional judgment model”, exemplified by Norway, and the “structured assessment model”, exemplified by England. The aim is to explore the experiences of social workers who carry out assessments in England and Norway, and compare and discuss these experiences in light of “accountability” theory.

  19. Collieries of North East Lancashire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadin, J.

    2003-06-01

    The last deep mine in the Burnley Coalfield, Hapton Valley Colliery, closed in 1982 and with its demise went a comradeship and companionship that few other industries have enjoyed. The Burnley Coalfield covers an area from Colne through to Blackburn and Darwen, Higham Village to the west and Worsthorne Moor to the east. A number of pits in the Bacup area have also been included. Four companies - John Hargeaves, George Hargreaves, Brooks and Pickup and the Cliverger Coal Co. dominated coal mining in the area and between them sank the pits which many of the Burnley miners will, even now, recall. This is the story of those pits, of those who sunk and financed them, and of those who toiled, laboured, even perished, within the their depths. 200 photos.

  20. East and Southeast Asia assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyono, H

    1984-06-01

    The people of East and Southeast Asia, despite societal differences and varied economic successes, share 1 cultural value, i.e., the love of children and the importance of family. The small family norms espoused by family planning programs, the goal in some nations of 1- or 2-child families, the concept that 2 children are enough regardless of their sex -- all these ideas contradict the basic cultural appreciation for children in most countries and the preference for sons in many. Yet, demographic realities give Asia no alternative. It is necessary to work against cultural values to increase the opportunities for individuals, their families, their countries, and the region as a whole. All the countries of this region have had family planning programs since at least the 1970s, and some have been very successful. It may be well into the 21st century before the populations of most East and Southeast countries stabilize. Stabilization will take longer for those countries which are without successful family planning policies and programs. Each national family planning program requires the full and positive political and financial commitment of its government. Programs also need the freedom to try all new approaches. The appropriateness and acceptability of a particular mehtod should be decided by program managers and personnel in consultation with potential users, rather than by politicians. Future family planning programs will need to be even more innovative. Family planning service delivery must be brought closer to the client so it will be available in all communities and work places and at all potential public and private places. Other basic services such as nutrition, income-generating schemes, and general and maternal/child health must be integrated into the programs. The responsibility for managing programs must be assumed by the community in order to create a very strong and broad base of national commitment.

  1. East Capital suunab investorid Venemaale / Gert Tiivas ; interv. Raivo Sormunen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tiivas, Gert, 1973-

    2007-01-01

    Rootsi investeerimispanga East Capitali Balti regiooni juht Gert Tiivas soovitab investeerida Baltimaadest suurema potentsiaaliga riikide börsidele. Vt. samas: CV: Gert Tiivas; East Capitali fondid. Diagramm: East Capitali Venemaa fondis on enim raha

  2. East Capital suunab investorid Venemaale / Gert Tiivas ; interv. Raivo Sormunen

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tiivas, Gert, 1973-

    2007-01-01

    Rootsi investeerimispanga East Capitali Balti regiooni juht Gert Tiivas soovitab investeerida Baltimaadest suurema potentsiaaliga riikide börsidele. Vt. samas: CV: Gert Tiivas; East Capitali fondid. Diagramm: East Capitali Venemaa fondis on enim raha

  3. The Current State of the New England Lodging Market: New England Falls Short of the Nation in RevPAR Growth in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Roginsky

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pinnacle Advisory Group provides an update of lodging industry performance in New England, with a focus on Boston for 2013. While the New England region was behind the nation, the story varied from state to state. Only Massachusetts and Vermont achieved RevPAR performance better than the national average. The region as a whole is improving its performance, with RevPAR lagging only 0.2 percent, compared to 1.2 percent the year before. The outlook for the future remains positive as limited supply growth coupled with moderate growth in demand will result in higher occupancy levels and higher revenues.

  4. “Strange Beasts… in taste Chinese” : Le goût chinois dans l’Angleterre du XVIIIe siècle ou l’esthétique de l’étrange “Strange Beasts… in taste Chinese” The Chinese taste in 18th-century England or the aesthetics of the strange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Alayrac

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The wonders and riches of China brought back to England by the East Indiamen at the end of the 17th century and in the 18th century triggered a deep interest for things Chinese. Indeed, England was hit by the Chinese taste in the decorative arts, emblematised by the playful chinoiserie style. This taste nonetheless evolved during the 18th century, and although it remained very popular throughout the period, it underwent some sharp criticisms. What was the nature of the English reception of this style? Why was it so welcomed, and at the same time seen so suspicious? This paper explores the ambivalence which lay in the reception of the Chinese style, and examines what was perceived as the lure and threat of Chinese exoticism through the concepts of strangeness and foreignness.

  5. Explaining variation in the uptake of HPV vaccination in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whynes David K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In England, two national programmes of HPV vaccination for girls have been instituted, a routine programme for 12- and 13-year-olds and a catch-up programme for 17- and 18-year-olds. Uptake rates across the country have been far from uniform, and this research sought to identify factors explaining the variation in uptake by locality. Methods An association between uptake, deprivation and ethnic background had been established in pilot research. The present analysis was conducted at an aggregate, Primary Care Trust (PCT, level for the first year of the programmes. Published measures of HPV vaccination uptake, material deprivation, ethnic composition of PCT populations, primary care quality, and uptake of cervical screening and of other childhood immunisations were collated. Strong evidence of collinearity amongst the explanatory variables required a factor analysis to be undertaken. This provided four independent factors, used thereafter in regression models to explain uptake by PCT. Results The factor analysis revealed that ethnic composition was associated with attitudes towards cervical screening and other childhood vaccinations, whilst material deprivation and quality of primary care were orthogonal. Ethnic composition, early childhood vaccination, cervical screening and primary care quality were found to be influential in predicting uptake in both the routine and the catch-up cohorts, although with a lower degree of confidence in the case of the last two independent variables. Lower primary care quality was significant in explaining a greater fall in vaccination uptake between the first two doses in the catch-up cohort. Greater deprivation was a significant explanatory factor for both uptake and the fall in uptake between doses for the catch-up cohort but not for uptake in the routine cohort. Conclusion These results for uptake of the first year of the national programme using aggregate data corroborate findings from

  6. Bath Stone - a Possible Global Heritage Stone from England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The Middle Jurassic strata of England have several horizons of oolitic and bioclastic limestones that provide high quality dimension stone. One of the most important is found in and near the City of Bath. The Great Oolite Group (Upper Bathonian) contains the Combe Down and Bath Oolites, consisting of current bedded oolites and shelly oolites, that have been used extensively as freestones for construction nearby, for prestigious buildings through much of southern England and more widely. The stone has been used to some extent since Roman times when the city, then known as Aquae Sulis, was an important hot spa. The stone was used to a limited extent through medieval times but from the early 18th century onwards was exploited on a large scale through surface quarrying and underground mining. The City was extensively redeveloped in the 18th to early 19th century, mostly using Bath Stone, when the spas made it a fashionable resort. Buildings from that period include architectural "gems" such as the Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge, as well as the renovated Roman Baths. Many buildings were designed by some of the foremost British architects of the time. The consistent use of this stone gives the City an architectural integrity throughout. These features led to the designation of the City as a World Heritage Site. It is a requirement in current City planning policy documents that Bath Stone should be used for new building to preserve the appearance of the City. More widely the stone was used in major houses (e.g. Buckingham Palace and Apsley House in London; King's Pavilion in Brighton); civic buildings (e.g. Bristol Guildhall; Dartmouth Naval College in Devon); churches and cathedrals (e.g. Truro Cathedral in Cornwall); and engineered structures (e.g. the large Dundas Aqueduct on the Kennet and Avon Canal). More widely, Bath Stone has been used in Union Station in Washington DC; Toronto Bible College and the Town Hall at Cape Town, South Africa. Extraction declined in

  7. Thresholds for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in England and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikesalingam, Alan; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Holt, Peter J; Loftus, Ian M; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Soden, Peter A; Landon, Bruce E; Thompson, Matthew M

    2016-11-24

    Background Thresholds for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms vary considerably among countries. Methods We examined differences between England and the United States in the frequency of aneurysm repair, the mean aneurysm diameter at the time of the procedure, and rates of aneurysm rupture and aneurysm-related death. Data on the frequency of repair of intact (nonruptured) abdominal aortic aneurysms, in-hospital mortality among patients who had undergone aneurysm repair, and rates of aneurysm rupture during the period from 2005 through 2012 were extracted from the Hospital Episode Statistics database in England and the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Data on the aneurysm diameter at the time of repair were extracted from the U.K. National Vascular Registry (2014 data) and from the U.S. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2013 data). Aneurysm-related mortality during the period from 2005 through 2012 was determined from data obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.K. Office of National Statistics. Data were adjusted with the use of direct standardization or conditional logistic regression for differences between England and the United States with respect to population age and sex. Results During the period from 2005 through 2012, a total of 29,300 patients in England and 278,921 patients in the United States underwent repair of intact abdominal aortic aneurysms. Aneurysm repair was less common in England than in the United States (odds ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48 to 0.49; Paneurysm-related death was more common in England than in the United States (odds ratio, 3.60; 95% CI, 3.55 to 3.64; Paneurysm rupture occurred more frequently in England than in the United States (odds ratio, 2.23; 95% CI, 2.19 to 2.27; Paneurysm diameter at the time of repair was larger in England (63.7 mm vs. 58.3 mm, Pabdominal aortic aneurysms and a larger mean aneurysm diameter at the time of repair in England than in the United

  8. The developing world in The New England Journal of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, Bernard; Banerjee, Amitava

    2006-03-16

    Rampant disease in poor countries impedes development and contributes to growing North-South disparities; however, leading international medical journals underreport on health research priorities for developing countries. We examined 416 weekly issues of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) over an eight-year period, January 1997 to December 2004. A total of 8857 articles were reviewed by both authors. The content of each issue was evaluated in six categories: research, review articles, editorial, correspondence, book reviews and miscellaneous. If the title or abstract concerned a topic pertinent to any health issue in the developing world, the article was reviewed. Over the eight years covered in this study, 1997-2004, in the three essential categories of original research articles, review articles and editorials, less than 3.0 percent of these addressed health issues in the developing world. Publications relevant to DC were largely concerned with HIV and communicable diseases and constituted 135 of the 202 articles of which 63 were devoted to HIV. Only 23 articles addressed non-communicable disease in the DC and only a single article - a book review - discussed heart disease. The medical information gap between rich and poor countries as judged by publications in the NEJM appears to be larger than the gap in the funding for research. Under-representation of developing world health issues in the medical literature is a global phenomenon. International medical journals cannot rectify global inequities, but they have an important role in educating their constituencies about the global divide.

