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Sample records for east african trypanosomiasis

  1. Addendum to East African trypanosomiasis in Nkhotakota District

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Y. Nyasulu, Disease Control Coordinator,. Ministry of Health is f't'ganizing future trypanoso- miasis control acti\\ffties. Donors are being ident- ifyied to implement a control-programme and to start training sessions. A clinical trial of a new trypanosomiasis drug (D.F.M.O.) may be under- taken at Nkhotakota District Hospital.

  2. The history of African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steverding Dietmar

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The prehistory of African trypanosomiasis indicates that the disease may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of hominids. Ancient history and medieval history reveal that African trypanosomiasis affected the lives of people living in sub-Saharan African at all times. Modern history of African trypanosomiasis revolves around the identification of the causative agents and the mode of transmission of the infection, and the development of drugs for treatment and methods for control of the disease. From the recent history of sleeping sickness we can learn that the disease can be controlled but probably not be eradicated. Current history of human African trypanosomiasis has shown that the production of anti-sleeping sickness drugs is not always guaranteed, and therefore, new, better and cheaper drugs are urgently required.

  3. Reproductive disorders in African trypanosomiasis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikede, B O; Elhassan, E; Akpavie, S O

    1988-03-01

    Reproductive disorders are frequently seen in human beings and in animals infected with tsetse-transmitted (African)trypanosomiasis. The disorders include irregular menstrual (or oestrus) cycle, infertility, abortion and impotence. Intrauterine infections occasionally occur, resulting in still birth or neonatal mortality. The changes are essentially reversible after treatment, although recovery may take several months.

  4. Evaluating paratransgenesis as a potential control strategy for African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Medlock

    Full Text Available Genetic-modification strategies are currently being developed to reduce the transmission of vector-borne diseases, including African trypanosomiasis. For tsetse, the vector of African trypanosomiasis, a paratransgenic strategy is being considered: this approach involves modification of the commensal symbiotic bacteria Sodalis to express trypanosome-resistance-conferring products. Modified Sodalis can then be driven into the tsetse population by cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI from Wolbachia bacteria. To evaluate the effectiveness of this paratransgenic strategy in controlling African trypanosomiasis, we developed a three-species mathematical model of trypanosomiasis transmission among tsetse, humans, and animal reservoir hosts. Using empirical estimates of CI parameters, we found that paratransgenic tsetse have the potential to eliminate trypanosomiasis, provided that any extra mortality caused by Wolbachia colonization is low, that the paratransgene is effective at protecting against trypanosome transmission, and that the target tsetse species comprises a large majority of the tsetse population in the release location.

  5. Mathematical models of human african trypanosomiasis epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Kat S; Stone, Chris M; Hastings, Ian M; Keeling, Matt J; Torr, Steve J; Chitnis, Nakul

    2015-03-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), commonly called sleeping sickness, is caused by Trypanosoma spp. and transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp.). HAT is usually fatal if untreated and transmission occurs in foci across sub-Saharan Africa. Mathematical modelling of HAT began in the 1980s with extensions of the Ross-Macdonald malaria model and has since consisted, with a few exceptions, of similar deterministic compartmental models. These models have captured the main features of HAT epidemiology and provided insight on the effectiveness of the two main control interventions (treatment of humans and tsetse fly control) in eliminating transmission. However, most existing models have overestimated prevalence of infection and ignored transient dynamics. There is a need for properly validated models, evolving with improved data collection, that can provide quantitative predictions to help guide control and elimination strategies for HAT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug resistance in human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael P; Vincent, Isabel M; Burchmore, Richard J S; Kazibwe, Anne J N; Matovu, Enock

    2011-09-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or 'sleeping sickness' is a neglected tropical disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. A decade of intense international cooperation has brought the incidence to fewer than 10,000 reported cases per annum with anti-trypanosomal drugs, particularly against stage 2 disease where the CNS is involved, being central to control. Treatment failures with melarsoprol started to appear in the 1990s and their incidence has risen sharply in many foci. Loss of plasma membrane transporters involved in drug uptake, particularly the P2 aminopurine transporter and also a transporter termed the high affinity pentamidine transporter, relate to melarsoprol resistance selected in the laboratory. The same two transporters are also responsible for the uptake of the stage 1 drug pentamidine and, to varying extents, other diamidines. However, reports of treatment failures with pentamidine have been rare from the field. Eflornithine (difluoromethylornithine) has replaced melarsoprol as first-line treatment in many regions. However, a need for protracted and complicated drug dosing regimens slowed widespread implementation of eflornithine monotherapy. A combination of eflornithine with nifurtimox substantially decreases the required dose and duration of eflornithine administration and this nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy has enjoyed rapid implementation. Unfortunately, selection of resistance to eflornithine in the laboratory is relatively easy (through loss of an amino acid transporter believed to be involved in its uptake), as is selection of resistance to nifurtimox. The first anecdotal reports of treatment failures with eflornithine monotherapy are emerging from some foci. The possibility that parasites resistant to melarsoprol on the one hand, and eflornithine on the other, are present in the field indicates that genes capable of conferring drug resistance to both drugs are in circulation. If new drugs, that act in ways that will not

  7. Immunophenotypic lymphocyte profiles in human african trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Boda

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is a deadly vector-born disease caused by an extracellular parasite, the trypanosome. Little is known about the cellular immune responses elicited by this parasite in humans. We used multiparameter flow cytometry to characterize leukocyte immunophenotypes in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of 33 HAT patients and 27 healthy controls identified during a screening campaign in Angola and Gabon. We evaluated the subsets and activation markers of B and T lymphocytes. Patients had a higher percentage of CD19+ B lymphocytes and activated B lymphocytes in the blood than did controls, but lacked activated CD4+ T lymphocytes (CD25+. Patients displayed no increase in the percentage of activated CD8+ T cells (HLA-DR+, CD69+ or CD25+, but memory CD8 T-cell levels (CD8+CD45RA2 were significantly lower in patients than in controls, as were effector CD8 T-cell levels (CD8+CD45RA+CD62L2. No relationship was found between these blood immunophenotypes and disease severity (stage 1 vs 2. However, CD19+ B-cell levels in the CSF increased with disease severity. The patterns of T and B cell activation in HAT patients suggest that immunomodulatory mechanisms may operate during infection. Determinations of CD19+ B-cell levels in the CSF could improve disease staging.

  8. Immunology and immunopathology of African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Vincendeau

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Major modifications of immune system have been observed in African trypanosomiasis. These immune reactions do not lead to protection and are also involved in immunopathology disorders. The major surface component (variable surface glycoprotein,VSG is associated with escape to immune reactions, cytokine network dysfunctions and autoantibody production. Most of our knowledge result from experimental trypanosomiasis. Innate resistance elements have been characterised. In infected mice, VSG preferentially stimulates a Th 1-cell subset. A response of gd and CD8 T cells to trypanosome antigens was observed in trypanotolerant cattle. An increase in CD5 B cells, responsible for most serum IgM and production of autoantibodies has been noted in infected cattle. Macrophages play important roles in trypanosomiasis, in synergy with antibodies (phagocytosis and by secreting various molecules (radicals, cytokines, prostaglandins,.... Trypanosomes are highly sensitive to TNF-alpha, reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates. TNF-alpha is also involved in cachexia. IFN-gamma acts as a parasite growth factor. These various elements contribute to immunosuppression. Trypanosomes have learnt to use immune mechanisms to its own profit. Recent data show the importance of alternative macrophage activation, including arginase induction. L-ornithine produced by host arginase is essential to parasite growth. All these data reflect the deep insight into the immune system realised by trypanosomes and might suggest interference therapeutic approaches.Modificações importantes no sistema imune são observadas na tripanosomíase Africana. Essas reações imunológicas não protegem e estão envolvidas em distúrbios imunopatológicos. O principal componente de superfície (glicoproteína variante de superfície, VSG está associado à evasão das respostas imune, às disfunções da rede de citocinas e à produção de autoanticorpos. Muitos de nossos conhecimentos resultam

  9. [Blood proteins in African trypanosomiasis: variations and statistical interpretations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailliez, M; Poupin, F; Pages, J P; Savel, J

    1982-01-01

    The estimation of blood orosomucoid, haptoglobin, C-reactive protein and immunoglobulins levels, has enable us to prove a specific proteic profile in the human african trypanosomiasis, as compared with other that of parasitic diseases, and with an healthy african reference group. Data processing informatique by principal components analysis, provide a valuable pool for epidemiological surveys.

  10. Knowledge and prevalence of Human African Trypanosomiasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We administered structured questionnaire on Knowledge, practices relating to HAT prevention and screened for HAT using card agglutination test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT). Knowledge of HAT was scored 0-5 and categorized good (3-5) and poor (0-2) based on score, predisposition to risk of HAT as exposure to ≥two ...

  11. Study of African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    isolates from Turkana are needed for cnzyme comparisons with the dog strain and with otherKenyan strains. A total of 38 human cases of visceral...the Home Bay Hospital, Kenya, December 1980. The patient had been infected by fly bite in the Lambwe Valley, South Nyanza District, near Lake Victoria...African Medical Research Foundation Hydatid Project - Turkana District. and the International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology sandfly studies

  12. The detection and treatment of human African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouteille B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bernard Bouteille,1 Alain Buguet21Laboratory of Parasitology, Dupuytren University Hospital of Limoges, France; 2Polyclinic Marie-Louise Poto-Djembo, Pointe-Noire, CongoAbstract: Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is caused by the injection of Trypanosoma brucei (T. b. gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense by Glossina, the tsetse fly. Three historical eras followed the exclusive clinical approach of the 19th century. At the turn of the century, the “initial research” era was initiated because of the dramatic spread of HAT throughout intertropical Africa, and scientists discovered the agent and its vector. Two entities, recurrent fever and sleeping sickness, were then considered a continuum between hemolymphatic stage 1 and meningoencephalitic stage 2. Treatments were developed. Soon after World War I, specific services and mobile teams were created, initiating the “epidemiological” era, during which populations were visited, screened, and treated. As a result, by 1960, annual new cases were rare. New mass screening and staging tools were then developed in a third, “modern” era, especially to counter a new epidemic wave. Currently, diagnosis still relies on microscopic detection of trypanosomes without (wet and thick blood films or with concentration techniques (capillary tube centrifugation, miniature anion-exchange centrifugation technique. Staging is a vital step.Stage 1 patients are treated on site with pentamidine or suramin. However, stage 2 patients are treated in specialized facilities, using drugs that are highly toxic and/or that require complex administration procedures (melarsoprol, eflornithine, or nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy. Suramin and melarsoprol are the only medications active against Rhodesian HAT. Staging still relies on cerebrospinal fluid examination for trypanosome detection and white blood cell counts: stage 1, absence of trypanosomes, white blood cell counts ≤ 5/µL; stage 2, presence of

  13. Chemotherapy for second-stage human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutje, Vittoria; Seixas, Jorge; Kennedy, Adrian

    2013-06-28

    Human African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, is a painful and protracted disease affecting people in the poorest parts of Africa and is fatal without treatment. Few drugs are currently available for second-stage sleeping sickness, with considerable adverse events and variable efficacy. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of drugs for treating second-stage human African trypanosomiasis. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (January 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library Issue 12 2012) , MEDLINE (1966 to January 2013), EMBASE (1974 to January 2013), LILACS (1982 to January 2013 ), BIOSIS (1926-January 2013), mRCT (January 2013) and reference lists. We contacted researchers working in the field and organizations. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials including adults and children with second-stage HAT, treated with anti-trypanosomal drugs. Two authors (VL and AK) extracted data and assessed methodological quality; a third author (JS) acted as an arbitrator. Included trials only reported dichotomous outcomes, and we present these as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Nine trials with 2577 participants, all with Trypansoma brucei gambiense HAT, were included. Seven trials tested currently available drugs: melarsoprol, eflornithine, nifurtimox, alone or in combination; one trial tested pentamidine, and one trial assessed the addition of prednisolone to melarsoprol. The frequency of death and number of adverse events were similar between patients treated with fixed 10-day regimens of melarsoprol or 26-days regimens. Melarsoprol monotherapy gave fewer relapses than pentamidine or nifurtimox, but resulted in more adverse events.Later trials evaluate nifurtimox combined with eflornithine (NECT), showing this gives few relapses and is well tolerated. It also has practical advantages in reducing the frequency and number of eflornithine slow infusions to twice a day, thus easing the burden on health

  14. Expression and role of CXCL10 during the encephalitic stage of experimental and clinical African trypanosomiasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Daniel N; Rottenberg, Martin E; Thomsen, Allan R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human African trypanosomiasis, caused by Trypanosoma brucei, involves an early hemolymphatic stage followed by a late encephalitic stage. METHODS: We studied the expression of chemokines with use of microarray and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in T. brucei brucei-infected mice...... and in patients with human African trypanosomiasis and examined their role in controlling brain accumulation of T cells and parasites. RESULTS: The messenger RNAs (mRNAs) encoding CXCR3 ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10 demonstrated the greatest increases among chemokines in brain specimens of infected mice, as determined...... accumulation of trypanosomes and T cells in the brain parenchyma but similar parasitemia levels, compared with wild-type mice. CXCL10 and IFN-gamma levels were increased in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with late stage but not early stage human African trypanosomiasis. Levels of CXCL10 in patients...

  15. [The distribution of sleep and wakefulness in human African trypanosomiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buguet, A; Bert, J; Tapie, P; Bogui, P; Doua, F; Mouanga, G; Stanghellini, A; Sarda, J; Tabaraud, F; Gati, R

    1994-01-01

    Last century, patients with human African trypanosomiasis were described as sleepy by day and restless by night, and physicians referred to this condition as sleeping sickness. Such a description could have evoked a disturbance of circadian rhythms. However, it is only in 1989 that the first 24-hour recording was performed by our team in Niamey (Niger) in a patient with sleeping sickness. The patient was a Niger-born farm worker who had contracted the disease near Gagnoa (Côte d'Ivoire). Polysomnographic recordings (electroencephalogram, EEG, electrooculogram, electromyogram, electrocardiogram, buccal and nasal airflow, and chest respiratory movements) showed a disappearance of the circadian distribution of sleep and wakefulness, which tended to occur evenly throughout day and night, with a sleep-wake alternation of approximately 80 minutes. Two investigations were conducted thereafter. The first one was done at Daloa (Côte d'Ivoire) in 8 patients who were recorded during two 24-hour periods, with and without hourly blood samples; the second at Brazzaville (Congo) in 10 patients recorded for 24 hours before and after treatment with melarsoprol. All patients were at the stage of early meningoencephalitis. At Daloa, polysomnographic recordings were taken on two 8-channel EEG machines (Alvar Minihuit, and T3-ECEM), as well as on a portable Oxford Medilog 9000 system from the same electrodes. Sleep and wake structure was altered in the most severely sick patient, the EEG trace being loaded with slow waves. Stages 1 and 2, and stages 3 and 4 could not be distinguished from one another. In the other patients, all sleep stages were easily scored. No difference was seen between recordings, regarding blood collection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Determinants of Human African Trypanosomiasis Elimination via Paratransgenesis.

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    Jennifer A Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, transmitted by tsetse flies, has historically infected hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last decade, concerted control efforts have reduced reported cases to below 10,000 annually, bringing complete elimination within reach. A potential technology to eliminate HAT involves rendering the flies resistant to trypanosome infection. This approach can be achieved through the introduction of transgenic Sodalis symbiotic bacteria that have been modified to produce a trypanocide, and propagated via Wolbachia symbionts, which confer a reproductive advantage to the paratransgenic tsetse. However, the population dynamics of these symbionts within tsetse flies have not yet been evaluated. Specifically, the key factors that determine the effectiveness of paratransgenesis have yet to be quantified. To identify the impact of these determinants on T.b. gambiense and T.b. rhodesiense transmission, we developed a mathematical model of trypanosome transmission that incorporates tsetse and symbiont population dynamics. We found that fecundity and mortality penalties associated with Wolbachia or recombinant Sodalis colonization, probabilities of vertical transmission, and tsetse migration rates are fundamental to the feasibility of HAT elimination. For example, we determined that HAT elimination could be sustained over 25 years when Wolbachia colonization minimally impacted fecundity or mortality, and when the probability of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission exceeded 99.9%. We also found that for a narrow range of recombinant Sodalis vertical transmission probability (99.9-90.6% for T.b. gambiense and 99.9-85.8% for T.b. rhodesiense, cumulative HAT incidence was reduced between 30% and 1% for T.b. gambiense and between 21% and 3% for T.b. rhodesiense, although elimination was not predicted. Our findings indicate that fitness and mortality penalties associated with paratransgenic

  17. 79 A retrospective study of Human African Trypanosomiasis in three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study was conducted in three Malawian districts: Nkhotakota, Rumphi and Kasungu to describe the prevalence of HAT. Hospital laboratory registers from January 2000 to December 2006 were used. The calculated annual district prevalence of Trypanosomiasis ranged from 0.29 cases per 100,000.

  18. [Some new cases of congenital human African trypanosomiasis (T. gambiense) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, G; Testa, G; Triolo, N; Trova, P; Cramet, B

    1979-01-01

    The authors report three cases of congenital transmission of T. gambiense. In two cases, the parasite has been found in the blood of the umbilical cord. In the third case, it has been found twenty hours after birth in the peripherical blood of a new born child whose mother was affected by trypanosomiasis. They report also two cases of pregnant mothers with sleeping sickness, whose children were born-unaffected by the disease. The authors believe that the placental transmission of the human african trypanosomiasis is more frequent than thought.

  19. East African Medical journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    312 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL JulyZOO7. East African Medical journal Vol. 84 N0. 7 Iuly 2007. MANAGEMENT PATHWAY FOR CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL,. NAIROBI. M.N. Awori, MBChB, MMed (Surg), Tutorial Fellow, S.W.O. Ogendo, MBChB, MMed (Surg), Associate.

  20. Aparasitemic serological suspects in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis : a potential human reservoir of parasites ?

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Denizot, M.; Courtin, D.; Garcia, André; Lejon, V.; Buscher, P.; Cuny, Gérard; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The serological and parasitological tests used for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) diagnosis have low specificity and sensitivity, respectively, and in the field, control program teams are faced with subjects with positive serology but negative parasitology who remain untreated. The aim of this work was to explore, using PCR tool, the significance of these aparasitemic serological suspects. Since discordant PCR results have been observed earlier with different...

  1. Genome sequence of the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans ): Vector of African trypanosomiasis

    KAUST Repository

    Watanabe, Junichi

    2014-04-24

    Tsetse flies are the sole vectors of human African trypanosomiasis throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Both sexes of adult tsetse feed exclusively on blood and contribute to disease transmission. Notable differences between tsetse and other disease vectors include obligate microbial symbioses, viviparous reproduction, and lactation. Here, we describe the sequence and annotation of the 366-megabase Glossina morsitans morsitans genome. Analysis of the genome and the 12,308 predicted protein-encoding genes led to multiple discoveries, including chromosomal integrations of bacterial (Wolbachia) genome sequences, a family of lactation-specific proteins, reduced complement of host pathogen recognition proteins, and reduced olfaction/chemosensory associated genes. These genome data provide a foundation for research into trypanosomiasis prevention and yield important insights with broad implications for multiple aspects of tsetse biology.

  2. Human african trypanosomiasis diagnosis in first-line health services of endemic countries, a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mitashi

    Full Text Available While the incidence of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT is decreasing, the control approach is shifting from active population screening by mobile teams to passive case detection in primary care centers. We conducted a systematic review of the literature between 1970 and 2011 to assess which diagnostic tools are most suitable for use in first-line health facilities in endemic countries. Our search retrieved 16 different screening and confirmation tests for HAT. The thermostable format of the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT test was the most appropriate screening test. Lateral flow antibody detection tests could become alternative screening tests in the near future. Confirmation of HAT diagnosis still depends on visualizing the parasite in direct microscopy. All other currently available confirmation tests are either technically too demanding and/or lack sensitivity and thus rather inappropriate for use at health center level. Novel applications of molecular tests may have potential for use at district hospital level.

  3. The changing epidemiology of human African trypanosomiasis among patients from nonendemic countries--1902-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami Neuberger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is uncommon among patients from non-endemic countries (NEC, there has been an increase in the number of cases reported in recent years. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed. The number of incoming tourists to HAT endemic countries was obtained from the United Nations World Tourism Organization. All HAT cases diagnosed in patients from NEC were included. Immigrants and refugees were excluded. We compared patients during and after the colonial period, and analyzed the relationship between the number of incoming travellers and the number of HAT cases. RESULTS: Between 1902 and 2012, HAT was reported in 244 patients. Most HAT cases were reported before 1920, and after the year 2000. In the colonial era the average age of patients was lower (32.5±7.8 vs. 43.0±16.1 years, P<0.001, the proportion of females was lower (10.0% vs. 23.9%, P<0.01], most cases were diagnosed in expatriates, missionaries and soldiers (74.3%, and Gambian trypanosomiasis accounted for 86/110, (78% of cases. In the post-colonial era most patients 91/125 (72.8% were short-term tourists to game parks in Eastern and South-Eastern Africa (mainly in Tanzania; Rhodesian trypanosomiasis accounted for 94/123 (76.4% of cases. Between 1995 and 2010 there has been a constant linear increase in the number of incoming tourists to Tanzania, and HAT cases occurred in small outbreaks rather than following a similar linear pattern. CONCLUSIONS: In recent decades HAT patients from NEC are older, and more likely to be tourists who acquired the disease while visiting game-parks in Eastern and South-Eastern Africa. While Rhodesian trypanosomiasis is relatively uncommon among Africans, it now accounts for most cases reported among patients from NEC. Returning febrile travellers without an alternative diagnosis should be evaluated for HAT. Cases among travellers may serve as sentinels for Rhodesian trypanosomiasis "hot

  4. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

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    Juan D Unciti-Broceta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  5. Predicting the effect of climate change on African trypanosomiasis: integrating epidemiology with parasite and vector biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sean; Shrestha, Sourya; Tomlinson, Kyle W; Vuong, Holly

    2012-05-07

    Climate warming over the next century is expected to have a large impact on the interactions between pathogens and their animal and human hosts. Vector-borne diseases are particularly sensitive to warming because temperature changes can alter vector development rates, shift their geographical distribution and alter transmission dynamics. For this reason, African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness), a vector-borne disease of humans and animals, was recently identified as one of the 12 infectious diseases likely to spread owing to climate change. We combine a variety of direct effects of temperature on vector ecology, vector biology and vector-parasite interactions via a disease transmission model and extrapolate the potential compounding effects of projected warming on the epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis. The model predicts that epidemics can occur when mean temperatures are between 20.7°C and 26.1°C. Our model does not predict a large-range expansion, but rather a large shift of up to 60 per cent in the geographical extent of the range. The model also predicts that 46-77 million additional people may be at risk of exposure by 2090. Future research could expand our analysis to include other environmental factors that influence tsetse populations and disease transmission such as humidity, as well as changes to human, livestock and wildlife distributions. The modelling approach presented here provides a framework for using the climate-sensitive aspects of vector and pathogen biology to predict changes in disease prevalence and risk owing to climate change.

  6. Selective primary health care: strategies for control of disease in the developing world. VIII. African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, D H

    1983-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis in humans is caused by trypanosomes, parasitic protozoa that inhabit the blood and tissue spaces. Humans are infected by the bite of the tsetse (Glossina species), which itself acquires the parasites from human or animal hosts. The vector and the disease are confined to sub-saharan Africa where the disease occurs in endemic foci from which epidemics arise. Two forms of African trypanosomiasis in humans are recognized and both are fatal if left untreated. Control strategy is dependent on the capacity of the public health services to diagnose and treat cases, and the maintenance of surveillance is essential if epidemics are to be prevented. In epidemics this strategy should be extended to include vector-control measures to break transmission of the disease while cases continue to be diagnosed and treated. Eradication of the vector is not feasible nor can animal reservoirs be eliminated. National authorities must thus maintain surveillance to reduce the human reservoir of infection in order for low levels of endemicity, particularly in areas where epidemics have occurred in the past, to be retained.

  7. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-01-01

    Jan 1, 2002 ... include hypothermia, reduced appetite, depressed overall sexual potency and clinical spermatorrhoea ..... EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL. 25. Table 4. Drug consumption and semen volume. (GMH, BMS, 1992-1995). No. Drag consumed. 0-2. No. %. No. Semen volume (ml). 2-6. % No. >6. %. No.

  8. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 79 No. 2 February 2002. HAEMATOLÖGICAL ALTERATIONS IN LEPROSY PATIENTS TREATED WITH DAPSONE. N.K.D. Halim, MBChB, FMCPath, Senior Lecturer and Head, Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, College of Medical Sciences,. University of Benin, Benin ...

  9. Socio-economic and cultural determinants of human african trypanosomiasis at the Kenya - Uganda transboundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Jemeli Rutto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kenya and Uganda have reported different Human African Trypanosomiasis incidences in the past more than three decades, with the latter recording more cases. This cross-sectional study assessed the demographic characteristics, tsetse and trypanosomiasis control practices, socio-economic and cultural risk factors influencing Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense (T.b.r. infection in Teso and Busia Districts, Western Kenya and Tororo and Busia Districts, Southeast Uganda. A conceptual framework was postulated to explain interactions of various socio-economic, cultural and tsetse control factors that predispose individuals and populations to HAT. METHODS: A cross-sectional household survey was conducted between April and October 2008. Four administrative districts reporting T.b.r and lying adjacent to each other at the international boundary of Kenya and Uganda were purposely selected. Household data collection was carried out in two villages that had experienced HAT and one other village that had no reported HAT case from 1977 to 2008 in each district. A structured questionnaire was administered to 384 randomly selected household heads or their representatives in each country. The percent of respondents giving a specific answer was reported. Secondary data was also obtained on socio-economic and political issues in both countries. RESULTS: Inadequate knowledge on the disease cycle and intervention measures contributed considerable barriers to HAT, and more so in Uganda than in Kenya. Gender-associated socio-cultural practices greatly predisposed individuals to HAT. Pesticides-based crop husbandry in the 1970's reportedly reduced vector population while vegetation of coffee and banana's and livestock husbandry directly increased occurrence of HAT. Livestock husbandry practices in the villages were strong predictors of HAT incidence. The residents in Kenya (6.7% applied chemoprophylaxis and chemotherapeutic controls against trypanosomiasis to a

  10. African animal trypanosomiasis as a constraint to livestock health and production in Karamoja region: a detailed qualitative and quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhanguzi, Dennis; Mugenyi, Albert; Bigirwa, Godfrey; Kamusiime, Maureen; Kitibwa, Ann; Akurut, Grace Gloria; Ochwo, Sylvester; Amanyire, Wilson; Okech, Samuel George; Hattendorf, Jan; Tweyongyere, Robert

    2017-11-25

    Nagana (African Animal Trypanosomiasis-AAT) and tick-borne diseases (TBDs) constrain livestock production in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa. To this realisation, Uganda government set up an African trypanosomiasis (AT) control unit, which among other activities generates national tsetse control priority maps using apparent tsetse density data. Such maps underestimate mechanically transmitted AAT and thus ought to be refined using actual AT prevalence data. We therefore set out to generate up-to-date cattle and donkey trypanosomiasis prevalence data as well as find out the constraints to livestock production in Karamoja region in a bid to re-define AT control priority in this region. Livestock keepers and animal health workers indicated that TBDs and AAT were the most important livestock diseases in Karamoja region. The prevalence of Trypanosoma spp. in cattle and donkeys was 16.3% (95% CI: 12.4-21.1%) and 32.4% (95% CI; 20.2-47.6%) respectively. Trypanosoma vivax (12.1%) and Trypanosoma congolense savannah (29.6%) were the most prevalent Trypanosoma spp. in cattle and donkeys respectively. Majority of the cattle (85.7%) and more than half of the donkey (57.1%) herds were positive for Trypanosoma spp. African animal trypanosomiasis and TBDs are the most important constraints to livestock production in Karamoja region. In order to improve livestock production and hence Karamajong livelihoods, government of Uganda and her development partners will need to invest in livestock health programs particularly targeting tsetse and TBD control.

  11. African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    human tissue. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense can infect domestic an- imals such as pigs , goats, and sheep, but humans are the most significant host.17...also serve as hosts. Trypanosomes can cross the placenta and infect the fetus, causing abortion, stillbirth, or neonatal death.18 They are rarely...in the liver. Trypanosomes escape the host immune response by a variety of mechanisms.29 Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and T. b. rhodesiense evade

  12. QSAR modeling for anti-human African trypanosomiasis activity of substituted 2-Phenylimidazopyridines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Vijay H.; El-Sayed, Nahed N. E.; Mahajan, Devidas T.; Mercader, Andrew G.; Alafeefy, Ahmed M.; Shibi, I. G.

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, sixty substituted 2-Phenylimidazopyridines previously reported with potent anti-human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) activity were selected to build genetic algorithm (GA) based QSAR models to determine the structural features that have significant correlation with the activity. Multiple QSAR models were built using easily interpretable descriptors that are directly associated with the presence or the absence of a structural scaffold, or a specific atom. All the QSAR models have been thoroughly validated according to the OECD principles. All the QSAR models are statistically very robust (R2 = 0.80-0.87) with high external predictive ability (CCCex = 0.81-0.92). The QSAR analysis reveals that the HAT activity has good correlation with the presence of five membered rings in the molecule.

  13. Man-fly contact in the Gambian trypanosomiasis focus of Nola-Bilolo (Central African Republic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouteux, J P; Kounda Gboumbi, J C; Noutoua, L; D'Amico, F; Bailly, C; Roungou, J B

    1993-09-01

    A study using bipyramid tetse fly traps in the Nola-Bilolo sleeping sickness focus (Central African Republic) reveals ecological and behavioural differences between two vectors, Glossina palpalis palpalis and G. fuscipes fuscipes. The latter species inhabits mainly open water sites and surrounding forest, whereas G. p. palpalis occurs mainly in coffe plantations near villages. Consequently, the man-fly contact differs considerably according to the species. The intensity of trypanosomiasis transmission, estimated by the probable distribution of cases, showed significant positive correlation with the density of the flies. Analysis of the fly blood meals in two villages show that, unlike G. g. palpalis, G. f. fuscipes feeds on men more than on pigs. Trypanosoma vivax infection was observed only in G. fuscipes fuscipes. The differences in occupation of the environment between the two vectors must be taken in account in trapping programmes which may modify this distribution.

  14. Hsp70/J-protein machinery from Glossina morsitans morsitans, vector of African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Bentley

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies (Glossina spp. are the sole vectors of the protozoan parasites of the genus Trypanosoma, the causative agents of African Trypanosomiasis. Species of Glossina differ in vector competence and Glossina morsitans morsitans is associated with transmission of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which causes an acute and often fatal form of African Trypanosomiasis. Heat shock proteins are evolutionarily conserved proteins that play critical roles in proteostasis. The activity of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 is regulated by interactions with its J-protein (Hsp40 co-chaperones. Inhibition of these interactions are emerging as potential therapeutic targets. The assembly and annotation of the G. m. morsitans genome provided a platform to identify and characterize the Hsp70s and J-proteins, and carry out an evolutionary comparison to its well-studied eukaryotic counterparts, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens, as well as Stomoxys calcitrans, a comparator species. In our study, we identified 9 putative Hsp70 proteins and 37 putative J-proteins in G. m. morsitans. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three evolutionarily distinct groups of Hsp70s, with a closer relationship to orthologues from its blood-feeding dipteran relative Stomoxys calcitrans. G. m. morsitans also lacked the high number of heat inducible Hsp70s found in D. melanogaster. The potential localisations, functions, domain organisations and Hsp70/J-protein partnerships were also identified. A greater understanding of the heat shock 70 (Hsp70 and J-protein (Hsp40 families in G. m. morsitans could enhance our understanding of the cell biology of the tsetse fly.

  15. 398 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    398 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL. August 2004. East African Medical Journal Vol. 81 No. 8 August 2004. POTENTIAL PATHOGENS IN THE LOWER GENITAL TRACT AT MANUAL VACUUM ASPIRATION FOR INCOMPLETE ABORTION IN KORLE. BU TEACHING HOSPITAL, GHANA. A. T. Lassey, FRCOG ...

  16. Archives: East African Orthopaedic Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 18 of 18 ... Archives: East African Orthopaedic Journal. Journal Home > Archives: East African Orthopaedic Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 18 of ...

  17. Mathematical models to simulate the East African trypanosomiasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is aimed at modelling the population dynamics for the human and domestic animal victims as well as the dynamics of the tsetse fly population that acts as the vector that spreads the parasite causing this disease. Since sleeping sickness is caused by two protozoan parasites that are morphologically similar but cause ...

  18. Cross-resistance to nitro drugs and implications for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Antoaneta Y; Wyllie, Susan; Patterson, Stephen; Oza, Sandra L; Read, Kevin D; Fairlamb, Alan H

    2010-07-01

    The success of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) has renewed interest in the potential of nitro drugs as chemotherapeutics. In order to study the implications of the more widespread use of nitro drugs against these parasites, we examined the in vivo and in vitro resistance potentials of nifurtimox and fexinidazole and its metabolites. Following selection in vitro by exposure to increasing concentrations of nifurtimox, Trypanosoma brucei brucei nifurtimox-resistant clones designated NfxR1 and NfxR2 were generated. Both cell lines were found to be 8-fold less sensitive to nifurtimox than parental cells and demonstrated cross-resistance to a number of other nitro drugs, most notably the clinical trial candidate fexinidazole (approximately 27-fold more resistant than parental cells). Studies of mice confirmed that the generation of nifurtimox resistance in these parasites did not compromise virulence, and NfxR1 remained resistant to both nifurtimox and fexinidazole in vivo. In the case of fexinidazole, drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies indicate that the parent drug is rapidly metabolized to the sulfoxide and sulfone form of this compound. These metabolites retained trypanocidal activity but were less effective in nifurtimox-resistant lines. Significantly, trypanosomes selected for resistance to fexinidazole were 10-fold more resistant to nifurtimox than parental cells. This reciprocal cross-resistance has important implications for the therapeutic use of nifurtimox in a clinical setting and highlights a potential danger in the use of fexinidazole as a monotherapy.

  19. 90 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 78 No. 2 February 2001. TRANSMISSION BIJOCKING VACCINE STUDIES IN LEISHMANIASIS: II. EFFECT OF IMMUNISATION USING LEISHMANIA MAJOR DERIVED 63. KILODALTON GLYCOPROTEIN, LIPOPHOSPHOGLYCAN AND WHOLE PARASITE ANTIGENS ON THE COURSE ...

  20. Syndromic algorithms for detection of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in South Sudan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J Palmer

    Full Text Available Active screening by mobile teams is considered the best method for detecting human African trypanosomiasis (HAT caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense but the current funding context in many post-conflict countries limits this approach. As an alternative, non-specialist health care workers (HCWs in peripheral health facilities could be trained to identify potential cases who need testing based on their symptoms. We explored the predictive value of syndromic referral algorithms to identify symptomatic cases of HAT among a treatment-seeking population in Nimule, South Sudan.Symptom data from 462 patients (27 cases presenting for a HAT test via passive screening over a 7 month period were collected to construct and evaluate over 14,000 four item syndromic algorithms considered simple enough to be used by peripheral HCWs. For comparison, algorithms developed in other settings were also tested on our data, and a panel of expert HAT clinicians were asked to make referral decisions based on the symptom dataset. The best performing algorithms consisted of three core symptoms (sleep problems, neurological problems and weight loss, with or without a history of oedema, cervical adenopathy or proximity to livestock. They had a sensitivity of 88.9-92.6%, a negative predictive value of up to 98.8% and a positive predictive value in this context of 8.4-8.7%. In terms of sensitivity, these out-performed more complex algorithms identified in other studies, as well as the expert panel. The best-performing algorithm is predicted to identify about 9/10 treatment-seeking HAT cases, though only 1/10 patients referred would test positive.In the absence of regular active screening, improving referrals of HAT patients through other means is essential. Systematic use of syndromic algorithms by peripheral HCWs has the potential to increase case detection and would increase their participation in HAT programmes. The algorithms proposed here, though promising, should be

  1. Monitoring the Progress towards the Elimination of Gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere P Simarro

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, momentum has gathered around the feasibility and opportunity of eliminating gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (g-HAT. Under the leadership of the World Health Organization (WHO, a large coalition of stakeholders is now committed to achieving this goal. A roadmap has been laid out, and indicators and milestones have been defined to monitor the progress of the elimination of g-HAT as a public health problem by 2020. Subsequently, a more ambitious objective was set for 2030: to stop disease transmission. This paper provides a situational update to 2012 for a number of indicators of elimination: number of cases annually reported, geographic distribution of the disease and areas and populations at different levels of risk.Comparing the 5-year periods 2003-2007 and 2008-2012, the area at high or very high risk of g-HAT shrank by 60%, while the area at moderate risk decreased by 22%. These are the areas where g-HAT is still to be considered a public health problem (i.e. > 1 HAT reported case per 10,000 people per annum. This contraction of at-risk areas corresponds to a reduction of 57% for the population at high or very high risk (from 4.1 to 1.8 million, and 20% for moderate risk (from 14.0 to 11.3 million.Improved data completeness and accuracy of the Atlas of HAT enhanced our capacity to monitor the progress towards the elimination of g-HAT. The trends in the selected indicators suggest that, in recent years, progress has been steady and in line with the elimination goal laid out in the WHO roadmap on neglected tropical diseases.

  2. Development of a safer laboratory vervet monkey model for the study of human African trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Waema

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are three subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei: T. b. gambiense, T. b. rhodesiense and T. b. brucei. The first two are infectious to humans, whilst T. b. brucei is not. Identifying an animal model of T. b. brucei that mimics human African trypanosomiasis (HAT would enable researchers to study HAT without subjecting themselves to undue risks such as accidental infection. Objectives: This study assessed the sequential clinical, parasitological and haematological changes in vervet monkeys infected with T. b. brucei.Methods: Three vervet monkeys were infected with a 104 inoculum of T. b. brucei (isolate GUTat 1. Late-stage disease was induced by subcurative treatment with diminazene aceturate 28 days post-infection. The animals were treated curatively with melarsoprol upon relapse. Parasitaemia and clinical signs were monitored daily and, at weekly intervals, the monkeys’ blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were sampled for haematology and parasitosis assessments, respectively.Results: The first-peak parasitaemia was observed between seven and nine days post-infection. Clinical signs associated with the disease included fever, dullness, pallor of mucous membranes, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and oedema. Late-stage signs included stiffness of joints and lethargy. The monkeys developed a disease associated with microcytic hypochromic anaemia. There was an initial decline, followed by an increase, in total white blood cell counts from early- to late-stage disease. Trypanosomes were detected in the CSF and there was a significant increase in white cell counts in the CSF during late-stage disease. Infected vervet monkeys displayed classical clinical symptoms, parasitological and haematological trends that were similar to monkeys infected withT.b. rhodesiense.Conclusion: The T. b. brucei vervet monkey model can be used for studying HAT without putting laboratory technicians and researchers at high risk of accidental infection.

  3. A literature review of economic evaluations for a neglected tropical disease: human African trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, C Simone; Yukich, Joshua; Goeree, Ron; Tediosi, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by infection with the parasite Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. b. rhodesiense. It is transmitted to humans via the tsetse fly. Approximately 70 million people worldwide were at risk of infection in 1995, and approximately 20,000 people across Africa are infected with HAT. The objective of this review was to identify existing economic evaluations in order to summarise cost-effective interventions to reduce, control, or eliminate the burden of HAT. The studies included in the review were compared and critically appraised in order to determine if there were existing standardised methods that could be used for economic evaluation of HAT interventions or if innovative methodological approaches are warranted. A search strategy was developed using keywords and was implemented in January 2014 in several databases. The search returned a total of 2,283 articles. After two levels of screening, a total of seven economic evaluations were included and underwent critical appraisal using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) Methodology Checklist 6: Economic Evaluations. Results from the existing studies focused on the cost-effectiveness of interventions for the control and reduction of disease transmission. Modelling was a common method to forecast long-term results, and publications focused on interventions by category, such as case detection, diagnostics, drug treatments, and vector control. Most interventions were considered cost-effective based on the thresholds described; however, the current treatment, nifurtomix-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT), has not been evaluated for cost-effectiveness, and considerations for cost-effective strategies for elimination have yet to be completed. Overall, the current evidence highlights the main components that play a role in control; however, economic evaluations of HAT elimination strategies are needed to assist national decision makers, stakeholders, and

  4. Urea Derivatives of 2-Aryl-benzothiazol-5-amines: A New Class of Potential Drugs for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Donald A; Gillespie, J Robert; McQueen, Joshua; Hulverson, Matthew A; Ranade, Ranae M; Creason, Sharon A; Herbst, Zackary M; Gelb, Michael H; Buckner, Frederick S; Tidwell, Richard R

    2017-02-09

    A previous publication from this lab (Patrick, et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2016, 24 , 2451 - 2465 ) explored the antitrypanosomal activities of novel derivatives of 2-(2-benzamido)ethyl-4-phenylthiazole (1), which had been identified as a hit against Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis. While a number of these compounds, particularly the urea analogues, were quite potent, these molecules as a whole exhibited poor metabolic stability. The present work describes the synthesis of 65 new analogues arising from medicinal chemistry optimization at different sites on the molecule. The most promising compounds were the urea derivatives of 2-aryl-benzothiazol-5-amines. One such analogue, (S)-2-(3,4-difluorophenyl)-5-(3-fluoro-N-pyrrolidylamido)benzothiazole (57) was chosen for in vivo efficacy studies based upon in vitro activity, metabolic stability, and brain penetration. This compound attained 5/5 cures in murine models of both early and late stage human African trypanosomiasis, representing a new lead for the development of drugs to combat this neglected disease.

  5. Archives: Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 14 of 14 ... Archives: Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology. Journal Home > Archives: Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. East African Journal of Statistics: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Journal of Statistics: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > East African Journal of Statistics: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Effect of Tetracycline on Late-stage African trypanosomiasis in Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    determined (Ekanem et al, 2002). The effect of Tetracycline on late stage trypanosomiasis in this experiment may be attributed, firstly, to its antimicrobial activity. Fig. 1: Parasite count in T. brucei infected rats treated with tetracycline twice daily as the infection progressed until death. Treatment of rats started with 10mg/kg and ...

  8. SCYX-7158, an orally-active benzoxaborole for the treatment of stage 2 human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Jacobs

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa, affecting hundreds of thousands of individuals. An urgent need exists for the discovery and development of new, safe, and effective drugs to treat HAT, as existing therapies suffer from poor safety profiles, difficult treatment regimens, limited effectiveness, and a high cost of goods. We have discovered and optimized a novel class of small-molecule boron-containing compounds, benzoxaboroles, to identify SCYX-7158 as an effective, safe and orally active treatment for HAT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A drug discovery project employing integrated biological screening, medicinal chemistry and pharmacokinetic characterization identified SCYX-7158 as an optimized analog, as it is active in vitro against relevant strains of Trypanosoma brucei, including T. b. rhodesiense and T. b. gambiense, is efficacious in both stage 1 and stage 2 murine HAT models and has physicochemical and in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicology (ADMET properties consistent with the compound being orally available, metabolically stable and CNS permeable. In a murine stage 2 study, SCYX-7158 is effective orally at doses as low as 12.5 mg/kg (QD×7 days. In vivo pharmacokinetic characterization of SCYX-7158 demonstrates that the compound is highly bioavailable in rodents and non-human primates, has low intravenous plasma clearance and has a 24-h elimination half-life and a volume of distribution that indicate good tissue distribution. Most importantly, in rodents brain exposure of SCYX-7158 is high, with C(max >10 µg/mL and AUC(0-24 hr >100 µg*h/mL following a 25 mg/kg oral dose. Furthermore, SCYX-7158 readily distributes into cerebrospinal fluid to achieve therapeutically relevant concentrations in this compartment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The biological and pharmacokinetic properties of SCYX-7158 suggest that this compound will be

  9. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 29

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-01-01

    Jan 1, 2002 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 79 No. 1 January 2002. EFFICACY OF OXAMNIQUINE AND PRAZIQUANTEL IN SCHOOL CHILDREN FROM TWO SCHISTOSOMA MANSON] ENDEMIC AREAS l . F. W. Thiong'o, MSc, PhD, Senior Parasitologist, Division'of Vector Borne Diseases, Ministry of Health, ...

  10. East African Orthopaedic Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The East African Orthopaedic Journal is published biannually by the Kenya Orthopaedics Association. Its primary objective is to give researchers in orthopaedics and other related fields a forum of disseminating their research findings. The journal is dedicated to serve researchers in Africa and those ...

  11. East African Medical Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The East African Medical Journal (EAMJ) aims to improve the practice of all aspects of medicine and health care in general. To achieve these objectives, the journal publishes original scientific articles, reviews, clinical case reports and letters dealing with any factor impacting on health. EAMJ in published ...

  12. 298 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    June 2003. East African Medical Journal Vol. 80 No. 6 June 2003. NOISE INDUCED HEARING LOSS AMONG INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN DAR ES SALAAM. BM, Minja MBChB (EA), MMed (Surgery) MSc (ORL), NH. Moshi, MD, MMed (Surgery) MSc (ORL), Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Muhimbili. University ...

  13. 88 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-02-02

    Feb 2, 2007 ... The low incision in a capacious abdomen may lend a lost sponge difficult to visualise at the end of the laparotomy. Although reports suggest that emergency surgery is the culprit in a number of cases of retained sponges, one must consider a diagnosis of retained. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 91.

  14. 442 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 79 N0. 8 August 2002. SOIL TRANSMITTED NEMATODES IN CHILDREN IN BUEA HEALTH DISTRICT OF CAMEROON. L. Ndenecho, BSc., MSc., Graduate Assistant, KIN. Ndamukong, BSc, MSc, PhD, Senior Lecturer and Faculty Officer and M.M. Mature. BSc, MSc. PhD,. Lecturer and ...

  15. East African Journal of Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The East African Journal of Sciences (EAJS) publishes original scientific papers and disseminates scientific and technological information to the users in Eastern Africa and elsewhere in the world; the Journal also enhances exchange of ideas among scientists engaged in research and development activities; and accepts ...

  16. 666 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Joumal Vol. 78 No. 12 December 2001. MAJOR OBSTETRIC INTERVENTIONS AMONG ENCAMPED REFUGEES AND THE LOCAL POPULATION IN TURKANA DISTRICT, KENYA. W. Odero, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Institute of Public ...

  17. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-05-05

    May 5, 2007 ... 242 EAST A FRICAN MEDICAL J O URNAL. This partially compromised blood supply and resulted in gangrene. After debridement, the patient lost the whole of the skin and subcutaneous layer' of the right forearm with the thumb, index and little fingers (Figure3). She had skin grafting subsequently and she ...

  18. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite anti-retroviral therapy (ART) improving CD4 cell counts and reducing incidence of TB among HIV- infected persons, one South African study showed that TB incidence rates still remained higher among those with CD4 of greater than 700 cells/mL on long- term ART compared to HIV-uninfected persons (4). In 1998 ...

  19. Spatial predictions of Rhodesian Human African Trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness prevalence in Kaberamaido and Dokolo, two newly affected districts of Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola A Batchelor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The continued northwards spread of Rhodesian sleeping sickness or Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT within Uganda is raising concerns of overlap with the Gambian form of the disease. Disease convergence would result in compromised diagnosis and treatment for HAT. Spatial determinants for HAT are poorly understood across small areas. This study examines the relationships between Rhodesian HAT and several environmental, climatic and social factors in two newly affected districts, Kaberamaido and Dokolo. A one-step logistic regression analysis of HAT prevalence and a two-step logistic regression method permitted separate analysis of both HAT occurrence and HAT prevalence. Both the occurrence and prevalence of HAT were negatively correlated with distance to the closest livestock market in all models. The significance of distance to the closest livestock market strongly indicates that HAT may have been introduced to this previously unaffected area via the movement of infected, untreated livestock from endemic areas. This illustrates the importance of the animal reservoir in disease transmission, and highlights the need for trypanosomiasis control in livestock and the stringent implementation of regulations requiring the treatment of cattle prior to sale at livestock markets to prevent any further spread of Rhodesian HAT within Uganda.

  20. Human/vector relationships during human African trypanosomiasis: initial screening of immunogenic salivary proteins of Glossina species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poinsignon, Anne; Cornelie, Sylvie; Remoue, Franck; Grébaut, Pascal; Courtin, David; Garcia, Andre; Simondon, Francois

    2007-02-01

    The morbidity and mortality of vector-borne diseases is closely linked to exposure of the human host to vectors. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation of individual exposure to arthropod bites by investigation of the specific immune response to vector saliva would make it possible to monitor individuals at risk of vectorial transmission of pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the antibody (IgG) response to saliva from uninfected Glossina species, vectors, or non-vectors of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense by detecting immunogenic proteins in humans residing in an area endemic for human African trypanosomiasis in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Our results suggest that the immunogenic profiles observed seemed specific to the Glossina species (vector or non-vector species) and to the infectious status of exposed individuals (infected or not infected). This preliminary work tends to support the feasibility of development of an epidemiologic tool based on this antibody response to salivary proteins.

  1. Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology has been published since 1977 by the Bird Committee of the East Africa Natural History Society. Originally titled Scopus, the addition of Journal of East African Ornithology began with our January 2018 issue. The journal is published Open Access twice a year, typically in January ...

  2. Proteomic Selection of Immunodiagnostic Antigens for Human African Trypanosomiasis and Generation of a Prototype Lateral Flow Immunodiagnostic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren; Wall, Steven J.; Carrington, Mark; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT). While this test is successful, it is acknowledged that there may be room for improvement. Our aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test based on the detection of antibodies to trypanosome antigens. Methodology/Principal Findings We took a non-biased approach to identify potential immunodiagnostic parasite protein antigens. The IgG fractions from the sera from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infected and control patients were isolated using protein-G affinity chromatography and then immobilized on Sepharose beads. The IgG-beads were incubated with detergent lysates of trypanosomes and those proteins that bound were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods. This approach provided a list of twenty-four trypanosome proteins that selectively bound to the infection IgG fraction and that might, therefore, be considered as immunodiagnostic antigens. We selected four antigens from this list (ISG64, ISG65, ISG75 and GRESAG4) and performed protein expression trials in E. coli with twelve constructs. Seven soluble recombinant protein products (three for ISG64, two for ISG65 and one each for ISG75 and GRESAG4) were obtained and assessed for their immunodiagnostic potential by ELISA using individual and/or pooled patient sera. The ISG65 and ISG64 construct ELISAs performed well with respect to detecting T. b. gambiense infections, though less well for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections, and the best performing ISG65 construct was used to develop a prototype lateral flow diagnostic device. Conclusions/Significance Using a panel of eighty randomized T. b. gambiense infection and control sera, the prototype showed reasonable sensitivity (88%) and specificity (93%) using visual readout in detecting T. b. gambiense infections. These results provide encouragement to further develop and optimize the lateral flow device for clinical

  3. Proteomic selection of immunodiagnostic antigens for human African trypanosomiasis and generation of a prototype lateral flow immunodiagnostic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sullivan

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT. While this test is successful, it is acknowledged that there may be room for improvement. Our aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test based on the detection of antibodies to trypanosome antigens.We took a non-biased approach to identify potential immunodiagnostic parasite protein antigens. The IgG fractions from the sera from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infected and control patients were isolated using protein-G affinity chromatography and then immobilized on Sepharose beads. The IgG-beads were incubated with detergent lysates of trypanosomes and those proteins that bound were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods. This approach provided a list of twenty-four trypanosome proteins that selectively bound to the infection IgG fraction and that might, therefore, be considered as immunodiagnostic antigens. We selected four antigens from this list (ISG64, ISG65, ISG75 and GRESAG4 and performed protein expression trials in E. coli with twelve constructs. Seven soluble recombinant protein products (three for ISG64, two for ISG65 and one each for ISG75 and GRESAG4 were obtained and assessed for their immunodiagnostic potential by ELISA using individual and/or pooled patient sera. The ISG65 and ISG64 construct ELISAs performed well with respect to detecting T. b. gambiense infections, though less well for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections, and the best performing ISG65 construct was used to develop a prototype lateral flow diagnostic device.Using a panel of eighty randomized T. b. gambiense infection and control sera, the prototype showed reasonable sensitivity (88% and specificity (93% using visual readout in detecting T. b. gambiense infections. These results provide encouragement to further develop and optimize the lateral flow device for clinical use.

  4. Monitoring the use of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT in the treatment of second stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis

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    Franco JR

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Jose R Franco,1 Pere P Simarro,1 Abdoulaye Diarra,2 Jose A Ruiz-Postigo,3 Mireille Samo,1 Jean G Jannin11World Health Organization, Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, Innovative and Intensified Disease Management, Geneva, Switzerland; 2World Health Organization, Regional Office for Africa, Brazzaville, Congo; 3World Health Organization, Communicable Disease Control, Control of Tropical Diseases and Zoonoses Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: After inclusion of the nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT in the Model List of Essential Medicines for the treatment of second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, the World Health Organization, in collaboration with National Sleeping Sickness Control Programs and nongovernmental organizations set up a pharmacovigilance system to assess the safety and efficacy of NECT during its routine use. Data were collected for 1735 patients treated with NECT in nine disease endemic countries during 2010–2011. At least one adverse event (AE was described in 1043 patients (60.1% and a total of 3060 AE were reported. Serious adverse events (SAE were reported for 19 patients (1.1% of treated, leading to nine deaths (case fatality rate of 0.5%. The most frequent AE were gastrointestinal disorders (vomiting/nausea and abdominal pain, followed by headache, musculoskeletal pains, and vertigo. The most frequent SAE and cause of death were convulsions, fever, and coma that were considered as reactive encephalopathy. Two hundred and sixty-two children below 15 years old were treated. The characteristics of AE were similar to adults, but the major AE were less frequent in children with only one SAE and no deaths registered in this group. Gastrointestinal problems (vomiting and abdominal pain were more frequent than in adults, but musculoskeletal pains, vertigo, asthenia, neuropsychiatric troubles (headaches, seizures, tremors, hallucinations, insomnia were less

  5. Expression of interferon-inducible chemokines and sleep/wake changes during early encephalitis in experimental African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperchia, Claudia; Tesoriero, Chiara; Seke-Etet, Paul F; La Verde, Valentina; Colavito, Valeria; Grassi-Zucconi, Gigliola; Rodgers, Jean; Montague, Paul; Kennedy, Peter G E; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2017-08-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, leads to neuroinflammation and characteristic sleep/wake alterations. The relationship between the onset of these alterations and the development of neuroinflammation is of high translational relevance, but remains unclear. This study investigates the expression of interferon (IFN)-γ and IFN-inducible chemokine genes in the brain, and the levels of CXCL10 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid prior to and during the encephalitic stage of trypanosome infection, and correlates these with sleep/wake changes in a rat model of the disease. The expression of genes encoding IFN-γ, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 was assessed in the brain of rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei and matched controls using semi-quantitative end-point RT-PCR. Levels of CXCL10 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid were determined using ELISA. Sleep/wake states were monitored by telemetric recording. Using immunohistochemistry, parasites were found in the brain parenchyma at 14 days post-infection (dpi), but not at 6 dpi. Ifn-γ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Cxcl11 mRNA levels showed moderate upregulation by 14 dpi followed by further increase between 14 and 21 dpi. CXCL10 concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid increased between 14 and 21 dpi, preceded by a rise in the serum CXCL10 level between 6 and 14 dpi. Sleep/wake pattern fragmentation was evident at 14 dpi, especially in the phase of wake predominance, with intrusion of sleep episodes into wakefulness. The results show a modest increase in Cxcl9 and Cxcl11 transcripts in the brain and the emergence of sleep/wake cycle fragmentation in the initial encephalitic stage, followed by increases in Ifn-γ and IFN-dependent chemokine transcripts in the brain and of CXCL10 in the cerebrospinal fluid. The latter parameter and sleep/wake alterations could provide combined humoral and functional biomarkers of the early encephalitic stage in African trypanosomiasis.

  6. February2007 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL - _77

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-02-01

    Feb 1, 2007 ... February2007 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL - _77. East African Medical Journal Vol. 84 N0. ... Tropical Institute, Department of Biomedical Research, Royal Tropical Institute. Request for reprints to: Dr. L. ... to optimize diagnosis and therapy; it enhances compliance and provides information on what.

  7. Archives: East African Journal of Statistics

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    Archives: East African Journal of Statistics. Journal Home > Archives: East African Journal of Statistics. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 3 of 3 Items. 2007 ...

  8. East African Orthopaedic Journal: About this journal

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    East African Orthopaedic Journal: About this journal. Journal Home > East African Orthopaedic Journal: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. People.

  9. February2006 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 95

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-02-01

    Feb 1, 2006 ... February2006 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 95. East African Medical Iournal Vol 83 N0. 2 February ... community health, and a university nursing college with midwifery option. The maternity unit of the .... of births defects among livebirths in Singapore. Teratology. 1992; 46: 277-281. Ahuka O.L. ...

  10. Journal of East African Natural History

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of East African Natural History is published jointly by the East Africa Natural History Society and the National Museums of Kenya. The Journal publishes papers and notes in the field of natural history, broadly defined as the study of organisms in their natural state, relevant to the eastern African region.

  11. June2007 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 279

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    June2007 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 279. East African ... Objective: To determine whether a single weekly low dose of erythropoietin (EPO), haematenics ... adults respectively. Weekly chloroquine of 300mg for adults and 60mg for the two year old, and a high protein diet of fish, meat and beans were also given.

  12. Animal trypanosomiasis in Africa: Aetiology and Epidemiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aetiology and epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis in bovine species are comprehensively presented. In addition, a critical review o the history and transmission of the disease is exhaustively discussed. The mystery of other epizootiological factors associated with bovine trypanosomiasis is highlighted. Four major ...

  13. [Report on l7 years of studies of human African trypanosomiasis caused by T. gambiense in children 0-6 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, N; Trova, P; Fusco, C; Le Bras, J

    1985-01-01

    The authors present 227 cases of human African trypanosomiasis in children between 0 and 6 years, which have been observed for 17 years in the hyperendemic area of Fontem, Cameroon. These cases deal with a subject seldom described in medical literature. The authors especially insist on the velocity of both the contamination and involvement of the nervous system, as well as on the difficulty in settling a diagnosis when failing consider the notion of endemic area. On the other hand, they stress the fact that the efficiency of arsenical treatment is not more dangerous for children than for adults. Finally, they confirm the existence of congenital trypanosomiasis, which proves to be as important from the epidemiological point of view than from the strategical means to be used to identify this disease.

  14. Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and coenzyme-Q10 ameliorate post treatment reactive encephalopathy associated with cerebral human African trypanosomiasis in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Khalid; Wachira, Francis N; Nyariki, James N; Isaac, Alfred O

    2014-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a tropical disease caused by two subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei, the East African variant T. b. rhodesiense and the West African variant T. b. gambiense. Melarsoprol, an organic arsenical, is the only drug used to treat late stage T. b. rhodesiense infection. Unfortunately, this drug induces an extremely severe post treatment reactive encephalopathy (PTRE) in up to 10% of treated patients, half of whom die from this complication. A highly reproducible mouse model was adapted to assess the use of Kenyan purple tea anthocyanins and/or coenzyme-Q10 in blocking the occurrence of PTRE. Female Swiss white mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with approximately 10(4) trypanosome isolate T. b. rhodesiense KETRI 2537 and treated sub-curatively 21days post infection with 5mg/kg diminazene aceturate (DA) daily for 3days to induce severe late CNS infection that closely mirrors PTRE in human subjects. Thereafter mice were monitored for relapse of parasitemia after which they were treated with melarsoprol at a dosage of 3.6mg/kg body weight for 4days and sacrificed 24h post the last dosage to obtain brain samples. Brain sections from mice with PTRE that did not receive any antioxidant treatment showed a more marked presence of inflammatory cells, microglial activation and disruption of the brain parenchyma when compared to PTRE mice supplemented with either coenzyme-Q10, purple tea anthocyanins or a combination of the two. The mice group that was treated with coenzyme-Q10 or purple tea anthocyanins had higher levels of GSH and aconitase-1 in the brain compared to untreated groups, implying a boost in brain antioxidant capacity. Overall, coenzyme-Q10 treatment produced more beneficial effects compared to anthocyanin treatment. These findings demonstrate that therapeutic intervention with coenzyme-Q10 and/or purple tea anthocyanins can be used in an experimental mouse model to ameliorate PTRE associated with cerebral HAT. Copyright

  15. A longitudinal survey of African animal trypanosomiasis in domestic cattle on the Jos Plateau, Nigeria: prevalence, distribution and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majekodunmi, Ayodele O; Fajinmi, Akinyemi; Dongkum, Charles; Picozzi, Kim; Thrusfield, Michael V; Welburn, Susan C

    2013-08-19

    Trypanosomiasis is a widespread disease of livestock in Nigeria and a major constraint to the rural economy. The Jos Plateau, Nigeria was free from tsetse flies and the trypanosomes they transmit due to its high altitude and the absence of animal trypanosomiasis attracted large numbers of cattle-keeping pastoralists to inhabit the plateau. The Jos Plateau now plays a significant role in the national cattle industry, accommodating approximately 7% of the national herd and supporting 300,000 pastoralists and over one million cattle. However, during the past two decades tsetse flies have invaded the Jos Plateau and animal trypanosomiasis has become a significant problem for livestock keepers. In 2008 a longitudinal two-stage cluster survey on the Jos Plateau. Cattle were sampled in the dry, early wet and late wet seasons. Parasite identification was undertaken using species-specific polymerase chain reactions to determine the prevalence and distribution bovine trypanosomiasis. Logistic regression was performed to determine risk factors for disease. The prevalence of bovine trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma brucei brucei, Trypanosoma congolense savannah, Trypanosoma vivax) across the Jos Plateau was found to be high at 46.8% (39.0 - 54.5%) and significant, seasonal variation was observed between the dry season and the end of the wet season. T. b. brucei was observed at a prevalence of 3.2% (1% - 5.5%); T. congolense at 27.7% (21.8% - 33.6%) and T. vivax at 26.7% (18.2% - 35.3%). High individual variation was observed in trypanosomiasis prevalence between individual villages on the Plateau, ranging from 8.8% to 95.6%. Altitude was found to be a significant risk factor for trypanosomiasis whilst migration also influenced risk for animal trypanosomiasis. Trypanosomiasis is now endemic on the Jos Plateau showing high prevalence in cattle and is influenced by seasonality, altitude and migration practices. Attempts to successfully control animal trypanosomiasis on the Plateau

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of loopamp Trypanosoma brucei detection kit for diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis in clinical samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Mitashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular methods have great potential for sensitive parasite detection in the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, but the requirements in terms of laboratory infrastructure limit their use to reference centres. A recently developed assay detects the Trypanozoon repetitive insertion mobile element (RIME DNA under isothermal amplification conditions and has been transformed into a ready-to-use kit format, the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei. In this study, we have evaluated the diagnostic performance of the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei assay (hereafter called LAMP in confirmed T.b. gambiense HAT patients, HAT suspects and healthy endemic controls from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 142 T.b. gambiense HAT patients, 111 healthy endemic controls and 97 HAT suspects with unconfirmed status were included in this retrospective evaluation. Reference standard tests were parasite detection in blood, lymph or cerebrospinal fluid. Archived DNA from blood of all study participants was analysed in duplicate with LAMP. Sensitivity of LAMP in parasitologically confirmed cases was 87.3% (95% CI 80.9-91.8% in the first run and 93.0% (95% CI 87.5-96.1% in the second run. Specificity in healthy controls was 92.8% (95% CI 86.4-96.3% in the first run and 96.4% (95% CI 91.1-98.6% in the second run. Reproducibility was excellent with a kappa value of 0.81. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this laboratory-based study, the Loopamp Trypanosoma brucei Detection Kit showed good diagnostic accuracy and excellent reproducibility. Further studies are needed to assess the feasibility of its routine use for diagnosis of HAT under field conditions.

  17. Enhanced passive screening and diagnosis for gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in north-western Uganda - Moving towards elimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Wamboga

    Full Text Available The incidence of gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (gHAT in Uganda has been declining, from 198 cases in 2008, to only 20 in 2012. Interruption of transmission of the disease by early diagnosis and treatment is core to the control and eventual elimination of gHAT. Until recently, the format of available screening tests had restricted screening and diagnosis to central health facilities (passive screening. We describe a novel strategy that is contributing to elimination of gHAT in Uganda through expansion of passive screening to the entire population at risk.In this strategy, patients who are clinically suspected of having gHAT at primary health facilities are screened using a rapid diagnostic test (RDT, followed by parasitological confirmation at strategically located microscopy centres. For patients who are positive with the RDT and negative by microscopy, blood samples undergo further testing using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, a molecular test that detects parasite DNA. LAMP positive patients are considered strong suspects, and are re-evaluated by microscopy. Location and upgrading of facilities to perform microscopy and LAMP was informed by results of georeferencing and characterization of all public healthcare facilities in the 7 gHAT endemic districts in Uganda. Three facilities were upgraded to perform RDTs, microscopy and LAMP, 9 to perform RDTs and microscopy, and 200 to screen patients with RDTs. This reduced the distance that a sick person must travel to be screened for gHAT to a median distance of 2.5km compared to 23km previously. In this strategy, 9 gHAT cases were diagnosed in 2014, and 4 in 2015.This enhanced passive screening strategy for gHAT has enabled full coverage of the population at risk, and is being replicated in other gHAT endemic countries. The improvement in case detection is making elimination of the disease in Uganda an imminent possibility.

  18. Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense transmitted by a single tsetse fly bite in vervet monkeys as a model of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Thuita

    Full Text Available We have investigated the pathogenicity of tsetse (Glossina pallidipes-transmitted cloned strains of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in vervet monkeys. Tsetse flies were confirmed to have mature trypanosome infections by xenodiagnosis, after which nine monkeys were infected via the bite of a single infected fly. Chancres developed in five of the nine (55.6% monkeys within 4 to 8 days post infection (dpi. All nine individuals were successfully infected, with a median pre-patent period of 4 (range = 4-10 days, indicating that trypanosomes migrated from the site of fly bite to the systemic circulation rapidly and independently of the development of the chancre. The time lag to detection of parasites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was a median 16 (range = 8-40 days, marking the onset of central nervous system (CNS, late stage disease. Subsequently, CSF white cell numbers increased above the pre-infection median count of 2 (range = 0-9 cells/microl, with a positive linear association between their numbers and that of CSF trypanosomes. Haematological changes showed that the monkeys experienced an early microcytic-hypochromic anaemia and severe progressive thrombocytopaenia. Despite a 3-fold increase in granulocyte numbers by 4 dpi, leucopaenia occurred early (8 dpi in the monkey infection, determined mainly by reductions in lymphocyte numbers. Terminally, leucocytosis was observed in three of nine (33% individuals. The duration of infection was a median of 68 (range = 22-120 days. Strain and individual differences were observed in the severity of the clinical and clinical pathology findings, with two strains (KETRI 3741 and 3801 producing a more acute disease than the other two (KETRI 3804 and 3928. The study shows that the fly-transmitted model accurately mimics the human disease and is therefore a suitable gateway to understanding human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness.

  19. Portulacaria afra in East AFrica | Newton | Journal of East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. East African Journal of Natural History Vol. 96 (1) 2007: pp. 107-108. http://dx.doi.org/10.2982/0012-8317(2007)96[107:PAIEA]2.0.CO;2 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use ...

  20. A combined CXCL10, CXCL8 and H-FABP panel for the staging of human African trypanosomiasis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hainard

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, also known as sleeping sickness, is a parasitic tropical disease. It progresses from the first, haemolymphatic stage to a neurological second stage due to invasion of parasites into the central nervous system (CNS. As treatment depends on the stage of disease, there is a critical need for tools that efficiently discriminate the two stages of HAT. We hypothesized that markers of brain damage discovered by proteomic strategies and inflammation-related proteins could individually or in combination indicate the CNS invasion by the parasite.Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF originated from parasitologically confirmed Trypanosoma brucei gambiense patients. Patients were staged on the basis of CSF white blood cell (WBC count and presence of parasites in CSF. One hundred samples were analysed: 21 from stage 1 (no trypanosomes in CSF and 5 WBC/microL patients. The concentration of H-FABP, GSTP-1 and S100beta in CSF was measured by ELISA. The levels of thirteen inflammation-related proteins (IL-1ra, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-9, IL-10, G-CSF, VEGF, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, CCL2, CCL4, CXCL8 and CXCL10 were determined by bead suspension arrays.CXCL10 most accurately distinguished stage 1 and stage 2 patients, with a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 100%. Rule Induction Like (RIL analysis defined a panel characterized by CXCL10, CXCL8 and H-FABP that improved the detection of stage 2 patients to 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity.This study highlights the value of CXCL10 as a single biomarker for staging T. b. gambiense-infected HAT patients. Further combination of CXCL10 with H-FABP and CXCL8 results in a panel that efficiently rules in stage 2 HAT patients. As these molecules could potentially be markers of other CNS infections and disorders, these results should be validated in a larger multi-centric cohort including other inflammatory diseases such as cerebral malaria and active tuberculosis.

  1. 476 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL September 2002 East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-09-09

    Sep 9, 2002 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 79 No 9 September 2002. CHLAMYDIA AS A CAUSE OF LATE NEONATAL PNEUMONIA AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL. NAIROBI. F.N. Were, MBChB, MMed, FNIC, Lecturer. A.F. Govedi, MBChB, Senior House Officer, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, ...

  2. Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology: About this journal

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  3. Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology: Journal Sponsorship

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    Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. East and Central African Journal of Surgery: Site Map

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    East and Central African Journal of Surgery: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > East and Central African Journal of Surgery: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. East and Central African Journal of Surgery: Journal Sponsorship

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  6. East and Central African Journal of Surgery: About this journal

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  7. Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology: Site Map

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  8. Archives: East and Central African Journal of Surgery

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    Items 1 - 39 of 39 ... Archives: East and Central African Journal of Surgery. Journal Home > Archives: East and Central African Journal of Surgery. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Oral fexinidazole for late-stage African Trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis: a pivotal multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesu, Victor Kande Betu Ku; Kalonji, Wilfried Mutombo; Bardonneau, Clélia; Mordt, Olaf Valverde; Blesson, Séverine; Simon, François; Delhomme, Sophie; Bernhard, Sonja; Kuziena, Willy; Lubaki, Jean-Pierre Fina; Vuvu, Steven Lumeya; Ngima, Pathou Nganzobo; Mbembo, Hélène Mahenzi; Ilunga, Médard; Bonama, Augustin Kasongo; Heradi, Josué Amici; Solomo, Jean Louis Lumaliza; Mandula, Guylain; Badibabi, Lewis Kaninda; Dama, Francis Regongbenga; Lukula, Papy Kavunga; Tete, Digas Ngolo; Lumbala, Crispin; Scherrer, Bruno; Strub-Wourgaft, Nathalie; Tarral, Antoine

    2017-11-04

    Few therapeutic options are available to treat the late-stage of human African trypanosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease, caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (g-HAT). The firstline treatment is a combination therapy of oral nifurtimox and intravenous eflornithine that needs to be administered in a hospital setting by trained personnel, which is not optimal given that patients often live in remote areas with few health resources. Therefore, we aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of an oral regimen of fexinidazole (a 2-substituted 5-nitroimidazole with proven trypanocidal activity) versus nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy in patients with late-stage g-HAT. In this randomised, phase 2/3, open-label, non-inferiority trial, we recruited patients aged 15 years and older with late-stage g-HAT from g-HAT treatment centres in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (n=9) and the Central African Republic (n=1). Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive either fexinidazole or nifurtimox eflornithine combination therapy according to a predefined randomisation list (block size six). The funder, data management personnel, and study statisticians were masked to treatment. Oral fexinidazole was given once a day (days 1-4: 1800 mg, days 5-10: 1200 mg). Oral nifurtimox was given three times a day (days 1-10: 15 mg/kg per day) with eflornithine twice a day as 2 h infusions (days 1-7: 400 mg/kg per day). The primary endpoint was success at 18 months (ie, deemed as patients being alive, having no evidence of trypanosomes in any body fluid, not requiring rescue medication, and having a cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell count ≤20 cells per μL). Safety was assessed through routine monitoring. Primary efficacy analysis was done in the modified intention-to-treat population and safety analyses in the intention-to-treat population. The acceptable margin for the difference in success rates was defined as 13%. This study has been completed and is registered with

  10. East African rarities committee report | Fisher | Scopus: Journal of ...

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    East African Rarities Committee (EARC) Special Report Species included for East African countries in Britton (1980) which have since been considered unacceptable. East African Rarities Committee Report 2013–2015. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  11. East African Journal of Sciences: Submissions

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    The East African Journal of Sciences (EAJS) publishes original scientific papers and disseminates scientific and technological information to the users in ... The text pages encompass the following sections: Abstract, introduction, materials and methods (methodology), results, discussion, conclusion, acknowledgement and ...

  12. East African Journal of Public Health

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    The East African Journal of Public Health is a multi-disciplinary journal publishing scientific research work from a range of public health related disciplines including community medicine, epidemiology, nutrition, behavioural sciences, health promotion, health education, communicable and non-communicable disease.

  13. Editorial: Acute compartment syndrome | Gakuu | East African ...

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    East African Orthopaedic Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: Acute compartment syndrome. LN Gakuu. Abstract. No abstract.

  14. Editorial: Acute compartment syndrome | Gakuu | East African ...

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    East African Orthopaedic Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  15. East African Rarities Committee (EARC) Rarities Report

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    The East African Rarities Committee assesses records of new and very rare birds occurring in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi. This includes up to the fifth record of any species from each of the five countries. Sightings of species for which there are fewer than five records for a country should be submitted to.

  16. September 2004 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 459

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-09-01

    Sep 1, 2004 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 81 No. 9 September 2004. SOLITARY THYROID NODULE: THE RISK OF CANCER AND THE EXTENT OF SURGICAL THERAPY I ~ ~ . G. A. Khairy, FRCS, MS, Assistant Professor and Consultant General Surgeon, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital,.

  17. East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal is published by the Kenya Forestry Research Institute (KARI). Improving and sustaining the national soil and water resource base to meet the challenges of poverty alleviation and food security. Vol 69 (2003). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  18. 92 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL ' Apri12006

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for both girl's and boy' s dental aesthetics. Asearch for data on malocclusion studies among East African children in connection with awareness and concern about malocclusion reveals very little information. A study by Ng'ang' a et al. (4) among subjects aged 13-. 15 years in Nairobi showed more females being dissatisfied ...

  19. 24 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL January2007

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical [oumal Vol. 84 No. 1 Ianuary 2007 I . EFFECT OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF INOPERABLE CERVICAL CANCER ON QUALITY OF LIFE AMONG. WOMEN RECEIVING RADIOTHERAPY AT KENYATTA NATIONAL HOSPITAL ' v. R.K. Kamau, MBChB (Nbi), MMed, Obs/ Gyn '(Nbi), Chairman and ...

  20. OF EAST AFRICAN HIGHLAND BANANA CV ' NAKYETENGU'

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    establishment of their embryogénie cell suspensions. The present study was therefore instituted to investigate somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration of East African highland bananas using male flowers of cultivar. 'Nakyetengu'. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Ten male buds ofcv 'Nakyetengu' were harvested.

  1. I30 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    March 2003. East African Medical Journal Vol. 80 No. 3 March 2003. CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA IN SCHOOL PUPILS IN NIGERIA. FE. Ologe, MBBS, FWACS, FMCORL, Lecturer, Department of ... in chi]dhood(1-3). Its incidence has been reported to depend on race and socio- economic factors(4). A high.

  2. Journal of East African Natural History: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-01

    Nov 1, 2017 ... Author Guidelines. Submission: manuscripts should be submitted as a Word document in an email attachment, to the Editor-in-Chief, Journal of East African Natural History at office@naturekenya.org. The manuscript should be accompanied by a covering letter from the author, or in the case of multiple ...

  3. East African Journal of Public Health: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Aims, scope and policy: The East African Journal of Public Health is a multi-disciplinary journal publishing scientific research work from a wide range of public health related disciplines including community medicine, epidemiology, biostatistics, behavioral sciences, health promotion, health economics, ...

  4. Assessing sanitary mixtures in East African cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letema, S.C.

    2012-01-01

    The urbanisation of poverty and informality in East African cities poses a threat to environmental
    health, perpetuates social exclusion and inequalities, and creates service gaps (UN-Habitat, 2008).
    This makes conventional sanitation provision untenable citywide, giving rise to the

  5. 232 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL May 2002

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a prevalence of 79% in 29 Italian type II diabetics. In another European study, Gentile et al.(10) found 74% of. 164 type II diabetics as compared to 50% controls with H. pylori infection. N 0 local studies have so ... EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 233 congestive cardiac failure and onewith hepatitis were also excluded.

  6. Regional Integration: A Political Federation of the East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to explore the possibility and viability of an East African political federation project. Since the late 1800s under the then British East Africa, the countries of East Africa have been searching for ways to integrate. The search led to the establishment of the East African Community (EAC) in December ...

  7. Study of African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    by the Biuret method and serum electrophoresis on cellulose acetate was done using the BecKman Microzone technique. Immunoglobulin levels were...the lumbar sacral junction. Laboratory procedures Routine hematological methods [Wellde et al. 1974) were employed. Total serum proteins were determined...et. al (1966). Complement fixation tests were done following the method of StaaK and Lohding (1979). In an attempt to identify other agents in

  8. The African elephants' toe nails | Parker | Journal of East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of East African Natural History. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 106, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here ...

  9. 290 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-06-02

    Jun 2, 2001 ... This paper was presented at the 12th International Association for Dental Research (IADR), East and Southern Africa Division, Conference in Nairobi, Kenya ... Setting: Division of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Dental Sciences, University of ... extent, their compromised facial appearances (aesthetics).

  10. 604 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-11-01

    Nov 1, 2001 ... Indian South Africans in genes associated with bone mineral density and osteoporosis. Design: Genes selected were the vitamin D receptor (Apa I and Taq I polymorphisms) and collagen (Sp I transcription factor polymorphism) using standard molecular biology techniques. Setting: Department of Chemical ...

  11. Archives: East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 228 ... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality. Current Issue Atom logo. RSS2 logo. RSS1 logo. 521 African Journals. Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  12. Archives: East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 101 - 150 of 228 ... Current Issue Atom logo. RSS2 logo. RSS1 logo. 521 African Journals. Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Featuring journals from 32 Countries: Algeria (5); Benin (2); Botswana (3); Burkina Faso (3) ...

  13. Collaboration with East African security organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, Johannes Riber; Jacobsen, Katja L.

    2012-01-01

    of the concept. At the same time the three organisations represent different constellations of member nations and thus different national interests, and locally they have different legitimacy and political strength. Thus, when choosing collaboration partners for a security project it is not simply a question......When it comes to understanding the concept of security and the way fragile security situations should be solved, the difference is big. While EASF – the East African Standby Force – is a regular military force with a rather traditional, military perception of the concept of security, EAC (East...... African Community) and IGAD (Intergovernmental Authority on Development) have broader perceptions of the concept. According to EAC, security also concerns matters such as policy reform, legislation, education and infrastructure. IGAD considers food security and environmental and economic issues as part...

  14. Molecular Evidence of a Trypanosoma brucei gambiense Sylvatic Cycle in the Human African Trypanosomiasis Foci of Equatorial Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eCordon-Obras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gambiense trypanosomiasis is considered an anthroponotic disease. Consequently, control programs are generally aimed at stopping transmission of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (T. b. gambiense by detecting and treating human cases. However, the persistence of numerous foci despite efforts to eliminate this disease questions this strategy as unique tool to pursue the eradication. The role of animals as a reservoir of T. b. gambiense is still controversial, but could partly explain maintenance of the infection at hypo-endemic levels. In the present study, we evaluated the presence of T. b. gambiense in wild animals in Equatorial Guinea. The infection rate ranged from 0.8% in the insular focus of Luba to more than 12% in Mbini, a focus with a constant trickle of human cases. The parasite was detected in a wide range of animal species including four species never described previously as putative reservoirs. Our study comes to reinforce the hypothesis that animals may play a role in the persistence of T. b. gambiense transmission, being particularly relevant in low transmission settings. Under these conditions the integration of sustained vector control and medical interventions should be considered to achieve the elimination of Gambiense trypanosomiasis.

  15. Performance of the SD BIOLINE® HAT rapid test in various diagnostic algorithms for gambiense human African trypanosomiasis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispin Lumbala

    Full Text Available We carried out a study to compare the performance, in terms of sensitivity and specificity, of the new SD BIOLINE® HAT rapid diagnostic test (RDT with the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT for diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC. Participants were enrolled actively by four mobile teams, and passively at four health facilities in three provinces. Consenting participants were tested concurrently with the RDT and CATT on whole blood. Those found positive by either test were tested with CATT on serial dilutions of plasma, and with a parasitological composite reference standard (CRS. Cases were only the individuals found positive by the CRS, while controls were negative by both CATT and RDT, as well as those that were positive by CATT or RDT, but were negative by the CRS, and had no history of HAT. Over five months, 131 cases and 13,527 controls were enrolled. The sensitivity of the RDT was 92.0% (95% confidence interval (CI = 86.1-95.5, which was significantly higher than CATT (sensitivity 69.1%; 95% CI = 60.7-76.4. The sensitivity of CATT on plasma at a dilution of 1:8 was 59.0% (95% CI = 50.2-67.2. The specificity of the RDT was 97.1% (95% CIs = 96.8-97.4 while that of CATT was 98.0% (95% CIs = 97.8, 98.2 and specificities of algorithms involving CATT at 1:8 dilution were 99.6% (95% CI = 99.5-99.7. Reproducibility of results was excellent. We concluded that an algorithm in which the SD BIOLINE® HAT RDT is used for screening is optimal for case detection in both passive and active screening settings. However, the lower specificity of the RDT compared to that of CATT would result in a larger number of false positive individuals undergoing confirmatory testing.

  16. First evidence that parasite infecting apparent aparasitemic serological suspects in human African trypanosomiasis are Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and are similar to those found in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboré, Jacques; Koffi, Mathurin; Bucheton, Bruno; MacLeod, Annette; Duffy, Craig; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Camara, Mamadou; De Meeûs, Thierry; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2011-08-01

    Thanks to its sensitivity and its ease of use in the field, the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT) is widely used for serological screening of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Positive subjects are then examined by microscopy to confirm the disease. However, the CATT exhibits false-positive results raising the question of whether CATT-positive subjects who are not confirmed by microscopic detection of trypanosomes (SERO) are truly exposed to T.b. gambiense infection. For this purpose, we applied microsatellite genotyping on DNA extracted from blood of both HAT confirmed patients and SERO subjects in Guinea and Côte d'Ivoire since microsatellite genotyping has proved useful for the study of T.b. gambiense genetic diversity. Problems of amplification failures raise the question of the sensitivity of microsatellite markers when applied on biological samples especially from SERO subjects for who low blood parasitaemia are suspected. Nevertheless, we have shown that the trypanosomes from SERO individuals that have been genotyped belong to T.b. gambiense group 1 and were identical to those found in HAT patients. These results constitute the first evidences that at least some SERO are indeed infected by T.b. gambiense group 1 and that they may constitute a human reservoir of parasite in HAT foci. Whether these individuals should undergo treatment remains an open question as long as their role in HAT transmission is unknown. Our results strongly recommend the follow-up of such subjects to improve control strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nifurtimox-Eflornithine Combination Therapy for Second-Stage Gambiense Human African Trypanosomiasis: Médecins Sans Frontières Experience in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    OpenAIRE

    Alirol, E; Schrumpf, D; Amici Heradi, J.; Riedel, A.; de Patoul, C.; Quere, M.; Chappuis, F.

    2017-01-01

    Existing diagnostic and treatment tools for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are limited. The recent development of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) has brought new hopes for patients in the second stage. While NECT has been rolled out in most endemic countries, safety data are scarce and derive only from clinical trials. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a pharmacovigilance program to collect additional data on NECT safety and efficacy. We report here the r...

  18. Are caecilians rare? An East African perspective | Measey | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    representation are identified. It is concluded that not all members of the order Gymnophiona in East Africa are rare, although more field studies are needed to redress herpetology's subterranean blind spot. Journal of East African Natural History Vol.

  19. International Terrorism and East African sub-regionalism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper discusses both positive and negative implications of fighting international terrorism and how it impacts on trust between East African countries, peace building in the region and tourism development in East Africa.

  20. Animal trypanosomiasis in Africa: Aetiology and Epidemiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four major elements were identifed as important in the epizootiology of African animal trypanosomiasis namely the trypanosome, the tsetse fy the mammalian host and the environmental factors. It was concluded that the phenomenon of high rate of resistance referred to as trypanosotolerance has genetic correspondence.

  1. Genetically Distinct Glossina fuscipes fuscipes Populations in the Lake Kyoga Region of Uganda and Its Relevance for Human African Trypanosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Echodu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tsetse flies (Glossina spp. are the sole vectors of Trypanosoma brucei—the agent of human (HAT and animal (AAT trypanosomiasis. Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Gff is the main vector species in Uganda—the only country where the two forms of HAT disease (rhodesiense and gambiense occur, with gambiense limited to the northwest. Gff populations cluster in three genetically distinct groups in northern, southern, and western Uganda, respectively, with a contact zone present in central Uganda. Understanding the dynamics of this contact zone is epidemiologically important as the merger of the two diseases is a major health concern. We used mitochondrial and microsatellite DNA data from Gff samples in the contact zone to understand its spatial extent and temporal stability. We show that this zone is relatively narrow, extending through central Uganda along major rivers with south to north introgression but displaying no sex-biased dispersal. Lack of obvious vicariant barriers suggests that either environmental conditions or reciprocal competitive exclusion could explain the patterns of genetic differentiation observed. Lack of admixture between northern and southern populations may prevent the sympatry of the two forms of HAT disease, although continued control efforts are needed to prevent the recolonization of tsetse-free regions by neighboring populations.

  2. The East African Resilience Innovation Hub | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The East African Resilience Innovation Hub. By 2025, poverty will primarily be centred in low-income, conflict and violence-affected African states. This project will invest in an East Africa research hub that will help resolve priority policy challenges related to violence, disaster, and conflict. Poverty, conflict, and development ...

  3. Journal of East African Natural History: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Journal of East African Natural History is published jointly by the East Africa Natural History Society and the National Museums of Kenya. The Journal publishes papers and notes in the field of natural history, broadly defined as the study of organisms in their natural state, relevant to the eastern African ...

  4. The East African Resilience Innovation Hub | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The East African Resilience Innovation Hub. By 2025, poverty will primarily be centred in low-income, conflict and violence-affected African states. This project will invest in an East Africa research hub that will help resolve priority policy challenges related to violence, disaster, and conflict. Poverty, conflict, and development ...

  5. Identification of sVSG117 as an immunodiagnostic antigen and evaluation of a dual-antigen lateral flow test for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Sullivan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense relies mainly on the Card Agglutination Test for Trypanosomiasis (CATT. There is no immunodiagnostic for HAT caused by T. b. rhodesiense. Our principle aim was to develop a prototype lateral flow test that might be an improvement on CATT.Pools of infection and control sera were screened against four different soluble form variant surface glycoproteins (sVSGs by ELISA and one, sVSG117, showed particularly strong immunoreactivity to pooled infection sera. Using individual sera, sVSG117 was shown to be able to discriminate between T. b. gambiense infection and control sera by both ELISA and lateral flow test. The sVSG117 antigen was subsequently used with a previously described recombinant diagnostic antigen, rISG65, to create a dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype. The latter was used blind in a virtual field trial of 431 randomized infection and control sera from the WHO HAT Specimen Biobank.In the virtual field trial, using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, the sVSG117 and rISG65 dual-antigen lateral flow test prototype showed a sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI: 93.3 to 99.2 and a specificity of 83.3% (95% CI: 76.4 to 88.9 for the detection of T. b. gambiense infections. The device was not as good for detecting T. b. rhodesiense infections using two positive antigen bands as the criterion for infection, with a sensitivity of 58.9% (95% CI: 44.9 to 71.9 and specificity of 97.3% (95% CI: 90.7 to 99.7. However, using one or both positive antigen band(s as the criterion for T. b. rhodesiense infection improved the sensitivity to 83.9% (95% CI: 71.7 to 92.4 with a specificity of 85.3% (95% CI: 75.3 to 92.4. These results encourage further development of the dual-antigen device for clinical use.