  9. Casebooks in early modern England: medicine, astrology, and written records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassell, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Casebooks are the richest sources that we have for encounters between early modern medical practitioners and their patients. This article compares astrological and medical records across two centuries, focused on England, and charts developments in the ways in which practitioners kept records and reflected on their practices. Astrologers had a long history of working from particular moments, stellar configurations, and events to general rules. These practices required systematic notation. Physicians increasingly modeled themselves on Hippocrates, recording details of cases as the basis for reasoned expositions of the histories of disease. Medical records, as other scholars have demonstrated, shaped the production of medical knowledge. Instead, this article focuses on the nature of casebooks as artifacts of the medical encounter. It establishes that casebooks were serial records of practice, akin to diaries, testimonials, and registers; identifies extant English casebooks and the practices that led to their production and preservation; and concludes that the processes of writing, ordering, and preserving medical records are as important for understanding the medical encounter as the records themselves.

  10. Background exposure rates of terrestrial wildlife in England and Wales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH-Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.uk; Barnett, C.L. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, CEH-Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Jones, D.G. [British Geological Society, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Wood, M.D. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER), Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GP (United Kingdom); Appleton, J.D.; Breward, N. [British Geological Society, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D. [Environment Agency, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    It has been suggested that, when assessing radiation impacts on non-human biota, estimated dose rates due to anthropogenically released radionuclides should be put in context by comparison to dose rates from natural background radiation. In order to make these comparisons, we need data on the activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in environmental media and organisms of interest. This paper presents the results of a study to determine the exposure of terrestrial organisms in England and Wales to naturally occurring radionuclides, specifically {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U series and {sup 232}Th series radionuclides. Whole-body activity concentrations for the reference animals and plants (RAPs) as proposed by the ICRP have been collated from literature review, data archives and a targeted sampling campaign. Data specifically for the proposed RAP are sparse. Soil activity concentrations have been derived from an extensive geochemical survey of the UK. Unweighted and weighted absorbed dose rates were estimated using the ERICA Tool. Mean total weighted whole-body absorbed dose rates estimated for the selected terrestrial organisms was in the range 6.9 x 10{sup -2} to 6.1 x 10{sup -1} {mu}Gy h{sup -1}.

  11. Empirical determinants of measles metapopulation dynamics in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstädt, B; Grenfell, B

    1998-02-07

    A key issue in metapopulation dynamics is the relative impact of internal patch dynamics and coupling between patches. This problem can be addressed by analysing large spatiotemporal data sets, recording the local and global dynamics of metapopulations. In this paper, we analyse the dynamics of measles meta-populations in a large spatiotemporal case notification data set, collected during the pre-vaccination era in England and Wales. Specifically, we use generalized linear statistical models to quantify the relative importance of local influences (birth rate and population size) and regional coupling on local epidemic dynamics. Apart from the proportional effect of local population size on case totals, the models indicate patterns of local and regional dynamic influences which depend on the current state of epidemics. Birth rate and geographic coupling are not associated with the size of major epidemics. By contrast, minor epidemics--and especially the incidence of local extinction of infection--are influenced both by birth rate and geographical coupling. Birth rate at a lag of four years provides the best fit, reflecting the delayed recruitment of susceptibles to school cohorts. A hierarchical index of spatial coupling to large centres provides the best spatial model. The model also indicates that minor epidemics and extinction patterns are more strongly influenced by this regional effect than the local impact of birth rate.

  12. Good to Think with: Domestic Servants, England 1660-1750

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Clegg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article surveys scholarship dealing with domestic service in England at the latter end of early modernity. Neglected by British social historians of ‘productive’ working classes, servants began to attract serious interest only after demographers of the 1970s showed that in the north and west of pre-industrial Europe youths of all social ranks passed several years in ‘life-cycle service’. The concept has proved controversial, but fruitful for study of the family and of the many functions performed within the extended household. In the 1980s feminism, and the revival of servant-keeping, stimulated interest in modern domestic workers, to whom those of earlier times were often assimilated. The focus has since shifted to radical changes (feminisation and proletarianisation taking place in the later eighteenth century, and away from the complex hierarchies typical of great houses onto middling-sort servant-keeping. Recently historians have investigated the agency enjoyed by eighteenth-century servants, and affective aspects of household relationships. Archival research, facilitated by digitalisation, studies of material culture and household spaces, willingness to read between the lines and against the grain, now offer greater insight into the experiences of and cultural forms used by this group of labouring-class men and women. 

  13. Salience Effects in the North-West of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Jansen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The question of how we can define salience, what properties it includes and how we can quantify it have been discussed widely over the past thirty years but we still have more questions than answers about this phenomenon, e. g. not only how salience arises, but also how we can define it. However, despite the lack of a clear definition, salience is often taken into account as an explanatory factor in language change. The scientific discourse on salience has in most cases revolved around phonetic features, while hardly any variables on other linguistic levels have been investigated in terms of their salience. Hence, one goal of this paper is to argue for an expanded view of salience in the sociolinguistic context. This article investigates the variation and change of two groups of variables in Carlisle, an urban speech community in the north west of England. I analyse the variable (th and in particular the replacement of /θ/ with [f] which is widely known as th-fronting. The use of three discourse markers is also examined. Both groups of features will then be discussed in the light of sociolinguistic salience.

  14. Social representations of memory and gender in later medieval England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Bronach

    2012-12-01

    Social representations in later medieval culture have attracted little attention amongst psychologists, pre-dating the development of the so-called 'public sphere' in the eighteenth century. In addition, the association of pre-modern societies with 'traditional' modes of communication in social psychology places implicit limits on areas that may be studied through the lens of social representation theory. This article analyses the way in which knowledge circulated in late medieval society, noting initially the plural nature of representations of events and marginal groups, and the myriad channels through which beliefs were consolidated. In later medieval England perceptions of the past depended on collective and group memory, with customary rights and local histories forged through 'common knowledge', hearsay and the opinions of 'trustworthy men' of the village. The final section of this commentary provides an analysis of testimony from the late medieval church courts, in which witnesses articulated gender ideologies that reflected perceptions drawn from everyday life. Social representations of women were thus deployed in ecclesiastical suits, on the one hand supporting evidence of female witnesses and on the other justifying misogynistic stereotypes of women's behaviour.

  15. Sexual health service providers' perceptions of transgender youth in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Ayla R F; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2017-01-23

    Transgender youth often face difficulties when accessing sexual health services. However, few studies investigate health service providers' perceptions of transgender youth, and fewer focus on sexual health. To fill this gap, our study draws on social representations theory to examine sexual health service providers' perceptions of transgender youth and how this influences the provision of health services for this marginalised population in England. A thematic analysis of 20 semi-structured interviews with service providers, conducted between March and June 2014, resulted in five main themes centred on: binary representations of transgender; transgender as homosexuality; uncertain bodies; unstable mental states; and too young to know. Of the service providers interviewed, many understood transgender within a male/female binary, and perceived being transgender to be synonymous with being gay. There was confusion among service providers regarding transgender youths' sexual organs, and most of those interviewed saw transgender youth as mentally unstable and confused. Finally, many service providers perceived that transgender youth are too young to know that they are transgender and make decisions about their body. Some of these representations were potentially stigmatising and many conflicted with transgender youths' representations of themselves. Training by transgender people is recommended to help address these misunderstandings.

  16. 'Herbals she peruseth': reading medicine in early modern England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Elaine

    2014-09-01

    In 1631, Richard Brathwaite penned a conduct manual for 'English Gentlewomen'. In Brathwaite's mind, the ideal English gentlewoman was not only chaste, modest and honourable but also an avid reader. In fact, Brathwaite specifically recommends English gentlewomen to first peruse herbals and then to deepen their medical knowledge via conference. Centred on the manuscript notebooks of two late seventeenth-century women, Margaret Boscawen (d. 1688) and Elizabeth Freke (1642-1714), this article explores women and 'medical reading' in early modern England. It first demonstrates that whilst both women consulted herbals by contemporary authors such as John Gerard and Nicholas Culpeper, their modes of reading could not be more different. Where Freke ruminated, digested and abstracted from Gerard's large tome, Boscawen made practical lists from Culpeper's The English Physitian. Secondly, the article shows that both supplemented their herbal reading with a range of other vernacular medical texts including printed medical recipe books, contemporary pharmacopoeia and surgical handbooks. Early modern English women's medical reading, I argue, was nuanced, sophisticated and diverse. Furthermore, I contend that well-informed readers like Boscawen and Freke made smart medical consumers and formidable negotiators in their medical encounters.