  6. Zoogeographical Patterns in the Distribution of East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The savanna fauna of treefrogs in East Africa includes five distributional patterns: a widely distributed element, an element in the savanna north of the central forest from Cameroun to northern East Africa. an element south of the central forest, an East African lowland fauna. and an element in the dry savanna of Kenya and ...

  7. Understanding the health beliefs and practices of East African refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmelink, Jennifer; Lightfoot, Elizabeth; Dube, Amano; Blevins, Jennifer; Lum, Terry

    2013-03-01

    To explore East African refugees' perceptions, ideas, and beliefs about health and health care, as well as the ways in which health information is shared within their communities. This study consisted of 2 focus groups with a total of 15 participants, including East African community leaders and health professionals. East African refugees in the United States have strong cultural, religious, and traditional health practices that shape their health behavior and influence their interactions with Western health care systems. Health care providers who understand refugees' beliefs about health may achieve more compliance with refugee patients.

  8. The socio-economic burden of human African trypanosomiasis and the coping strategies of households in the South Western Kenya foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukachi, Salome A; Wandibba, Simiyu; Nyamongo, Isaac K

    2017-10-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), a disease caused by protozoan parasites transmitted by tsetse flies, is an important neglected tropical disease endemic in remote regions of sub-Saharan Africa. Although the determination of the burden of HAT has been based on incidence, mortality and morbidity rates, the true burden of HAT goes beyond these metrics. This study sought to establish the socio-economic burden that households with HAT faced and the coping strategies they employed to deal with the increased burden. A mixed methods approach was used and data were obtained through: review of hospital records; structured interviews (152); key informant interviews (11); case narratives (12) and focus group discussions (15) with participants drawn from sleeping sickness patients in the south western HAT foci in Kenya. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics while qualitative data was analysed based on emerging themes. Socio-economic impacts included, disruption of daily activities, food insecurity, neglect of homestead, poor academic performance/school drop-outs and death. Delayed diagnosis of HAT caused 93% of the affected households to experience an increase in financial expenditure (ranging from US$ 60-170) in seeking treatment. Out of these, 81.5% experienced difficulties in raising money for treatment resorting to various ways of raising it. The coping strategies employed to deal with the increased financial expenditure included: sale of agricultural produce (64%); seeking assistance from family and friends (54%); sale/lease of family assets (22%); seeking credit (22%) and use of personal savings (17%). Coping strategies outlined in this study impacted negatively on the affected households leading to further food insecurity and impoverishment. Calculation of the true burden of disease needs to go beyond incidence, mortality and morbidity rates to capture socio-economic variables entailed in seeking treatment and coping strategies of HAT affected

  9. International Terrorism and East African sub-regionalism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2006-05-23

    regional Tourism. Industry in the Face of War. Alfred Anangwe*. Abstract. This paper discusses both positive and negative implications of fighting interna- tional terrorism and how it impacts on trust between East African countries, ...

  10. Records: East African Rarities Committee report and change of remit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 29 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. East African rarities committee report | Fisher | Scopus: Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 36, No 2 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. Review | Ng'weno | Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 34 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. The East African Resilience Innovation Hub | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    affected African states. This project will invest in an East Africa research hub that will help resolve priority policy challenges related to violence, disaster, and conflict. Poverty, conflict, and development Promoting development and humanitarian ...

  14. 1 East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Vol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Vol. 16 (2013). EDITORIAL ... bleeding, deafness, erectile dysfunction and loss of libido, amenorrhoea, alopecia, insomnia, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, nightmares, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, rashes, fever, weight gain and spontaneous tendon damage.

  15. The East African Mantle: Warm but not Hot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, T. O.; Herzberg, C. T.; Bastow, I. D.

    2011-12-01

    East Africa is underlain by one of the most conspicuous features of global tomographic models: the African Super-plume. Magmatism during the African-Arabian flood basalt event and ongoing development of the East African rift have long been linked to the super-plume, with high temperatures usually cited as evidence for its existence. However, our work shows that seismic wave-speeds in the East African mantle are too low to be accounted for by only thermal effects. Other factors such as composition must also play a role. To address these issues we present mantle potential temperature estimates (TP) and preliminary high-precision compositional data from olivine crystals for East African lavas with the goal of constraining the thermo-chemical conditions of the East African upper mantle. Our estimates of mantle TP show that the East African mantle has remained warmer than ambient mantle conditions over the past 40 Myr, peaking during the Oligocene African-Arabian flood basalt episode (1520°C). These TP values, while clearly elevated, fall toward the lower end of the global temperature range of large igneous provinces, and are inconsistent with a solely thermal origin for the profound mantle seismic velocity anomalies beneath East Africa. Evidence of compositional heterogeneity in the East African upper mantle is preserved in the Fe, Mn, Ca, and Ni content of olivine crystals in lavas. We have found that Fe/Mn (42-95) within this preliminary dataset extend to the most extreme values yet recorded in the global LIP and oceanic island database, plotting well-outside fields accepted for olivine derived from peridotite-sourced melt. These data are strong evidence of a significant role for non-peridotite lithologies such as pyroxenite in the East African upper mantle. Such pyroxenites may reside in the metasomatized lithospheric mantle, or be derived from the reaction of recycled oceanic slabs upwelling in the African Superplume. Such recycled materials likely contain

  16. East and Central African Journal of Surgery: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Prof. Ignatius Kakande Editor-in-Chief Association of Surgeons of East Africa. East and Central African Journal of Surgery. P.O. Box 7051. Kampala. Uganda. Alternative email: igkakande@gmail.com. Phone: +256 772 501 745. Email: ecajs@gmail.com ...

  17. Acute appendicitis in a Kenya rural hospital | Willmore | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal: 2001 78(7): 355-357). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i7.9007 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  18. Jonathan Kingdon and the east African forests | Groves | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jonathan Kingdon, 45 years ago, first pointed out the special nature of the East African coastal and montane forests, that a number of mammals are endemic to these forests, and that they are not just an eastern extension of the Central African rainforest belt. Other authors, and Kingdon himself, subsequently enhanced and ...

  19. Editorial - East and Central African Journal of Surgery: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial - East and Central African Journal of Surgery: The Canadian connection. Jonathan Meakins, Edward W Archibald, James Waddell. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE ...

  20. Adhesive intestinal obstruction | Kuremu | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. East African Medical Journal Vol. 83(6) 2006: 333-336. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v83i6.9441 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  1. Surgical management of peptic ulcer disease | Kuremu | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical management of peptic ulcer disease. R. T. Kuremu. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal: 2002 79(9): 454-456). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v79i9.9115 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  2. Suicide attempts in a Nigerian military setting | Okulate | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suicide attempts in a Nigerian military setting. G. T. Okulate. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (9): 493-496). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i9.8983 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...

  3. HIV infection in elderly medical patients | Mtei | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV infection in elderly medical patients. L. N. Mtei, P. Pallangyo. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal: 2001 78(3): 144-147). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i3.9081 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  4. Goldenhar 's syndrome: case report | Adeoye | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Goldenhar 's syndrome: case report. A. O. Adeoye. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal: 2002 79(9): 502-504). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v79i9.9125 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL ...

  5. JanuaryZi'KW EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-01-01

    Jan 1, 2007 ... JanuaryZi'KW EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 3. Rust African Medical Ioumul Vol. 534 No. l .... of the frequent causes of bloodstream infections. (BSI) among febrile adults with advanced HIV ... liigmnclroilrle primers: A single set of oligonucleot it in primers was used (Mill. ., lllerlin, (l;erinanybi'jii.

  6. African Trypanosomiasis-Associated Anemia: The Contribution of the Interplay between Parasites and the Mononuclear Phagocyte System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Stijlemans

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomosis (AT is a chronically debilitating parasitic disease of medical and economic importance for the development of sub-Saharan Africa. The trypanosomes that cause this disease are extracellular protozoan parasites that have developed efficient immune escape mechanisms to manipulate the entire host immune response to allow parasite survival and transmission. During the early stage of infection, a profound pro-inflammatory type 1 activation of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS, involving classically activated macrophages (i.e., M1, is required for initial parasite control. Yet, the persistence of this M1-type MPS activation in trypanosusceptible animals causes immunopathology with anemia as the most prominent pathological feature. By contrast, in trypanotolerant animals, there is an induction of IL-10 that promotes the induction of alternatively activated macrophages (M2 and collectively dampens tissue damage. A comparative gene expression analysis between M1 and M2 cells identified galectin-3 (Gal-3 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF as novel M1-promoting factors, possibly acting synergistically and in concert with TNF-α during anemia development. While Gal-3 enhances erythrophagocytosis, MIF promotes both myeloid cell recruitment and iron retention within the MPS, thereby depriving iron for erythropoiesis. Hence, the enhanced erythrophagocytosis and suppressed erythropoiesis lead to anemia. Moreover, a thorough investigation using MIF-deficient mice revealed that the underlying mechanisms in AT-associated anemia development in trypanosusceptible and tolerant animals are quite distinct. In trypanosusceptible animals, anemia resembles anemia of inflammation, while in trypanotolerant animals’ hemodilution, mainly caused by hepatosplenomegaly, is an additional factor contributing to anemia. In this review, we give an overview of how trypanosome- and host-derived factors can contribute to trypanosomosis

  7. Assessment of conventional oil resources of the East African Rift Province, East Africa, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfield, Michael E.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Klett, Timothy R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Marra, Kristen R.; Finn, Thomas M.; Le, Phuong A.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2017-03-27

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated undiscovered, technically recoverable mean conventional resources of 13.4 billion barrels of oil and 4.6 trillion cubic feet of gas in the East African Rift Province of east Africa.

  8. East and Central African Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objects of the Association journal shall be the advancement of the science and art of surgery and the promotion of friendship and exchange of ideas between surgeons in the constituent countries of The Association of Surgeons of East Africa (ASEA) and The College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa ...

  9. Tuberculosis of the spine in Ilorin, Nigeria | Solagberu | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the spine in Ilorin, Nigeria. B. A. Solagberu, R. O. Ayorinde. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal: 2001 78(4): 197-199). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i4.9062 · AJOL African Journals ...

  10. Multi-stage models for recovery process | Ugwuowo | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract > East African Journal of Statistics Vol. 1 (3) 2007: pp.317-333. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eajosta.v1i3.39187 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  11. Body dysmorphic disorder: case report | Mareko | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    G M Mareko, C J Othieno, M W Kuria, J N Kiarie, D M Ndetei. Abstract. No Abstract. East African Medical Journal Vol. 84 (9) 2007: pp. 450-452. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v84i9.9555 · AJOL African ...

  12. Fractures of the mandible in children | Fasola | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fractures of the mandible in children. A. O. Fasola, A. E. Obiechina, J. T. Arotiba. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (11): 616-618). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i11.8954 · AJOL African ...

  13. 72 ' EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL February 2008 East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-02-02

    Feb 2, 2008 ... Design: Descriptive, cross sectional study involving use of questionnaire administered in interview format. Setting: Pumwani .... the urban and rural South African pregnant women in their study. Tayie and Lartey (12) ... considered a very preliminary one in the area of pica prevalence in Kenya. In addition ...

  14. Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Darcy Ogada Dr Bird Committee of the East Africa Natural History Society. Editors,. Scopus,. c/o Nature Kenya,. P.O. Box 44486,. G.P.O. 00100,. Nairobi, Kenya. Email: scopus@naturekenya.org ...

  15. Nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy for second-stage African Trypanosoma brucei gambiense trypanosomiasis: a multicentre, randomised, phase III, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priotto, Gerardo; Kasparian, Serena; Mutombo, Wilfried; Ngouama, Daniel; Ghorashian, Sara; Arnold, Ute; Ghabri, Salah; Baudin, Elisabeth; Buard, Vincent; Kazadi-Kyanza, Serge; Ilunga, Médard; Mutangala, Willy; Pohlig, Gabriele; Schmid, Caecilia; Karunakara, Unni; Torreele, Els; Kande, Victor

    2009-07-04

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT; sleeping sickness) caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is a fatal disease. Current treatment options for patients with second-stage disease are toxic, ineffective, or impractical. We assessed the efficacy and safety of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) for second-stage disease compared with the standard eflornithine regimen. A multicentre, randomised, open-label, active control, phase III, non-inferiority trial was done at four HAT treatment centres in the Republic of the Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Patients aged 15 years or older with confirmed second-stage T b gambiense infection were randomly assigned by computer-generated randomisation sequence to receive intravenous eflornithine (400 mg/kg per day, every 6 h; n=144) for 14 days or intravenous eflornithine (400 mg/kg per day, every 12 h) for 7 days with oral nifurtimox (15 mg/kg per day, every 8 h) for 10 days (NECT; n=143). The primary endpoint was cure (defined as absence of trypanosomes in body fluids and a leucocyte count

  16. Hydatid disease of the spine: Case report | Kuremu | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rare case of spinal hydatid disease presenting with paraparesis and sensory loss is reported. The patient was treated with albendazole resulting in significant improvement within eight weeks. Investigations and treatment modalities are discussed. (East African Medical Journal: 2002 79(3): 165-166) ...

  17. Herpes zoster myelitis: report of two cases | Amanyo | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 79, No 5 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  18. Editorial : Clinical drug interactions | Kokwaro | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 78, No 10 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: Clinical drug interactions. G. O. Kokwaro. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (10): 505-506). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  19. Informed consent for clinical trials: a review | Lema | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 86, No 3 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  20. Campylobacter enteritis in Ilorin, Nigeria | Samuel | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 83, No 9 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  1. Retinitis pigmentosa in Benin, Nigeria | Ukponmwan | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 81, No 5 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  2. Maritime Security Concerns of the East African Community (EAC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maritime domain of the East African Community (EAC) is affected by a number of maritime security threats, including piracy, armed robbery against ships and an ongoing maritime border dispute between Kenya and Somalia. Neither the EAC nor its member States have long-term and holistic maritime security policies.

  3. Panmixia in east African Platgyra daedalea | Macdonald | Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reef coral populations in the western Indian Ocean are neglected in terms of research and management. Very little is known about coral population connectivity and dynamics at regional scales. Platygyra daedalea was collected from Indian Ocean coral reefs, mainly from the east African coast between Mombasa Marine ...

  4. Panmixia in East African Populations of Platygyra daedalea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—Very little is known about coral population connectivity and dynamics at regional scales, particularly in the western Indian Ocean. Platygyra daedalea was collected from Indian Ocean coral reefs, mainly from the east African coast between Mombasa Marine Park (Kenya) in the north and Maputaland (South Africa).

  5. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences is dedicated to all aspects of Pharmaceutical Sciences research and is published in English. The scientific papers published in the Journal fall into three main categories: review papers, original research papers and short communications. Review papers in ...

  6. Cerebellar Pilomyxoid Astrocytoma | Biluts | East and Central African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East and Central African Journal of Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 3 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  7. Thyroid disease in a rural Kenyan hospital | Hill | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To review the spectrum of thyroid pathology diagnoses likely to be encountered by surgeons working in East African hospitals. Design: A retrospective review of all thyroidectomies performed over a three year period. Setting: A rural church based hospital in Kenya. Subjects: Two hundred and twenty two patients ...

  8. Gastro-duodenal peptic ulcer perforation | Dakubo | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 86, No 3 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  9. East and Central African Journal of Surgery: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. Instructions for Authors. The East and Central African Journal of Surgery will consider new manuscripts on clinical research, surgical technique, surgical practice, trauma, critical care, as well as clinical reviews, editorials, brief communications, and letters of interest to readers in Africa and globally.

  10. East African Journal of Public Health: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The East African Journal of Public Health is a multi-disciplinary journal publishing scientific research work from a range of public health related disciplines including community medicine, epidemiology, nutrition, behavioural sciences, health promotion, health education, communicable and ...

  11. Editorial Health seeking behaviour in context | Olenja | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 80, No 2 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  12. East African Medical Journal Vol. 79 No. 2 February 2002

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-02-02

    Feb 2, 2002 ... East African Medical Journal Vol. 79 No. 2 February 2002. VERBAL AUTOPSY IN ESTABLISHING CAUSE OF PERINATAL DEATH. N. Iriya, MD, MMed (Paed), Bugando Medical Centre, Mwanza, Tanzania, K. P. Ma'nji, MBBS, MMed (Paed) and R.L Mbise, MBChB, MMed., M.Sc., Department of. Paediatrics ...

  13. Post-traumatic stress disorder: Case report | Nyamai | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 77, No 4 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  14. Primary cerebral angitis of the central nervous | Das | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various medications like intravenous immunoglobulin, antibiotics, acyclovir, methyl prednisolone and management for raised intracranial pressure were instituted. She rapidly deteroriated and died on tenth hospital day. Only at autopsy was the diagnosis of primary angitis of central nervous system established. East African ...

  15. Population Dynamics of the East African Sleeping Sickness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematical models of the East African sleeping sickness epidemiology are presented. This paper is aimed at modelling the dynamics of the disease as it affects the human and domestic animal populations. The mathematical model is extended to include the contact rate of the tsetse flies with the wild park animals that ...

  16. Germination of important East African mountain forest trees ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary forest species mainly germinated under low illumination or dark conditions and showed a very short seed viability. The storage temperature did not influence viability, whereas the maturity of the seeds collected had a considerable influence on the germination success. Journal of East African Natural History Vol.

  17. Forensic medicine in Kenya: A personal view | Olumbe | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 77, No 1 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome in black Kenyans | Lule | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 79, No 7 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  19. Emerging picture of multiple sclerosis in Kenya | Kioy | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging picture of multiple sclerosis in Kenya. P. G. Kioy. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal: 2001 78(2): 93-96). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

  20. Temporomandibular joint dislocation in Nairobi | Sang | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite the diverse conservative and surgical modalities for the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation and the controversy that surrounds them, very little has been done within the East-African setup in terms of highlighting and provoking greater interest in the epidemiology and ...

  1. Looking forward to the East African Countries' Collaboration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Looking forward to the East African Countries' Collaboration in Nursing and. Midwifery Education, Practice and Legislation ... Assembly (WHA) resolution 62.12 directed countries to strengthen nursing and midwifery professions in .... report of the nursing harmonization study and chart the way forward for the harmonization ...

  2. Editorial: Road safety in Kenya | Otsyeno | East African Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Orthopaedic Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  3. Editorial: Road safety in Kenya | Otsyeno | East African Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Orthopaedic Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Editorial: Road safety in Kenya. F Otsyeno. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text:.

  4. Body dysmorphic disorder: case report | Mareko | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 84, No 9 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  5. Doctors lifestyle in Enugu, Nigeria | Aghaji | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 77, No 9 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  6. Climate variability and impacts on east African livestock herders: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African pastoral adaptation and vulnerability to climate variability and climate change is assessed, using data from decision-making processes and ecological data of the Maasai of Ngorongoro Conservation Area as an example. The paper uses integrated modeling, linking PHEWS, a household model, to Savanna, ...

  7. Bandwidth selection in smoothing functions | Kibua | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... inexpensive and, hence, worth adopting. We argue that the bandwidth parameter is determined by two factors: the kernel function and the length of the smoothing region. We give an illustrative example of its application using real data. Keywords: Kernel, Smoothing functions, Bandwidth > East African Journal of Statistics ...

  8. The black Dutchmen : African soldiers in the Netherlands East Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, van W.M.J.; Kessel, van I.

    2002-01-01

    Between 1831 and 1872 some 3,000 African recruits sailed from Elmina (Gold Coast, now Ghana) to Batavia, the capital of the Netherlands East Indies. They had been recruited to serve in the Dutch colonial army, which throughout most of the 19th century experienced a chronic shortage of European

  9. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences: Advanced Search ... Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ((journal OR conference) NOT theses); Search for an exact phrase by putting ...

  10. New use of indomethacin | Maitai | East and Central African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... their rodenticidal effects confirmed. On the basis of these results use of indomethacin as rodenticide is justified as it is much cheaper, readily available and safer in humans compared to other rodenticides in the market. Keywords: Indomethacin, rodenticide. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences Vol.

  11. Leprosy in Nkhotakota District Hospital | Chisi | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 80, No 12 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  12. Genetic structure and diversity of East African taro [ Colocasia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taro [Colocasia esculenta (L) Schott] is mainly produced in Africa by small holder farmers and plays an important role in the livelihood of millions of poor people in less developed countries. The genetic diversity of East African taro has not been determined. This study utilizes six microsatellite primers to analyze five ...

  13. Regional East African Community Health Policy Initiative (REACH ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Regional East African Community Health (REACH) policy initiative aims to improve health and health equity in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda by facilitating the translation of health research into policy and practice. Once fully established, REACH will function as a bridge linking health researchers and policymakers.

  14. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences In vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Vol. 6(2003) 15- 19. In vitro In hi bition of Mycobncterium smegmntis and Mycobncterium tuhercu1o.si.s by Some .... fine po\\vda' \\\\;it11 the help of pestle and mortar. The powdered plant materials were taken to tlie. Natural Products Research Laboratory, School.

  15. GalAactosaemia in black South African children | Ojwang | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the most common form of galactosaemia in black children in the KwaZulu Natal region. Cases of galactokinase or epimerase enzyme deficiency appear to be present. Further investigation is required to establish the occurrence and prevalence of the latter in affected individuals in this region. East African Medical Journal, ...

  16. Sexual abuse in children | Ngiloi | East and Central African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East and Central African Journal of Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (1999) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  17. Suicide attempts in a Nigerian military setting | Okulate | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 78, No 9 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  18. Testicular torsion: case report | Kuremu | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 81, No 5 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  19. Ergonomics in the computer workstation | Karoney | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 87, No 9 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  20. Looking forward to the East African Countries' Collaboration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2014, the East African Community (EAC) partner states began to explore the possibility of harmonizing nursing and midwifery education, practice and legislation. A study to examine harmonization was commissioned and variations in nursing and midwifery education, practice and legislation were discussed among ...

  1. Goldenhar 's syndrome: case report | Adeoye | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 79, No 9 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  2. East African Medical Journal Vol. 78 No. 4 April 2001

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-04-04

    Apr 4, 2001 ... mostly among young adults most of whom were farmers. Postoperative complications occurred in 36 ... April 2001 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 209. Table 1. Causes of acute intestinal obstruction in .... and ingest single voluminous meals late in the afternoon. This association is in conformity with ...

  3. Regional Trade Agreement and Agricultural Trade in East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    According to World Bank statistics, agricultural activities contribute about 33 per cent of the East African Community's Gross Domestic Product, and up to 80 per cent of the populace depends on agriculture directly and indirectly for food, employment and income, while about 40 million people in EAC suffer from hunger.

  4. Emerging picture of multiple sclerosis in Kenya | Kioy | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 78, No 2 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  5. Lower limb amputation in Jos, Nigeria | Kidmas | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 81, No 8 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  6. Anorexia nervosa in Kenya | Njenga | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 81, No 4 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  7. The study of trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in two human African trypanosomiasis foci of Côte d'Ivoire identifies pigs and cattle as potential reservoirs of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Djetchi, Martial Kassi; Ilboudo, Hamidou; Koffi, Mathurin; Kaboré, Jacques; Kaboré, Justin Windingoudi; Kaba, Dramane; Courtin, Fabrice; Coulibaly, Bamoro; Fauret, Pierre; Kouakou, Lingué; Ravel, Sophie; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Solano, Philippe; De Meeûs, Thierry; Bucheton, Bruno; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    Important control efforts have led to a significant reduction of the prevalence of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Côte d'Ivoire, but the disease is still present in several foci. The existence of an animal reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense may explain disease persistence in these foci where animal breeding is an important source of income but where the prevalence of animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT) is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the trypanosome species circulating in domestic animals in both Bonon and Sinfra HAT endemic foci. 552 domestic animals (goats, pigs, cattle and sheep) were included. Blood samples were tested for trypanosomes by microscopic observation, species-specific PCR for T. brucei sl, T. congolense, T. vivax and subspecies-specific PCR for T. b. gambiense and T. b. gambiense immune trypanolysis (TL). Infection rates varied significantly between animal species and were by far the highest in pigs (30%). T. brucei s.l was the most prevalent trypanosome species (13.7%) followed by T. congolense. No T. b. gambiense was identified by PCR while high TL positivity rates were observed using T. b. gambiense specific variants (up to 27.6% for pigs in the Bonon focus). This study shows that domestic animals are highly infected by trypanosomes in the studied foci. This was particularly true for pigs, possibly due to a higher exposure of these animals to tsetse flies. Whereas T. brucei s.l. was the most prevalent species, discordant results were obtained between PCR and TL regarding T. b. gambiense identification. It is therefore crucial to develop better tools to study the epidemiological role of potential animal reservoir for T. b. gambiense. Our study illustrates the importance of "one health" approaches to reach HAT elimination and contribute to AAT control in the studied foci.

  8. African Muslim Youth and the Middle East

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihle, Annette Haaber

    of anthropological fieldwork in Northern Ghana 2001-2002, supplemented with two weeks of fieldwork in branches of the Faculty of Islamic Call in Libya and Syria, 2003 and 2005, the paper will document the role which Muslim institutions, resident in Africa as well as in the Middle East, play in furthering...

  9. Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Privacy Statement. The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party. ISSN: 2313-1799. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  10. Scientific Communication | Okolo | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    What will it take to accelerate the rate of decline of neonatal mortality in West Africa? Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  11. East and Central African Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    been won against smallpox, poliomyelitis, whooping cough, diphtheria and measles. These no longer reach epidemic proportions in Africa as they did 30 years ago. But against a background of over- population, war and malnutrition, malaria and the diarrhoea1 diseases take an increasing toll of African children. In the cities ...

  12. East African Medical Journal: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality.

  13. The epidemiology of trypanosomiasis in Rumphi district, Malawi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is caused by two species of the tsetse fly vectored protozoan hemoflagellates belonging to Trypanosma brucei, namely T.b gambiense which predominates in Western Africa and follows a chronic disease course and T.b rhodensiense which is more prevalent in Southern ...

  14. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2013 East African Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Jones, Eric S.; Stadler, Timothy J.; Barnhart, William D.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Hayes, Gavin P.; Jones, Eric S.; Stadler, Timothy J.; Barnhart, William D.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Benz, Harley M.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The East African Rift system (EARS) is a 3,000-km-long Cenozoic age continental rift extending from the Afar triple junction, between the horn of Africa and the Middle East, to western Mozambique. Sectors of active extension occur from the Indian Ocean, west to Botswana and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). It is the only rift system in the world that is active on a continent-wide scale, providing geologists with a view of how continental rifts develop over time into oceanic spreading centers like the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  15. Hybridization in East African swarm-raiding army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel Jc; Peters, Marcell K; Schöning, Caspar

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization can have complex effects on evolutionary dynamics in ants because of the combination of haplodiploid sex-determination and eusociality. While hybrid non-reproductive workers have been found in a range of species, examples of gene-flow via hybrid queens and males are rare. We studied...... hybridization in East African army ants (Dorylus subgenus Anomma) using morphology, mitochondrial DNA sequences, and nuclear microsatellites....

  16. Twice Versus Direct Migrants: East African Sikh Settlers in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Bhachu, Parminder

    1990-01-01

    This paper has three main aims:first, it attempts to document salient features of a settler population of the twice migrant East African Sikhs,whose orientations and patterns of settlement, are different from that of the directly migrant groups who constitute the majority South Asian population in Britain. It analyses the major features of the organisation of the community, namely community values, its structure, economic organisation, the influence of a strong communications network, the con...

  17. Monitoring East African vegetation using AVHRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, C. O.; Holben, B. N.; Gwynne, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite data are applied to regional vegetation monitoring in East Africa. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data for a one-year period from May 1983 are used to examine the phenology of a range of vegetation types. The integrated NDVI data for the same period are compared with an ecoclimatic zone map of the region and show marked similarities. Particular emphasis is placed on quantifying the phenology of the Acacia Commiphora bushlands. Considerable variation was found in the phenology of the bushlands as determined by the satellite NDVI, and is explained through the high spatial variability in the distribution of rainfall and the resulting green-up of the vegetation. The relationship between rainfall and NDVI is further examined for selected meteorological stations existing within the bushland. A preliminary estimate is made of the length of growing season using an NDVI thresholding technique.

  18. Improving the Quality of Host Country Ethical Oversight of International Research: The Use of a Collaborative 'Pre-Review' Mechanism for a Study of Fexinidazole for Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Carl H; Ardiot, Chantal; Blesson, Séverine; Bonnin, Yves; Bompart, Francois; Colonna, Pierre; Dhai, Ames; Ecuru, Julius; Edielu, Andrew; Hervé, Christian; Hirsch, François; Kouyaté, Bocar; Mamzer-Bruneel, Marie-France; Maoundé, Dionko; Martinent, Eric; Ntsiba, Honoré; Pelé, Gérard; Quéva, Gilles; Reinmund, Marie-Christine; Sarr, Samba Cor; Sepou, Abdoulaye; Tarral, Antoine; Tetimian, Djetodjide; Valverde, Olaf; Van Nieuwenhove, Simon; Strub-Wourgaft, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    Developing countries face numerous barriers to conducting effective and efficient ethics reviews of international collaborative research. In addition to potentially overlooking important scientific and ethical considerations, inadequate or insufficiently trained ethics committees may insist on unwarranted changes to protocols that can impair a study's scientific or ethical validity. Moreover, poorly functioning review systems can impose substantial delays on the commencement of research, which needlessly undermine the development of new interventions for urgent medical needs. In response to these concerns, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi), an independent nonprofit organization founded by a coalition of public sector and international organizations, developed a mechanism to facilitate more effective and efficient host country ethics review for a study of the use of fexinidazole for the treatment of late stage African Trypanosomiasis (HAT). The project involved the implementation of a novel 'pre-review' process of ethical oversight, conducted by an ad hoc committee of ethics committee representatives from African and European countries, in collaboration with internationally recognized scientific experts. This article examines the process and outcomes of this collaborative process. © 2014 The Authors. Developing World Bioethics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. High osteoporosis risk among East Africans linked to lactase persistence genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliard, Constance B

    2016-01-01

    This ecological correlation study explores the marked differential in osteoporosis susceptibility between East and West Africans. African tsetse belt populations are lactase non-persistent (lactose intolerant) and possess none of the genetic polymorphisms carried by lactase persistent (lactose tolerant) ethnic populations. What appears paradoxical, however, is the fact that Niger-Kordofanian (NK) West African ethnicities are also at minimal risk of osteoporosis. Although East Africans share a...

  20. Cerebral trypanosomiasis and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes Apio Claudio Martins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36 year-old black female, complaining of headache of one month's duration presented with nausea, vomiting, somnolence, short memory problems, loss of weight, and no fever history. Smoker, intravenous drugs abuser, promiscuous lifestyle. Physical examination: left homonimous hemianopsia, left hemiparesis, no papilledema, diffuse hyperreflexia, slowness of movements. Brain CT scan: tumor-like lesion in the splenium of the corpus calosum, measuring 3.5 x 1.4 cm, with heterogeneous enhancing pattern, sugesting a primary CNS tumor. Due to the possibility of CNS infection, a lumbar puncture disclosed an opening pressure of 380 mmH(20; 11 white cells (lymphocytes; glucose 18 mg/dl (serum glucose 73 mg/dl; proteins 139 mg/dl; presence of Trypanosoma parasites. Serum Elisa-HIV tests turned out to be positive. Treatment with benznidazole dramatically improved clinical and radiographic picture, but the patient died 6 weeks later because of respiratory failure. T. cruzi infection of the CNS is a rare disease, but we have an increasing number of cases in HIV immunecompromised patients. Diagnosis by direct observation of CSF is uncommon, and most of the cases are diagnosed by pathological examination. It is a highly lethal disease, even when properly diagnosed and treated. This article intends to include cerebral trypanosomiasis in the differential diagnosis of intracranial space-occupying lesions, especially in immunecompromised patients from endemic regions.

  1. Constraints to estimating the prevalence of trypanosome infections in East African zebu cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Andrew P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In East Africa, animal trypanosomiasis is caused by many tsetse transmitted protozoan parasites including Trypanosoma vivax, T. congolense and subspecies of T. brucei s.l. (T. b. brucei and zoonotic human infective T. b. rhodesiense that may co-circulate in domestic and wild animals. Accurate species-specific prevalence measurements of these parasites in animal populations are complicated by mixed infections of trypanosomes within individual hosts, low parasite densities and difficulties in conducting field studies. Many Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR based diagnostic tools are available to characterise and quantify infection in animals. These are important for assessing the contribution of infections in animal reservoirs and the risk posed to humans from zoonotic trypanosome species. New matrices for DNA capture have simplified large scale field PCR analyses but few studies have examined the impact of these techniques on prevalence estimations. Results The Whatman FTA matrix has been evaluated using a random sample of 35 village zebu cattle from a population naturally exposed to trypanosome infection. Using a generic trypanosome-specific PCR, prevalence was systematically evaluated. Multiple PCR samples taken from single FTA cards demonstrated that a single punch from an FTA card is not sufficient to confirm the infectivity status of an individual animal as parasite DNA is unevenly distributed across the card. At low parasite densities in the host, this stochastic sampling effect results in underestimation of prevalence based on single punch PCR testing. Repeated testing increased the estimated prevalence of all Trypanosoma spp. from 9.7% to 86%. Using repeat testing, a very high prevalence of pathogenic trypanosomes was detected in these local village cattle: T. brucei (34.3%, T. congolense (42.9% and T. vivax (22.9%. Conclusions These results show that, despite the convenience of Whatman FTA cards and specific PCR based

  2. Yellow fever, Asia and the East African slave trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathey, John T; Marr, John S

    2014-05-01

    Yellow fever is endemic in parts of sub-Saharan Africa and South America, yet its principal vectors--species of mosquito of the genus Aedes--are found throughout tropical and subtropical latitudes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that yellow fever originated in Africa and that its spread to the New World coincided with the slave trade, but why yellow fever has never appeared in Asia remains a mystery. None of several previously proposed explanations for its absence there is considered satisfactory. We contrast the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and trade across the Sahara and to the Arabian Peninsula and Mesopotamia, with that to Far East and Southeast Asian ports before abolition of the African slave trade, and before the scientific community understood the transmission vector of yellow fever and the viral life cycle, and the need for shipboard mosquito control. We propose that these differences in slave trading had a primary role in the avoidance of yellow fever transmission into Asia in the centuries before the 20(th) century. The relatively small volume of the Black African slave trade between Africa and East and Southeast Asia has heretofore been largely ignored. Although focal epidemics may have occurred, the volume was insufficient to reach the threshold for endemicity.

  3. Diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense in central Africa, by the polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Penchenier, Laurent; Simo, G.; Grébaut, Pascal; Nkinin, S.; Laveissière, Claude; Herder, Stéphane

    2000-01-01

    During a mass screening of sleeping sickness conducted in 1998 and 1999, and involving 27,932 persons in Cameroon and the Central African Republic, we tested the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on whole blood for the diagnosis of human African trypanosomiasis due to #Trypanosoma brucei gambiense$. The 1858 samples obtained were from 4 groups : 155 infected patients, 1432 serological suspects detected by the card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis (CATT), 222 negative controls living in th...

  4. Sensitivity of the East African rift lakes to climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaka, L.; Trauth, M. H.

    2009-04-01

    Lakes in the East African Rift have provided excellent proxies to reconstruct past climate changes in the low latitudes. The lakes occupy volcano-tectonic depressions with highly variable climate and hydrological setting, that present a good opportunity to study the climatic and hydrogeological influences on the lake water budget. Previous studies have used lake floor sediments to establish the sensitivity of the East African rift lakes. This study focuses on geomorphology and climate to offer additional or alternative record of lake history that are key to quantifying sensitivity of these lakes as archives to external and internal climatic forcings. By using the published Holocene lake areas and levels, we analyze twelve lakes on the eastern arm of the East African rift; Ziway, Awassa, Turkana, Suguta, Baringo, Nakuru, Elmenteita, Naivasha, Natron, Manyara and compare with Lake Victoria, that occupies the plateau between the east and the western arms of the rift. Using the SRTM data, Hypsometric (area-altitude) analysis has been used to compare the lake basins between latitude 80 North and 30 South. The mean elevation for the lakes, is between 524 and 2262 meters above sea level, the lakes' hypsometric integrals (HI), a measure of landmass volume above the reference plane, vary from 0.31 to 0.76. The aridity index (Ai), defined as Precipitation/ Evapotranspiration, quantifies the water available to a lake, it encompasses land cover and climatic effects. It is lowest (arid) in the basin between the Ethiopian rift and the Kenyan rift and at the southern termination of the Kenyan Rift in the catchments of lake Turkana, Suguta, Baringo and Manyara with values of 0.55, 0.43, 0.43 and 0.5 respectively. And it is highest (wet) in the catchments of, Ziway, Awassa, Nakuru and Naivasha as 1.33,1.03 and 1.2 respectively, which occupy the highest points of the rift. Lake Victoria has an index of 1.42 the highest of these lakes and receives a high precipitation. We use a

  5. Signatures of positive selection in East African Shorthorn Zebu: a genome-wide SNP analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small East African Shorthorn Zebu is the main indigenous cattle across East Africa. A recent genome wide SNPs analysis has revealed their ancient stable African taurine x Asian zebu admixture. Here, we assess the presence of candidate signature of positive selection in their genome, with the aim...

  6. The biggest fish in the sea? Dynamic Kenyan labour migration in the East African community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong'ayo, A.O.O.; Oucho, J.O.; Oucho, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the Kenyan policy and institutional framework concerning South–South labour migration with particular focus on the East African Community (EAC) countries. It focuses mainly on one particular policy instrument, the East African Community Common Market framework. The research

  7. East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights: About this journal. Journal Home > East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Submissions. » Author Guidelines; » Copyright Notice ...

  8. East African weathering dynamics controlled by vegetation-climate feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivory, Sarah J.; McGlue, Michael M.; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Boehlke, Adam; Lézine, Anne-Marie; Vincens, Annie; Cohen, Andrew S.

    2017-01-01

    Tropical weathering has important linkages to global biogeochemistry and landscape evolution in the East African rift. We disentangle the influences of climate and terrestrial vegetation on chemical weathering intensity and erosion at Lake Malawi using a long sediment record. Fossil pollen, microcharcoal, particle size, and mineralogy data affirm that the detrital clays accumulating in deep water within the lake are controlled by feedbacks between climate and hinterland forest composition. Particle-size patterns are also best explained by vegetation, through feedbacks with lake levels, wildfires, and erosion. We develop a new source-to-sink framework that links lacustrine sedimentation to hinterland vegetation in tropical rifts. Our analysis suggests that climate-vegetation interactions and their coupling to weathering/erosion could threaten future food security and has implications for accurately predicting petroleum play elements in continental rift basins.

  9. Nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy for second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis: Médecins Sans Frontières experience in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alirol, Emilie; Schrumpf, David; Amici Heradi, Josué; Riedel, Andrea; de Patoul, Catherine; Quere, Michel; Chappuis, François

    2013-01-01

    Existing diagnostic and treatment tools for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are limited. The recent development of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) has brought new hopes for patients in the second stage. While NECT has been rolled out in most endemic countries, safety data are scarce and derive only from clinical trials. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a pharmacovigilance program to collect additional data on NECT safety and efficacy. We report here the results of 18 months of experience of NECT use in treatment centers run by Médecins Sans Frontières in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). This cohort study included 684 second-stage HAT patients (including 120 children) treated with NECT in Doruma and Dingila hospitals, northeastern DRC, between January 2010 and June 2011. All treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were recorded and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Safety and efficacy data were retrieved from the WHO pharmacovigilance forms and from Epitryps, a program monitoring database. Eighty-six percent of the patients experienced at least 1 AE during treatment. On average, children experienced fewer AEs than adults. Most AEs were mild (37.9%) or moderate (54.7%). Severe AEs included vomiting (n = 32), dizziness (n = 16), headache (n = 11), and convulsions (n = 11). The in-hospital case fatality rate was low (0.15%) and relapses were rare (n = 14). In comparison with previous treatments, NECT was effective, safe, and well tolerated in nontrial settings in DRC, further supporting the roll-out of NECT as first-line treatment in second-stage Trypanosoma brucei gambiense HAT. Tolerance was particularly good in children.

  10. East and Central African Journal of Surgery - Vol 7, No 1 (2002)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial - East and Central African Journal of Surgery: The Canadian connection · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Jonathan Meakins, Edward W Archibald, James Waddell ...

  11. Digging deeper into East African human Y chromosome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Verónica; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Amorim, António; Carracedo, Angel; Gusmão, Leonor

    2010-03-01

    The most significant and widely studied remodeling of the African genetic landscape is the Bantu expansion, which led to an almost total replacement of the previous populations from the sub-Saharan region. However, a poor knowledge exists about other population movements, namely, the Nilotic migration, which is a pastoralist dispersal that, contrary to the Bantu expansion, impacted only East African populations. Here, samples from a Ugandan Nilotic-speaking population were studied for 37 Y chromosome-specific SNPs, and the obtained data were compared with those already available for other sub-Saharan population groups. Although Uganda lies on the fringe of both Bantu and Nilotic expansions, a low admixture with Bantu populations was detected, with haplogroups carrying M13, M182 and M75 mutations prevailing in Nilotes together with a low frequency of the main Bantu haplogroups from clade E1b1a-M2. The results of a comparative analysis with data from other population groups allowed a deeper characterization of some lineages in our sample, clarifying some doubts about the origin of some particular Y-SNPs in different ethnic groups, such as M150, M112 and M75. Moreover, it was also possible to identify a new Y-SNP apparently specific to Nilotic groups, as well as the presence of particular haplogroups that characterize Nilotic populations. The detection of a new haplogroup B2a1b defined by G1, could be, therefore, important to differentiate Nilotes from other groups, helping to trace migration and admixture events that occurred in eastern Africa.

  12. Tectonic Evolution of Mozambique Ridge in East African continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Tectonic Evolution of Mozambique Ridge in East African continental margin Yong Tang He Li ES.Mahanjane Second Institute of Oceanography,SOA,Hangzhou The East Africa passive continental margin is a depression area, with widely distributed sedimentary wedges from southern Mozambique to northern Somali (>6500km in length, and about 6km in thickness). It was resulted from the separation of East Gondwana, and was developed by three stages: (1) rifting in Early-Middle Jurassic; (2) spreading from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous; (3) drifting since the Cretaceous period. Tectonic evolution of the Mozambique continental margin is distinguished by two main settings separated by a fossil transform, the Davie Fracture Zone; (i) rifting and transform setting in the northern margin related to opening of the Somali and Rovuma basins, and (ii) rifting and volcanism setting during the opening of the Mozambique basin in the southern margin. 2D reflection seismic investigation of the crustal structure in the Zambezi Delta Depression, provided key piece of evidence for two rifting phases between Africa and Antarctica. The magma-rich Rift I phase evolved from rift-rift-rift style with remarkable emplacement of dyke swarms (between 182 and 170 Ma). Related onshore outcrops are extensively studied, the Karoo volcanics in Mozambique, Zimbabwe and South Africa, all part of the Karoo "triple-junction". These igneous bodies flow and thicken eastwards and are now covered by up to 5 km of Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments and recorded by seismic and oil exploration wells. Geophysical and geological data recorded during oceanographic cruises provide very controversial results regarding the nature of the Mozambique Ridge. Two conflicting opinions remains open, since the early expeditions to the Indian Ocean, postulating that its character is either magmatic (oceanic) or continental origin. We have carried out an China-Mozambique Joint Cruise(CMJC) on southern Mozambique Basin on 1st June to

  13. Ky'osimba Onaanya: Understanding Productivity of East African Highland Banana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taulya, G.

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress, potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) deficiencies are major constraints to East African highland banana (Musa spp. AAA-EA; hereafter referred to as ‘highland banana’), a primary staple food crop for over 30 million people in East Africa. This study explored the main and interactive effects

  14. African Postal Heritage : Tanzania 1885-1920s : part I : German East Africa, 1885-1914

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    An earlier version of this African Postal Heritage Paper was published as African Studies Centre Leiden Working Paper 119 / 2015: "A postal history of the First World War in Africa and its aftermath - German colonies; III Deutsch Ostafrika / German East Africa", written by Ton Dietz.

  15. Principles of screening for chronic diseases | Nyong'o | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principles of screening for chronic diseases. A. O. Nyong'o. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal: 2001 78(7) Supplement: 36-37). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  16. Vitamin A levels in HIV/AIDS | Kafwembe | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (9): 451-453). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i9.8972 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  17. African Lion Cities: Deflating the MDG success of East Asian Tigers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In analysing the latest cross-country and household survey data, the paper finds that the MDG performance of African coastal capitals and island states is more like that of East Asian Tigers (which also have relatively small land size) compared to the national averages in mainland African countries. This is largely explained ...