  17. Victim support services in England, Wales and Northern Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćopić Sanja M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, authors tried to present activities of one of the oldest European Victim Support Services - Victim Support for England, Wales and Northern Ireland. During 1970s, through practice and research projects, the need for recognizing the physical and psychological status of victims after the crime was committed, as well as the need of providing them with the (informal assistance and support were noticed. That has resulted in establishing numerous of local victim support services (schemes, which united in the National Association of the Victim Support Services in 1979. Significant support was given to the Service in 1980s through the recommendations of the Council of Europe on the assistance for victims of crime and prevention of victimization through direct support given to the victim immediately after the incident, including protection and safety, medical, mental, social and financial support, as well as providing the victim with information on his/her rights, support during the criminal proceeding, assistance in getting compensation etc. Organization and structure of the service, referral system, code of practice and two main programs: Victim Service and Witness Service are reviewed in the paper.

  18. Bringing it all Together: Networking Heritage Inventories in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, P. K.; Lee, E. S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper will look at the requirements for a future vision of networked, digital heritage inventories to support heritage protection in England. The present loose network presents several challenges for multiple organizations maintaining similar datasets on disparate IT software: Duplication of content; ownership of content and different approaches to recording practice and standards. This paper will discuss the potential use of the Arches Heritage Inventory and Management System as part of the vision for better operation of this network. Arches was developed by the Getty Conservation Institute, World Monuments Fund and Farallon Geographics as an open source web-based geographic information system (GIS) to help inventorize and manage immovable cultural heritage. The system is based around internationally recognized standards from both the heritage and IT sectors. These include: ISO 21127: 2006, commonly referred to as the CIDOC-CRM (Conceptual Reference Model); the CIDOC Core Data Standard for Archaeological and Architectural Sites; Core Data Index to Historic Buildings and Monuments of the Architectural Heritage as well as Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. The proposed use of Arches as a data collection and exchange platform would provide effective and useful recording systems for small heritage projects lacking in-house IT support and the finances and skills to support their development. In addition it would promote standards to support cross-searching, data exchange and digital archiving and through its use of open source a community of IT developers, standards developers and content specialists can be developed to sustain the network.

  19. Fuel Poverty Advisory Group (for England). Fifth annual report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-17

    The Fuel Poverty Advisory Group is an non-departmental public body that advises ministers on progress in England towards meeting the goals sets out in the UK fuel poverty strategy. This is its fifth annual report setting out progress in reducing the number of households in fuel poverty and thus achieving the Government's challenging fuel poverty targets for 2010 and 2016. The report examines developments in fuel poverty during the year, targets, energy prices, resources needed to meet fuel poverty targets, the various Fuel Poverty Programmes, high cost measures, information sharing, incomes, the work of other Government departments and the specific roles of the Department of Work and Pensions, the Department for Communities and Local Government, the Department of Health and Ofgem. The report stresses the need for the Government to underline its continued commitment to the statutory fuel poverty targets by including these targets in the Public Service Agreement (PSA) for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) and the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), and by clearly defining the roles of other departments within the PSA framework.

  20. Lessons from England's health care workforce redesign: no quick fixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Imison, Candace

    2013-11-01

    In 2000 the English National Health Service (NHS) began a series of workforce redesign initiatives that increased the number of doctors and nurses serving patients, expanded existing staff roles and developed new ones, redistributed health care work, and invested in teamwork. The English workforce redesign experience offers important lessons for US policy makers. Redesigning the health care workforce is not a quick fix to control costs or improve the quality of care. A poorly planned redesign can even result in increased costs and decreased quality. Changes in skill mix and role definitions should be preceded by a detailed analysis and redesign of the work performed by health care professionals. New roles and responsibilities must be clearly defined in advance, and teamwork models that include factors common in successful redesigns such as leadership, shared objectives, and training should be promoted. The focus should be on retraining current staff instead of hiring new workers. Finally, any workforce redesign must overcome opposition from professional bodies, individual practitioners, and regulators. England's experience suggests that progress is possible if workforce redesigns are planned carefully and implemented with skill.

  1. User involvement in assisted reproductive technologies: England and Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorinha, Catarina; Lichon, Mateusz; Silva, Susana; Dent, Mike

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare user involvement in the case of assisted reproductive technologies in England and Portugal through the concepts of voice, choice and co-production, assessing the implications for user empowerment. This qualitative study draws primarily on policy review and uses exploratory semi-structured interviews with key informants as a way of illustrating points. Data on the following themes was compared: voice (users' representativeness on licensing bodies and channels of communication between users and doctors); choice (funding and accessibility criteria; choice of fertility centres, doctors and level of care); and co-production (criteria through which users actively engage with health professionals in planning the treatment). Inter- and intra-healthcare systems variations between the two countries on choice and co-production were identified. Differences between funding and accessibility, regions, public and private sectors and attitudes towards doctor-patient relationship (paternalistic/partnership) were the key issues. Although consumer choice and indicators of co-production are evident in treatment pathways in both countries, user empowerment is not. This is limited by inequalities in accessibility criteria, dependence on doctors' individual perspectives and lack of genuine and formal hearing of citizens' voice. Enhancing users' involvement claims for individual and organizational cultures reflecting user-centred values. Effective ways to incorporate users' knowledge in shared decision making and co-design are needed to empower patients and to improve the delivery of care.

  2. Enhancing the Conservation of Crop Wild Relatives in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Hannah; Brotherton, Peter; Hosking, Julian; Hopkins, John J.; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Maxted, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Humans require resilient, rapidly renewable and sustainable supplies of food and many other plant-derived supplies. However, the combined effects of climate change and population growth compromise the provision of these supplies particularly in respect to global food security. Crop wild relatives (CWR) contain higher genetic diversity than crops and harbour traits that can improve crop resilience and yield through plant breeding. However, in common with most countries, CWR are poorly conserved in England. There is currently no provision for long-term CWR conservation in situ, and comprehensive ex situ collection and storage of CWR is also lacking. However, there is a commitment to achieve their conservation in England’s Biodiversity Strategy and the UK has international commitments to do so as part of the Global Plant Conservation Strategy. Here, we identify a series of measures that could enhance the conservation of English CWR, thereby supporting the achievement of these national and international objectives. We provide an inventory of 148 priority English CWR, highlight hotspots of CWR diversity in sites including The Lizard Peninsula, the Dorset coast and Cambridgeshire and suggest appropriate sites for the establishment of a complementary network of genetic reserves. We also identify individual in situ and ex situ priorities for each English CWR. Based on these analyses, we make recommendations whose implementation could provide effective, long-term conservation of English CWR whilst facilitating their use in crop improvement. PMID:26110773

  3. Risk factors of lameness in sows in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgert, Katriina J E; Brewster, Veronica; Wright, Angela J; Nevel, Amanda

    2014-02-01

    Lameness in pigs is a major welfare concern and one of the most commonly reported reasons for premature culling of breeding sows. In this study, the prevalence of lameness in sows was estimated using data from 76 pig breeding units in England and risk factors associated with the occurrence of lameness were examined. The prevalence of lameness in sows was 4.5% (farm median 5.0%, range 0-40%), with at least one lame sow being observed at 54% of the 76 farms. Relative risk (RR) of lameness was determined by multivariable Poisson regression analysis. Farms with high producing sows had a lower rate of lame sows than farms with a medium level of production (P=0.01). However, medium levels of production on a farm were associated with higher levels of lameness than farms having the lowest level of production (P=0.02). Farms where the stockman had responsibility for more sows resulted in an increased risk of lameness (P=0.0062). When indoor units were considered, the area of the pen and younger sows (two parities or less) had higher risk of lameness (P=0.001 and P=0.026 respectively). An increased awareness of the risk factors behind lameness is essential in farm management and can be useful when designing housing areas as well as developing future prevention plans for lameness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Innate resistance to myxomatosis in wild rabbits in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J; Sanders, M F

    1977-12-01

    Wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) from one study area in England have been used over a period of 11 years to investigate the possible appearance of innate resistance to myxomatosis. Rabbits of 4-6 weeks old were captured alive, retained in the laboratory until at least 4 months old, and then infected with a type of myxoma virus which kills 90-95% of laboratory rabbits. Observations were made of symptoms, mortality rate and survival times.In the first 4 years of the study (1966-9), mortality rates were not significantly different from those of laboratory rabbits, although survival times of wild rabbits were appreciably longer. In 1970, the mortality rate amongst wild rabbits was 59%, in 1974 it was 17%, and in 1976 it was 20%, thus showing that a considerable degree of inherited resistance to myxomatosis has developed.The types of myxoma virus most commonly isolated from wild rabbits in Great Britain in recent years have been those which cause 70-95% mortality in laboratory rabbits. Therefore, if the degree of innate resistance demonstrated is widespread in Great Britain, there are serious implications regarding the size of the rabbit population, because myxomatosis has been an important factor in holding rabbit numbers at a relatively low level.

  5. Innate resistance to myxomatosis in wild rabbits in England*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.; Sanders, M. F.

    1977-01-01

    Wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) from one study area in England have been used over a period of 11 years to investigate the possible appearance of innate resistance to myxomatosis. Rabbits of 4-6 weeks old were captured alive, retained in the laboratory until at least 4 months old, and then infected with a type of myxoma virus which kills 90-95% of laboratory rabbits. Observations were made of symptoms, mortality rate and survival times. In the first 4 years of the study (1966-9), mortality rates were not significantly different from those of laboratory rabbits, although survival times of wild rabbits were appreciably longer. In 1970, the mortality rate amongst wild rabbits was 59%, in 1974 it was 17%, and in 1976 it was 20%, thus showing that a considerable degree of inherited resistance to myxomatosis has developed. The types of myxoma virus most commonly isolated from wild rabbits in Great Britain in recent years have been those which cause 70-95% mortality in laboratory rabbits. Therefore, if the degree of innate resistance demonstrated is widespread in Great Britain, there are serious implications regarding the size of the rabbit population, because myxomatosis has been an important factor in holding rabbit numbers at a relatively low level. PMID:270526

  6. West Nile virus vector Culex modestus established in southern England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golding Nick

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The risk posed to the United Kingdom by West Nile virus (WNV has previously been considered low, due to the absence or scarcity of the main Culex sp. bridge vectors. The mosquito Culex modestus is widespread in southern Europe, where it acts as the principle bridge vector of WNV. This species was not previously thought to be present in the United Kingdom. Findings Mosquito larval surveys carried out in 2010 identified substantial populations of Cx. modestus at two sites in marshland in southeast England. Host-seeking-adult traps placed at a third site indicate that the relative seasonal abundance of Cx. modestus peaks in early August. DNA barcoding of these specimens from the United Kingdom and material from southern France confirmed the morphological identification. Conclusions Cx. modestus appears to be established in the North Kent Marshes, possibly as the result of a recent introduction. The addition of this species to the United Kingdom's mosquito fauna may increase the risk posed to the United Kingdom by WNV.