  18. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: east African Species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloo, Francis; Sciarretta, Andrea; Mohamed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Kröber, Thomas; McMullin, Andrew; Mihok, Steve; Guerin, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Riverine species of tsetse are responsible for most human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) transmission and are also important vectors of animal trypanosomiasis. This study concerns the development of visual control devices for two such species, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides, at the eastern limits of their continental range. The goal was to determine the most long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that induces the strongest landing responses in these species for use as insecticide-impregnated tools in vector population suppression. Field trials were conducted in different seasons on G. f. fuscipes in Kenya, Ethiopia and the Sudan and on G. tachinoides in Ethiopia to measure the performance of traps and 2D targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used to enumerate flies at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies. The findings show that targets made from black and blue fabrics (either phthalogen or turquoise) covered with adhesive film render them equal to or more efficient than traps at capturing G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides. Biconical trap efficiency varied between 25% and 33% for the two species. Smaller 0.25 m×0.25 m phthalogen blue-black targets proved more efficient than the regular 1 m2 target for both species, by over six times for Glossina f. fuscipes and two times for G. tachinoides based on catches per m2. Overall, targets with a higher edge/surface area ratio were more efficient at capturing flies. Taking into account practical considerations and fly preferences for edges and colours, we propose a 0.5×0.75 m blue-black target as a simple cost-effective device for management of G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides, impregnated with insecticide for control and covered with adhesive film for population sampling.

  19. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: east African Species Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Oloo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Riverine species of tsetse are responsible for most human African trypanosomiasis (HAT transmission and are also important vectors of animal trypanosomiasis. This study concerns the development of visual control devices for two such species, Glossina fuscipes fuscipes and Glossina tachinoides, at the eastern limits of their continental range. The goal was to determine the most long-lasting, practical and cost-effective visually attractive device that induces the strongest landing responses in these species for use as insecticide-impregnated tools in vector population suppression.Field trials were conducted in different seasons on G. f. fuscipes in Kenya, Ethiopia and the Sudan and on G. tachinoides in Ethiopia to measure the performance of traps and 2D targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used to enumerate flies at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies. The findings show that targets made from black and blue fabrics (either phthalogen or turquoise covered with adhesive film render them equal to or more efficient than traps at capturing G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides. Biconical trap efficiency varied between 25% and 33% for the two species. Smaller 0.25 m×0.25 m phthalogen blue-black targets proved more efficient than the regular 1 m2 target for both species, by over six times for Glossina f. fuscipes and two times for G. tachinoides based on catches per m2. Overall, targets with a higher edge/surface area ratio were more efficient at capturing flies.Taking into account practical considerations and fly preferences for edges and colours, we propose a 0.5×0.75 m blue-black target as a simple cost-effective device for management of G. f. fuscipes and G. tachinoides, impregnated with insecticide for control and covered with adhesive film for population sampling.

  20. Human African Trypanosomiasis And Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine possible interaction between infections of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense sleeping sickness and HIV/AIDS in Western Kenya Design: Random selection and testing for HIV infections of serum samples from HAT patients using an indirect single phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assay ...

  1. East and Central African Journal of Surgery: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The journal's objects are the advancement of the science and art of surgery and exchange of ideas among surgeons in the constituent countries of The Association of Surgeons of East Africa (ASEA) and The College of Surgeons of East, Central and Southern Africa (COSECSA).

  2. Applying East Asian Media Diplomacy Models to African Media: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The last two decades have seen the extensive expansion of South African and Nigerian media on the African continent. However, while the link between media and diplomacy, and the role of media in visualising the state for foreign audiences have received a lot of scholarly attention internationally, relatively little work has ...

  3. Anorexia nervosa in Kenya | Njenga | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anorexia nervosa is a rare disorder in Africans, inspite of posing a serious public health hazard in the West. Whereas it is possible that African psychiatrists lack the skills to diagnose the disorder, other possible explanations for its apparent rarity must be sought in view of emerging evidence, which suggests a ...

  4. Use of Machine Learning Techniques for Identification of Robust Teleconnections to East African Rainfall Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, F. R.; Funk, C.

    2014-01-01

    Hidden Markov models can be used to investigate structure of subseasonal variability. East African short rain variability has connections to large-scale tropical variability. MJO - Intraseasonal variations connected with appearance of "wet" and "dry" states. ENSO/IOZM SST and circulation anomalies are apparent during years of anomalous residence time in the subseasonal "wet" state. Similar results found in previous studies, but we can interpret this with respect to variations of subseasonal wet and dry modes. Reveal underlying connections between MJO/IOZM/ENSO with respect to East African rainfall.

  5. Mitochondrial phylogeny and phylogeography of East African squeaker catfishes (Siluriformes: Synodontis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblmüller, Stephan; Sturmbauer, Christian; Verheyen, Erik; Meyer, Axel; Salzburger, Walter

    2006-06-19

    Squeaker catfishes (Pisces, Mochokidae, Synodontis) are widely distributed throughout Africa and inhabit a biogeographic range similar to that of the exceptionally diverse cichlid fishes, including the three East African Great Lakes and their surrounding rivers. Since squeaker catfishes also prefer the same types of habitats as many of the cichlid species, we hypothesized that the East African Synodontis species provide an excellent model group for comparative evolutionary and phylogeographic analyses. Our analyses reveal the existence of six major lineages of Synodontis in East Africa that diversified about 20 MYA from a Central and/or West African ancestor. The six lineages show a clear geographic patterning. Two lineages are endemic to Lake Tanganyika (plus one non-endemic representative), and these are the only two Synodontis lineages that diversified further into a small array of species. One of these species is the cuckoo catfish (S. multipunctatus), a unique brood parasite of mouthbrooding haplochromine cichlids, which seems to have evolved in parallel with the radiation of its cichlid host lineage, the Tropheini. We also detect an accelerated rate of molecular evolution in S. multipunctatus, which might be the consequence of co-evolutionary dynamics. We conclude that the ancestral lineage of today's East African squeaker catfish fauna has colonized the area before the Great Lakes have formed. This ancestor diversified rapidly into at least six lineages that inhabit lakes and rivers in East Africa. Lake Tanganyika is the only lake harboring a small species flock of squeaker catfishes.

  6. Group Counseling with Traumatized East African Refugee Women in the United States: Using the "Kaffa" Ceremony Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewy, Michael I.; Williams, DiAnna Toliver; Keleta, Aster

    2002-01-01

    The Kaffa ceremony is a unique, culturally appropriate, group counseling intervention for female East African refugees. A counseling group is described in which the Kaffa ceremony was instrumental in helping to bridge the gap between Western counseling and East African culture, providing a context for the group members to resolve long-held trauma.…

  7. Editorial : A case for a day care surgery | Kyambi | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial: A case for a day care surgery. J. M. Kyambi. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal: 2001 78(4): 169-170). http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i4.9056 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and ...

  8. Pastoralists' Vulnerability to Trypanosomiasis in Maasai Steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnko, Happiness J; Gwakisa, Paul S; Ngonyoka, Anibariki; Saigilu, Meshack; Ole-Neselle, Moses; Kisoka, William; Sindato, Calvin; Estes, Anna

    2017-11-02

    Trypanosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of both livestock and humans. Although pastoral communities of the Maasai Steppe have been able to adapt to trypanosomiasis in the past, their traditional strategies are now constrained by changes in climate and land regimes that affect their ability to move with their herds and continually shape the communities' vulnerability to trypanosomiasis. Despite these constraints, information on communities' vulnerability and adaptive capacity to trypanosomiasis is limited. A cross-sectional study was therefore conducted in Simanjiro and Monduli districts of the Maasai Steppe to establish pastoralists' vulnerability to animal trypanosomiasis and factors that determined their adaptation strategies. A weighted overlay approach in ArcGIS 10.4 was used to analyze vulnerability levels while binomial and multinomial logistic regressions in R 3.3.2 were used to analyze the determinants of adaptation. Simanjiro district was the most vulnerable to trypanosomiasis. The majority (87.5%, n = 136) of the respondents were aware of trypanosomiasis in animals, but only 7.4% (n = 136) knew about the human form of the disease. Reported impacts of animal trypanosomiasis were low milk production (95.6%, n = 136), death of livestock (96.8%, n = 136) and emaciation of animals (99.9%, n = 136). Crop farming was the most frequently reported animal trypanosomiasis adaptation strategy (66%, n = 136). At a 95% confidence interval, accessibility to livestock extension services (β = 7.61, SE = 3.28, df = 135, P = 0.02), years of livestock keeping experience (β = 6.17, SE = 1.95, df = 135, P = 0.001), number of cattle owned (β = 5.85, SE = 2.70, df = 135, P = 0.03) and membership in associations (β = - 4.11, SE = 1.79, df = 135, P = 0.02) had a significant impact on the probability of adapting to animal trypanosomiasis.

  9. High osteoporosis risk among East Africans linked to lactase persistence genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Constance B

    2016-01-01

    This ecological correlation study explores the marked differential in osteoporosis susceptibility between East and West Africans. African tsetse belt populations are lactase non-persistent (lactose intolerant) and possess none of the genetic polymorphisms carried by lactase persistent (lactose tolerant) ethnic populations. What appears paradoxical, however, is the fact that Niger-Kordofanian (NK) West African ethnicities are also at minimal risk of osteoporosis. Although East Africans share a genetic affinity with NK West Africans, they display susceptibility rates of the bone disorder closer to those found in Europe. Similar to Europeans, they also carry alleles conferring the lactase persistence genetic traits. Hip fracture rates of African populations are juxtaposed with a global model to determine whether it is the unique ecology of the tsetse-infested zone or other variables that may be at work. This project uses MINITAB 17 software for regression analyses. The research data are found on AJOL (African Journals Online), PUBMED and JSTOR (Scholarly Journal Archive). Data showing the risk of osteoporosis to be 80 times higher among East Africans with higher levels of lactase persistence than lactase non-persistence West Africans are compared with global statistics. Hip fracture rates in 40 countries exhibit a high Pearson's correlation of r=0.851, with P-value=0.000 in relation to dairy consumption. Lower correlations are seen for hip fracture incidence vis-à-vis lactase persistence, per capita income and animal protein consumption. Ethnic populations who lack lactase persistence single-nucleotide polymorphisms may be at low risk of developing osteoporosis. PMID:27408710

  10. High osteoporosis risk among East Africans linked to lactase persistence genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Constance B

    2016-01-01

    This ecological correlation study explores the marked differential in osteoporosis susceptibility between East and West Africans. African tsetse belt populations are lactase non-persistent (lactose intolerant) and possess none of the genetic polymorphisms carried by lactase persistent (lactose tolerant) ethnic populations. What appears paradoxical, however, is the fact that Niger-Kordofanian (NK) West African ethnicities are also at minimal risk of osteoporosis. Although East Africans share a genetic affinity with NK West Africans, they display susceptibility rates of the bone disorder closer to those found in Europe. Similar to Europeans, they also carry alleles conferring the lactase persistence genetic traits. Hip fracture rates of African populations are juxtaposed with a global model to determine whether it is the unique ecology of the tsetse-infested zone or other variables that may be at work. This project uses MINITAB 17 software for regression analyses. The research data are found on AJOL (African Journals Online), PUBMED and JSTOR (Scholarly Journal Archive). Data showing the risk of osteoporosis to be 80 times higher among East Africans with higher levels of lactase persistence than lactase non-persistence West Africans are compared with global statistics. Hip fracture rates in 40 countries exhibit a high Pearson's correlation of r=0.851, with P-value=0.000 in relation to dairy consumption. Lower correlations are seen for hip fracture incidence vis-à-vis lactase persistence, per capita income and animal protein consumption. Ethnic populations who lack lactase persistence single-nucleotide polymorphisms may be at low risk of developing osteoporosis.

  11. Regional Integration: A Political Federation of the East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sulaiman.adebowale

    2006-06-13

    Mukandala 2000:89). In other words, the integration process in East Africa is to be achieved incrementally. The argument has always been whether the logical conclusion of any integration process is politi- cal or economic unity.

  12. Is the Proposed East African Monetary Union an Optimal Currency Area? A Structural Vector Autoregression Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Steven K. Buigut; Neven Valev

    2004-01-01

    The treaty of 1999 to revive the defunct East African Community (EAC) ratified by Kenya, Uganda, and Tanzania came into force on July 2000 with the objective of fostering a closer co-operation in political, economic, social, and cultural fields. To achieve this, an East Africa Customs Union protocol was signed in March 2004. A Common Market, a Monetary Union, and ultimately a Political Federation of East Africa states is planned. Though the question of a monetary union has been discussed in t...

  13. Signatures of selection for environmental adaptation and zebu × taurine hybrid fitness in East African shorthorn zebu

    Science.gov (United States)

    The East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ) cattle are ancient hybrid between Asian zebu × African taurine cattle preferred by local farmers due to their adaptability to the African environment. The genetic controls of these adaptabilities are not clearly understood yet. Here, we genotyped 92 EASZ sample...

  14. Profile Of Bacteria And Fungi On Money Coins | Kuria | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 86, No 4 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  15. Bioavailability of Sediment-bound Heavy Metals on the East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioavailability of Sediment-bound Heavy Metals on the East African Coast. ... Western Indian Ocean Journal of Marine Science ... (to determine the total quantity of metals) and three-step BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction (to obtain the metal fractionation patterns in the sediments in this region).

  16. Louse-borne relapsing fever among East African refugees in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinori, Spinello; Mediannikov, Oleg; Corbellino, Mario; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Louse-borne relapsing fever a neglected and forgotten disease by western physicians has recently re-emerged among East African migrants seeking asylum in Europe. We review here the cases observed so far together with a critical reappraisal of several issues regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. How to develop an operational plan for health | Kirirgia | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 78, No 3 (2001) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  18. Profile of suicide in Dar es Salaam | Ndosi | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 81, No 4 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  19. Simulating sanitation and waste flows and their environmental impacts in East African urban centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Simulating Sanitation and Waste Flows and their Environmental Impacts in East African Urban Centres Abstract If improperly managed, urban waste flows can pose a significant threat to the quality of both the natural environment and public health. Just as many urban

  20. Characteristics of soils in selected maize growing sites along altitudinal gradients in East African highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Njuguna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Maize is the main staple crop in the East African Mountains. Understanding how the edaphic characteristics change along altitudinal gradients is important for maximizing maize production in East African Highlands, which are the key maize production areas in the region. This study evaluated and compared the levels of some macro and micro-elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na and P and other soil parameters (pH, organic carbon content, soil texture [i.e. % Sand, % Clay and % Silt], cation exchange capacity [CEC], electric conductivity [EC], and water holding capacity [HC]. Soil samples were taken from maize plots along three altitudinal gradients in East African highlands (namely Machakos Hills, Taita Hills and Mount Kilimanjaro characterized by graded changes in climatic conditions. For all transects, pH, Ca, K and Mg decreased with the increase in altitude. In contrast, % Silt, organic carbon content, Al and water holding capacity (HC increased with increasing altitude. The research provides information on the status of the physical–chemical characteristics of soils along three altitudinal ranges of East African Highlands and includes data available for further research.

  1. East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 15 Number 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 15 Number 2. July/August 2010. ECAJS. Page 54. Duration of symptoms ranged from 4 weeks to 109 weeks with a median of 8 weeks. None of our patients have family history of pancreatic cancer. Only eleven (11.5%) have previous history of diabetic mellitus (DM) before ...

  2. The Impact of the Geologic History and Paleoclimate on the Diversification of East African Cichlids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. Danley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cichlid fishes of the East African Great Lakes are the largest extant vertebrate radiation identified to date. These lakes and their surrounding waters support over 2,000 species of cichlid fish, many of which are descended from a single common ancestor within the past 10 Ma. The extraordinary East African cichlid diversity is intricately linked to the highly variable geologic and paleoclimatic history of this region. Greater than 10 Ma, the western arm of the East African rift system began to separate, thereby creating a series of rift basins that would come to contain several water bodies, including the extremely deep Lakes Tanganyika and Malawi. Uplifting associated with this rifting backponded many rivers and created the extremely large, but shallow Lake Victoria. Since their creation, the size, shape, and existence of these lakes have changed dramatically which has, in turn, significantly influenced the evolutionary history of the lakes' cichlids. This paper reviews the geologic history and paleoclimate of the East African Great Lakes and the impact of these forces on the region's endemic cichlid flocks.

  3. East And Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 11 Number 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-12-02

    Dec 2, 2006 ... East And Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 11 Number 2. December 2006. 3. Problem Based Learning at .... promotes the teaching of concepts and principles needed by students to understand their case. ... principles of PBL, the learning expected of students in this pedagogy, as well as aspects.

  4. Resistance of three strains of small East African goats to artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TWC (529) and mortality rate (0%) but higher PCV (20.4%)while Ujiji, goats showed the highest FEC (2043 epg). ... while the Ujiji goats were more susceptible to gastrointestinal nematode injection. Keywords: Small East African goats, gastrointestinal nematodes, resistance. Tanzania J.Agric. Sc. (2002) Vol. 5 No.1 l-IO ...

  5. Contrasted continental rifting via plume-craton interaction : Applications to Central East African Rift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koptev, Alexander; Burov, Evgueni; Calais, Eric; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Cloetingh, Sierd

    The East African Rift system (EARS) provides a unique system with the juxtaposition of two contrasting yet simultaneously formed rift branches, the eastern, magma-rich, and the western, magma-poor, on either sides of the old thick Tanzanian craton embedded in a younger lithosphere. Data on the

  6. Cleft lip and palate: the Jos exprience | Orkar | East African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 79, No 10 (2002) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  7. The role of households in solid waste management in East African capital cities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solomon, A.O.

    2011-01-01

    Solid Management is a concern in East African capital cities. The absence of managing solid waste is a serious problem. An ever bigger concern is the growing quantities of waste that are generatedat households level in informal settlements. In most cases proper safeguard measures are largely

  8. Job conditions, job satisfaction, somatic complaints and burnout among East African nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Doef, Margot; Mbazzi, Femke Bannink; Verhoeven, Chris

    2012-06-01

    To describe job conditions, job satisfaction, somatic complaints and burnout of female East African nurses working in public and private hospitals and to determine how these well-being outcomes are associated with job conditions. Insight into job conditions, health and well-being status and their interrelation is virtually lacking for East African nurses. Cross-sectional survey of 309 female nurses in private and public hospitals in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Nurses completed a survey assessing job conditions and job satisfaction (the Leiden Quality of Work Life Questionnaire-nurses version), somatic complaints (subscale of the Symptom CheckList) and burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory). The East African nurses show high levels of somatic complaints, and nearly one-third of the sample would be labelled as burned out. In comparison with a Western European nurses reference group, the nurses score unfavourably on job conditions that require financial investment (e.g. workload, staffing, equipment and materials). On aspects related to the social climate (e.g. decision latitude, cooperation), however, they score more favourably. In comparison with private hospital nurses, public hospital nurses score similarly on aspects related to the social climate, but worse on the other job conditions. Public hospital nurses have a lower job satisfaction than private hospital nurses, but show comparable levels of somatic complaints and burnout. Strongest correlates of low job satisfaction are low supervisor support and low financial reward. Burnout is mainly associated with high workload and inadequate information provision, whereas somatic complaints are associated with demanding physical working conditions. Improvement in job conditions may reduce the high levels of burnout and somatic complaints and enhance job satisfaction in East African nurses. Efforts and investments should be made to improve the job conditions in East African nurses as they are key persons in the delivery of

  9. Social Realism in the African Novel: The South African and East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the African novel arose from Europe, the African has used it to explore a different world view; a world where gods and men hold a place together in the affairs of men. But more importantly, the African novel has followed the peculiar history of colonization and decolonization. While the earlier novels depicted the ...

  10. Modern non-pollen palynomorphs from East African Lake sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelorini, V.; Verbeken, A.; van Geel, B.; Cocquyt, C.; Verschuren, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an illustrated guide to the identification of non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs) preserved in lake-sediment archives from equatorial East Africa. Modern NPPs were recovered from recently deposited surface sediment in 20 small crater lakes in western Uganda, located along

  11. East African refugees adapting to life in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bekalo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on the first-hand life experiences of refugees ofEast/Horn of Africa origin on arrival in the UK. The experiences – someof which could be seen as humorous or sad – may be informative andrelevant for other practitioners.

  12. East African Medical Journal Vol. 81 No. 9 September 2004

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population and Housing Census 2002 Vol. 2, Age and Sex distribution. Central Census Office, National Bureau of. Statistics, President's Office, Planning and Privatisation. Published September 2003, pg 125. 10. Shija, J.K. Childhood intussusception in Dares-Salaam. The proceedings of the Association of Surgeons of East.

  13. East African Medical Journal - Vol 94, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occupational cycling is a risk factor for erectile dysfunction in east Africa · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Assessment of cold chain management practices in immunisation centres in Kacheliba division, Pokot County, Kenya · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  14. Global AIDS medicines in East African health institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Dilger, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this introduction to the special issue, we follow the journey of global AIDS medicines into diverse health facilities in East Africa, which for decades have been subjected to neoliberal reform processes and increasing fragmentation. The introduction explores the multifaceted and multidirectional

  15. East African refugees adapting to life in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Bekalo

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on the first-hand life experiences of refugees ofEast/Horn of Africa origin on arrival in the UK. The experiences – someof which could be seen as humorous or sad – may be informative andrelevant for other practitioners.

  16. Orthopaedics in day surgery | Mulimba | East African Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Day surgery is now well established worldwide, but is just being established in Africa. In this paper is examined the efficacy of day care surgery in Orthopaedics. Setting up of the units and types of units that are looked at. Objective: To study the feasibility of day surgery in orthopaedics in an Urban African setting ...

  17. JuneZOO6 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL 295

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-06-06

    Jun 6, 2006 ... morbidity in a subset of HIV infected patients with chronic cough and negative sputum smears for AFB in Kenya. INTRODUCTION. Kenya remains amongst the top ten African countries affected by HIV (1). By June 2005, an estimated 1.5 million Kenyans were infected by HIV, close to 250,000 were in need ...

  18. East African Medical Journal Vol. 79 No 8 August 2002

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-08-08

    Aug 8, 2002 ... NEPHROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH RECENTLY DIAGNOSED TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. IN BLACK AFRICANS. F.W. WANJOHI. F.C.F. OTIENO, E.N. OGOLA and E0. AMAYO. ABSTRACT. Background: Albuminuria is long recognised as a sign of renal disease in diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, renal ...

  19. Primary duodenal cancer: case report | Wasike | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v84i6.9540 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  20. Forensic medicine in Kenya: A personal view | Olumbe | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics Loading ... Metrics powered by PLOS ALM · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v77i1.46389 · AJOL African ...

  1. 520 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL March (Supplement) 2001

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Health policies and plans evaluation in the WHO African Region. Subjects or participants: WHO ... policy (HP), strategic plan (SP), operational plan (OP), and an evaluation culture,. Results: The study found that: 88%, 8% ... public on governments and ministries of health to be more accountable andtransparent in ...

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome in black Kenyans | Lule | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Irritable bowel syndrome in black Kenyans. ... The mean age was 40 years with range of 11 to 75 years with a peak prevalence in the 3rd decade. The male ... Conclusion: The Black African patient is equally as exposed to Irritable Bowel Syndrome as is his counterpart in the western world and has similar morbidity patterns.

  3. Editorial Air pollution and health | Saoke | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    org/10.4314/eamj.v82i9.9332 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER ...

  4. East African Medical Journal - Vol 87, No 8 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of the ENPP1 rs997509 polymorphism with obesity in South African mixed ancestry learners · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD ... Human Papilloma virus Genotypes in Ghanaian women with Cervical Carcinoma · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD ...

  5. S20 EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL March (Supplement) 2001

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Health policies and plans evaluation in the WHO African Region. Subjects or ... Main outcome measures: Availability and quality of long-term health plan (LTHP), health policy (HP) ... resource base, there is greater need for resilient and cost- accountable and transparent in their spending for health- effective ...

  6. East African Medical Journal - Vol 86, No 1 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality. Current Issue Atom logo · RSS2 logo · RSS1 logo. 521 African Journals. Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Featuring journals

  7. East African Medical Journal - Vol 90, No 6 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access · Journal Quality. Current Issue Atom logo · RSS2 logo · RSS1 logo. 521 African Journals. Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Featuring journals

  8. East African Medical Journal Vol.' 79. No II October 2002

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-10-02

    Oct 2, 2002 ... and eczema in children in the study population over the last six years. INTRODUCTION. Asthma and allergic diseases are increasingly becoming important in developing countries as in developed countries( 1-3). In the ISAAC study of 1995 the prevalence rates among African children were lower than.

  9. Maintainability in a manpower system | Owino | East African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eajosta.v1i1.39173 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  10. Stimulation model for dental arch shapes | Pokhariyal | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stimulation model for dental arch shapes. GP Pokhariyal, CA Moturi, J Hassanali. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More ...

  11. East African Medical Journal - Vol 91, No 5 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary Malignant Amelanotic Melanoma Arising From a Vitiligo Patch of an African Tanzanian: Case Report · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. SK Kiprono, DR Mavura, EJ Masenga, M Mohrle, G Metzler, 178-180 ...

  12. East African Medical Journal - Vol 92, No 11 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post- axial polydactyly A and delayed puberty in a female African patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: Case report · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. MP Shongo, TK Lubala, O Mukuku, ON Luboya, PT Lukusa, 562-567 ...

  13. Refractive errors in type 2 diabetic patients | Mwale | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    : EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v84i6.9534 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  14. Editorial: Dynamics of blood-borne diseases | Okoth | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10.4314/eamj.v82i4.9274 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER ...

  15. East African Medical Journal - Vol 83, No 9 (2006)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An overview of health financing patterns and the way forward in the who african region · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JM Kirigia, A Preker, G Carrin, C Mwikisa, AJ Diarra-Nama, S1-S28. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v83i9.9492 ...

  16. The Use Of Information And Communication Technology And Social Networking Sites In Political Governance Of East African Legislative Assembly Parliament

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ainebyona Robert; Gregory S Namusonge

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This research project was carried out to ascertain the use of Information and Communication Technologies and Social Networking Sites in political governance of East African Legislative Assembly Parliament...

  17. Trends and variability of East African rainfall and its relationship to the Mascarene High pressure system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregina, Larisa; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Fink, Andreas H.; Ermert, Volker

    2016-04-01

    In the recent decades, East Africa needs to deal with strong fluctuations in seasonal rainfall including precipitation extremes. In context of climate change, such extremes can become more frequent in the future. However, regional climate projections are uncertain about the future development of seasonal precipitation in the region. Rainfall regimes over East Africa are influenced by multiple factors, including two monsoon systems, several convergence zones and the Rift Valley lakes. In addition, local conditions, like topography, modulate the large-scale rainfall pattern. East African rainfall variability is also influenced by various teleconnections like the Indian Ocean Zonal Mode and El Niño Southern Oscillation. The study of past climate variability in East Africa requires sufficient observational data coverage in the region. As East Africa does not have a dense observational network of meteorological stations, satellite rainfall observations gain on importance in studies on climate variability in the region. The specific aim of the present study is the analysis of historic data from weather stations in East Africa (Kenya, Tanzania, Ruanda and Uganda), the use of gridded satellite products, and three-dimensional atmospheric reanalysis (e.g., ERA-Interim) to quantify climate variability in the recent past and to understand its causes. Climate variability and trends, including changes in extreme events, are evaluated using ETCCDI climate change and standardized precipitation indices. These climate indices are determined in order to investigate the variability of rainfall and its trends with the focus on recent decades. For seasonal trend analysis, an independent and non-calendaric rainfall onset criterion is introduced. In the follow-up, statistical and dynamical analyses are conducted to quantify the local impact of Mascarene High as a part of the Subtropical High Pressure Ridge on East African seasonal rainfall. Possible connections to pertinent large

  18. Attitudes, perceptions and behaviours towards HIV testing among African-American and East African immigrant women in Washington, DC: implications for targeted HIV testing promotion and communication strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus, Maria; Carrete, Claudia; Maine, Cathleen; Nalls, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to examine and compare the HIV testing attitudes, perceptions and behaviours between African-American and East African immigrant women in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. Adopting an inductive, qualitative methodological approach, we conducted a total of 40 in-depth, semistructured interviews between October 2012 and March 2013. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Overall, African-American women held more favourable views towards HIV testing than East African immigrant women. Very few East African immigrant women sought HIV testing intentionally. The majority of East African participants were tested inadvertently, while others tested for immigration-related or employment-related purposes. There were many barriers that impede women from seeking an HIV test including negative assumptions (eg, "Getting an HIV test implies that I am HIV positive"), negative emotions (eg, "Fear of being diagnosed with HIV and what this will mean for me") and potential negative reactions from partner or others (eg, "Getting an HIV test can signal distrust, disrespect, or infidelity"). There were nuances in how each group articulated some of these barriers and East African women expressed unique concerns that originated from experiences in their home countries. The study shed light into the complexity of factors that constrain women from presenting themselves voluntarily for an HIV test and highlighted the nuances between African-American and East African perceptions. Implications of findings for effective targeted HIV screening promotion and communication strategies among these groups of women are discussed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. East African wetland-catchment data base for sustainable wetland management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leemhuis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands cover an area of approx. 18 Mio ha in the East African countries of Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania, with still a relative small share being used for food production. Current upland agricultural use intensification in these countries due to demographic growth, climate change and globalization effects are leading to an over-exploitation of the resource base, followed by an intensification of agricultural wetland use. We aim on translating, transferring and upscaling knowledge on experimental test-site wetland properties, small-scale hydrological processes, and water related ecosystem services under different types of management from local to national scale. This information gained at the experimental wetland/catchment scale will be embedded as reference data within an East African wetland-catchment data base including catchment physical properties and a regional wetland inventory serving as a base for policy advice and the development of sustainable wetland management strategies.

  20. East African wetland-catchment data base for sustainable wetland management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leemhuis, Constanze; Amler, Esther; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Gabiri, Geofrey; Näschen, Kristian

    2016-10-01

    Wetlands cover an area of approx. 18 Mio ha in the East African countries of Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania, with still a relative small share being used for food production. Current upland agricultural use intensification in these countries due to demographic growth, climate change and globalization effects are leading to an over-exploitation of the resource base, followed by an intensification of agricultural wetland use. We aim on translating, transferring and upscaling knowledge on experimental test-site wetland properties, small-scale hydrological processes, and water related ecosystem services under different types of management from local to national scale. This information gained at the experimental wetland/catchment scale will be embedded as reference data within an East African wetland-catchment data base including catchment physical properties and a regional wetland inventory serving as a base for policy advice and the development of sustainable wetland management strategies.

  1. East African Community (EAC) as Regionalism : The Exclusion and Inclusion of Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Butanaziba, Yunus Lubega

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine and recommend possible prescriptions against problems that regionalism has since occasioned for the last 110 years, and the ones we might face in the short and long term future. It brings forward the East African Community (EAC) as a regional grouping under the ‘exclusive’ and ‘inclusive’ damages of controls by western dominant states, particularly Britain and the United States of America (USA). The problem is that official reasoning and incompetence ...

  2. Predicting and attributing recent East African Spring droughts with dynamical-statistical climate model ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C. C.; Shukla, S.; Hoerling, M. P.; Robertson, F. R.; Hoell, A.; Liebmann, B.

    2013-12-01

    During boreal spring, eastern portions of Kenya and Somalia have experienced more frequent droughts since 1999. Given the region's high levels of food insecurity, better predictions of these droughts could provide substantial humanitarian benefits. We show that dynamical-statistical seasonal climate forecasts, based on the latest generation of coupled atmosphere-ocean and uncoupled atmospheric models, effectively predict boreal spring rainfall in this area. Skill sources are assessed by comparing ensembles driven with full-ocean forcing with ensembles driven with ENSO-only sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Our analysis suggests that both ENSO and non-ENSO Indo-Pacific SST forcing have played an important role in the increase in drought frequencies. Over the past 30 years, La Niña drought teleconnections have strengthened, while non-ENSO Indo-Pacific convection patterns have also supported increased (decreased) Western Pacific (East African) rainfall. To further examine the relative contribution of ENSO, low frequency warming and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, we present decompositions of ECHAM5, GFS, CAM4 and GMAO AMIP simulations. These decompositions suggest that rapid warming in the western Pacific and steeper western-to-central Pacific SST gradients have likely played an important role in the recent intensification of the Walker circulation, and the associated increase in East African aridity. A linear combination of time series describing the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the strength of Indo-Pacific warming are shown to track East African rainfall reasonably well. The talk concludes with a few thoughts linking the potentially important interplay of attribution and prediction. At least for recent East African droughts, it appears that a characteristic Indo-Pacific SST and precipitation anomaly pattern can be linked statistically to support forecasts and attribution analyses. The combination of traditional AGCM attribution analyses with simple yet

  3. Immigrant Entrepreneurship in United Arab Emirates: An exploratory study on East African Asian Immigrant Businesses

    OpenAIRE

    Khakoo, Mohamed Hussein Turabali

    2008-01-01

    Immigrant entrepreneurship has always existed and has developed remarkably. It is related to migration flows over time and has brought increasing attention from researchers and management practitioners in recent years. The research sets out to investigate the process by which immigrants enter into entrepreneurship. The idea of starting a small business and the internationalization strategies they follow. A homogeneous ethnic minority is researched upon, the East African Asians who had migrate...

  4. East African wetland-catchment data base for sustainable wetland management

    OpenAIRE

    Leemhuis, Constanze; Amler, Esther; Diekkrüger, Bernd; Gabiri, Geofrey; Näschen, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Wetlands cover an area of approx. 18 Mio ha in the East African countries of Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania, with still a relative small share being used for food production. Current upland agricultural use intensification in these countries due to demographic growth, climate change and globalization effects are leading to an over-exploitation of the resource base, followed by an intensification of agricultural wetland use. We aim on translating, transferring and upscali...

  5. Stable isotope geochemistry of East African waters. [Abstract only

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayer, M.D.; Cerling, T.E.; Bowman, J.R.

    1983-03-01

    Lakes and Rivers in East Africa have varied stable isotopic compositions. Lakes exhibit enriched delta13-C values (-2 to +5%), while their inflowing rivers show depleted values (-15 to -8%). Hot springs and standing pools of water have intermediate values. Some small lakes are extremely variable in delta18-0 or deltaD (+2 to +8% and +20 to +40%, respectively for Lake Naivasha), whereas larger lakes are relatively constant for long periods of time (+5.6 to 6.1 and +36 to 40, respectively for Lake Turkana). Isotopic values are unrelated to salinity for comparison between lakes. Stable isotopes also reveal the sources of hot spring discharges: the Kapedo hot springs probably originate from Maralel and not from Lake Baringo as local legend has it; the hot springs north of Lake Naivasha are of meteoric origin while those to the south of Lake Naivasha have similar isotopic compositions to Lake Naivasha.

  6. Gender attitudes and fertility aspirations among young men in five high fertility East African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Rachel C; Winter, Rebecca A; Harlow, Siobán D

    2013-03-01

    The relationship between women's attitudes toward gender equality and their fertility aspirations has been researched extensively, but few studies have explored the same associations among men. Using recent Demographic and Health Survey data from five high fertility East African countries, we examine the association between young men's gender attitudes and their ideal family size. Whereas several DHS gender attitude responses were associated with fertility aspirations in select countries, men's greater tolerance of wife beating was consistently associated with higher fertility aspirations across all countries, independent of education, income, or religion. Our findings highlight the overlapping values of male authority within marriage and aspirations for large families among young adult males in East Africa. Total lifetime fertility in East Africa remains among the highest worldwide: thus, governments in the region seeking to reduce fertility may need to explicitly scrutinize and address the reproduction of prevailing masculine values. © 2013 The Population Council, Inc.

  7. East-African Social Sciences and Humanities Publishing: A Handmade Bibliometrics Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, N

    2016-07-01

    For Eastern Africa, very little information about the SSH knowledge production can be found from a European perspective. Adequate indicators like information-rich bibliographic databases that cover East-Africa-based journals and book publishers are lacking. This research in progress explores their indexing situation in detail, their development, which is closely connected to political history, their (non-)usage, and affiliations as well as careerstages of their authors. Furthermore, it also pays attention to East-Africa-based SSH researchers who use other publication venues. Any bibliometric analysis in this field needs to rely on manual data collection, otherwise it would be heavily biased. This study lays out the foundation for citation analyses, qualitative research on the publications' content and the self-description of East-African scholars against the background of an academic environment that is often described as “international”. (Author)

  8. Ideological trends in initial teacher education curricula: the case of East African universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proscovia Namubiru Ssentamu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the ideological trends in initial teacher education curricula in East African universities during the post-independent and contemporary times. From the mid-1960s and mid-1980s, initial teacher education curricula were integrated and harmonised with support from the East African Community whose efforts were coordinated by the Inter-University Council for East Africa. With the breakup of the Community in 1977, each independent state pursued its own educational strategy. However, underfunding of the public sector by governments, introduction of market-friendly reforms under the World Bank Structural Adjustment Programme in 1987 and the de-regularisation policies led to the liberalisation of public services, including education. Liberalisation affected among others, the quality of the initial teacher education curricula. Consequently, national councils and commissions for higher education were established to control standards in higher education, and the Inter-University Council for East Africa was revived to standardise and harmonise educational standards at regional level. The review shows that over the past five decades, the structure and organisation of initial teacher education curricula has continuously adjusted itself and been adjusted to a hybrid culture blending classical humanism, utilitarianism, social re-constructionism, market and global ideologies. Comparable ideological inclinations at socio-economic and political levels have influenced this trend in the region. The paper highlights the implications of such trends on the future of initial teacher education in the region.

  9. Orogen styles in the East African Orogen: A review of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian tectonic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, H.; Abdelsalam, M.; Ali, K. A.; Bingen, B.; Collins, A. S.; Fowler, A. R.; Ghebreab, W.; Hauzenberger, C. A.; Johnson, P. R.; Kusky, T. M.; Macey, P.; Muhongo, S.; Stern, R. J.; Viola, G.

    2013-10-01

    The East African Orogen, extending from southern Israel, Sinai and Jordan in the north to Mozambique and Madagascar in the south, is the world´s largest Neoproterozoic to Cambrian orogenic complex. It comprises a collage of individual oceanic domains and continental fragments between the Archean Sahara-Congo-Kalahari Cratons in the west and Neoproterozoic India in the east. Orogen consolidation was achieved during distinct phases of orogeny between ∼850 and 550 Ma. The northern part of the orogen, the Arabian-Nubian Shield, is predominantly juvenile Neoproterozoic crust that formed in and adjacent to the Mozambique Ocean. The ocean closed during a protracted period of island-arc and microcontinent accretion between ∼850 and 620 Ma. To the south of the Arabian Nubian Shield, the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex of southern Kenya, Tanzania and Mozambique was an extended crust that formed adjacent to theMozambique Ocean and experienced a ∼650-620 Ma granulite-facies metamorphism. Completion of the nappe assembly around 620 Ma is defined as the East African Orogeny and was related to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Oceans persisted after 620 Ma between East Antarctica, India, southern parts of the Congo-Tanzania-Bangweulu Cratons and the Zimbabwe-Kalahari Craton. They closed during the ∼600-500 Ma Kuungan or Malagasy Orogeny, a tectonothermal event that affected large portions of southern Tanzania, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Madagascar and Antarctica. The East African and Kuungan Orogenies were followed by phases of post-orogenic extension. Early ∼600-550 Ma extension is recorded in the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Eastern Granulite-Cabo Delgado Nappe Complex. Later ∼550-480 Ma extension affected Mozambique and southern Madagascar. Both extension phases, although diachronous,are interpreted as the result of lithospheric delamination. Along the strike of the East African Orogen, different geodynamic settings resulted in the evolution of

  10. Correlates of complete childhood vaccination in East African countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen E Canavan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the benefits of childhood vaccinations, vaccination rates in low-income countries (LICs vary widely. Increasing coverage of vaccines to 90% in the poorest countries over the next 10 years has been estimated to prevent 426 million cases of illness and avert nearly 6.4 million childhood deaths worldwide. Consequently, we sought to provide a comprehensive examination of contemporary vaccination patterns in East Africa and to identify common and country-specific barriers to complete childhood vaccination. METHODS: Using data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS for Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda, we looked at the prevalence of complete vaccination for polio, measles, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and DTwPHibHep (DTP as recommended by the WHO among children ages 12 to 23 months. We conducted multivariable logistic regression within each country to estimate associations between complete vaccination status and health care access and sociodemographic variables using backwards stepwise regression. RESULTS: Vaccination varied significantly by country. In all countries, the majority of children received at least one dose of a WHO recommended vaccine; however, in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda less than 50% of children received a complete schedule of recommended vaccines. Being delivered in a public or private institution compared with being delivered at home was associated with increased odds of complete vaccination status. Sociodemographic covariates were not consistently associated with complete vaccination status across countries. CONCLUSIONS: Although no consistent set of predictors accounted for complete vaccination status, we observed differences based on region and the location of delivery. These differences point to the need to examine the historical, political, and economic context of each country in order to maximize vaccination coverage. Vaccination against these childhood diseases is a

  11. Trypanosomiasis re-emerges under cover of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The incidence of trypanosomiasis has increased in southern Sudan along the border of the Central African Republic; up to 30% of the population is infected in some areas. A study conducted by CARE and the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has shown that the disease has spread to over 30,000 people in Tambura county alone; up to 4% of the local population is expected to die this year. According to the local coordinator for CARE, the pyramidal effect is great; when a tsetse fly bites a human, he or she becomes a host who is bitten by uninfected flies that then become carriers to other humans. The disease spreads exponentially. A tsetse fly can bite 3-4 humans/day, and there are thousands of flies in the area. A member of the CDC research team warns that the problem is regional; the annual incidence of the disease in the former Zaire is higher than at any time in the last 60 years, and the mortality associated with the disease is approaching that of AIDS. In a Ugandan outbreak in 1906, 4 million people died; at the turn of the century, trypanosomiasis was the greatest health threat in the tropics, greater even than malaria. Although tsetse fly control gradually reduced the incidence of the disease to less than 1% in the early 1980s, war and population displacement overturned these gains. CARE's director in southern Sudan warns that war and civil conflict are contributing to the reemergence of "super" diseases like sleeping sickness. The assessment team had to cease activities halfway through July 1997, when rebel soldiers commandeered the team's vehicles.

  12. Crustal evolution in the East African Orogen: a neodymium isotopic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robert J.

    2002-05-01

    The East African Orogen (EAO) is one of Earth's great collision zones, where East and West Gondwana collided to form the supercontinent `Greater Gondwana' or `Pannotia' at the end of Neoproterozoic time. There is now sufficient Nd isotopic data for basement rocks of the EAO to yield a useful summary. A total of 449 samples were gleaned from the literature, recalculated to a common value for the La Jolla Nd standard, and entered in Excel spreadsheets. This data set was filtered to exclude samples with 147Sm/ 144Nd> 0.165, considered to yield unreliable model ages, leaving 413 suitable data. The crust of the Arabian-Nubian Shield, including Egypt east of the Nile, Sudan east of the Keraf suture, Sinai, Israel, Jordan, most of Arabia, Eritrea, and northern Ethiopia yields overwhelmingly Neoproterozoic model ages. Crust to the east, in the Afif terrane of Arabia, Yemen, Somalia, and Eastern Ethiopia yields much older model ages, averaging 2.1 Ga, demonstrating an abundance of reworked ancient crust. This provides an isotopic link with Madagascar (mean age of 2.4 Ga), which in pre-Jurassic reconstructions lies on the southern extension of this older, remobilized tract. Crust in the far southern extreme of the EAO in Tanzania also yields ancient model ages, averaging 2.3 Ga. The central EAO, in southern Ethiopia and Kenya, yields intermediate ages (mean 1.1-1.2 Ga), interpreted to indicate extensive mixing between Neoproterozoic mantle-derived melts and ancient crust. The Nd isotope data indicate that the northern EAO is composed of juvenile Neoproterozoic crust sandwiched between reworked older crust, whereas the EAO farther south is progressively dominated by ancient crust reworked during Neoproterozoic time. The distribution of juvenile and reworked ancient crust suggests that the most intense collision between East and West Gondwana occurred in the southern part of the EAO.

  13. Current prevalence of cattle trypanosomiasis and of its vector in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Livestock diseases especially cattle trypanosomiasis remains a challenge and a call for concern. A Cross sectional study was carried out on the entomological and parasitological prevalence of cattle trypanosomiasis, in the tsetse fly infested zone-Alme in Faro and Deo division, Adamaoua region Cameroon. The aim of this ...

  14. Prevalence of trypanosomiasis in sheep in the Kachia Grazing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , to determine the prevalence of trypanosomiasis among sheep. The reserve has had a history of high prevalence of the disease and farmers in the area are known to ignore the control of trypanosomiasis in sheep and goats and focus more on ...

  15. Molecular investigation of genetic assimilation during the rapid adaptive radiations of East African cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M; Schneider, Ralf F; Karner, Immanuel; Sturmbauer, Christian; Meyer, Axel

    2017-12-01

    Adaptive radiations are characterized by adaptive diversification intertwined with rapid speciation within a lineage resulting in many ecologically specialized, phenotypically diverse species. It has been proposed that adaptive radiations can originate from ancestral lineages with pronounced phenotypic plasticity in adaptive traits, facilitating ecologically driven phenotypic diversification that is ultimately fixed through genetic assimilation of gene regulatory regions. This study aimed to investigate how phenotypic plasticity is reflected in gene expression patterns in the trophic apparatus of several lineages of East African cichlid fishes, and whether the observed patterns support genetic assimilation. This investigation used a split brood experimental design to compare adaptive plasticity in species from within and outside of adaptive radiations. The plastic response was induced in the crushing pharyngeal jaws through feeding individuals either a hard or soft diet. We find that nonradiating, basal lineages show higher levels of adaptive morphological plasticity than the derived, radiated lineages, suggesting that these differences have become partially genetically fixed during the formation of the adaptive radiations. Two candidate genes that may have undergone genetic assimilation, gif and alas1, were identified, in addition to alterations in the wiring of LPJ patterning networks. Taken together, our results suggest that genetic assimilation may have dampened the inducibility of plasticity related genes during the adaptive radiations of East African cichlids, flattening the reaction norms and canalizing their feeding phenotypes, driving adaptation to progressively more narrow ecological niches. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Field Plot Techniques for Black Sigatoka Evaluation in East African Highland Bananas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoro, JU.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Number of plants per experimental unit and number of replications for the efficient and precise assessment of black sigatoka leaf spot disease caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis in East African Highland bananas were determined. Two representative cultivars were used. Host response to black sigatoka infection was measured by recording the youngest leaf with necrotic spots. The number of plants per experimental unit was determined, using the methods of maximum curvature and comparison of variances, while the number of replications was estimated by Hatheway's method. The optimum experimental plot size was 3 plants (18 m2 for the beer banana cultivar 'Igitsiri', and 30 plants (180 m2 for the cooking banana cultivar 'Igisahira Gisanzwe', using the comparison of variances method. However, the optimum plot size was 15 plants (90 m2 for both cultivars using the method of maximum curvature. The latter statistical method was preferred because of the low precision of the estimates in the former method. Unreplicated trials with plots of 15 plants could be adequate to assess black sigatoka response in East African bananas if uniform disease pressure exists.

  17. East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus - a recombinant begomovirus species with a mild phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthi, M N; Seal, S; Colvin, J; Briddon, R W; Bull, S E

    2004-12-01

    Cassava plants exhibiting mild symptoms of cassava mosaic disease (CMD) were collected from Unguja island, Zanzibar. Cuttings grown from these plants in the glasshouse produced similar symptoms, which were milder than those caused by other known cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMGs). The whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), transmitted the putative virus to 27.7% (n = 18) of target plants. Total DNA extracted from diseased leaves did not yield diagnostic PCR-bands using virus-specific primers to known CMGs. Degenerate primers, however, produced a diagnostic band indicating the presence of a begomovirus. Full-length DNA-A (2785 nucleotides) and DNA-B (2763 nucleotides) components were subsequently PCR-amplified, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA-A and -B sequences showed that they were most similar to strains of East African cassava mosaic virus from Tanzania and Uganda at 83% and 86% nucleotide identities, respectively. The number and arrangement of open reading frames were similar to those of bipartite begomoviruses from the Old World. DNA-A was predicted to have recombined in the intergenic region (IR), AC1 and AC4 genes, and DNA-B in the IR. A maximum nucleotide identity of 83% in the DNA-A component with other sequenced begomoviruses, together with different biological properties allows this virus to be recognised as belonging to a new species named East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus (EACMZV).

  18. Post-collisional magmatism in the central East African Orogen: The Maevarano Suite of north Madagascar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, K.M.; Thomas, Ronald J.; De Waele, B.; Key, R.M.; Schofield, D.I.; Bauer, W.; Tucker, R.D.; Rafahatelo, J.-M.; Rabarimanana, M.; Ralison, A.V.; Randriamananjara, T.

    2010-01-01

    Late tectonic, post-collisional granite suites are a feature of many parts of the Late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO), where they are generally attributed to late extensional collapse of the orogen, accompanied by high heat flow and asthenospheric uprise. The Maevarano Suite comprises voluminous plutons which were emplaced in some of the tectonostratigraphic terranes of northern Madagascar, in the central part of the EAO, following collision and assembly during a major orogeny at ca. 550 Ma. The suite comprises three main magmatic phases: a minor early phase of foliated gabbros, quartz diorites, and granodiorites; a main phase of large batholiths of porphyritic granitoids and charnockites; and a late phase of small-scale plutons and sheets of monzonite, syenite, leucogranite and microgranite. The main phase intrusions tend to be massive, but with variably foliated margins. New U-Pb SHRIMP zircon data show that the whole suite was emplaced between ca. 537 and 522 Ma. Geochemically, all the rocks of the suite are enriched in the LILE, especially K, and the LREE, but are relatively depleted in Nb, Ta and the HREE. These characteristics are typical of post-collisional granitoids in the EAO and many other orogenic belts. It is proposed that the Maevarano Suite magmas were derived by melting of sub-continental lithospheric mantle that had been enriched in the LILE during earlier subduction events. The melting occurred during lithospheric delamination, which was associated with extensional collapse of the East African Orogen. ?? 2009 Natural Environment Research Council.

  19. East African origins for Madagascan chickens as indicated by mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Michael B; Thomson, Vicki A; Wadley, Jessica J; Piper, Philip J; Sulandari, Sri; Dharmayanthi, Anik Budhi; Kraitsek, Spiridoula; Gongora, Jaime; Austin, Jeremy J

    2017-03-01

    The colonization of Madagascar by Austronesian-speaking people during AD 50-500 represents the most westerly point of the greatest diaspora in prehistory. A range of economically important plants and animals may have accompanied the Austronesians. Domestic chickens (Gallus gallus) are found in Madagascar, but it is unclear how they arrived there. Did they accompany the initial Austronesian-speaking populations that reached Madagascar via the Indian Ocean or were they late arrivals with Arabian and African sea-farers? To address this question, we investigated the mitochondrial DNA control region diversity of modern chickens sampled from around the Indian Ocean rim (Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, East Africa and Madagascar). In contrast to the linguistic and human genetic evidence indicating dual African and Southeast Asian ancestry of the Malagasy people, we find that chickens in Madagascar only share a common ancestor with East Africa, which together are genetically closer to South Asian chickens than to those in Southeast Asia. This suggests that the earliest expansion of Austronesian-speaking people across the Indian Ocean did not successfully introduce chickens to Madagascar. Our results further demonstrate the complexity of the translocation history of introduced domesticates in Madagascar.

  20. Determinants of Oral Diseases in the African and Middle East Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidzonga, M M; Carneiro, L C; Kalyanyama, B M; Kwamin, F; Oginni, F O

    2015-07-01

    Oral health policies must be developed that emphasize the role of social determinants in health and oral diseases. The aim of this report is to review literature on determinants of oral diseases and apply the concepts to promoting oral health in the African countries in the African and Middle East region (AMER). Structural and proximal determinants of oral diseases are common to those affected by other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Oral diseases are also heavily affected by issues of politics, poor health behaviors, underdeveloped health systems, and low oral health literacy. Wide-scale poverty exists in populations in the AMER. Oral health promotion and preventive oral health programs should therefore be integrated with those for general health and use the common risk factor approach (CRFA). Attempts should be made to improve the daily living conditions and reduce the incline of the social gradient. Oral health practitioners should use the CRFA when dealing with determinants of oral diseases and in the design of preventive oral health programs. The detrimental effects of the social determinants of health may be ameliorated by involving both the individual and community. Interventions in health promotion programs in the AMER need more research on the epidemiology of oral diseases and the role played by the social determinants of oral diseases, especially with regard to poverty. The high levels of poverty and low gross domestic product in most countries in the African region make it difficult to fund high-quality, affordable, accessible oral health services. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  1. Ecosocial consequences and policy implications of disease management in East African agropastoral systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Andrew Paul; Gilioli, Gianni; Baumgärtner, Johann

    2009-01-01

    International research and development efforts in Africa have brought ecological and social change, but analyzing the consequences of this change and developing policy to manage it for sustainable development has been difficult. This has been largely due to a lack of conceptual and analytical models to access the interacting dynamics of the different components of ecosocial systems. Here, we examine the ecological and social changes resulting from an ongoing suppression of trypanosomiasis disease in cattle in an agropastoral community in southwest Ethiopia to illustrate how such problems may be addressed. The analysis combines physiologically based demographic models of pasture, cattle, and pastoralists and a bioeconomic model that includes the demographic models as dynamic constraints in the economic objective function that maximizes the utility of individual consumption under different level of disease risk in cattle. Field data and model analysis show that suppression of trypanosomiasis leads to increased cattle and human populations and to increased agricultural development. However, in the absence of sound management, these changes will lead to a decline in pasture quality and increase the risk from tick-borne diseases in cattle and malaria in humans that would threaten system sustainability and resilience. The analysis of these conflicting outcomes of trypanosomiasis suppression is used to illustrate the need for and utility of conceptual bioeconomic models to serve as a basis for developing policy for sustainable agropastoral resource management in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:19620722

  2. Framing the economy of the East African Community: A decade of disparities and similarities found in Chinese and Western news media’s reporting on the East African Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, E.K.; Boukes, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how the economic climate of the East African Community was covered in Chinese and Western news media between 2005 and 2015. Framing devices measuring risk, opportunity, morality and valence were detected and analysed in four news agencies. A content analysis showed that both the

  3. Gene-centric meta-analysis of lipid traits in African, East Asian and Hispanic populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara C Elbers

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses of European populations has successfully identified genetic variants in over 100 loci associated with lipid levels, but our knowledge in other ethnicities remains limited. To address this, we performed dense genotyping of ∼2,000 candidate genes in 7,657 African Americans, 1,315 Hispanics and 841 East Asians, using the IBC array, a custom ∼50,000 SNP genotyping array. Meta-analyses confirmed 16 lipid loci previously established in European populations at genome-wide significance level, and found multiple independent association signals within these lipid loci. Initial discovery and in silico follow-up in 7,000 additional African American samples, confirmed two novel loci: rs5030359 within ICAM1 is associated with total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C (p = 8.8×10(-7 and p = 1.5×10(-6 respectively and a nonsense mutation rs3211938 within CD36 is associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels (p = 13.5×10(-12. The rs3211938-G allele, which is nearly absent in European and Asian populations, has been previously found to be associated with CD36 deficiency and shows a signature of selection in Africans and African Americans. Finally, we have evaluated the effect of SNPs established in European populations on lipid levels in multi-ethnic populations and show that most known lipid association signals span across ethnicities. However, differences between populations, especially differences in allele frequency, can be leveraged to identify novel signals, as shown by the discovery of ICAM1 and CD36 in the current report.

  4. Norms for multivariate diagnosis of nutrient imbalance in the East African highland bananas (musa spp.aaa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wairegi, L.; Asten, van P.

    2011-01-01

    Despite low yields and soil fertility problems, fertilizer use in the East African Highland banana (AAA-EA) production is absent. High fertilizer costs increase the need for site-specific fertilizer recommendations that address deficiencies. This study aimed to derive and compare norms for AAA-EA

  5. Phenological development of East African highland banana involves trade-offs between physiological age and chronological age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taulya, G.; Asten, van P.J.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Giller, K.E.

    2014-01-01

    The phenology of East African highland banana (Musa acuminata AAA-EA, hereafter referred to as ‘highland banana’) is poorly understood. We tested three hypotheses: (1) the physiological age at flowering is independent of site effects, (2) there is no difference in threshold size at flowering between

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces from the East African highlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asfaw, A.; Blair, M.W.; Almekinders, C.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The East African highlands are a region of important common bean production and high varietal diversity for the crop. The objective of this study was to uncover the diversity and population structure of 192 landraces from Ethiopia and Kenya together with four genepool control genotypes using

  7. The status and relationships of some East African Earless Toads (Anura, Bufonidae) with a description of a new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandison, A.G.C.

    1972-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In comparing some small Ethiopian Bufo with the descriptions, types and other examples of numerous forms from East and Central African countries I became very much aware of the confusion that exists in the taxonomy and of the need for a revision of this group of dwarf toads. Most of the

  8. East African highland bananas (Musa spp. AAA-EA) 'worry' more about potassium deficiency than drought stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taulya, G.

    2013-01-01

    Drought stress, potassium (K) and nitrogen (N) deficiencies are major constraints to rain-fed East African highland banana (EAHB) production in Uganda. It was hypothesised that the reduction in fresh bunch mass and increase in dry matter (DM) allocation to corms with drought stress, K and N

  9. Mineral fertilizer response and nutrient use efficiencies of East African highland banana (Musa spp., AAA-EAHB, cv. Kisansa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyombi, K.; Asten, van P.J.A.; Corbeels, M.; Taulya, G.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Giller, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    Poor yields of East African highland bananas (Musa spp., AAA-EAHB) on smallholder farms have often been attributed to problems of poor soil fertility. We measured the effects of mineral fertilizers on crop performance at two sites over two to three crop cycles; Kawanda in central Uganda and Ntungamo

  10. Allometric scaling predicts preferences for burned patches in a guild of East African grazers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensenig, Ryan L; Demment, Montague W; Laca, Emilio A

    2010-10-01

    The high herbivore diversity in savanna systems has been attributed to the inherent spatial and temporal heterogeneity related to the quantity and quality of food resources. Allometric scaling predicts that smaller-bodied grazers rely on higher quality forage than larger-bodied grazers. We replicated burns at varying scales in an East African savanna and measured visitation by an entire guild of larger grazers ranging in size from hare to elephant. We found a strong negative relationship between burn preference and body mass with foregut fermenters preferring burns to a greater degree than hindgut fermenters. Burns with higher quality forage were preferred more than burns with lower quality forage by small-bodied grazers, while the opposite was true for large-bodied grazers. Our results represent some of the first experimental evidence demonstrating the importance of body size in predicting how large herbivores respond to fire-induced changes in plant quality and quantity.

  11. Predicting East African spring droughts using Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperature indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Christopher C.; Hoell, Andrew; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Blade, Ileana; Liebmann, Brant; Roberts, Jason B.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    2014-01-01

    In southern Ethiopia, Eastern Kenya, and southern Somalia poor boreal spring rains in 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2011 contributed to severe food insecurity and high levels of malnutrition. Predicting rainfall deficits in this region on seasonal and decadal time frames can help decision makers support disaster risk reduction while guiding climate-smart adaptation and agricultural development. Building on recent research that links more frequent droughts to a stronger Walker Circulation, warming in the Indo-Pacific warm pool, and an increased western Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) gradient, we explore the dominant modes of East African rainfall variability, links between these modes and sea surface temperatures, and a simple index-based monitoring-prediction system suitable for drought early warning.

  12. Testing the stages model in the adaptive radiation of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschick, Moritz; Nosil, Patrik; Roesti, Marius; Dittmann, Marie Theres; Harmon, Luke; Salzburger, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive radiation (AR) is a key process in the origin of organismal diversity. However, the evolution of trait disparity in connection with ecological specialization is still poorly understood. Available models for vertebrate ARs predict that diversification occurs in the form of temporal stages driven by different selective forces. Here, we investigate the AR of cichlid fishes in East African Lake Tanganyika and use macroevolutionary model fitting to evaluate whether diversification happened in temporal stages. Six trait complexes, for which we also provide evidence of their adaptiveness, are analysed with comparative methods: body shape, pharyngeal jaw shape, gill raker traits, gut length, brain weight and body coloration. Overall, we do not find strong evidence for the ‘stages model’ of AR. However, our results suggest that trophic traits diversify earlier than traits implicated in macrohabitat adaptation and that sexual communication traits (i.e. coloration) diversify late in the radiation. PMID:25274371

  13. Two Plumes Beneath the East African Rift System: a Geochemical Investigation into Possible Interactions in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W. R.; Furman, T.; van Keken, P. E.; Lin, S.

    2007-12-01

    East African Rift System magmatism began over 40 my ago and has continued through the present. Numerical models have determined two plumes are necessary to create the spatial and temporal distribution of volcanism. Geochemical data support the presence of two chemically distinct plumes initially located beneath the Afar Depression (NE Ethiopia) and the Turkana Depression (SW Ethiopia/N Kenya). The timing and eruptive of the Afar and Kenya plumes are also distinct. While there is growing evidence to support the existence of two dynamically and chemically distinct plumes beneath the East African Rift System, the interactions between them remain unclear. Our study focuses on the geochemistry of mafic shield lavas from three locations on the eastern flank of the Ethiopian plateau. These lavas are spatially located between the surface manifestation of the Afar and Kenya plumes. The majority of the lava is alkaline and has experienced varying degrees of olivine and pyroxene fractionation. The northernmost lavas (9°10'N) are transitional and display the most fractionation. Primitive mantle melts were generated at depths near the fertile mantle garnet-spinel transition zone and deeper (80-100km) and are free of metasomatic influence. Minor HREE depletions also support derivation of melts from a garnet-bearing source. Lavas with lithospheric influence are generated from shallower depths and show minor amphibole influence. Overall, geochemical data show the lavas in this study closely resemble those from various episodes of Kenya plume magmatism with modifications attributed to lithospheric contamination. This interpretation is consistent with current numerical models suggesting episodic northward movement of Kenya plume magmas along the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. The data imply that the Kenya plume has a much larger spatial influence and therefore a larger geodynamic influence in the EARS than previously recognized.

  14. Association of genetic variation with blood pressure traits among East Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayima, J; Liang, J; Natanzon, Y; Nankabirwa, J; Ssinabulya, I; Nakibuuka, J; Katamba, A; Mayanja-Kizza, H; Miron, A; Li, C; Zhu, X

    2017-11-01

    Genetic variation may play explain some of the disparity in prevalence and control of hypertension across Sub-Saharan Africa. However, there have been very few studies to characterize genetic variation of blood pressure traits. To determine whether a set of blood pressure-associated genetic loci can be replicated among samples East African samples. Twenty-seven blood pressures (BP)-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped among 2881 samples from participants in the Medical Education Partnership Initiative for Cardiovascular Disease (MEPI-CVD) survey. Associations with known BP variants were evaluated for systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and pulse pressure (PP) as continuous variables and for hypertension (HTN) as a binary variable. Eleven SNPS were associated with at least 1 BP trait (P close to AGT, IGFBP3, CYP17A1, PLEKHA7, ATP2B1 and JAG, respectively, were associated with DBP while 2 SNPs located within AGT and IGFBP-3 genes associated with HTN. For PP, 4 variants rs1458038, rs11725861, rs7726475 and rs11953630 whose corresponding genes are FGF5, CHIC2, SUB1/NPR3 and EBF1 reached significance (P < .05). Eight SNPs were replicated in the same effect direction as the parent studies. Risk scores defined using published effect sizes were significantly associated with both SBP (P = .0026) and DBP (P = .0214). The replication of multiple BP variants among East Africans suggests that these variants may have universal effects across ethnic populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Khat chewing and acculturation in East-African migrants living in Frankfurt am Main/Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongard, Stephan; Nakajima, Motohiro; al'Absi, Mustafa

    2015-04-22

    Khat (Catha edulis, Forsk) is a drug widely used in countries around the Red Sea (East-Africa and Arabian Peninsula). In Germany khat chewing is illegal but nevertheless an often observed habit in immigrants from this region. This study investigates the interrelation between immigrants acculturation processes and traditional khat chewing habits. Sixty-one khat chewers (14 female) from East-African countries were interviewed about their khat chewing habits and acculturation strategy using standardized questionnaires. Results indicate that immigrants׳ khat chewing behaviors are similar to what is common in countries with traditional khat use. But khat chewing tended to be less among immigrants who were relatively more oriented towards their cultures of origin. Chewing khat was subjectively considered to help coping with problems, to forget bad memories and to concentrate better. It was concluded that khat chewing serves a functional use of coping with stressful events in the present or in the past within this sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Warm spells on the East African plateau and impacts in the White Nile basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2017-07-01

    This study analyzes warm spells in the dry season over the East African plateau. Lake levels were observed to decline in the period July 2004 to January 2007. The warmest spell was identified using maximum temperature and satellite outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) observations averaged over Uganda: 20-22 Feb 2005. Meteorological conditions in that case were dominated by a surge of the NE monsoon from the Arabian Sea toward East Africa. Subsiding air induced daytime land surface temperatures >55 °C. Dry easterly winds swept across Uganda, and the vegetation fraction dropped >10% in 1 month. At the seasonal scale, the NE monsoon intensity over the Arabian Sea correlated with indices of desiccation over the White Nile basin. In the annual cycle, sensible heat flux follows potential evaporation, reaching -4.5 mm/day in February. Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model projections favor a long-term weakening of the NE monsoon and a northward migration of the equatorial trough over the west Indian Ocean in Dec-Mar season. Although maximum temperatures are projected to rise +2 °C by the end of the 21st century, the length of the dry season could shrink, thus maintaining the water balance near current levels.

  17. Conceptualizations of heterosexual anal sex and HIV risk in five East African communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duby, Zoe; Colvin, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Heterosexual anal sex is underresearched and little understood, particularly in the African context. Existing prevalence data indicate that heterosexual anal sex is a widespread practice, yet little is known about the way in which it is conceptualized and understood. Describing findings from qualitative research conducted in Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, we shed light on conceptualizations of heterosexual anal sex and its relation to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These findings suggest that penile-anal sex is practiced by men and women in Africa for a range of reasons, including virginity maintenance, contraception, fulfillment of male pleasure, relationship security, menstruation, in the presence of vaginal complications, financial gain, fidelity, and prestige. Despite anal sex being the most efficient way to transmit HIV sexually, there is widespread lack of knowledge about its risks. These findings describe the ways in which anal sex is conceptualized in five East African communities, highlighting how penile-anal intercourse is often not considered "sex" and how the omission of anal sex in safe-sex messaging is interpreted as meaning that anal sex is safe. In light of its frequency and risks, greater attention must be paid to heterosexual anal sex in Africa to ensure a comprehensive approach to HIV prevention.

  18. Bioenergy from agro-industrial residues in the East African region. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungersen, G. [Dansk Teknologisk Inst. (Denmark); Kivaisi, A.; Rubindamayugi, M. [Univ. of Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    Tanzania has recently developed a comprehensive environmental policy which has put high priority on several specific environmental issues. One of the issues is the quality of waste water. A special priority is given to the pollution from the sisal industry. The East-African agro-industries generate very large quantities of organic residues from production and processing of different crops. These residues form a major contribution to the pollution of air, soil and waterways, but, at the same time they constitute a large potential for production of bioenergy through anaerobic digestion as well as potential substrate for other biological fermentation processes. Generally, these residues are regarded as having no or very little value and the different disposal methods are mainly a matter of getting rid of the waste. The generation of residues are very often concentrated on few large units, which makes the exploitation of these resources feasible in large scale biogas systems. Typically the units will have a potential of a daily methane generation of 1,000-20,000 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}, equivalent to a potential electricity production of 0.2-3.2 MW. The future utilization of these resources for production of valuable products is described in this report. This report consists of 3 volumes. This summary report including the main objectives and findings from the different project report: Mapping and Quantification of Organic Agro-Industrial Residues in East Africa; Biogas - Bioenergy Potential in East Africa, Seminar Proceedings, Siler Sands, Dar es Salaam 22-23 September 1997; Bioenergy from Sisal residues - Experimental results and Capacity Building Activities. (EG)

  19. Exploring Pacific Climate Variability and Its Impacts on East African Water Resources and Food Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C. C.; Hoerling, M. P.; Hoell, A.; Liebmann, B.; Verdin, J. P.; Eilerts, G.

    2014-12-01

    In 8 out the past 15 boreal springs (1999, 2000, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, and 2013), substantial parts of eastern East Africa experienced very low boreal spring rains. These rainfall deficits have triggered widespread food insecurity, and even contributed to the outbreak of famine conditions in Somalia in 2011. At both seasonal and decadal time scales, new science supported by the USAID Famine Early Warning Systems Network seeks to understand the mechanisms producing these droughts. We present research suggesting that the ultimate and proximate causes of these increases in aridity are i) stronger equatorial Pacific SST gradients and ii) associated increases in the strength of the Indo-Pacific Walker circulation. Using observations and new modeling ensembles, we explore the relative contributions of Pacific Decadal Variability (PDV) and global warming under warm and cold east Pacific Ocean states. This question is addressed in two ways: by using atmospheric GCMs forced with full and ENSO-only SSTs, and ii) by decomposing coupled ocean-atmosphere climate simulations into PDV and non-PDV components. These analyses allow us to explore the Walker circulation's sensitivity to climate change under various PDV states, and inform a tentative bracketing of 2030 climate conditions. We conclude by discussing links to East African development. Regions of high rainfall sensitivity are delineated and intersected with recent changes in population and land cover/land use. The interaction of elevation and climate is shown to create climatically secure regions that are likely to remain viable even under drier and warmer conditions; such regions may be logical targets for agricultural intensification. Conversely, arid low elevation regions are likely to experience substantial temperature impacts. Continued expansion into these areas may effectively create more 'drought' even if rainfall increases.

  20. Extremes in East African hydroclimate and links to Indo-Pacific variability on interannual to decadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.; Kulüke, Marco; Tierney, Jessica E.

    2017-07-01

    East African hydroclimate exhibits considerable variability across a range of timescales, with implications for its population that depends on the region's two rainy seasons. Recent work demonstrated that current state-of-the-art climate models consistently underestimate the long rains in boreal spring over the Horn of Africa while overestimating the short rains in autumn. This inability to represent the seasonal cycle makes it problematic for climate models to project changes in East African precipitation. Here we consider whether this bias also has implications for understanding interannual and decadal variability in the East African long and short rains. Using a consistent framework with an unforced multi-century global coupled climate model simulation, the role of Indo-Pacific variability for East African rainfall is compared across timescales and related to observations. The dominant driver of East African rainfall anomalies critically depends on the timescale under consideration: Interannual variations in East African hydroclimate coincide with significant sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies across the Indo-Pacific, including those associated with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the eastern Pacific, and are linked to changes in the Walker circulation, regional winds and vertical velocities over East Africa. Prolonged drought/pluvial periods in contrast exhibit anomalous SST predominantly in the Indian Ocean and Indo-Pacific warm pool (IPWP) region, while eastern Pacific anomalies are insignificant. We assessed dominant frequencies in Indo-Pacific SST and found the eastern equatorial Pacific dominated by higher-frequency variability in the ENSO band, while the tropical Indian Ocean and IPWP exhibit lower-frequency variability beyond 10 years. This is consistent with the different contribution to regional precipitation anomalies for the eastern Pacific versus Indian Ocean and IPWP on interannual and decadal timescales, respectively. In the model

  1. Mainstreaming biodiversity and wildlife management into climate change policy frameworks in selected east and southern African countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga L. Kupika

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Rio+20 outcomes document, the Future We Want, enshrines green economy as one of the platforms to attain sustainable development and calls for measures that seek to address climate change and biodiversity management. This paper audits climate change policies from selected east and southern African countries to determine the extent to which climate change legislation mainstreams biodiversity and wildlife management. A scan of international, continental, regional and national climate change policies was conducted to assess whether they include biodiversity and/or wildlife management issues. The key finding is that many climate change policy–related documents, particularly the National Adaptation Programme of Actions (NAPAs, address threats to biodiversity and wildlife resources. However, international policies like the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and Kyoto Protocol do not address the matter under deliberation. Regional climate change policies such as the East African Community, Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa and African Union address biodiversity and/or wildlife issues whilst the Southern African Development Community region does not have a stand-alone policy for climate change. Progressive countries like Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania and Zambia have recently put in place detailed NAPAs which are mainstream responsive strategies intended to address climate change adaptation in the wildlife sector.Keywords: mainstreaming, biodiversity, wildlife, climate change policy, east and southern Africa

  2. An interdisciplinary approach for groundwater management in area contaminated by fluoride in East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Pelo, Stefania; Melis, M. Teresa; Dessì, Francesco; Pistis, Marco; Funedda, Antonio; Oggiano, Giacomo; Carletti, Alberto; Soler Gil, Albert; Barbieri, Manuela; Pittalis, Daniele; Ghiglieri, Giorgio

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater is the main source of fresh water supply for most of the rural communities in Africa (approximately 75% of Africans has confidence in groundwater as their major source of drinking water). Many African countries has affected by high fluoride concentration in groundwater (up to 90 mg/L), generating the contamination of waters, soils and food, in particular in the eastern part of the continent. It seems that fluoride concentration is linked to geology of the Rift Valley: geogenic occurrence of fluoride is often connected to supergenic enrichment due to the weathering of alkaline volcanic rocks, fumaric gases and presence of thermal waters. The H2020 project FLOWERED (de-FLuoridation technologies for imprOving quality of WatEr and agRo-animal products along the East African Rift Valley in the context of aDaptation to climate change) wish to address environmental and health (human and animal) issues associated to the fluoride contamination in the African Rift Valley, in particular in three case study area located in Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya. FLOWERED aims to develop an integrated, sustainable and participative water and agriculture management at a cross-boundary catchment scale through a strong interdisciplinary research approach. It implies knowledge of geology, hydrogeology, mineralogy, geochemistry, agronomy, crop and animal sciences, engineering, technological sciences, data management and software design, economics and communication. The proposed approach is based on a detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological setting, with the identification and mapping of the specific geological conditions of water contamination and its relation with the different land uses. The East African Rift System (EARS) groundwater circulation and storage, today already poorly understood, is characterized by a complex arrangement of aquifers. It depends on the type of porosity and permeability created during and after the rock formation, and is strongly conditioned by the

  3. Genetic diversity and connectivity in the East African giant mud crab Scylla serrata: Implications for fisheries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumisha, Cyrus; Huyghe, Filip; Rapanoel, Diary; Mascaux, Nemo; Kochzius, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The giant mud crab Scylla serrata provides an important source of income and food to coastal communities in East Africa. However, increasing demand and exploitation due to the growing coastal population, export trade, and tourism industry are threatening the sustainability of the wild stock of this species. Because effective management requires a clear understanding of the connectivity among populations, this study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity and connectivity in the East African mangrove crab S. serrata. A section of 535 base pairs of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene and eight microsatellite loci were analysed from 230 tissue samples of giant mud crabs collected from Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar, and South Africa. Microsatellite genetic diversity (He) ranged between 0.56 and 0.6. The COI sequences showed 57 different haplotypes associated with low nucleotide diversity (current nucleotide diversity = 0.29%). In addition, the current nucleotide diversity was lower than the historical nucleotide diversity, indicating overexploitation or historical bottlenecks in the recent history of the studied population. Considering that the coastal population is growing rapidly, East African countries should promote sustainable fishing practices and sustainable use of mangrove resources to protect mud crabs and other marine fauna from the increasing pressure of exploitation. While microsatellite loci did not show significant genetic differentiation (p > 0.05), COI sequences revealed significant genetic divergence between sites on the East coast of Madagascar (ECM) and sites on the West coast of Madagascar, mainland East Africa, as well as the Seychelles. Since East African countries agreed to achieve the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) target to protect over 10% of their marine areas by 2020, the observed pattern of connectivity and the measured genetic diversity can serve to provide useful information for designing networks of

  4. Genetic diversity and connectivity in the East African giant mud crab Scylla serrata: Implications for fisheries management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrus Rumisha

    Full Text Available The giant mud crab Scylla serrata provides an important source of income and food to coastal communities in East Africa. However, increasing demand and exploitation due to the growing coastal population, export trade, and tourism industry are threatening the sustainability of the wild stock of this species. Because effective management requires a clear understanding of the connectivity among populations, this study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity and connectivity in the East African mangrove crab S. serrata. A section of 535 base pairs of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI gene and eight microsatellite loci were analysed from 230 tissue samples of giant mud crabs collected from Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar, and South Africa. Microsatellite genetic diversity (He ranged between 0.56 and 0.6. The COI sequences showed 57 different haplotypes associated with low nucleotide diversity (current nucleotide diversity = 0.29%. In addition, the current nucleotide diversity was lower than the historical nucleotide diversity, indicating overexploitation or historical bottlenecks in the recent history of the studied population. Considering that the coastal population is growing rapidly, East African countries should promote sustainable fishing practices and sustainable use of mangrove resources to protect mud crabs and other marine fauna from the increasing pressure of exploitation. While microsatellite loci did not show significant genetic differentiation (p > 0.05, COI sequences revealed significant genetic divergence between sites on the East coast of Madagascar (ECM and sites on the West coast of Madagascar, mainland East Africa, as well as the Seychelles. Since East African countries agreed to achieve the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD target to protect over 10% of their marine areas by 2020, the observed pattern of connectivity and the measured genetic diversity can serve to provide useful information for designing

  5. Spatial patterns of sea surface temperature influences on East African precipitation as revealed by empirical orthogonal teleconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eAppelhans

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available East Africa is characterized by a rather dry annual precipitation climatology with two distinct rainy seasons. In order to investigate sea surface temperature driven precipitation anomalies for the region we use the algorithm of empirical orthogonal teleconnection analysis as a data mining tool. We investigate the entire East African domain as well as 5 smaller sub-regions mainly located in areas of mountainous terrain. In searching for influential sea surface temperature patterns we do not focus any particular season or oceanic region. Furthermore, we investigate different time lags from zero to twelve months. The strongest influence is identified for the immediate (i.e. non-lagged influences of the Indian Ocean in close vicinity to the East African coast. None of the most important modes are located in the tropical Pacific Ocean, though the region is sometimes coupled with the Indian Ocean basin. Furthermore, we identify a region in the southern Indian Ocean around the Kerguelen Plateau which has not yet been reported in the literature with regard to precipitation modulation in East Africa. Finally, it is observed that not all regions in East Africa are equally influenced by the identified patterns.

  6. Late Miocene to Pliocene carbon isotope record of differential diet change among East African herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kevin T.; Cerling, Thure E.; Harris, John M.; Kunimatsu, Yutaka; Leakey, Meave G.; Nakatsukasa, Masato; Nakaya, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Stable isotope and molecular data suggest that C4 grasses first appeared globally in the Oligocene. In East Africa, stable isotope data from pedogenic carbonate and fossil tooth enamel suggest a first appearance between 15–10 Ma and subsequent expansion during the Plio-Pleistocene. The fossil enamel record has the potential to provide detailed information about the rates of dietary adaptation to this new resource among different herbivore lineages. We present carbon isotope data from 452 fossil teeth that record differential rates of diet change from C3 to mixed C3/C4 or C4 diets among East African herbivore families at seven different time periods during the Late Miocene to the Pliocene (9.9–3.2 Ma). Significant amounts of C4 grasses were present in equid diets beginning at 9.9 Ma and in rhinocerotid diets by 9.6 Ma, although there is no isotopic evidence for expansive C4 grasslands in this part of the Late Miocene. Bovids and hippopotamids followed suit with individuals that had C4-dominated (>65%) diets by 7.4 Ma. Suids adopted C4-dominated diets between 6.5 and 4.2 Ma. Gomphotheriids and elephantids had mostly C3-dominated diets through 9.3 Ma, but became dedicated C4 grazers by 6.5 Ma. Deinotheriids and giraffids maintained a predominantly C3 diet throughout the record. The sequence of differential diet change among herbivore lineages provides ecological insight into a key period of hominid evolution and valuable information for future studies that focus on morphological changes associated with diet change. PMID:21464327

  7. Seasonal patterns of mixed species groups in large East African mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kiffner

    Full Text Available Mixed mammal species groups are common in East African savannah ecosystems. Yet, it is largely unknown if co-occurrences of large mammals result from random processes or social preferences and if interspecific associations are consistent across ecosystems and seasons. Because species may exchange important information and services, understanding patterns and drivers of heterospecific interactions is crucial for advancing animal and community ecology. We recorded 5403 single and multi-species clusters in the Serengeti-Ngorongoro and Tarangire-Manyara ecosystems during dry and wet seasons and used social network analyses to detect patterns of species associations. We found statistically significant associations between multiple species and association patterns differed spatially and seasonally. Consistently, wildebeest and zebras preferred being associated with other species, whereas carnivores, African elephants, Maasai giraffes and Kirk's dik-diks avoided being in mixed groups. During the dry season, we found that the betweenness (a measure of importance in the flow of information or disease of species did not differ from a random expectation based on species abundance. In contrast, in the wet season, we found that these patterns were not simply explained by variations in abundances, suggesting that heterospecific associations were actively formed. These seasonal differences in observed patterns suggest that interspecific associations may be driven by resource overlap when resources are limited and by resource partitioning or anti-predator advantages when resources are abundant. We discuss potential mechanisms that could drive seasonal variation in the cost-benefit tradeoffs that underpin the formation of mixed-species groups.

  8. Seasonal Patterns of Mixed Species Groups in Large East African Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiffner, Christian; Kioko, John; Leweri, Cecilia; Krause, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Mixed mammal species groups are common in East African savannah ecosystems. Yet, it is largely unknown if co-occurrences of large mammals result from random processes or social preferences and if interspecific associations are consistent across ecosystems and seasons. Because species may exchange important information and services, understanding patterns and drivers of heterospecific interactions is crucial for advancing animal and community ecology. We recorded 5403 single and multi-species clusters in the Serengeti-Ngorongoro and Tarangire-Manyara ecosystems during dry and wet seasons and used social network analyses to detect patterns of species associations. We found statistically significant associations between multiple species and association patterns differed spatially and seasonally. Consistently, wildebeest and zebras preferred being associated with other species, whereas carnivores, African elephants, Maasai giraffes and Kirk's dik-diks avoided being in mixed groups. During the dry season, we found that the betweenness (a measure of importance in the flow of information or disease) of species did not differ from a random expectation based on species abundance. In contrast, in the wet season, we found that these patterns were not simply explained by variations in abundances, suggesting that heterospecific associations were actively formed. These seasonal differences in observed patterns suggest that interspecific associations may be driven by resource overlap when resources are limited and by resource partitioning or anti-predator advantages when resources are abundant. We discuss potential mechanisms that could drive seasonal variation in the cost-benefit tradeoffs that underpin the formation of mixed-species groups. PMID:25470495

  9. Mainstreaming biodiversity and wildlife management into climate change policy frameworks in selected east and southern African countries

    OpenAIRE

    Olga L. Kupika; Godwell Nhamo

    2016-01-01

    The Rio+20 outcomes document, the Future We Want, enshrines green economy as one of the platforms to attain sustainable development and calls for measures that seek to address climate change and biodiversity management. This paper audits climate change policies from selected east and southern African countries to determine the extent to which climate change legislation mainstreams biodiversity and wildlife management. A scan of international, continental, regional and national climate change ...

  10. Towards an understanding and application of environmental flow requirements for human welfare in East African Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In semi-arid regions of Africa, rivers are of vital importance to humans for the many direct ecosystem services they provide and, in some cases, for their potential to irrigate and power larger-scale development. More than in most regions of the world, Africans still rely individually on rivers for domestic water, nutrition, and other materials contributing to their daily welfare. This has led to a uniquely African adaptation of the environmental flow concept to incorporate the basic water needs of people as well as ecosystems. The combined flow is referred to as the 'Reserve'. East Africa has seen comparatively little development of its water resources to-date, but ambitious initiatives are underway to increase water use in new large-scale irrigation schemes and hydropower projects. Consequently, a number of comprehensive environmental flow assessments and ecohydrological research activities have recently been carried out in the region. This presentation briefly reviews the initiatives underway across the region but focuses mainly on combined research and flow-setting efforts in the transboundary Mara River Basin of Kenya and Tanzania, home to more than 800,000 people and the region's most popular conservation areas, Masai-Mara National Reserve and Serengeti National Park. Since 2006 a team of scientists, in cooperation with water authorities and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), has investigated the hydrology, hydraulics, biology, and human uses of the Mara River in order to make initial environmental flow (reserve) recommendations. The flow regime of the still largely unregulated Mara River, based on analyses or 20+ years of data from three gauging stations, is highly variable and perennial flow in the middle reaches is dependent on inflows from two tributaries draining the heavily deforested Mau Escarpment, one of Kenya's five water towers. Downstream flows are also seasonally influenced by inflows from ephemeral tributaries that drain degraded grazing

  11. The episode of genetic drift defining the migration of humans out of Africa is derived from a large east African population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassan, Nuha; Gebremeskel, Eyoab Iyasu; Elnour, Mohamed Ali; Isabirye, Dan; Okello, John; Hussien, Ayman; Kwiatksowski, Dominic; Hirbo, Jibril; Tishkoff, Sara; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic variation particularly in Africa is still poorly understood. This is despite a consensus on the large African effective population size compared to populations from other continents. Based on sequencing of the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit II (MT-CO2), and genome wide microsatellite data we observe evidence suggesting the effective size (Ne) of humans to be larger than the current estimates, with a foci of increased genetic diversity in east Africa, and a population size of east Africans being at least 2-6 fold larger than other populations. Both phylogenetic and network analysis indicate that east Africans possess more ancestral lineages in comparison to various continental populations placing them at the root of the human evolutionary tree. Our results also affirm east Africa as the likely spot from which migration towards Asia has taken place. The study reflects the spectacular level of sequence variation within east Africans in comparison to the global sample, and appeals for further studies that may contribute towards filling the existing gaps in the database. The implication of these data to current genomic research, as well as the need to carry out defined studies of human genetic variation that includes more African populations; particularly east Africans is paramount.

  12. The episode of genetic drift defining the migration of humans out of Africa is derived from a large east African population size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Elhassan

    Full Text Available Human genetic variation particularly in Africa is still poorly understood. This is despite a consensus on the large African effective population size compared to populations from other continents. Based on sequencing of the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit II (MT-CO2, and genome wide microsatellite data we observe evidence suggesting the effective size (Ne of humans to be larger than the current estimates, with a foci of increased genetic diversity in east Africa, and a population size of east Africans being at least 2-6 fold larger than other populations. Both phylogenetic and network analysis indicate that east Africans possess more ancestral lineages in comparison to various continental populations placing them at the root of the human evolutionary tree. Our results also affirm east Africa as the likely spot from which migration towards Asia has taken place. The study reflects the spectacular level of sequence variation within east Africans in comparison to the global sample, and appeals for further studies that may contribute towards filling the existing gaps in the database. The implication of these data to current genomic research, as well as the need to carry out defined studies of human genetic variation that includes more African populations; particularly east Africans is paramount.

  13. Use of Machine Learning Techniques for Iidentification of Robust Teleconnections to East African Rainfall Variability in Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Funk, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Providing advance warning of East African rainfall variations is a particular focus of several groups including those participating in the Famine Early Warming Systems Network. Both seasonal and long-term model projections of climate variability are being used to examine the societal impacts of hydrometeorological variability on seasonal to interannual and longer time scales. The NASA / USAID SERVIR project, which leverages satellite and modeling-based resources for environmental decision making in developing nations, is focusing on the evaluation of both seasonal and climate model projections to develop downscaled scenarios for using in impact modeling. The utility of these projections is reliant on the ability of current models to capture the embedded relationships between East African rainfall and evolving forcing within the coupled ocean-atmosphere-land climate system. Previous studies have posited relationships between variations in El Niño, the Walker circulation, Pacific decadal variability (PDV), and anthropogenic forcing. This study applies machine learning methods (e.g. clustering, probabilistic graphical model, nonlinear PCA) to observational datasets in an attempt to expose the importance of local and remote forcing mechanisms of East African rainfall variability. The ability of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS5) coupled model to capture the associated relationships will be evaluated using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations.