  7. Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Y.; Minoura, K.; Hirano, S.; Yamada, T.

    2011-12-01

    The 11 March 2011, Mw 9.0 Great East Japan Earthquake, already among the most destructive earthquakes in modern history, emanated from a fault rupture that extended an estimated 500 km along the Pacific coast of Honshu. This earthquake is the fourth among five of the strongest temblors since AD 1900 and the largest in Japan since modern instrumental recordings began 130 years ago. The earthquake triggered a huge tsunami, which invaded the seaside areas of the Pacific coast of East Japan, causing devastating damages on the coast. Artificial structures were destroyed and planted forests were thoroughly eroded. Inrush of turbulent flows washed backshore areas and dunes. Coastal materials including beach sand were transported onto inland areas by going-up currents. Just after the occurrence of the tsunami, we started field investigation of measuring thickness and distribution of sediment layers by the tsunami and the inundation depth of water in Sendai plain. Ripple marks showing direction of sediment transport were the important object of observation. We used a soil auger for collecting sediments in the field, and sediment samples were submitted for analyzing grain size and interstitial water chemistry. Satellite images and aerial photographs are very useful for estimating the hydrogeological effects of tsunami inundation. We checked the correspondence of micro-topography, vegetation and sediment covering between before and after the tsunami. The most conspicuous phenomenon is the damage of pine forests planted in the purpose of preventing sand shifting. About ninety-five percent of vegetation coverage was lost during the period of rapid currents changed from first wave. The landward slopes of seawalls were mostly damaged and destroyed. Some aerial photographs leave detailed records of wave destruction just behind seawalls, which shows the occurrence of supercritical flows. The large-scale erosion of backshore behind seawalls is interpreted to have been caused by

  8. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project, Newsletter #5 -- January 2010, Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

    2010-01-01

    Wind Powering America program launched the New England Wind Forum (NEWF) in 2005 to provide a single comprehensive source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind energy issues pertaining to New England. The NEWF newsletter provides New England stakeholders with updates on wind energy development in the region. In addition to regional updates, Issue #5 offers an interview with Angus King, former governor of Maine and co-founder of Independence Wind.

  9. Large springs of east Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pao-chang P.; Criner, J.H.; Poole, J.L.

    1963-01-01

    Springs constitute an important source of water in east Tennessee, and many individual springs are capable of supplying the large quantities needed for municipal and industrial supplies. Most of the springs in east Tennessee issue from solution openings and fractured and faulted zones in limestone and dolomite of the Knox Group, Chickamauga Limestone, and Conasauga Group. The ability of these rocks to yield a sustained flow of water to springs is dependent on a system of interconnected openings through which water can infiltrate from the land surface and move to points of natural discharge. Ninety springs were selected for detailed study, and 84 of these are analyzed in terms of magnitude and variability of discharge. Of the 84 springs analyzed, 4 flow at an average rate of 10 to 100 cfs (cubic feet per second), 62 at an average rate of 1 to 10 cfs, and 18 at an average rate of 1 cfs or less. Of the 90 springs, 75 are variable in their discharge; that is, the ratio of their fluctuations to their average discharges exceeds 100 percent. Mathematical analysis of the flow recession curve of Mill Spring near Jefferson City shows that the hydrologic system contributing to the flow of the spring has an effective capacity of about 70 million cubic feet of water. The rate of depletion of this volume of water, in the absence of significant precipitation, averages 0.0056 cfs per day between the time when the hydrologic system is full and the time when the spring ceases to flow. From such a curve it is possible to determine at any time the residual volume of water remaining in the system and the expected rate of decrease in discharge from that time to cessation of flow. Correlation of discharge measurements of 22 springs with those of Mill Spring shows that rough approximations of discharge can be projected for springs for which few measurements are available. Seventeen of the springs analyzed in this manner show good correlation with Mill Spring: that is, their coefficients

  10. Volcanic caves of East Africa - an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim W. Simons

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Tertiary to recent volcanoes are located in East Africa. Thus, much of the region is made up volcanic rock, which hosts the largest and greatest variety of East Africas caves. Exploration of volcanic caves has preoccupied members of Cave Exploration Group of East Africa (CEGEA for the past 30 years. The various publications edited by CEGEA are in this respect a treasure troves of speleological information. In the present paper an overview on the most important volcanic caves and areas are shortly reported.

  11. Cholera outbreaks in South-East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Kaushik; Bhattacharya, S K

    2014-01-01

    This chapter highlights the cholera situation in South Asia and the Bay of Bengal region, the original 'homeland' of cholera. A detailed discussion of cholera outbreaks in individual countries in South-East Asia follows. The countries of the World Health Organization (WHO) SEARO (South-East Asia Region) region are discussed first, followed by discussions about the other countries in South-East Asia that do not fall within the purview of the WHO SEARO classification of the member countries of the region. Therefore, the chapter attempts to provide a comprehensive yet precise outline of the major cholera outbreaks that have occurred in the region over the years.

  12. Networks model of the East Turkistan terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ben-xian; Zhu, Jun-fang; Wang, Shun-guo

    2015-02-01

    The presence of the East Turkistan terrorist network in China can be traced back to the rebellions on the BAREN region in Xinjiang in April 1990. This article intends to research the East Turkistan networks in China and offer a panoramic view. The events, terrorists and their relationship are described using matrices. Then social network analysis is adopted to reveal the network type and the network structure characteristics. We also find the crucial terrorist leader. Ultimately, some results show that the East Turkistan network has big hub nodes and small shortest path, and that the network follows a pattern of small world network with hierarchical structure.

  13. Early urban development in the Near East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur, Jason A; Karsgaard, Philip; Oates, Joan

    2007-08-31

    It has been thought that the first cities in the Near East were spatially extensive and grew outward from a core nucleated village while maintaining a more or less constant density in terms of persons or households per unit of area. The general applicability outside of the Near East of this southern Mesopotamian.derived model has been questioned recently, and variations from it are increasingly recognized. We can now demonstrate that such variation was present at the beginnings of urbanism in the Near East as well.

  14. Simulation Analysis of Divertor Performance in EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Sizheng; Zha Xuejun

    2005-01-01

    A detailed study of the divertor performance in the EAST has been conducted for both its double null and single null configurations. The results of the application of the SOLPS (B2/Eirene) code package to the analysis of the EAST divertor are summarized. Here we concentrate on the effects of the increased geometrical closure and variation in the magnetic topology on the behavior of divertor plasmas. The results of numerical predictions for the EAST divertor's operational window are also described in this paper.

  15. Vaccination policy against smallpox, 1835-1914: a comparison of England with Prussia and Imperial Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennock, E P

    1998-04-01

    There are three identifiable phases in comparing vaccination policy in England, Prussia and Imperial Germany. (1) Prior to the 1870's the tradition of medical police in Prussia resulted in the vaccination of the population being treated as a State responsibility earlier than in England and provided an appropriate administrative framework. The administrative pressure that could be exerted persuaded the Prussian authorities that legislation to make vaccination compulsory was unnecessary. In contrast, England and Wales lacked both the tradition and administrative structures of a medical police. Legislation (1840, 1853) for free and universal infant vaccination was followed by radical ideological and administrative innovation. (2) From 1875 to 1889 both countries provided free and compulsory vaccination for all. In England this was limited to infants; in Germany including Prussia, it included the re-vaccination of children. (3) After 1889 England and Germany began to diverge more sharply. In England vaccination rates fell and after 1898 conscientious objectors were excused from having to have their children vaccinated. Germany retained compulsory vaccination and rates in the two countries increasingly diverged. England came to rely on the local public health administration for the surveillance and containment of smallpox, including selective vaccination of contacts. Despite these differences smallpox mortality dropped sharply in both countries, although in Germany somewhat earlier. The English reliance on surveillance and containment prefigures that of the WHO in the eradication of smallpox in the Third World. It suggests that the emphasis on the importance of high levels of mass vaccination in the German literature should perhaps be revised.

  16. Middle East food safety perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idriss, Atef W; El-Habbab, Mohammad S

    2014-08-01

    Food safety and quality assurance are increasingly a major issue with the globalisation of agricultural trade, on the one hand, and intensification of agriculture, on the other. Consumer protection has become a priority in policy-making amongst the large economies of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) countries following a number of food safety incidents. To enhance food safety, it is necessary to establish markets underpinned by knowledge and resources, including analysis of international rejections of food products from MENA countries, international laboratory accreditation, improved reporting systems and traceability, continued development and validation of analytical methods, and more work on correlating sensory evaluation with analytical results. MENA countries should develop a national strategy for food safety based on a holistic approach that extends from farm-to-fork and involves all the relevant stakeholders. Accordingly, food safety should be a regional programme, raising awareness among policy- and decision-makers of the importance of food safety and quality for consumer protection, food trade and economic development.

  17. WEST AND EAST REGIONS OF GHANA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mobilisation and saving as well as records keeping in PMCS in the Upper West and. East Regions. 1. ..... money to meet the maintenance of pump facilities including pump site .... are given some incentives as motivation, the data show that the.

  18. Lots, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This dataset depicts the polygon boundaries of the parcels of land within the Parish of East Baton Rouge, with the exception of those parcels that fall within the...

  19. EAST OJAI SURVEY, VENTURA COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Field Survey for East Ojai FIS mostly consists of hydraulic structures survey as well as geological and geomorphologic surveys. No topographic surveys are rendered...

  20. Transport: Shipping emissions in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, James

    2016-11-01

    Large growth in East Asia's sea-borne trade has increased premature deaths and atmospheric warming in the region. New legislation could reduce these impacts in areas around China, but joint efforts are needed for region-wide benefits.

  1. Hydrography, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — The Hydrography layer is an area geometry depicting the various water features that include the rivers, streams, creeks, lakes, etc of East Baton Rouge Parish.

  2. ISSN 2073 East Cent. Afr. j. surg.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 16 Number 1 ... sarcomas of the shoulder girdle particularly osteosarcomas of the proximal humerus and ... suggestive of an osteosarcoma which was confirmed histologically (Figure 7).

  3. Biogas - Bioenergy potential in East Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The workshop is part of the project: `Energy production from Sisal Waste in East Africa` sponsored by the Danish Energy Agency, an agency under the Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy. This project has been carried out in close cooperation between the Danish Technological Institute and University of Dar es Salaam, Applied Microbiology Unit, who has also taken care of the practical arrangement. The main objectives of the workshop was: To present the ongoing research in East Africa on biogas production from organic residues; To get an overview of political and administrative issues related to promotion and implementation of renewable energy facilities in East Africa; To discuss appropriate set-ups for bioenergy facilities in East Africa. (au)

  4. Zoning, 2004, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a graphical polygon dataset depicting the zoning boundaries of the East Baton Rouge Parish of the State of Louisiana. Zoning can be defined as the range of...

  5. Cultures of the east (1984-1992)

    OpenAIRE

    Pajin Dušan

    2013-01-01

    The quarterly journal, Cultures of the East (1984-92), was founded with the intention of presenting Near and Far East cultures to academics, as well as a wider audience, and illuminate some of its rich cultural heritage. The subtitle defined the journal as a “journal for Eastern philosophy, literature and art”. However it also contained other issues, such as religion. Some issues had a comparative approach, compiling studies (on philosophy, religion, etc.) of Eastern as well as Western ...

  6. Evolving economic architecture in East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines how East Asia's economic architecture has been evolving over the last ten years and how it will shape itself in the future. With the progress of market-driven economic integration, East Asian economies have developed various cooperative initiatives for trade and finance, including free trade agreements (FTAs), the Chiang Mai Initiative, the Economic Review and Policy Dialogue, and the Asian Bond Markets Initiative. The paper suggests policy directions for greater regional ...

  7. [Publicly funded programs of psychotherapy in Australia and England].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Dezetter, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Quebec's HealthCommissioner on the performance of the health system clearly highlighted gaps in the collaboration between primary care physicians and mental health specialists, decreased accessibility and inequity in access to effective mental health services such as psychotherapy.Objectives The aim of this article was to describe the implementation of two publicly funded programs of psychotherapy in Australia and England with similar gatekeeper systems to the one in Quebec.Findings Following the Access to Allied Psychological Services (ATAPS) program introduced in Australia in 2003, one of the most important initiatives from the Council of Australian Governments' National Action Plan on Mental Health 2006-2011 was the Better Access Initiative which commenced in 2006. The plan included AUD1.2 billion in funding for integrating and improving the mental health care system. The purpose of Better Access was to improve the treatment and management of mental illnesses and increasing community access to mental health professionals and providing more affordable mental health care. GPs were encouraged to work more closely with mental health professionals. Under this program, these professionals are able to provide mental health services on a fee-for-service basis subsidized through Medicare. Access to psychological therapies is provided through private providers, rather than through fund holding arrangements. As of 2009 in Australia, 2 million people (1 in 11) had received over 11.2 million subsidized mental health services. A recent study showed clinical improvements in patients with depression associated with Better Access, concluding that the program is meeting previously unmet mental health needs.In the case of England, the IAPT - Improving Access to psychological Therapies-program enabled primary care trusts (PCTs) to implement evidence-based psychological therapies as recommended by National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence for people suffering from

  8. Pharmacy and formulation support for paediatric clinical trials in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mandy; Al Hashimi, Ali; Batchelor, Hannah

    2016-09-25

    Availability and sourcing of investigational drugs for paediatric clinical trials is known to be a challenge for investigator-led clinical trials. The National Institute of Health Research Clinical Research Network: Children (CRN: Children) provides support for formulations and pharmacy related issues to researchers planning and setting up paediatric clinical trials within England. This paper reviews pharmacy and formulation support provided to a consecutive series of investigator-led clinical studies supported by CRN:Children. Case studies are included to describe some of the unique pharmaceutical challenges encountered. 44 trials were reviewed and a total of 103 products were required to support these clinical trials. UK authorised products were suitable for use for 62 of these 103 products. In the remaining 41 cases, 4 could be sourced as an authorised product within the European Union and the remaining 37 required bespoke manufacture. Bespoke manufacture of an investigational drug or placebo is costly. Typical costs for the initial development and testing of a bespoke investigational drug or placebo were in the range of £30,000-100,000 per product. The estimated cost for 19 out of 45 trials was available; in summary, the costs on a per patient per day of therapy basis ranged from under £1 to almost £600; short studies involving multiple agents are obviously the most expensive. This range is dependent upon the need for bespoke manufacture and also the number of participants within the trial. The arrangements for investigational drug supply can greatly affect the study design, regulatory requirements, trial logistics, as well as the total cost of research. As investigational product related activities are often costly, necessitating months of advance planning, it is imperative that specialist inputs are sought from the very start of the study design and planning process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Challenges of research recruitment in a university setting in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadeboncoeur, Claudia; Foster, Charlie; Townsend, Nick

    2017-05-20

    The recruitment is an integral part of most research projects in medical sciences involving human participants. In health promotion research, there is increasing work on the impact of environments. Settings represent environments such as schools where social, physical and psychological development unfolds. In this study, we investigated weight gain in students within a university setting. Barriers to access and recruitment of university students within a specific setting, in the context of health research are discussed. An online survey on health behaviours of first year students across 101 universities in England was developed. Ethics committees of each institutions were contacted to obtain permission to recruit and access their students. Recruitment adverts were standardized and distributed within restrictions imposed by universities. Three time points and incentives were used. Several challenges in recruiting from a university setting were found. These included (i) ethics approval, (ii) recruitment approval, (iii) navigating restrictions on advertisement and (iv) logistics of varying university academic calendars. We also faced challenges of online surveys including low recruitment, retention and low eligibility of respondents. From the 101 universities, 28 allowed dissemination of adverts. We obtained 1026 responses at T1, 599 at T2 and 497 at T3. The complete-case sample represented 13% of those originally recruited at T1. Conducting research on students within the university setting is a time consuming and challenging task. To improve research-based health promotion, universities could work together to increase consistency as to their policies on student recruitment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The developing world in The New England Journal of Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Amitava

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rampant disease in poor countries impedes development and contributes to growing North-South disparities; however, leading international medical journals underreport on health research priorities for developing countries. Methods We examined 416 weekly issues of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM over an eight-year period, January 1997 to December 2004. A total of 8857 articles were reviewed by both authors. The content of each issue was evaluated in six categories: research, review articles, editorial, correspondence, book reviews and miscellaneous. If the title or abstract concerned a topic pertinent to any health issue in the developing world, the article was reviewed. Results Over the eight years covered in this study, 1997–2004, in the three essential categories of original research articles, review articles and editorials, less than 3.0 percent of these addressed health issues in the developing world. Publications relevant to DC were largely concerned with HIV and communicable diseases and constituted 135 of the 202 articles of which 63 were devoted to HIV. Only 23 articles addressed non-communicable disease in the DC and only a single article – a book review – discussed heart disease. Conclusion The medical information gap between rich and poor countries as judged by publications in the NEJM appears to be larger than the gap in the funding for research. Under-representation of developing world health issues in the medical literature is a global phenomenon. International medical journals cannot rectify global inequities, but they have an important role in educating their constituencies about the global divide.

  11. Using population segmentation to inform local obesity strategy in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Jane; Crichton, Nicola; Lorenc, Ava; Kelly, Muireann

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the views of obese people and how best to meet their needs. Amongst London boroughs Barking and Dagenham has the highest prevalence of adult obesity at 28.7%; the lowest level of healthy eating and of physical activity; and is the 22nd most deprived area of England. The study aimed to gain insight into the attitudes, motivations and priorities of people who are obese or overweight to inform the social marketing of an obesity strategy. Two hundred and ten obese or overweight adults were recruited through visual identification in public thoroughfares to attempt to recruit those seldom seen in primary care. One hundred and eighty-one street-intercept and 52 in-depth interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis was followed by psychographic segmentation. Eleven population segments were identified based on their readiness to change, the value accorded to tackling obesity, identified enabling factors and barriers to weight management and perceived self-efficacy. This population showed considerable variation in its readiness to change and perceived control over obesity but considerable similarity in the exchange value they attributed to tackling their obesity. Even within a relatively homogenous socio-demographic community, there needs to be a range of interventions and messages tailored for different population segments that vary in their readiness to change and confidence about tackling obesity. The dominant emphasis of policy and practice on the health consequences of obesity does not reflect the priorities of this obese population for whom the exchange value of addressing obesity was daily functioning especially in relation to family life.