  14. Giant seismites and megablock uplift in the East African Rift: evidence for Late Pleistocene large magnitude earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert-Wolf, Hannah Louise; Roberts, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    In lieu of comprehensive instrumental seismic monitoring, short historical records, and limited fault trench investigations for many seismically active areas, the sedimentary record provides important archives of seismicity in the form of preserved horizons of soft-sediment deformation features, termed seismites. Here we report on extensive seismites in the Late Quaternary-Recent (≤ ~ 28,000 years BP) alluvial and lacustrine strata of the Rukwa Rift Basin, a segment of the Western Branch of the East African Rift System. We document examples of the most highly deformed sediments in shallow, subsurface strata close to the regional capital of Mbeya, Tanzania. This includes a remarkable, clastic 'megablock complex' that preserves remobilized sediment below vertically displaced blocks of intact strata (megablocks), some in excess of 20 m-wide. Documentation of these seismites expands the database of seismogenic sedimentary structures, and attests to large magnitude, Late Pleistocene-Recent earthquakes along the Western Branch of the East African Rift System. Understanding how seismicity deforms near-surface sediments is critical for predicting and preparing for modern seismic hazards, especially along the East African Rift and other tectonically active, developing regions.

  15. Spatial vegetation patterns and neighborhood competition among woody plants in an East African savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Justin; Augustine, David J; Hanan, Niall P; Ratnam, Jayashree; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2017-02-01

    The majority of research on savanna vegetation dynamics has focused on the coexistence of woody and herbaceous vegetation. Interactions among woody plants in savannas are relatively poorly understood. We present data from a 10-yr longitudinal study of spatially explicit growth patterns of woody vegetation in an East African savanna following exclusion of large herbivores and in the absence of fire. We examined plant spatial patterns and quantified the degree of competition among woody individuals. Woody plants in this semiarid savanna exhibit strongly clumped spatial distributions at scales of 1-5 m. However, analysis of woody plant growth rates relative to their conspecific and heterospecific neighbors revealed evidence for strong competitive interactions at neighborhood scales of up to 5 m for most woody plant species. Thus, woody plants were aggregated in clumps despite significantly decreased growth rates in close proximity to neighbors, indicating that the spatial distribution of woody plants in this region depends on dispersal and establishment processes rather than on competitive, density-dependent mortality. However, our documentation of suppressive effects of woody plants on neighbors also suggests a potentially important role for tree-tree competition in controlling vegetation structure and indicates that the balanced-competition hypothesis may contribute to well-known patterns in maximum tree cover across rainfall gradients in Africa. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Zebrafish bioassay-guided natural product discovery: isolation of angiogenesis inhibitors from East African medicinal plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Crawford

    Full Text Available Natural products represent a significant reservoir of unexplored chemical diversity for early-stage drug discovery. The identification of lead compounds of natural origin would benefit from therapeutically relevant bioassays capable of facilitating the isolation of bioactive molecules from multi-constituent extracts. Towards this end, we developed an in vivo bioassay-guided isolation approach for natural product discovery that combines bioactivity screening in zebrafish embryos with rapid fractionation by analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC and initial structural elucidation by high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HRESIMS. Bioactivity screening of East African medicinal plant extracts using fli-1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos identified Oxygonum sinuatum and Plectranthus barbatus as inhibiting vascular development. Zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation identified the active components of these plants as emodin, an inhibitor of the protein kinase CK2, and coleon A lactone, a rare abietane diterpenoid with no previously described bioactivity. Both emodin and coleon A lactone inhibited mammalian endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro, as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay. These results suggest that the combination of zebrafish bioassays with analytical chromatography methods is an effective strategy for the rapid identification of bioactive natural products.

  17. Zebrafish bioassay-guided natural product discovery: isolation of angiogenesis inhibitors from East African medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Alexander D; Liekens, Sandra; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary R; Maes, Jan; Munck, Sebastian; Busson, Roger; Rozenski, Jef; Esguerra, Camila V; de Witte, Peter A M

    2011-02-17

    Natural products represent a significant reservoir of unexplored chemical diversity for early-stage drug discovery. The identification of lead compounds of natural origin would benefit from therapeutically relevant bioassays capable of facilitating the isolation of bioactive molecules from multi-constituent extracts. Towards this end, we developed an in vivo bioassay-guided isolation approach for natural product discovery that combines bioactivity screening in zebrafish embryos with rapid fractionation by analytical thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and initial structural elucidation by high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (HRESIMS). Bioactivity screening of East African medicinal plant extracts using fli-1:EGFP transgenic zebrafish embryos identified Oxygonum sinuatum and Plectranthus barbatus as inhibiting vascular development. Zebrafish bioassay-guided fractionation identified the active components of these plants as emodin, an inhibitor of the protein kinase CK2, and coleon A lactone, a rare abietane diterpenoid with no previously described bioactivity. Both emodin and coleon A lactone inhibited mammalian endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro, as well as angiogenesis in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. These results suggest that the combination of zebrafish bioassays with analytical chromatography methods is an effective strategy for the rapid identification of bioactive natural products.

  18. Mapping the Elephants of the 19th Century East African Ivory Trade with a Multi-Isotope Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Ashley N; Lee-Thorp, Julia; Collins, Matthew J; Lane, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    East African elephants have been hunted for their ivory for millennia but the nineteenth century witnessed strongly escalating demand from Europe and North America. It has been suggested that one consequence was that by the 1880s elephant herds along the coast had become scarce, and to meet demand, trade caravans trekked farther into interior regions of East Africa, extending the extraction frontier. The steady decimation of elephant populations coupled with the extension of trade networks have also been claimed to have triggered significant ecological and socio-economic changes that left lasting legacies across the region. To explore the feasibility of using an isotopic approach to uncover a 'moving frontier' of elephant extraction, we constructed a baseline isotope data set (δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and 87Sr/86Sr) for historic East African elephants known to have come from three distinct regions (coastal, Rift Valley, and inland Lakes). Using the isotope results with other climate data and geographical mapping tools, it was possible to characterise elephants from different habitats across the region. This baseline data set was then used to provenance elephant ivory of unknown geographical provenance that was exported from East Africa during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to determine its likely origin. This produced a better understanding of historic elephant geography in the region, and the data have the potential to be used to provenance older archaeological ivories, and to inform contemporary elephant conservation strategies.

  19. Comparison of two methods of inquiry for torture with East African refugees: single query versus checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeyer, Joseph; Hollifield, Michael; Spring, Marline; Johnson, David; Jaranson, James

    2011-01-01

    First to compare two methods of inquiry regarding torture: i.e., the traditional means of inquiry versus a checklist of torture experiences previously identified for these African refugees. Second, we hoped to identify factors that might influence refugees to not report torture on a single query when checklist data indicated torture events had occurred or to report torture when checklist data indicated that torture had not occurred. Consisted of queries to 1,134 community-dwelling East African refugees (Somalia and Ethiopia) regarding the presence-versus-absence of torture in Africa (single query), a checklist of torture experiences in Africa that we had previously identified as occurring in these groups, demography, non-torture traumatic experiences in Africa, and current posttraumatic symptoms. Showed that 14% of the study participants reported a torture experience on a checklist, but not on a single query. Nine percent responded positively to the single query on torture, but then failed to check any torture experience. Those reporting trauma on an open-ended query, but not on a checklist, had been highly traumatized in other ways (warfare, civil chaos, robbery, assault, rape, trauma during flight out of the country). Those who reported torture on the checklist but not on the single query reported fewer instances of torture, suggesting that perhaps a "threshold" of torture experience influenced the single-query report. In addition, certain types of torture appeared more apt to be associated with a singlequery endorsement of torture. On regression analysis, a single-query self-report of torture was associated with traumatic experiences consistent with torture, older age, female gender, and nontorture trauma in Africa. Inconsistent reporting of torture occurred when two methods of inquiry (one openended and one a checklist) were employed in this sample. We believe that specific contexts of torture and non-torture trauma, together with individual demographic

  20. Two phases of the Holocene East African Humid Period: Inferred from a high-resolution geochemical record off Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiting; Rendle-Bühring, Rebecca; Kuhlmann, Holger; Li, Anchun

    2017-02-01

    During the Holocene, the most notably climatic change across the African continent is the African Humid Period (AHP), however the pace and primary forcing for this pluvial condition is still ambiguous, particularly in East Africa. We present a high-resolution marine sediment record off Tanzania to provide insights into the climatic conditions of inland East Africa during the Holocene. Major element ratios (i.e., log-ratios of Fe/Ca and Ti/Ca), derived from X-Ray Fluorescence scanning, have been employed to document variations in humidity in East Africa. Our results show that the AHP is represented by two humid phases: an intense humid period from the beginning of the Holocene to 8 ka (AHP I); and a moderate humid period spanning from 8 to 5.5 ka (AHP II). On the basis of our geochemical record and regime detection, the termination of the AHP initiated at 5.5 ka and ceased around 3.5 ka. Combined with other paleoclimatic records around East Africa, we suggest that the humid conditions in this region responded to Northern Hemisphere (NH) summer insolation. The AHP I and II might have been related to an eastward shift of the Congo Air Boundary and warmer conditions in the western Indian Ocean, which resulted in additional moisture being delivered from the Atlantic and Indian Oceans during the NH summer and autumn, respectively. We further note a drought event throughout East Africa north of 10°S around 8.2 ka, which may have been related to the southward migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone in response to the NH cooling event.

  1. Trading or coercion? Variation in male mating strategies between two communities of East African chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburu, Stefano S K; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas E

    2015-06-01

    Across taxa, males employ a variety of mating strategies, including sexual coercion and the provision, or trading, of resources. Biological market theory (BMT) predicts that trading of commodities for mating opportunities should exist only when males cannot monopolize access to females and/or obtain mating by force, in situations where power differentials between males are low; both coercion and trading have been reported for chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Here, we investigate whether the choice of strategy depends on the variation in male power differentials, using data from two wild communities of East African chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii): the structurally despotic Sonso community (Budongo, Uganda) and the structurally egalitarian M-group (Mahale, Tanzania). We found evidence of sexual coercion by male Sonso chimpanzees, and of trading-of grooming for mating-by M-group males; females traded sex for neither meat nor protection from male aggression. Our results suggest that the despotism-egalitarian axis influences strategy choice: male chimpanzees appear to pursue sexual coercion when power differentials are large and trading when power differentials are small and coercion consequently ineffective. Our findings demonstrate that trading and coercive strategies are not restricted to particular chimpanzee subspecies; instead, their occurrence is consistent with BMT predictions. Our study raises interesting, and as yet unanswered, questions regarding female chimpanzees' willingness to trade sex for grooming, if doing so represents a compromise to their fundamentally promiscuous mating strategy. It highlights the importance of within-species cross-group comparisons and the need for further study of the relationship between mating strategy and dominance steepness.

  2. Economic values for production and functional traits of Small East African goat using profit functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuku, Samuel; Kosgey, Isaac; Okeyo, Mwai; Kahi, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Economic values for production traits (milk yield, MY, g; 12-month live weight, yLW, kg; consumable meat percentage, CM, %) and functional traits (mature doe live weight, DoLW, kg; mature buck live weight, LWb, kg; kidding frequency, KF; pre-weaning survival rate, PrSR, %; post-weaning survival rate, PoSR,%; doe survival rate, DoSR, %; and residual feed intake, RFI, kg) were estimated using profit functions for the Small East African goat. The scenario evaluated was a fixed flock size, and the resultant economic values (Kes per doe per year) were 34.46 (MY), 62.35 (yLW), 40.69 (CM), 0.15 (DoLW), 2.84 (LWb), 8.69 (KF), 17.38 (PrSR), 16.60 (PoSR), 16.69 (DoSR) and -3.00 (RFI). Similarly, the economic values decreased by -14.7 % (MY), -2.7 % (yLW), -23.9 % (CM), -6.6 % (DoLW), -98 % (LWb), -8.6 % (KF), -8.2 % (PrSR), -8.9 % (PoSR), -8.1 % (DoSR) and 0 % (RFI) when they were risk rated. The economic values for production and functional traits, except RFI, were positive, which implies that genetic improvement of these traits would have a positive effect on the profitability in the pastoral production systems. The application of an Arrow-Pratt coefficient of absolute risk aversion (λ) at the level of 0.02 resulted in a decrease on the estimated economic values, implying that livestock keepers who were risk averse were willing to accept lower expected returns. The results indicate that there would be improvement in traits of economic importance, and, therefore, easy-to-manage genetic improvement programmes should be established.

  3. Oral Health Inequalities between Rural and Urban Populations of the African and Middle East Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbodede, E O; Kida, I A; Madjapa, H S; Amedari, M; Ehizele, A; Mutave, R; Sodipo, B; Temilola, S; Okoye, L

    2015-07-01

    Although there have been major improvements in oral health, with remarkable advances in the prevention and management of oral diseases, globally, inequalities persist between urban and rural communities. These inequalities exist in the distribution of oral health services, accessibility, utilization, treatment outcomes, oral health knowledge and practices, health insurance coverage, oral health-related quality of life, and prevalence of oral diseases, among others. People living in rural areas are likely to be poorer, be less health literate, have more caries, have fewer teeth, have no health insurance coverage, and have less money to spend on dental care than persons living in urban areas. Rural areas are often associated with lower education levels, which in turn have been found to be related to lower levels of health literacy and poor use of health care services. These factors have an impact on oral health care, service delivery, and research. Hence, unmet dental care remains one of the most urgent health care needs in these communities. We highlight some of the conceptual issues relating to urban-rural inequalities in oral health, especially in the African and Middle East Region (AMER). Actions to reduce oral health inequalities and ameliorate rural-urban disparity are necessary both within the health sector and the wider policy environment. Recommended actions include population-specific oral health promotion programs, measures aimed at increasing access to oral health services in rural areas, integration of oral health into existing primary health care services, and support for research aimed at informing policy on the social determinants of health. Concerted efforts must be made by all stakeholders (governments, health care workforce, organizations, and communities) to reduce disparities and improve oral health outcomes in underserved populations. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  4. Transmission of human African trypanosomiasis in the Komo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to update transmission features of sleeping sickness in that focus, we have conducted epidemiological and entomological surveys in March-April 2008. Methods: Epidemiological investigation relied on a casecontrol study using a quantitative and qualitative methodology (a structured questionnaire). Cases were ...

  5. Entomological patterns in the human African trypanosomiasis focus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The incidence of sleeping sickness is still considerable in the Komo Mondah focus, in spite of case-detection strategy. A combined strategy that associated both mass screening and vector control is effective for the control of the disease. In the perspective of a targeted vector control in main transmission sites, ...

  6. INSIDE THE NUMBERS: USING PRIVATE COMMERCIAL DATA TO ANALYZE EAST AFRICAN IMPORTED SOAP CONSUMPTION, 1870-1914

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laird Jones

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social historians identify soap as a “new need,” and argue its consumption indicates changing notions of bodily cleanliness, beauty and status. Relying largely on qualitative evidence such as traveler and missionary accounts, print advertising and oral interviews, they contend African soap use was influenced by Christian missions, colonial education and branding in the marketplace. Quantitative evidence – limited customs data – neither confirms nor challenges this position. More detailed commercial records, however, paint a somewhat different picture. The East African correspondence of William O’Swald & Co. indicates that soap marketing predated both Christian missions and colonial influence. Further, general purpose laundry soap was the overwhelming best seller. Personal toilette soaps lagged far behind. Laundering imported cotton textiles appeared the motive for initial soap purchases, and perhaps also the first step toward later personal soap use.

  7. Control of cattle trypanosomiasis in coastal savannah of Ghana Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field studies on the control of animal trypanosomiasis were undertaken in the Coastal Savanna of Ghana to det-ermine the importance of the disease in livestock production. The methodologies adopted were participatory ru-ral appraisal, geographical information systems, and entomological or parasitological evaluation.

  8. Preliminary assessment of bovine trypanosomiasis and its vectors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acetone baited blue biconical traps ﴾n=5﴿ were used for entomological survey. Questionnaire survey revealed that trypanosomiasis was one of the major health problems affecting animals and a hindrance to agricultural activities. The overall prevalence was 10.3% ﴾31/301﴿. Trypanosome species identified consisted of: T.

  9. Historical volcanism and the state of stress in the East African Rift System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Wadge

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crustal extension at the East African Rift System (EARS should, as a tectonic ideal, involve a stress field in which the direction of minimum horizontal stress is perpendicular to the rift. A volcano in such a setting should produce dykes and fissures parallel to the rift. How closely do the volcanoes of the EARS follow this? We answer this question by studying the 21 volcanoes that have erupted historically (since about 1800 and find that 7 match the (approximate geometrical ideal. At the other 14 volcanoes the orientation of the eruptive fissures/dykes and/or the axes of the host rift segments are oblique to the ideal values. To explain the eruptions at these volcanoes we invoke local (non-plate tectonic variations of the stress field caused by: crustal heterogeneities and anisotropies (dominated by NW structures in the Protoerozoic basement, transfer zone tectonics at the ends of offset rift segments, gravitational loading by the volcanic edifice (typically those with 1-2 km relief and magmatic pressure in central reservoirs. We find that the more oblique volcanoes tend to have large edifices, large eruptive volumes and evolved and mixed magmas capable of explosive behaviour. Nine of the volcanoes have calderas of varying ellipticity, 6 of which are large, reservoir-collapse types mainly elongated across rift (e.g. Kone and 3 are smaller, elongated parallel to the rift and contain active lava lakes (e.g. Erta Ale, suggesting different mechanisms of formation and stress fields. Nyamuragira is the only EARS volcano with enough sufficiently well-documented eruptions to infer its long-term dynamic behaviour. Eruptions within 7 km of the volcano are of relatively short duration (<100 days, but eruptions with more distal fissures tend to have greater obliquity and longer durations, indicating a changing stress field away from the volcano. There were major changes in long-term magma extrusion rates in 1977 (and perhaps in 2002 due to major along

  10. Contrasted continental rifting via plume-craton interaction: Applications to Central East African Rift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Koptev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The East African Rift system (EARS provides a unique system with the juxtaposition of two contrasting yet simultaneously formed rift branches, the eastern, magma-rich, and the western, magma-poor, on either sides of the old thick Tanzanian craton embedded in a younger lithosphere. Data on the pre-rift, syn-rift and post-rift far-field volcanic and tectonic activity show that the EARS formed in the context of the interaction between a deep mantle plume and a horizontally and vertically heterogeneous lithosphere under far-field tectonic extension. We bring quantitative insights into this evolution by implementing high-resolution 3D thermo-mechanical numerical deformation models of a lithosphere of realistic rheology. The models focus on the central part of the EARS. We explore scenarios of plume-lithosphere interaction with plumes of various size and initial position rising beneath a tectonically pre-stretched lithosphere. We test the impact of the inherited rheological discontinuities (suture zones along the craton borders, of the rheological structure, of lithosphere plate thickness variations, and of physical and mechanical contrasts between the craton and the embedding lithosphere. Our experiments indicate that the ascending plume material is deflected by the cratonic keel and preferentially channeled along one of its sides, leading to the formation of a large rift zone along the eastern side of the craton, with significant magmatic activity and substantial melt amount derived from the mantle plume material. We show that the observed asymmetry of the central EARS, with coeval amagmatic (western and magmatic (eastern branches, can be explained by the splitting of warm material rising from a broad plume head whose initial position is slightly shifted to the eastern side of the craton. In that case, neither a mechanical weakness of the contact between the craton and the embedding lithosphere nor the presence of second plume are required to

  11. East African mid-Holocene wet-dry transition recorded in palaeo-shorelines of Lake Turkana, northern Kenya Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Yannick; Melnick, Daniel; Strecker, Manfred R.; Olago, Daniel; Tiercelin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-05-01

    The 'wet' early to mid-Holocene of tropical Africa, with its enhanced monsoon, ended with an abrupt shift toward drier conditions and was ultimately replaced by a drier climate that has persisted until the present day. The forcing mechanisms, the timing, and the spatial extent of this major climatic transition are not well understood and remain the subject of ongoing research. We have used a detailed palaeo-shoreline record from Lake Turkana (Kenya) to decipher and characterise this marked climatic transition in East Africa. We present a high-precision survey of well-preserved palaeo-shorelines, new radiocarbon ages from shoreline deposits, and oxygen-isotope measurements on freshwater mollusk shells to elucidate the Holocene moisture history from former lake water-levels in this climatically sensitive region. In combination with previously published data our study shows that during the early Holocene the water-level in Lake Turkana was high and the lake overflowed temporarily into the White Nile drainage system. During the mid-Holocene (~ 5270 ± 300 cal. yr BP), however, the lake water-level fell by ~ 50 m, coeval with major episodes of aridity on the African continent. A comparison between palaeo-hydrological and archaeological data from the Turkana Basin suggests that the mid-Holocene climatic transition was associated with fundamental changes in prehistoric cultures, highlighting the significance of natural climate variability and associated periods of protracted drought as major environmental stress factors affecting human occupation in the East African Rift System.

  12. Genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis East African–Indian family in three tropical Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yih-Yuan Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Beijing lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB is the most predominant MTB strain in Asian countries and is spreading worldwide, however, the East African–Indian (EAI lineage is also particularly prevalent in many tropical Asian countries. The evolutionary relationships among MTB EAI isolates from Taiwan and those of tropical Asian countries remain unknown. Methods: The EAI strains collected from patients in Taiwan were analyzed using spacer oligonucleotide typing and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR typing, and compared with published profiles from Cambodia and Singapore to investigate potential epidemiological linkages. Results: Among the three countries, the EAI lineage was most prevalent in Cambodia (60%; Singapore, 25.62%; and Taiwan, 21.85%, having also the highest rates of multidrug resistance and lowest rates of clustering of MTB isolates. We describe a convenient method using seven selected MIRU-VNTR loci for first-line typing to discriminate Beijing and EAI lineages. A potential epidemiological linkage in these tropical Asian countries is also discussed based on a minimum-spanning tree constructed using 24 MIRU-VNTR loci of MTB EAI strains. Conclusion: This study identified evolutionary relationships among MTB EAI isolates from Taiwan and those of two other tropical Asian countries, Cambodia and Singapore. Keywords: East African–Indian family, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tropical Asian countries

  13. Genetic evidence of successful establishment of the Nile perch (Lates spp. L. in East African lakes and implications for management

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    Matthew Tenywa Mwanja

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nile perch establishment in novel ranges in East Africa is one of the most successful freshwater invasion stories in the recent history. Itbecame ecologically dominant and well established in several lakes in the Lake Victoria Region in a period of less than 5 decades. Geneticdiversity of both introduced and native populations were assessed and patterns compared in order to establish the genetic consequences oftheir introductions. Genetic variation was surveyed at both the mitochondrial control region (CR and at nine microsatellite loci. A total of 527 Nile perch fish were sampled from 5 East African lakes: native source populations were examined from lakes Albert and Turkana while introduced populations were sampled from lakes Kyoga, Nabugabo and Victoria. Both types of markers revealed higher average geneticdiversity for invasive species (HE = 0.70, h = 0.81 than for native source populations (HE = 0.66, h = 0.69. Both populations scoredrelatively higher than the average for freshwater fishes (HE = 0.62. Both native and introduced populations had 2 underlying geneticgroupings in similar proportions as revealed by the STRUCTURE program. The high genetic diversity was most probably a consequence ofhigher numbers of propagules than outlined by official records of introductions. Use of high number of individuals at stocking is probably the reason for apparently minimized ‘founder effects’ of Nile perch in the introduced ranges. The two underling populations revealed through genetic analysis may be representatives of the two subspecies of Nile perch previously reported in other studies. Implications to the management of this fishery in the East African region is that with the relatively high genetic diversity, the species could be sustainably exploited if it were effectively managed. In addition, further studies of the life histories and other attributes of the two genetic groupings of Nile perch in the region are recommended, as they may

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Institutional Capacities for Implementing Disability Policies in East African Countries: Functions of National Councils for Disability

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    Akiko Yokoyama

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available During the “African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (2000-2009”, East African countries witnessed significant achievements, especially in the development of law, collection of statistics and in funding. However, many persons with disability are still marginalised from opportunities in education, healthcare and employment.Purpose: With the pre-supposition that the lack of institutional capacities for implementing disability policies is the one major stumbling-block which hinders widespread delivery of social services to persons with disabilities in low-income countries, this study makes a comparative analysis of institutional capacities in the disability sectors of Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania.Method: The research methods adopted were a literature survey and a field survey. The framework for analysis consists of: 1 capacities and functions of disability units in central governments, 2 relationships between central and local governments in the disability sector, and 3 relationships between governments and organisations of persons with disability (DPOs. Special attention is paid to the status, roles and functions of national councils for disability (NCDs, the independent statutory bodies recently established in each of the three countries, with clear authority and duties for the implementation of disability policies. The NCDs enable multi-sectoral stakeholders to be involved in the implementation of disability policies; therefore, positive relationships between the governments and DPOs are essential for the smooth functioning of the NCDs.Results: While the result of the field survey in Tanzania reveals several effective approaches for the smooth operation of the NCD, further study is needed to verify whether these approaches would be applicable to other East African countries such as Kenya and Uganda.doi 10.5463/DCID.v23i2.106

  15. Environmental determinants of diatom assemblages along a North African wadi, the Kebir-East, North-East Algeria

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    Boudjéma SAMRAOUI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A total of 322 benthic diatoms with the majority being cosmopolitan species was recorded during a survey of the catchment area of the Kebir-East wadi, northeast Algeria. The spatial distribution patterns of diatom communities in relation to environmental gradients were examined using Co-Inertia Analysis (CIA for ascertaining the interdependence between physico-chemical descriptors and diatom assemblages in 182 samples, collected over a period of 3 years, across 23 sampling stations. There was a significant covariance between the environmental data set and the benthic diatom data set with the CIA highlighting correlations between environmental factors and diatom species. A clear longitudinal gradient was a main driver of diatom communities with upstream sites characterized by high dissolved oxygen concentrations and downstream sites characterized by high organic load and nutrient enrichment of the water. A further factor influencing the shape of diatom assemblages was related to the conductivity, and the high values possibly reflected the close proximity of the sea to the downstream sites. An anthropogenic impact was also most evident in structuring diatom assemblages at sites close to Lake Oubeïra where agriculture was concentrated.

  16. Imprints of a Pan-African transpressional orogen superimposed on an inferred Grenvillian accretionary belt in central East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraccioli, Fausto; Seddon, Samuel; Finn, Carol; Bell, Robin; Wu, Guochao; Jordan, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains in interior East Antarctica are underlain by 50-60 km thick crust imaged by gravity and seismic models (Ferraccioli et al., 2011; An et al., 2015). In contrast, the composite Archean to Mesoproterozoic Mawson craton that occupies the Wilkes and Terre Adelie sector of East Antarctica typically features only 40-45 km thick crust (Aitken et al., 2014). Over 200 km thick and seismically fast lithosphere underlies the Gamburtsev Province, as typically observed over Precambrian lithosphere that has not been substantially reworked during Phanerozoic subduction or collision. Satellite and airborne magnetic data indicate that the Gamburtev Province is sandwiched in between distinct Precambrian lithospheric blocks including the Ruker, Princess Elizabeth Land, Vostok, Nimrod (Goodge and Finn, 2010), South Pole and Recovery provinces. Ferraccioli et al., (2011) proposed that a segment of a stalled orogen (i.e. an orogen where widespread orogenic collapse and root delamination has not occurred) is preserved in the Gamburtsev Province and further hypothesised that its origin relates to widespread accretionary and subsequent collisional events at ca 1 Ga, linked to the assembly of the Rodinia supercontinent. However, recent passive seismic interpretations (An et al., 2015) indicate that crustal thickening may relate instead to Pan-African age assembly of Greater India, East Antarctica and Australia within Gondwana (at ca 550 Ma). Here we interpret a set of enhanced magnetic and gravity images, depth to magnetic and gravity sources and preliminary 2D and 3D forward and inverse models to characterise in detail the crustal architecture of the Gamburtsev Province. Enhanced aeromagnetic images reveal a system of subglacial faults that segment the Gamburtsev Province into three distinct geophysical domains, the northern, central and southern domains. Apparent offsets in high-frequency magnetic anomalies within the central domain are interpreted here

  17. Signatures of Selection for Environmental Adaptation and Zebu × Taurine Hybrid Fitness in East African Shorthorn Zebu

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    Hussain Bahbahani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The East African Shorthorn Zebu (EASZ cattle are ancient hybrid between Asian zebu × African taurine cattle preferred by local farmers due to their adaptability to the African environment. The genetic controls of these adaptabilities are not clearly understood yet. Here, we genotyped 92 EASZ samples from Kenya (KEASZ with more than 770,000 SNPs and sequenced the genome of a pool of 10 KEASZ. We observe an even admixed autosomal zebu × taurine genomic structure in the population. A total of 101 and 165 candidate regions of positive selection, based on genome-wide SNP analyses (meta-SS, Rsb, iHS, and ΔAF and pooled heterozygosity (Hp full genome sequence analysis, are identified, in which 35 regions are shared between them. A total of 142 functional variants, one novel, have been detected within these regions, in which 30 and 26 were classified as of zebu and African taurine origins, respectively. High density genome-wide SNP analysis of zebu × taurine admixed cattle populations from Uganda and Nigeria show that 25 of these regions are shared between KEASZ and Uganda cattle, and seven regions are shared across the KEASZ, Uganda, and Nigeria cattle. The identification of common candidate regions allows us to fine map 18 regions. These regions intersect with genes and QTL associated with reproduction and environmental stress (e.g., immunity and heat stress suggesting that the genome of the zebu × taurine admixed cattle has been uniquely selected to maximize hybrid fitness both in terms of reproduction and survivability.

  18. Quantification of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-UG) in single and mixed infected Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Saadia; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of genomic DNA-A and DNA-B of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus Uganda (Uganda variant, EACMV-UG) was analysed using quantitative PCR to assess virus concentrations in plants from susceptible and tolerant cultivars. The concentrations of genome components in absolute and relative quantification experiments in single and mixed viral infections were determined. Virus concentration was much higher in symptomatic leaf tissues compared to non-symptomatic leaves and corresponded with the severity of disease symptoms. In general, higher titres were recorded for EACMV-UG Ca055 compared to ACMV DRC6. The quantitative assessment also showed that the distribution of both viruses in the moderately resistant cassava cv. TMS 30572 was not different from the highly susceptible cv. TME 117. Natural mixed infections with both viruses gave severe disease symptoms. Relative quantification of virus genomes in mixed infections showed higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-A compared to ACMV DNA-A, but a marked reduction of EACMV-UG DNA-B. The higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-B compared to EACMV DNA-A accumulation in single infections were consistent. Since DNA-B is implicated in virus cell-to-cell spread and systemic movement, the abundance of the EACMV-UG DNA-B may be an important factor driving cassava mosaic disease epidemic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Standardizing visual control devices for tsetse flies: East African species Glossina swynnertoni.

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    Furaha Mramba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Here we set out to standardize long-lasting, visually-attractive devices for Glossina swynnertoni, a vector of both human and animal trypanosomiasis in open savannah in Tanzania and Kenya, and in neighbouring conservation areas used by pastoralists. The goal was to determine the most practical device/material that would induce the strongest landing response in G. swynnertoni for use in area-wide population suppression of this fly with insecticide-impregnated devices. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Trials were conducted in wet and dry seasons in the Serengeti and Maasai Mara to measure the performance of traps and targets of different sizes and colours, with and without chemical baits, at different population densities and under different environmental conditions. Adhesive film was used as a simple enumerator at these remote locations to compare trapping efficiencies of devices. Independent of season or presence of chemical baits, targets in phthalogen blue or turquoise blue cloth with adhesive film were the best devices for capturing G. swynnertoni in all situations, catching up to 19 times more flies than pyramidal traps. Baiting with chemicals did not affect the relative performance of devices. Fly landings were two times higher on 1 m(2 blue-black targets as on pyramidal traps when equivalent areas of both were covered with adhesive film. Landings on 1 m(2 blue-black targets were compared to those on smaller phthalogen blue 0.5 m(2 all-blue or blue-black-blue cloth targets, and to landings on all-blue plastic 0.32-0.47 m(2 leg panels painted in phthalogen blue. These smaller targets and leg panels captured equivalent numbers of G. swynnertoni per unit area as bigger targets. CONCLUSIONS: Leg panels and 0.5 m(2 cloth targets show promise as cost effective devices for management of G. swynnertoni as they can be used for both control (insecticide-impregnated cloth and for sampling (rigid plastic with insect glue or adhesive film of

  20. Development of an improved method for soil and water conservation planning at catchment scale in the East African Higlands : Progress Report 1 jan - 30 sep 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzandvoort, S.J.E.

    2002-01-01

    The overall goal of the EROAHI Project is to improve the Catchment Approach, a methodology for participatory soil conservation planning currently applied in the East African Highlands Eco-region. Anticipated improvements are: semi-quantification of soil and productivity loss using farmers’

  1. Teachers’ Perceptions on the Use of African Languages in the Curriculum: A Case Study of Schools in Kenya, East Africa

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    Martin C. Njoroge

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to revitalize African languages and advocate for their use as media of instruction in Kenyan schools, it is important to investigate and document the teachers’ attitude towards the use of these languages in teaching. The research on which this paper is based set forth to explore teachers’ perceptions on the use of the mother tongue as the language of instruction in Kenya, East Africa. Six schools out of 54 public schools in the Gatundu district were randomly sampled. 32 teachers of Grades 1-3 were interviewed to find out the actual practices in their classrooms, the challenges they faced, and the perceptions they held in relation to the use of the mother tongue in their teaching. The data were qualitatively analyzed and the emergent findings support the claim that the use of learners’ mother tongue is beneficial to learners. In addition, the paper discusses the findings and proposes recommendations for pedagogy.

  2. The Lake Albert Rift (uganda, East African Rift System): Deformation, Basin and Relief Evolution Since 17 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendan, Simon; François, Guillocheau; Cécile, Robin; Olivier, Dauteuil; Thierry, Nalpas; Martin, Pickford; Brigitte, Senut; Philippe, Lays; Philippe, Bourges; Martine, Bez

    2016-04-01

    This study is based on a coupled basin infilling study and a landforms analysis of the Lake Albert Rift located at the northern part of the western branch of the East African Rift. The basin infilling study is based on both subsurface data and outcrops analysis. The objective was to (1) obtain an age model based on onshore mammals biozones, (2) to reconstruct the 3D architecture of the rift using sequence stratigraphy correlations and seismic data interpretation, (3) to characterize the deformation and its changes through times and (4) to quantify the accommodation for several time intervals. The infilling essentially consists of isopach fault-bounded units composed of lacustrine deposits wherein were characterized two major unconformities dated at 6.2 Ma (Uppermost Miocene) and 2.7 Ma (Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary), coeval with major subsidence and climatic changes. The landforms analysis is based on the characterization and relative dating (geometrical relationships with volcanism) of Ugandan landforms which consist of stepped planation surfaces (etchplains and peplians) and incised valleys. We here proposed a seven-steps reconstruction of the deformation-erosion-sedimentation relationships of the Lake Albert Basin and its catchments: - 55-45 Ma: formation of laterites corresponding to the African Surface during the very humid period of the Lower-Middle Eocene; - 45-22: stripping of the African Surface in response of the beginning of the East-African Dome uplift and formation of a pediplain which associated base level is the Atlantic Ocean; - 17-2.5 Ma: Initiation of the Lake Albert Basin around 17 Ma and creation of local base levels (Lake Albert, Edward and George) on which three pediplains tend to adapt; - 18 - 16 Ma to 6.2 Ma: "Flexural" stage (subsidence rate: 150-200 m/Ma; sedimentation rate 1.3 km3/Ma between 17 and 12 Ma and 0.6 km3/Ma from 12 to 6 Ma) - depocenters location (southern part of Lake Albert Basin) poorly controlled by fault; - 6.2 Ma to 2

  3. The Use Of Information And Communication Technology And Social Networking Sites In Political Governance Of East African Legislative Assembly Parliament

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    Ainebyona Robert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This research project was carried out to ascertain the use of Information and Communication Technologies and Social Networking Sites in political governance of East African Legislative Assembly Parliament. The research project was based on the conviction that in this era of globalization use of ICTs and SNSs are fundamentally important and will have tremendous impact on governance leadership and legislation now and in the near future. The specific objective of this study was intended a To evaluate the use of Social Networking Sites in enhancing the political governance of East African Legislative assembly Parliament. The findings from the research showed that that all the respondents 100 were subscribed to social networking sites and used them from time to time. Additionally the EALA parliamentarians had a disparity when it came to use of SNSs to interact with constituents 73.3 of the respondents indicated that they have used SNSs to interact with constituents on matters affecting the community from time to time however 26.7 showed that they did not use Social Networking sites to interact with constituents. Lastly the use of ICTs and SNSs by EALA has also made it possible for citizens to view Assembly proceedings in real time and hence where able to view their representatives in the course of carrying out their duties in the political arena.Lastly the world is changing in a dynamic fashion SNSs are among the tools leading the transformation and it is about time Parliamentarians in Africa embrace SNSs as major tools in changing how leaders interact and remain accountable to their constituents a practice thats been a myth in Africa.

  4. The Thermal History of the East African Rift Lakes Region Since the Last Glacial Maximum Using TEX86 Paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, M. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Werne, J. P.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    We present preliminary results from a study using the TEX86 temperature proxy from sediments of East African Rift Lakes (including Lakes Turkana, Albert, and Malawi) to reconstruct the thermal history of tropical Africa for the last ~ 20,000 years at a subcentennial to multicentennial resolution. The TEX86 proxy, based on tetraether membrane lipids produced by lacustrine Crenarchaeota, has been shown to be successful at recording lake surface temperatures of some large lakes, including Lakes Malawi and Tanganyika, while providing unreasonable surface temperatures for lakes that receive a large input of soil material. The East African Rift Lakes are climatically sensitive, with the majority of water loss due to evaporation rather than outflow. Thus, they are useful for paleoclimate studies, being sensitive to even small changes in aridity. Temperature records from the northern and central basins of Lake Malawi agree well and fall within modern surface lake temperatures. A 2.5°C cooling is evident during the Younger Dryas in the northern basin record, with no response seen in the central basin. We are currently investigating mechanisms to explain why both records show a gradual cooling of 3°C during the late Holocene. Lake Albert shows an intriguing two-step cooling during the Younger Dryas, reaching temperatures 2.5°C lower than temperatures preceding or following this interval. The temperature record of Lake Turkana shows an interesting ~ 500 year cyclicity of low temperatures punctuated by abrupt warming events. Lakes Turkana and Albert show TEX86 paleotemperatures considerably lower (8°C cooler in Lake Albert and ~ 4°C cooler in Lake Turkana) than modern surface water temperatures. Although these records appear to fall in the range of temporal variability, these temperature discrepancies may indicate varying Crenarcheotal populations between lakes or other influencing factors.

  5. Mapping International University Partnerships Identified by East African Universities as Strengthening Their Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmoshuk, Aaron N; Guantai, Anastasia Nkatha; Mwangu, Mughwira; Cole, Donald C; Zarowsky, Christina

    International university partnerships are recommended for increasing the capacity of sub-Saharan African universities. Many publications describe individual partnerships and projects, and tools are available for guiding collaborations, but systematic mappings of the basic, common characteristics of partnerships are scarce. To document and categorize the international interuniversity partnerships deemed significant to building the capacity of medicine, nursing, and public health programs of 4 East African universities. Two universities in Kenya and 2 in Tanzania were purposefully selected. Key informant interviews, conducted with 42 senior representatives of the 4 universities, identified partnerships they considered significant for increasing the capacity of their institutions' medicine, nursing, and public health programs in education, research, or service. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed. Partners were classified by country of origin and corresponding international groupings, duration, programs, and academic health science components. One hundred twenty-nine university-to-university partnerships from 23 countries were identified. Each university reported between 25 and 36 international university partners. Seventy-four percent of partnerships were with universities in high-income countries, 15% in low- and middle-income countries, and 11% with consortia. Seventy percent included medicine, 37% nursing, and 45% public health; 15% included all 3 programs. Ninety-two percent included an education component, 47% research, and 24% service; 12% included all 3 components. This study confirms the rapid growth of interuniversity cross-border health partnerships this century. It also finds, however, that there is a pool of established international partnerships from numerous countries at each university. Most partnerships that seek to strengthen universities in East Africa should likely ensure they have a significant education component. Universities should make

  6. Fire and life in Tarangire : effects of burning and herbivory on an East African Savanna system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, van de C.A.D.M.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis investigates the effects of fire on quality and quantity of forage for grazers in the savannas of East Africa where fire has been used as a tool in pasture management for centuries. Hereby the mechanisms that cause the effects, as well as the manner in which the effects are

  7. Journal of East African Natural History - Vol 88, No 1 (1999)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Canthariphilous insects in east Africa · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. C Hemp, A Hemp, K Dettner, 1-15. http://dx.doi.org/10.2982/0012-8317(1999)88[1:CIIEA]2.0.CO;2 ...

  8. Scopus: Journal of East African Ornithology - Vol 37, No 1 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A taxonomic review of the genus Zosterops in East Africa, with a revised list of species occurring in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. David J. Pearson, Donald A. Turner, 1–13 ...

  9. Innovations in sanitation for sustainable urban growth; modernized mixtures in an east african context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letema, S.; Van Vliet, B.; Van Lier, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Urbanisation of poverty and informality in East Africa poses a threat to public health and environmental protection, perpetuating social exclusion and inequalities, while it creates service gaps. Neither conventional on-site sanitation nor modern centralised off-site sanitation provisions are

  10. Epidemic malaria and warmer temperatures in recent decades in an East African highland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, David; Bouma, Menno J.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2011-01-01

    Climate change impacts on malaria are typically assessed with scenarios for the long-term future. Here we focus instead on the recent past (1970-2003) to address whether warmer temperatures have already increased the incidence of malaria in a highland region of East Africa. Our analyses rely on a

  11. East and Central African Journal of Surgery http://www.bioline.org.br ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patrick

    described as far back as seventeenth century by the London surgeon Everard Home4.To date, several and different forms of cutenous horns have been described mainly involving European. Caucasians and other populations in Asia, Far east and North America4-6. Cutenous horns most often occur in adults, usually elderly ...

  12. Analysis of the genetic diversity of selected East African sweet potato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    Sweet potato (Ipomea batatas [L.] Lam.) is an economically important crop in East Africa chiefly grown by small holder farmers. Sharing of vines for planting is a very common occurrence among these farmers and eventually varieties are given local names, making it hard to trace the original pedigree. It is therefore important ...

  13. East and Central African Journal of Surgery Volume 15 Number 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    belts, speed limits and safety/protective vehicular devices, with better road rehabilitation. Introduction ... modern vehicles with protective devices and safety gadgets, the lack of strict traffic regulations and the poor network of roads ..... Analysis of 1089 cases of head injury, African Journal of Medical Science. 1978; 7:23-7. 8.

  14. East and Central African Journal of Surgery - Volume 14 Number 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jen

    Elderly patients generally have a higher rate of colon cancer. In this study however there was no single case of malignant bowel obstruction. This is not very surprising as colon cancer is particularly rare in rural African setting as compared to the western world (5,6,7). The rates of intestinal obstruction caused by malignancy ...

  15. Morpho-Tectonic Evidence of Multi-Stage Uplift History of the Southeastern Ethiopian Plateau, the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Abdelsalam, M. G.

    2016-12-01

    We used Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to extract geomorphic proxies (normalized steepness, stream length gradient, shape factor, and valley height ratio) for the Southwestern Ethiopian Plateau. We also imaged the Moho beneath the plateau using two-dimensional power radially-average power spectral analysis of World Gravity Model (WGM 2012) satellite gravity data. Our aim is to examine the uplift history of the plateau that might be associated with the uprising of the Afar mantle plume and opening of the East African Rift System. This plateau, which is bounded by the Afar Depression in the north and the Main Ethiopian Rift in the east, exposes Cenozoic volcanic rocks at the top underlain by Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. Studies in the Northwestern Ethiopian Plateau resulted in two contrasting models for explaining the uplift history of the region. Thermogeochronology studies suggest a continuous and steady uplift rate since 30 Ma possibly driven by the ascending Afar mantle plume. While, the interpretation of incision of drainage systems in the plateau suggests three stage and accelerated uplift. Our work found two areas with high rate of tectonic uplift located around the Mendebo and the Ahmar mountains. These regions show two distinct phases of uplift of the Southeastern Ethiopian Plateau. Also, a chronological framework has been provided to the knickpoint migration and associated Quaternary basalt event by knickpoint celerity model.