  12. GPs' perceptions of workload in England: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxson, Caroline Hd; Ashdown, Helen F; Hobbs, Fd Richard

    2017-02-01

    GPs report the lowest levels of morale among doctors, job satisfaction is low, and the GP workforce is diminishing. Workload is frequently cited as negatively impacting on commitment to a career in general practice, and many GPs report that their workload is unmanageable. To gather an in-depth understanding of GPs' perceptions and attitudes towards workload. All GPs working within NHS England were eligible. Advertisements were circulated via regional GP e-mail lists and national social media networks in June 2015. Of those GPs who responded, a maximum-variation sample was selected until data saturation was reached. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted. Data were analysed thematically. In total, 171 GPs responded, and 34 were included in this study. GPs described an increase in workload over recent years, with current working days being long and intense, raising concerns over the wellbeing of GPs and patients. Full-time partnership was generally not considered to be possible, and many participants felt workload was unsustainable, particularly given the diminishing workforce. Four major themes emerged to explain increased workload: increased patient needs and expectations; a changing relationship between primary and secondary care; bureaucracy and resources; and the balance of workload within a practice. Continuity of care was perceived as being eroded by changes in contracts and working patterns to deal with workload. This study highlights the urgent need to address perceived lack of investment and clinical capacity in general practice, and suggests that managing patient expectations around what primary care can deliver, and reducing bureaucracy, have become key issues, at least until capacity issues are resolved. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  13. Inversion for sediment geoacoustic properties at the New England Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potty, Gopu R.; Miller, James H.; Lynch, James F.

    2003-10-01

    This article discusses inversions for bottom geoacoustic properties using broadband acoustic signals obtained from explosive sources. Two different inversion schemes for estimating the compressional wave speeds and attenuation are presented in this paper. In addition to these sediment parameters, source-receiver range is also estimated using the arrival time data. The experimental data used for the inversions are SUS charge explosions acquired on a vertical hydrophone array during the Shelf Break Primer Experiment conducted south of New England in the Middle Atlantic Bight in August 1996. The modal arrival times are extracted using a wavelet analysis. In the first inversion scheme, arrival times corresponding to various modes and frequencies from 10 to 200 Hz are used for the inversion of compressional wave speeds. A hybrid inversion scheme based on a genetic algorithm (GA) is used for the inversion. In an earlier study, Potty et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108(3), 973-986 (2000)] have used this hybrid scheme in a range-independent environment. In the present study results of range-dependent inversions are presented. The sound speeds in the water column and bathymetry are assumed range dependent, whereas the sediment compressional wave speeds are assumed range independent. The variations in the sound speeds in the water column are represented using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). The replica fields corresponding to the unknown parameters were constructed using adiabatic theory. In the second inversion scheme, modal attenuation coefficients are calculated using modal amplitude ratios. The ratios of the modal amplitudes are also calculated using time-frequency diagrams. A GA-based inversion scheme is used for this search. Finally, as a cross check, the computed compressional wave speeds along with the modal arrival times were used to estimate the source-receiver range. The inverted sediment properties and ranges are seen to compare well with in situ measurements

  14. Teachers' reported practices for teaching writing in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Julie E; Marshall, Chloë R; Wyse, Dominic

    To date there have been no systematic studies examining the ways in which teachers in England focus and adapt their teaching of writing. The current study addresses this gap by investigating the nature and frequency of teachers' approaches to the teaching of writing in a sample of English primary schools, using the 'simple view of writing' as a framework to examine the extent to which different aspects of the writing process are addressed. One hundred and eighty-eight staff from ten different schools responded to an online questionnaire. Only the data from class teachers (n = 88) who responded to all items on the questionnaire were included in the final analyses. Respondents enjoyed teaching writing and felt prepared to teach it. However, despite feeling that they were effective in identifying approaches to support students' writing, nearly half reported that supporting struggling writers was problematic for them. Overall teachers reported more work at word level, occurring several times a week, than with transcription, sentence or text levels, which were reported to occur weekly. Planning, reviewing and revising occurred least often, only monthly. For these variables no differences were found between teachers of younger (age 4-7) and older students (age 8-11). By contrast, an examination of specific aspects of each component revealed differences between the teachers of the two age groups. Teachers of younger students focused more frequently on phonic activities related to spelling, whereas teachers of older students focussed more on word roots, punctuation, word classes and the grammatical function of words, sentence-level work, and paragraph construction.

  15. Governing obesity policies from England, France, Germany and Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallgårda, Signild

    2015-12-01

    Defining a phenomenon as a political problem could be considered a crucial part of any political process. Body weight, when categorised as obesity, has been defined as a political problem since the beginning of the 21st century and has entered the political agenda in many countries. In this article, I present a study of four plans from four Western European countries: England, France, Germany and Scotland, identifying how obesity is defined as a political issue. The questions addressed are: How is the development in the obesity prevalence explained and who is considered responsible for the development? What are the suggested remedies and who is considered responsible for acting? All plans state that obesity is a political issue because it causes health problems; in fact, weight is almost equated to health. The English and Scottish plans present a bio-political argument, characterising obesity as a serious threat to the countries' economies. So does the German plan, but not with the same emphasis. The plans portray people with obesity as being economically harmful to their fellow citizens. The French plan expresses another concern by focussing on the discrimination and stigmatization of obese people. All plans define the physical and food environment as a crucial factor in the obesity development, but only the Scottish Government is prepared to use statutory means towards industry and other actors to achieve change. The policies convey an unresolved dilemma: To govern or not to govern? The Governments want individuals to choose for themselves, yet they try to govern the populations to choose as the Governments find appropriate. The plans have a legitimising function, showing that the Governments take the issue seriously. Accordingly, in this case, the actual problematisations seem to be less crucial.

  16. Patterns and Predictors of Recent Forest Conversion in New England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Thorn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available New England forests provide numerous benefits to the region’s residents, but are undergoing rapid development. We used boosted regression tree analysis (BRT to assess geographic predictors of forest loss to development between 2001 and 2011. BRT combines classification and regression trees with machine learning to generate non-parametric statistical models that can capture non-linear relationships. Based on National Land Cover Database (NLCD maps of land cover change, we assessed the importance of the biophysical and social variables selected for full region coverage and minimal collinearity in predicting forest loss to development, specifically: elevation, slope, distance to roads, density of highways, distance to built land, distance to cities, population density, change in population density, relative change in population density, population per housing unit, median income, state, land ownership categories and county classification as recreation or retirement counties. The resulting models explained 6.9% of the variation for 2001–2011, 4.5% for 2001–2006 and 1.8% for 2006–2011, fairly high values given the complexity of factors predicting land development and the high resolution of the spatial datasets (30-m pixels. The two most important variables in the BRT were “population density” and “distance to road”, which together made up 55.5% of the variation for 2001–2011, 49.4% for 2001–2006 and 42.9% for 2006–2011. The lower predictive power for 2006–2011 may reflect reduced development due to the “Great Recession”. From our models, we generated high-resolution probability surfaces, which can provide a key input for simulation models of forest and land cover change.

  17. Depletions in winter total ozone values over southern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapworth, A.

    1994-01-01

    A study has been made of the recently re-evaluated time series of daily total ozone values for the period 1979 to 1992 for southern England. The series consists of measurements made at two stations, Bracknell and Camborne. The series shows a steady decline in ozone values in the spring months over the period, and this is consistent with data from an earlier decade that has been published but not re-evaluated. Of exceptional note is the monthly mean for January 1992 which was very significantly reduced from the normal value, and was the lowest so far measured for this month. This winter was also noteworthy for a prolonged period during which a blocking anticyclone dominated the region, and the possibility existed that this was related to the ozone anomaly. It was possible to determine whether the origin of the low ozone value lay in ascending stratospheric motions. A linear regression analysis of ozone value deviation against 100hPa temperature deviations was used to reduce ozone values to those expected in the absence of high pressure. The assumption was made that the normal regression relation was not affected by atmospheric anomalies during the winter. This showed that vertical motions in the stratosphere only accounted for part of the ozone anomaly and that the main cause of the ozone deficit lay either in a reduced stratospheric circulation to which the anticyclone may be related or in chemical effects in the reduced stratospheric temperatures above the high pressure area. A study of the ozone time series adjusted to remove variations correlated with meteorological quantities, showed that during the period since 1979, one other winter, that of 1982/3, showed a similar although less well defined deficit in total ozone values.

  18. A survey of trauma database utilisation in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racy, M; Al-Nammari, S; Hing, C B

    2014-03-01

    Trauma registries are used worldwide to coordinate patient care as well as provide data for audit and research purposes. National registries collect this data, producing research opportunities, outcome standards and a means by which to benchmark trauma centre performance. The Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN) is the UK national registry, with data upload being mandatory from all major trauma centres (MTCs), a process which is manual and time and resource intensive. A telephone survey was carried out to collect data from all 26 MTCs in England. A questionnaire was designed to identify how data was collected at a local level, what software and methods were used and what resources were allocated to collect and upload trauma data to the TARN. Further information on hospital size and number of beds was collected from internet searches. Twenty-three MTCs were contacted in total. The majority used Microsoft Excel, with the next most common programme being Bluespier. Other commercially available registries used included Collector, VTOMS and McKesson. One trust created its own software and three used no electronic database at all. Electronic patient record integration was variable and limited to some commercially available registries. The mean number of TARN data collectors was two per centre, with a mean duration of data collection of 4.5 years. The wide range of software options and their lack of integration with the hospital electronic patient records results in the duplication of data as well as requiring time and resources. This may also be due to the difference in data required for coordinating on-going patient care and that required for upload to the TARN. Whilst some of these programmes do have the capabilities for automatic data upload, further efforts must be made to provide a cohesive system that provides the required integration and customisability in order to improve efficiency and ultimately trauma care.

  19. Myxomatosis in farmland rabbit populations in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J; Tittensor, A M; Fox, A P; Sanders, M F

    1989-10-01

    The overall pattern and consequences of myxomatosis in wild rabbit populations were studied at three farmland sites in lowland southern England and upland central Wales between 1971 and 1978. When results from all years were combined, the disease showed a clear two-peaked annual cycle, with a main autumn peak between August and January, and a subsidiary spring peak during February to April. Rabbit fleas, the main vectors of myxomatosis in Britain, were present on full-grown rabbits in sufficient numbers for transmission to occur throughout the year, but the observed seasonal pattern of the disease appeared to be influenced by seasonal mass movements of these fleas. However other factors were also important including the timing and success of the main rabbit breeding season, the proportion of rabbits which had recovered from the disease and the timing and extent of autumn rabbit mortality from other causes. Significantly more males than females, and more adults and immatures than juveniles, were observed to be infected by myxomatosis. Only 25-27% of the total populations were seen to be infected during outbreaks. Using two independent methods of calculation, it was estimated that between 47 and 69% of infected rabbits died from the disease (much lower than the expected 90-95% for fully susceptible rabbits with the partly attenuated virus strains that predominated). Thus it was estimated that 12-19% of the total rabbit populations were known to have died directly or indirectly from myxomatosis. Although the effects of myxomatosis were much less than during the 1950s and 1960s, it continued to be an important mortality factor. It may still have a regulatory effect on rabbit numbers, with autumn/winter peaks of disease reducing the numbers of rabbits present at the start of the breeding season.

  20. Medication adherence and community pharmacy: a review of education, policy and research in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford S

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this narrative review was to identify and describe the current policy, education and research related to community pharmacy and medication adherence in England.Methods: Medline, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and Pharmline were used to search for relevant research articles. Current policy documents were identified via the websites of the Department of Health in England, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain, the National Pharmacy Association, the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee and NHS Employers. All pharmacy schools in England were contacted to obtain information about the adherence-related courses they provide to undergraduate and postgraduate pharmacy students.Results: National policies and guidelines in England are conducive to an increasing role for community pharmacists to support patients with medication adherence. Many pharmacy schools cover the issue of adherence in their undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Research in this area has tested the effectiveness of pharmacists providing adherence support in the form of compliance aids, education, involvement in discharge planning, and tailored interventions. Conclusion: In community pharmacy in England, current policy and funding arrangements suggest there is great scope for pharmacists to support patients with medication adherence. Further research is necessary to identify the most useful, cost-effective and sustainable approach in practice.

  1. Guidance for commissioning NHS England dental conscious sedation services: a framework tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Conscious sedation is an integral part of modern day dental care and should be delivered through a high quality, effective and evidence-based approach. Commissioning of NHS dental services in England is currently under review by NHS England and the National Dental Commissioning Group. This group has identified the management of vulnerable people including anxious patients, as one of its priorities. The Society for the Advancement of Anaesthesia in Dentistry (SAAD) believes this provides an opportunity to influence the commissioning of NHS conscious sedation services. With this aim in mind,"Guidance for Commissioning NHS England Dental Conscious Sedation Services: A Framework Tool" was developed. This guidance proposes a common approach to the organisation of NHS dental conscious sedation services in England, advocating the provision of Tier 1 and Tier 2 services in all regions. Its ethos is a"hub and spoke" model of service delivery with patient assessment delivered by experienced and well trained dental sedationists at its core. In line with the recent Francis Report fundamental standards for all aspects of dental conscious sedation practice are outlined, supported by a robust and predictable quality assurance process. This work has been shared with key stakeholders in NHS England including the Chief Dental Officer and the Head of Primary Care Commissioning.

  2. A critical analysis of the cycles of physical activity policy in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Karen; Bauman, Adrian

    2015-02-01

    There has been increasing focus on the importance of national policy to address population levels of physical inactivity. Components of a comprehensive national physical activity policy framework include: 1) national recommendations on physical activity levels; 2) setting population goals and targets; 3) surveillance or health monitoring systems; and 4) public education. The aim of the current paper was to analyse the policy actions which have addressed each of these elements in England and to identify areas of progress and remaining challenges. A literature search was undertaken to identify past and present documents relevant to physical activity policy in England. Each document was analysed to identify content relevant to the four key elements of policy which formed the focus of the current research. Physical activity recommendations are an area where England has demonstrated a robust scientific approach and good practice; however, the physical activity campaigns in England have not been sufficiently sustained to achieve changes in social norms and behaviour. The setting of physical activity targets has been unrealistic and continuous changes to national surveillance measures have presented challenges for monitoring trends over time. Overall, physical activity policy in England has fluctuated over the past two decades. The variations and cycles in policy reflect some of the challenges in implementing and sustaining physical activity policy in the face of political changes, changes in government direction, and changing opportunities to profile active lifestyles.

  3. TestMeEast: a campaign to increase HIV testing in hospitals and to reduce late diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, R; O'Connell, R; Lascar, M; Ferrand, R; Strachan, S; Matin, N; Bassnet, I; Orkin, C

    2016-01-01

    Late diagnosis occurs in almost half of those diagnosed in the UK (HIV Prevention England, 2013. Retrieved June 22, 2014, from HIV Prevention England: http://www.hivpreventionengland.org.uk/Campaigns-Current/National-HIV-Testing-Week ). Testing occurs mainly in sexual health and antenatal clinics despite recommendations to test more broadly [Ellis, S., & Curtis, H. (2012). HIV diagnoses and missed opportunities. Results of the British HIV association (BHIVA) National Audit 2010. Clinical Medicine, 12(5), 430-434]. We report the findings of an HIV-testing week campaign to offer testing to those who have blood tests as part of routine care within outpatient clinics and emergency departments of six London hospitals. The campaign target was to test 500 patients a day during the 2013 National HIV Testing Week (NHTW). Clinic staff and medical students were trained to offer routine HIV testing. Linkage to care was arranged for those who tested HIV-positive. During NHTW we tested 2402 of the planned 2500 test target. 2402/4317 (55.6% 95% CI 54.1-57.1%) of those who had routine blood tests were tested for HIV. There were eight HIV-positive tests; three were new diagnoses (all linked to care). The campaign hashtag #TestMeEast achieved a total Twitter "reach" of 238, 860 and the campaign had widespread news coverage. Our campaign showed that staff and students could be trained and mobilised to do thousands of routine HIV tests during a campaign.

  4. Prevalence of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS in three regions of England: a repeated cross-sectional study in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayyaz Shagufta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS has been used to name a range of chronic conditions characterized by extreme fatigue and other disabling symptoms. Attempts to estimate the burden of disease have been limited by selection bias, and by lack of diagnostic biomarkers and of agreed reproducible case definitions. We estimated the prevalence and incidence of ME/CFS in three regions in England, and discussed the implications of frequency statistics and the use of different case definitions for health and social care planning and for research. Methods We compared the clinical presentation, prevalence and incidence of ME/CFS based on a sample of 143,000 individuals aged 18 to 64 years, covered by primary care services in three regions of England. Case ascertainment involved: 1 electronic search for chronic fatigue cases; 2 direct questioning of general practitioners (GPs on cases not previously identified by the search; and 3 clinical review of identified cases according to CDC-1994, Canadian and Epidemiological Case (ECD Definitions. This enabled the identification of cases with high validity. Results The estimated minimum prevalence rate of ME/CFS was 0.2% for cases meeting any of the study case definitions, 0.19% for the CDC-1994 definition, 0.11% for the Canadian definition and 0.03% for the ECD. The overall estimated minimal yearly incidence was 0.015%. The highest rates were found in London and the lowest in East Yorkshire. All but one of the cases conforming to the Canadian criteria also met the CDC-1994 criteria, however presented higher prevalence and severity of symptoms. Conclusions ME/CFS is not uncommon in England and represents a significant burden to patients and society. The number of people with chronic fatigue who do not meet specific criteria for ME/CFS is higher still. Both groups have high levels of need for service provision, including health and social

  5. Politics, Society and Communication in the Constitution of Modern Society: Early Modern England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devrim ÖZKAN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The inception of Modern England comprises a hundred and fifty years between sixteenth and mid eighteenth centuries. The structural qualities of modern societies of this day occur in this era. The political and economic changes and transformations that England experienced in this period of time are in enormous scale. In this period all social structure and institutions experienced structural change in terms of cultural, economic and political processes. In addition to this in this period the framework of the international system regarding economy and politics is established too. Important qualities of current modern societies are the speed of communication and interaction between its elements, its transformational capacity and the extent of its scope. In this, it is possible to apprehend the basic cornerstones of today’s information and communication age by analyzing the early modern period of England

  6. The direct cost of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Rajesh; Scott, Anne; Rayman, Gerry

    2015-08-01

    The cost of intravenous insulin infusion to the NHS is unknown. The aim of this study was to estimate the direct cost of insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales in the first 24-hour period of infusion. Data from the National Inpatient Diabetes Audit 2013 in the UK were used to estimate the number of insulin infusions in use across England and Wales. Costs were calculated for six models for setting up and maintenance of insulin infusions, depending on the extent of involvement of different healthcare professionals in the UK. In this study, the direct costs of intravenous insulin infusions to the NHS in England and Wales have been estimated to vary from £6.4-8.5 million in the first 24-hour period on infusion. More appropriate use of these infusions could result in substantial cost savings.

  7. Short-term international migration trends in England and Wales from 2004 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Simon; Loukas, Konstantinos; McGregor, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Short-term migration estimates for England and Wales are the latest addition to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) migration statistics. This article discusses definitions of short-term migration and the methodology that is used to produce the estimates. Some of the estimates and the changes in the estimates over time are then discussed. The article includes previously unpublished short-term migration statistics and therefore helps to give a more complete picture of the size and characteristics of short-term international migration for England and Wales than has previously been possible. ONS have identified a clear user requirement for short-term migration estimates at local authority (LA) level. Consequently, attention is also paid to the progress that has been made and future work that is planned to distribute England and Wales short-term migration estimates to LA level.

  8. 77 FR 72846 - H.Q. Energy Services (U.S.) Inc. v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission H.Q. Energy Services (U.S.) Inc. v. ISO New England Inc.; Notice of....S.) Inc. (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against ISO New England Inc....

  9. 75 FR 18828 - PSEG Power Connecticut LLC, Complainant v. ISO New England Inc., Respondent; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PSEG Power Connecticut LLC, Complainant v. ISO New England Inc., Respondent... (Complainant) filed a formal complaint against ISO New England Inc. (Respondent) challenging the justness...

  10. The Future of New England. 1987 Survey of Business, Government and Higher Education Leaders. State by State Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England Board of Higher Education, Boston, MA.

    Information from the 1987 Future of New England survey is presented, gaining the perspectives of the region's business, higher education, and government leaders about five major areas of concern to the New England states: economic growth, internationalization of the economy, education and training, environmental concerns, and public policy…

  11. Launching the next Industrial Revolution in New England: New Hampshire's Green Launching Pad 1.0 and 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittell, Ross; Venkatachalam, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    There is an exciting new opportunity for universities and colleges to advance the New England economy and at the same time help address environmental concerns. The current snapshot of New England's economy relative to other areas is favorable. The region suffered less decline during the recent recession than the national average, and the region's…

  12. Lost in Transition? A Comparison of Early "Drop Out" from Education and Training in England and France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Carol; Blaya, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    It is argued that the social control function of education and training is becoming increasingly explicit in England and France. Education and training can be viewed as a form of custody for young people, with enforced participation post 16 planned in the near future in England. Compulsory education for this age group is not currently planned in…

  13. Regional risk factors for health inequalities in Scotland and England and the "Scottish effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Nicola Jane

    2009-09-01

    This paper uses data from the Scottish Health Survey 2003 and the comparable Health Survey for England 2003 to look at whether Scotland's poor health image and mortality profile is reflected in regional inequalities in prevalence of four risk factors for cardiovascular disease: fruit and vegetable consumption, smoking, obesity and diabetes. It also looks at the "Scottish effect" - how much of any difference between and within Scotland and England remains once socio-demographic factors have been taken in to account. The paper then uses regional analyses to determine the extent to which areas within England and Scotland contribute to their national health advantage and disadvantage. All 2003 strategic health authorities in England and Scottish health boards were compared with Greater Glasgow health board as the reference category. The results showed that significant geographic variation in the risk factors remained once individual economic status was taken into account, but the relationship was complex and varied in strength and direction depending upon risk factor involved and gender of respondent. A small number of areas had significantly lower odds of fruit and vegetable consumption of five portions or more a day in men, compared with Greater Glasgow. In contrast some areas had significantly higher odds of fruit and vegetable consumption for women compared with Greater Glasgow. There was greater geographic variation in the odds of smoking in women than in men. Respondents in the south west and southeast of England (areas which usually show health advantage) did not show significantly lower odds of smoking compared with Greater Glasgow once socio-economic variation, age and urban residence was taken into account. It was respondents from central England that had lower odds of smoking than might be expected. Obesity stood out as the single risk factor that had demonstrated a "Scottish effect" in women only.

  14. Ethnic group variations in alcohol-related hospital admissions in England: does place matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Eleanor; Laverty, Anthony A; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The health burden of alcohol use is socially and geographically patterned in many countries. Less is known about variations in this burden between ethnic groups and whether this differs across place of residence. National cross-sectional study using hospital admission data in England. Alcohol-related admission rates, where an alcohol-related condition was either the primary diagnosis (considered as the reason for admission) or a comorbidity, were calculated using ethnic group specific rates for English regions. In 2010/11 there were a total of 264,870 alcohol-related admissions in England. Admission rates were higher in the North of England than elsewhere (e.g. for primary diagnosis 161 per 100,000 population in the North vs. 62 per 100,000 in the South). These patterns were not uniform across ethnic groups however. For example, admission rates for alcohol-related comorbidity were four times higher among White Irish in London compared with those in the South of England (306 to 76 per 100,000) and four times higher in Indians living in the Midlands compared with those in the South of England (128 to 29 per 100,000). These patterns were similar for admissions with a comorbid alcohol-related condition. Geographical location may be an important determinant of within and between ethnic group variations in alcohol-related hospital admissions in England. While a number of factors were not examined here, this descriptive analysis suggests that this heterogeneity should be taken into account when planning interventions and services for the prevention and management of alcohol misuse.

  15. New England Energy Congress project. Final report, June 1978-July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-11-20

    From May 1978 until April 1979, 120 New Englanders volunteered for one of six committees to devise and consider energy policy recommendations for the region's twenty-five Member, six state Congressional delegation. Sponsored by the New England Congressional Caucus and Tufts University, the New England Energy Congress was funded by grants from the Economic Development Administration, US Department of Commerce and the Office of Environment, US Department of Energy. The results of the work of the 120 delegates and nine staff was a 500 page report, Blueprint for Energy Action, containing over 150 policy recommendations to the Congress, Executive agencies, state legislatures and municipalities. The New England Congressional Caucus responded in June 1979 with an Energy Package, including twenty (and ultimately twenty-five) legislative bills and several letters to federal agencies, based on the recommendations of the Energy Congress. Following the release of the report in June 1979, 55 delegates continued their efforts as members of the Implementation Group of the Energy Congress. In July 1980, this group released a volume of Strategy Papers designed to assist in the implementation of Energy Congress recommendations. As a result of this work, a broad array of energy activities were initiated in New England and in Washington. By January 1981, 20 of the 25 bills in the Caucus package had been passed in whole or in part. This final report discusses the Energy Congress' activities, consensus decision-making process and its findings. The report reviews the results of a thorough evaluation conducted through the mail and by phone of participants, outside observers and from Capital Hill. The clear conclusion is that the Energy Congress made a unique and significant contribution towards enabling New Englanders, both in the region and in Washington, to set energy goals and priorities and to begin serious efforts to reduce the region's precarious dependence on oil imports.

  16. The great East Japan earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, R.

    2011-06-15

    'Full text:' More formally called the Tohoku-Chihou-Taiheiyo-Oki Earthquake of March 11, 2011, it was the ensuing tsunami that caused the most death and destruction to the north-east coastal region of Japan. It is also what caused the multiple meltdowns at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Reactor Unit 1, ironically, was scheduled to be permanently shut down for decommissioning just two weeks later. The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant has a tsunami protection barrier designed for the worst recorded tsunami in that area since 1896 - to a height of 5.7 m. The plant itself is on an elevated grade of about 10 m. The tsunami, reported to be 14-15 m, caused inundation of the entire site with at least four metres of seawater. The seawater flooded the turbine building and damaged electrical equipment including the emergency diesel generators, leaving the entire six-unit nuclear power plan without any source of AC power, known as the 'station blackout scenario'. There are numerous reports available on-line at various sites. The Japanese Government report is frank and forthcoming on the causes and the lessons learned, and the lAEA Mission report is in-depth and well presented, not only as a factual account of the events but as a unified source of the conclusions and lessons learned. Photos of the catastrophe are available at the TEPCO web site: http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/index-e.html. In this edition of the Bulletin there is a 'layman's' description of CANDU and BWR design in terms of the fundamental safety principles - Control, Cool and Contain as well as a description of how these principles were met, or not met at Fukushima Dai-ichi. Also, an excerpt from the IAEA Expert Mission is included. We 'technocrats' sometimes forget about the human aspects of a nuclear disaster. An essay by Dr. Michael Edwards is included entitled 'Psychology, Philosophy and Nuclear Science'. Other references to the events appear throughout this

  17. Assessment of conventional oil resources of the East African Rift Province, East Africa, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2017-03-27

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean conventional resources of 13.4 billion barrels of oil and 4.6 trillion cubic feet of gas in the East African Rift Province of east Africa.

  18. Is education the best contraception: the case of teenage pregnancy in England?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girma, Sourafel; Paton, David

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines potential explanations for recent declines in teenage pregnancy in England. We estimate panel data models of teenage conception, birth and abortion rates from regions in England. Although point estimates are consistent with the promotion of long acting reversible contraception (LARC) having a negative impact on teenage pregnancy rates, the effects are generally small and statistically insignificant. In contrast, improvements in educational achievement and, to a lesser extent, increases in the non-white proportion of the population are associated with large and statistically significant reductions in teenage pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Malthus in cointegration space: evidence of a post-Malthusian pre-industrial England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels Framroze; Sharp, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper re-examines the interaction between population growth and income per capita in pre-industrial England. Our results suggest that, as early as two centuries preceding the Industrial Revolution, England had already escaped the Malthusian Epoch and entered a post-Malthusian regime, where i...... can be interpreted as an extension of the latter model where the negative Malthusian feedback effect from population on income, as implied by diminishing returns to labor, is offset by a positive Boserupian and/or Smithian scale effect of population on technology....

  20. The rise of agrarian capitalism and the decline of family farming in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Taylor, Leigh

    2012-01-01

    Historians have documented rising farm sizes throughout the period 1450–1850. Existing studies have revealed much about the mechanisms underlying the development of agrarian capitalism. However, we currently lack any consensus as to when the critical developments occurred. This is largely due to the absence of sufficiently large and geographically wide-ranging datasets but is also attributable to conceptual weaknesses in much of the literature. This article develops a new approach to the problem and argues that agrarian capitalism was dominant in southern and eastern England by 1700 but that in northern England the critical developments came later.