  16. Behind the data: Establishing the Network for Surveillance for Pneumococcal Diseases in the East African Region, netSPEAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Ben; Kisakye, Annet; Makewa, Douglas; Mudhune, Sandra; Mwamtemi, Hadija; Nansera, Dennis; Ngwiri, Thomas; Wamae, Maranga; English, Mike

    2009-01-01

    In a region with high rates of mortality among children aged <5 years, the underfunded health care systems of sub-Saharan Africa have few resources available to perform surveillance activities that can help determine the causes of morbidity and mortality in the region. At present, there are few examples of attempts to promote public health care surveillance that might inform current debates about how to expand and improve surveillance, particularly for bacterial diseases. Driven by this gap in knowledge, we attempted to explore the successes and failures of the Network for Surveillance of Pneumococcal Disease in the East African Region and to share the experiences of what are essentially non research public-sector hospitals in East Africa, with the hopes that surveillance systems for other diseases, especially those that require complex diagnostic support, may be informed by these experiences. The state of services essential for surveillance and the measures taken to overcome any shortcomings are described, as is the progress made in improving clinical diagnosis, laboratory processing, and data management. For surveillance to play a role in public health care, ministries of health and associated institutions must own and push forward the surveillance agenda, with support from global partners, and take advantage of the developments that have been achieved within the institutions. PMID:19191612

  17. History of the development of the East African Rift System: A series of interpreted maps through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    This review paper presents a series of time reconstruction maps of the 'East African Rift System' ('EARS'), illustrating the progressive development of fault trends, subsidence, volcanism and topography. These maps build on previous basin specific interpretations and integrate released data from recent petroleum drilling. N-S trending EARS rifting commenced in the petroliferous South Lokichar Basin of northern Kenya in the Late Eocene to Oligocene, though there seem to be few further deep rifts of this age other than those immediately adjoining it. At various times during the Mid-Late Miocene, a series of small rifts and depressions formed between Ethiopia and Malawi, heralding the main regional rift subsidence phase and further rift propagation in the Plio-Pleistocene. A wide variation is thus seen in the ages of initiation of EARS basins, though the majority of fault activity, structural growth, subsidence, and associated uplift of East Africa seem to have occurred in the last 5-9 Ma, and particularly in the last 1-2 Ma. These perceptions are key to our understanding of the influence of the diverse tectonic histories on the petroleum prospectivity of undrilled basins.

  18. Characterization of Ionospheric Dynamics Over The East African Dip Equatorial Region Using GPS-Derived Total Electron Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olwendo, J. O.

    2016-12-01

    Through a linear combination of GPS satellite range and phase measurement observed on two carrier frequencies by terrestrial based GPS receivers, the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) along oblique GPS signal path can be quantified. Using Adjusted Spherical Harmonic (ASHA) expansion, regional TEC maps over the East Africa sector has been achieved. The observed TEC has been used to evaluate the performance of IRI2007 and NeQuick 2 models over the region. Ionospheric irregularities have been measured and the plasma drift velocity and the East-West extent of the irregularities have also been analyzed by using a Very High Frequency (VHF) receiver system that is closely spaced. The hourly TEC images developed have shown that the Southern Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) crest over the East African sector lies within the Kenyan region, and the occurrence of scintillation is dependent on how well the anomaly crest forms. Scintillation occurrences are intense at and around the edges of EIA crest due to the presence of high ambient electron densities and sharp TEC depletions. Simultaneous recording of amplitude scintillations at VHF and L-band frequencies reveal two distinct types of scintillation namely; the Plasma Bubble Induced (PBI) and the Bottom Side Sinusoidal (BSS). The PBI scintillations are characterized by high intensity during the post-sunset hours of the equinoctial months and appear at both VHF and L-band frequencies. The BSS type are associated with VHF scintillation and are characterized by long duration patches and often exhibit Fresnel oscillation on the roll portion of the power spectrum, which suggest a weak scattering from thin screen irregularities. The occurrence of post-midnight L-band scintillation events which are not linked to pre-midnight scintillation observations raises fundamental question on the mechanism and source of electric fields driving the plasma depletion under conditions of very low background electron density.

  19. A Scoring Tool to Identify East African HIV-1 Serodiscordant Partnerships with a High Likelihood of Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Renee; Cohen, Craig R; Ngure, Kenneth; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Were, Edwin; Kiarie, James; Mugo, Nelly; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 prevention programs targeting HIV-1 serodiscordant couples need to identify couples that are likely to become pregnant to facilitate discussions about methods to minimize HIV-1 risk during pregnancy attempts (i.e. safer conception) or effective contraception when pregnancy is unintended. A clinical prediction tool could be used to identify HIV-1 serodiscordant couples with a high likelihood of pregnancy within one year. Using standardized clinical prediction methods, we developed and validated a tool to identify heterosexual East African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples with an increased likelihood of becoming pregnant in the next year. Datasets were from three prospectively followed cohorts, including nearly 7,000 couples from Kenya and Uganda participating in HIV-1 prevention trials and delivery projects. The final score encompassed the age of the woman, woman's number of children living, partnership duration, having had condomless sex in the past month, and non-use of an effective contraceptive. The area under the curve (AUC) for the probability of the score to correctly predict pregnancy was 0.74 (95% CI 0.72-0.76). Scores ≥ 7 predicted a pregnancy incidence of >17% per year and captured 78% of the pregnancies. Internal and external validation confirmed the predictive ability of the score. A pregnancy likelihood score encompassing basic demographic, clinical and behavioral factors defined African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples with high one-year pregnancy incidence rates. This tool could be used to engage African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in counseling discussions about fertility intentions in order to offer services for safer conception or contraception that align with their reproductive goals.

  20. A Scoring Tool to Identify East African HIV-1 Serodiscordant Partnerships with a High Likelihood of Pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Heffron

    Full Text Available HIV-1 prevention programs targeting HIV-1 serodiscordant couples need to identify couples that are likely to become pregnant to facilitate discussions about methods to minimize HIV-1 risk during pregnancy attempts (i.e. safer conception or effective contraception when pregnancy is unintended. A clinical prediction tool could be used to identify HIV-1 serodiscordant couples with a high likelihood of pregnancy within one year.Using standardized clinical prediction methods, we developed and validated a tool to identify heterosexual East African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples with an increased likelihood of becoming pregnant in the next year. Datasets were from three prospectively followed cohorts, including nearly 7,000 couples from Kenya and Uganda participating in HIV-1 prevention trials and delivery projects.The final score encompassed the age of the woman, woman's number of children living, partnership duration, having had condomless sex in the past month, and non-use of an effective contraceptive. The area under the curve (AUC for the probability of the score to correctly predict pregnancy was 0.74 (95% CI 0.72-0.76. Scores ≥ 7 predicted a pregnancy incidence of >17% per year and captured 78% of the pregnancies. Internal and external validation confirmed the predictive ability of the score.A pregnancy likelihood score encompassing basic demographic, clinical and behavioral factors defined African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples with high one-year pregnancy incidence rates. This tool could be used to engage African HIV-1 serodiscordant couples in counseling discussions about fertility intentions in order to offer services for safer conception or contraception that align with their reproductive goals.

  1. Combining detrital geochronology and sedimentology to assess basin development in the Rukwa Rift of the East African Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert-Wolf, Hannah; Roberts, Eric; Mtelela, Cassy; Downie, Bob

    2015-04-01

    We have employed a multifaceted approach to sedimentary provenance analysis in order to assess the timing and magnitude of tectonic events, sedimentation, and landscape development in the Western Branch of the East African Rift System. Our approach, termed 'Sedimentary Triple Dating', integrates: (1) U-Pb dating via LA-ICPMS; (2) fission track; and (3) (U-Th)/He thermochronology of detrital zircon and apatite. We integrate geochronology, thermochronology, and provenance analysis to relate the initiation of rifting events to regional dynamic uplift, sedimentation patterns, and interpret the far-reaching climatic and evolutionary effects of fluctuating rift flank topography in the Rukwa Rift, a segment of the Western Branch. This work provides additional data to support the recent concept of synchronous development of the Western and Eastern branches of the East African Rift System ~25 Ma, and better constrains the age, location and provenance of subsequent rifting and sedimentation events in the Rukwa Rift Basin. Investigation of well cuttings and outcrop samples from the Neogene-Recent Lake Beds Succession in the Rukwa Rift Basin revealed a suite of previously unrecognized tuffaceous deposits at the base of the succession. A population of euhedral, magmatic zircons from a basal Lake Beds tuff and Miocene-Pliocene detrital zircons from well cuttings suggest that Neogene rift reactivation and volcanism began ~9-10 Ma. This timing is consistent with demonstrated rifting in Uganda and Malawi, as well as with the initiation of volcanism in the Rungwe Volcanic Province at the southern end of the Rukwa Rift, and the estimated development of Lake Tanganyika to the north. Moreover, there appear to be a suite of unconformity bounded stratigraphic units that make up the Lower Lake Beds succession, and detrital zircon maximum depositional ages from these units suggests episodic sedimentation in the rift, punctuated by long hiatuses or uplift, rather than steady subsidence and

  2. An Investigation of the Sensitivity of East African Climate Variability to Urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudoshava, Masilin

    The aim of this research was to investigate the impact of urbanization on the climate of East Africa and the subsequent consequences on the energy and agricultural sectors. This was achieved by accomplishing the following objectives (i) Comprehensive customization and evaluation of the performance of the International Center of Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Regional climate model (ii) Investigation of the ability of the ICTP Regional climate model to reproduce the modes of climate variability from observational data. (iii) Investigate the impact of urbanization on the precipitation of East Africa (iv) Investigation of the dominant process between, moisture supply, thermal convergence and frictional convergence, and (v) Impact on agriculture and energy sector. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  3. Modelling the role of groundwater hydro-refugia in East African hominin evolution and dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Gleeson, T.; Reynolds, S. C.; Bennett, M. R.; Newton, A. C.; McCormack, C. J.; Ashley, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    Water is a fundamental resource, yet its spatiotemporal availability in East Africa is poorly understood. This is the area where most hominin first occurrences are located, and consequently the potential role of water in hominin evolution and dispersal remains unresolved. Here, we show that hundreds of springs currently distributed across East Africa could function as persistent groundwater hydro-refugia through orbital-scale climate cycles. Groundwater buffers climate variability according to spatially variable groundwater response times determined by geology and topography. Using an agent-based model, grounded on the present day landscape, we show that groundwater availability would have been critical to supporting isolated networks of hydro-refugia during dry periods when potable surface water was scarce. This may have facilitated unexpected variations in isolation and dispersal of hominin populations in the past. Our results therefore provide a new environmental framework in which to understand how patterns of taxonomic diversity in hominins may have developed.

  4. Control of cattle trypanosomiasis in coastal savannah of Ghana Part I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Triangulation design of mixed-mode research on control of trypanosomiasis involving Participatory Rural Appr-aisal (PRA), surveys, parasitological studies and satellite data (as a holistic approach) is presented. Trypanoso-miasis is a disease affecting human and livestock, and the multi-method research approach was ...

  5. Trypanosomiasis in a migrating herd of cattle in Kaduna State Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypanosomiasis was observed in the herd examined and laboratory examination corroborated the observed clinical signs. The results, as well as the role of migration and transhumance pastoralism in disease occurrence are discussed. Keywords: Trypanosomiasis, trypanosomes, cattle, Fulani, migration, Nigeria ...

  6. Surface Drift in the South-East Atlantic Ocean | Wedepohl | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surface drift in the South-East Atlantic Ocean is described using historical shipdrift data. The Benguela Current has a width of 200 km in the south and 750 km in the north. The mean speeds of the current vary from <11 cm.s-1 to a maximum of 23 cm.s-1. The highest current speeds occur during summer in the southern ...

  7. Coping with Displacement: Social Networking among Urban Refugees in an East African Context

    OpenAIRE

    Willems, Roos

    2005-01-01

    This article on urban self-settled refugees from the Great Lakes region in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, documents the tenacious resistance of this growing group of African refugees against official policies requiring them to depend on humanitarian assistance. While dealing with the permanent risk of being arrested by the immigration authorities, these men and women make ends meet by relying on supportive social network members and engaging in informal employment based on individual arrange...

  8. Pastoralism and wildlife: historical and current perspectives in the East African rangelands of Kenya and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankester, F; Davis, A

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between pastoralists, their livestock, wildlife and the rangelands of East Africa is multi-directional, complex and long-standing. The tumultuous events of the past century, however, have rewritten the nature of this relationship, reshaping the landscapes that were created, and relied upon, by both pastoralists and wildlife. Presently, much of the interaction between wildlife and pastoralists takes place in and around protected areas, the most contentious occurring in pastoral lands surrounding national parks. In conservation terminology these areas are called buffer zones. In the past century buffer zones have been shaped by, and contributed to, restrictive conservation policies, expropriation of land, efforts to include communities in conservation, both positive and negative wildlife/livestock interactions, and political tensions. In this review paper, the authors outline the history that shaped the current relationship between pastoralists, livestock and wildlife in buffer zones in East Africa and highlight some of the broader issues that pastoralists (and pastoralism as an effective livelihood strategy) now face. Finally, they consider some of the sustainable and equitable practices that could be implemented to improve livelihoods and benefit wildlife and pastoralism alike.

  9. Seismic hazard of the Kivu rift (western branch, East African Rift system): new neotectonic map and seismotectonic zonation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, Damien; Mulumba, Jean-Luc; Sebagenzi Mwene Ntabwoba, Stanislas; Fiama Bondo, Silvanos; Kervyn, François; Havenith, Hans-Balder

    2017-04-01

    The first detailed probabilistic seismic hazard assessment has been performed for the Kivu and northern Tanganyika rift region in Central Africa. This region, which forms the central part of the Western Rift Branch, is one of the most seismically active part of the East African rift system. It was already integrated in large scale seismic hazard assessments, but here we defined a finer zonation model with 7 different zones representing the lateral variation of the geological and geophysical setting across the region. In order to build the new zonation model, we compiled homogeneous cross-border geological, neotectonic and sismotectonic maps over the central part of East D.R. Congo, SW Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and NW Tanzania and defined a new neotectonic sheme. The seismic risk assessment is based on a new earthquake catalogue, compiled on the basis of various local and global earthquake catalogues. The use of macroseismic epicenters determined from felt earthquakes allowed to extend the time-range back to the beginning of the 20th century, spanning 126 years, with 1068 events. The magnitudes have been homogenized to Mw and aftershocks removed. From this initial catalogue, a catalogue of 359 events from 1956 to 2015 and with M > 4.4 has been extracted for the seismic hazard assessment. The seismotectonic zonation includes 7 seismic source areas that have been defined on the basis of the regional geological structure, neotectonic fault systems, basin architecture and distribution of thermal springs and earthquake epicenters. The Gutenberg-Richter seismic hazard parameters were determined using both the least square linear fit and the maximum likelihood method (Kijko & Smit aue program). Seismic hazard maps have been computed with the Crisis 2012 software using 3 different attenuation laws. We obtained higher PGA values (475 years return period) for the Kivu rift region than the previous estimates (Delvaux et al., 2016). They vary laterally in function of the tectonic

  10. Genetic consequences of Pleistocene range shifts: contrast between the Arctic, the Alps and the East African mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, Dorothee; Gaudeul, Myriam; Assefa, Adane; Koch, Marcus A; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Nemomissa, Sileshi; Brochmann, Christian

    2007-06-01

    In wide-ranging species, the genetic consequences of range shifts in response to climate change during the Pleistocene can be predicted to differ among different parts of the distribution area. We used amplified fragment length polymorphism data to compare the genetic structure of Arabis alpina, a widespread arctic-alpine and afro-alpine plant, in three distinct parts of its range: the North Atlantic region, which was recolonized after the last ice age, the European Alps, where range shifts were probably primarily altitudinal, and the high mountains of East Africa, where the contemporary mountain top populations result from range contraction. Genetic structure was inferred using clustering analyses and estimates of genetic diversity within and between populations. There was virtually no diversity in the vast North Atlantic region, which was probably recolonized from a single refugial population, possibly located between the Alps and the northern ice sheets. In the European mountains, genetic diversity was high and distinct genetic groups had a patchy and sometimes disjunct distribution. In the African mountains, genetic diversity was high, clearly structured and partially in accordance with a previous chloroplast phylogeography. The fragmented structure in the European and African mountains indicated that A. alpina disperses little among established populations. Occasional long-distance dispersal events were, however, suggested in all regions. The lack of genetic diversity in the north may be explained by leading-edge colonization by this pioneer plant in glacier forelands, closely following the retracting glaciers. Overall, the genetic structure observed corresponded to the expectations based on the environmental history of the different regions.

  11. Multiproxy Evidence for a Positive Hydrological Budget during the Little Ice Age in the East African Rift, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goman, M.; Ashley, G. M.; Hover, V. C.; Owen, R.

    2011-12-01

    Hominin evolution took place in Africa during the Plio-Pleistocene and climate change is thought to be a factor, with Africa experiencing a general cooling and increasing aridification over the last several million years. Today, the climate of the East African Rift Valley of Kenya is characterized as semi-arid with evapotranspiration four times precipitation. Water resources are a valuable commodity for the many millions of inhabitants of the Valley. The short instrumental record shows precipitation fluctuates at sub-decadal timeframes as a result of the ENSO cycle; while during prehistory variations in monsoonal precipitation occurred on Milankovitch timescales (i.e. African Humid Period). Both timescales exhibit significant impacts on the distribution of surface water. However, little is known regarding precipitation variability over sub-millennial timescales. Emerging paleoclimate data indicates that the near surface presence of water has also varied over century length timescales. We present paleoclimate data from multiple sites along a north-south 600 km transect of the Gregory Rift Valley (Kenya) that indicate the region experienced wetter conditions during the Little Ice Age (A.D. 1400-1850). Our reconstructions of landscape and climate during this time frame rely upon a multiproxy and interdisciplinary approach. We discuss data from a variety of environmental settings (e.g. lakes, wetlands, and springs) that indicate an overall increase in hydrologic balance. Evidence is derived from biologic microfossils such as pollen, diatom and testate amoebae assemblages as well as inorganic components of the sedimentary record and geomorphic changes. The data differs significantly from studies undertaken to the west in Uganda and the Congo, where negative hydrologic balances occurred during the Little Ice Age. While the atmospheric dynamics causing this disparity are not yet recognized, interactions between the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the Congo Air Boundary

  12. TRADE, REVENUE AND WELFARE EFFECTS OF THE EAST AFRICAN COMMUNITY CUSTOMS UNION PRINCIPLE OF ASYMMETRY ON UGANDA: AN APPLICATION OF WITS-SMART SIMULATION MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Othieno, Lawrence; Shinyekwa, Isaac

    2011-01-01

    Using the WITS-SMART simulation model, this paper provides insights on the effects of the East African Community Customs Union principle of asymmetry on Uganda with regard to trade, welfare and revenue effects since 2005. The end to the phased tariff reduction on category B products (these products were treated as sensitive products in 2005) increased trade creation and welfare effects. This effect shall have a reflection on consumer surplus in terms of reduced prices. The results also sugges...

  13. Littoral sedimentation of rift lakes: an illustrated overview from the modern to Pliocene Lake Turkana (East African Rift System, Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Mathieu; Nutz, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Existing depositional models for rift lakes can be summarized as clastics transported by axial and lateral rivers, then distributed by fan-deltas and/or deltas into a standing water body which is dominated by settling of fine particles, and experiencing occasional coarser underflows. Even if known from paleolakes and modern lakes, reworking of clastics by alongshore drift, waves and storms are rarely considered in depositional models. However, if we consider the lake Turkana Basin (East African Rift System, Kenya) it is obvious that this vision is incomplete. Three representative time slices are considered here: the modern Lake Turkana, the Megalake Turkana which developed thanks to the African Humid Period (Holocene), and the Plio-Pleistocene highstand episodes of paleolake Turkana (Nachukui, Shungura and Koobi Fora Formations, Omo Group). First, remarkable clastic morphosedimentary structures such as beach ridges, spits, washover fans, lagoons, or wave-dominated deltas are very well developed along the shoreline of modern lake Turkana, suggesting strong hydrodynamics responsible for a major reworking of the fluvial-derived clastics all along the littoral zone (longshore and cross-shore transport) of the lake. Similarly, past hydrodynamics are recorded from prominent raised beach ridges and spits, well-preserved all around the lake, above its present water-level (~360 m asl) and up to ~455 m. These large-scale clastic morphosedimentary structures also record the maximum extent of Megalake Turkana during the African Humid Period, as well as its subsequent regression forced by the end of the Holocene climatic optimum. Several hundreds of meters of fluvial-deltaic-lacustrine deposits spanning the Pliocene-Pleistocene are exposed in the Turkana basin thanks to tectonic faulting. These deposits are world famous for their paleontological and archeological content that documents the very early story of Mankind. They also preserve several paleolake highstand episodes with

  14. PROPOSAL FOR REVIEW OF RESTRICTIONS AND LOGISTIC OPPORTUNITIES IN AN EAST AFRICAN PORT: FROM A TECHNICAL MISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Quinello

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The logistics went over the century, as noted by Gonçalves (2007, from  a fragmented and diluted within and value of organizations profile to a critical role in the strategy of the networks and chains of international business. For the twenty-first century, as will be seen in this article, logistics goes beyond these functions going to represent a social and political role in international relations between countries. The installation of a port located in East Africa near the Red Sea, the critical incident will be reviewed during a technical mission undertaken by a researcher in 2009. This research field, in the form of checklist, appoint the main barriers in infrastructure, information, rules and norms. The results indicate critical constraints of infrastructure and institutional opportunities that impact the implementation of new developments there. We will show that the progressive development of organizational arrangement to a complex undertaking, such as ports, can be key role in reversing the condition of misery and poverty in African countries.

  15. Malaria in east African refugees resettling to the United States: development of strategies to reduce the risk of imported malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsker, L; Tipple, M; Keane, V; McCance, C; Campbell, C C

    1995-02-01

    Resettlement to the United States of malaria-infected refugees can pose problems for both the refugees and their resettlement communities. To formulate malaria management strategies for East African refugees before resettlement to the United States, epidemiologic data were reviewed and malaria prevalence surveys were conducted among refugees awaiting resettlement in Mombasa, Kenya, and Khartoum, Sudan, in 1993. Overall, 279 Somali (Mombasa) and 127 Ethiopian (Khartoum) refugees were surveyed. Malaria contributed significantly to morbidity in Mombasa: 15% (43/279) of Somalis were parasitemic; 39 infections (91%) were due to Plasmodium falciparum. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was effective treatment. In Khartoum, only 0.8% (1/127) were parasitemic; recent fever or antimalarial use were uncommon. Presumptive sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine treatment before departure was recommended for all resettling refugees from Mombasa; in Khartoum, individual assessment of febrile illness was recommended. Prevention of malaria parasitemia by mass drug administration or individual therapy can minimize the burden of malarial illness to refugees and their resettlement communities.

  16. Genetic adaptation of giant lobelias (Lobelia aberdarica and Lobelia telekii to different altitudes in East African mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ying eZhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The giant lobelias in East African mountains are good models for studying molecular mechanisms of adaptation to different altitudes. In this study, we generated RNA-seq data of a middle-altitude species Lobelia aberdarica and a high-altitude species L. telekii, followed by selective pressure estimation of their orthologous genes. Our aim was to explore the important genes potentially involved in adaptation to different altitudes. About 9.3 Gb of clean nucleotides, 167,929 – 170,534 unigenes with total lengths of 159,762,099 – 171,138,936 bp for each of the two species were generated. OrthoMCL method identified 3,049 1:1 orthologous genes (each species was represented by one ortholog. Estimations of non-synonymous to synonymous rate were performed using an approximate method and a maximum likelihood method in PAML. 85 orthologous genes were under positive selection. At least 8 of these genes are possibly involved in DNA repair, response to DNA damage and temperature stimulus, and regulation of gene expression, which hints on how giant lobelias adapt to high altitudinal environment that characterised by cold, low oxygen and strong ultraviolet radiation. The negatively selected genes are over-represented in Gene ontology terms of hydrolase, macromolecular complex assembly among others. This study sheds light on understanding the molecular mechanism of adaptation to different altitudes, and provides genomic resources for further studies of giant lobelias.

  17. Characterisation of the Wildlife Reservoir Community for Human and Animal Trypanosomiasis in the Luangwa Valley, Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neil E.; Mubanga, Joseph; Fevre, Eric M.; Picozzi, Kim; Eisler, Mark C.; Thomas, Robert; Welburn, Susan C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Animal and human trypanosomiasis are constraints to both animal and human health in Sub-Saharan Africa, but there is little recent evidence as to how these parasites circulate in wild hosts in natural ecosystems. The Luangwa Valley in Zambia supports high densities of tsetse flies (Glossina species) and is recognised as an historical sleeping sickness focus. The objective of this study was to characterise the nature of the reservoir community for trypanosomiasis in the absence of influence from domesticated hosts. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross-sectional survey of trypanosome prevalence in wildlife hosts was conducted in the Luangwa Valley from 2005 to 2007. Samples were collected from 418 animals and were examined for the presence of Trypanosoma brucei s.l., T. b. rhodesiense, Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax using molecular diagnostic techniques. The overall prevalence of infection in all species was 13.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.71–17.57%). Infection was significantly more likely to be detected in waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) (Odds ratio [OR] = 10.5, 95% CI: 2.36–46.71), lion (Panthera leo) (OR = 5.3, 95% CI: 1.40–19.69), greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) (OR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.41–15.41) and bushbuck (Tragelaphus scriptus) (OR = 4.5, 95% CI: 1.51–13.56). Bushbucks are important hosts for T. brucei s.l. while the Bovidae appear the most important for T. congolense. The epidemiology of T. vivax was less clear, but parasites were detected most frequently in waterbuck. Human infective T. b. rhodesiense were identified for the first time in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) and T. brucei s.l. in leopard (Panthera pardus). Variation in infection rates was demonstrated at species level rather than at family or sub-family level. A number of significant risk factors interact to influence infection rates in wildlife including taxonomy, habitat and blood meal preference. Conclusion and Significance

  18. The Eastern Arc Mountains and coastal forests of East Africa-an archive to understand large-scale biogeographical patterns: Pseudotomias, a new genus of African Pseudophyllinae (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Claudia

    2016-06-21

    A new genus of Pseudophyllinae restricted to East Africa is described. Data on the ecology, and the habitat are provided. The biogeographical pattern and morphology suggests an old radiation since Tomias from Central and West Africa is the closest relative to Pseudotomias. The old forests of East Africa could hereby be the source of representatives of this old radiation since venation is less reduced in East African taxa of Phyllomimini.

  19. Phytolith indices as proxies of grass subfamilies on East African tropical mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond, Laurent; Alexandre, Anne; Wooller, Matthew J.; Hély, Christelle; Williamson, David; Schäfer, Peter A.; Majule, Amos; Guiot, Joël

    2008-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to provide researchers that investigate fossil phytolith assemblages and model/data comparisons a new tool for estimating C 3/C 4 grass composition over time. We tested the reliability of modern soil phytolith assemblages and phytolith indices for tracing the dominance of different grass subfamilies and tree cover density. We analyzed modern soil phytolith assemblages from sites over elevation gradients on Mount Kenya (Kenya), Mount Rungwe and around Lake Masoko (southern Tanzania). These data were compared with available botanical data. A phytolith index named Ic, proved to be an effective proxy of the proportions of Pooideae, Arundinoideae and Bambusoideae grasses (mainly C 3 grasses) versus Panicoideae grasses (mainly C 4 grasses), increasing with elevation in East-Africa. When tropical mountains are covered by open habitats (e.g . grasses and shrublands), Ic should be a reliable proxy of the C 3/C 4 grass composition. These results highlight the value of the phytolith index Ic, when interpreting paleo-environmental records from tropical mountains, to: 1) better understand past local and regional C 3/C 4 grass distributions and associated climatic changes and 2) increase the set of C 3/C 4 data available for model/data comparisons.

  20. Extent of East-African Nurse Leaders’ Participation in Health Policy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shariff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports part of a bigger study whose aim was to develop an empowerment model that could be used to enhance nurse leaders’ participation in health policy development. A Delphi survey was applied which included the following criteria: expert panelists, iterative rounds, statistical analysis, and consensus building. The expert panelists were purposively selected and included national nurse leaders in leadership positions at the nursing professional associations, nursing regulatory bodies, ministries of health, and universities in East Africa. The study was conducted in three iterative rounds. The results reported here were gathered as part of the first round of the study and that examined the extent of nurse leaders’ participation in health policy development. Seventy-eight (78 expert panelists were invited to participate in the study, and the response rate was 47%. Data collection was done with the use of a self-report questionnaire. Data analysis was done by use of SPSS and descriptive statistics were examined. The findings indicated that nurse leaders participate in health policy development though participation is limited and not consistent across all the stages of health policy development. The recommendations from the findings are that health policy development process needs to be pluralistic and inclusive of all nurse leaders practicing in positions related to policy development and the process must be open to their ideas and suggestions.

  1. Rooting the phylogenetic tree of middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus by characterization of a conspecific virus from an African bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Victor Max; Ithete, Ndapewa Laudika; Richards, Leigh Rosanne; Schoeman, M Corrie; Preiser, Wolfgang; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix

    2014-10-01

    The emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes lethal respiratory infections mainly on the Arabian Peninsula. The evolutionary origins of MERS-CoV are unknown. We determined the full genome sequence of a CoV directly from fecal material obtained from a South African Neoromicia capensis bat (NeoCoV). NeoCoV shared essential details of genome architecture with MERS-CoV. Eighty-five percent of the NeoCoV genome was identical to MERS-CoV at the nucleotide level. Based on taxonomic criteria, NeoCoV and MERS-CoV belonged to one viral species. The presence of a genetically divergent S1 subunit within the NeoCoV spike gene indicated that intraspike recombination events may have been involved in the emergence of MERS-CoV. NeoCoV constitutes a sister taxon of MERS-CoV, placing the MERS-CoV root between a recently described virus from African camels and all other viruses. This suggests a higher level of viral diversity in camels than in humans. Together with serologic evidence for widespread MERS-CoV infection in camelids sampled up to 20 years ago in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, the genetic data indicate that camels act as sources of virus for humans rather than vice versa. The majority of camels on the Arabian Peninsula is imported from the Greater Horn of Africa, where several Neoromicia species occur. The acquisition of MERS-CoV by camels from bats might have taken place in sub-Saharan Africa. Camelids may represent mixing vessels for MERS-CoV and other mammalian CoVs. It is unclear how, when, and where the highly pathogenic MERS-CoV emerged. We characterized the full genome of an African bat virus closely related to MERS-CoV and show that human, camel, and bat viruses belong to the same viral species. The bat virus roots the phylogenetic tree of MERS-CoV, providing evidence for an evolution of MERS-CoV in camels that preceded that in humans. The revised tree suggests that humans are infected by camels rather than vice versa. Although

  2. Regional differences in seasonal timing of rainfall discriminate between genetically distinct East African giraffe taxa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri A Thomassen

    Full Text Available Masai (Giraffa tippelskirchi, Reticulated (G. reticulata and Rothschild's (G. camelopardalis giraffe lineages in East Africa are morphologically and genetically distinct, yet in Kenya their ranges abut. This raises the question of how divergence is maintained among populations of a large mammal capable of long-distance travel, and which readily hybridize in zoos. Here we test four hypotheses concerning the maintenance of the phylogeographic boundaries among the three taxa: 1 isolation-by-distance; 2 physical barriers to dispersal; 3 general habitat differences resulting in habitat segregation; or 4 regional differences in the seasonal timing of rainfall, and resultant timing of browse availability. We used satellite remotely sensed and climate data to characterize the environment at the locations of genotyped giraffes. Canonical variate analysis, random forest algorithms, and generalized dissimilarity modelling were employed in a landscape genetics framework to identify the predictor variables that best explained giraffes' genetic divergence. We found that regional differences in the timing of precipitation, and resulting green-up associated with the abundance of browse, effectively discriminate between taxa. Local habitat conditions, topographic and human-induced barriers, and geographic distance did not aid in discriminating among lineages. Our results suggest that selection associated with regional timing of events in the annual climatic cycle may help maintain genetic and phenotypic divergence in giraffes. We discuss potential mechanisms of maintaining divergence, and suggest that synchronization of reproduction with seasonal rainfall cycles that are geographically distinct may contribute to reproductive isolation. Coordination of weaning with green-up cycles could minimize the costs of lactation and predation on the young. Our findings are consistent with theory and empirical results demonstrating the efficacy of seasonal or phenologically

  3. Polymorphism in the HASPB repeat region of East African Leishmania donovani strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Zackay

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL caused by Leishmania donovani is a major health problem in Ethiopia. Parasites in disparate regions are transmitted by different vectors, and cluster in distinctive genotypes. Recently isolated strains from VL and HIV-VL co-infected patients in north and south Ethiopia were characterized as part of a longitudinal study on VL transmission. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixty-three L. donovani strains were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting three regions: internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1, cysteine protease B (cpb, and HASPB (k26. ITS1- and cpb--PCR identified these strains as L. donovani. Interestingly, the k26--PCR amplicon size varied depending on the patient's geographic origin. Most strains from northwestern Ethiopia (36/40 produced a 290 bp product with a minority (4/40 giving a 410 bp amplicon. All of the latter strains were isolated from patients with HIV-VL co-infections, while the former group contained both VL and HIV-VL co-infected patients. Almost all the strains (20/23 from southwestern Ethiopia produced a 450 bp amplicon with smaller products (290 or 360 bp only observed for three strains. Sudanese strains produced amplicons identical (290 bp to those found in northwestern Ethiopia; while Kenyan strains gave larger PCR products (500 and 650 bp. High-resolution melt (HRM analysis distinguished the different PCR products. Sequence analysis showed that the k26 repeat region in L. donovani is comprised of polymorphic 13 and 14 amino acid motifs. The 13 amino acid peptide motifs, prevalent in L. donovani, are rare in L. infantum. The number and order of the repeats in L. donovani varies between geographic regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HASPB repeat region (k26 shows considerable polymorphism among L. donovani strains from different regions in East Africa. This should be taken into account when designing diagnostic assays and vaccines based on this antigen.

  4. Not just academics: Supporting international graduate students at an East African private university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Rasmussen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of students enrolled in higher education outside their countries of originincreased from 0.8 million in 1975, to 2.1 million in 2000, and to 3.7 million in 2009(Ryan, 2012. This growing trend of student mobility leads to increased universitycompetition for students around the globe. However, little is known about the experiencesof international students in Africa. This lack of understanding could leave the continentat a disadvantage for attracting and retaining international students, while other partsof the world continue to benefit. To begin to address this gap, I conducted a qualitativephenomenological study at one private university in East Africa that attracts about 20% ofits population as international students.As International Student Coordinator at this university, I interviewed 13 graduatestudents from various countries and conducted participant observations on campus forthree years. I aimed to understand students’ perceptions of their learning experiences.This article focuses on students’ non-academic learning. Students’ positive and negativeexperiences highlighted the difference that student affairs and administrative staff can makein the quality of students’ educational experiences. A needs model shed light on students’non-academic experiences. Student affairs and administrative staff were essential in1 providing pre-arrival information, 2 meeting students’ initial basic needs, 3 connectingthem with others, keeping immigration documents current, and 5 understanding the newacademic system. Ecologically, students were required to make a variety of connections intheir adjustment process on campus and beyond.If the university could adequately addressinternational students’ non-academic issues, then students would be better able to focuson their main purpose: their academics. It is recommended that the university revisit itsprocedures and develop more holistic international-student-friendly policies. Then, it

  5. Regional differences in seasonal timing of rainfall discriminate between genetically distinct East African giraffe taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, Henri A; Freedman, Adam H; Brown, David M; Buermann, Wolfgang; Jacobs, David K

    2013-01-01

    Masai (Giraffa tippelskirchi), Reticulated (G. reticulata) and Rothschild's (G. camelopardalis) giraffe lineages in East Africa are morphologically and genetically distinct, yet in Kenya their ranges abut. This raises the question of how divergence is maintained among populations of a large mammal capable of long-distance travel, and which readily hybridize in zoos. Here we test four hypotheses concerning the maintenance of the phylogeographic boundaries among the three taxa: 1) isolation-by-distance; 2) physical barriers to dispersal; 3) general habitat differences resulting in habitat segregation; or 4) regional differences in the seasonal timing of rainfall, and resultant timing of browse availability. We used satellite remotely sensed and climate data to characterize the environment at the locations of genotyped giraffes. Canonical variate analysis, random forest algorithms, and generalized dissimilarity modelling were employed in a landscape genetics framework to identify the predictor variables that best explained giraffes' genetic divergence. We found that regional differences in the timing of precipitation, and resulting green-up associated with the abundance of browse, effectively discriminate between taxa. Local habitat conditions, topographic and human-induced barriers, and geographic distance did not aid in discriminating among lineages. Our results suggest that selection associated with regional timing of events in the annual climatic cycle may help maintain genetic and phenotypic divergence in giraffes. We discuss potential mechanisms of maintaining divergence, and suggest that synchronization of reproduction with seasonal rainfall cycles that are geographically distinct may contribute to reproductive isolation. Coordination of weaning with green-up cycles could minimize the costs of lactation and predation on the young. Our findings are consistent with theory and empirical results demonstrating the efficacy of seasonal or phenologically dictated

  6. Virtual industrial water usage and wastewater generation in the Middle East/North African region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhel, S. R.; Geissen, S.-U.; Vogelpohl, A.

    2013-01-01

    This study deals with the quantification of volumes of water usage, wastewater generation, virtual water export, and wastewater generation from export for eight export relevant industries present in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA). It shows that about 3400 million m3 of water is used per annum while around 793 million m3 of wastewater is generated from products that are meant for domestic consumption and export. The difference between volumes of water usage and wastewater generation is due to water evaporation or injecting underground (oil wells pressure maintenance). The wastewater volume generated from production represents a population equivalent of 15.5 million in terms of wastewater quantity and 30.4 million in terms of BOD. About 409 million m3 of virtual water flows from MENA to EU27 (resulting from export of eight commodities) which is equivalent to 12.1% of the water usage of those industries and Libya is the largest virtual water exporter (about 87 million m3). Crude oil and refined petroleum products represent about 89% of the total virtual water flow, fertilizers represent around 10% and 1% remaining industries. EU27 poses the greatest indirect pressure on the Kuwaiti hydrological system where the virtual water export represents about 96% of the actual renewable water resources in this country. The Kuwaiti crude oil water use in relation to domestic water withdrawal is about 89% which is highest among MENA countries. Pollution of water bodies, in terms of BOD, due to production is very relevant for crude oil, slaughterhouses, refineries, olive oil, and tanneries while pollution due to export to EU27 is most relevant for crude oil industry and olive oil mills.

  7. Tradeoffs in regulating ecosystem services in East African Papyrus Wetlands: Denitrification as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettel, G. M.; Tshering, K.; Nakitende, H.; van Dam, A.

    2012-12-01

    Papyrus wetlands are important to the livelihoods of millions of people in East Africa, partly because they converted to grazing and agricultural lands during during dry seasons. At the same time, papyrus wetlands fringe important water bodies - e.g. Lake Victoria - and may help protect these ecosystems from the impacts of increased nutrient inputs. Denitrification -- the production of gaseous nitrogen (N) from the microbial reduction of nitrate (NO3) in anaerobic environments -- is likely an important mechanism for nitrogen retention in these systems. However, few measurements have been made, and the effect of wetland exploitation on denitrification has not yet been determined. In particular, we were interested in whether the hydrologic status (wet vs dry) is as important as agricultural activities in controlling denitrification potential. Using acetylene block technique to measure potential denitrification (denitrification enzyme assay), we measured potential denitrification rates in natural papyrus vegetation and in grazing, rice, maize, and sugarcane fields in the Nyando and Mara wetlands in Kenya and Tanzania (respectively) in November - December 2010. We also determined whether denitrification was limited by soil organic carbon or by NO3 in different patch types, and further assessed controls using multivariate analysis relating soil characteristics to potential denitrification rates. Potential denitrification in papyrus vegetation was the highest of all measured sites (pNO3 limited denitrification in papyrus vegetation, whereas organic carbon was limiting in all agricultural sites. Multivariate analysis showed that this pattern also corresponded significantly with low soil organic matter in the agricultural sites and low soil NO3 (by KCl extraction) in papyrus vegetation (pwetlands during dry seasons.

  8. PrEP Use During Periods of HIV Risk Among East African Women in Serodiscordant Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyra, Maria; Haberer, Jessica E; Heffron, Renee; Kidoguchi, Lara; Brown, Elizabeth R; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Asiimwe, Stephen; Celum, Connie; Katabira, Elly; Mugo, Nelly R; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-09-29

    PrEP is efficacious for African women at risk for HIV, but data on adherence outside of clinical trials are sparse. We describe the persistence and execution of PrEP use among women participating in a large open-label PrEP demonstration project, particularly during periods of HIV risk. & Methods: 310 HIV-uninfected women in HIV serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda were offered and accepted PrEP. Electronic monitoring caps were used to measure daily PrEP adherence. Time on PrEP while at risk for HIV (when the HIV-infected partner was on ART PrEP were calculated and compared among older and younger (PrEP during their entire risk period and 24% stopped but re-started PrEP during their risk period. While on PrEP, women took ≥6 doses/week for 78% of weeks (67% of weeks for women PrEP successfully over sustained periods of risk. While young women had lower adherence than older women, they achieved strong protection, suggesting women can align PrEP use to periods of risk and imperfect adherence can still provide substantial benefit.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download, share, remix, transform, and buildup the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be used commercially without permission from the journal.

  9. Stratigraphic framework and lake level history of Lake Kivu, East African Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Douglas A.; Scholz, Christopher A.

    2017-10-01

    Sediment cores and seismic reflection data acquired from the eastern basin of Lake Kivu, Rwanda reveal extensive limnologic variations due to changes in regional climate and basin structure. The eastern basin of the lake contains a sedimentary wedge which is > 1.5 km in thickness on its western side, and basal sediments are estimated to be at least 1.5 million years old. Sediments are likely to be thicker and older than this in the northern, Congolese basin of the lake. Above the ∼300 m iosbath only a thin layer of Holocene sediments are observed indication that this may have been the lake's high stand prior to that time. There are at least three erosional unconformities interpreted as desiccation or near-desiccation events which are estimated to have occurred at ∼475 ka, ∼100 ka, and ∼20 ka; the two most recent of these low stages likely developed during the African Megadrought and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) periods. Following the LGM, the water levels rose to form a ∼100 m deep lake with its surface ∼370 m below the current lake level. The lake remained near that level for several thousand years and during this time the Virunga Volcanic Province expanded. At ∼12.2 ka a change to wetter climate conditions rapidly filled the lake to spill out of the Bukavu Bay basin southward toward Lake Tanganyika. Tephra sampled from the cores show that there have been at least 24 large local volcanic events since the early Holocene lake transgression.

  10. Genetic Evidence for Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks in Madagascar Resulting from Virus Introductions from the East African Mainland rather than Enzootic Maintenance▿†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Serena A.; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Khristova, Marina L.; Andriamandimby, Soa Fy; Rollin, Pierre E.; Nichol, Stuart T.

    2011-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne phlebovirus, has been detected in Madagascar since 1979, with occasional outbreaks. In 2008 to 2009, a large RVFV outbreak was detected in Malagasy livestock and humans during two successive rainy seasons. To determine whether cases were due to enzootic maintenance of the virus within Madagascar or to importation from the East African mainland, nine RVFV whole genomic sequences were generated for viruses from the 1991 and 2008 Malagasy outbreaks. Bayesian coalescent analyses of available whole S, M, and L segment sequences were used to estimate the time to the most recent common ancestor for the RVFVs. The 1979 Madagascar isolate shared a common ancestor with strains on the mainland around 1972. The 1991 Madagascar isolates were in a clade distinct from that of the 1979 isolate and shared a common ancestor around 1987. Finally, the 2008 Madagascar viruses were embedded within a large clade of RVFVs from the 2006–2007 outbreak in East Africa and shared a common ancestor around 2003 to 2004. These results suggest that the most recent Madagascar outbreak was caused by a virus likely arriving in the country some time between 2003 and 2008 and that this outbreak may be an extension of the 2006–2007 East African outbreak. Clustering of the Malagasy sequences into subclades indicates that the viruses have continued to evolve during their short-term circulation within the country. These data are consistent with the notion that RVFV outbreaks in Madagascar result not from emergence from enzootic cycles within the country but from recurrent virus introductions from the East African mainland. PMID:21507967

  11. Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) Contributions to Strengthening Resilience and Sustainability for the East African Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, M. E.; Galu, G.; Funk, C. C.; Verdin, J. P.; Rowland, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Planning for Resilience in East Africa through Policy, Adaptation, Research, and Economic Development (PREPARED) is a multi-organizational project aimed at mainstreaming climate-resilient development planning and program implementation into the East African Community (EAC). The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has partnered with the PREPARED project to address three key development challenges for the EAC; 1) increasing resiliency to climate change, 2) managing trans-boundary freshwater biodiversity and conservation and 3) improving access to drinking water supply and sanitation services. USGS FEWS NET has been instrumental in the development of gridded climate data sets that are the fundamental building blocks for climate change adaptation studies in the region. Tools such as the Geospatial Climate Tool (GeoCLIM) have been developed to interpolate time-series grids of precipitation and temperature values from station observations and associated satellite imagery, elevation data, and other spatially continuous fields. The GeoCLIM tool also allows the identification of anomalies and assessments of both their frequency of occurrence and directional trends. A major effort has been put forth to build the capacities of local and regional institutions to use GeoCLIM to integrate their station data (which is not typically available to the public) into improved national and regional gridded climate data sets. In addition to the improvements and capacity building activities related to geospatial analysis tools, FEWS NET will assist in two other areas; 1) downscaling of climate change scenarios and 2) vulnerability impact assessments. FEWS NET will provide expertise in statistical downscaling of Global Climate Model output fields and work with regional institutions to assess results of other downscaling methods. Completion of a vulnerability impact assessment (VIA) involves the examination of sectoral consequences in identified climate "hot spots". FEWS NET

  12. A Delphi survey of leadership attributes necessary for national nurse leaders' participation in health policy development: an East African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivraj Shariff, Nilufa

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' involvement in health policy development ensures that health services are: safe, effective, available and inexpensive. Nursing history reveals several legendary nurse leaders who have influenced policy and the course of nursing and health care. In the recent times there have been concerns regarding the availability of effective leaders physically, symbolically and functionally at clinical, organizational and national levels, who can effectively influence health policy. Exerting influence in the policy arena requires that nurse leaders acquire attributes that enable them to be effective in policy development activity. This paper reports part of a larger study whose purpose included: "build consensus on leadership attributes necessary for nurse leaders' participation in health policy development in East Africa". A Delphi survey was utilized and included the following criteria: expert panelists, three iterative rounds, qualitative and quantitative analysis, and building consensus. The study included purposively selected sample of national nurse leaders (expert panelists) from the three East African countries of Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. The study was conducted in three iterative rounds. Seventy eight (78) expert panelists were invited to participate in the study and 37 (47%) participated in the first round of these; 24 (64.8%) participated in the second round and all invited in the third round 24 (100%) participated. Data collection was done using questionnaires and collected qualitative and quantitative data. Data analysis was done utilizing the principles of qualitative analysis in the first round and descriptive statistics in the second and third rounds. The study achieved consensus on the essential leadership attributes for nurse leaders' participation in health policy and include being able to: influence; communicate effectively; build relationships; feel empowered and demonstrate professional credibility. For nursing to participate in influencing the

  13. Seroprevalence of CANINE LEISHMANIASIS AND American trypanosomiasis in dogs from Grenada, West Indies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canine leishmaniasis and American trypanosomiasis (AT) are caused by related hemoflagellated parasites, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi, which share several common host species. Dogs are reservoirs for human infections with both pathogens. We determined the prevalence of antibodies to Leishman...

  14. ICDP project DeepCHALLA: reconstructing East African climate change and environmental history over the past 250,000 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuren, Dirk; Van Daele, Maarten; Wolff, Christian; Waldmann, Nicolas; Meyer, Inka; Ombori, Titus; Peterse, Francien; O'Grady, Ryan; Schnurrenberger, Doug; Olago, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Sediments on the bottom of Lake Challa, a 92-meter deep crater lake on the border of Kenya and Tanzania near Mt. Kilimanjaro, contain a uniquely long and continuous record of past climate and environmental change. The near-equatorial location and exceptional quality of this natural archive provide great opportunities to study tropical climate variability at both short (inter-annual to decadal) and long (glacial-interglacial) time scales; and the influence of this climate variability on the region's freshwater resources, the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, and the history of the East African landscape in which modern humans (our species, Homo sapiens) evolved and have lived ever since. Supported in part by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Programme (ICDP), the DeepCHALLA project has now recovered the sediment record of Lake Challa down to 214.8 meter below the lake floor, with almost certain 100% cover of the uppermost 121.3 meter (ca.150,000 year BP to present) and estimated 85% cover over the lower part of the sequence, down to the lowermost distinct reflector in the available seismic stratigraphy. This reflector represents a 2 meter thick layer of volcanic sand and silt deposited ca.250,000 years ago, and overlies still older silty lacustrine clays deposited during early lake development. Down-hole logging produced continuous profiles of in-situ sediment composition that confer an absolute depth scale to both the recovered cores and their three-dimensional representation in seismic stratigraphy. As readily observed through the transparent core liners, Lake Challa sediments are finely laminated throughout most of the recovered sequence. Combined with the great time span, the exquisite temporal resolution of these sediments promises to greatly increase our understanding of tropical climate and ecosystem dynamics, and create a long-awaited equatorial counterpart to the high-latitude climate records extracted from the ice sheets of Greenland

  15. Introduction of East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus to Oman harks back to "Zanzibar, the capital of Oman".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Akhtar J; Akhtar, Sohail; Al-Matrushi, Abdulrahman M; Fauquet, Claude M; Briddon, Rob W

    2013-02-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is the most devastating disease of the subsistence crop cassava (Manihot esculenta) across Africa and the Indian subcontinent. The disease is caused by viruses of the genus Begomovirus (family Geminiviridae)-seven species have been identified so far. The Sultanate of Oman is unusual among countries in Arabia in growing cassava on a small scale for local consumption. During a recent survey in A'Seeb wilayat of Muscat governorate, Oman, cassava plants were identified with symptoms typical of CMD. A begomovirus, East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus (EACMZV), was isolated from symptomatic plants. This virus was previously only known to occur in Zanzibar and Kenya. During the 19th Century, Zanzibar was governed by Oman and was so important that the Sultan of Oman moved his capital there from Muscat. After a period of colonial rule, the governing Arab elite was overthrown, following independence in the 1960s, and many expatriate Omanis returned to their homeland. Having gained a liking for the local Zanzibar cuisine, it appears that returning Omanis did not wish to do without dishes made from one particular favorite, cassava. Consequently, they carried planting material back to Oman for cultivation in their kitchen gardens. The evidence suggests that this material harbored EACMZV. Recently, Oman has been shown to be a nexus for geminiviruses and their associated satellites from diverse geographic origins. With their propensity to recombine, a major mechanism for evolution of geminiviruses, and the fact that Oman (and several other Arabian countries) is a major hub for trade and travel by air and sea, the possibility of onward spread is worrying.

  16. Sexual learning among East African adolescents in the context of generalized HIV epidemics: A systematic qualitative meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, Amelia S; McNealy, Kim R; Al-Khattab, Halima; Carter-Harris, Lisa; Oruche, Ukamaka Marian; Naanyu, Violet; Draucker, Claire Burke

    2017-01-01

    AIDS-related illness is the leading cause of mortality for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Together, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda account for 21% of HIV-infected adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. The United Nations framework for addressing the epidemic among adolescents calls for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education. These HIV prevention efforts could be informed by a synthesis of existing research about the formal and informal sexual education of adolescents in countries experiencing generalized epidemics. The purpose of this study was to describe the process of sexual learning among East African adolescents living in the context of generalized HIV epidemics. Qualitative metasynthesis, a systematic procedure for integrating the results of multiple qualitative studies addressing a similar phenomenon, was used. Thirty-two research reports met study inclusion criteria. The reports were assessed in a four-step analytic process: appraisal, classification of findings, synthesis of findings, and construction of a framework depicting the process of sexual learning in this population. The framework includes three phases of sexual learning: 1) being primed for sex, 2) making sense of sex, and 3) having sexual experiences. Adolescents were primed for sex through gender norms, cultural practices, and economic structures as well as through conversations and formal instruction. They made sense of sex by acquiring information about sexual intercourse, reproduction and pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and relationships and by developing a variety of beliefs and attitudes about these topics. Some adolescents described having sexual experiences that met wants or needs, but many experienced sex that was coerced or violent. Whether sex was wanted, coerced, or violent, adolescents experienced worry about sexually transmitted infections or premarital pregnancy. The three phases of sexual learning interact to shape adolescents' sexual lives and their risk

  17. Sexual learning among East African adolescents in the context of generalized HIV epidemics: A systematic qualitative meta-synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia S Knopf

    Full Text Available AIDS-related illness is the leading cause of mortality for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. Together, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda account for 21% of HIV-infected adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. The United Nations framework for addressing the epidemic among adolescents calls for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education. These HIV prevention efforts could be informed by a synthesis of existing research about the formal and informal sexual education of adolescents in countries experiencing generalized epidemics. The purpose of this study was to describe the process of sexual learning among East African adolescents living in the context of generalized HIV epidemics.Qualitative metasynthesis, a systematic procedure for integrating the results of multiple qualitative studies addressing a similar phenomenon, was used. Thirty-two research reports met study inclusion criteria. The reports were assessed in a four-step analytic process: appraisal, classification of findings, synthesis of findings, and construction of a framework depicting the process of sexual learning in this population.The framework includes three phases of sexual learning: 1 being primed for sex, 2 making sense of sex, and 3 having sexual experiences. Adolescents were primed for sex through gender norms, cultural practices, and economic structures as well as through conversations and formal instruction. They made sense of sex by acquiring information about sexual intercourse, reproduction and pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and relationships and by developing a variety of beliefs and attitudes about these topics. Some adolescents described having sexual experiences that met wants or needs, but many experienced sex that was coerced or violent. Whether sex was wanted, coerced, or violent, adolescents experienced worry about sexually transmitted infections or premarital pregnancy.The three phases of sexual learning interact to shape adolescents' sexual lives

  18. Political federation in East Africa: Progress, challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights. Journal Home ... Political federation in East Africa: Progress, challenges and prospects for constitutional development ... the East African Community faces the potential risk of collapsing like its

  19. Isotopic compositions of tropical East African flora and their potential as source indicators of organic matter in coastal marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzuka, Alfred N. N.

    1999-04-01

    significant difference in the isotopic compositions between the two groups. In the savannah environment, where a contribution from the C 4 types of plants might be substantial, the δ13C value for a terrestrial end member needs to be established prior to evaluation of the terrestrially derived organic matter in the marine environment. Owing to a significant contribution of sea grasses to the total organic matter preserved in coastal marine sediments, the stable isotopes of organic C seem to have a limited applicability as source indicators in the East African coastal waters. Furthermore, the results indicate that N stable isotopes seem to have a limited applicability as source indicators in coastal waters of East Africa. However, more work needs to be conducted to determine the terrestrial and sea grass end member values for the coastal areas.

  20. Neglected diseases in the news: a content analysis of recent international media coverage focussing on leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangai Balasegaram

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the pharmaceutical industry's "neglect" of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs has been investigated, no study evaluating media coverage of NTDs has been published. Poor media coverage exacerbates the neglect. This study aimed to investigate, describe, and analyse international media coverage of "neglected diseases" in general and three specific NTDs--African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease--from 1 January 2003 to 1 June 2007. METHODS: Archives of 11 leading international, English-language media were searched. A content analysis was done, coding for media organisation, date, author, type of report, slant, themes, and "frames". Semi-structured interviews with journalists and key informants were conducted for further insight. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Only 113 articles in a 53-month time period met the inclusion criteria, with no strong trends or increases in coverage. Overall, the BBC had the highest coverage with 20 results, followed by the Financial Times and Agence France Presse. CNN had the least coverage with one result. The term "neglected diseases" had good media currency and "sleeping sickness" was far more widely used than trypanosomiasis. The disease most covered was leishmaniasis and the least covered was Chagas. Academic researchers were most commonly quoted as a main source, while the World Health Organization (WHO and pharmaceutical industry were the least quoted. Journalists generally agreed NTDs had not been adequately covered, but said a lack of real news development and the need to cater to domestic audiences were major obstacles for NTD reporting. All journalists said health agencies, particularly WHO, were not communicating adequately about the burden of NTDs. CONCLUSIONS: Public health agencies need to raise priority for NTD advocacy. Innovative strategies, such as reporting grants or creating a network of voices, may be needed.

  1. Neglected Diseases in the News: A Content Analysis of Recent International Media Coverage Focussing on Leishmaniasis and Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasegaram, Mangai; Balasegaram, Sooria; Malvy, Denis; Millet, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the pharmaceutical industry's “neglect” of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) has been investigated, no study evaluating media coverage of NTDs has been published. Poor media coverage exacerbates the neglect. This study aimed to investigate, describe, and analyse international media coverage of “neglected diseases” in general and three specific NTDs—African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease—from 1 January 2003 to 1 June 2007. Methods Archives of 11 leading international, English-language media were searched. A content analysis was done, coding for media organisation, date, author, type of report, slant, themes, and “frames”. Semi-structured interviews with journalists and key informants were conducted for further insight. Principal Findings Only 113 articles in a 53-month time period met the inclusion criteria, with no strong trends or increases in coverage. Overall, the BBC had the highest coverage with 20 results, followed by the Financial Times and Agence France Presse. CNN had the least coverage with one result. The term “neglected diseases” had good media currency and “sleeping sickness” was far more widely used than trypanosomiasis. The disease most covered was leishmaniasis and the least covered was Chagas. Academic researchers were most commonly quoted as a main source, while the World Health Organization (WHO) and pharmaceutical industry were the least quoted. Journalists generally agreed NTDs had not been adequately covered, but said a lack of real news development and the need to cater to domestic audiences were major obstacles for NTD reporting. All journalists said health agencies, particularly WHO, were not communicating adequately about the burden of NTDs. Conclusions Public health agencies need to raise priority for NTD advocacy. Innovative strategies, such as reporting grants or creating a network of voices, may be needed. PMID:18478048

  2. Content of a novel online collection of traditional east African food habits (1930s-1960s): data collected by the Max-Planck-Nutrition Research Unit, Bumbuli, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschke, Verena; Oltersdorf, Ulrich; Elmadfa, Ibrahim; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Cheema, Birinder Sb; Kouris-Blazos, Antigone

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of traditional African foods and food habits has been, and continues to be, systematically extirpated. With the primary intent of collating data for our online collection documenting traditional African foods and food habits (available at: www.healthyeatingclub.com/Africa/), we reviewed the Oltersdorf Collection, 75 observational investigations conducted throughout East Africa (i.e. Tanzania, Kenya, and Uganda) between the 1930s and 1960s as compiled by the Max Planck Nutrition Research Unit, formerly located in Bumbuli, Tanzania. Data were categorized as follows: (1) food availability, (2) chemical composition, (3) staple foods (i.e. native crops, cereals, legumes, roots and tubers, vegetables, fruits, spices, oils and fats, beverages, and animal foods), (4) food preparation and culture, and (5) nutrient intake and health status indicators. Many of the traditional foods identified, including millet, sorghum, various legumes, root and tubers, green leafy vegetables, plant oils and wild meats have known health benefits. Food preparatory practices during this period, including boiling and occasional roasting are superior to current practices which favor frying and deep-frying. Overall, our review and data extraction provide reason to believe that a diversified diet was possible for the people of East Africa during this period (1930s-1960s). There is a wealth of knowledge pertaining to traditional East African foods and food habits within the Oltersdorf Collection. These data are currently available via our online collection. Future efforts should contribute to collating and honing knowledge of traditional foods and food habits within this region, and indeed throughout the rest of Africa. Preserving and disseminating this knowledge may be crucial for abating projected trends for non-communicable diseases and malnutrition in Africa and abroad.

  3. Cryptic diversity within the major trypanosomiasis vector Glossina fuscipes revealed by molecular markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi A Dyer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The tsetse fly Glossina fuscipes s.l. is responsible for the transmission of approximately 90% of cases of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness. Three G. fuscipes subspecies have been described, primarily based upon subtle differences in the morphology of their genitalia. Here we describe a study conducted across the range of this important vector to determine whether molecular evidence generated from nuclear DNA (microsatellites and gene sequence information, mitochondrial DNA and symbiont DNA support the existence of these taxa as discrete taxonomic units. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The nuclear ribosomal Internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 provided support for the three subspecies. However nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data did not support the monophyly of the morphological subspecies G. f. fuscipes or G. f. quanzensis. Instead, the most strongly supported monophyletic group was comprised of flies sampled from Ethiopia. Maternally inherited loci (mtDNA and symbiont also suggested monophyly of a group from Lake Victoria basin and Tanzania, but this group was not supported by nuclear loci, suggesting different histories of these markers. Microsatellite data confirmed strong structuring across the range of G. fuscipes s.l., and was useful for deriving the interrelationship of closely related populations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that the morphological classification alone is not used to classify populations of G. fuscipes for control purposes. The Ethiopian population, which is scheduled to be the target of a sterile insect release (SIT programme, was notably discrete. From a programmatic perspective this may be both positive, given that it may reflect limited migration into the area or negative if the high levels of differentiation are also reflected in reproductive isolation between this population and the flies to be used in the release programme.

  4. Meat Quality Characteristics of Small East African Goats and Norwegian Crosses Finished under Small Scale Farming Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Hozza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to study the effect of feeding system on meat quality characteristics of Small East African (SEA goats and their crosses with Norwegian (SEA×N goats finished under small scale farming conditions. Twenty four castrated goats at the age of 18 months with live body weight of 16.7±0.54 kg from each breed (SEA and SEA×N were distributed in a completely randomized design in a 2×3 factorial arrangement (two breed, and three dietary treatments. The dietary treatments were; no access to concentrate (T0, 66% access to ad libitum concentrate allowance (T66 and 100% access to ad libitum concentrate allowance with 20% refusal (T100 and the experimental period was for 84 days. In addition, all goats were allowed to graze for 2 hours daily and later fed grass hay on ad libitum basis. Daily feed intakes were recorded for all 84-days of experiment after which the animals were slaughtered. Feed intake of T100 animals was 536 g/d, which was 183 g/d higher than that of T66 group. Supplemented goats had significantly (p0.05 for dressing percentage and carcass conformation among supplemented goats except fatness score, total fat depots and carcass fat which increased (p<0.05 with increasing concentrate levels in the diet. Increasing level of concentrate on offer increased meat dry matter with subsequent increase of fat in the meat. Muscle pH of goats fed concentrate declined rapidly and reached below 6 at 6 h post-mortem but temperature remained at 28°C. Cooking loss and meat tenderness improved (p<0.05 and thawing loss increased (p<0.05 with ageing period. Similarly, meat tenderness improved (p<0.05 with concentrate supplementation. Shear force of muscles varied from 36 to 66, the high values been associated with Semimembranosus and Gluteobiceps muscles. The present study demonstrates that there are differences in meat quality characteristics of meat from SEA goats and their crosses with Norwegian breeds finished under small scale

  5. Equality in Maternal and Newborn Health: Modelling Geographic Disparities in Utilisation of Care in Five East African Countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrine W Ruktanonchai

    Full Text Available Geographic accessibility to health facilities represents a fundamental barrier to utilisation of maternal and newborn health (MNH services, driving historically hidden spatial pockets of localized inequalities. Here, we examine utilisation of MNH care as an emergent property of accessibility, highlighting high-resolution spatial heterogeneity and sub-national inequalities in receiving care before, during, and after delivery throughout five East African countries.We calculated a geographic inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility at 300 x 300 m using a dataset of 9,314 facilities throughout Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda. Using Demographic and Health Surveys data, we utilised hierarchical mixed effects logistic regression to examine the odds of: 1 skilled birth attendance, 2 receiving 4+ antenatal care visits at time of delivery, and 3 receiving a postnatal health check-up within 48 hours of delivery. We applied model results onto the accessibility surface to visualise the probabilities of obtaining MNH care at both high-resolution and sub-national levels after adjusting for live births in 2015.Across all outcomes, decreasing wealth and education levels were associated with lower odds of obtaining MNH care. Increasing geographic inaccessibility scores were associated with the strongest effect in lowering odds of obtaining care observed across outcomes, with the widest disparities observed among skilled birth attendance. Specifically, for each increase in the inaccessibility score to the nearest health facility, the odds of having skilled birth attendance at delivery was reduced by over 75% (0.24; CI: 0.19-0.3, while the odds of receiving antenatal care decreased by nearly 25% (0.74; CI: 0.61-0.89 and 40% for obtaining postnatal care (0.58; CI: 0.45-0.75.Overall, these results suggest decreasing accessibility to the nearest health facility significantly deterred utilisation of all maternal health care services. These

  6. Antigenic Variation of East/Central/South African and Asian Chikungunya Virus Genotypes in Neutralization by Immune Sera.

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    Chong-Long Chua

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a re-emerging mosquito-borne virus which causes epidemics of fever, severe joint pain and rash. Between 2005 and 2010, the East/Central/South African (ECSA genotype was responsible for global explosive outbreaks across India, the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia. From late 2013, Asian genotype CHIKV has caused outbreaks in the Americas. The characteristics of cross-antibody efficacy and epitopes are poorly understood.We characterized human immune sera collected during two independent outbreaks in Malaysia of the Asian genotype in 2006 and the ECSA genotype in 2008-2010. Neutralizing capacity was analyzed against representative clinical isolates as well as viruses rescued from infectious clones of ECSA and Asian CHIKV. Using whole virus antigen and recombinant E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins, we further investigated antibody binding sites, epitopes, and antibody titers. Both ECSA and Asian sera demonstrated stronger neutralizing capacity against the ECSA genotype, which corresponded to strong epitope-antibody interaction. ECSA serum targeted conformational epitope sites in the E1-E2 glycoprotein, and E1-E211K, E2-I2T, E2-H5N, E2-G118S and E2-S194G are key amino acids that enhance cross-neutralizing efficacy. As for Asian serum, the antibodies targeting E2 glycoprotein correlated with neutralizing efficacy, and I2T, H5N, G118S and S194G altered and improved the neutralization profile. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against the N-terminal linear neutralizing epitope from the ECSA sequence has reduced binding capacity and neutralization efficacy against Asian CHIKV. These findings imply that the choice of vaccine strain may impact cross-protection against different genotypes.Immune serum from humans infected with CHIKV of either ECSA or Asian genotypes showed differences in binding and neutralization characteristics. These findings have implications for the continued outbreaks of co-circulating CHIKV genotypes and effective

  7. Investigating the effect of geomagnetic storm and equatorial electrojet on equatorial ionospheric irregularity over East African sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Nigussie, Melessew

    2016-11-01

    The variability of the equatorial ionosphere is still a big challenge for ionospheric dependent radio wave technology users. To mitigate the effect of equatorial ionospheric irregularity on trans-ionospheric radio waves considerable efforts are being done to understand and model the equatorial electrodynamics and its connection to the creation of ionospheric irregularity. However, the effect of the East-African ionospheric electrodynamics on ionospheric irregularity is not yet well studied due to lack of multiple ground based instruments. But, as a result of International Heliophysical Year (IHY) initiative, which was launched in 2007, some facilities are being deployed in Africa since then. Therefore, recently deployed instruments, in the Ethiopian sector, such as SCINDA-GPS receiver (2.64°N dip angle) for TEC and amplitude scintillation index (S4) data and two magnetometers, which are deployed on and off the magnetic equator, data collected in the March equinoctial months of the years 2011, 2012, and 2015 have been used for this study in conjunction with geomagnetic storm data obtained from high resolution OMNI WEB data center. We have investigated the triggering and inhibition mechanisms for ionospheric irregularities using, scintillation index (S4), equatorial electrojet (EEJ), interplanetary electric field (IEFy), symH index, AE index and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz on five selected storm and two storm free days. We have found that when the eastward EEJ fluctuates in magnitude due to storm time induced electric fields at around noontime, the post-sunset scintillation is inhibited. All observed post-sunset scintillations in equinox season are resulted when the daytime EEJ is non fluctuating. The strength of noontime EEJ magnitude has shown direct relation with the strength of the post-sunset scintillations. This indicates that non-fluctuating EEJ stronger than 20 nT, can be precursor for the occurrence of the evening time ionospheric irregularities

  8. Regional opportunities in East Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen N. Karingi; Pesce, Ottavia; Sommer, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made by the East African Community partner states in implementing the East African Community customs union. Trade within the East African Community is now free from import duties, and partner states have adopted a three-band common external tariff. This paper assesses how the customs union has supported intraregional trade and industrialization, in particular through the development of competitive smokestack-free industries. It concludes that regional integration...

  9. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-05-01

    May 1, 2003 ... Objective: To investigate nutrient composition in moringa leaves and compare with those of kale (Brassica cannata) and Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris). Design: Laboratory based study, nutrient composition of fresh and cooked leaves of. M. stenopetala were ..... Similar to the mature seeds of Moringa oleifera.

  10. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-12-01

    Dec 1, 2001 ... The children consumed sugar in most of the beverages and breakfast cereals, with 88.5% consuming porridge, 86.2% beverages,. 43.1% breakfast cereals and 39.8% milk with sugar. The confectioneries such as chocolate, cookies, soda, ice- cream, cakes, sweets and biscuits were consumed occasionally ...

  11. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... Intervention: Conservative measures were commenced in all cases and involved diet manipulation, enema and physiotherapeutic training. Results: The age of maximum presentation was within the 6-10 year age bracket. The main presenting complain was faecal soilage and poor bowel habit. The children ...

  12. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-07-01

    Jul 1, 2002 ... prevalence of xerophthalmia increases with age(4,5). Furthermore, other studies have shown that corneal ... cool box containing dry ice. The serum samples were stored in the dark at 20°c until .... However, recent WHO report recommends that a cut- off level of <20ug/dl for serum retinol be used and that the ...

  13. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-06-06

    Jun 6, 2002 ... difficulties experienced by carers. It is unclear who is at the most risk from adverse consequences and which ..... various definitions of care giver burden: the effects of patient's illness on the family, such as physical, .... In Brubaker. T.H. (ed.) Aging health and family: long term care. Sage. Beverley Hills, 1987.

  14. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-12-12

    Dec 12, 2002 ... The popularity of these products, which is promoted by aggressive advertisement and popular belief, is illustrated by their widespread use, but verification of their safety prior to marketing remains an important question. Infant skin and particularly neonatal skin is especially prone to dermatitis provoked by ...

  15. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-09

    00202, Nairobi, Kenya, H. Ogutu,. KRN, BSc, Nurse/Counsellor, ... pathology may differ based on gender and route of infection (5). Secondly ... had not had unprotected vaginal or anal sex with a known HIV-infected person or a ...

  16. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-11-11

    Nov 11, 2002 ... MANAGEMENT OF TRACHEOBRONCHIAL FOREIGN BODIES IN CHILDREN. T.M. Sisenda, MBChB .... and ranged between six months and eight years. They .... close co-operation between the surgeon and the anaesthetist.

  17. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-10-01

    Oct 1, 2002 ... was a 42 year old female who presented with dysuria and frequency of micturition. The radiological features, diagnosis and management are discussed and the literature on this subject is briefly reviewed. INTRODUCTION. Leiomyomas of the urinary bladder are rare tumours that can occur in all age groups ...

  18. East African Medical journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concusz'on: This study has demonstrated that not all acquired cardiovascular diseases are associated with hyperlipidaemia. Intervention studies may therefore be needed to examine the benefits or adverse effects of dietary restriction in such conditions. INTRODUCTION With increasing awareness of systemic hypertension ...

  19. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-10-10

    Oct 10, 2004 ... bubble had progressively disappeared. The abdominal ... reported to show right side pneumonia with a large gastric bubble. An N/G tube could not pass beyond. 10cm. The baby, however, remained pink with SP02 of 100% while ... The ehest was re-explored and an anastomotic leak, measuring about.

  20. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-11

    Nov 11, 2007 ... placed posterior bladder wall suture may also increase the risk of a ... a 3-4 cm rent was noted in the dome of the bladder. The posterior wall of the bladder was subsequently gently dissected off the lower uterine segment upto the level of the ... Other advantages of retaining the cervix include the reduced ...

  1. East African Orthopaedic Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the journal is to give orthopaedic surgeons, technologists and other personnel within the orthopaedic specialty a forum of diverging their research findings to the rest of the world. We publish original research papers, case reports, reviews and commentaries.

  2. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-11-11

    Nov 11, 2007 ... Reich in 1988, and since then at least eight different variations of the technique have been reported (2). In Kenya, our group is the first to practice total laparoscopic hysterectomy as opposed to LAVH. In this communication, we report our experiences with the method and how it compares with the traditional.

  3. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS was significantly associated with mouth lesions, both ulcers and oral candidiasis, skin lesions especially eczema and generalised pruritic dermatitis, prolonged cough, ... Afterpre-testcounselling, asampleofperipheral venous blood was drawn from both mother (1 ml) and child (0.5 ml) for HIV-1 serology. Two ELISA ...

  4. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-07-01

    Jul 1, 2002 ... PREVALENCE OF VITAMIN A DEFICIENCY AMONG PRE-SCHOOL AND SCHOOL-AGED CHILDREN IN ARSSI ZONE. ETHIOPIA. YT Asrat, BSc. MSc, Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute, PO. Box 5654, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Applied Nutrition Programme. Department of Food Technology ...

  5. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate the proposed criteria against the laboratory parameters and to identify the clinical features with the highest predictive value in the diagnosis of paediatric AIDS. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi. Results: More than twenty three per cent of the children studied ...

  6. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-12-01

    Dec 1, 2001 ... 3-5 years were assessed in 1997. Results: There was a high consumption of fruits, vegetables and milk on a daily basis. There was also a ..... Kenya Demographic and Health. Survey, Macro International Inc. Maryland. USA. 1993: l l-lS. 10. Roberts, G. J., Cleaton-Jones, P. E, Fatti, L. P., Richardson, B. D.,.

  7. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-05-01

    May 1, 2002 ... for maximal cephalic breadth (MCB), respectively. The MCL also showed a high correlation with age (R = 0.842, P = 0.002) but age only correlated moderately with the MCB (R = 0.569). The thoracic circumference (TC) and inter-nipple distance (IND) showed a very high positive correlation with age (R ...

  8. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-10-10

    Oct 10, 2007 ... Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-00100, Nairobi, Kenya, N. Tunge, Laboratory. Technician ... of tuberculosis when used with fluorescent microscopy. .... Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values, 95% confidence intervals of fluorescence microscopy.

  9. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-09

    .), Medical Manager, KAVI,. University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 19676-00202, Nairobi, Kenya, P. Fast, MD, PhD, Chief Medical Officer, Research and. Development, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), 110 William Street, ...

  10. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-08-01

    Aug 1, 2002 ... burns infections and resistance to various antimicrobials. The continous selection of resistant flora together .... unit-and kitchen level training and education of all staff, medical and non-medical. It may also ..... patients with Acquired immunodeficiency Syndrome. N. Engl. J. Med. 1992; 326:]514-1521. Jeena ...

  11. East African Medical journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    proportion (90.8%) of parents attach equal importance for both girl's and boy' s ... Mugonzibwa et a1. (5) reported that parents and their ..... DiBiase AT and Sandier R]. Malocclusion, orthodontics and bullying. Dent. Update. 2001; 28: 464-466. 10. Shaw W.C., Addy M. and Ray C. Dental and social effects of malocclusion and ...

  12. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-08

    Aug 8, 2006 ... Resuscitation included suction. through direct laryngoscopy, nasotracheal intubation with pulmonary toilet, as well as .... There was no history of draining amniotic fluid. The fundal height was term and the lie was .... cardiopulmonary meconium—initiated insufficiency. That the mother retrospectively reported ...

  13. East African Medical journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To investigate and compare the outcomes of invasive cervical cancer patients with ... Subjects: Medical records of thirty six patients treated in our department between May and July. 2000 ..... Summary of outcomes for the seronegative patients (shown as percentages of the total number of people on fol low-up.

  14. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-08

    Aug 8, 2006 ... of the permethrin impregnated bed nets (PIBs) in the. Republic of Benin: The role of women in the acquisition and utilisation of PIBs. Social Sci. & Med. 1999; 49: 993-1005. 16. Republic of Kenya. National malaria strategy, 2001-. 2010: Division of malaria control. Ministry of Health,. Nairobi, Kenya. 2001.

  15. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-10-10

    Oct 10, 2002 ... hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy: long-term octreotide treatment without pancreatectomy. ./. Pediatr. 1993; 123:644-650. 11. Aynsley-Green. A., Polak. J.M.. Bloom. Sr. et al. Nesidioblastosis of the pancreas: definition of the syndrome and the management of the severe neonatal hyperinsulinemic.

  16. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental health illnesses (MHI) contribute to approximately 13% of the total global disease burden, while in low- and middle-income countries this burden is even higher, estimated at 25% and 34%, respectively (1). A paucity of attention has been given to mental health in developing countries where 76-. 85% of those affected ...

  17. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Promotive Health, Community Health and Development Unit, Nairobi, Kenya, A. B. Kihara, MBChB, MMed, R. J.. Kosgei, MBChB, MMed, MSc, PGDRM, Department of Obstetric and Gynaecology, University of Nairobi, Kenya, H. Tweya, MSc, Lighthouse Trust, Lilongwe, Malawi, The International Union Against Tuberculosis ...

  18. east african medical journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2004-10-10

    Oct 10, 2004 ... has had polyhydramnios. Ninety per cent have some form of fistula the commonest being a proximal atresia with a distal fistula. The presence of fistula allows air from the trachea to the gastrointestinal tract causing abdominal distension. Any attempt to feed causes choking, cough and cyanosis. The baby ...

  19. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-05-01

    May 1, 2007 ... regions, it contains two controlled substances, cathinone (schedule I) which is present in fresh khat and cathine (schedule VI) which is a degradation product of cathinone abundant in old khat. Objective: To determine the .... developed at least class 2 seizures in each treatment group were recorded and ...

  20. East- African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-08

    Aug 8, 2006 ... METHOD. M. Chardoli, MD, Department of Emergency Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran and V. Rahimi-. Movaghar, MD, Department of Neurosurgery, ... Objective: To evaluate validity of TRISS (Trauma score and injury severity score) method in trauma ... analysed using T-tests.

  1. East- African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-08

    Aug 8, 2006 ... Request for reprints to: Dr. M. Chardoli, Department of Emergency Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences,. Tehran .... Trauma mortality in Khatam-ol—anbia Hospital and its match predicted in UK and USA in dlflerent departments. Khatam ... facilities in this relation, increasing neurosurgeons or short ...

  2. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-01

    Aug 1, 2006 ... Resuscitation included suction through direct laryngoscopy, nasotracheal intubation with pulmonary toilet, as well as administration of 100% oxygen. The condition of the baby did not improve. A diagnosis of severe MAS with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE), persistent pulmonary hypertension ...

  3. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The number of HIV infected patients is increasing considerably in Nigeria and other developing countries(4) and the provision of medical care to seropositive patients is becoming a major activity for many health care personnel. The occupational risk of HIV infection results when workers are exposed to HIV infected. fluids.

  4. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-05-05

    May 5, 2002 ... Objective: To assess the prevalence and risk factors of cigarette smoking and khat chewing. Design: College based cross sectional. Setting: Four colleges found in north west Ethiopia namely Gondar College of Medical. Sciences, Gondar College of Teachers Education, Bahr Dar University Engineering ...

  5. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lesions especially eczema and generalised pruritic dermatitis, prolonged cough, prolonged fever and generalised lymphadenopathy. The WHO criteria had a sensitivity of 60%, a specificity of 94%, positive predictive value of 60%, and negative predictive value of 94%. The Nairobi diagnostic criteria had a sensitivity of 80%, ...

  6. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors of virologic failure and slow response to art among HIV-infected children and adolescents in Nairobi · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. J. M. Kabogo, S. Gupta, A. K. Maina, M. Ochwoto, R. W. Omange, R. N. Musoke, R. W. Lihana, E. Muniu, F. W. ...

  7. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-05-01

    May 1, 2003 ... Applied Human Nutrition Programme, Department of Food Technology and Nutrition, University of Nairobi, PO. Box. 442, Uthiru, Nairobi and ... of carbohydrate, crude fiber and calcium compared to both raw and cooked kale and swiss chard. Vitamins are ... the staple diet of the population. Kurkurfa, a paste.

  8. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and one (4.8%) had pyomyositis. A single patient was also registered with each of the following conditions: rhabdomyoma, hepatocarcinoma with metastatic bone lesions, achondroplasia and chondromalacia of the patella. DISCUSSION.

  9. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the clinical presentation, mode of investigation and management of gastric cancer at New Mulago Hospital. Design: Prospective descriptive study. Settings: Three general surgical wards, Department of Surgery, New Mulago Hospital. Subjects: Thirty five patients were studied within 12 months.

  10. East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The isolation of such pathogenic bacteria as. Esche richia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and. Pseudomonas aeruginosa raises public health concern. Although E. coli is a normal microflora of the gut and has been isolated from rats previously (5) its role as a cause of gastroenteritis in children and the immunocompromised.

  11. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-05-01

    May 1, 2003 ... Discipline of Anatomy, School of Basic and Applied Medical Sciences,. University of Durban-Westville, Private Bag X54001, Durban, 4001, South Africa. Request for reprints ... Operative findings - inferior lumbar hernia. Note: (a) Lumbodorsal fascia of floor of inferior lumbar triangle flanking aponeuroses of ...

  12. EAST AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2001-02-01

    Feb 1, 2001 ... employment status, religion, marital status and educational level for the cases and their matched controls with a mean parity of 4 in both. Table 1. Medical and surgical history afeases and controls. Risk factor. Cases n=186. Freq. (%). Freq. Controls n=180. (%). X2. P value. Sign. Abortion. Yes. 58. (31.2). 39.

  13. East African cassava mosaic-like viruses from Africa to Indian ocean islands: molecular diversity, evolutionary history and geographical dissemination of a bipartite begomovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Bruyn Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cassava (Manihot esculenta is a major food source for over 200 million sub-Saharan Africans. Unfortunately, its cultivation is severely hampered by cassava mosaic disease (CMD. Caused by a complex of bipartite cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMG species (Family: Geminivirideae; Genus: Begomovirus CMD has been widely described throughout Africa and it is apparent that CMG's are expanding their geographical distribution. Determining where and when CMG movements have occurred could help curtail its spread and reveal the ecological and anthropic factors associated with similar viral invasions. We applied Bayesian phylogeographic inference and recombination analyses to available and newly described CMG sequences to reconstruct a plausible history of CMG diversification and migration between Africa and South West Indian Ocean (SWIO islands. Results The isolation and analysis of 114 DNA-A and 41 DNA-B sequences demonstrated the presence of three CMG species circulating in the Comoros and Seychelles archipelagos (East African cassava mosaic virus, EACMV; East African cassava mosaic Kenya virus, EACMKV; and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus, EACMCV. Phylogeographic analyses suggest that CMG’s presence on these SWIO islands is probably the result of at least four independent introduction events from mainland Africa occurring between 1988 and 2009. Amongst the islands of the Comoros archipelago, two major migration pathways were inferred: One from Grande Comore to Mohéli and the second from Mayotte to Anjouan. While only two recombination events characteristic of SWIO islands isolates were identified, numerous re-assortments events were detected between EACMV and EACMKV, which seem to almost freely interchange their genome components. Conclusions Rapid and extensive virus spread within the SWIO islands was demonstrated for three CMG complex species. Strong evolutionary or ecological interaction between CMG species may explain

  14. ISSN 2073 ISSN 2073 9990 East Cent. Afr. J. s 9990 East Cent. Afr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    COSECSA/ASEA Publication -East & Central African Journal of Surgery. Nov/Dec 2014 Vol. 19 (3). East & Central African Journal of Surgery. Nov/Dec 2014 Vol. 19 (3). East & Central African Journal of Surgery. Nov/Dec 2014 Vol. 19 (3). Three patients presented with septic shock that persisted after source control and they.

  15. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reviewed, African-published scholarly journals. Historically, scholarly information has flowed from North to South and from West to East. ... Featured Country: South Africa, Featured Journal: Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies ...

  16. The innovative and collective capacity of low-income East African women in the era of HIV/AIDS: contesting western notions of African Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Kako, Peninnah; Kibicho, Jennifer; Stevens, Patricia E

    2013-01-01

    Historically, African women have been viewed through a colonizing and Eurocentric lens emphasizing poverty, oppression, and suffering. A postcolonial, feminist approach to our two qualitative studies with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women in Malawi and Kenya led us to depart from this discourse, highlighting women's capacity. Through this article, not only is a forum created for African women's voices to be heard as subaltern knowledge leading to transformational change, but also health care providers are made aware, through women's words, of how they might capitalize on grassroots women's movements, particularly in resource-poor communities, to implement effective HIV prevention and treatment strategies.

  17. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest and pre-eminent collection of peer-reviewed, African-published scholarly journals. Historically, scholarly information has flowed from North to South and from West to East. It has also been difficult for African researchers to access the work of other African academics.

  18. Late Pan-African and early Mesozoic brittle compressions in East and Central Africa: lithospheric deformation within the Congo-Tanzania Cratonic area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvaux, D.; Kipata, M. L.; Macheyeki, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions leading to the formation of the Central-African part of Gondwana have so far not much taken into account constraints provided by the evolution of brittle structures and related stress field. This is largely because little is known on continental brittle deformation in Equatorial Africa before the onset of the Mesozoic Central-African and Late Cenozoic East-African rifts. We present a synthesis of fault-kinematic data and paleostress inversion results from field surveys covering parts of Tanzania, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is based on investigations along the eastern margin of the Tanzanian craton, in the Ubendian belt between the Tanzanian craton and Bangweulu block, in the Lufilian Arc between the Kalahari and Congo cratons and along the Congo intracratonic basin. Paleostress tensors were computed for a substantial database by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and the relative succession of major brittle events established. Two of them appear to be of regional importance and could be traced from one region to the other. The oldest one is the first brittle event recorded after the paroxysm of the Terminal Pan-African event that led to the amalgamation Gondwana at the Precambrian-Cambrian transition. It is related to compressional deformation with horizontal stress trajectories fluctuating from an E-W compression in Central Tanzania to NE-SW in the Ubende belt and Lufilian Arc. The second event is a transpressional inversion with a consistent NW-SE compression that we relate to the far-field effects of the active margin south of Gondwana during the late Triassic - early Jurassic.

  19. A tale of two haplotypes: the EDA2R/AR Intergenic region is the most divergent genomic segment between Africans and East Asians in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casto, Amanda M; Henn, Brenna M; Kidd, Jeffery M; Bustamante, Carlos D; Feldman, Marcus W

    2012-12-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with large allele frequency differences between human populations are relatively rare. The longest run of SNPs with an allele frequency difference of one between the Yoruba of Nigeria and the Han Chinese is found on the long arm of the X chromosome in the intergenic region separating the EDA2R and AR genes. It has been proposed that the unusual allele frequency distributions of these SNPs are the result of a selective sweep affecting African populations that occurred after the out-of-Africa migration. To investigate the evolutionary history of the EDA2R/AR intergenic region, we characterized the haplotype structure of 52 of its highly differentiated SNPs. Using a publicly available data set of 3,000 X chromosomes from 65 human populations, we found that nearly all human X chromosomes carry one of two modal haplotypes for these 52 SNPs. The predominance of two highly divergent haplotypes at this locus was confirmed by use of a subset of individuals sequenced to high coverage. The first of these haplotypes, the α-haplotype is at high frequencies in most of the African populations surveyed and likely arose before the separation of African populations into distinct genetic entities. The second, the β-haplotype, is frequent or fixed in all non-African populations and likely arose in East Africa before the out-of-Africa migration. We also observed a small group or rare haplotypes with no clear relationship to the α- and β-haplotypes. These haplotypes occur at relatively high frequencies in African hunter-gatherer populations, such as the San and Mbuti Pygmies. Our analysis indicates that these haplotypes are part of a pool of diverse, ancestral haplotypes that have now been almost entirely replaced by the α- and β-haplotypes. We suggest that the rise of the α- and β-haplotypes was the result of the demographic forces that human populations experienced during the formation of modern African populations and the out

  20. Good clinical practice in East Africa: a review | Kimanani | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Good clinical practice in East Africa: a review. E. Kimanani. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal 2001 78 (10): 550-554). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/eamj.v78i10.8967 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO ...