WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth re123 cuprate

  1. Near-Net-Shaped Objects of RE123 Superconductors by Infiltration Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The fabrication of near-net-shaped objects of RE123 superconductors by "infiltration processing" is discussed. Near-net-shape processing involves the infiltration of preshaped porous green bodies of either 211 or yttria phases by liquidscontaining barium cuprates and copper oxides followed by a controlled peritecticsolidification. The process yields poly- and also single-crystalline superconducting objects with a shrinkage of less than half of one percent of the green bodies. The preservation of the initial structure of the green bodies results in fabrication of RE123 in a wide variety of dimensions and complex shapes. The demonstrated products include bulk components like cylinders, single domain thick films on a variety of substrates, freestanding fabrics and open porous superconducting foams. This paper presents a comprehensive description of the infiltration processing technique and the resulting microstructures of the superconducting bodies. The advantages of this technique and practical applications of the processed superconducting structures are highlighted.

  2. Development of Commercial RE123 Coated Conductors for Practical Applications by IBAD/PLD Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Y.; Fujita, S.; Igarashi, M.; Daibo, M.; Nakamura, N.; Hanyu, S.; Kikutake, R.; Sutoh, Y.; Tobita, H.; Fuji, H.; Kakimoto, K.; Nagata, M.; Itoh, M.

    Longitudinal homogeneity and REBa2Cu3Ox: RE123 thickness dependence of in-field superconducting properties for commercial RE123 coated conductors (C.C.) were measured at varied temperatures. Self-field Ic homogeneity for typical ∼500-m long samples were evaluated below 2% measured by continues reel-to-reel measurement. In-field Ic distributions were not changed at temperatures from 10K to 77.3K, being estimated by Ic measurements at separated points of a 1 km long sample. Linear dependences of in-field Ic on RE123 thickness up to 5 μm were observed at temperatures of 20K and 77.3K, in contrast with non-linear dependences observed for self-field Ic for RE123 films. The results indicate good longitudinal homogeneity and universal linearity of thickness dependence for in-field Ic at wide temperature range, which suggest simple scaling for in-field Ic of RE123 wires among different temperatures.

  3. High-speed deposition of high-quality RE123 films by a PLD system with hot-wall heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, K; Igarashi, M; Hanada, Y; Hayashida, T; Tashita, C; Morita, K; Hanyu, S; Sutoh, Y; Kutami, H; Iijima, Y; Saitoh, T [Fujikura Ltd, 1440, Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba, 285-8550 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    We have studied the use of a hot-wall heating system for producing GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-X} (Gd123) films with large critical current (I{sub c}), stably, at high speed, by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. We achieved a material yield from the PLD system with hot-wall heating of about 50% through optimization of the evaporation conditions. With the PLD system, we were able to fabricate a Gd123 film about 20 cm long with a high I{sub c} of 997 A (77 K, self-field) at about 6 {mu}m thickness. The maximum I{sub c} that we achieved for a Gd123 film about 2 cm long was 1040 A (77 K, self-field) at about 6 {mu}m thickness. Furthermore, we were able to form a Gd123 film about 1 {mu}m thick and 20 cm long with an I{sub c} of 352 A (77 K, self-field) at a high speed of 60 m h{sup -1} using high laser power. For the production of long conductors coated with RE123 (REBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-X}, where RE stands for rare earth) using hot-wall heating, it was found that RE123 coated conductors over 100 m long with I{sub c} of over 200 A had uniform I{sub c} distributions with {+-} 2% variations in the direction of the length.

  4. Rare-earth magnetism in cuprates with T' structure. [GdPrCuO; GdNdCuO; GdSmCuO; GdEuCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czjzek, G. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP (Germany)); Roth, G. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP (Germany)); Kroener, T. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP (Germany)); Adelmann, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP (Germany))

    1994-02-01

    Cuprates of composition (Gd[sub 1-x]R[sub x])[sub 2]CuO[sub 4], R = Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, have been studied by complementary experimental techniques. Only in compounds with Sm, exchange interactions between Sm and Cu moments are ineffective since the easy axis of the Sm moments is perpendicular to the Cu - O planes to which the Cu moments are confined. Here, we present new evidence that in the other cuprates with magnetic rare earths, R - Cu exchange interactions strongly influence the magnetic properties. (orig.)

  5. Rare-earth magnetism in cuprates with T[sup prime-]structure. [GdPrCuO; GdNdCuO; GdSmCuO; GdEuCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czjzek, G. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP, P.O. Box 3640, W-7500 Karlsruhe 1 (Germany)); Roth, G. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP, P.O. Box 3640, W-7500 Karlsruhe 1 (Germany)); Kroener, T. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP, P.O. Box 3640, W-7500 Karlsruhe 1 (Germany)); Adelmann, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INFP and ITP, P.O. Box 3640, W-7500 Karlsruhe 1 (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    Cuprates of composition (Gd[sub 1-x]R[sub x])[sub 2]CuO[sub 4], R=Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, have been studied by [sup 155]Gd Moessbauer spectroscopy and by complementary experimental techniques. The results provide new evidence for the important influence of exchange interactions between Cu and rare-earth 4f-moments on rare-earth magnetism in these compounds. ((orig.))

  6. Remarkable progress in fabricating RE123 coated conductors by IBAD/PLD technique at Fujikura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, M; Kakimoto, K; Hanyu, S; Tashita, C; Hayashida, T; Hanada, Y; Fujita, S; Morita, K; Nakamura, N; Sutoh, Y; Kutami, H; Iijima, Y; Saitoh, T, E-mail: m_igarashi@fujikura.co.j [Fujikura Ltd., 1440, Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba, 285-8550 (Japan)

    2010-06-01

    Increase of production rate and improvement of quality for RE123 coated conductors have been tried. In-plane texturing of MgO was attempted by the IBAD system with the world largest ion source. As a result of optimizing condition in large deposition area, the dramatically high throughput of 1000 m / h was realized to obtain the IBAD-MgO with {Delta}{phi} < 10{sup 0}. Furthermore, simple buffer structure was demonstrated. Well textured CeO{sub 2} layer with {Delta}{phi} of around 4{sup 0} was obtained by directly deposited on IBAD-MgO layer in spite of large lattice mismatch of 28% between CeO{sub 2} and MgO. Several over 100 m buffer substrates with the architecture of / PLD-CeO{sub 2} (60 m / h) / IBAD-MgO (333{approx}1000 m / h) / Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (500 m / h) / Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (150 m / h) / Hastelloy / were already prepared. On these production substrates, GdBCO layer was deposited by the large PLD system at high throughput. The 260 m long GdBCO tape with I{sub c} > 600 A except some locations was obtained at the throughput of 15 m / h. In addition to the speed-up, the very high I{sub c} of 1040 A was also achieved by the hot-wall heating PLD system.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and properties of undoped und doped rare earth cuprates; Synthese, Charakterisierung und Eigenschaften undotierter und dotierter Seltenerdcuprate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hord, Roland

    2014-06-01

    Undoped La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} was prepared as bulk sample in the Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} structure type by low-temperature synthesis using CsOH flux. The obtained product was characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, high-temperature X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, differential thermal analysis and high-temperature solution calorimetry, in order to examine the structural variations and stability regions of this compound. Furthermore, Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, which crystallizes also in the Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} structure type, was prepared by high-temperature synthesis known from literature. Neutron diffraction studies on both La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Pr{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} were performed to determine the exact occupancies of all oxygen atom positions. In addition, the dopability, that means the substitution of lanthanum by rare earth elements (Nd-Lu) was studied applying low-temperature synthesis. The properties of the doped compounds of the general formula La{sub 2-x}SE{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, SE = Gd-Nd were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry, high-temperature X-ray powder diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Long RE123 coated conductors with high critical current over 500 A/cm by IBAD/PLD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, K., E-mail: kkakimoto@fujikura.co.jp [Fujikura Ltd., 1440, Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan); Igarashi, M.; Hanyu, S.; Sutoh, Y.; Takemoto, T.; Hayashida, T.; Hanada, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Kikutake, R.; Kutami, H.; Iijima, Y.; Saitoh, T. [Fujikura Ltd., 1440, Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    We have developed long RE123 coated conductors with large current capacity by IBAD and HW-PLD technique. We could fabricate an 8 m-long Gd123 coated wire with the I{sub c} of over 900 A/cm-w at 77 K, 0 T. We set the new world record of I{sub c} x L value as 374535 A m (= 609 A x 615 m). We have developed long RE{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-X} (RE123) coated conductors with large current capacity by the ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and the pulsed laser deposition using hot wall heating (HW-PLD) technique. As a result, we could fabricate an 8 m-long Gd{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-X} (Gd123) coated wire with the minimum and maximum critical current (I{sub c}) of 951 A/cm-w and 1003 A/cm-w at 77 K, 0 T, respectively, measured in 0.7 m-long sections by the standard 4-probe technique. Furthermore, we succeeded in preparation of over 600 m-long Gd123 coated wire with the uniform I{sub c} distribution over 600 A/cm-w. It had average, maximum and minimum I{sub c} of 665, 698, 609 A/cm-w, respectively. The n-values of the sample showed the maximum I{sub c} and minimum I{sub c} were 40 and 36, respectively. As a result, we set the new world record of I{sub c} x L value as 374535 A m (= 609 A x 615 m). The in-field performance of this long wire was quite high as well; the minimum I{sub c} exceeded 50 A/cm-w at 77 K, 3 T.

  9. Sample and length-dependent variability of 77 and 4.2 K properties in nominally identical RE123 coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, L.; Hu, X.; Kametani, F.; Abraimov, D.; Polyanskii, A.; Jaroszynski, J.; Larbalestier, D. C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a broad study by multiple techniques of the critical current and critical current density of a small but representative set of nominally identical commercial RE123 (REBa2Cu3O7-δ , RE = rare Earth, here Y and Gd) coated conductors (CC) recently fabricated by SuperPower Inc. to the same nominal high pinning specification with BaZrO3 and RE2O3 nanoprecipitate pinning centers. With high-field low-temperature applications to magnet technology in mind, we address the nature of their tape-to-tape variations and length-wise I c inhomogeneities by measurements on a scale of about 2 cm rather than the 5 m scale normally supplied by the vendor and address the question of whether these variations have their origin in cross-sectional or in vortex pinning variations. Our principal method has been a continuous measurement transport critical current tool (YateStar) that applies about 0.5 T perpendicular and parallel to the tape at 77 K, thus allowing variations of c-axis and ab-plane properties to be clearly distinguished in the temperature and field regime where strong pinning defects are obvious. We also find such in-field measurements at 77 K to be more valuable in predicting 4.2 K, high-field properties than self-field, 77 K properties because the pinning centers controlling 77 K performance play a decisive role in introducing point defects that also add strongly to J c at 4.2 K. We find that the dominant source of I c variation is due to pinning center fluctuations that control J c, rather than to production defects that locally reduce the active cross-section. Given the 5-10 nm scale of these pinning centers, it appears that the route to greater I c homogeneity is through more stringent control of the REBCO growth conditions in these Zr-doped coated conductors.

  10. Interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards controllable in situ self-assembly of artificial pinning centers in RE-123 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Judy; Shi, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Raising critical current density J c in high temperature superconductors (HTSs) is an important strategy towards performance-cost balanced HTS technology for commercialization. The development of strong nanoscale artificial pinning centers (APCs) in HTS, such as YBa2Cu3O7 or RE-123 in general, represents one of the most exciting progressions in HTS material research in the last decade. Significantly raised J c has been demonstrated in APC/RE-123 nanocomposites by enhanced pinning on magnetic vortices in magnetic fields towards that demanded in practical applications. Among other processes, strain-mediated self-organization has been explored extensively for in situ formation of the APCs based on fundamental physics design rules. The desire in controlling the morphology, dimension, orientation, and concentration of APCs has led to a fundamental question on how strains interact in determining APCs at a macroscopic scale. Answering this question demands an interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards a thorough understanding of fundamental physics governing the strain-mediated self-organization of the APCs in the APC/RE-123 nanocomposites. Such an understanding is the key for a leap forward from the traditionally empirical method to materials-by-design to enable an optimal APC landscape to be achieved in epitaxial films of APC/YBCO nanocomposites under a precise guidance of fundamental physics. The paper intends to provide a review of recent progress made in the controllable generation of APCs using the interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach. The emphasis will be given to the understanding so far achieved using such an approach on the collective effect of the strain field on the morphology, dimension, and orientation of APCs in epitaxial APC/RE-123 nanocomposite films.

  11. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214-family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal ``quasiparticles'' and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  12. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J.M

    2004-08-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214 family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal 'quasiparticles' and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  13. Stripes and Superconductivity in Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Holes doped into the CuO2 planes of cuprate parent compounds frustrate the antiferromagnetic order. The development of spin and charge stripes provides a compromise between the competing magnetic and kinetic energies. Static stripe order has been observed only in certain particular compounds, but there are signatures which suggest that dynamic stripe correlations are common in the cuprates. Though stripe order is bad for superconducting phase coherence, stripes are compatible with strong pair...

  14. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2004-08-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214 family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal “quasiparticles” and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  15. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John M.

    2012-06-01

    Holes doped into the CuO2 planes of cuprate parent compounds frustrate the antiferromagnetic order. The development of spin and charge stripes provides a compromise between the competing magnetic and kinetic energies. Static stripe order has been observed only in certain particular compounds, but there are signatures which suggest that dynamic stripe correlations are common in the cuprates. Though stripe order is bad for superconducting phase coherence, stripes are compatible with strong pairing. Ironically, magnetic-field-induced stripe order appears to enhance the stability of superconducting order within the planes.

  16. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, John M., E-mail: jtran@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Dept., Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Holes doped into the CuO{sub 2} planes of cuprate parent compounds frustrate the antiferromagnetic order. The development of spin and charge stripes provides a compromise between the competing magnetic and kinetic energies. Static stripe order has been observed only in certain particular compounds, but there are signatures which suggest that dynamic stripe correlations are common in the cuprates. Though stripe order is bad for superconducting phase coherence, stripes are compatible with strong pairing. Ironically, magnetic-field-induced stripe order appears to enhance the stability of superconducting order within the planes.

  17. Charge order in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulut, Sinan; Kampf, Arno P. [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Atkinson, Bill A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Motivated by widespread experimental evidence of charge orders in underdoped cuprate superconductors, we study a three band model of a cuprate plane. Our calculations start from a pseudogap-like normal system with a reconstructed Fermi surface, and we search for charge instabilities. From the charge susceptibilities, we identify a charge ordering instability with an ordering wavevector, q*, that matches experimental results not only with respect to the doping dependence but more importantly regarding its magnitude and direction. Namely, q* points along the Brillouin zone axes. Thus, our results clarify the discrepancy between many recent theoretical calculations and the experiments. We extend this calculation towards possible loop current instabilities and the charge ordering pattern in bilayer systems.

  18. Terahertz oscillations in mercury cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Z GüVENOZDEM Özdemir; Ö Aslan; Ü Onbaşli

    2009-10-01

    It has been recently reported that the three-dimensional Bose–Einstein condensation of the quasi-particles is valid for the mercury cuprates at liquid helium temperature. In this study, the validity of the interlayer theory in three dimensions has been investigated for optimally oxygen-doped mercury cuprates at the temperature interval of 0–15 K. Furthermore, some thermodynamic and electrodynamics parameters of mercury cuprates have been calculated for both the under-doped and the over-doped samples at the vicinity of 4.2 K. Moreover, it has been determined that the superconducting system behaves as a terahertz wave cavity regardless of the oxygen doping concentration.

  19. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are pres...

  20. The electronic Hamiltonian for cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, James F.; Mcmahan, A. K.; Martin, Richard M.

    1991-01-01

    A realistic many-body Hamiltonian for the cuprate superconductors should include both copper d and oxygen p states, hopping matrix elements between them, and Coulomb energies, both on-site and inter-site. We have developed a novel computational scheme for deriving the relevant parameters ab initio from a constrained occupation local density functional. The scheme includes numerical calculation of appropriate Wannier functions for the copper and oxygen states. Explicit parameter values are given for La2CuO4. These parameters are generally consistent with other estimates and with the observed superexchange energy. Secondly, we address whether this complicated multi-band Hamiltonian can be reduced to a simpler one with fewer basis states per unit cell. We propose a mapping onto a new two-band effective Hamiltonian with one copper d and one oxygen p derived state per unit cell. This mapping takes into account the large oxygen-oxygen hopping given by the ab initio calculations.

  1. Enhancing critical current density of cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Praveen

    2015-06-16

    The present invention concerns the enhancement of critical current densities in cuprate superconductors. Such enhancement of critical current densities include using wave function symmetry and restricting movement of Abrikosov (A) vortices, Josephson (J) vortices, or Abrikosov-Josephson (A-J) vortices by using the half integer vortices associated with d-wave symmetry present in the grain boundary.

  2. A view on organocopper compounds an cuprates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van

    1990-01-01

    Research on the chemistry and structural aspects of ortho-substituted-arylcopper and -cuprate compounds in which the ortho-substituents either interfere sterically with the C{i}{p}{s}{o}-to-copper bonding or have a potentially coordinating heteroatom, is described. Concluded is that the simple arylc

  3. Kinetic energy driven pairing in cuprate superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, TA; Jarrell, M; Macridin, A; Slezak, C

    2004-01-01

    Pairing occurs in conventional superconductors through a reduction of the electronic potential energy accompanied by an increase in kinetic energy. In the underdoped cuprates, optical experiments show that pairing is driven by a reduction of the electronic kinetic energy. Using the dynamical cluster

  4. Spinon Superconductivity and Superconductivities Mediated by Spin-Waves and Phonons in Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Mourachkine, A.

    1998-01-01

    The disclosure of spinon superconductivity and superconductivity mediated by spin-waves in hole-doped Bi2212 cuprate raises the question about the origin of the superconductivity in other cuprates and specially in an electron-doped NCCO cuprate.

  5. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  6. Structural and Chemical Diversity of Tl-Based Cuprate Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    信赢

    2003-01-01

    The Tl-based cuprate superconductor family is the largest family in crystal structure and chemical composition among all high Tc cuprate superconductors. The Tl family can be divided into two sub-families, the Tl single layer family and the Tl double layer family, based on their crystal structural characteristics. The Tl single layer family is an ideal material for investigating the evolution of crystalline formation, charge carrier density, chemical composition, transport properties, superconductivity and their relationships. The Tl family contains almostall possible crystal structures discovered in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. Tl cuprate superconductors are of great importance not only in studying high-temperature superconductivity but also in commercial applications.

  7. STRIPES AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY IN CUPRATE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRANQUADA, J.M.

    2005-08-22

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  8. Stripes and superconductivity in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    One type of order that has been observed to compete with superconductivity in cuprates involves alternating charge and antiferromagnetic stripes. Recent neutron scattering studies indicate that the magnetic excitation spectrum of a stripe-ordered sample is very similar to that observed in superconducting samples. In fact, it now appears that there may be a universal magnetic spectrum for the cuprates. One likely implication of this universal spectrum is that stripes of a dynamic form are present in the superconducting samples. On cooling through the superconducting transition temperature, a gap opens in the magnetic spectrum, and the weight lost at low energy piles up above the gap; the transition temperature is correlated with the size of the spin gap. Depending on the magnitude of the spin gap with respect to the magnetic spectrum, the enhanced magnetic scattering at low temperature can be either commensurate or incommensurate. Connections between stripe correlations and superconductivity are discussed.

  9. Spin-freezing perspective on cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Philipp; Hoshino, Shintaro; Shinaoka, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The high-temperature superconducting state in cuprates appears if charge carriers are doped into a Mott-insulating parent compound. An unresolved puzzle is the unconventional nature of the normal state above the superconducting dome and its connection to the superconducting instability. At weak hole doping, a "pseudogap" metal state with signatures of time-reversal symmetry breaking is observed, which near-optimal doping changes into a "strange metal" with non-Fermi-liquid properties. Qualitatively similar phase diagrams are found in multiorbital systems, such as pnictides, where the unconventional metal states arise from a Hund-coupling-induced spin freezing. Here, we show that the relevant model for cuprates, the single-orbital Hubbard model on the square lattice, can be mapped onto an effective multiorbital problem with strong ferromagnetic Hund coupling. The spin-freezing physics of this multiorbital system explains the phenomenology of cuprates, including the pseudogap, the strange metal, and the d -wave superconducting instability. Our analysis suggests that spin/orbital freezing is the universal mechanism which controls the properties of unconventional superconductors.

  10. Two-magnon excitations in cuprates and nickelates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzana, J.; Sawatzky, G.A

    1996-01-01

    We discuss two-magnon phonon-assisted infrared absorption in two-dimensional Heisenberg systems like the parent insulating high-T-c cuprates (spin 1/2) and nickelates (spin 1). The theoretical line shape is compared with experiments. In the case of the cuprates it explains the mid-infrared peaks obs

  11. Chasing the cuprates with dilatonic dyons

    CERN Document Server

    Amoretti, Andrea; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Musso, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic field and momentum dissipation are key ingredients in describing condensed matter systems. We include them in gauge/gravity and systematically explore the bottom-up panorama of holographic IR effective field theories based on bulk Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangians plus scalars. Notably, this general class of theories - at the core of a long-standing AdS/CMT program - appears not to be capable of accommodating the fundamental phenomenology of the cuprate transport. We analyze in particular the temperature scaling of the resistivity and of the Hall angle. We keep a problematic attitude and illustrate weak and strong points of the approach.

  12. Impurity atoms on view in cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Séamus Davis

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Impurity atoms in a material are usually viewed as a problem because they can result in non-ideal properties. However, they can sometimes be used to advantage when attempting to understand new materials. This is because the interactions of an impurity atom with the material reveal detailed information on the local electronic environment. In this paper we discuss scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the atomic-scale effects of individual Ni and Zn impurity atoms on the cuprate high critical temperature superconductors.

  13. Chasing the cuprates with dilatonic dyons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Andrea [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge,Cambridge, CB3 OWA (United Kingdom); Baggioli, Matteo [Institut de Física d’Altes Energies (IFAE), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona,The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology,Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Magnoli, Nicodemo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova, and I.N.F.N. - Sezione di Genova,via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146, Genova (Italy); Musso, Daniele [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP),Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-06-20

    Magnetic field and momentum dissipation are key ingredients in describing condensed matter systems. We include them in gauge/gravity and systematically explore the bottom-up panorama of holographic IR effective field theories based on bulk Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangians plus scalars. The class of solutions here examined appears insufficient to capture the phenomenology of charge transport in the cuprates. We analyze in particular the temperature scaling of the resistivity and of the Hall angle. Keeping an open attitude, we illustrate weak and strong points of the approach.

  14. Condensation energy of the superconducting bilayer cuprates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Govind; Ajay; S K Joshi

    2002-05-01

    In the present work, we report the interplay of single particle and Cooper pair tunnelings on the superconducting state of layered high-c cuprate superconductors. For this we have considered a model Hamiltonian incorporating the intra-planar interactions and the contributions arising due to the coupling between the planes. The interplanar interactions include the single particle tunneling as well as the Josephson tunneling of Cooper pairs between the two layers. The expression of the out-of-plane correlation parameter which describes the hopping of a particle from one layer to another layer in the superconducting state is obtained within a Bardeen–Cooper–Schriefer (BCS) formalism using the Green’s function technique. This correlation is found to be sensitive to the various parameter of the model Hamiltonian. We have calculated the out-of-plane contribution to the superconducting condensation energy. The calculated values of condensation energy are in agreement with those obtained from the specific heat and the -axis penetration depth measurements on bilayer cuprates.

  15. Charge stripes and antiferromagnetism in insulating nickelates and superconducting cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J.

    1998-10-01

    Neutron and X-ray scattering studies have provided strong evidence for coupled spatial modulations of charge and spin densities in layered nickelates and cuprates. The accumulated results for La(2-x)Sr(x)NiO(4+d) are consistent with the strongly-modulated topological-stripe concept. Clues from Nd-doped La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4) suggest similar behavior for the cuprates. The experimental results are summarized, and features that conflict with an interpretation based on a Fermi-surface instability are emphasized. A rationalization for the differences in transport properties between the cuprates and nickelates is given.

  16. Unified picture of the oxygen isotope effect in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Wu, Zhigang; Lin, Hai-Qing; Hemley, Russell J; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2007-03-06

    High-temperature superconductivity in cuprates was discovered almost exactly 20 years ago, but a satisfactory theoretical explanation for this phenomenon is still lacking. The isotope effect has played an important role in establishing electron-phonon interaction as the dominant interaction in conventional superconductors. Here we present a unified picture of the oxygen isotope effect in cuprate superconductors based on a phonon-mediated d-wave pairing model within the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory. We show that this model accounts for the magnitude of the isotope exponent as functions of the doping level as well as the variation between different cuprate superconductors. The isotope effect on the superconducting transition is also found to resemble the effect of pressure on the transition. These results indicate that the role of phonons should not be overlooked for explaining the superconductivity in cuprates.

  17. Ultrafast spectroscopy of quasiparticle dynamics in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Chunfeng, E-mail: cfzhang@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Xiaoyong [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Chakhalian, Jak, E-mail: jchakhal@uark.edu [Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Xiao, Min, E-mail: mxiao@uark.edu [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy is a powerful tool to study the nonequilibrium dynamics in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. The photo-induced quasiparticle (QP) dynamics revealed by pump-probe spectroscopy are sensitive to the near-Fermi level electronic structures. Here we review several selected examples to illustrate the enduring challenges including pairing glue, phase separation, and phase transitions in cuprate superconductors. We also present the data obtained on thin films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} in connection to these issues. - Highlights: • This paper reviews recent ultrafast spectroscopic study on cuprates. • Dynamics related to pairing glues and phase separations are summarized. • Mid-IR pulses enhance the coherent transport in underdoped cuprates. • Pump-probe data on the quasiparticle dynamics in YBCO films are presented.

  18. Neutron Scattering Studies of Antiferromagnetic Correlations in Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, John M.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron scattering studies have provided important information about the momentum and energy dependence of magnetic excitations in cuprate superconductors. Of particular interest are the recent indications of a universal magnetic excitation spectrum in hole-doped cuprates. That starting point provides motivation for reviewing the antiferromagnetic state of the parent insulators, and the destruction of the ordered state by hole doping. The nature of spin correlations in stripe-ordered phases i...

  19. Study of Pseudogap in Underdoped Cuprate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Ping; WU Hang-Sheng

    2001-01-01

    A mean-field spin-density wave (SDW) analysis of pseudogap in the underdoped cuprates is proposed on the dependence of the energy gap which mimics the pseudogap near (π, 0) point at least. It implies that the pseudogap structure near (π, 0) is not sensitive to the long-range order and will survive leading to the pseudogap phenomenon in the underdoped metallic phase. On the other hand, in the long-range ordering antiferromagnetic region, the mean-field SDW theory holds and the pseudogap structure predicated by the theory should be observable experimentallyv. Then one prediction is that the pseudogap would smoothly extrapolate between itinerant antiferromagnetic phase and underdoped metallic phase.

  20. Pseudogap and cuprate superconductivity: MaxEnt-μSR studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boekema, C., E-mail: boekemac@aol.com [San Jose State University, San Jose, CA (United States); Schwartz, R.; Love, A. [San Jose State University, San Jose, CA (United States); Browne, M.C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, CA (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A magnetic origin of cuprate superconductivity is plausible. • Cuprate loop currents are observed, close to predictions. • Pseudogap effects are seen above and below T{sub c}. -- Abstract: The basic physics of cuprate superconductivity is still much deliberated after 27 years of research. In contrast to phononic or polaronic roots, Varma’s theory promotes a magnetic origin. To probe cuprate magnetism, we examine zero field (ZF) muon-spin-rotation (μSR) data of RBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} (RBCO; R = Gd, Eu) especially near T{sub c}. Possible weak effects are analyzed using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt, ME) to transform our μSR time series. Concerning predicted pseudogap loop currents, we have observed μSR signals in zero field for GdBCO above and now also below T{sub c}. These are near predicted fields of about 100 Oe. Using MaxEnt, we analyze transverse field (TF) μSR data of optimal doped EuBCO. Our focus is also on a temperature interval above T{sub c} to comprehend precursor effects. Our results point toward magnetic roots of cuprate superconductivity.

  1. Antiferromagnetic phase diagram of the cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, L. H. C. M.; Teixeira, A. W.; Marino, E. C.

    2017-02-01

    Taking the spin-fermion model as the starting point for describing the cuprate superconductors, we obtain an effective nonlinear sigma-field hamiltonian, which takes into account the effect of doping in the system. We obtain an expression for the spin-wave velocity as a function of the chemical potential. For appropriate values of the parameters we determine the antiferromagnetic phase diagram for the YBa2Cu3O6+x compound as a function of the dopant concentration in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, our approach provides a unified description for the phase diagrams of the hole-doped and the electron doped compounds, which is consistent with the remarkable similarity between the phase diagrams of these compounds, since we have obtained the suppression of the antiferromagnetic phase as the modulus of the chemical potential increases. The aforementioned result then follows by considering positive values of the chemical potential related to the addition of holes to the system, while negative values correspond to the addition of electrons.

  2. LDA+DCA calculations of cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Paul; Macridin, Alexandru; Schulthess, Thomas; Krogh Andersen, Ole

    2005-03-01

    We present calculations of the properties of realistic models of single-layer cuprate superconductors. A multi-band Hubbard model is obtained from downfolded material specific local density approximation (LDA) density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The on-site U is obtained from constrained DFT calculations. The resulting model is solved using the dynamic cluster approximation (DCA) and quantum Monte Carlo, for small clusters. Some of us have previously shown that DCA calculations of the single band Hubbard model, with empirical parameters, reproduce key features of the experimental phase diagram, including the d-wave superconducting region and pseudogap. In the multi-band model, we find a superconducting region, and discuss how the computed transition temperature depends on the downfolded band structure. In model calculations, we test the sensitivity of the transition temperature to changes in the individual hopping terms, including the copper-oxygen and oxygen-oxygen hybridization. Work supported by the Division of Materials Science and Engineering, U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle LLC.

  3. High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors Experiment, Theory, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Plakida, Nikolay Maksimilianovich

    2010-01-01

    High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors provides an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the properties of these fascinating materials. The essential properties of high-temperature cuprate superconductors are reviewed on the background of their theoretical interpretation. The experimental results for structural, magnetic, thermal, electric, optical and lattice properties of various cuprate superconductors are presented with respect to relevant theoretical models. A critical comparison of various theoretical models involving strong electron correlations, antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations, phonons and excitons provides a background for understanding of the mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity. Recent achievements in their applications are also reviewed. A large number of illustrations and tables gives valuable information for specialists. A text-book level presentation with formulation of a general theory of strong-coupling superconductivity will help students and researches to consolidate their...

  4. Fermi-surface reconstruction by stripe order in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberté, F; Chang, J; Doiron-Leyraud, N; Hassinger, E; Daou, R; Rondeau, M; Ramshaw, B J; Liang, R; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Pyon, S; Takayama, T; Takagi, H; Sheikin, I; Malone, L; Proust, C; Behnia, K; Taillefer, Louis

    2011-08-16

    The origin of pairing in a superconductor resides in the underlying normal state. In the cuprate high-temperature superconductor YBa(2)Cu(3)O(y) (YBCO), application of a magnetic field to suppress superconductivity reveals a ground state that appears to break the translational symmetry of the lattice, pointing to some density-wave order. Here we use a comparative study of thermoelectric transport in the cuprates YBCO and La(1.8-x)Eu(0.2)Sr(x)CuO(4) (Eu-LSCO) to show that the two materials exhibit the same process of Fermi-surface reconstruction as a function of temperature and doping. The fact that in Eu-LSCO this reconstruction coexists with spin and charge modulations that break translational symmetry shows that stripe order is the generic non-superconducting ground state of hole-doped cuprates.

  5. Mean field theory of high Tc cuprate superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Maki

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   Two decades ago the epoch making discovery of high Tc cuprate superconductivity by Bednorz and Müller shocked the world’s superconductivity community. However, already in 1979 and 1980, the first heavy fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2 and organic superconductor (TMTSF2PF6 have been discovered respectively. Also we know now that all these superconductors are unconventional and nodal. Further the quasiparticles in the normal state in these systems are Fermi liquids and the superconducting states are described in terms of generalized BCS wave function. Also the pseudogap phase in underdoped high Tc cuprates is described in terms of d-wave density wave. This implies necessarily that the superconductivity in underdoped cuprates is gossamer (i.e. d-wave superconductivity coexists with d-wave density wave. We shall present some quantitative tests of these new concepts, notions and ideas.

  6. Charge Stripes and Antiferromagnetism in Insulating Nickelates and Superconducting Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron and X-ray scattering studies have provided strong evidence for coupled spatial modulations of charge and spin densities in layered nickelates and cuprates. The accumulated results for La(2-x)Sr(x)NiO(4+d) are consistent with the strongly-modulated topological-stripe concept. Clues from Nd-doped La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4) suggest similar behavior for the cuprates. The experimental results are summarized, and features that conflict with an interpretation based on a Fermi-surface instability are...

  7. Photoemission spectra of charge density wave states in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wei-Lin; Chen, Peng-Jen; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy(ARPES) experiments have reported many exotic properties of cuprates, such as Fermi arc at normal state, two gaps at superconducting state and particle-hole asymmetry at the antinodal direction. On the other hand, a number of inhomogeneous states or so-called charge density waves(CDW) states have also been discovered in cuprates by many experimental groups. The relation between these CDW states and ARPES spectra is unclear. With the help of Gutzwiller projected mean-field theory, we can reproduce the quasiparticle spectra in momentum space. The spectra show strong correspondence to the experimental data with afore-mentioned exotic features in it.

  8. Thermodynamic and transport properties of underdoped cuprates from ARPES data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Zhou, X.J.; Yagi, H.; Lu, D.H.; Tanaka, K.; Fujimori, A.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.-X.; Kakeshita, T.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Segawa, Kouji; Lavrov, A.N.; Ando, Yoichi

    2004-09-15

    The relationship between photoemission spectra of high-T{sub c} cuprates and their thermodynamic and transport properties are discussed. The doping dependence of the expected quasi-particle density at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) are compared with the electronic specific heat coefficient {gamma} and that of the spectral weight at E{sub F} with the in-plane and out-of-plane superfluid density. We have estimated the electrical resistivity of underdoped cuprates from the momentum distribution curve (MDC) at E{sub F} in the nodal direction. The temperature dependence of the MDC width is also consistent with that of the electrical resistivity.

  9. Thermal transport in cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berggold, K.

    2006-09-15

    The subject of this thesis is the investigation of the thermal transport properties of three classes of transition-metal oxides: Cuprates, cobaltates, and manganites. The layered cuprates R{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} with R=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd show an anomalous thermal conductivity {kappa}. Two maxima of {kappa} are observed as a function of temperature for a heat current within the CuO{sub 2} planes, whereas for a heat current perpendicular to the CuO{sub 2} planes only a conventional phononic low-temperature maximum of {kappa} is present. Evidence is provided that the high-temperature maximum is caused by heat-carrying excitations on the CuO{sub 2} square lattice. Moreover, it is shown that the complex low-temperature and magnetic-field behavior of {kappa} in Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} is most likely caused by additional phonon scattering rather than by heat-carrying Nd magnons, as it was proposed in the literature. In the cobaltates RCoO{sub 3} with R=La, Pr, Nd, and Eu, a temperature-induced spin-state transition of the Co{sup 3+} ions occurs. It is shown that the additional lattice disorder caused by the random distribution of populated higher spin states causes a large suppression of the thermal conductivity of LaCoO{sub 3} for T>25 K. The effect is much weaker in PrCoO{sub 3} and NdCoO{sub 3} due to the increased spin gap. A quantitative analysis of the responsible mechanisms based on EuCoO{sub 3} as a reference compound is provided. A main result is that the static disorder is sufficient to explain the suppression of {kappa}. No dynamical Jahn-Teller distortion, as proposed in the literature, is necessary to enhance the scattering strength. Below 25 K, k is mainly determined by resonant phonon scattering on paramagnetic impurity levels, e.g. caused by oxygen non-stoichiometry. Such a suppression of the thermal conductivity by resonant scattering processes is e.g. known from Holmium ethylsulfate. This effect is most pronounced in LaCoO{sub 3}, presumably due to

  10. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John M.

    2015-03-01

    The concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x=0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with the uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x=0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.

  11. Some unique superconductive Properties of Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    Copper oxides are the only materials that show transition temperatures, Tc, above the boiling point of liquid nitrogen, with a maximum Tmc of 162 K under pressure. Their structure is layered, with one to several CuO2 planes, and upon hole doping, their transition temperature follows a dome-shaped curve with a maximum at Tmc. In the underdoped regime, i.e., below Tmc, a pseudogap T* is found, with T* always being larger than Tc, a property unique to the copper oxides [1]. In the superconducting state, Cooper pairs (two holes with antiparallel spins) are formed that exhibit coherence lengths on the order of a lattice distance in the CuO2 plane and one order of magnitude less perpendicular to it. Their macroscopic wave function is parallel to the CuO2 plane near 100% d at their surface, but only 75% d and 25 % s in the bulk, and near 100% s perpendicular to the plane in YBCO. There are two gaps with the same Tc [2]. As function of doping, the oxygen isotope effect is novel and can be quantitatively accounted for by a two-band vibronic theory [3] near Tmc, and underdoped below it till Tc = 0 with by a formula valid for (bi)polarons [4]. These cuprates are intrinsically heterogeneous in a dynamic way. In terms of quasiparticles, Jahn-Teller bipolarons are present at low doping, and aggregate upon cooling [1], so that probably ramified clusters and/or stripes are formed, leading over to a more Fermi-liquid-type behavior at large carrier concentrations above Tmc.

  12. Superconductivity above 10 K in Non-Cuprate Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Beginning in 1973, several non-cuprate transition metal and non-transition metal oxides were discovered with superconducting transition temperatures between 10 and 30 K. Retrospectives about these discoveries in spinel structure LiTi2O4 and perovskite structure (Ba,K)(Bi,Pb)O3 are given.

  13. EXACT DIAGONALIZATION RESULTS FOR MULTIMAGNON IR ABSORPTION IN THE CUPRATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzana, J.; Eder, R; Meinders, M.B J; Sawatzky, G.A

    1995-01-01

    Recent measured bands in the mid IR of parent insulating compounds of cuprate superconductors [Perkins et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 71 1621 (1993)] are interpreted as multimagnon infrared (IR) absorption assisted by phonons. We present results for the coupling constant of light with this excitations and

  14. Modulated spin and charge densities in cuprate superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have played a crucial role in characterizing the spin and charge correlations in copper-oxide superconductors. While the data are often interpreted with respect to specific theories of the cuprates, an attempt is made here to distinguish those facts that can be extracted empirically, and the connections that can be made with minimal assumptions.

  15. Model of electron pairs in electron-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. J.; Khan, Shakeel

    2016-07-01

    In the order parameter of hole-doped cuprate superconductors in the pseudogap phase, two holes enter the order parameter from opposite sides and pass through various CuO2 cells jumping from one O2- to the other under the influence of magnetic field offered by the Cu2+ ions in that CuO2 cell and thus forming hole pairs. In the pseudogap phase of electron-doped cuprates, two electrons enter the order parameter at Cu2+ sites from opposite ends and pass from one Cu2+ site to the diagonally opposite Cu2+ site. Following this type of path, they are subjected to high magnetic fields from various Cu2+ ions in that cell. They do not travel from one Cu2+ site to the other along straight path but by helical path. As they pass through the diagonal, they face high to low to very high magnetic field. Therefore, frequency of helical motion and pitch goes on changing with the magnetic field. Just before reaching the Cu2+ ions at the exit points of all the cells, the pitch of the helical motion is enormously decreased and thus charge density at these sites is increased. So the velocity of electrons along the diagonal path is decreased. Consequently, transition temperature of electron-doped cuprates becomes less than that of hole-doped cuprates. Symmetry of the order parameter of the electron-doped cuprates has been found to be of 3dx2-y2 + iS type. It has been inferred that internal magnetic field inside the order parameter reconstructs the Fermi surface, which is requisite for superconductivity to take place. Electron pairs formed in the pseudogap phase are the precursors of superconducting order parameter when cooled below Tc.

  16. Spin fluctuations and high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2016-12-01

    To describe the cuprate superconductors, models of strongly correlated electronic systems, such as the Hubbard or t - J models, are commonly employed. To study these models, projected (Hubbard) operators have to be used. Due to the unconventional commutation relations for the Hubbard operators, a specific kinematical interaction of electrons with spin and charge fluctuations emerges. The interaction is induced by the intraband hopping with a coupling parameter of the order of the kinetic energy of electrons W which is much larger than the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J induced by the interband hopping. This review presents a consistent microscopic theory of spin excitations and superconductivity for cuprates where these interactions are taken into account within the Hubbard operator technique. The low-energy spin excitations are considered for the t-J model, while the electronic properties are studied using the two-subband extended Hubbard model where the intersite Coulomb repulsion V and electron-phonon interaction are taken into account.

  17. Charge stripes in cuprate superconductors: The middle way

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Charge and spin stripe order is a type of electronic crystal observed in certain layered cuprates associated with high-temperature superconductivity. Quantum-disordered stripes could be relevant for understanding the superconductivity. Here I discuss recent experimental characterizations of the stripe-ordered state in La(1.875)Ba(0.125)CuO(4), and compare them with properties of superconducting compositions.

  18. Experimental Evidence for Topological Doping in the Cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Some recent experiments that provide support for the concept of topological doping in cuprate superconductors are discussed. Consistent with the idea of charge segregation, it is argued that the scattering associated with the ``resonance'' peak found in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6+x) and Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+\\delta) comes from the Cu spins and not from the doped holes.

  19. Charge stripes in cuprate superconductors: The middle way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Charge and spin stripe order is a type of electronic crystal observed in certain layered cuprates associated with high-temperature superconductivity. Quantum-disordered stripes could be relevant for understanding the superconductivity. Here I discuss recent experimental characterizations of the stripe-ordered state in La{1.875}Ba{0.125}CuO4, and compare them with properties of superconducting compositions.

  20. Growth of cuprate high temperature superconductor thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H-U Habermeier

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   This paper reviews briefly the development of physical vapour deposition based HTS thin film preparation technologies to today’s state-of-the-art methods. It covers the main trends of in-situ process and growth control. The current activities to fabricate tapes for power applications as well as to tailor interfaces in cuprate are described. Some future trends in HTS thin film research, both for science as well as application driven activities are outlined.

  1. Carrier relaxation time divergence in single and double layer cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M. L.; Rast, S.; Onellion, M.; Demsar, J.; Taylor, A. J.; Glinka, Y.; Tolk, N. H.; Ren, Y. H.; Lüpke, G.; Klimov, A.; Xu, Y.; Sobolewski, R.; Si, W.; Zeng, X. H.; Soukiassian, A.; Xi, X. X.; Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Pavuna, D.; Krapf, A.; Manzke, R.; Printz, J. O.; Williamsen, M. S.; Downum, K. E.; Guptasarma, P.; Bozovic, I.

    2003-12-01

    We report the transient optical pump-probe reflectivity measurements on single and double layer cuprate single crystals and thin films of ten different stoichiometries. We find that with sufficiently low fluence the relaxation time (tauR) of all samples exhibits a power law divergence with temperature (T): tauR ∝ T^{-3 ± 0.5}. Further, the divergence has an onset temperature above the superconducting transition temperature for all superconducting samples. Possible causes of this divergence are discussed.

  2. Praseodymium Cuprate Thin Film Cathodes for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Roles of Doping, Orientation, and Crystal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kunal; Hayamizu, Yoshiaki; Kim, Chang Sub; Kolchina, Liudmila M; Mazo, Galina N; Istomin, Sergey Ya; Bishop, Sean R; Tuller, Harry L

    2016-12-21

    Highly textured thin films of undoped, Ce-doped, and Sr-doped Pr2CuO4 were synthesized on single crystal YSZ substrates using pulsed laser deposition to investigate their area-specific resistance (ASR) as cathodes in solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The effects of T' and T* crystal structures, donor and acceptor doping, and a-axis and c-axis orientation on ASR were systematically studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on half cells. The addition of both Ce and Sr dopants resulted in improvements in ASR in c-axis oriented films, as did the T* crystal structure with the a-axis orientation. Pr1.6Sr0.4CuO4 is identified as a potential cathode material with nearly an order of magnitude faster oxygen reduction reaction kinetics at 600 °C compared to thin films of the commonly studied cathode material La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ. Orientation control of the cuprate films on YSZ was achieved using seed layers, and the anisotropy in the ASR was found to be less than an order of magnitude. The rare-earth doped cuprate was found to be a versatile system for study of relationships between bulk properties and the oxygen reduction reaction, critical for improving SOFC performance.

  3. Composite Operator Method Analysis of the Underdoped Cuprates Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Avella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microscopical analysis of the unconventional and puzzling physics of the underdoped cuprates, as carried out lately by means of the composite operator method (COM applied to the 2D Hubbard model, is reviewed and systematized. The 2D Hubbard model has been adopted as it has been considered the minimal model capable of describing the most peculiar features of cuprates held responsible for their anomalous behavior. COM is designed to endorse, since its foundation, the systematic emergence in any SCS of new elementary excitations described by composite operators obeying noncanonical algebras. In this case (underdoped cuprates—2D Hubbard model, the residual interactions—beyond a 2-pole approximation—between the new elementary electronic excitations, dictated by the strong local Coulomb repulsion and well described by the two Hubbard composite operators, have been treated within the noncrossing approximation. Given this recipe and exploiting the few unknowns to enforce the Pauli principle content in the solution, it is possible to qualitatively describe some of the anomalous features of high-Tc cuprate superconductors such as large versus small Fermi surface dichotomy, Fermi surface deconstruction (appearance of Fermi arcs, nodal versus antinodal physics, pseudogap(s, and kinks in the electronic dispersion. The resulting scenario envisages a smooth crossover between an ordinary weakly interacting metal sustaining weak, short-range antiferromagnetic correlations in the overdoped regime to an unconventional poor metal characterized by very strong, long-but-finite-range antiferromagnetic correlations leading to momentum-selective non-Fermi liquid features as well as to the opening of a pseudogap and to the striking differences between the nodal and the antinodal dynamics in the underdoped regime.

  4. A spatial interpretation of emerging superconductivity in lightly doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutscher, Guy; de Gennes, Pierre-Gilles

    The formation of domains comprising alternating 'hole rich' and 'hole poor' ladders recently observed by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy by Kohsaka et al., on lightly hole doped cuprates, is interpreted in terms of an attractive mechanism which favors the presence of doped holes on Cu sites located each on one side of an oxygen atom. This mechanism leads to a geometrical pattern of alternating hole-rich and hole-poor ladders with a periodicity equal to 4 times the lattice spacing in the CuO plane, as observed experimentally. Cuprates supraconducteurs peu dopés : une interprétation des structures spatiales. Des arrangements électroniques réguliers ont été détectés récemment par Kohsaka et al. dans des cuprates sous dopés (via une sonde tunnel locale). Certaines paires Cu-O-Cu sont « actives », et forment une échelle. Les autres sites sont peu actifs. Pour expliquer ces structures, nous postulons que, lorsqu'une liaison Cu-O-Cu est occupée par deux trous, la distance (Cu-Cu) rétrécit et l'intégrale de transfert (t) est fortement augmentée. Ceci peut engendrer des paires localisées (réelles ou virtuelles). Aux taux de dopage étudiés, la période de répétition vaudrait 4 mailles élémentaires.

  5. Loop-Current Order in Several Families of Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    In high temperature copper oxides superconductors, a novel long range 3D magnetic order associated with the pseudogap phase has been identified in two different cuprate families - YBa2Cu3CuO6 + x (YBCO), HgBa2CuO4 (Hg1201) - over a wide region of temperature and doping. That magnetic order, evidended using polarized neutron diffraction, respects the translation symmetry of the lattice and can be described as a Q=0 antiferromagnetism with active role of in-plane oxygens atoms. Such a magnetic order can be associated with orbital moments in the circulating currents phase proposed by C. Varma. Similar magnetic ordering is observed in the archetypal cuprate La2 - xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) system below 120 K for x=0.085. In contrast to the previous reports, the magnetic ordering in LSCO is only short range with an in-plane correlation length of ~ 10 Å and is bidimensional (2D). Such a less pronounced order suggests an interaction with other electronic instabilities. In particular, LSCO also exhibits a strong tendency towards stripes ordering at the expense of the superconducting state. Additional polarized neutron diffraction measurements have been performed in YBCO. At lower doping (8 . 5 %), the magnetic order is observed at lower temperature (~ 150 K) than the generally assumed value for the pseudogap. It tends to vanish for dopings where the nematic electronic liquid crystal phase sets up. Recently, two others cuprates families have been studied: Bi2Ca2SrCu2O8 + δ (Bi2212) and electron doped Nd2 - xCexCuO4 (NCCO). In both families, a magnetic order related to the pseudogap phase has been also observed. The recent results will be discussed during the talk. B. Fauquée, Y. Sidis, V. Hinkov, S. Pailhes, C.T. Lin, X. Chaud, and P. Bourges, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 197001 (2006).

  6. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc, max ≈ 95 K and (Bi 1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc, max ≈ 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major differences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to (π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is

  7. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palczewski, Ari Deibert [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three different angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) studies on cuprate superconductors. The first study compares the band structure from two different single layer cuprates Tl2Ba2CuO6+δ (Tl2201) Tc,max ~95 K and (Bi1.35Pb0.85)(Sr1.47La0.38)CuO6+δ (Bi2201) Tc,max 35 K. The aim of the study was to provide some insight into the reasons why single layer cuprate's maximum transition temperatures are so different. The study found two major di erences in the band structure. First, the Fermi surface segments close to ( π,0) are more parallel in Tl2201 than in Bi2201. Second, the shadow band usually related to crystal structure is only present in Bi2201, but absent in higher Tc Tl2201. The second study looks at the different ways of doping Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi2212) in-situ by only changing the post bake-out vacuum conditions and temperature. The aim of the study is to systematically look into the generally overlooked experimental conditions that change the doping of a cleaved sample in ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiments. The study found two major experimental facts. First, in inadequate UHV conditions the carrier concentration of Bi2212 increases with time, due to the absorption of oxygen from CO2/CO molecules, prime contaminants present in UHV systems. Second, in a very clean UHV system at elevated temperatures (above about 200 K), the carrier concentration decreases due to the loss of oxygen atoms from the Bi-O layer. The final study probed the particle-hole symmetry of the pseudogap phase in high temperature superconducting cuprates by looking at the thermally excited bands above the Fermi level. The data showed a particle-hole symmetric pseudogap which symmetrically closes away from the nested FS before the node. The data is consistent with

  8. Heisenberg exchange enhancement by orbital relaxation in cuprate compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, A.B.; Broer, R.; Nieuwpoort, WC

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the Heisenberg exchange J in the quasi-2D antiferromagnetic cuprates La2CuO4, YBa2Cu3O6, Nd2CuO4 and Sr2CuO2Cl2. We apply all-electron (MC)SCF and non-orthogonal CI calculations to [Cu2O11](18-), [Cu2O9](14-), [Cu2O7](10-) and [Cu2O7Cl4](14-) clusters in a model charge embedding. The (M

  9. Silicon- and tin-based cuprates: now catalytic in copper!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weickgenannt, Andreas; Oestreich, Martin

    2010-01-11

    Silicon- and tin-containing molecules are versatile building blocks in organic synthesis. A stalwart method for their preparation relies on the stoichiometric use of silicon- and tin-based cuprates, although a few copper(I)-catalyzed or even copper-free protocols have been known for decades. In this Concept, we describe our efforts towards copper(I)-catalyzed carbon--silicon and also carbon--tin bond formations using soft bis(triorganosilyl) and bis(triorganostannyl) zinc reagents as powerful sources of nucleophilic silicon and tin. Conjugate addition, allylic substitution, and carbon--carbon multiple bond functionalization is now catalytic in copper!

  10. Experimental Evidence for Topological Doping in the Cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    1999-04-06

    Some recent experiments that provide support for the concept of topological doping in cuprate superconductors are discussed. Consistent with the idea of charge segregation, it is argued that the scattering associated with the ''resonance'' peak found in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} comes from the Cu spins and not from the doped holes.

  11. Experimental evidence for topological doping in the cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranquada, J. M. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Some recent experiments that provide support for the concept of topological doping in cuprate superconductors are discussed. Consistent with the idea of charge segregation, it is argued that the scattering associated with the ''resonance'' peak found in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} comes from the Cu spins and not from the doped holes. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Heisenberg exchange enhancement by orbital relaxation in cuprate compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, A.B.; Broer, R.; Nieuwpoort, WC

    1996-01-01

    We calculate the Heisenberg exchange J in the quasi-2D antiferromagnetic cuprates La2CuO4, YBa2Cu3O6, Nd2CuO4 and Sr2CuO2Cl2. We apply all-electron (MC)SCF and non-orthogonal CI calculations to [Cu2O11](18-), [Cu2O9](14-), [Cu2O7](10-) and [Cu2O7Cl4](14-) clusters in a model charge embedding. The

  13. Diagonal stripes in the spin glass phase of cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, G., E-mail: goetz@physik.tu-cottbus.d [Institut fuer Physik, BTU Cottbus, Post Box 101344, 03013 Cottbus (Germany); Lorenzana, J. [SMC-INFM-CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Based on the unrestricted Gutzwiller approximation we study the possibility that the diagonal incommensurate spin scattering in the spin glass phase of lanthanum cuprates originates from stripe formation. Similar to the metallic phase two types of diagonal stripe structures appear to be stable: (a) site-centered textures which have one hole per site along the stripe and (b) ferromagnetic stair-case structures which are the diagonal equivalent to bond-centered stripes in the metallic phase and which on average have a filling of 3/4 holes per stripe site. We give a detailed analysis of the stability of both diagonal textures with regard to the vertical ones.

  14. Carrier Rexlaxation Time Divergence in Single and Double Layer Cuprates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M.; Rast, S.; Onellion, M.; Demsar, J.; Taylor, A. J.; Glinka, Y.; Tolk, N. H.; Ren, Y. H.; Lupke, G.; Klimov, A.; Sobolewski, R.; Xu, Y.; Si, Weidong; Zeng, X. H.; Soukiassian, A.; Xi, X. X.; Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, D.; Pavuna, D.; Drapf, A.; Manzke, R.; Printz, J. O.; Williamsen, M. S.; Downum, K. E.; Guptasarma, P.

    2003-06-20

    We report the transient optical pump-probe reflectivity measurements on single and double layer cuprate single crystals and thin films of ten different stoichiometries. We find that with sufficiently low fluence the relaxation time (tau [sub R] of all samples exhibits a power law divergence with temperature (T): tau [sub R] [proportional to] T[sup -3 [plus or minus] 0.5]. Further, the divergence has an onset temperature above the superconducting transition temperature for all superconducting samples. Possible causes of this divergence are discussed.

  15. Structural analysis of the precursor pseudogap in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sokichi

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the precursor pseudogap (PP) state that emerges on the lower temperature side of the pseudogap phase in cuprate superconductors based on the characteristic layer structure. The coherence among layers in the electronic state may be broken by low energy thermal interactions, whereas the coherence within the layers remains in the phase above the superconducting (SC) phase on account of strongness of the bonding. In this state, the two-electron energy gain (TEG) is also larger than that of SC state and the one-electron energy gain (OEG) is smaller than that of the SC state. We call this incoherent ensemble of in-layer states the in-layer electronic state system (IESS). The PP state is a crossover state between IESS and the normal pseudogap (NP) state, which appears on the upper temperature side, because the d-wave pairing symmetry in cuprates inverts the sign of the difference of the total electronic energy gain between the IESS and the NP state around the nodal region, even though it is positive overall. We perform our analysis at the mean field level. We show that the relationships among the SC gap, the gap of in-layer state, and the transition temperatures in the relevant phases are compatible with existing experimental data. The proposed precursor state requires pairing models to make the SC interactions three-dimensional beyond a single layer, although the precursors have in-layer properties.

  16. Manganite/Cuprate Superlattice as Artificial Reentrant Spin Glass

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Junfeng

    2016-05-04

    Emerging physical phenomena at the unit-cell-controlled interfaces of transition-metal oxides have attracted lots of interest because of the rich physics and application opportunities. This work reports a reentrant spin glass behavior with strong magnetic memory effect discovered in oxide heterostructures composed of ultrathin manganite La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) and cuprate La2CuO4 (LCO) layers. These heterostructures are featured with enhanced ferromagnetism before entering the spin glass state: a Curie temperature of 246 K is observed in the superlattice with six-unit-cell LSMO layers, while the reference LSMO film with the same thickness shows much weaker magnetism. Furthermore, an insulator-metal transition emerges at the Curie temperature, and below the freezing temperature the superlattices can be considered as a glassy ferromagnetic insulator. These experimental results are closely related to the interfacial spin reconstruction revealed by the first-principles calculations, and the dependence of the reentrant spin glass behavior on the LSMO layer thickness is in line with the general phase diagram of a spin system derived from the infinite-range SK model. The results of this work underscore the manganite/cuprate superlattices as a versatile platform of creating artificial materials with tailored interfacial spin coupling and physical properties. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Investigation of renormalization effects in high temperature cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabolotnyy, Volodymyr B.

    2008-04-16

    It has been found that the self-energy of high-T{sub C} cuprates indeed exhibits a well pronounced structure, which is currently attributed to coupling of the electrons either to lattice vibrations or to collective magnetic excitations in the system. To clarify this issue, the renormalization effects and the electronic structure of two cuprate families Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} were chosen as the main subject for this thesis. With a simple example of an electronic system coupled to a collective mode unusual renormalization features observed in the photoemission spectra are introduced. It is shown that impurity substitution in general leads to suppression of the unusual renormalization. Finally an alternative possibility to obtain a purely superconducting surface of Y-123 via partial substitution of Y atoms with Ca is introduced. It is shown that renormalization in the superconducting Y-123 has similar strong momentum dependence as in the Bi-2212 family. It is also shown that in analogy to Bi-2212 the renormalization appears to have strong dependence on the doping level (no kinks for the overdoped component) and practically vanishes above T{sub C} suggesting that coupling to magnetic excitations fits much better than competing scenarios, according to which the unusual renormalization in ARPES spectra is caused by the coupling to single or multiple phononic modes. (orig.)

  18. Optical properties of the pseudogap state in deeply underdoped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Adam; Carbotte, Jules; Nicol, Elisabeth

    2011-03-01

    Recent optical measurements of deeply underdoped cuprates have revealed that a coherent Drude response persists well below the end of the superconducting dome in the phase diagram. We show that this observation is consistent with the resonating valence bond spin-liquid model proposed by Yang, Rice, and Zhang. Within this model, we analyze the three elements that cause the overall reduction in optical conductivity in the approach to the Mott insulating state: a Gutzwiller factor associated with increased correlations, which causes a reduction in the coherent part of the carrier Green's function; a shrinking of the Fermi surface defining the hole Luttinger contours; and an increase in optical effective mass. We show that each of these elements yields qualitative agreement with various experimental observations. Finally, we show how the increased magnitude of the pseudogap at low doping modifies the microwave conductivity and the Wiedemann-Franz law.

  19. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one.

  20. The Origin of Tc Enhancement in Heterostructure Cuprate Superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doron L. Bergman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments on heterostructures composed of two or more films of cuprate superconductors of different oxygen doping levels have shown a remarkable Tc enhancement (up to 50% relative to single compound films. We provide a simple explanation of the enhancement which arises naturally from a collection of experimental works. We show that the enhancement could be caused by a structural change in the lattice, namely an increase in the distance of the apical oxygen from the copper-oxygen plane. This increase modifies the effective off-site interaction in the plane which in turn enhances the d-wave superconductivity order parameter. To illustrate this point we study the extended Hubbard model using the fluctuation exchange approximation.

  1. The intrinsic heterogeneity of superconductivity in the cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shengelaya, A.; Müller, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    In the hole-doped, high-temperature superconducting cuprates, an intrinsic heterogeneity is found, from the early observations to recent data. Below optimum doping, the heterogeneity consists of dynamic metallic and, at low temperatures, superconducting regions in the form of clusters or stripes, which develop and decay as a function of time and location in the antiferromagnetic lattice. This behaviour is underlined by the interesting linear relation between the oxygen isotope shifts of the magnetic penetration depth and the critical temperature with a slope that is a factor 2 larger than expected for the homogeneous distribution of superfluid density. Allusion is also made to the Bose-Einstein condensation reported in structurally heterogeneous, polycrystalline polymer platelets as well as especially to the heterogeneous distribution of visible and dark matter in the Universe, which point to a change of paradigm in modern physics.

  2. Mottness at finite doping and charge instabilities in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peli, S.; Conte, S. Dal; Comin, R.; Nembrini, N.; Ronchi, A.; Abrami, P.; Banfi, F.; Ferrini, G.; Brida, D.; Lupi, S.; Fabrizio, M.; Damascelli, A.; Capone, M.; Cerullo, G.; Giannetti, C.

    2017-08-01

    The influence of Mott physics on the doping-temperature phase diagram of copper oxides represents a major issue that is the subject of intense theoretical and experimental efforts. Here, we investigate the ultrafast electron dynamics in prototypical single-layer Bi-based cuprates at the energy scale of the O-2p --> Cu-3d charge-transfer (CT) process. We demonstrate a clear evolution of the CT excitations from incoherent and localized, as in a Mott insulator, to coherent and delocalized, as in a conventional metal. This reorganization of the high-energy degrees of freedom occurs at the critical doping pcr ~ 0.16 irrespective of the temperature, and it can be well described by dynamical mean-field theory calculations. We argue that the onset of low-temperature charge instabilities is the low-energy manifestation of the underlying Mottness that characterizes the p low-temperature phases in underdoped copper oxides.

  3. Theoretical study of magnetoelectric effects in noncentrosymmetric and cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Manoj K.

    A century after the discovery of superconductivity at the lab of Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, it is noticeable that the phenomenon is quite ubiquitous in nature. In addition to a long list of superconducting alloys and compounds, almost half the elements in the periodic table superconduct. By the late seventies, superconductivity was thought to be well understood. This turned out to be a myth, with the discovery of unconventional superconductors that defied Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory. Cuprates have been the most prominent example among them ever since their discovery in 1986 by Bednorz and Muller. Another example of non-compliance with BCS theory lie among noncentrosymmetric superconductors. In this dissertation, magnetoelectric (ME) effects in these two classes of superconductors have been studied from different perspectives, utilizing Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. Even though GL theory was proposed before the BCS theory, it was not given much importance due to its phenomenological nature until Gor'kov proved that it is a limiting form of the microscopic BCS theory. However today, in the absence of any complete microscopic theory to explain superconductivity in unconventional superconductors, Ginzburg-Landau theory is an important tool to move ahead and qualitatively understand the behavior of varied superconducting systems. Noncentrosymmetric superconductors have generated much theoretical interest since 2004 despite been known for long. The absence of inversion symmetry in non- centrosymmetric superconductors allows for extra terms called Lifshitz invariants in the Ginzburg-Landau functional. This leads to magnetoelectric effects that do not exist in centrosymmetric superconductors. One manifestation of this is in the vortex structure in materials with a cubic point group O. In particular, a current is predicted to flow parallel to the applied magnetic field in such a vortex in addition to the usual vortex supercurrents. In this work, we present both

  4. Stripes in cuprate superconductors: Excitations and dynamic dichotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, G., E-mail: goetz@physik.tu-cottbus.de [Institut fuer Physik, BTU Cottbus, P.O. Box 101344, 03013 Cottbus (Germany); Grilli, M.; Lorenzana, J. [SMC-INFM-CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2012-11-01

    We present a short account of the present experimental situation of stripes in cuprates followed by a review of our present understanding of their ground state and excited state properties. Collective modes, the dynamical structure factor, and the optical conductivity of stripes are computed using the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation applied to realistic one band and three band Hubbard models, and are found to be in excellent agreement with experiment. On the other hand, experiments like angle-resolved photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy show the coexistence of stripes at high energies with Fermi liquid quasiparticles at low energies. We show that a phenomenological model going beyond mean-field can reconcile this dynamic dichotomy.

  5. Charge orders, magnetism and pairings in the cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, T; Montiel, X; de Carvalho, V S; Freire, H; Pépin, C

    2016-08-01

    We review the recent developments in the field of cuprate superconductors with special focus on the recently observed charge order in the underdoped compounds. We introduce new theoretical developments following the study of the antiferromagnetic quantum critical point in two dimensions, in which preemptive orders in both charge and superconducting (SC) sectors emerge, that are in turn related by an SU(2) symmetry. We consider the implications of this proliferation of orders in the underdoped region, and provide a study of the type of fluctuations which characterize the SU(2) symmetry. We identify an intermediate energy scale where the SC fluctuations are dominant and argue that they are unstable towards the formation of a resonant excitonic state at the pseudogap temperature T (*). We discuss the implications of this scenario for a few key experiments.

  6. Transport anomalies and quantum criticality in electron-doped cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu; Yu, Heshan; He, Ge; Hu, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Zhu, Beiyi [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Jin, Kui, E-mail: kuijin@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • Electrical transport and its complementary thermal transport on electron-doped cuprates are reviewed. • The common features of electron-doped cuprates are sorted out and shown in the last figure. • The complex superconducting fluctuations and quantum fluctuations are distinguished. - Abstract: Superconductivity research is like running a marathon. Three decades after the discovery of high-T{sub c} cuprates, there have been mass data generated from transport measurements, which bring fruitful information. In this review, we give a brief summary of the intriguing phenomena reported in electron-doped cuprates from the aspect of electrical transport as well as the complementary thermal transport. We attempt to sort out common features of the electron-doped family, e.g. the strange metal, negative magnetoresistance, multiple sign reversals of Hall in mixed state, abnormal Nernst signal, complex quantum criticality. Most of them have been challenging the existing theories, nevertheless, a unified diagram certainly helps to approach the nature of electron-doped cuprates.

  7. Magnon-phonon coupling and implications for charge-density wave states and superconductivity in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2016-10-01

    The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity of copper oxides (cuprates) remains unsolved puzzle in condensed matter physics. The cuprates represent extremely complicated system, showing fascinating variety of quantum phenomena and rich phase diagram as a function of doping. In the suggested "superconducting glue" mechanisms, phonon and spin excitations are invoked most frequently, and it appears that only spin excitations cover the energy scale required to justify very high transition temperature Tc ˜ 165 K (as in mercury-based triple layer cuprates compressed to 30 GPa). It appears that pressure is quite important variable helping to boost the Tc record by almost 30°. Pressure may be also considered as a clean tuning parameter, helping to understand the underlying balance of various energy scales and ordered states in cuprates. In this paper, a review of mostly our work on cuprates under pressure will be given, with the emphasis on the interactions between phonon and spin excitations. It appears that there is a strong coupling between superexchange interaction and stretching in-plane oxygen vibrations, which may give rise to a variety of complex phenomena, including the charge-density wave state intertwined with superconductivity and attracting a lot of interest recently.

  8. Optical properties of the pseudogap state in underdoped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, A.; Carbotte, J. P.; Nicol, E. J.

    2011-05-01

    Recent optical measurements of deeply underdoped cuprates have revealed that a coherent Drude response persists well below the end of the superconducting dome. In addition, no large increase in optical effective mass has been observed, even at dopings as low as 1%. We show that this behavior is consistent with the resonating valence bond spin-liquid model proposed by Yang, Rice, and Zhang. In this model, the overall reduction in optical conductivity in the approach to the Mott insulating state is caused not by an increase in effective mass, but by a Gutzwiller factor, which describes decreased coherence due to correlations, and by a shrinking of the Fermi surface, which decreases the number of available charge carriers. We also show that in this model, the pseudogap does not modify the low-temperature, low-frequency behavior, though the magnitude of the conductivity is greatly reduced by the Gutzwiller factor. Similarly, the profile of the temperature dependence of the microwave conductivity is largely unchanged in shape, but the Gutzwiller factor is essential in understanding the observed difference in magnitude between ortho-I and -II YBa2Cu3O y .

  9. Raman spectroscopy of manganite (CMR) and cuprate (HTS) oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Malde, N

    2002-01-01

    This thesis discusses Raman scattering measurements on colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganite and high temperature superconducting (HTS) cuprate oxides. We have examined the influence of oxygen partial pressure (PO sub 2) on the Raman active phonon modes in infinite layer (n = infinity) manganite thin films. The 230cm sup - sup 1 and 600cm sup - sup 1 phonon frequencies were found to monotonically harden as function of PO sub 2 , therefore serving as good indicators of oxygen stoichiometry. Temperature dependent Raman scattering measurements on two La sub 0 sub . sub 7 Ca sub 0 sub . sub 3 MnO sub 3 (n = infinity) thin films with different structural distortions (induced by deoxygenation) revealed that the 480cm sup - sup 1 and 610cm sup - sup 1 phonon peak intensities were correlated with the d.c resistivity in both films. This could help clarify the role played by phonons on carrier localisation (for T>T sub c) that has been suggested to explain the CMR effect. The controversial origin of the 'FM-like' o...

  10. Infrared pseudogap in cuprate and pnictide high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. J. [University of California; Lee, Y. S. [University of California; Schafgans, A. A. [University of California; Chubukov, A. V. [Universsity of Wisconsin - Madison; Kasahara, S. [Kyoto University; Shibauchi, T. [Kyoto University; Terashima, T. [Kyoto University; Matsuda, Y. [Kyoto University; Tanatar, M. A. [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, R. [Ames Laboratory; Thaler, A. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul C. [Ames Laboratory; Bud' ko, Sergey L. [Ames Laboratory; Sefat, A. S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Mandrus, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Segawa, K. [Osaka University; Ando, Y. [Osaka University; Basov, D. N. [University of California

    2014-07-01

    We investigate infrared manifestations of the pseudogap in the prototypical cuprate and pnictide superconductors, YBa2Cu3Oy and BaFe2As2 (Ba122) systems. We find remarkable similarities between the spectroscopic features attributable to the pseudogap in these two classes of superconductors. The hallmarks of the pseudogap state in both systems include a weak absorption feature at about 500cm-1 followed by a featureless continuum between 500 and 1500cm-1 in the conductivity data and a significant suppression in the scattering rate below 700–900 cm-1. The latter result allows us to identify the energy scale associated with the pseudogap ΔPG. We find that in the Ba122-based materials the superconductivity-induced changes of the infrared spectra occur in the frequency region below 100–200 cm-1, which is much lower than the energy scale of the pseudogap. We performed theoretical analysis of the scattering rate data of the two compounds using the same model, which accounts for the effects of the pseudogap and electron-boson coupling. We find that the scattering rate suppression in Ba122-based compounds below ΔPG is solely due to the pseudogap formation, whereas the impact of the electron-boson coupling effects is limited to lower frequencies. The magnetic resonance modes used as inputs in our modeling are found to evolve with the development of the pseudogap, suggesting an intimate correlation between the pseudogap and magnetism

  11. Unraveling electronic and magnetic structure at cuprate-manganite interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, John

    2014-03-01

    Oxide interfaces offer a rich variety of physics and a pathway to create new classes of functional oxide materials. The interface between the cuprate high-temperature superconductors and ferromagnetic manganites is of particular interest due to the strongly antagonistic nature of the superconducting and ferromagnetic phases. Advancements in the synthesis of oxide heterostructure offers the opportunity to merge these two dissimilar oxides with atomic precision to understand the fundamental limits of bringing such states into close proximity. However, the main challenge is to understand the physical framework that describes the behavior of strongly correlated electrons near oxide interfaces. One aspect that will be addressed here is the use of advanced tools to gain detailed electronic and magnetic information from the boundary region. In this talk, recent work will be addressed both in connection to visualizing the interface with spatially resolved tools as well as harnessing layer-by-layer growth to explore the limits in ultrathin superlattices. These insights allow us to better understand the physics behind the interfacial spin and orbital reconstruction observed in this system. Work at Argonne is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  12. Superconducting fluctuations and pseudogap in high-Tc cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alloul H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Large pulsed magnetic fields up to 60 Tesla are used to suppress the contribution of superconducting fluctuations (SCF to the ab-plane conductivity above Tc in a series of YBa2Cu3O6+x. These experiments allow us to determine the field Hc’(T and the temperature Tc’ above which the SCFs are fully suppressed. A careful investigation near optimal doping shows that Tc’ is higher than the pseudogap temperature T*, which is an unambiguous evidence that the pseudogap cannot be assigned to preformed pairs. Accurate determinations of the SCF contribution to the conductivity versus temperature and magnetic field have been achieved. They can be accounted for by thermal fluctuations following the Ginzburg-Landau scheme for nearly optimally doped samples. A phase fluctuation contribution might be invoked for the most underdoped samples in a T range which increases when controlled disorder is introduced by electron irradiation. Quantitative analysis of the fluctuating magnetoconductance allows us to determine the critical field Hc2(0 which is found to be be quite similar to Hc’ (0 and to increase with hole doping. Studies of the incidence of disorder on both Tc’ and T* allow us to to propose a three dimensional phase diagram including a disorder axis, which allows to explain most observations done in other cuprate families.

  13. Evidence for Intertwining of Superconductivity and Antiferromagnetism in a Cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John; Xu, Zhijun; Stock, C.; Chi, S. X.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Xu, G. Y.; Gu, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering to measure the low-energy, incommensurate antiferromagnetic spin excitations both above and below the superconducting transition temperature (Tc = 32 K) of La1.905Ba0.095CuO4. While the magnetic excitations in optimally-doped cuprates typically show the development of a spin gap and magnetic resonance below Tc, our sample shows no such effect. Instead strong, gapless spin excitations coexist with bulk superconductivity. To understand this, we note that previous transport measurements have shown that the superconducting layers are decoupled by a magnetic field applied along the c-axis, resulting in a state with frustrated interlayer Josephson coupling, similar to LBCO with x = 1 / 8 , where it has been proposed that pair-density-wave superconductivity occurs. This suggests that, in a similar fashion, the spatially modulated antiferromagnetic correlations (which we see directly in the x = 0 . 095 sample) are intertwined with a spatially modulated superconducting pair wave function. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  14. Transport properties of stripe-ordered high Tc cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Qing; Han, Su Jung; Dimitrov, Ivo; Tranquada, J. M.; Li, Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Transport measurements provide important characterizations of the nature of stripe order in the cuprates. Initial studies of systems such as La1.6-xNd0.4SrxCuO4 demonstrated the strong anisotropy between in-plane and c-axis resistivities, but also suggested that stripe order results in a tendency towards insulating behavior within the planes at low temperature. More recent work on La2-xBaxCuO4 with x = 1/8 has revealed the occurrence of quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity that onsets with spin-stripe order. The suppression of three-dimensional superconductivity indicates a frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling, motivating a proposal that superconductivity and stripe order are intertwined in a pair-density-wave state. Complementary characterizations of the low-energy states near the Fermi level are provided by measurements of the Hall and Nernst effects, each revealing intriguing signatures of stripe correlations and ordering. We review and discuss this work.

  15. Spins, stripes, and superconductivity in hole-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John M.

    2013-08-01

    One of the major themes in correlated electron physics over the last quarter century has been the problem of high-temperature superconductivity in hole-doped copper-oxide compounds. Fundamental to this problem is the competition between antiferromagnetic spin correlations, a symptom of strong Coulomb interactions, and the kinetic energy of the doped carriers, which favors delocalization. After discussing some of the early challenges in the field, I describe the experimental picture provided by a variety of spectroscopic and transport techniques. Then I turn to the technique of neutron scattering, and discuss how it is used to determine spin correlations, especially in model systems of quantum magnetism. Neutron scattering and complementary techniques have determined the extent to which antiferromagnetic spin correlations survive in the cuprate superconductors. One experimental case involves the ordering of spin and charge stripes. I first consider related measurements on model compounds, such as La2-xSrxNiO4+δ, and then discuss the case of La2-xBaxCuO4. In the latter system, recent transport studies have demonstrated that quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity coexists with the stripe order, but with frustrated phase order between the layers. This has led to new concepts for the coexistence of spin order and superconductivity. While the relevance of stripe correlations to high-temperature superconductivity remains a subject of controversy, there is no question that stripes are an intriguing example of electron matter that results from strong correlations.

  16. Mottness at finite doping and charge-instabilities in cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peli, S; Dal Conte, S; Comin, R; Nembrini, N; Ronchi, A; Abrami, P; Banfi, F; Ferrini, G; Brida, D; Lupi, S; Fabrizio, M; Damascelli, A; Capone, M; Cerullo, G; Giannetti, C

    2017-08-01

    The influence of the Mott physics on the doping-temperature phase diagram of copper oxides represents a major issue that is subject of intense theoretical and experimental effort. Here, we investigate the ultrafast electron dynamics in prototypical single-layer Bi-based cuprates at the energy scale of the O-2p→Cu-3d charge-transfer (CT) process. We demonstrate a clear evolution of the CT excitations from incoherent and localized, as in a Mott insulator, to coherent and delocalized, as in a conventional metal. This reorganization of the high-energy degrees of freedom occurs at the critical doping pcr ≈0.16 irrespective of the temperature, and it can be well described by dynamical mean field theory calculations. We argue that the onset of the low-temperature charge instabilities is the low-energy manifestation of the underlying Mottness that characterizes the p < pcr region of the phase diagram. This discovery sets a new framework for theories of charge order and low-temperature phases in underdoped copper oxides.

  17. Dynamical charge density waves rule the phase diagram of cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, S.; Di Castro, C.; Seibold, G.; Grilli, M.

    2017-06-01

    In the last few years, charge density waves (CDWs) have been ubiquitously observed in high-temperature superconducting cuprates and are now the most investigated among the competing orders in the still hot debate on these systems. A wealth of new experimental data raises several fundamental issues that challenge the various theoretical proposals. We here relate our mean-field instability line TCDW0 of a strongly correlated Fermi liquid to the pseudogap T*(p ) line, marking in this way the onset of CDW-fluctuations. These fluctuations reduce strongly the mean-field critical line. Controlling this reduction via an infrared frequency cutoff related to the characteristic time of the probes, we account for the complex experimental temperature versus doping phase diagram. We provide a coherent scenario explaining why different CDW onset curves are observed by different experimental probes and seem to extrapolate at zero temperature into seemingly different quantum critical points (QCPs) in the intermediate and overdoped region. The nearly singular anisotropic scattering mediated by these fluctuations also accounts for the rapid changes of the Hall number seen in experiments and provides the first necessary step for a possible Fermi surface reconstruction fully establishing at lower doping. Finally, we show that phase fluctuations of the CDWs, which are enhanced in the presence of strong correlations near the Mott insulating phase, naturally account for the disappearance of the CDWs at low doping with yet another QCP as seen by the experiments.

  18. Redistribution of phase fluctuations in a periodically driven cuprate superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeppner, Robert; Zhu, Beilei; Rexin, Tobias [Zentrum fuer Optische Quantentechnologien und Institut fuer Laserphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Mathey, Ludwig [Zentrum fuer Optische Quantentechnologien und Institut fuer Laserphysik, Hamburg (Germany); The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Hamburg (Germany); Cavalleri, Andrea [Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    We study the thermally fluctuating state of a bi-layer cuprate superconductor under the periodic action of a staggered field oscillating at optical frequencies. This analysis distills essential elements of the recently discovered phenomenon of light enhanced coherence in YBCO, which was achieved by periodically driving infrared active apical oxygen distortions. The effect of a staggered periodic perturbation is studied using a Langevin description of driven, coupled Josephson junctions, which represent two neighboring pairs of layers and their two plasmons. We demonstrate that the external driving leads to a suppression of phase fluctuations of the low-energy plasmon, an effect which is amplified via the resonance of the high energy plasmon, with a striking suppression of the low-energy fluctuations, as visible in the power spectrum. We also find that this effect acts onto the in-plane fluctuations, which are reduced on long length scales and we discuss the behavior of vortices in the ab-planes and across the weakly coupled junctions.

  19. Mottness collapse and T-linear resistivity in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Philip

    2011-04-28

    Central to the normal state of cuprate high-temperature superconductors is the collapse of the pseudo-gap, briefly reviewed here, at a critical point and the subsequent onset of the strange metal characterized by a resistivity that scales linearly with temperature. A possible clue to the resolution of this problem is the inter-relation between two facts: (i) a robust theory of T-linear resistivity resulting from quantum criticality requires an additional length scale outside the standard one-parameter scaling scenario and (ii) breaking the Landau correspondence between the Fermi gas and an interacting system with short-range repulsions requires non-fermionic degrees. We show that a low-energy theory of the Hubbard model that correctly incorporates dynamical spectral weight transfer has the extra degrees of freedom needed to describe this physics. The degrees of freedom that mix into the lower band as a result of dynamical spectral weight transfer are shown to either decouple beyond a critical doping, thereby signalling Mottness collapse, or unbind above a critical temperature, yielding strange metal behaviour characterized by T-linear resistivity.

  20. Lattice Instability in High Temperature Superconducting Cuprates and FeAs Systems: Polarons Probed by EXAFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Oyanagi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrier-induced lattice distortion (signature of polaron in oxypnictide superconductors is found by an instantaneous local probe, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS. Polaron formation is detected as two distinct nearest neighbor distances (Fe-As, implying an incoherent local mode that develops coherence at the critical temperature. Comparing the results with the unusual lattice response in cuprate superconductors, intimate correlation between evolution of local lattice mode and superconductivity is revealed. The results suggest that strong electron-lattice interaction is present as a common ingredient in the microscopic mechanism of superconducting transition. The effect of magnetic impurity atoms in cuprates further indicates that magnetic scattering becomes diluted as long as polaron formation is conserved. We argue that polaron coherence dominates electrical conduction and magnetic interaction in oxypnictide and cuprate superconductors.

  1. Interpretation of Scanning Tunneling Quasiparticle Interference and Impurity States in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisel, A.; Choubey, Peayush; Berlijn, T.; Ku, W.; Andersen, B. M.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2015-05-01

    We apply a recently developed method combining first principles based Wannier functions with solutions to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations to the problem of interpreting STM data in cuprate superconductors. We show that the observed images of Zn on the surface of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 can only be understood by accounting for the tails of the Cu Wannier functions, which include significant weight on apical O sites in neighboring unit cells. This calculation thus puts earlier crude "filter" theories on a microscopic foundation and solves a long-standing puzzle. We then study quasiparticle interference phenomena induced by out-of-plane weak potential scatterers, and show how patterns long observed in cuprates can be understood in terms of the interference of Wannier functions above the surface. Our results show excellent agreement with experiment and enable a better understanding of novel phenomena in the cuprates via STM imaging.

  2. Transport anomalies and quantum criticality in electron-doped cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Yu, Heshan; He, Ge; Hu, Wei; Yuan, Jie; Zhu, Beiyi; Jin, Kui

    2016-06-01

    Superconductivity research is like running a marathon. Three decades after the discovery of high-Tc cuprates, there have been mass data generated from transport measurements, which bring fruitful information. In this review, we give a brief summary of the intriguing phenomena reported in electron-doped cuprates from the aspect of electrical transport as well as the complementary thermal transport. We attempt to sort out common features of the electron-doped family, e.g. the strange metal, negative magnetoresistance, multiple sign reversals of Hall in mixed state, abnormal Nernst signal, complex quantum criticality. Most of them have been challenging the existing theories, nevertheless, a unified diagram certainly helps to approach the nature of electron-doped cuprates.

  3. Count rates and structure factors in anomalous soft x-ray scattering from cuprate superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbamonte, P; Rusydi, A; Logvenov, G; Bozovic, [No Value; Sawatzky, GA; Venema, L.C.; Bozovic,; Pavuna, D

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been shown that x-ray diffraction from the doped holes in cuprates can be enhanced by 3-4 orders of magnitude by exploiting resonance effects in the oxygen K shell. This new type of anomalous scattering is direct way of probing ground state inhomogeneity in the mobile carrier liquid

  4. Excitation of coherent oscillations in underdoped cuprate superconductors by intense THz pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Turner, Joshua J.; Gerber, Simon M.; Bonn, Doug; Hardy, Walter; Liang, Ruixing; Salluzzo, Marco

    2016-05-01

    We use intense broadband THz pulses to excite the cuprate superconductors YBCO and NBCO in their underdoped phase, where superconducting and charge density wave ground states compete. We observe pronounced coherent oscillations at attributed to renormalized low-energy phonon modes. These oscillation features are much more prominent than those observed in all-optical pump-probe measurements, suggesting a different excitation mechanism.

  5. A magnetic origin of cuprate superconductivity? A MaxEnt-μSR view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekema, C.; Owens, F.; Love, A.; Li, Z.; Sakkaris, P.; Dawson, W. K.

    2015-08-01

    The fundamental physics of cuprate superconductivity is still much deliberated after three decades of research. In contrast to phononic or polaronic roots, some major theories promote a magnetic origin. In this perspective, we review cuprate magnetism, as probed by muon-spin-rotation (μSR) in RBa2Cu3O7-δ (RBCO), Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi2212) and Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10+x (Tl2223). Site-search RBCO studies show that muons localize and probe in locations away from the superconducting CuO2 planes. Maximum entropy (MaxEnt, ME) analysis of transverse field μSR data of GdBa2Cu3O7-δ (GdBCO) indicates that the muon probes in an undisturbed insulating environment, allowing μSR to detect (weak) magnetic features in these cuprates. Concerning Varma’s predicted loop currents, MaxEnt has shown weak μSR signals for GdBCO in zero field above and below the critical temperature, Tc; these are near the predicted ˜ 100 Oe. Concerning Zhang’s predicted antiferromagnetism (AF) connected to the vortex cores, we have observed Lorentzian relaxation of cuprate vortex signals below half Tc, consistent with AF-broadening effects. For both Bi2212 and Tl2223, Lorentzians describe the μSR vortex signals much better below 0.4Tc than Gaussians, indicating that extra AF fields occur near and in the vortex cores. In sum, both our MaxEnt-μSR (ME-μSR) studies point toward magnetic roots of cuprate superconductivity.

  6. Reversible DC Magnetization Measurements of the Superconducting Parameters and Their Anisotropies in the Randomly-Doped Cuprates and Prelude to the Magnetic Resonance Studies of - Cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Jonathan Lynn

    The fact that there is no consensus on the microscopic origin of the high-temperature superconducting phenomenon highlights the need for accurate measurements of the parameters which characterize the superconducting state (i.e., the coherence lengths (Ginzburg-Landau), penetration depths, and critical fields) and their anisotropies in these materials. This dissertation presents the first dc magnetization measurements of these parameters in the electron-doped, infinite-layer superconductor rm Sr_{0.90}La _{0.10}CuO_2 (T _{c} = 40 K). This material is particularly attractive for study because of its simple structure which contains nothing more than the features common to all of the high temperature superconducting copper oxides--a stacking of CuO_2 planes separated by (here, single) ion charge doping layers. From these measurements, xi_{| }(0) (xi_|(0))=46 A (30 A), lambda _{|}(0) (lambda_ |(0))=290 nm (450 nm), and H_{c2|}(0) (H _{c2|}(0))=23.8 T (15.5 T) where | and | are with respect to the CuO_2 planes. The ratio of H_ {c2}'s indicates that rm Sr_{0.90}La_{0.10}CuO _2 is much more isotropic than the other cuprates ((m_{c}/m_{ab })^{1/2}~1.5), and one of the samples measured even displayed a surprising anisotropy of less than one. In light of this surprising inverse anisotropy, the first systematic study of the effects of sample inhomogeneities on these reversible dc magnetization measurements was performed. rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{7 -delta} was used in this study because it can be doped either randomly or uniformly, allowing isolation of the artifacts of the measurement technique due to the random nature of the doping alone. This study demonstrates that neglecting the distribution of superconducting transition temperatures which come from the random doping in this type of analysis leads to errors in the measured parameters of up to 1000%. Efforts to measure the distribution of T_{c}'s and to use this distribution in the analysis have produced mixed results, with the most

  7. Peculiar oxygen and copper isotope effects on the pseudogap formation temperature in underdoped to overdoped cuprates: Pseudogap induced by pairing correlations above Tc in cuprates with large and small Fermi surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhumanov, S.; Khudayberdiev, Z. S.; Djumanov, Sh. S.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the pseudogap (PG) state and the peculiar oxygen and copper isotope effects on the PG onset temperature T* in cuprate superconductors with large and small Fermi surfaces within the polaron model and two different BCS-based approaches extended to the intermediate coupling regime. We argue that the unconventional electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the polaron formation and BCS-like pairing correlations above Tc in underdoped to overdoped cuprates, which are exotic (non-BCS) superconductors. Using the generalized BCS-like theory, we calculate pseudogap formation temperatures T*, isotope shifts ΔT*, oxygen and copper isotope exponents (i.e. αT*O and αT*Cu) and show that isotope effects on T* strongly depend on strengths of Coulomb and electron-phonon interactions, doping levels and dielectric constants of the cuprates. This theory explains the existence of small positive or sign reversed oxygen isotope effect, sizable and very large negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on T* in cuprates with large Fermi surfaces. Further, we use another version of the extended BCS-like model to study the PG formation and the peculiar isotope effects on T* in deeply underdoped cuprates with small Fermi surfaces and predict the existence of small and sizable negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on T* in such underdoped cuprates. The results for T*, isotope shifts ΔT* and exponents (αT*O and αT*Cu) in different classes of high-Tc cuprates are in good agreement with the existing well-established experimental data and explain the controversy between various experiments on isotope effects for T* in the cuprates.

  8. Relationship between critical temperature and core orbital coupling in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Bo; Chen, Ning, E-mail: nchen@sina.com

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • In this paper we found a new relationship between critical temperature and core orbital coupling in cuprate superconductors. In other words, we studied the core orbital couplings which few scientists paid attention to in cuprate superconductors and obtained a new T{sub c} relationship. • The binding energy differences between the valence couplings and the core couplings are positively related with the systemic T{sub c} values for all cuprate superconductors. This new relationship tells us that we should focus on not only the valence couplings but also the core couplings. • The new relationship seems very important and helpful for us to study the pairing nature of high- T{sub c} superconductivity and seek superconductors with higher T{sub c}. - Abstract: Because superconductivity and several relevant phenomena of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) arise from interactions of valence electrons near the Fermi surface, the valence orbital coupling has usually been thought to be critical to understanding the electronic pairing mechanism which seems work without the core coupling orbitals. But, as strong electronic correlations are believed to be essential for a comprehensive understanding of the cuprate superconductors, the Fermi surface is influenced directly or indirectly by all orbital couplings in the entire energy band. In this paper, we focused on the core orbital coupling which arises from the overlap between the Oxygen's 2 s core orbital and the core p orbital of neighboring ion of CuO{sub 2} layers as they have a similar energy level ranging from –12 ∼ –23 eV below the Fermi level. The characters of this core coupling are varied with different kinds of neighboring ions or from the crystal structures. Based on the experimental superconducting critical temperature (T{sub c}) data, we found that the binding energy differences between the valence couplings and the core couplings are positively related with the systemic T{sub c

  9. Atomic scale studies of doped-hole distributions, self-organized electronic nano-domains, and electron-boson coupling in high Tc-cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, James C.

    2014-05-14

    Progress is reported in these areas (titles and abstracts of journal articles produced for the contract): Exotic Density Wave in Underdoped Cuprates; Varying the inter-atomic distances within individual crystal unit-­cells of cuprates; Truncated Momentum Space Electronic Structure of Underdoped Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ; and, Visualizing Phase Fluctuating d-Wave Superconductivity in the Cuprate Pseudogap State.

  10. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  11. Perspective on the phase diagram of cuprate high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Damian; Jurkutat, Michael; Reichardt, Steven; Kapusta, Czesław; Haase, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Universal scaling laws can guide the understanding of new phenomena, and for cuprate high-temperature superconductivity the influential Uemura relation showed, early on, that the maximum critical temperature of superconductivity correlates with the density of the superfluid measured at low temperatures. Here we show that the charge content of the bonding orbitals of copper and oxygen in the ubiquitous CuO2 plane, measured with nuclear magnetic resonance, reproduces this scaling. The charge transfer of the nominal copper hole to planar oxygen sets the maximum critical temperature. A three-dimensional phase diagram in terms of the charge content at copper as well as oxygen is introduced, which has the different cuprate families sorted with respect to their maximum critical temperature. We suggest that the critical temperature could be raised substantially if one were able to synthesize materials that lead to an increased planar oxygen hole content at the expense of that of planar copper.

  12. Entropic Origin of Pseudogap Physics and a Mott-Slater Transition in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, R. S.; Buda, I. G.; Mistark, P.; Lane, C.; Bansil, A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a new approach to understand the origin of the pseudogap in the cuprates, in terms of bosonic entropy. The near-simultaneous softening of a large number of different q-bosons yields an extended range of short-range order, wherein the growth of magnetic correlations with decreasing temperature T is anomalously slow. These entropic effects cause the spectral weight associated with the Van Hove singularity (VHS) to shift rapidly and nearly linearly toward half filling at higher T, consistent with a picture of the VHS driving the pseudogap transition at a temperature ~T*. As a byproduct, we develop an order-parameter classification scheme that predicts supertransitions between families of order parameters. As one example, we find that by tuning the hopping parameters, it is possible to drive the cuprates across a transition between Mott and Slater physics, where a spin-frustrated state emerges at the crossover. PMID:28327627

  13. Kramer-Pesch effect and damping of the vortex motion in the cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doettinger, S. G.; Huebener, R. P.; Kittelberger, S.

    1997-03-01

    Kramer and Pesch discussed the fact that in the clean limit the radius of a vortex core in a type-II superconductor decreases proportionally to T with decreasing temperature. This 'Kramer-Pesch effect' results from the thermal population of the quasiparticle bound states in the vortex core. In addition to the case of a static vortex, this effect also has important consequences for the vortex dynamics. Because of this, for the cuprate superconductors features of the damping of the vortex motion are expected at low temperatures. We discuss recent measurements of the electric resistance at high vortex velocities and of the microwave power absorption for different cuprate superconductors in conjunction with the Kramer-Pesch effect.

  14. A pseudogap term in the magnetic response of the cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walstedt, Professor Russell E. [University of Michigan; Mason, Dr. Thomas Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Aeppli, Professor Gabriel [University College, London; Hayden, Professor Stephen M. [University of Bristol, UK; Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We combine neutron scattering (INS) data and NMR/NQR nuclear spin lattice relaxation rate (1/T1) data to deduce the existence of a new contribution to the magnetic response (~q, ) in cuprate superconductors. This contribution, which has yet to be observed with INS, is shown to embody the magnetic pseudogap effects. As such, it explains the long-standing puzzle of pseudogap effects missing from cuprate INS data, dominated by stripe fluctuations, for (~q, ) at low energies. For La1.86Sr0.14CuO4 and Y Ba2Cu3O6.5, the new term is the chief contributor to 1/T1 for T Tc.

  15. Importance of polaron effects for charge carrier mobility above and below pseudogap temperature in superconducting cuprates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ORIFJON GANIEV

    2017-06-01

    Polaron effects and charge carrier mobility in high-$T_c$ cuprate superconductors (HTSCs) have been investigated theoretically. The appropriate Boltzmann transport equations under relaxation time approximation were used to calculate the mobility of polaronic charge carriers and bosonic Cooper pairs above and below the pseudogap (PG) temperature $T^\\ast$. It is shown that the scattering of polaronic charge carriers and bosonic Cooper pairs at acoustic and optical phonons are responsible for the charge carrier mobility above and below the PG temperature. We show that the energy scales of the binding energies of large polarons and polaronic Cooper pairs can be identified by PG cross-over temperature on the cuprate phase diagram.

  16. On field effect studies and superconductor-insulator transition in high-Tc cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuis, G.; Bollinger, A. T.; Pavuna, D.; Božović, I.

    2013-07-01

    We summarize previous field effect studies in high- T c cuprates and then discuss our method to smoothly tune the carrier concentration of a cuprate film over a wide range using an applied electric field. We synthesized epitaxial one-unit-cell thick films of La2- x Sr x CuO4 and from them fabricated electric double layer transistor devices utilizing various gate electrolytes. We were able to vary the carrier density by about 0.08 carriers per Cu atom, with the resulting change in T c of 30 K. The superconductor-insulator transition occurred at the critical resistance very close to the quantum resistance for pairs, R Q = h/(2 e)2 = 6.5 kΩ. This is suggestive of a quantum phase transition, possibly driven by quantum phase fluctuations, between a "Bose insulator" and a high- T c superconductor state.

  17. Indelible Rules of Josephson Coupling Energy and Zero-Point Energy in High-Tc Cuprates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fu-Sui; CHEN Wan-Fang

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows that the Josephson coupling energy and the zero-point energy have indelible rules on the superfluid density and the superconductivity in the high-Tc cuprates.This paper also shows that the values of Tc at underdoped and overdoped regions are determined by the damage conditions of the phase coherence in the classical and the quantum XY-models,respectively.

  18. Superfluid density in cuprates: hints on gauge compositeness of the holes

    CERN Document Server

    Marchetti, P A

    2016-01-01

    We show that several features (the three-dimensional XY universality for moderate underdoping, the almost-BCS behaviour for moderate overdoping and the critical exponent) of the superfluid density in hole-doped cuprates hint at a composite structure of the holes. This idea can be implemented in a spin-charge gauge approach to the $t - t' - J$ model and provides indeed good agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Electrostatic Potential in High-Temperature Superconducting Cuprates: Extended Ginzburg-Landau Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuparna Karmakar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic potential and the associated charge distribution in the vortices of high- superconductors involving mixed symmetry state of the order parameters have been studied. The work is carried out in the framework of an extended Ginzburg-Landau (GL theory involving the Gorter-Casimir two-fluid model and Bardeen's extension of GL theory applied to the high- superconductors. The properties are calculated using the material parameters relevant for the high- cuprate YBCO.

  20. Anisotropy of the cuprate superconductors in the three-dimensional Bigausson model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajilic, Z.; Mirjanic, D. (Technological Faculty, Univ. of Banja Luka (Yugoslavia))

    1992-10-01

    The bigausson model of high-temperature superconductivity is generalized to three dimensions. The stability of the bigaussons is investigated and the possibility of a bigausson condensate is shown. The anisotropy for the following parameters of cuprate superconductors is calculated: coherence length, energy gap, and critical current density. The obtained results are in agreement with the experimental data for Y[sub 1]Ba[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7-[delta

  1. Microscopic Superconductivity and Room Temperature Electronics of High-Tc Cuprates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fu-Sui; CHEN Wan-Fang

    2008-01-01

    This paper points out that the Landau criterion for macroscopic superfluidity of He H is only a criterion for microscopic superfluidity of 4He, extends the Landau criterion to microscopic superconductivity in fermions (electron and hole) system and system with Cooper pairs without long-range phase coherence. This paper gives another three non-superconductive systems that are of microscopic superconductivity. This paper demonstrates that one application of microscopic superconductivity is to establish room temperature electronics of the high-To cuprates.

  2. Investigation of potential fluctuating intra-unit cell magnetic order in cuprates by μ SR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, A.; Akintola, K.; Potma, M.; Ishikado, M.; Eisaki, H.; Hardy, W. N.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Sonier, J. E.

    2016-10-01

    We report low temperature muon spin relaxation (μ SR ) measurements of the high-transition-temperature (Tc) cuprate superconductors Bi2 +xSr2 -xCaCu2O8 +δ and YBa2Cu3O6.57 , aimed at detecting the mysterious intra-unit cell (IUC) magnetic order that has been observed by spin-polarized neutron scattering in the pseudogap phase of four different cuprate families. A lack of confirmation by local magnetic probe methods has raised the possibility that the magnetic order fluctuates slowly enough to appear static on the time scale of neutron scattering, but too fast to affect μ SR or nuclear magnetic resonance signals. The IUC magnetic order has been linked to a theoretical model for the cuprates, which predicts a long-range ordered phase of electron-current loop order that terminates at a quantum crictical point (QCP). Our study suggests that lowering the temperature to T ˜25 mK and moving far below the purported QCP does not cause enough of a slowing down of fluctuations for the IUC magnetic order to become detectable on the time scale of μ SR . Our measurements place narrow limits on the fluctuation rate of this unidentified magnetic order.

  3. Magnetic excitations of layered cuprates studied by RIXS at Cu L{sub 3} edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiringhelli, G., E-mail: giacomo.ghiringhelli@fisi.polimi.it [CNR/SPIN, CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Braicovich, L. [CNR/SPIN, CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► We have developed very high resolution RIXS instrumentation. ► Cu L{sub 3} RIXS is ideal for studying magnetic excitations in layered cuprates. ► RIXS has been used to map magnon and paramagnon dispersion in HTcS. ► We have developed the first partial polarization analyzer for RIXS in the soft X-rays. -- Abstract: The inelastic scattering of X-rays is becoming a powerful alternative to better established techniques, based on neutrons or low energy photons, for the study of low- and medium-energy excitations in solids. When performed in the soft range the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) is ideal for strongly correlated electron systems based on 3d transition metals. The remarkable evolution of Cu L{sub 3} RIXS has been boosted by the steady improvement of experimental energy resolution, and by the fortunate fact that cuprates give intense and richly featured spectra. Over the last 8 years several key results were obtained using the AXES (ESRF) and the SAXES (SLS) spectrometers. This initial success is now supporting several new projects for soft X-ray RIXS worldwide. We briefly present here the case of spin excitation dispersion in insulating and superconducting cuprates and the first RIXS spectra with partial polarization analysis of the scattered photons.

  4. Flop Transitions in Cuprate and Color Superconductors From SO(5) to SO(10) Unification?

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekharan, S; Schlittgen, B; Wiese, U J

    2001-01-01

    The phase diagrams of cuprate superconductors and of QCD at non-zero baryon chemical potential are qualitatively similar. The Neel phase of the cuprates corresponds to the chirally broken phase of QCD, and the high-temperature superconducting phase corresponds to the color superconducting phase. In the SO(5) theory for the cuprates the $SO(3)_s$ spin rotational symmetry and the $U(1)_{em}$ gauge symmetry of electromagnetism are dynamically unified. This suggests that the $SU(2)_L \\otimes SU(2)_R \\otimes U(1)_B$ chiral symmetry of QCD and the $SU(3)_c$ color gauge symmetry may get unified to SO(10). Dynamical enhancement of symmetry from $SO(2)_s \\otimes \\Z(2)$ to $SO(3)_s$ is known to occur in anisotropic antiferromagnets. In these systems the staggered magnetization flops from an easy 3-axis into the 12-plane at a critical value of the external magnetic field. Similarly, the phase transitions in the SO(5) and SO(10) models are flop transitions of a ``superspin''. Despite this fact, a renormalization group fl...

  5. Progress in Neutron Scattering Studies of Spin Excitations in High-Tc Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Masaki; Hiraka, Haruhiro; Matsuda, Masaaki; Matsuura, Masato; Tranquada, John M.; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Xu, Guangyong; Yamada, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments continue to improve our knowledge of spin fluctuations in layered cuprates, excitations that are symptomatic of the electronic correlations underlying high-temperature superconductivity. Time-of-flight spectrometers, together with new and varied single crystal samples, have provided a more complete characterization of the magnetic energy spectrum and its variation with carrier concentration. While the spin excitations appear anomalous in comparison with simple model systems, there is clear consistency among a variety of cuprate families. Focusing initially on hole-doped systems, we review the nature of the magnetic spectrum, and variations in magnetic spectral weight with doping. We consider connections with the phenomena of charge and spin stripe order, and the potential generality of such correlations as suggested by studies of magnetic-field and impurity induced order. We contrast the behavior of the hole-doped systems with the trends found in the electron-doped superconductors. Returning to hole-doped cuprates, studies of translation-symmetry-preserving magnetic order are discussed, along with efforts to explore new systems. We conclude with a discussion of future challenges.

  6. Progress in Neutron Scattering Studies of Spin Excitations in High-T(c) Cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita M.; Tranquada J.; Hiraka, H.; Matsuda, M.; Matsuura, M.; Wakimoto, S.; Xu, G.; Yamada, K.

    2012-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments continue to improve our knowledge of spin fluctuations in layered cuprates, excitations that are symptomatic of the electronic correlations underlying high-temperature superconductivity. Time-of-flight spectrometers, together with new and varied single crystal samples, have provided a more complete characterization of the magnetic energy spectrum and its variation with carrier concentration. While the spin excitations appear anomalous in comparison with simple model systems, there is clear consistency among a variety of cuprate families. Focusing initially on hole-doped systems, we review the nature of the magnetic spectrum, and variations in magnetic spectral weight with doping. We consider connections with the phenomena of charge and spin stripe order, and the potential generality of such correlations as suggested by studies of magnetic-field and impurity induced order. We contrast the behavior of the hole-doped systems with the trends found in the electron-doped superconductors. Returning to hole-doped cuprates, studies of translation-symmetry-preserving magnetic order are discussed, along with efforts to explore new systems. We conclude with a discussion of future challenges.

  7. Inverse correlation between quasiparticle mass and T c in a cuprate high-T c superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzke, Carsten; Malone, Liam; Badoux, Sven; Vignolle, Baptiste; Vignolles, David; Tabis, Wojciech; Walmsley, Philip; Bird, Matthew; Hussey, Nigel E; Proust, Cyril; Carrington, Antony

    2016-03-01

    Close to a zero-temperature transition between ordered and disordered electronic phases, quantum fluctuations can lead to a strong enhancement of electron mass and to the emergence of competing phases such as superconductivity. A correlation between the existence of such a quantum phase transition and superconductivity is quite well established in some heavy fermion and iron-based superconductors, and there have been suggestions that high-temperature superconductivity in copper-oxide materials (cuprates) may also be driven by the same mechanism. Close to optimal doping, where the superconducting transition temperature T c is maximal in cuprates, two different phases are known to compete with superconductivity: a poorly understood pseudogap phase and a charge-ordered phase. Recent experiments have shown a strong increase in quasiparticle mass m* in the cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ as optimal doping is approached, suggesting that quantum fluctuations of the charge-ordered phase may be responsible for the high-T c superconductivity. We have tested the robustness of this correlation between m* and T c by performing quantum oscillation studies on the stoichiometric compound YBa2Cu4O8 under hydrostatic pressure. In contrast to the results for YBa2Cu3O7-δ, we find that in YBa2Cu4O8, the mass decreases as T c increases under pressure. This inverse correlation between m* and T c suggests that quantum fluctuations of the charge order enhance m* but do not enhance T c.

  8. Thermodynamic properties of underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x cuprates for several doping values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, P.; Solís, M. A.; Fortes, M.; Sevilla, F. J.

    2017-05-01

    We report the thermodynamic properties of cuprate superconductors YBa2Cu3O6+x, with x ranging from underdoped (x = 0.55) to optimally doped (x = 0.9) regions. We model cuprates as a boson-fermion gas mixture immersed in a layered structure, which is generated via a Dirac-comb potential applied in the perpendicular direction to the CuO2 planes, while the particles move freely in the other two directions. The optimal system parameters, namely, the planes’ impenetrability and the paired-fermion fraction, are obtained by minimizing the Helmholtz free energy in addition to fixing the critical temperature Tc to its experimental value. Using this optimized scheme, we calculate the entropy, the Helmholtz free energy and the specific heat as functions of temperature. Additionally, some fundamental properties of the electronic specific heat are obtained, such as the normal linear coefficient γ(Tc), the quadratic α term and the jump height at Tc. We reproduce the cubic βl term of the total specific heat for low temperatures. Also our multilayer model inherently brings with it the mass anisotropy observed in cuprate superconductors. Furthermore, we establish the doping value beyond which superconductivity is suppressed.

  9. 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Contrasting Superconductivity of Pnictides and Cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States); Schmalian, J. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States); Canfield, P. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States); Chakravarty, S. [Aspen Center for Physics, CO (United States)

    2011-05-02

    Our quest for materials with better properties is closely integral to the fabric of our society. Currently the development of materials that will allow for improved generation, transport, and storage of energy is at the forefront of our research in condensed matter physics and materials science. Among these materials, compounds that exhibit correlated electron states and emergent phenomena such as superconductivity have great promise, but also difficulties that need to be overcome: problems associated with our need to reliably find, understand, improve and control these promising materials. At the same time, the field of correlated electrons represents the frontier of our understanding of the electronic properties of solids. It contains deep open scientific issues within the broad area of quantum phenomena in matter. The aim of this workshop is to explore and understand the physics of recently discovered Fe-based high-temperature superconductors and contrast and compare them with the cuprates. The superconductivity in iron pnictides, with transition temperatures in excess of 55 K, was discovered in early 2008. The impact of this discovery is comparable to cuprates discovered in 1986. At the same time a number of recent experimental developments in cuprates may lead to a shift in our thinking with regards to these materials. There is therefore much to be learned by devoting a conference in which both classes of superconductors are discussed, especially at this nascent stage of the pnictides.

  10. The crystal structure of RESrGaCuO sub 5 (RE: La, Pr, Nd), a gallate-cuprate with strong structural similarities to superconducting cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, G.; Adelmann, P.; Massing, S. (INFP, Karlsruhe (Germany)); Knitter, R. (IMF, Karlsruhe (Germany)); Wolf, T. (ITP, Karlsruhe (Germany))

    1992-08-01

    The crystal structure and some basic properties of RESrGaCuO{sub 5}(RE: La, Pr, Nd, space group Ima2, z = 4, a = 16.277(1) {angstrom}, b = 5.5191(3) {angstrom}, c = 5.3342(3) {angstrom} for RE = Nd) has been studied by powder and single-crystal X-ray methods, electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements, DSC, TG, and optical microscopy. The structure consists of almost planar nets of distorted corner sharing Cu-O{sub 6} octahedra connected along the longest axis via Ga-O{sub 4} tetrahedral chains with RE and Sr ions filling the large voids between planes and chains. It is isotypic to the structure of the mineral Brownmillerite (Ca{sub 2}(Al,Fe){sub 2}O{sub 5}). Together with its recently described double Cu-O{sub n} layer counterpart RESr{sub 2}GaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7} it forms a homologous series of new gallate-cuprates which closely resemble the corresponding Ga-free superconducting cuprates with single and double Cu-O{sub n} layers. Stoichiometric RESrGaCuO{sub 5} has a fixed oxygen content and is semiconducting with a strong anisotropy of the optical absorption, indicating a pronounced 2-dimensional character of the electronic properties. P-doping of these materials by partial substitution of RE by additional Sr has not been successful up to now.

  11. Phase fluctuation in overdoped cuprates? Superconducting dome due to Mott-ness of the tightly bound preformed pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Wei; Yang, Fan

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the current lore, we demonstrate that even the overdoped cuprates suffer from superconducting phase fluctuation in the strong binding limit. Specifically, the Mott-ness of the underlying doped holes dictates naturally a generic optimal doping around 15% and nearly complete loss of phase coherence around 25%, giving rise to a dome shape of superconducting transition temperature in excellent agreement with experimental observations of the cuprates. We verify this effect with a simple estimation using Gutzwiller approximation of the preformed pairs, obtained through variational Monte Carlo calculation. This realization suggests strongly the interesting possibility that the high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates might be mostly described by Bose-Einstein condensation, without crossing over to amplitude fluctuating Cooper pairs. Supported by Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  12. Expanding earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arguments in favor of an expanding earth are presented. The author believes that the theory of plate tectonics is a classic error in the history of geology. The case for the expanding earth is organized in the following way: introductory review - face of the earth, development of expanding earth concept, necessity for expansion, the subduction myth, and definitions; some principles - scale of tectonic phenomena, non-uniformitarianism, tectonic profile, paleomagnetism, asymmetry of the earth, rotation of the earth, and modes of crustal extension; regional studies - western North America, Central America, South-East Asia, and the rift oceans; tests and cause of expansion. 824 references, 197 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

  13. Spectral properties of doped bilayer cuprates at finite temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Pratap; Ratan Lal; Govinda; S K Joshi

    2002-05-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+, which possesses two CuO2 layers in the same unit cell, have yielded very interesting results. For the overdoped samples, these results show a splitting of electronic states near = (,0) point of Brillioun zone. On the other hand, no splitting is observed in the underdoped samples. In view of this, the detailed studies including the doping and temperature dependence of the spectral properties become desirable. In this paper, we consider cuprates possessing two CuO2 layers per unit cell. Each layer in the system is described by the -'- model and the two layers are coupled via an intrabilayer hopping term (⊥) and an intrabilayer exchange coupling (⊥). A self-consistent perturbation approach is used to calculate the electronic spectral function for different values of hole density, hole momentum and temperature. We find that the imaginary part of the self energy is strongly momentum dependent which contradicts the suggestion that the Fermi surface of cuprates may be described by marginal Fermi liquid theory. We have calculated the spectral function for various values of intrabilayer parameters ⊥ and ⊥. For larger values of intrabilayer interactions we observe the splitting in the quasi-particle peak at = (,0) which is in agreement with the recent observations. The splitting is also found to be sensitive to the hole concentration as well as the temperature of the system. We have also discussed the reasons why the splitting is absent in underdoped bilayer cuprates at low temperature.

  14. Analysis of mid-infrared optical conductivity in electron-doped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, Dinesh [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhawan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore-452017 (India); Patel, G S [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhawan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore-452017 (India); Singh, R K [M P Bhoj (Open) University, Shivaji Nagar, Bhopal-462016, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2003-05-01

    Observed frequency dependent optical conductivity {sigma}({omega}) of electron-doped cuprate Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4-{delta}} ({delta} {approx} 0.02, T{sub c} {approx} 25 K) superconductors has been theoretically analysed. Starting from an effective two-dimensional (2D) interaction potential for superlattice of electron-doped cuprates treated as a layered electron gas, the spectral function is developed. Calculations of {sigma}({omega}) have been made within the two component scheme: one is the coherent Drude carriers responsible for superconductivity and the other is incoherent motion of carriers from one site to the other that leads to a pairing between Drude carriers. The approach accounts for the anomalies observed (frequency dependence of optical conductivity) in the optical measurements for the normal state. Estimating the effective mass from specific heat measurement and {epsilon}{sub {infinity}} from band structure calculations for the low-energy charge density waves, the model has only one free parameter, the relaxation rate. The frequency dependent relaxation rates are expressed in terms of memory functions, and the coherent Drude carriers from the effective interaction potential lead to a sharp peak at zero frequency and a long tail at higher frequencies, i.e. in the infrared region, while the hopping of carriers from one site to the other (incoherent motion of doped carriers) yields a peak value in the optical conductivity centred at mid-infrared region. We find that both the Drude and hopping carriers in the superlattice of electron-doped cuprates will contribute to the optical process of conduction in the CuO{sub 2} planes and show similar results on optical conductivity in the mid-infrared as well as infrared frequency regions as those revealed from experiments.

  15. Analysis of mid-infrared optical conductivity in electron-doped cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Dinesh; Patel, G. S.; Singh, R. K.

    2003-05-01

    Observed frequency dependent optical conductivity sigma(omega) of electron-doped cuprate Nd1.85Ce0.15CuO4-delta (delta approx 0.02, Tc approx 25 K) superconductors has been theoretically analysed. Starting from an effective two-dimensional (2D) interaction potential for superlattice of electron-doped cuprates treated as a layered electron gas, the spectral function is developed. Calculations of sigma(omega) have been made within the two component scheme: one is the coherent Drude carriers responsible for superconductivity and the other is incoherent motion of carriers from one site to the other that leads to a pairing between Drude carriers. The approach accounts for the anomalies observed (frequency dependence of optical conductivity) in the optical measurements for the normal state. Estimating the effective mass from specific heat measurement and varepsiloninfty from band structure calculations for the low-energy charge density waves, the model has only one free parameter, the relaxation rate. The frequency dependent relaxation rates are expressed in terms of memory functions, and the coherent Drude carriers from the effective interaction potential lead to a sharp peak at zero frequency and a long tail at higher frequencies, i.e. in the infrared region, while the hopping of carriers from one site to the other (incoherent motion of doped carriers) yields a peak value in the optical conductivity centred at mid-infrared region. We find that both the Drude and hopping carriers in the superlattice of electron-doped cuprates will contribute to the optical process of conduction in the CuO2 planes and show similar results on optical conductivity in the mid-infrared as well as infrared frequency regions as those revealed from experiments.

  16. Unusual Metallic Conductivity of Underdoped and Optimally Doped Cuprates: Evidence for Competing Fermi-Liquid and Pairing Pseudogap Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Dzhumanov, S.; Dushanov, E.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a possible scenario for the new metallic conductivity of underdoped and optimally doped cuprates. Charge carriers are assumed to be large polarons which form a Fermi-liquid and Cooper-like pairs below a crossover tempurature $T^{\\ast}$. We use the Boltzmann equation to calculate the conductivity of self-trapped carriers and the resistivity $\\rho$ as a function of temperature and doping for different cuprates. We show that various anomalies in $\\rho(T)$ below $T^{\\ast}$ are caused b...

  17. Hidden Fermi-liquid Charge Transport in the Antiferromagnetic Phase of the Electron-Doped Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangmu; Tabis, W.; Yu, G.; Barišić, N.; Greven, M.

    2016-11-01

    Systematic analysis of the planar resistivity, Hall effect, and cotangent of the Hall angle for the electron-doped cuprates reveals underlying Fermi-liquid behavior even deep in the antiferromagnetic part of the phase diagram. The transport scattering rate exhibits a quadratic temperature dependence, and is nearly independent of doping and compound and carrier type (electrons versus holes), and hence is universal. Our analysis moreover indicates that the material-specific resistivity upturn at low temperatures and low doping has the same origin in both electron- and hole-doped cuprates.

  18. Synthesis of a new layered cuprate, Gd 2CaBa 2Ti 2Cu 2O 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, A.; Adachi, S.; Sugano, T.; Wu, X.-J.; Yamauchi, H.

    1994-10-01

    A new layered cuprate, Gd 2CaBa 2Ti 2Cu 2O 12, which has a perovskite-related structure, has been discovered. The crystal structure is investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and Rietveld analysis. It has a tetragonal symmetry with lattice parameters a=3.894 Å and c=35.49 Å. In the crystal there are sheets consisting of CuO 5 pyramids, which is one of the common features of p-type high- Tc superconducting cuprates.

  19. Nanoscopic stripe-like inhomogeneities and optical conductivity of doped cuprates

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new approach to theoretical description of doped cuprate like $La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_4$ and $YBa_2Cu_3O_{6+x}$, assuming phase separation and treating it as inhomogeneous composite material, containing the dielectric and metallic stripe-like nanoparticles. The formalism of effective medium theory is then applied for calculation of dielectric permittivity, optical and EELS spectra of $La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_4$ with $x$ varying in a wide range. Reasonable semi-quantitative agreement with ex...

  20. Anti-Correlation between Energy-Gap and Phonon Energy for Cuprate Bi2212 Superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wei

    2008-01-01

    Using the electron-phonon mechanism, we explain the spatial anti-correlation between the energy-gap and the energy of phonon mode for cuprate superconductor found in tunnelling spectrum by STM measurements of Bi2212, which is the direct effect of an important relationship (or constraint) I =const, where I is superconducting parameters. By relaxing above constraint, we study the correlation of energy gap and phonon energy when I has a distribution. We calculate a map of transition temperature in space constructing by phonon energy and the parameter of electron-phonon interaction, which is helpful for understanding of the relation.

  1. Isotope effect in the superfluid density of high-temperature superconducting cuprates: stripes, pseudogap, and impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallon, J L; Islam, R S; Storey, J; Williams, G V M; Cooper, J R

    2005-06-17

    Underdoped cuprates exhibit a normal-state pseudogap, and their spins and doped carriers tend to spatially separate into 1D or 2D stripes. Some view these as central to superconductivity and others as peripheral and merely competing. Using La(2-x)Sr(x)Cu(1-y)Zn(y)O4 we show that an oxygen isotope effect in Tc and in the superfluid density can be used to distinguish between the roles of stripes and pseudogap and also to detect the presence of impurity scattering. We conclude that stripes and pseudogap are distinct, and both compete and coexist with superconductivity.

  2. Theory of High-T{sub c} Superconducting Cuprates Based on Experimental Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikosov, A. A.

    1999-12-10

    A model of superconductivity in layered high-temperature superconducting cuprates is proposed, based on the extended saddle point singularities in the electron spectrum, weak screening of the Coulomb interaction and phonon-mediated interaction between electrons plus a small short-range repulsion of Hund's, or spin-fluctuation, origin. This permits to explain the large values of T{sub c}, features of the isotope effect on oxygen and copper, the existence of two types of the order parameter, the peak in the inelastic neutron scattering, the positive curvature of the upper critical field, as function of temperature etc.

  3. Superfluid density and superconducting transition temperature in Bi-based cuprate single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparov, L.; Tanner, D.; Berger, H.; Forro, L.; Margaritondo, G.

    2000-03-01

    We present temperature-dependent reflectance measurements for Bi-based cuprate single crystals in the frequency range from 100 to 40,000 cm-1 (0.012--5 eV). The optical conductivity is obtained by Kramers-Kronig analysis. We compare differently doped Bi-2212 (particularly in the underdoped regime) as well as Pr-doped Bi-2212 crystals by analyzing optical conductivity in the framework of a two-fluid approach. This approach allows us to study correlations between superfluid density and superconducting transition temperature of these materials.

  4. Irradiation-induced disorder in high- Tc cuprates: electronic band structure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, I.; Quitmann, C.; Zacchigna, M.; Zwick, F.; Grioni, M.; Karkin, A.; Kelley, R. J.; Onellion, M.; Margaritondo, G.

    1998-05-01

    We used thermal neutron irradiation to produce disorder in Bi-2212 single crystals ( TC=85 K), at a constant carrier density. The irradiated samples were insulators. High-temperature superconductivity with a lower TC than prior to irradiation could be restored by a low-temperature annealing. We performed angle-resolved photoemission investigation on both unannealed (insulating) and annealed (superconducting) samples in order to study the corresponding changes in electronic structure. We observed a strong suppression of the spectral weight near the Fermi energy with increasing disorder. Our results demonstrate that effects related to disorder cannot be neglected in the interpretation of the spectral properties of cuprates.

  5. High-Energy Kink Observed in the Electron Dispersion of High-Temperature Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla, T.; Kidd, T. E.; Yin, W.-G.; Gu, G. D.; Johnson, P. D.; Pan, Z.-H.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2007-04-01

    Photoemission studies show the presence of a high-energy anomaly in the observed band dispersion for two families of cuprate superconductors, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ and La2-xBaxCuO4. The anomaly, which occurs at a binding energy of approximately 340 meV, is found to be anisotropic and relatively weakly doping dependent. Scattering from short range or nearest neighbor spin excitations is found to supply an adequate description of the observed phenomena.

  6. A novel first-principles approach to effective Hamiltonians for high Tc superconducting cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, W.-G.; Ku, W.

    2008-03-01

    We report our recent progress of deriving the low-energy effective one-band Hamiltonians for the prototypical cuprate superconductor Ca2CuO2Cl2, based on a newly developed first-principles Wannier-states approach that takes into account large on-site Coulomb repulsion. The apical atom pz state is found to affect the general properties of the low-energy hole state, namely the Zhang-Rice singlet, via additional intra-sublattice hoppings, nearest-neighbor 'super-repulsion,' and other microscopic many-body processes.

  7. Does the Two-Step Resistive Transition Represent AN Intrinsic Property of Electron-Doped Cuprates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, T. R.

    This work presents the results of the resistivity vs. temperature measurements obtained under different excitation currents, carried out on Nd1.783Ce0.15CuO3.989 followed by the new analytical formula Nd2-(4x + v-2)/3Ce0.15 CuOy. The measurements revealed different characteristics for different parts of the investigated sample. The obtained results may suggest the idea that double resistive superconducting transition in n-type polycrystalline cuprates is of a rather extrinsic future. The electron microscope photography applied in order to investigate the microstructure of the chosen samples also supported the above view.

  8. Supercurrent through cuprate grain boundaries in the presence of strong correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Fabian Alexander; Graser, Siegfried; Loder, Florian; Kopp, Thilo [Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Strong correlations are known to severely reduce the mobility of charge carriers near half-filling and thus have an important influence on the current carrying properties of grain boundaries in high-T{sub c} cuprates. We apply a Gutzwiller method to investigate the critical current through microscopically reconstructed grain boundaries for a wide range of misalignment angles. In good agreement with experimental data, we find a reduction of the current by one order of magnitude as compared to an analogous weak coupling evaluation. This reduction emerges from the interplay of charge fluctuations and strong correlations.

  9. The Kramer-Pesch Effect and Damping of the Vortex Motion in the Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doettinger, S. G.; Kapitulnik, A.; Huebener, R. P.; Kittelberger, S.

    1997-03-01

    We discuss relevance of the Kramer-Pesch-effect for cuprate superconductors. As first discussed by Kramer and Pesch, in the clean limit the radius of the vortex core in a type-II superconductor decreases in proportion to T with decreasing temperature. This effect is due to the thermal population of the quasiparticle bound states in the vortex core. This shrinking has important consequences for vortex statics and dynamics, and leads to novel features of the damping of the vortex motion at low temperatures. Recent measurements of the microwave power absorption and the electric resistance at high vortex velocities are presented in this context.

  10. Relaxation time of the Cooper pairs near Tc in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramallo, M. V.; Carballeira, C.; Viña, J.; Veira, J. A.; Mishonov, T.; Pavuna, D.; Vidal, F.

    1999-10-01

    It is first shown that the thermal fluctuation effects on the transport and on the thermodynamic observables above the superconducting transition may provide, when they are analyzed simultaneously and consistently, a powerful tool to access the relaxation time, τ0, of the Cooper pairs with wave vector k = 0 in high-temperature cuprate superconductors (HTSC). Then, we apply this procedure to optimally doped YBa2Cu3O7 - δ (Y-123) crystals. It is found that in this HTSC τ0 follows, within 20% accuracy, the BCS temperature behaviour and amplitude given by τ0 = πhbar/[8kB(T - Tc0)].

  11. Properties of HIGH-Tc Cuprates: Some Recent Results and Open Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, Ivana; Pavuna, Davor

    Thirteen years ago, late in 1986, several groups confirmed striking claims of the famous paper by Bednorz and M[Z Phys. B 64 (1986) 189] that announced the discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in cuprates. Some 60,000 papers later, we are still struggling to understand the high-Tc oxide superconductivity. Here we present some of the most relevant recent experiments and discuss some open questions across rather complex electronic phase diagram; we also note an important role of un-intentional and intentional disorder in these layered, high-Tc oxides.

  12. On the doping variation of the pseudogap in high- Tc cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuna, Davor; Abrecht, Mike; Ariosa, Daniel; Margaritondo, Giorgio

    2001-11-01

    We briefly summarize well established and the latest experimental results concerning the doping dependence of the so-called pseudogap ( T*) and emphasize that surface related techniques, like ARPES or tunneling, give somewhat higher value of T* as compared to the bulk techniques, like specific heat. In the underdoped regime most theoretical models differ in extrapolating the T*-line to zero doping. As underdoped cuprates are rather inhomogeneous and the disorder plays an important role, the complete microscopic theory will have to take into account all these subtle effects.

  13. Defect-Induced Changes in the Spectral Properties of HIGH-Tc Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, I.; Berger, H.; Rullier-Albenque, F.; Margaritondo, G.; Pavuna, D.; Grioni, L. Forroand M.

    Superconductivity in high-Tc cuprates is particularly sensitive to disorder due to the unconventional d-wave pairing symmetry. We investigated effects of disorder on the spectral properties of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x high-Tc superconductor. We found that already small defect densities suppress the characteristic spectral signature of the superconducting state. The spectral line shape clearly reflects new excitations within the gap, as expected for defect-induced pair breaking. At the lowest defect concentrations the normal state remains unaffected, while increased disorder leads to suppression of the normal quasiparticle peaks.

  14. Phase separation of electrons strongly coupled with phonons in cuprates and manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Sasha

    2009-03-01

    Recent advanced Monte Carlo simulations have not found superconductivity and phase separation in the Hubbard model with on-site repulsive electron-electron correlations. I argue that microscopic phase separations in cuprate superconductors and colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) manganites originate from a strong electron-phonon interaction (EPI) combined with unavoidable disorder. Attractive electron correlations, caused by an almost unretarded EPI, are sufficient to overcome the direct inter-site Coulomb repulsion in these charge-transfer Mott-Hubbard insulators, so that low energy physics is that of small polarons and small bipolarons. They form clusters localized by disorder below the mobility edge, but propagate as the Bloch states above the mobility edge. I identify the Froehlich EPI as the most essential for pairing and phase separation in superconducting layered cuprates. The pairing of oxygen holes into heavy bipolarons in the paramagnetic phase (current-carrier density collapse (CCDC)) explains also CMR and high and low-resistance phase coexistence near the ferromagnetic transition of doped manganites.

  15. Magnetic proximity effect at the interface between a cuprate superconductor and an oxide spin valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Demidov, V. V.; Khaydukov, Yu. N.; Mustafa, L.; Constantinian, K. Y.; Kalabukhov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-04-01

    A heterostructure that consists of the YBa2Cu3O7-δ cuprate superconductor and the SrRuO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 ruthenate/manganite spin valve is investigated using SQUID magnetometry, ferromagnetic resonance, and neutron reflectometry. It is shown that a magnetic moment is induced due to the magnetic proximity effect in the superconducting part of the heterostructure, while the magnetic moment in the composite ferromagnetic interlayer is suppressed. The magnetization emerging in the superconductor coincides in order of magnitude with the results of calculations taking into account the induced magnetic moment of Cu atoms because of orbital reconstruction at the interface between the superconductor and the ferromagnet, as well as with the results of the model taking into account the variations in the density of states at a distance on the order of the coherence length in the superconductor. The experimentally obtained characteristic penetration depth of the magnetic moment in the superconductor considerably exceeds the coherence length of the cuprate superconductor, which indicates the predominance of the mechanism of induced magnetic moment of Cu atoms.

  16. Metal–insulator crossover in high c cuprates: A gauge field approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P A Marchetti; Z B Su; L Yu

    2002-05-01

    A metal–insulator crossover appears in the experimental data for in-plane resistivity of underdoped cuprates and a range of superconducting cuprates in the presence of a strong magnetic field suppressing superconductivity. We propose an explanation for this phenomenon based on a gauge field theory approach to the t-J model. In this approach, based on a formal spin-charge separation, the low energy effective action describes gapful spinons (with a theoretically derived doping dependence of the gap $m^{2}_{s}∼|{\\rm ln }|$) and holons with finite Fermi surface (F ∼ ) interacting via a gauge field whose basic effect on the spinons is to bind them into overdamped spin waves, shifting their gap by a damping term linear in , which causes the metal–insulator crossover. The presence of a magnetic field perpendicular to the plane acts by increasing the damping, in turn producing a big positive transverse in-plane magnetoresistance at low , as experimentally observed.

  17. Ultrasonic signatures at the superconducting and the pseudogap phase boundaries in YBCO cuprates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehter, Arkady [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, Jonathan B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balakirev, Fedor F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McDonald, Ross David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Riggs, Scott C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramshaw, Brad [University of British Columbia, Canada; Liang, Ruixing [University of British Columbia, Canada; Hardy, Walter N. [University of British Columbia, Canada; Bonn, Doug A. [University of British Columbia, Canada

    2012-08-28

    A major issue in the understanding of cuprate superconductors is the nature of the metallic state from which high temperature superconductivity emerges. Central to this issue is the pseudogap region of the doping-temperature phase diagram that extends from room temperature to the superconducting transition. Although polarized neutron scattering studies hint at magnetic order associated with the pseudogap, there is no clear thermodynamic evidence for a phase boundary. Such evidence has a straightforward physical interpretation, however, it is difficult to obtain over a temperature range wide enough to encompass both the pseudogap and superconducting phases. We address this by measuring the elastic response of detwinned single crystals, an underdoped YBCO{sub 6.60} with superconducting transition at T{sub c} = 61.6K and a slightly overdoped YBCO{sub 6.98} with T{sub c} = 88.0K. We observe a discontinuity in the elastic moduli across the superconducting transition. Its magnitude requires that pair formation is coincident with superconducting coherence (the onset of the Meissner effect). For both crystals the elastic response reveals a phase transition at the pseudogap boundary. In slightly overdoped YBCO that transition is 20K below T{sub c}, extending the pseudogap phase boundary inside the superconducting dome. This supports a description of the metallic state in cuprates where a pseudogap phase boundary evolves into a quantum critical point masked by the superconducting dome.

  18. Random Walks in Anderson's Garden: A Journey from Cuprates to Cooper Pair Insulators and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Baskaran, G

    2016-01-01

    Anderson's Garden is a drawing presented to Philip W. Anderson on the eve of his 60th birthday celebration, in 1983. This cartoon (Fig. 1), whose author is unknown, succinctly depicts some of Anderson's pre-1983 works, as a blooming garden. As an avid reader of Anderson's papers, random walk in Anderson's garden had become a part of my routine since graduate school days. This was of immense help and prepared me for a wonderful collaboration with the gardener himself, on the resonating valence bond (RVB) theory of High Tc cuprates and quantum spin liquids, at Princeton. The result was bountiful - the first (RVB mean field) theory for i) quantum spin liquids, ii) emergent fermi surfaces in Mott insulators and iii) superconductivity in doped Mott insulators. Beyond mean field theory - i) emergent gauge fields, ii) Ginzbuerg Landau theory with RVB gauge fields, iii) prediction of superconducting dome, iv) an early identification and study of a non-fermi liquid normal state of cuprates and so on. Here I narrate th...

  19. Doping-dependent critical Cooper-pair momentum pc in thin underdoped cuprate films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Thomas; Draskovic, John; Steers, Stanley; McJunkin, Thomas; Anmed, Adam

    2015-03-01

    We apply a low-field (oxygen stoichiometry through post-deposition annealing. The technique is based on applying a perpendicular magnetic field to the center of a superconducting film and measuring the field at which screening of the field catastrophically fails. Theory together with measurements on thin films of conventional superconductors Nb and MoGe argue for the validity of the technique. In underdoped cuprates, spectroscopy identifies multiple characteristic energy scales, e.g., the pseudogap and the ``nodal'' gap, neither of which is proportional to Tc. On general grounds, we expect to find that pc ~ 1/1ξ ξ is proportional to the characteristic superconducting energy scale. We observe that pc ~Tc as Tc decreases with underdoping, identifying kBTc as the characteristic energy. While this result is trivial in conventional superconductors whose spectroscopic gaps are proportional to Tc, it is significant in cuprates. Research supported by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences through Grant No. FG02-08ER46533.

  20. Real-Time Observation of Cuprates Structural Dynamics by Ultrafast Electron Crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Carbone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The phonon-mediated attractive interaction between carriers leads to the Cooper pair formation in conventional superconductors. Despite decades of research, the glue holding Cooper pairs in high-temperature superconducting cuprates is still controversial, and the same is true for the relative involvement of structural and electronic degrees of freedom. Ultrafast electron crystallography (UEC offers, through observation of spatiotemporally resolved diffraction, the means for determining structural dynamics and the possible role of electron-lattice interaction. A polarized femtosecond (fs laser pulse excites the charge carriers, which relax through electron-electron and electron-phonon couplings, and the consequential structural distortion is followed diffracting fs electron pulses. In this paper, the recent findings obtained on cuprates are summarized. In particular, we discuss the strength and symmetry of the directional electron-phonon coupling in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (BSCCO, as well as the c-axis structural instability induced by near-infrared pulses in La2CuO4 (LCO. The theoretical implications of these results are discussed with focus on the possibility of charge stripes being significant in accounting for the polarization anisotropy of BSCCO, and cohesion energy (Madelung calculations being descriptive of the c-axis instability in LCO.

  1. Imaging the impact on cuprate superconductivity of varying the interatomic distances within individual crystal unit cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, J A; Lee, Jinho; Wang, M; McElroy, K; Fujita, K; Andersen, B M; Hirschfeld, P J; Eisaki, H; Uchida, S; Davis, J C

    2008-03-04

    Many theoretical models of high-temperature superconductivity focus only on the doping dependence of the CuO(2)-plane electronic structure. However, such models are manifestly insufficient to explain the strong variations in superconducting critical temperature, T(c), among cuprates that have identical hole density but are crystallographically different outside of the CuO(2) plane. A key challenge, therefore, has been to identify a predominant out-of-plane influence controlling the superconductivity, with much attention focusing on the distance d(A) between the apical oxygen and the planar copper atom. Here we report direct determination of how variations in interatomic distances within individual crystalline unit cells affect the superconducting energy-gap maximum Delta of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta). In this material, quasiperiodic variations of unit cell geometry occur in the form of a bulk crystalline "supermodulation." Within each supermodulation period, we find approximately 9 +/- 1% cosinusoidal variation in local Delta that is anticorrelated with the associated d(A) variations. Furthermore, we show that phenomenological consistency would exist between these effects and the random Delta variations found near dopant atoms if the primary effect of the interstitial dopant atom is to displace the apical oxygen so as to diminish d(A) or tilt the CuO(5) pyramid. Thus, we reveal a strong, nonrandom out-of-plane effect on cuprate superconductivity at atomic scale.

  2. Pseudogap-generated a coexistence of Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaisong; Gao, Deheng; Feng, Shiping

    2017-03-01

    One of the most intriguing puzzle is why there is a coexistence of Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in the pseudogap phase of cuprate superconductors? This puzzle is calling for an explanation. Based on the t - J model in the fermion-spin representation, the coexistence of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets in cuprate superconductors is studied by taking into account the pseudogap effect. It is shown that the pseudogap induces an energy band splitting, and then the poles of the electron Green's function at zero energy form two contours in momentum space, however, the electron spectral weight on these two contours around the antinodal region is gapped out by the pseudogap, leaving behind the low-energy electron spectral weight only located at the disconnected segments around the nodal region. In particular, the tips of these disconnected segments converge on the hot spots to form the closed Fermi pockets, generating a coexistence of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. Moreover, the single-particle coherent weight is directly related to the pseudogap, and grows linearly with doping. The calculated result of the overall dispersion of the electron excitations is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The theory also predicts that the pseudogap-induced peak-dip-hump structure in the electron spectrum is absent from the hot-spot directions.

  3. Striped superconductors: how spin, charge and superconducting orders intertwine in the cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Erez; Kivelson, Steven A [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Fradkin, Eduardo [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801-3080 (United States); Tranquada, John M [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)], E-mail: kivelson@stanford.edu

    2009-11-15

    Recent transport experiments in the original cuprate high temperature superconductor, La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, have revealed a remarkable sequence of transitions and crossovers that give rise to a form of dynamical dimensional reduction, in which a bulk crystal becomes essentially superconducting in two directions while it remains poorly metallic in the third. We identify these phenomena as arising from a distinct new superconducting state, the 'striped superconductor', in which the superconducting order is spatially modulated, so that its volume average value is zero. Here, in addition to outlining the salient experimental findings, we sketch the order parameter theory of the state, stressing some of the ways in which a striped superconductor differs fundamentally from an ordinary (uniform) superconductor, especially concerning its response to quenched randomness. We also present the results of density matrix renormalization group calculations on a model of interacting electrons in which sign oscillations of the superconducting order are established. Finally, we speculate concerning the relevance of this state to experiments in other cuprates, including recent optical studies of La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} in a magnetic field, neutron scattering experiments in underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} and a host of anomalies seen in STM and ARPES studies of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}}.

  4. Evolution of symmetry-broken states in the pseudogap regime of cuprates - the atomic structure footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozin, Emil; Zhong, R.; Knox, K. R.; Winn, B. L.; Gu, G. D.; Hill, J. P.; Tranquada, J. M.; Billinge, S. J. L.

    2015-03-01

    Revealing the nature of the symmetry broken states in strongly correlated electron systems in general, and in the pseudo-gap (PG) phase of cuprates in particular, is instrumental in understanding the underlying properties. To that effect the knowledge of the local atomic structure may reveal relevant details important for more comprehensive understanding of the character of symmetry broken states in strongly correlated electron systems. Atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is one of the few experimental methods that can speak to this problem. Mounting experimental evidence suggests that the pseudogap phase may represent an electronic state in which the four-fold rotational symmetry of the CuO2 planes is broken, pointing to stripe or nematic character. Systematic approach has been taken in charting both long and short range structural orders, on an equal footing, across the (x, T) phase diagrams of cuprates. For example, in La2-xBaxCuO4, by combining inelastic neutron scattering and neutron PDF approaches, we find evidence consistent with there being a dynamic symmetry breaking well above the charge ordering temperature and within the pseudogap regime. The response has non-monotonic doping dependence that peaks at 1/8 composition. Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was supported by US DOE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DOE-BES) under Contract DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  5. Striped superconductors: how spin, charge and superconducting orders intertwine in the cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Erez; Fradkin, Eduardo; Kivelson, Steven A.; Tranquada, John M.

    2009-11-01

    Recent transport experiments in the original cuprate high temperature superconductor, La2-xBaxCuO4, have revealed a remarkable sequence of transitions and crossovers that give rise to a form of dynamical dimensional reduction, in which a bulk crystal becomes essentially superconducting in two directions while it remains poorly metallic in the third. We identify these phenomena as arising from a distinct new superconducting state, the 'striped superconductor', in which the superconducting order is spatially modulated, so that its volume average value is zero. Here, in addition to outlining the salient experimental findings, we sketch the order parameter theory of the state, stressing some of the ways in which a striped superconductor differs fundamentally from an ordinary (uniform) superconductor, especially concerning its response to quenched randomness. We also present the results of density matrix renormalization group calculations on a model of interacting electrons in which sign oscillations of the superconducting order are established. Finally, we speculate concerning the relevance of this state to experiments in other cuprates, including recent optical studies of La2-xSrxCuO4 in a magnetic field, neutron scattering experiments in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x and a host of anomalies seen in STM and ARPES studies of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ.

  6. Electron dynamics in the normal state of cuprates: Spectral function, Fermi surface and ARPES data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubov, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    An influence of the electron-phonon interaction on excitation spectrum and damping in a narrow band electron subsystem of cuprates has been investigated. Within the framework of the t-J model an approach to solving a problem of account of both strong electron correlations and local electron-phonon binding with characteristic Einstein mode ω0 in the normal state has been presented. In approximation Hubbard-I it was found an exact solution for the polaron bands. We established that in the low-dimensional system with a pure kinematic part of Hamiltonian a complicated excitation spectrum is realized. It is determined mainly by peculiarities of the lattice Green's function. In the definite area of the electron concentration and hopping integrals a correlation gap may be possible on the Fermi level. Also, in specific cases it is observed a doping evolution of the Fermi surface. We found that the strong electron-phonon binding enforces a degree of coherence of electron-polaron excitations near the Fermi level and spectrum along the nodal direction depends on wave vector module weakly. It corresponds to ARPES data. A possible origin of the experimentally observed kink in the nodal direction of cuprates is explained by fine structure of the polaron band to be formed near the mode -ω0.

  7. The novel metallic states of the cuprates: topological Fermi liquids and strange metals

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, Subir

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a talk by S.S. at the Nambu Memorial Symposium at the University of Chicago. We review ideas on the nature of the metallic states of the hole-doped cuprate high temperature superconductors, with an emphasis on the connections between the Luttinger theorem for the size of the Fermi surface, topological quantum field theories (TQFTs), and critical theories involving changes in the size of the Fermi surface. We begin with the derivation of the Luttinger theorem for a Fermi liquid, using momentum balance during a process of flux-insertion in a lattice electronic model with toroidal boundary conditions. We then review the TQFT of the Z2 spin liquid, and demonstrate its compatibility with the toroidal momentum balance argument. This discussion leads naturally to a simple construction of `topological' Fermi liquid states: the fractionalized Fermi liquid (FL*) and the algebraic charge liquid (ACL). We present arguments for a description of the pseudogap metal of the cuprates using Z2-FL* or Z...

  8. Quasi-particles ultrafastly releasing kink bosons to form Fermi arcs in a cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Y; Saitoh, T; Mochiku, T; Nakane, T; Hirata, K; Shin, S

    2016-01-01

    In a conventional framework, superconductivity is lost at a critical temperature (Tc) because, at higher temperatures, gluing bosons can no longer bind two electrons into a Cooper pair. In high-Tc cuprates, it is still unknown how superconductivity vanishes at Tc. We provide evidence that the so-called ≲ 70-meV kink bosons that dress the quasi-particle excitations are playing a key role in the loss of superconductivity in a cuprate. We irradiated a 170-fs laser pulse on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ) and monitored the responses of the superconducting gap and dressed quasi-particles by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We observe an ultrafast loss of superconducting gap near the d-wave node, or light-induced Fermi arcs, which is accompanied by spectral broadenings and weight redistributions occurring within the kink binding energy. We discuss that the underlying mechanism of the spectral broadening that induce the Fermi arc is the undressing of quasi-particles from the kink bosons. The loss mechanism is beyond the conventional framework, and can accept the unconventional phenomena such as the signatures of Cooper pairs remaining at temperatures above Tc.

  9. Single reconstructed Fermi surface pocket in an underdoped single-layer cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M K; Harrison, N; McDonald, R D; Ramshaw, B J; Modic, K A; Barišić, N; Greven, M

    2016-01-01

    The observation of a reconstructed Fermi surface via quantum oscillations in hole-doped cuprates opened a path towards identifying broken symmetry states in the pseudogap regime. However, such an identification has remained inconclusive due to the multi-frequency quantum oscillation spectra and complications accounting for bilayer effects in most studies. We overcome these impediments with high-resolution measurements on the structurally simpler cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg1201), which features one CuO2 plane per primitive unit cell. We find only a single oscillatory component with no signatures of magnetic breakdown tunnelling to additional orbits. Therefore, the Fermi surface comprises a single quasi-two-dimensional pocket. Quantitative modelling of these results indicates that a biaxial charge density wave within each CuO2 plane is responsible for the reconstruction and rules out criss-crossed charge stripes between layers as a viable alternative in Hg1201. Lastly, we determine that the characteristic gap between reconstructed pockets is a significant fraction of the pseudogap energy.

  10. Two energy scales and two quasiparticle dynamics in the superconducting state of under-doped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Tacon, M.; Sacuto, A. [Paris-7 Univ., Lab. Mat riaux et Ph nom nes Quantiques (UMR 7162 CNRS), 75 (France); Laboratoire de Physique du Solide, ESPCI, 75 - Paris (France); Georges, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Kotliar, G. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Rutgers Univ., Serin Physics Lab. (United States); Gallais, Y. [Columbia Univ. New York, Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics, NY (United States); Colson, D.; Forget, A. [CEA Saclay, Service de Physique de l' Etat Condense, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The superconducting state of under-doped cuprates is often described in terms of a single energy scale, associated with the maximum of the (d-wave) gap. Here, we report on electronic Raman scattering results, which show that the gap function in the under-doped regime is characterized by two energy scales, depending on doping in opposite manners. Their ratios to the maximum critical temperature are found to be universal in cuprates. Our experimental results also reveal two different quasiparticle dynamics in the under-doped superconducting state, associated with two regions of momentum space: nodal regions near the zeros of the gap and anti-nodal regions. While anti-nodal quasiparticles quickly loose coherence as doping is reduced, coherent nodal quasiparticles persist down to low doping levels. A theoretical analysis using a new sum-rule allows us to relate the low-frequency-dependence of the Raman response to the temperature-dependence of the superfluid density, both controlled by nodal excitations. (authors)

  11. Change of carrier density at the pseudogap critical point of a cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoux, S; Tabis, W; Laliberté, F; Grissonnanche, G; Vignolle, B; Vignolles, D; Béard, J; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Liang, R; Doiron-Leyraud, N; Taillefer, Louis; Proust, Cyril

    2016-03-10

    The pseudogap is a partial gap in the electronic density of states that opens in the normal (non-superconducting) state of cuprate superconductors and whose origin is a long-standing puzzle. Its connection to the Mott insulator phase at low doping (hole concentration, p) remains ambiguous and its relation to the charge order that reconstructs the Fermi surface at intermediate doping is still unclear. Here we use measurements of the Hall coefficient in magnetic fields up to 88 tesla to show that Fermi-surface reconstruction by charge order in the cuprate YBa2Cu3Oy ends sharply at a critical doping p = 0.16 that is distinctly lower than the pseudogap critical point p* = 0.19 (ref. 11). This shows that the pseudogap and charge order are separate phenomena. We find that the change in carrier density n from n = 1 + p in the conventional metal at high doping (ref. 12) to n = p at low doping (ref. 13) starts at the pseudogap critical point. This shows that the pseudogap and the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator are linked.

  12. Quantum critical point for stripe order: An organizing principle of cuprate superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doiron-Leyraud, Nicolas [Departement de Physique and RQMP, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto (Canada); Taillefer, Louis, E-mail: Louis.Taillefer@USherbrooke.ca [Departement de Physique and RQMP, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-11-01

    A spin density-wave quantum critical point (QCP) is the central organizing principle of organic, iron-pnictide, heavy-fermion and electron-doped cuprate superconductors. It accounts for the superconducting T{sub c} dome, the non-Fermi-liquid resistivity, and the Fermi-surface reconstruction. Outside the magnetically ordered phase above the QCP, scattering and pairing decrease in parallel as the system moves away from the QCP. Here we argue that a similar scenario, based on a stripe-order QCP, is a central organizing principle of hole-doped cuprate superconductors. Key properties of La{sub 1.8-x}Eu{sub 0.2}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}, La{sub 1.6-x}Nd{sub 0.4}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} are naturally unified, including stripe order itself, its QCP, Fermi-surface reconstruction, the linear-T resistivity, and the nematic character of the pseudogap phase.

  13. Self-optimized superconductivity attainable by interlayer phase separation at cuprate interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Takahiro; Nomura, Yusuke; Biermann, Silke; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-07-01

    Stabilizing superconductivity at high temperatures and elucidating its mechanism have long been major challenges of materials research in condensed matter physics. Meanwhile, recent progress in nanostructuring offers unprecedented possibilities for designing novel functionalities. Above all, thin films of cuprate and iron-based high-temperature superconductors exhibit remarkably better superconducting characteristics (for example, higher critical temperatures) than in the bulk, but the underlying mechanism is still not understood. Solving microscopic models suitable for cuprates, we demonstrate that, at an interface between a Mott insulator and an overdoped nonsuperconducting metal, the superconducting amplitude is always pinned at the optimum achieved in the bulk, independently of the carrier concentration in the metal. This is in contrast to the dome-like dependence in bulk superconductors but consistent with the astonishing independence of the critical temperature from the carrier density x observed at the interfaces of La2CuO4 and La2-x Sr x CuO4. Furthermore, we identify a self-organization mechanism as responsible for the pinning at the optimum amplitude: An emergent electronic structure induced by interlayer phase separation eludes bulk phase separation and inhomogeneities that would kill superconductivity in the bulk. Thus, interfaces provide an ideal tool to enhance and stabilize superconductivity. This interfacial example opens up further ways of shaping superconductivity by suppressing competing instabilities, with direct perspectives for designing devices.

  14. The novel metallic states of the cuprates: Topological Fermi liquids and strange metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Subir; Chowdhury, Debanjan

    2016-12-01

    We review ideas on the nature of the metallic states of the hole-doped cuprate high temperature superconductors, with an emphasis on the connections between the Luttinger theorem for the size of the Fermi surface, topological quantum field theories (TQFTs), and critical theories involving changes in the size of the Fermi surface. We begin with the derivation of the Luttinger theorem for a Fermi liquid, using momentum balance during a process of flux insertion in a lattice electronic model with toroidal boundary conditions. We then review the TQFT of the ℤ spin liquid, and demonstrate its compatibility with the toroidal momentum balance argument. This discussion leads naturally to a simple construction of "topological" Fermi liquid states: the fractionalized Fermi liquid (FL*) and the algebraic charge liquid (ACL). We present arguments for a description of the pseudogap metal of the cuprates using ℤ-FL* or ℤ-ACL states with Ising-nematic order. These pseudogap metal states are also described as Higgs phases of a SU(2) gauge theory. The Higgs field represents local antiferromagnetism, but the Higgs-condensed phase does not have long-range antiferromagnetic order: the magnitude of the Higgs field determines the pseudogap, the reconstruction of the Fermi surface, and the Ising-nematic order. Finally, we discuss the route to the large Fermi surface Fermi liquid via the critical point where the Higgs condensate and Ising nematic order vanish, and the application of Higgs criticality to the strange metal.

  15. Effects of magnetic field on the cuprate high-Tc superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lake, B.; Aeppli, G.; Christensen, N.B.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses neutron scattering measurements on the cuprate, high transition temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 (LSCO) in an applied magnetic field. LSCO is a type-II superconductor and magnetic flux can penetrate the material via the formation of vorticies. Phase coherent...

  16. Review- Magnetic orientation and magnetic anisotropy in paramagnetic layered oxides containing rare-earth ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Horii, Atsushi Ishihara, Takayuki Fukushima, Tetsuo Uchikoshi, Hiraku Ogino, Tohru S Suzuki, Yoshio Sakka, Jun-ichi Shimoyama and Kohji Kishio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic anisotropies and easy axes of magnetization at room temperature were determined, and the effects of rare-earth (RE ions were clarified for RE-based cuprates, RE-doped bismuth-based cuprates and RE-doped Bi-based cobaltite regarding the grain orientation by magnetic field. The easy axis, determined from the powder orientation in a static field of 10 T, depended qualitatively on the type of RE ion for all three systems. On the other hand, the magnetization measurement of the c-axis oriented powders, aligned in static or rotating fields, revealed that the type of RE ion strongly affected not only the directions of the easy axis but also the absolute value of magnetic anisotropy, and an appropriate choice of RE ion is required to minimize the magnetic field used for grain orientation. We also studied the possibility of triaxial grain orientation in high-critical-temperature superconductors by a modulated oval magnetic field. In particular, triaxial orientation was attempted in a high-oxygen-pressure phase of orthorhombic RE-based cuprates Y2Ba4Cu7Oy. Although the experiment was performed in epoxy resin, which is not practical, in-plane alignment within 3° was achieved.

  17. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  18. Specific heat of underdoped cuprate superconductors from a phenomenological layered Boson–Fermion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, P., E-mail: patysalasc@hotmail.com; Fortes, M.; Solís, M.A.; Sevilla, F.J.

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • We present a superconductivity model which includes the Boson–Fermion model and extend it to layered structures. • The model straightforwardly predicts and reproduces the electronic specific heat of underdoped cuprates. • The linear component of the electronic specific heat, and the quadratic and cubic behaviors for low temperatures are obtained. • The total specific heat is built giving very satisfactory results. • The mass anisotropy is explained through this model. - Abstract: We adapt the Boson–Fermion superconductivity model to include layered systems such as underdoped cuprate superconductors. These systems are represented by an infinite layered structure containing a mixture of paired and unpaired fermions. The former, which stand for the superconducting carriers, are considered as noninteracting zero spin composite-bosons with a linear energy–momentum dispersion relation in the CuO{sub 2} planes where superconduction is predominant, coexisting with the unpaired fermions in a pattern of stacked slabs. The inter-slab, penetrable, infinite planes are generated by a Dirac comb potential, while paired and unpaired electrons (or holes) are free to move parallel to the planes. Composite-bosons condense at a critical temperature at which they exhibit a jump in their specific heat. These two values are assumed to be equal to the superconducting critical temperature T{sub c} and the specific heat jump reported for YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.80} to fix our model parameters namely, the plane impenetrability and the fraction of superconducting charge carriers. We then calculate the isochoric and isobaric electronic specific heats for temperatures lower than T{sub c} of both, the composite-bosons and the unpaired fermions, which matches the latest experimental curves. From the latter, we extract the linear coefficient (γ{sub n}) at T{sub c}, as well as the quadratic (αT{sup 2}) term for low temperatures. We also calculate the lattice

  19. On d+id Density Wave and Superconducting Orderings in Hole-Doped Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Partha; Gahlot, Ajay Pratap Singh; Singh, Pankaj

    2013-05-01

    The d+id-density wave (chiral DDW) order, at the anti-ferromagnetic wave vector Q = (π, π), is assumed to represent the pseudo-gap (PG) state of a hole-doped cuprate superconductor. The pairing interaction U(k, k‧) required for d+id ordering comprises of (Ux2-y2(k, k‧), Uxy(k, k‧)), where Ux2-y2(k, k') = U1(cos kxa-cos kya)(cos k'xa- cos k'ya) and Uxy(k, k') = U2sin(kxa)sin(kya) sin(k'xa) sin(k'ya) with U1 > U2. The d-wave superconductivity (DSC), driven by an assumed attractive interaction of the form V(k, k') = -ěrt V1ěrt(cos kxa-cos kya)(cos k'xa- cos k'ya) where V1 is a model parameter, is discussed within the mean-field framework together with the d+id ordering. The single-particle excitation spectrum in the CDDW + DSC state is characterized by the Bogoluibov quasi-particle bands — a characteristic feature of SC state. The coupled gap equations are solved self-consistently together with the equation to determine the chemical potential (μ). With the pinning of the van Hove-singularities close to μ, one is able to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of the under-doped cuprates in a consistent manner. The electron specific heat displays non-Fermi liquid feature in the CDDW state. The CDDW and DSC are found to represent two competing orders as the former brings about a depletion of the spectral weight (and Raman response function density) available for pairing in the anti-nodal region of momentum space. It is also shown that the depletion of the spectral weight below Tc at energies larger than the gap amplitude occurs. This is an indication of the strong-coupling superconductivity in cuprates. The calculation of the ratio of the quasi-particle thermal conductivity αxx and temperature in the superconducting phase is found to be constant in the limit of near-zero quasi-particle scattering rate.

  20. Reassessment of the electronic state, magnetism, and superconductivity in high-T{sub c} cuprates with the Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naito, Michio, E-mail: minaito@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Naka-cho 2-24-16, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Ikeda, Ai; Yamamoto, Hideki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The 30-year history of “electron-doped” cuprates is reviewed, including basic physics and material issues. • Undoped cuprates with the Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} (T’) structure are superconducting with T{sub c} over 30 K. • Electron doping by Ce in T’-RE{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} lowers T{sub c} and the highest T{sub c} is obtained at no doping. - Abstract: The electronic phase diagram of the cuprates remains enigmatic and is still a key ingredient to understand the mechanism of high-T{sub c} superconductivity. It has been believed for a long time that parent compounds of cuprates were universally antiferromagnetic Mott insulators (charge-transfer insulators) and that high-T{sub c} superconductivity would develop upon doping holes or electrons in a Mott–Hubbard insulator (“doped Mott-insulator scenario”). However, our recent discovery of superconductivity in the parent compounds of square-planar cuprates with the Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} (T’) structure and the revised electronic phase diagram in T’ cuprates urged a serious reassessment to the above scenario. In this review, we present the main results derived from our synthesis and experiments on T’ cuprates in the undoped or heavily underdoped regime over 20 years, including material issues and basic physics. The key material issue is how to remove excess oxygen ions at the apical site without introducing oxygen vacancies in the CuO{sub 2} planes. In order to put this into practice, the basic knowledge of complex solid-state chemistry in T’ cuprates is required, which is also included in this review.

  1. Role of Lattice Coupling in Establishing Electronic and Magnetic Properties in Quasi-One-Dimensional Cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W. S.; Johnston, S.; Moritz, B.; Lee, J.; Yi, M.; Zhou, K. J.; Schmitt, T.; Patthey, L.; Strocov, V.; Kudo, K.; Koike, Y.; van den Brink, J.; Devereaux, T. P.; Shen, Z. X.

    2013-06-25

    High resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering has been performed to reveal the role of lattice coupling in a family of quasi-1D insulating cuprates, Ca2+5xY2-5xCu5O10. Site-dependent low-energy excitations arising from progressive emissions of a 70 meV lattice vibrational mode are resolved for the first time, providing a direct measurement of electron-lattice coupling strength. We show that such electron-lattice coupling causes doping-dependent distortions of the Cu-O-Cu bond angle, which sets the intrachain spin exchange interactions. Our results indicate that the lattice degrees of freedom are fully integrated into the electronic behavior in low-dimensional systems.

  2. The High Temperature Superconductivity in Cuprates: Physics of the Pseudogap Region

    CERN Document Server

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the physics of the high temperature superconductivity in hole doped copper oxide ceramics in the pseudogap region. Starting from an effective reduced Hamiltonian relevant to the dynamics of holes injected into the copper oxide layers proposed in a previous paper, we determine the superconductive condensate wavefunction. We show that the low-lying elementary condensate excitations are analogous to the rotons in superfluid $^4He$. We argue that the rotons-like excitations account for the specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature. We discuss and compare with experimental observations the London penetration length, the Abrikosov vortices, the upper and lower critical magnetic fields, and the critical current density. We give arguments to explain the origin of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. We investigate the nodal gap in the cuprate superconductors and discuss both the doping and temperature dependence of the nodal gap. We suggest that the nodal gap is responsible for the doping dependence o...

  3. Quenched disorder and vestigial nematicity in the pseudo-gap regime of the cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Laimei; Tarjus, Gilles; Kivelson, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We carry out a theoretical analysis of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson effective field theory of a classical incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) in the presence of weak quenched disorder. While the possibility a sharp phase transition and long-range CDW order are precluded in such systems, we show that any discrete symmetry breaking aspect of the charge order (nematicity in the case of the unidirectional (stripe) CDW we consider explicitly) generically survives up to a non-zero critical disorder strength. Such ``vestigial order,'' which is subject to unambiguous macroscopic detection, can serve as an avatar of what would be CDW order in the zero disorder limit. Various recent experiments in the pseudo-gap regime of the hole-doped cuprate high-temperature superconductors are interpreted in light of these results.

  4. Electronic properites of electron-doped cuprate superconductors probed by high-field magnetotransport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Toni

    2013-09-18

    In the present work the normal-state properties of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (NCCO) are investigated for a broad doping range, covering almost the whole phase diagram of this material. Magnetotransport measurements in the world's highest non-destructive magnetic fields were used as a spectroscopic tool for probing the electronic structure of single-crystalline NCCO as a function of the carrier concentration x. Quantum and semiclassical oscillations in the magnetoresistance provided new insights into various properties of the Fermi surface and the nature of the ground state in the system. The detailed investigations of the field- and temperature-dependent transport and its dependence on the field orientation have revealed a close correlation between symmetry-breaking ordering instabilities and the superconducting state.

  5. Probing Local Lattice Fluctautions in Cuprates and Manganites by High k-Resolution EXAFS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure has been exploited as a tool tostudy local lattice distortions in the perovskite cuperates and manganites, showing novel phenomena as high temperature superconductivity and colossal magneto-resistance. Temperature dependent Cu K-edge and Mn K-edge EXAFS have been used to investigate the local lattice distortions associated with the doped charge at metallic densities in these materials. Temperature dependent correlated Debye-Waller factors of the Cu-O in the cuprates shows an upturn at the stripe formation temperature Tso. Capabilities of the EXAFS technique have been further demonstrated for the case of the manganites, revealing key information on their metal-insulator transition. The EXAFS has been shown to be capable of providing quantitative local distortions that are closely associated with the characteristic properties of these complex materials.

  6. Comparison of electromechanical properties and lattice distortions of different cuprate high temperature superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C.; Grether, A; Rikel, M O; Hudspeth, J; Sugano, M; Ballarino, A; Bottura, L

    2016-01-01

    The electromechanical properties of different cuprate high-temperature superconductors, notably two ReBCO tapes, a reinforced and a nonreinforced Bi-2223 tape, and a Bi-2212 wire, have been studied. The axial tensile stress and strain, as well as the transverse compressive stress limits at which an irreversible critical current degradation occurs, are compared. The experimental setup has been integrated in a high-energy synchrotron beamline, and the self-field critical current and lattice parameter changes as a function of tensile stress and strain of a reinforced Bi-2223 tape have been measured simultaneously. Initially, the Bi-2223 filaments exhibit nearly linear elastic behavior up to the strain at which an irreversible degradation is observed. At 77 K, an axial Bi-2223 filament precompression of 0.09% in the composite tape and a Bi-2223 Poisson ratio ν = 0.21 have been determined.

  7. Inequivalence of single-particle and population lifetimes in a cuprate superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuolong [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Sobota, J. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leuenberger, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); He, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Hashimoto, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, D. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Eisaki, H. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan); Kirchmann, P. S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Z. -X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We study optimally doped Bi-2212 (Tc=96 K) using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Energy-resolved population lifetimes are extracted and compared with single-particle lifetimes measured by equilibrium photoemission. The population lifetimes deviate from the single-particle lifetimes in the low excitation limit by 1–2 orders of magnitude. Fundamental considerations of electron scattering unveil that these two lifetimes are in general distinct, yet for systems with only electron-phonon scattering they should converge in the low-temperature, low-fluence limit. As a result, the qualitative disparity in our data, even in this limit, suggests that scattering channels beyond electron-phonon interactions play a significant role in the electron dynamics of cuprate superconductors.

  8. Electron-phonon coupling in high-temperature cuprate superconductors determined from electron relaxation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadermaier, C; Alexandrov, A S; Kabanov, V V; Kusar, P; Mertelj, T; Yao, X; Manzoni, C; Brida, D; Cerullo, G; Mihailovic, D

    2010-12-17

    We determined electronic relaxation times via pump-probe optical spectroscopy using sub-15 fs pulses for the normal state of two different cuprate superconductors. We show that the primary relaxation process is the electron-phonon interaction and extract a measure of its strength, the second moment of the Eliashberg function λ[ω2] = 800 ± 200 meV2 for La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO4 and λ[ω2] = 400 ± 100 meV2 for YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6.5). These values suggest a possible fundamental role of the electron-phonon interaction in the superconducting pairing mechanism.

  9. Doping Dependent Charge Transfer Gap and Realistic Electronic Model of n-type Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, T.

    2010-05-03

    Based on the analysis of the measurement data of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and optics, we show that the charge transfer gap is significantly smaller than the optical one and is reduced by doping in electron doped cuprate superconductors. This leads to a strong charge fluctuation between the Zhang-Rice singlet and the upper Hubbard bands. The basic model for describing this system is a hybridized two-band t-J model. In the symmetric limit where the corresponding intra- and inter-band hopping integrals are equal to each other, this two-band model is equivalent to the Hubbard model with an antiferromagnetic exchange interaction (i.e. the t-U-J model). The mean-field result of the t-U-J model gives a good account for the doping evolution of the Fermi surface and the staggered magnetization.

  10. Energy gaps in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, J K; Zhu, X B; Yu, H F; Tian, Ye; Yang, H F; Gu, C Z; Wang, N L; Ren, Y F; Zhao, S P

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the cuprate pseudogap (Δ(p)) and superconducting gap (Δ(s)) remains an unsolved mystery. Here, we present a temperature- and doping-dependent tunneling study of submicron Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) intrinsic Josephson junctions, which provides a clear evidence that Δ(s) closes at a temperature T(c) (0) well above the superconducting transition temperature T(c) but far below the pseudogap opening temperature T*. We show that the superconducting pairing first occurs predominantly on a limited Fermi surface near the node below T(c) (0), accompanied by a Fermi arc due to the lifetime effects of quasiparticles and Cooper pairs. The arc length has a linear temperature dependence, and as temperature decreases below T(c) it reduces to zero while pairing spreads to the antinodal region of the pseudogap leading to a d-wave superconducting gap on the entire Fermi surface at lower temperatures.

  11. Hexaaquamagnesium(II bis{[N-(4-methoxy-2-oxidobenzylideneglycylglycinato(3−]cuprate(II} hexahydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxun Jiang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [Mg(H2O6][Cu(C12H11N2O5]2·6H2O, the CuII atoms lie at the center of the square plane of triple negatively charged O,N,N′,O′-tetradentate Schiff base ligands, which are coordinated by one phenolate O atom, one imine N atom, one deprotonated amide N atom and one carboxylate O atom. The MgII center, which sits on an inversion center, is coordinated by six aqua ligands and exhibits a slightly distorted octahedral conformation. The asymmetric unit consists of an [N-(4-methoxy-2-oxidobenzylideneglycylglycinato]cuprate(II anion, one half of an [Mg(H2O6]2+ cation and three free water molecules. The cations and anions form columns by O—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  12. Relaxation time of the Cooper pairs near T{sub c} in cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramallo, M.V.; Carballeira, C.; Vina, J.; Veira, J.A.; Mishonov, T.; Pavuna, D.; Vidal, F. [Santiago de Compostela Univ. (Spain). Lab. de Bajas Temperaturas y Superconductividad

    1999-10-01

    It is first shown that the thermal fluctuation effects on the transport and on the thermodynamic observables above the superconducting transition may provide, when they are analyzed simultaneously and consistently, a powerful tool to access the relaxation time, {tau}{sub 0}, of the Cooper pairs with wave vector k = 0 in high-temperature cuprate superconductors (HTSC). Then, we apply this procedure to optimally doped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (Y-123) crystals. It is found that in this HTSC {tau}{sub 0} follows, within 20% accuracy, the BCS temperature behaviour and amplitude given by {tau}{sub 0} = {pi}{Dirac_h}[8k{sub B}(T-T{sub c0})]. (orig.)

  13. Antiferromagnetism in metals: from the cuprate superconductors to the heavy fermion materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Subir; Metlitski, Max A; Punk, Matthias

    2012-07-25

    The critical theory of the onset of antiferromagnetism in metals, with concomitant Fermi surface reconstruction, has recently been shown to be strongly coupled in two spatial dimensions. The onset of unconventional superconductivity near this critical point is reviewed: it involves a subtle interplay between the breakdown of fermionic quasiparticle excitations on the Fermi surface and the strong pairing glue provided by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations. The net result is a logarithm-squared enhancement of the pairing vertex for generic Fermi surfaces, with a universal dimensionless coefficient independent of the strength of interactions, which is expected to lead to superconductivity at the scale of the Fermi energy. We also discuss the possibility that the antiferromagnetic critical point can be replaced by an intermediate 'fractionalized Fermi liquid' phase, in which there is Fermi surface reconstruction but no long-range antiferromagnetic order. We discuss the relevance of this phase to the underdoped cuprates and the heavy fermion materials.

  14. Sr 2 IrO 4 : Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-01

    To understand the varied magnetic and electronic properties of 3d transition metal oxides (TMO), we routinely invoke a separability among charge-, spin- and orbital degrees of freedom, tightly coupled yet distinct sectors that can be identified, measured, and understood individually. But something interesting happens on the way down the Periodic Table—relativistic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) grows progressively stronger, blurring the lines among these spin, charge, and orbital sectors. SOC forces us to consider a different conceptual framework for 4d, and particularly 5d TMO systems, than has been sufficient for our present day understanding of 3d analogs. Ironically, this rethinking needed for 5d oxides may turn out to be critical to our understanding of one of 3d TMO’s greatest treasures – cuprate superconductivity — and in the process may lead us on a pathway to discovery of a new class of high-Tc materials.

  15. Magnetic proximity effect and superconducting triplet correlations at the cuprate superconductor and oxide spin valve interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, G. A.; Constantinian, K. Y.; Demidov, V. V.; Khaydukov, Yu. N.

    2016-10-01

    A heterostructure consisting of a cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ and a ruthenate/manganite (SrRuO3/La0.7Sr0.3MnO3) spin valve was studied using SQUID magnetometry, ferromagnetic resonance, and neutron reflectometry. It is shown that because of the magnetic proximity effect a magnetic moment is excited in the superconducting portion of the heterostructure, whereas the magnetic moment in the spin valve becomes suppressed. The experimentally obtained value of a typical penetration depth of a magnetic moment into the superconductor is significantly greater than the coherence length of the cuprate superconductor, which indicates that the induced magnetic moment mechanism of Cu atoms is dominant. The mesastructure prepared by adding niobium film as a second superconducting electrode to the existing heterostructure, exhibited a superconducting current (dc Josephson effect) at interlayer thicknesses that are much greater than the coherence length of the ferromagnetic materials. The maximum of the critical current density dependence on the thickness of the spin valve material corresponds to the interlayer coherence length, which agrees with the theoretical predictions associated with spin-triplet pairing. The superconducting current is observed at magnetic fields that are two orders of magnitude greater than the field corresponding to the occurrence of one magnetic flux quantum in the mesastructure. The ratio of the second harmonic of the current-phase dependence of the mesastructure superconducting current to the first, determined according to the dependence of the Shapiro steps on the amplitude of microwave exposure, did not exceed 50%.

  16. The high temperature superconductivity in cuprates: physics of the pseudogap region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the physics of the high temperature superconductivity in hole doped copper oxide ceramics in the pseudogap region. Starting from an effective reduced Hamiltonian relevant to the dynamics of holes injected into the copper oxide layers proposed in a previous paper, we determine the superconductive condensate wavefunction. We show that the low-lying elementary condensate excitations are analogous to the rotons in superfluid 4He. We argue that the rotons-like excitations account for the specific heat anomaly at the critical temperature. We discuss and compare with experimental observations the London penetration length, the Abrikosov vortices, the upper and lower critical magnetic fields, and the critical current density. We give arguments to explain the origin of the Fermi arcs and Fermi pockets. We investigate the nodal gap in the cuprate superconductors and discuss both the doping and temperature dependence of the nodal gap. We suggest that the nodal gap is responsible for the doping dependence of the so-called nodal Fermi velocity detected in angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies. We discuss the thermodynamics of the nodal quasielectron liquid and their role in the low temperature specific heat. We propose that the ubiquitous presence of charge density wave in hole doped cuprate superconductors in the pseudogap region originates from instabilities of the nodal quasielectrons driven by the interaction with the planar CuO2 lattice. We investigate the doping dependence of the charge density wave gap and the competition between charge order and superconductivity. We discuss the effects of external magnetic fields on the charge density wave gap and elucidate the interplay between charge density wave and Abrikosov vortices. Finally, we examine the physics underlying quantum oscillations in the pseudogap region.

  17. Observation of two distinct pairs fluctuation lifetimes and supercurrents in the pseudogap regime of cuprate junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Gad; Lee, Patrick A.

    2016-11-01

    Pairs fluctuation supercurrents and inverse lifetimes in the pseudogap regime are reported. These were measured on epitaxial c-axis junctions of the cuprates, with a PrBa2Cu3O7-δ barrier sandwiched in between two YBa2Cu3O7-δ or doped YBa2Cu3Oy electrodes, with or without magnetic fields parallel to the a-b planes. All junctions had a Tc(high) ≈85 -90 K and a Tc(low) ≈50 -55 K electrodes, allowing us to study pairs fluctuation supercurrents and inverse lifetimes in between these two temperatures. In junctions with a pseudogap electrode under zero field, an excess current due to pair fluctuations was observed which persisted at temperatures above Tc(low) , in the pseudogap regime, and up to about Tc(high) . No such excess current was observed in junctions without an electrode with a pseudogap. The measured conductance spectra at temperatures above Tc(low) were fitted using a modified fluctuations model by Scalapino [Phys. Rev. Lett. 24, 1052 (1970), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.24.1052] of a junction with a serial resistance. We found that in the pseudogap regime, the conductance vs voltage consists of a narrow peak sitting on top of a very broad peak. This yielded two distinct pairs fluctuation lifetimes in the pseudogap electrode which differ by an order of magnitude up to about Tc(high) . Under in-plane fields, these two lifetime values remain separated in two distinct groups, which varied with increasing field moderately. We also found that detection of Amperian pairing [Phys. Rev. X 4, 031017 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.031017] in our cuprate junctions is not feasible, due to Josephson vortices penetration into the superconducting electrodes which drove the necessary field above the depairing field.

  18. Evolution des quasiparticules nodales du cuprate supraconducteur YBa2Cu3Oy en conductivite thermique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene de Cotret, Samuel

    Ce memoire presente des mesures de conductivite thermique sur les supraconducteurs YBCO et Tl-2201 afin de statuer sur la presence possible d'un point critique quantique (QCP) dans le diagramme de phase de cuprates. Ce point critique quantique serait a l'origine de la reconstruction de la surface de Fermi, d'un large cylindre de trous en de petites poches de trous et d'electrons. La conductivite thermique dans le regime T → 0 permet d'extraire une quantite purement electronique liee aux vitesses de Fermi et du gap, au noeud. Une discontinuite dans cette quantite pourrait signaler la traversee du dopage critique qui reconstruit la surface de Fermi. Plusieurs sondes experimentales distinguent une transition de phase ou un crossover a T* a temperature finie. D'autres sondes mettent en evidence une transition de phase sous l'effet d'un champ magnetique. La presence ou non de cet ordre, a temperature et champ magnetique nul questionne la communaute depuis plusieurs annees. Dans cette etude, nous detectons une variation brusque de kappa0/T a p = 0.18 dans YBCO et a p = 0.20 dans Tl-2201. Ces sauts sont interpretes comme un signe de la transition a temperature nulle et sont en faveur d'un QCP. Le manque de donnees d'un meme materiau a ces dopages ne permet pas de valider hors de tout doute l'existence d'un point critique quantique. Le modele theorique YRZ decrit aussi bien les donnees de conductivite thermique. Des pistes de travaux experimentaux a poursuivre sont proposees pour determiner la presence ou non du QCP de facon franche. Mots-cles : Supraconducteurs, cuprates, conductivite thermique, point critique quantique.

  19. Specific heat of underdoped cuprate superconductors from a phenomenological layered Boson-Fermion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, P.; Fortes, M.; Solís, M. A.; Sevilla, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    We adapt the Boson-Fermion superconductivity model to include layered systems such as underdoped cuprate superconductors. These systems are represented by an infinite layered structure containing a mixture of paired and unpaired fermions. The former, which stand for the superconducting carriers, are considered as noninteracting zero spin composite-bosons with a linear energy-momentum dispersion relation in the CuO2 planes where superconduction is predominant, coexisting with the unpaired fermions in a pattern of stacked slabs. The inter-slab, penetrable, infinite planes are generated by a Dirac comb potential, while paired and unpaired electrons (or holes) are free to move parallel to the planes. Composite-bosons condense at a critical temperature at which they exhibit a jump in their specific heat. These two values are assumed to be equal to the superconducting critical temperature Tc and the specific heat jump reported for YBa2Cu3O6.80 to fix our model parameters namely, the plane impenetrability and the fraction of superconducting charge carriers. We then calculate the isochoric and isobaric electronic specific heats for temperatures lower than Tc of both, the composite-bosons and the unpaired fermions, which matches the latest experimental curves. From the latter, we extract the linear coefficient (γn) at Tc, as well as the quadratic (αT2) term for low temperatures. We also calculate the lattice specific heat from the ARPES phonon spectrum, and add it to the electronic part, reproducing the experimental total specific heat at and below Tc within a 5% error range, from which the cubic (ßT3) term for low temperatures is obtained. In addition, we show that this model reproduces the cuprates mass anisotropies.

  20. Reassessment of the electronic state, magnetism, and superconductivity in high-Tc cuprates with the Nd2CuO4 structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Michio; Krockenberger, Yoshiharu; Ikeda, Ai; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-04-01

    The electronic phase diagram of the cuprates remains enigmatic and is still a key ingredient to understand the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity. It has been believed for a long time that parent compounds of cuprates were universally antiferromagnetic Mott insulators (charge-transfer insulators) and that high-Tc superconductivity would develop upon doping holes or electrons in a Mott-Hubbard insulator ("doped Mott-insulator scenario"). However, our recent discovery of superconductivity in the parent compounds of square-planar cuprates with the Nd2CuO4 (T') structure and the revised electronic phase diagram in T' cuprates urged a serious reassessment to the above scenario. In this review, we present the main results derived from our synthesis and experiments on T' cuprates in the undoped or heavily underdoped regime over 20 years, including material issues and basic physics. The key material issue is how to remove excess oxygen ions at the apical site without introducing oxygen vacancies in the CuO2 planes. In order to put this into practice, the basic knowledge of complex solid-state chemistry in T' cuprates is required, which is also included in this review.

  1. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  2. Simultaneous drop in mean free path and carrier density at the pseudogap onset in high-{T}_{{\\rm{c}}} cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, J. G.

    2017-10-01

    High-temperature superconducting cuprates are distinguished by an enigmatic pseudogap which opens near optimal doping where the superconducting transition temperature is highest. Key questions concern its origin and whether it is essential in any way to superconductivity. Recent field-induced normal-state transport experiments on hole-doped cuprates have measured abrupt changes in the doping-dependent Hall number and resistivity, consistent with a drop in carrier density from 1+p to p holes per copper atom, on entering the pseudogap phase. In this work the change in resistivity is analyzed in terms of an antiferromagnetic-order-induced Fermi surface reconstruction model that has already successfully described the Hall number. In order for this model to describe the resistivity we find that the zero-temperature mean free path must also drop abruptly in proportion to the size of the Fermi surface. This suggests that intrapocket scattering underlies the observed upturn in resistivity in the pseudogap state.

  3. Theory of a continuous stripe melting transition in a two-dimensional metal: a possible application to cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mross, David F; Senthil, T

    2012-06-29

    We construct a theory of continuous stripe melting quantum phase transitions in two-dimensional metals and the associated Fermi surface reconstruction. Such phase transitions are strongly coupled but yet theoretically tractable in situations where the stripe ordering is destroyed by proliferating doubled dislocations of the charge stripe order. The resulting non-Landau quantum critical point has strong stripe fluctuations which we show decouple dynamically from the Fermi surface even though static stripe ordering reconstructs the Fermi surface. We discuss connections to various stripe phenomena in the cuprates. We point out several puzzling aspects of old experimental results [G. Aeppli et al., Science 278, 1432 (1997)] on singular stripe fluctuations in the cuprates, and provide a possible explanation within our theory. These results may thus have been the first observation of non-Landau quantum criticality in an experiment.

  4. The cuprate superconductors: Narrow correlated-electron bands and interlayer pairing via plane-chain charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, J.; Kuper, C. G.

    1989-12-01

    The cuprate superconductors are modelled by two metallic CuO 2planes, separated by insulating layers, in an extended Hubbard Hamiltonian. Hybridization of O(2 p) and Cu( d) orbitals splits the wide bands of LDA theory, yielding a narrow conduction band of antibonding holes. Holes on the two CuO 2 planes are correlated via interplane hopping, giving a non-magnetic normal Fermi liquid. Charge exchange between the planes and the intervening layers generates attraction and a BCS condensation.

  5. Material and Doping Dependence of the Nodal and Anti-Nodal Dispersion Renormalizations in Single- and Multi-Layer Cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, S.; /Waterloo U. /SLAC; Lee, W.S.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /SLAC; Nowadnick, E.A.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Moritz, B.; /SLAC /North Dakota U.; Shen, Z.-X.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Devereaux, T.P.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab. /SLAC

    2010-02-15

    In this paper we present a review of bosonic renormalization effects on electronic carriers observed from angle-resolved photoemission spectra in the cuprates. Specifically, we discuss the viewpoint that these renormalizations represent coupling of the electrons to the lattice and review how materials dependence, such as the number of CuO{sub 2} layers, and doping dependence can be understood straightforwardly in terms of several aspects of electron-phonon coupling in layered correlated materials.

  6. Unusual isotope effects on the pseudogap in high-Tc cuprate superconductors as support for the BCS-like pairing theory of large polarons above Tc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhumanov, S.; Baimatov, P. J.; Djumanov, Sh. S.

    2015-06-01

    The BCS-like pairing theory is extended to the intermediate coupling regime and to the cases of exotic cuprate superconductors with large and small Fermi surfaces, so as to describe the pairing correlations above Tc , the opening of a pseudogap (PG) at a mean-field temperature T∗ >Tc and the unusual isotope effects on the PG in these materials within the large polaron model and two different BCS-like approaches. We argue that unconventional electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the polaron formation and the separation between temperatures T∗ (the onset of precursor Cooper pairing) and Tc (the onset of the superconducting transition) in exotic cuprate superconductors. Using the extended BCS-like approaches, we calculate the PG formation temperature T∗ , isotope shifts ΔT∗ , oxygen and copper isotope exponents and show that isotope effects on the PG basically depend on strengths of Coulomb and electron-phonon interactions, doping levels and dielectric constants of the cuprates. The new BCS-like pairing theory of polaronic carriers predicts the existence of small and sizable positive oxygen isotope effect and very large negative oxygen and copper isotope effects on the PG in the cuprates with large Fermi surfaces. The calculated results for T∗ , isotope shifts and exponents are compared with experimental data on various cuprate superconductors. For all the considered cases, a good quantitative agreement was found between theory and experimental data. We also predict the existence of small and sizable negative isotope effects on T∗ in deeply underdoped cuprates with small Fermi surfaces. Further, we find that the isotope effects on T∗ (=Tc) in heavily overdoped cuprates just like in some metals are relatively small positive or become even negative.

  7. Snowball Earth

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In the ongoing quest to better understand where life may exist elsewhere in the Universe, important lessons may be gained from our own planet. In particular, much can be learned from planetary glaciation events that Earth suffered ∼600 million years ago, so-called `Snowball Earth' episodes. I begin with an overview of how the climate works. This helps to explain how the ice-albedo feedback effect can destabilise a planet's climate. The process relies on lower temperatures causing more ice to ...

  8. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  9. Universal sheet resistance and revised phase diagram of the cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisic, Neven; Chan, Mun K; Li, Yuan; Yu, Guichuan; Zhao, Xudong; Dressel, Martin; Smontara, Ana; Greven, Martin

    2013-07-23

    Upon introducing charge carriers into the copper-oxygen sheets of the enigmatic lamellar cuprates, the ground state evolves from an insulator to a superconductor and eventually to a seemingly conventional metal (a Fermi liquid). Much has remained elusive about the nature of this evolution and about the peculiar metallic state at intermediate hole-carrier concentrations (p). The planar resistivity of this unconventional metal exhibits a linear temperature dependence (ρ ∝ T) that is disrupted upon cooling toward the superconducting state by the opening of a partial gap (the pseudogap) on the Fermi surface. Here, we first demonstrate for the quintessential compound HgBa2CuO4+δ a dramatic switch from linear to purely quadratic (Fermi liquid-like, ρ ∝ T(2)) resistive behavior in the pseudogap regime. Despite the considerable variation in crystal structures and disorder among different compounds, our result together with prior work gives insight into the p-T phase diagram and reveals the fundamental resistance per copper-oxygen sheet in both linear (ρ = A1T) and quadratic (ρ = A2T(2)) regimes, with A1 ∝ A2 ∝ 1/p. Theoretical models can now be benchmarked against this remarkably simple universal behavior. Deviations from this underlying behavior can be expected to lead to new insight into the nonuniversal features exhibited by certain compounds.

  10. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor La-214

    CERN Document Server

    Yung Moo Hu

    2001-01-01

    charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance zeta sub c becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO sub 2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H sub c sub 2. Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 sub - subdelta, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H(parallel)c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T sub c , magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied ove...

  11. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frano, A.; Blanco-Canosa, S.; Schierle, E.; Lu, Y.; Wu, M.; Bluschke, M.; Minola, M.; Christiani, G.; Habermeier, H. U.; Logvenov, G.; Wang, Y.; van Aken, P. A.; Benckiser, E.; Weschke, E.; Le Tacon, M.; Keimer, B.

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ~ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  12. Momentum and Doping Dependence of Spin Excitations in Electron-Doped Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pengfei; Zhao, Huaisong; Kuang, Lülin; Lan, Yu; Feng, Shiping

    2017-01-01

    Superconductivity in copper oxides emerges on doping holes or electrons into their Mott-insulating parent compounds. The spin excitations are thought to be the mediating glue for the pairing in superconductivity. Here the momentum and doping dependence of the dynamical spin response in the electron-doped cuprate superconductors is studied based on the kinetic-energy-driven superconducting mechanism. It is shown that the dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations changes strongly upon electron doping; however, the hour-glass-shaped dispersion of the low-energy spin excitations appeared in the hole-doped case is absent on the electron-doped side due to the electron-hole asymmetry. In particular, the commensurate resonance appears in the superconducting state with the resonance energy that correlates with the dome-shaped doping dependence of the superconducting gap. Moreover, the spectral weight and dispersion of the high-energy spin excitations in the superconducting state are comparable with those in the corresponding normal state, indicating that the high-energy spin excitations do not play an important part in the pair formation.

  13. Antiferromagnetic and superconducting gaps and their interrelation in high-T sub c cuprates

    CERN Document Server

    Arrigoni, E; Eckl, T; Hanke, W

    2003-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological model, comprising a microscopic SO(5) model plus the on-site Hubbard interaction U (projected SO(5) model) to understand the interrelation between the d-wave-gap modulation observed by recent angle-resolved photoemission experiments in the insulating antiferromagnet Ca sub 2 CuO sub 2 Cl sub 2 and the d-wave gap of high-T sub c superconducting materials. The on-site interaction U is important in order to produce a Mott gap of the correct order of magnitude, which would be absent in an exact SO(5) theory. The projected SO(5)-model explains the gap characteristics, namely both the symmetry and the different order of magnitude of the gap modulations between the AF and the SCc phases. Furthermore, it is shown that the projected SO(5) theory can provide an explanation for a recent observation [E. Pavarini et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 47003 (2001)], i. e. that the maximum T sub c observed in a large variety of high-T sub c cuprates scales with the next-nearest-neighbor hopping matrix e...

  14. Stimulated emission of Cooper pairs in a high-temperature cuprate superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wentao; Miller, Tristan; Smallwood, Christopher L.; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Kaindl, R. A.; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The concept of stimulated emission of bosons has played an important role in modern science and technology, and constitutes the working principle for lasers. In a stimulated emission process, an incoming photon enhances the probability that an excited atomic state will transition to a lower energy state and generate a second photon of the same energy. It is expected, but not experimentally shown, that stimulated emission contributes significantly to the zero resistance current in a superconductor by enhancing the probability that scattered Cooper pairs will return to the macroscopically occupied condensate instead of entering any other state. Here, we use time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the initial rise of the non-equilibrium quasiparticle population in a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ cuprate superconductor induced by an ultrashort laser pulse. Our finding reveals significantly slower buildup of quasiparticles in the superconducting state than in the normal state. The slower buildup only occurs when the pump pulse is too weak to deplete the superconducting condensate, and for cuts inside the Fermi arc region. We propose this is a manifestation of stimulated recombination of broken Cooper pairs, and signals an important momentum space dichotomy in the formation of Cooper pairs inside and outside the Fermi arc region.

  15. Isotropic round-wire multifilament cuprate superconductor for generation of magnetic fields above 30 T

    CERN Document Server

    Larbalestier, D C; Trociewitz, U P; Kametani, F; Scheuerlein, C; Dalban-Canassy, M; Matras, M; Chen, P; Craig, N C; Lee, P J; Hellstrom, E E

    2014-01-01

    Magnets are the principal market for superconductors, but making attractive conductors out of the high-temperature cuprate superconductors (HTSs) has proved difficult because of the presence of high-angle grain boundaries that are generally believed to lower the critical current density, J$_c$. To minimize such grain boundary obstacles, HTS conductors such as REBa$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{7−x}$ and (Bi, Pb)$_2$Sr$_2$Ca$_2$Cu$_3$O$_{10−x}$ are both made as tapes with a high aspect ratio and a large superconducting anisotropy. Here we report that Bi$_2$2Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_{8−x}$ (Bi-2212) can be made in the much more desirable isotropic, round-wire, multifilament form that can be wound or cabled into arbitrary geometries and will be especially valuable for high-field NMR magnets beyond the present 1 GHz proton resonance limit of Nb$_3$Sn technology. An appealing attribute of this Bi-2212 conductor is that, being without macroscopic texture, it contains many high-angle grain boundaries but nevertheless attains a very hi...

  16. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frano, A; Blanco-Canosa, S; Schierle, E; Lu, Y; Wu, M; Bluschke, M; Minola, M; Christiani, G; Habermeier, H U; Logvenov, G; Wang, Y; van Aken, P A; Benckiser, E; Weschke, E; Le Tacon, M; Keimer, B

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ∼ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  17. The rate of quasiparticle recombination probes the onset of coherence in cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, J P; Thewalt, E; Alpichshev, Z; Mahmood, F; Koralek, J D; Chan, M K; Veit, M J; Dorow, C J; Barišić, N; Kemper, A F; Bonn, D A; Hardy, W N; Liang, Ruixing; Gedik, N; Greven, M; Lanzara, A; Orenstein, J

    2016-04-13

    In the underdoped copper-oxides, high-temperature superconductivity condenses from a nonconventional metallic "pseudogap" phase that exhibits a variety of non-Fermi liquid properties. Recently, it has become clear that a charge density wave (CDW) phase exists within the pseudogap regime. This CDW coexists and competes with superconductivity (SC) below the transition temperature Tc, suggesting that these two orders are intimately related. Here we show that the condensation of the superfluid from this unconventional precursor is reflected in deviations from the predictions of BSC theory regarding the recombination rate of quasiparticles. We report a detailed investigation of the quasiparticle (QP) recombination lifetime, τqp, as a function of temperature and magnetic field in underdoped HgBa2CuO(4+δ) (Hg-1201) and YBa2Cu3O(6+x) (YBCO) single crystals by ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity. We find that τqp(T) exhibits a local maximum in a small temperature window near Tc that is prominent in underdoped samples with coexisting charge order and vanishes with application of a small magnetic field. We explain this unusual, non-BCS behavior by positing that Tc marks a transition from phase-fluctuating SC/CDW composite order above to a SC/CDW condensate below. Our results suggest that the superfluid in underdoped cuprates is a condensate of coherently-mixed particle-particle and particle-hole pairs.

  18. Spin incommensurability varies linearly with hole content in single-layer Bi2201 cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John; Enoki, M.; Fujita, M.; Nishizaki, T.; Yamada, K.; Iikubo, S.; Singh, D. K.; Chang, S.

    2013-03-01

    We have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on the single-layer cuprate Bi2+xSr2-xCuO6+y (Bi2201) with x = 0 . 2 , 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5, a doping range that spans the spin-glass (SG) to superconducting (SC) phase boundary. The doping evolution of low energy spin fluctuations (11 meV) was found to be characterized by a change of incommensurate modulation wave vector from the tetragonal [110] to [100]/[010] directions, while maintaining a linear relation between the incommensurability and the hole concentration, δ ~ p . In the SC regime, the spectral weight is strongly suppressed below ~ 4 meV. Similarities and differences in the spin correlations between Bi2201 and the prototypical single-layer system La2-xSrxCuO4 will be discussed. Work at BNL supported by Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  19. Transport properties of stripe-ordered high T{sub c} cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Qing; Han Sujung; Dimitrov, Ivo [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Dept., Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Tranquada, J.M., E-mail: jtran@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Dept., Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Li Qiang, E-mail: qiangli@bnl.gov [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Dept., Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Transport measurements provide important characterizations of the nature of stripe order in the cuprates. Initial studies of systems such as La{sub 1.6-x}Nd{sub 0.4}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} demonstrated the strong anisotropy between in-plane and c-axis resistivities, but also suggested that stripe order results in a tendency towards insulating behavior within the planes at low temperature. More recent work on La{sub 2-x}Ba{sub x}CuO{sub 4} with x = 1/8 has revealed the occurrence of quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity that onsets with spin-stripe order. The suppression of three-dimensional superconductivity indicates a frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling, motivating a proposal that superconductivity and stripe order are intertwined in a pair-density-wave state. Complementary characterizations of the low-energy states near the Fermi level are provided by measurements of the Hall and Nernst effects, each revealing intriguing signatures of stripe correlations and ordering. We review and discuss this work.

  20. Transport properties of stripe-ordered high Tc cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie, Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Han, Su Jung [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitrov, Ivo [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tranquada, J. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Qiang [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2012-04-13

    Transport measurements provide important characterizations of the nature of stripe order in the cuprates. Initial studies of systems such as La1.6-xNd0.4SrxCuO₄ demonstrated the strong anisotropy between in-plane and c-axis resistivities, but also suggested that stripe order results in a tendency towards insulating behavior within the planes at low temperature. More recent work on La2-xBaxCuO₄ with x = 1/8 has revealed the occurrence of quasi-two-dimensional superconductivity that onsets with spin-stripe order. The suppression of three-dimensional superconductivity indicates a frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling, motivating a proposal that superconductivity and stripe order are intertwined in a pair-density-wave state. Complementary characterizations of the low-energy states near the Fermi level are provided by measurements of the Hall and Nernst effects, each revealing intriguing signatures of stripe correlations and ordering. We review and discuss this work.

  1. Electron-phonon coupling associated with charge-stripe order in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquada, John; Reznik, D.; Pintschovius, L.; Ito, M.; Iikubo, S.; Sato, M.; Fujita, M.; Yamada, K.; Gu, G. D.

    2006-03-01

    We have used inelastic neutron scattering to study the Cu-O bond-stretching phonon in La1.875Ba0.125CuO4 and La1.48Nd0.4Sr0.12CuO4, two cuprate compounds that exhibit charge-stripe order. This is the phonon mode that one expects to be most sensitive to spatial inhomogeneity in the electronic structure of the CuO2 planes. Besides the cosine-like downward dispersion of the mode from zone center to zone boundary, we observe a dip in the dispersion and a very large energy width (> 10 meV) at q = a*/4. The dip and width gradually become smaller with increasing temperature. These evidences of a strong electron-phonon coupling (the dispersion dip and large energy width) have not been predicted by any conventional calculations. The nature of the connection with charge-stripe order will be discussed.

  2. d-Density Wave Scenario Description of the New Hidden Charge Order in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhfudz, Imam

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we show that the theory of high Tc superconductivity based on a microscopic model with d-density wave (DDW) scenario in the pseudogap phase is able to reproduce some of the most important features of the recent experimentally discovered hidden charge order in several families of Cuprates. In particular, by computing and comparing energies of charge orders of different modulation directions derived from a full microscopic theory with d-density wave scenario, the axial charge order ϕX(Y) with wavevector Q = (Q0,0)((0,Q0)) is shown to be unambiguously energetically more favorable over the diagonal charge order ϕX±Y with wavevector Q = (Q0, ± Q0) at least in commensurate limit, to be expected also to hold even to more general incommensurate case, in agreement with experiment. The two types of axial charge order ϕX and ϕY are degenerate by symmetry. We find that within the superconducting background, biaxial (checkerboard) charge order is energetically more favorable than uniaxial (stripe) charge order, and therefore checkerboard axial charge order should be the one observed in experiments, assuming a single domain of charge ordered state on each CuO2 plane.

  3. Gap anisotropy of layered cuprates in the framework of a correlated hopping model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkov, Alexander A.; Mishonov, Todor M.

    1997-04-01

    The superconductivity of the conducting CuO2plane of the layered cuprates is considered in the framework of a two-dimensional (2D) tight-binding model which contains O2pσand Cu3dx2 - y2states. Besides the standard LCAO amplitudes the correlated hopping between O2pσand Cu3dx2 - y2orbitals is also considered. The fact that the conduction band is mainly oxygen like and that the one electron hopping between next nearest neighbours (NNN) oxygen ions is relatively smaller then the nearest neighbours (NN) hopping between NN Cu and O ions is taken into account. The equations for the superconducting gap are derived. It is shown that such a choice of the orbitals leads to as-type superconducting gap, which is in qualitative agreement with data for strongly irradiated samples. It is briefly discussed that the addition to the Emery model of the Cu4sorbital could lead to ad-type gap in agreement with the π-shift of the Josephson effect and location of Δ(p) zeroes by recent ARPES data.

  4. Universal bulk charge-density-wave (CDW) correlations in the cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabis, Wojciech

    2014-03-01

    The recent observation of bulk CDW order in YBa2Cu3O8+δ(YBCO) in competition with superconductivity is a significant development. Using Cu L-edge resonant X-ray scattering, we also observe bulk CDW order in HgBa2CuO4+δ(Hg1201 Tc = 72K). The correlations appear below TCDW ~ 200K, well below the pseudogap temperature T* ~ 320K associated with unusual magnetism, but coincident with the onset of Fermi-liquid-like charge transport. In contrast to YBCO, we observe no decrease of the CDW amplitude below Tc, and the correlation length is short and temperature independent. CDW correlations therefore are a universal property of underdoped cuprates, enhanced by low structural symmetry and a magnetic field, but fundamentally not in significant competition with superconductivity. We also discuss the relationship between the CDW modulation wave vector and the Fermi surface area extracted from QO experiments. Work supported by DOE-BES. In collaboration with Y. Li, M. Le Tacon, L. Braicovich, A. Kreyssig, M. Minola, G. Dellea, E. Weschke, M. Veit, A. Goldman, T. Schmitt, G. Ghiringhelli, N. Barisic, M.K. Chan, C. Dorow, G. Yu, X. Zhao, B. Keimer, M. Greven.

  5. Stimulated emission of Cooper pairs in a high-temperature cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wentao; Miller, Tristan; Smallwood, Christopher L; Yoshida, Yoshiyuki; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Kaindl, R A; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The concept of stimulated emission of bosons has played an important role in modern science and technology, and constitutes the working principle for lasers. In a stimulated emission process, an incoming photon enhances the probability that an excited atomic state will transition to a lower energy state and generate a second photon of the same energy. It is expected, but not experimentally shown, that stimulated emission contributes significantly to the zero resistance current in a superconductor by enhancing the probability that scattered Cooper pairs will return to the macroscopically occupied condensate instead of entering any other state. Here, we use time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the initial rise of the non-equilibrium quasiparticle population in a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ cuprate superconductor induced by an ultrashort laser pulse. Our finding reveals significantly slower buildup of quasiparticles in the superconducting state than in the normal state. The slower buildup only occurs when the pump pulse is too weak to deplete the superconducting condensate, and for cuts inside the Fermi arc region. We propose this is a manifestation of stimulated recombination of broken Cooper pairs, and signals an important momentum space dichotomy in the formation of Cooper pairs inside and outside the Fermi arc region.

  6. Ultrafast quenching of electron-boson interaction and superconducting gap in a cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wentao; Hwang, Choongyu; Smallwood, Christopher L; Miller, Tristan L; Affeldt, Gregory; Kurashima, Koshi; Jozwiak, Chris; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Adachi, Tadashi; Koike, Yoji; Lee, Dung-Hai; Lanzara, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast spectroscopy is an emerging technique with great promise in the study of quantum materials, as it makes it possible to track similarities and correlations that are not evident near equilibrium. Thus far, however, the way in which these processes modify the electron self-energy--a fundamental quantity describing many-body interactions in a material--has been little discussed. Here we use time- and angle-resolved photoemission to directly measure the ultrafast response of self-energy to near-infrared photoexcitation in high-temperature cuprate superconductor. Below the critical temperature of the superconductor, ultrafast excitations trigger a synchronous decrease of electron self-energy and superconducting gap, culminating in a saturation in the weakening of electron-boson coupling when the superconducting gap is fully quenched. In contrast, electron-boson coupling is unresponsive to ultrafast excitations above the critical temperature of the superconductor and in the metallic state of a related material. These findings open a new pathway for studying transient self-energy and correlation effects in solids.

  7. Cationic Redistribution at Epitaxial Interfaces in Superconducting Two-Dimensionally Doped Lanthanum Cuprate Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiutti, Federico; Gregori, Giuliano; Wang, Yi; Suyolcu, Y Eren; Cristiani, Georg; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Logvenov, Gennady

    2016-10-12

    The exploration of interface effects in complex oxide heterostructures has led to the discovery of novel intriguing phenomena in recent years and has opened the path toward the precise tuning of material properties at the nanoscale. One recent example is space-charge superconductivity. Among the complex range of effects which may arise from phase interaction, a crucial role is played by cationic intermixing, which defines the final chemical composition of the interface. In this work, we performed a systematic study on the local cationic redistribution of two-dimensionally doped lanthanum cuprate films grown by oxide molecular beam epitaxy, in which single LaO layers in the epitaxial crystal structure were substituted by layers of differently sized and charged dopants (Ca, Sr, Ba, and Dy). In such a model system, in which the dopant undergoes an asymmetric redistribution across the interface, the evolution of the cationic concentration profile can be effectively tracked by means of atomically resolved imaging and spectroscopic methods. This allowed for the investigation of the impact of the dopant chemistry (ionic size and charge) and of the growth conditions (temperature) on the final superconducting and structural properties. A qualitative model for interface cationic intermixing, based on thermodynamic considerations, is proposed. This work highlights the key role which cationic redistribution may have in the definition of the final interface properties and represents a further step forward the realization of heterostructures with improved quality.

  8. Gutzwiller charge phase diagram of cuprates, including electron-phonon coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markiewicz, R. S.; Seibold, G.; Lorenzana, J.; Bansil, A.

    2015-02-01

    Besides significant electronic correlations, high-temperature superconductors also show a strong coupling of electrons to a number of lattice modes. Combined with the experimental detection of electronic inhomogeneities and ordering phenomena in many high-Tc compounds, these features raise the question as to what extent phonons are involved in the associated instabilities. Here we address this problem based on the Hubbard model including a coupling to phonons in order to capture several salient features of the phase diagram of hole-doped cuprates. Charge degrees of freedom, which are suppressed by the large Hubbard U near half-filling, are found to become active at a fairly low doping level. We find that possible charge order is mainly driven by Fermi surface nesting, with competition between a near-(π ,π ) order at low doping and antinodal nesting at higher doping, very similar to the momentum structure of magnetic fluctuations. The resulting nesting vectors are generally consistent with photoemission and tunneling observations, evidence for charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O7-δ including Kohn anomalies, and suggestions of competition between one- and two-q-vector nesting.

  9. Suppression of Superfluid Density and the Pseudogap State in the Cuprates by Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdenemunkh, Unurbat; Koopman, Brian; Fu, Ling; Chatterjee, Kamalesh; Wise, W D; Gu, G D; Hudson, E W; Boyer, Michael C

    2016-12-16

    We use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to study magnetic Fe impurities intentionally doped into the high-temperature superconductor Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ}. Our spectroscopic measurements reveal that Fe impurities introduce low-lying resonances in the density of states at Ω_{1}≈4  meV and Ω_{2}≈15  meV, allowing us to determine that, despite having a large magnetic moment, potential scattering of quasiparticles by Fe impurities dominates magnetic scattering. In addition, using high-resolution spatial characterizations of the local density of states near and away from Fe impurities, we detail the spatial extent of impurity-affected regions as well as provide a local view of impurity-induced effects on the superconducting and pseudogap states. Our studies of Fe impurities, when combined with a reinterpretation of earlier STM work in the context of a two-gap scenario, allow us to present a unified view of the atomic-scale effects of elemental impurities on the pseudogap and superconducting states in hole-doped cuprates; this may help resolve a previously assumed dichotomy between the effects of magnetic and nonmagnetic impurities in these materials.

  10. New investigations of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabijanić, Ivana; Matković-Čalogović, Dubravka; Pilepić, Viktor; Ivanišević, Irena; Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Sanković, Krešimir

    2017-01-01

    Crystals of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex, (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O (HGua = protonated guanine), were prepared and analysed by spectroscopic (IR, Raman) and computational methods. A new single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was conducted to obtain data with lower standard uncertainties than those in the previously published structure. Raman and IR spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical analysis gave us new insight into the vibrational states of the (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O crystal. The vibrational spectra of the crystal were assigned by performing a normal coordinate analysis for a free dimer with a centre of inversion as the only symmetry element. The stretching vibration observed at 279 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum corresponds to the N-Cu bond. The noncovalent interaction (NCI) plots and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis of the electron density obtained from periodic DFT calculations elucidated the interactions that exist within the crystal structure. Closed-shell ionic attractions, as well as weak and medium strength hydrogen bonds, prevailed in the crystal packing.

  11. The rate of quasiparticle recombination probes the onset of coherence in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, J. P.; Thewalt, E.; Alpichshev, Z.; Mahmood, F.; Koralek, J. D.; Chan, M. K.; Veit, M. J.; Dorow, C. J.; Barišić, N.; Kemper, A. F.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, Ruixing; Gedik, N.; Greven, M.; Lanzara, A.; Orenstein, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the underdoped copper-oxides, high-temperature superconductivity condenses from a nonconventional metallic ”pseudogap” phase that exhibits a variety of non-Fermi liquid properties. Recently, it has become clear that a charge density wave (CDW) phase exists within the pseudogap regime. This CDW coexists and competes with superconductivity (SC) below the transition temperature Tc, suggesting that these two orders are intimately related. Here we show that the condensation of the superfluid from this unconventional precursor is reflected in deviations from the predictions of BSC theory regarding the recombination rate of quasiparticles. We report a detailed investigation of the quasiparticle (QP) recombination lifetime, τqp, as a function of temperature and magnetic field in underdoped HgBa2CuO4+δ (Hg-1201) and YBa2Cu3O6+x (YBCO) single crystals by ultrafast time-resolved reflectivity. We find that τqp(T ) exhibits a local maximum in a small temperature window near Tc that is prominent in underdoped samples with coexisting charge order and vanishes with application of a small magnetic field. We explain this unusual, non-BCS behavior by positing that Tc marks a transition from phase-fluctuating SC/CDW composite order above to a SC/CDW condensate below. Our results suggest that the superfluid in underdoped cuprates is a condensate of coherently-mixed particle-particle and particle-hole pairs.

  12. Zeeman and orbital limiting magnetic fields in cuprates: The pseudogap connection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lia Krusin-Elbaum; Takasada Shibauchi; Gianni Blatter

    2006-01-01

    In cuprates, in a view where pairing correlations set in at the pseudogap energy scale * and acquire global coherence at a lower temperature c, the region c ≤ ≤ * is a vast fluctuation regime. c and * vary differently with doping and the question remains about the doping trends of the relevant magnetic field scales: the field c2 bounding the superconducting response and the pseudogap closing field pg. In-plane thermal (Nernst) and our interlayer (tunneling) transport experiments in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+ report hugely different limiting magnetic fields. Here, based on pairing (and the uncertainty principle) combined with the definitions of the Zeeman energy and the magnetic length, we show that both fields convert to the same pseudogap scale * upon transformation as orbital and Zeeman critical fields, respectively. The region of superconducting coherence is confined to the `dome' that coincides with the usual unique upper critical field c2 on the strongly overdoped side. We argue that the distinctly different orbital and the Zeeman limiting fields can co-exist owing to charge and spin degrees of freedom separated to different parts of the strongly anisotropic Fermi surface.

  13. Role of Cu d-d inter-orbital electron correlation on the out-of-plane conduction in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay; Pratap, A.; Joshi, S. K.

    2002-06-01

    In the present paper we study a model which is relevant to an analysis of the effects of the Cu d-d inter-orbital electron correlation on the motion of charge carriers along c-axis in high- Tc cuprates. For this a microscopic model Hamiltonian for the three atom cluster CuO 2 which incorporates the essential features of the basic unit of high- Tc cuprates has been considered. The model Hamiltonian for this three atom cluster includes various in-plane and out-of-plane orbital energies, their intra- and inter-orbital Coulomb interactions relevant for the electrons in the cluster. The out-of-plane correlation which appears when we consider the hopping of a hole from the Cu 3d 3 z2- r2 to apical O 2p z orbitals has been calculated using the Green's function technique. The equation of motion for the relevant Green's function contains higher order Green's functions and we evaluate the correlation parameter relevant to motion for a hole along the c-axis by using suitable decoupling approximations. It has been found through numerical calculations that the out-of-plane correlations depend on the intra- and inter-orbital Coulomb interactions, the out-of-plane orbital energies, hole occupancy and on temperature. Finally, the relevance of the out-of-plane correlation parameter for present three atom CuO 2 cluster model to the c-axis conductivity of the bulk high- Tc cuprate systems has been pointed out.

  14. Spin dynamics in high-T{sub C} superconducting cuprates; Dynamique de spins dans les oxydes de cuivre supraconducteurs a haute temperature critique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourges, Ph

    2003-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the detailed investigations of the magnetic resonance peak in the superconducting state of cuprates. The existence of such a peak could be the signature of a mechanism linked to magnetism that could explain high critical temperature superconductivity. Inelastic neutron scattering is an adequate tool for the understanding of cuprate properties because it reveals magnetic fluctuations whose behaviour and variety depend strongly on temperature and on the level of doping. The last part of this work is dedicated to the study of spin dynamics in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} system.

  15. Two-dimensional superconductivity in the cuprates revealed by atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, A. T.; Božović, I.

    2016-10-01

    Various electronic phases displayed by cuprates that exhibit high temperature superconductivity continue to attract much interest. We provide a short review of several experiments that we have performed aimed at investigating the superconducting state in these compounds. Measurements on single-phase films, bilayers, and superlattices all point to the conclusion that the high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) in these materials is an essentially quasi-two dimensional phenomenon. With proper control over the film growth, HTS can exist in a single copper oxide plane with the critical temperatures as high as that achieved in the bulk samples.

  16. Algebraic Fermi liquid from phase fluctuations: "topological" fermions, vortex "berryons," and QED3 theory of cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, M; Tesanović, Z

    2001-12-17

    Within the phase fluctuation model for the pseudogap state of cuprate superconductors we identify a novel statistical "Berry phase" interaction between the nodal quasiparticles and fluctuating vortex-antivortex excitations. The effective action describing this model assumes the form of an anisotropic Euclidean quantum electrodynamics in (2+1) dimensions (QED (3)) and naturally generates non-Fermi liquid behavior for its fermionic excitations. The doping axis in the x -T phase diagram emerges as a quantum critical line which regulates the low energy fermiology.

  17. Proposed chiral texture of the magnetic moments of unit-cell loop currents in the pseudogap phase of cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershoguba, Sergey S; Kechedzhi, Kostyantyn; Yakovenko, Victor M

    2013-07-26

    We propose a novel chiral order parameter to explain the unusual polar Kerr effect in underdoped cuprates. It is based on the loop-current model by Varma, which is characterized by the in-plane anapole moment N and exhibits the magnetoelectric effect. We propose a helical structure where the vector N(n) in the layer n is twisted by the angle π/2 relative to N(n-1), thus breaking inversion symmetry. We show that coupling between magnetoelectric terms in the neighboring layers for this structure produces optical gyrotropy, which results in circular dichroism and the polar Kerr effect.

  18. Separation of charge-order and magnetic QCPs in heavy fermions and high Tc cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil

    2010-03-01

    The Fermi surface topology of high temperature superconductors inferred from magnetic quantum oscillation measurements provides clues for the origin of unconventional pairing thus previously not accessed by other spectroscopy techniques. While the overdoped regime of the high Tc phase diagram has a large Fermi surface consistent with bandstructure calculations, the underdoped regime of YBa2Cu2O6+x is found to be composed of small pockets. There is considerable debate as to whether the small observed ``pocket'' is hole-like or electron-like- whether the Fermi surface is best described by a t-J model or a conventional band folding picture- whether or not a Fermi liquid description applies- or- whether bilayer coupling splits the degeneracy of the observed pockets. We (myself and collaborators) have now collected an extensive body of experimental data that brings this debate to rest, but raises new questions about the nature of itinerant magnetism in underdoped high Tc cuprates. Quantum oscillation measurements are performed on multiple samples in magnetic fields extending to 85 T, temperatures between 30 mK (dilution fridge in dc fields to 45 T) and 18 K, over a range of hole dopings and with samples rotated in-situ about multiple axes with respect to the magnetic field. We perform a topographical map of the Fermi surface, enabling the in-plane shape of one of the pockets to be determined- imposing stringent constraints on the origin of the Fermi surface. While quantum oscillations measurements are consistent with a topological Fermi surface change associated with magnetism near optimal doping, they also point to a secondary instability deep within the underdoped regime beneath a high Tc superconducting sub-dome. An steep upturn in the quasiparticle effective mass is observed on underdoping, suggestive of a quantum critical point near x= 0.46 separating the metallic regime (composed of small pockets) from a more underdoped insulating charge-ordered regime (earlier

  19. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finnemore, Douglas K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4-δ, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H $\\parallel$ c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below Tc, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the Tc0 vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La2-xSrxCuO4 (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to Tc. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance ξc becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near Hc2.

  20. Electron-phonon interaction using Wannier functions: from single-layer graphene to cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustino, Feliciano

    2008-03-01

    The interaction between electrons and phonons is central to many phenomena, including electrical and thermal transport and superconductivity. Recently the electron-phonon (e-ph) interaction has been the focus of intense research efforts in the physics of high-temperature superconductivity and nanoscale transport. Despite the continued interest in the e-ph problem, first-principles calculations remain challenging due to the large computational effort required to describe e-ph scattering processes in the proximity of the Fermi surface. In this talk I will present a method based on Wannier functions which greatly reduces the computational cost of e-ph calculations [1,2]. The underlying idea is to exploit the spatial localization of electrons and phonons in the maximally localized Wannier representation. After describing the method I will review recent applications to materials of current interest. I will discuss how the e-ph interaction affects the dynamics of Dirac fermions in graphene [3], the origin of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond [1], and the relation between Fermi surface topology and superconductivity in super-hard carbides. I will conclude this presentation by discussing the role of phonons in the angle-resolved photoemission spectra of cuprates [4]. [1] F. Giustino, J.R. Yates, I. Souza, M.L. Cohen, and S.G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 047005 (2007). [2] F. Giustino, M.L. Cohen, and S.G. Louie, Phys. Rev. B 76, 165108 (2007). [3] C.-H. Park, F. Giustino, M.L. Cohen, and S.G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 086804 (2007). [4] F. Giustino, M.L. Cohen, and S.G. Louie, http://arXiv:0710.2146.

  1. Superconductivity in optimally doped cuprates: BZA program works well and superexchange is the glue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baskaran

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   Resonating valence bond states in a doped Mott insulator was proposed to explain superconductivity in cuprates in January 1987 by Anderson. A challenging task then was proving existence of this unconventional mechanism and a wealth of possibilities, with a rigor acceptable in standard condensed matter physics, in a microscopic theory and develop suitable many body techniques. Shortly, a paper by Anderson, Zou and us (BZA undertook this task and initiated a program. Three key papers that followed, shortly, essentially completed the program, as far as superconductivity is concerned,i a gauge theory approach by Anderson and us, that went beyond mean field theory ii Kotliar’s d -wave solution in BZA theory iii improvement of a renormalized Hamiltonian in BZA theory, using a Gutzwiller approximation by Zhang, Gros, Rice and Shiba. In this article I shall focus on the merits of BZA and gauge theory papers. They turned out to be a foundation for subsequent developments dealing with more aspects that were unconventional - d -wave order parameter with nodal Bogoliubov quasi particles, Affleck-Marston’s π-flux condensed spin liquid phase, unconventional spin-1 collective mode at (π, π, and other fascinating developments. Kivelson, Rokhsar and Sethna’s idea of holons and their bose condensation found expression in the slave boson formalism and lead to results similar to BZA program. At optimal doping, correlated electrons acquire sufficient fermi sea character, at the same time retain enough superexchange inherited from a Mott insulator parentage, ending in a BCS like situation with superexchange as a glue! Not surprisingly, mean field theory works well at optimal doping, even quantitatively. Further, t-J model is a minimal model only around optimal doping, where RVB superconductivity is also at its best.

  2. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas K. Finnemore

    2001-06-25

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H {parallel} c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {xi}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near H{sub c2}.

  3. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung Moo Huh

    2001-05-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4-{delta}}, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H{parallel}c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below T{sub c}, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the T{sub c0} vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to T{sub c}. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance {zeta}{sub c} becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO{sub 2} layers s at sufficiently high magnetic fields near H{sub c2}.

  4. Quantitative determination of pairing interactions for high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Jin Mo; Bae, Jong Ju; Choi, Han-Yong; Varma, Chandra M; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhang, Yuxiao; Yu, Li; Zhou, X J

    2016-03-01

    A profound problem in modern condensed matter physics is discovering and understanding the nature of fluctuations and their coupling to fermions in cuprates, which lead to high-temperature superconductivity and the invariably associated strange metal state. We report the quantitative determination of normal and pairing self-energies, made possible by laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements of unprecedented accuracy and stability. Through a precise inversion procedure, both the effective interactions in the attractive d-wave symmetry and the repulsive part in the full symmetry are determined. The latter is nearly angle-independent. Near T c, both interactions are nearly independent of frequency and have almost the same magnitude over the complete energy range of up to about 0.4 eV, except for a low-energy feature at around 50 meV that is present only in the repulsive part, which has less than 10% of the total spectral weight. Well below T c, they both change similarly, with superconductivity-induced features at low energies. Besides finding the pairing self-energy and the attractive interactions for the first time, these results expose the central paradox of the problem of high T c: how the same frequency-independent fluctuations can dominantly scatter at angles ±π/2 in the attractive channel to give d-wave pairing and lead to angle-independent repulsive scattering. The experimental results are compared with available theoretical calculations based on antiferromagnetic fluctuations, the Hubbard model, and quantum-critical fluctuations of the loop-current order.

  5. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  6. Frank Isakson Prize Talk: Superfluid and normal-fluid densities in the cuprate superconductors from infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, D. B.

    Measurements for a number of cuprate families of optical reflectance over a wide spectral range (far-infrared to ultraviolet) have been analyzed using Kramers-Kronig analysis to obtain the optical conductivity σ (ω) and (by integration of the real part of the conductivity) the spectral weight of low- and mid-energy excitations. For the Kramers-Kronig analysis to give reliable results, accurate high-frequency extrapolations, based on x-ray atomic scattering functions, were used. When the optical conductivities of the normal and superconducting states are compared, a transfer of spectral weight from finite frequencies to the zero-frequency delta-function conductivity of the superconductor is seen. The strength of this delta function gives the superfluid density, ρs. In a clean metallic superconductor the superfluid density is essentially equal to the conduction electron density. The cuprates in contrast have only about 20% of the a b-plane low-energy spectral weight in the superfluid. The rest remains in finite-frequency, midinfrared absorption. In underdoped materials the superfluid fraction is even smaller. There are two ways to measure ρs, using either the partial sum rule for the conductivity or by examination of σ2 (ω) . Comparison of these two estimates of the superfluid density shows that 98% of the a b-plane superfluid density comes from energies below 0.15 eV. Many students, postdocs, and materials preparers have contributed to this work; to all I am very grateful.

  7. Stability of superconducting La Sr cuprate in hydrothermal NaF solutions at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korytkova, E.N.; Nesterchuk, N.I.; Pivovarova, L.N. [and others

    1992-04-20

    The successful application of hydrothermal treatment for raising the stability of the superconducting (SC) oxide of the composition La{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}CuO{sub 4-{delta}} (LSCO), demonstrated earlier, stimulates further development of studies in this field. Selection of chemical reagents the action of which on the crystal structure of the oxide strengthens it is most significant. The literature contains information on the stabilizing action of fluoride ions on the structure of HTSC compounds inserted in oxygen positions of crystal lattices during annealing of Sc cuprates in gaseous NF{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}F, NH{sub 5}F{sub 2}. The possibility of replacing oxygen ions by fluoride ions exists owing to the same electron configuration of their external layers and almost the same ionic radii. Since their electronegativities and degrees of oxidation are different, it may be inferred that even partial replacement of oxygen by fluorine would have a significant influence on the state of the structure of the SC oxide and possibly on the SC properties. In the light of this, hydrothermal treatment of SC oxide with solutions of fluorides, and in particular with NaF solution at an elevated temperature and especially at a high pressure, i.e., under conditions favorable for insertion of fluoride ions into the crystal structure of the cuprate, seemed to be appropriate. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Synthesis of novel strontium-based cuprate superconducting thin films, and the relationship between their crystal structures and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo-Wei

    2000-12-01

    Novel Sr-based cuprate thin films were investigated to explore their potential as next generation superconducting materials. Thin films of infinite-layer compound (Sr,Ca)CuO2 (no blocking layer), cuprate oxycarbonate Sr2CuO2(CO3) (carbonate blocking layer), and Tl(Sr,Ba)2Can-1CunOy (n = 2 and 3) (thin blocking layer) were synthesized using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The structure and defect chemistry of the blocking layers of these cuprate compounds were found to have profound effects on the transport properties both in the normal state and the superconducting state. Phase pure, epitaxial infinite-layer compound (Sr1-xCa x)CuO2 thin films were deposited on SrTiO3(100) substrates. However, these films were always semiconducting with resistivities of the order of 1 ohm- cm and with carrier concentrations of 1017~10 19cm-3, which is two to four orders of magnitude lower than the typical superconducting cuprates. The low carrier concentration was attributed to the absence of blocking layers containing a sufficient concentration of charged defects. Transport was via variable range hopping conduction. By annealing in air, the infinite-layer compound SrCuO2 thin films reacted with the CO2 in air to generate Sr 2CuO2(CO3) thin films. Upon formation of carbonate blocking layers, charger carriers were introduced into the Sr2CuO 2(CO3) thin films through the partial substitution of carbon by copper or boron in the SrCO3 blocking layers. After oxygen annealing or upon boron substitution, the carrier concentration increased up to 10 21 cm-3. A superconducting onset temperature of 34K and a zero resistivity temperature of 20K have been observed for Sr 2CuO2(C1-xBx)O3 thin films. A critical carrier density of 0.10~0.12 holes/Cu was required to render superconductivity. The effect of crystal structure on the critical current density was investigated by measuring the vortex pinning energies of Tl2Ba2CaCu 2Oy (Tl-2212) and Tl(Sr,Ba)2Ca Cu2O y (Tl- (Sr,Ba)1212) thin

  9. Spectroscopic evidence for Fermi liquid-like energy and temperature dependence of the relaxation rate in the pseudogap phase of the cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Seyed Iman; Stricker, Damien; Hancock, Jason N; Berthod, Christophe; Georges, Antoine; van Heumen, Erik; Chan, Mun K; Zhao, Xudong; Li, Yuan; Greven, Martin; Barišić, Neven; van der Marel, Dirk

    2013-04-09

    Cuprate high-Tc superconductors exhibit enigmatic behavior in the nonsuperconducting state. For carrier concentrations near "optimal doping" (with respect to the highest Tcs) the transport and spectroscopic properties are unlike those of a Landau-Fermi liquid. On the Mott-insulating side of the optimal carrier concentration, which corresponds to underdoping, a pseudogap removes quasi-particle spectral weight from parts of the Fermi surface and causes a breakup of the Fermi surface into disconnected nodal and antinodal sectors. Here, we show that the near-nodal excitations of underdoped cuprates obey Fermi liquid behavior. The lifetime τ(ω, T) of a quasi-particle depends on its energy ω as well as on the temperature T. For a Fermi liquid, 1/τ(ω, T) is expected to collapse on a universal function proportional to (ℏω)(2) + (pπk(B)T)(2). Magneto-transport experiments, which probe the properties in the limit ω = 0, have provided indications for the presence of a T(2) dependence of the dc (ω = 0) resistivity of different cuprate materials. However, Fermi liquid behavior is very much about the energy dependence of the lifetime, and this can only be addressed by spectroscopic techniques. Our optical experiments confirm the aforementioned universal ω- and T dependence of 1/τ(ω, T), with p ∼ 1.5. Our data thus provide a piece of evidence in favor of a Fermi liquid-like scenario of the pseudogap phase of the cuprates.

  10. Spectroscopic evidence for Fermi liquid-like energy and temperature dependence of the relaxation rate in the pseudogap phase of the cuprates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirzaei, S.I.; Stricker, D.; Hancock, J.N.; Berthod, C.; Georges, A.; van Heumen, E.; Chan, M.K.; Zhao, X.; Li, Y.; Greven, M.; Barišić, N.; van der Marel, D.

    2013-01-01

    Cuprate high-Tc superconductors exhibit enigmatic behavior in the nonsuperconducting state. For carrier concentrations near "optimal doping" (with respect to the highest Tcs) the transport and spectroscopic properties are unlike those of a Landau-Fermi liquid. On the Mott-insulating side of the opti

  11. Quantum-critical fluctuations in 2D metals: strange metals and superconductivity in antiferromagnets and in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Chandra M.

    2016-08-01

    The anomalous transport and thermodynamic properties in the quantum-critical region, in the cuprates, and in the quasi-two dimensional Fe-based superconductors and heavy-fermion compounds, have the same temperature dependences. This can occur only if, despite their vast microscopic differences, a common statistical mechanical model describes their phase transitions. The antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ic models for the latter two, just as the loop-current model for the cuprates, map to the dissipative XY model. The solution of this model in (2+1)D reveals that the critical fluctuations are determined by topological excitations, vortices and a variety of instantons, and not by renormalized spin-wave theories of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson type, adapted by Moriya, Hertz and others for quantum-criticality. The absorptive part of the fluctuations is a separable function of momentum \\mathbf{q} , measured from the ordering vector, and of the frequency ω and the temperature T which scale as \\tanh (ω /2T) at criticality. Direct measurements of the fluctuations by neutron scattering in the quasi-two-dimensional heavy fermion and Fe-based compounds, near their antiferromagnetic quantum critical point, are consistent with this form. Such fluctuations, together with the vertex coupling them to fermions, lead to a marginal fermi-liquid, with the imaginary part of the self-energy \\propto \\text{max}(ω,T) for all momenta, a resistivity \\propto T , a T\\ln T contribution to the specific heat, and other singular fermi-liquid properties common to these diverse compounds, as well as to d-wave superconductivity. This is explicitly verified, in the cuprates, by analysis of the pairing and the normal self-energy directly extracted from the recent high resolution angle resolved photoemission measurements. This reveals, in agreement with the theory, that the frequency dependence of the attractive irreducible particle-particle vertex in the d-wave channel is the same as the irreducible

  12. Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Oversupply of rare earths led to the significant price drop of rare earth mineral products and separated products in Chinese domestic market. To stabilize the price, prevent waste of resources, further improve regulation capability on domestic rare earth market and rare earth price and maintain sustaining and healthy development of rare earth industry, partial rare earth producers in Baotou and Jiangxi province projected to cease the production for one month.

  13. Dominance of Antinodal Quasiparticles on the Transport Properties of Heavily Overdoped High-To Cuprates: Infrared-Reflectance Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yong-Chang; ZHAO Jie; AN Yu-Kai; LIU Ji-Wen

    2009-01-01

    The infrared reflectance spectrum up to 2500 cm-1 for heavily overdoped TI-2201 at 300 K has been analysed under the semiclassical approximation. In this approach, we use two independent sets of parameters to fit the reflectance: the momentum-dependent Fermi velocity vk and the momentum-dependent scattering rate τ-1 (εk). Unlike the case at optimal doping in which the transport properties are dominated by the nodal quasi-particles (QPs), both the lifetime and the Fermi velocity of the QPs in the antinodal region near the Fermi surface increase remarkably for the heavily overdoped samples. Our fitting results indicate that the antinodal QPs tend to dominate the transport properties in heavily overdoped bigb-Tc cuprates.

  14. Edge ferromagnetism from Majorana flat bands: application to split tunneling-conductance peaks in high-Tc cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Andrew C; Lee, Patrick A

    2014-03-21

    In mean-field descriptions of nodal d-wave superconductors, generic edges exhibit dispersionless Majorana fermion bands at zero energy. These states give rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy, and are protected by time-reversal symmetry. We argue that the infinite density of states of these flat bands make them inherently unstable to interactions, and show that repulsive interactions lead to edge ferromagnetism which splits the flat bands. This edge ferromagnetism offers an explanation for the observation of the splitting of zero-bias peaks in edge tunneling in high-Tc cuprate superconductors. We argue that this mechanism for splitting is more likely than previously proposed scenarios and describe its experimental consequences.

  15. De Haas-van Alphen Oscillations In Quasi-two-dimensional Underdoped Cuprate Superconductors In The Canonical Ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sebastian, S E [CAMBRIDGE UNIV.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) effect waveform using the canonical ensemble for different Fermi surface scenarios applicable to the underdoped cuprate superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.5}, in which quantum oscillations have recently been observed. The harmonic content of the dHvA waveform of the principal F{sub {alpha}} {approx} 500 T frequency is consistent with the existence of a second thermodynamically dominant section of Fermi surface that acts primarily as a charge reservoir. Oscillations in the charge density to and from this reservoir are shown to potentially contribute to the observed large quantum oscillations in the Hall resistance.

  16. Angle-resolved photoemission studies of lattice polaron formation in the cuprate Ca2CuO2Cl2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, K.M.

    2010-05-03

    To elucidate the nature of the single-particle excitations in the undoped parent cuprates, we have performed a detailed study of Ca{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} using photoemission spectroscopy. The photoemission lineshapes of the lower Hubbard band are found to be well-described by a polaron model. By comparing the lineshape and temperature dependence of the lower Hubbard band with additional O 2p and Ca 3p states, we conclude that the dominant broadening mechanism arises from the interaction between the photohole and the lattice. The strength of this interaction was observed to be strongly anisotropic and may have important implications for the momentum dependence of the first doped hole states.

  17. Spin polarization in photoemission from the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciulli, Mauro; Muff, Stefan; Weber, Andrew P.; Dil, J. Hugo

    2017-06-01

    Photoelectrons produced from the excitation of spin-degenerate states in solids can have a sizable spin polarization, which is related to the phase of interfering channels in the photoemission matrix elements. Such spin polarization can be measured by spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to gain information about the transitions and the Wigner time delay of the process. Incorporating strongly correlated electron systems into this paradigm could yield a novel means of extracting phase information crucial to understanding the mechanism of their emergent behavior. In this work, we present, as a case study, experimental measurements of the cuprate superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ by spin-resolved photoemission while maintaining full angular and energy resolution. A spin polarization of at least 10 % is observed, which is related to the phase of the photoelectron wave function.

  18. High-temperature superconductivity in space-charge regions of lanthanum cuprate induced by two-dimensional doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiutti, F.; Logvenov, G.; Gregori, G.; Cristiani, G.; Wang, Y.; Sigle, W.; van Aken, P. A.; Maier, J.

    2015-10-01

    The exploitation of interface effects turned out to be a powerful tool for generating exciting material properties. Such properties include magnetism, electronic and ionic transport and even superconductivity. Here, instead of using conventional homogeneous doping to enhance the hole concentration in lanthanum cuprate and achieve superconductivity, we replace single LaO planes with SrO dopant planes using atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (two-dimensional doping). Electron spectroscopy and microscopy, conductivity measurements and zinc tomography reveal such negatively charged interfaces to induce layer-dependent superconductivity (Tc up to 35 K) in the space-charge zone at the side of the planes facing the substrate, where the strontium (Sr) profile is abrupt. Owing to the growth conditions, the other side exhibits instead a Sr redistribution resulting in superconductivity due to conventional doping. The present study represents a successful example of two-dimensional doping of superconducting oxide systems and demonstrates its power in this field.

  19. The roles of antiferromagnetic and nematic fluctuations in cuprate superconductors: a sign-free quantum Monte-Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zixiang; Yao, Hong; Wang, Fa; Lee, Dung-Hai

    Superconductivity is an emergent phenomena in the sense that the energy scale at which Cooper pairs form is generically much lower than the bare energy scale, namely the electron kinetic energy bandwidth. Addressing the mechanism of Cooper pairing amounts to finding out the effective interaction (or the renormalized interaction) that operates at the low energies. Finding such interaction from the bare microscopic Hamiltonian has not been possible for strong correlated superconductors such as the copper-oxide high temperature superconductor. In fact even one is given the effective interaction, determining its implied electronic instabilities without making any approximation has been a formidable task. Here, we perform sign-free quantum Monte-Carlo simulations to study the antiferromagnetic, superconducting, and the charge density wave instabilities which are ubiquitous in both electron and hole doped cuprates. Our result suggests only after including both the nematic and antiferromagnetic fluctuation, are the observed properties associated with these instabilities reproduced by the theory.

  20. Application of the new LDA+GTB method for the band structure calculation of n-type cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, M.M. [L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: mkor@iph.krasn.ru; Ovchinnikov, S.G. [L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Gavrichkov, V.A. [L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Nekrasov, I.A. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620219 Yekaterinburg GSP-170 (Russian Federation); Pchelkina, Z.V. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620219 Yekaterinburg GSP-170 (Russian Federation); Anisimov, V.I. [Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences-Ural Division, 620219 Yekaterinburg GSP-170 (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-01

    A novel hybrid scheme is proposed and applied for band structure calculations of undoped n-type cuprate Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. The ab initio LDA calculation is used to obtain single electron and Coulomb parameters of the multiband Hubbard-type model. In strong correlation regime the electronic structure within this model is calculated by the generalized tight-binding (GTB) method, that combines the exact diagonalization of the model Hamiltonian for a small cluster with perturbation treatment of the intercluster hopping and interactions. For Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, this scheme results in charge transfer insulator with value of the gap and band dispersion in agreement to the experimental data.

  1. High T{sub c} in cuprates as a universal property of the electron–phonon system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, E. A., E-mail: eugen-masur@mail.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Kagan, Yu. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    The Eliashberg theory, which is generalized due to peculiar properties of the finite-width electron band for electron–phonon (EP) systems with a variable electron density of states (DOS), as well as with allowance for the electron–hole nonequivalence of the frequency behavior of the chemical potential renormalization depending on the doping level and electron correlations in the vertex function, is used to study T{sub c} in cuprates. The phonon contribution to the nodal anomalous electron Green’s function (GF) is considered. Pairing within the total width of the electron band, and not only in a narrow layer at the Fermi surface, is taken into account. The calculated frequency and temperature dependences, as well as the dependence on the doping level of the complex renormalization ReZ, ImZ of the mass, complex renormalization Reχ(ω), Imχ(ω) of the chemical potential, and DOS N(ε) renormalized due to the EP interaction are used to calculate the electron nodal anomalous GF. It is found that the effect of suppressing the high-frequency contribution to the Eliashberg equations derived anew for the EP system with a finite width of the electron band is a decisive factor for the manifestation of the effect of high-temperature superconductivity (HTSC). It is shown that in the vicinity of the optimal hole-type doping level in cuprates, the high value of T{sub c} is reproduced by the spectral function of the electron–phonon interaction, which is obtained from tunneling experiments. Upon an increase in the doping level, leading to an increase in the degree of electron–hole nonequivalence, the new logarithmic term appearing in the equations for T{sub c} has a tendency to increase T{sub c}, while intensification of damping of charge carriers (especially suppression of the cutoff factor) leads to a decrease in T{sub c}.

  2. Pairing symmetries of several iron-based superconductor families and some similarities with cuprates and heavy-fermions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Tanmoy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We show that, by using the unit-cell transformation between 1 Fe per unit cell to 2 Fe per unit cell, one can qualitatively understand the pairing symmetry of several families of iron-based superconductors. In iron-pnictides and iron-chalcogenides, the nodeless s±-pairing and the resulting magnetic resonance mode transform nicely between the two unit cells, while retaining all physical properties unchanged. However, when the electron-pocket disappears from the Fermi surface with complete doping in KFe2As2, we find that the unit-cell invariant requirement prohibits the occurrence of s±-pairing symmetry (caused by inter-hole-pocket nesting. However, the intra-pocket nesting is compatible here, which leads to a nodal d-wave pairing. The corresponding Fermi surface topology and the pairing symmetry are similar to Ce-based heavy-fermion superconductors. Furthermore, when the Fermi surface hosts only electron-pockets in KyFe2-xSe2, the inter-electron-pocket nesting induces a nodeless and isotropic d-wave pairing. This situation is analogous to the electron-doped cuprates, where the strong antiferromagnetic order creates similar disconnected electron-pocket Fermi surface, and hence nodeless d-wave pairing appears. The unit-cell transformation in KyFe2-xSe2 exhibits that the d-wave pairing breaks the translational symmetry of the 2 Fe unit cell, and thus cannot be realized unless a vacancy ordering forms to compensate for it. These results are consistent with the coexistence picture of a competing order and nodeless d-wave superconductivity in both cuprates and KyFe1.6Se2.

  3. Earth from Above

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahley, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Google Earth is a free online software that provides a virtual view of Earth. Using Google Earth, students can view Earth by hovering over features and locations they preselect or by serendipitously exploring locations that catch their fascination. Going beyond hovering, they can swoop forward and even tilt images to make more detailed…

  4. Rare Earth Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    BEFORE the early 1970s, China had no rare earth exports, and the world rare earth market was dominated by the United States, Europe and Japan. In the 1970s, China began to enter the world rare earth market and its share has picked up sharply in the following decades. Today, having the monopoly over global rare earth production, China must improve the benefits from rare earth production, not only from producing individual rare earth products, but also from mastering the intensive processing of rare earth products.

  5. Role of competing orders (COs) in the low-energy pseudogap (PG) phenomena and quasiparticle (QP) excitations of hole- and electron-type cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A. D.; Grinolds, M. S.; Teague, M. L.; Yeh, N.-C.; Lee, S.-I.

    2008-03-01

    Our cryogenic scanning tunneling spectroscopic studies of spatially resolved QP density of states (DOS) in hole-type YBa2Cu3Ox and electron-type La0.1Sr0.9CuO2 cuprate superconductors (SC) reveal that the existence of COs in the cuprates can account for many seeming non-universal phenomena. Namely, we analyze the low-energy QP excitation spectra by using a microscopic model of coexisting SC/CO, with density-wave type COs, and find that various spectral characteristics are uniquely determined by the parameters δSC, VCO, Q, η, and γ (δSC: SC gap, VCO: CO gap, Q: CO wave-vector, η: strength of quantum fluctuations, γ: line-width of QP spectral peak). For instance, VCO>δSC (VCOVCO values derived by our analysis.

  6. Annealing condition dependence of the superconducting property and the pseudo-gap in the protect-annealed electron-doped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Woo Been; Cho, Su Hyun; Kim, Chang Young [Center for Correlated Electron Systems, Institute for Basic Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Dong Joon [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Park, Seung Ryong [Dept. of Physics, Research Institute of Basic Sciences, Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Annealing as-grown electron-doped cuprates under a low oxygen-partial-pressure condition is a necessary step to achieve superconductivity. It has been recently found that the so-called protect annealing results in much better superconducting properties in terms of the superconducting transition temperature and volume fraction. In this article, we report on angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy studies of a protect-annealed electron-doped cuprate Pr0.9La1.0Ce0.1CuO4 on annealing condition dependent superconducting and pseudo-gap properties. Remarkably, we found that the one showing a better superconducting property possesses almost no pseudo-gap while others have strong pseudo-gap feature due to an anti-ferromagnetic order.

  7. Observation of momentum-dependent charge excitations in hole-doped cuprates using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the oxygen K edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami; Asano, Shun; Sato, Kentaro; Fujita, Masaki; Wakimoto, Shuichi; Tustsui, Kenji; Sota, Shigetoshi; Miyawaki, Jun; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Pelliciari, Jonathan; Huang, Yaobo; Schmitt, Thorsten; Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2017-09-01

    We investigate electronic excitations in La2 -x(Br,Sr ) xCuO4 using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the oxygen K edge. RIXS spectra of the hole-doped cuprates show clear momentum dependence below 1 eV. The broad spectral weight exhibits positive dispersion and shifts to higher energy with increasing hole concentration. Theoretical calculation of the dynamical charge structure factor on oxygen orbitals in a three-band Hubbard model is consistent with the experimental observation of the momentum and doping dependence, and therefore the momentum-dependent spectral weight is ascribed to intraband charge excitations which have been observed in electron-doped cuprates. Our results confirm that the momentum-dependent charge excitations exist on the order of the transfer energy (t ), and the broad spectral line shape indicates damped and incoherent character of the charge excitations at the energy range in the doped Mott insulators.

  8. Commensurate antiferromagnetic excitations as a signature of the pseudogap in the tetragonal high-Tc cuprate HgBa2CuO4+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M. K.; Dorow, C. J.; Mangin-Thro, L.; Tang, Y.; Ge, Y.; Veit, M. J.; Yu, G.; Zhao, X.; Christianson, A. D.; Park, J. T.; Sidis, Y.; Steffens, P.; Abernathy, D. L.; Bourges, P.; Greven, M.

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic correlations have been argued to be the cause of the d-wave superconductivity and the pseudogap phenomena exhibited by the cuprates. Although the antiferromagnetic response in the pseudogap state has been reported for a number of compounds, there exists no information for structurally simple HgBa2CuO4+δ. Here we report neutron-scattering results for HgBa2CuO4+δ (superconducting transition temperature Tc≈71 K, pseudogap temperature T*≈305 K) that demonstrate the absence of the two most prominent features of the magnetic excitation spectrum of the cuprates: the X-shaped ‘hourglass' response and the resonance mode in the superconducting state. Instead, the response is Y-shaped, gapped and significantly enhanced below T*, and hence a prominent signature of the pseudogap state. PMID:26940332

  9. Spin-fluctuation mediated superconductivity and magnetic order in the cuprate La1.88Sr0.12CuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Astrid Tranum

    High-temperature superconductivity in cuprates emerges as one out of many electronic phases when doping the antiferromagnetic Mott insulator La2CuO4 away from half _lling. The description of the superconducting phase is therefore complicated by intertwined electronic orders that compete...... with superconductivity. However, it is possible that the tendency towards additional ordering phenomena is a necessary condition for unconventional superconductivity to develop. Indeed most superconductors discovered throughout the last 29 years, including also the recently discovered class of iron-based superconductors......, show a very rich electronic phase diagram. A common feature that characterizes both cuprates, heavy fermions, and iron pnictides is the proximity to magnetic order. Therefore, the idea of spin-uctuation mediated pairing is a popular paradigm proposed for unconventional superconductivity. A _ngerprint...

  10. Unusual Nernst Effect Suggesting Time-Reversal Violation in the Striped Cuprate Superconductor La2-xBaxCuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Alidoust, N.; Tranquada, J. M.; Gu, G. D.; Ong, N. P.

    2011-12-01

    The striped cuprate La2-xBaxCuO4 (x=(1)/(8)) undergoes several transitions below the charge-ordering temperature Tco=54K. From Nernst experiments, we find that, below Tco, there exists a large, anomalous Nernst signal eN,even(H,T) that is symmetric in field H, and remains finite as H→0. The time-reversal violating signal suggests that, below Tco, vortices of one sign are spontaneously created to relieve interlayer phase frustration.

  11. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy studies of the many-body effects in the electronic structure of high-T{sub c} cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inosov, Dmytro S.

    2008-06-18

    In the present work some steps are done towards understanding the anomalous effects observed in the single-particle excitation spectra of cuprates. First, the electronic properties of BSCCO are considered. The main result of this part of the work is a model of the Green's function that is later used for calculating the two-particle excitation spectrum. Then, the matrix element effects in the photoemission spectra of cuprates are discussed. After a general introduction to the problem, the thesis focuses on the recently discovered anomalous behavior of the ARPES spectra that partially originates from the momentum-dependent photoemission matrix element. The momentum- and excitation energy dependence of the anomalous high-energy dispersion, termed ''waterfalls'', is covered in full detail. Understanding the role of the matrix element effects in this phenomenon proves crucial, as they obstruct the view of the underlying excitation spectrum that is of indisputable interest. For the optimally doped bilayer Bi-based cuprate, the renormalized two-particle correlation function in the superconducting state is calculated from ARPES data within an itinerant model based on the random phase approximation (RPA). (orig.)

  12. Crystal structures of bis-[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinanium] tetra-chlorido-cobaltate and tetra-chlorido-cuprate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchat, Eric; Nazarenko, Alexander Y

    2017-01-01

    (9S,13S,14S)-3-Meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinan (dextromethorphan) forms two isostructural salts with (a) tetra-chlorido-cobaltate, namely bis-[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinanium] tetra-chlorido-cobaltate, (C18H26NO)2[CoCl4], and (b) tetra-chlorido-cuprate, namely bis-[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth-oxy-17-methyl-morphinanium] tetra-chlorido-cuprate, (C18H26NO)2[CuCl4]. The distorted tetra-hedral anions are located on twofold rotational axes. The dextromethorphan cation can be described as being composed of two ring systems, a tetra-hydro-naphthalene system A+B and a deca-hydro-isoquinolinium subunit C+D, that are nearly perpendicular to one another: the angle between mean planes of the A+B and C+D moieties is 78.8 (1)° for (a) and 79.0 (1)° for (b). Two symmetry-related cations of protonated dextromethorphan are connected to the tetra-chlorido-cobaltate (or tetra-chlorido-cuprate) anions via strong N-H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming neutral ion associates. These associates are packed in the (001) plane with no strong attractive bonding between them. Both compounds are attractive crystalline forms for unambiguous identification of the dextromethorphan and, presumably, of its optical isomer, levomethorphan.

  13. Thermodynamic properties of underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x cuprates for doping values x ∈ (0 . 5 , 0 . 9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, P.; Solis, M. A.; Fortes, M.

    We extend the Boson-Fermion superconductivity model to include layered systems, such as underdoped cuprate superconductors YBa2Cu3O6+x, with x ∈ (0 . 5 , 0 . 9) ranging from underdoped to optimally doped. We model cuprates as a boson-fermion quantum gas mixture immersed in a layered structure, generated via a Dirac comb potential applied in one direction while the particles move freely in the other two directions. The optimum parameters of the system, which are the impenetrability of the planes and the paired fermion fraction, are obtained by minimizing the Helmholtz free energy and setting the experimental critical temperature Tc. Using this optimized scheme, we are able to predict the following thermodynamic properties of cuprates as a function of temperature: the entropy; the Helmholtz free energy; the electronic specific heat and the total specific heat for different doping values. Furthermore, we determinate the behavior of the jump height in the electronic specific heat, the normal electronic specific heat coefficient γ (Tc) , the quadratic α and cubic β terms of the specific heat for low temperatures, the ground state energy and the mass anisotropy as a function of doping. Comparison to experimental values reported is analyzed. We aknowledge the support from Grants UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT IN-111613 and CONACYT 221030, Mexico.

  14. Energy and symmetry of dd excitations in undoped layered cuprates measured by Cu L{sub 3} resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti Sala, M; Minola, M [CNISM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bisogni, V; Brookes, N B [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BoIte Postale 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Aruta, C; Luca, G M de; Miletto Granozio, F; Perna, P; Radovic, M; Salluzzo, M [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Complesso di Monte S Angelo, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Balestrino, G; Di Castro, D; Medaglia, P G [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Berger, H; Grioni, M; Guarise, M [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institut de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Schmitt, T; Zhou, K J [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Braicovich, L; Ghiringhelli, G, E-mail: marco.moretti@esrf.fr [CNR-SPIN and Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    We measured the high-resolution Cu L{sub 3} edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) of undoped cuprates La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, CaCuO{sub 2} and NdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6}. The dominant spectral features were assigned to dd excitations and we extensively studied their polarization and scattering geometry dependence. In a pure ionic picture, we calculated the theoretical cross sections for those excitations and used these to fit the experimental data with excellent agreement. By doing so, we were able to determine the energy and symmetry of Cu-3d states for the four systems with unprecedented accuracy and confidence. The values of the effective parameters could be obtained for the single-ion crystal field model but not for a simple two-dimensional cluster model. The firm experimental assessment of dd excitation energies carries important consequences for the physics of high-T{sub c} superconductors. On the one hand, we found that the minimum energy of orbital excitation is always {>=}1.4 eV, i.e. well above the mid-infrared spectral range, which leaves to magnetic excitations (up to 300 meV) a major role in Cooper pairing in cuprates. On the other hand, it has become possible to study quantitatively the effective influence of dd excitations on the superconducting gap in cuprates.

  15. Study of apical oxygen atoms in a spin-ladder cuprate compound by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near the Cu K edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatterer, C.J.; Eustache, B.; Collin, L.; Beuran, C.F.; Partiot, C.; Germain, P.; Xu, X.Z.; Lagues, M. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs; Michalowicz, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France)]|[LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Moscovici, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Deville Cavellin, C. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs]|[Laboratoire d`Electronique, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 av. du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Traverse, A. [LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-04-01

    The structure of high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate compounds is based on CuO{sub 2} planes alternating with blocks that behave as charge reservoirs. The apical oxygen atoms which belong to these reservoirs are suspected to play a role in the mechanism of superconductivity. It thus seems necessary to measure the amount of apical oxygen atoms in various compounds, as a function of the superconducting properties. Polarisation dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were performed near the Cu K-edge on three types of phases. We collected information about the neighbourhood of the copper atom in the cuprate planes and in the direction perpendicular to these planes. Two of these phases have well known structures: Bi2212 in which copper atoms are on a pyramidal site and infinite layer phase, a square planar cuprate without apical oxygen. We used the obtained results as reference data to study a new copper-rich phase related to the spin-ladder series. (orig.)

  16. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  17. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  18. EarthKAM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sponsored by NASA, EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to take pictures...

  19. Earth on the Move.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on the layers of the earth, the relationship between changes on the surface of the earth and its insides, and plate tectonics. Teaching activities are included, with some containing reproducible worksheets and handouts to accompany them. (TW)

  20. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing....

  1. Capturing Near Earth Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Baoyin, Hexi; CHEN Yang; Li, Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting object after a small...

  2. Electronic bound states in parity-preserving QED{sub 3} applied to high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, H.R. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Teoria de Campos e Particulas]. E-mail: hugo@cbpf.br; Cima, O.M. Del [Universidade Catolica de Petropolis, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Fisica Teorica]. E-mail: delcima@gft.ucp.br; Ferreira Junior, M.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Teoria de Campos e Particulas]|[Maranhao Univ., Sao Luis, MA (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica]. E-mail: manojr@cbpf.br; Helayel-Neto, J.A. [Universidade Catolica de Petropolis, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Fisica Teorica]|[Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Teoria de Campos e Particulas]. E-mail: helayel@gft.ucp.br

    2001-08-01

    We consider a parity-preserving QED{sub 3} model with spontaneous breaking of the gauge symmetry as a framework for the evaluation of the electron-electron interaction potential underlying high-T{sub e} superconductivity. The fact that resulting potential, - C{sub s} K{sub o} (Mr), is non-confining and weak (in the sense of Kato) strongly suggests the mechanism of pair-condensation. This potential, compatible with an s-wave order parameters, is then applied to the Schrodinger equation for the sake of numerical calculations, thereby enforcing the existence of bound states. The results worked out by means of our theoretical framework are checked by considering a number of phenomenological data extracted from different copper oxide superconductors. The agreement may motivate a deeper analysis of our model viewing an application to quasi-planar cuprate superconductors. The data analyzed here suggest an energy scale of 1-10 meV for the breaking of the U(1)-symmetry. (author)

  3. Radiation of terahertz electromagnetic waves from build-in nano Josephson junctions of cuprate high-T(c) superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Zeng; Hu, Xiao

    2011-04-01

    The nano-scale intrinsic Josephson junctions in highly anisotropic cuprate superconductors have potential for generation of terahertz electromagnetic waves. When the thickness of a superconductor sample is much smaller than the wavelength of electromagnetic waves in vacuum, the superconductor renders itself as a cavity. Unlike conventional lasers, the presence of the cavity does not guarantee a coherent emission because of the internal degree of freedom of the superconductivity phase in long junctions. We study the excitation of terahertz wave by solitons in a stack of intrinsic Josephson junctions, especially for relatively short junctions. Coherent emission requires a rectangular configuration of solitons. However such a configuration is unstable against weak fluctuations, contrarily solitons favor a triangular lattice corresponding to an out-phase oscillation of electromagnetic waves. To utilize the cavity, we propose to use an array of stacks of short intrinsic Josephson junctions to generate powerful terahertz electromagnetic waves. The cavity synchronizes the plasma oscillation in different stacks and the emission intensity is predicted to be proportional to the number of stacks squared.

  4. Dislocations as a boundary between charge density wave and oxygen rich phases in a cuprate high temperature superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poccia, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandro; Campi, Gaetano; Bianconi, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Multiple functional ionic and electronic orders are observed in high temperature superconducting cuprates. The charge density wave order is one of them and it is spatially localized in different regions of the material. It is also known that the oxygen interstitials introduced by chemical intercalation self-organize in different oxygen rich regions corresponding with hole rich regions in the CuO2 layers left empty by the charge density wave order domains. However, what happens in between these two orders is not known, and neither there is a method to control this spatial separation. Here we demonstrate by using scanning nano x-ray diffraction, that dislocations or grain boundaries in the material can act as boundary between charge density wave and oxygen rich phases in a optimally doped {{La}}2{{CuO}}4+y high temperature superconductor. Dislocations can be used therefore to control the anti-correlation of the charge density wave order with the oxygen interstitials in specific portion of the material.

  5. Sharp low-energy feature in single-particle spectra due to forward scattering in d-wave cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Hwan; Bok, Jin Mo; Zhang, Wentao; He, Junfeng; Zhou, X J; Varma, C M; Choi, Han-Yong

    2014-08-01

    There is an enormous interest in the renormalization of the quasiparticle (qp) dispersion relation of cuprate superconductors both below and above the critical temperature T_{c} because it enables the determination of the fluctuation spectrum to which the qp's are coupled. A remarkable discovery by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) is a sharp low-energy feature (LEF) in qp spectra well below the superconducting energy gap but with its energy increasing in proportion to T_{c} and its intensity increasing sharply below T_{c}. This unexpected feature needs to be reconciled with d-wave superconductivity. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of ARPES data from Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} (Bi2212) using Eliashberg equations to show that the qp scattering rate due to the forward scattering impurities far from the Cu-O planes is modified by the energy gap below T_{c} and shows up as the LEF. This is also a necessary step to analyze ARPES data to reveal the spectrum of fluctuations promoting superconductivity.

  6. Onsager rule, quantum oscillation frequencies, and the density of states in the mixed-vortex state of cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Chakravarty, Sudip

    2016-05-01

    The Onsager rule determines the relationship between Fermi surface area and frequencies of quantum oscillations in magnetic fields. We show that this rule remains intact to an excellent approximation in the mixed-vortex state of the underdoped cuprates even though the Landau level index n may be fairly low, n ˜10 . The models we consider are fairly general, consisting of a variety of density wave states combined with d -wave superconductivity within a mean field theory. Vortices are introduced as quenched disorder and averaged over many realizations, which can be considered as snapshots of a vortex liquid state. We also show that the oscillations ride on top of a field independent density of states ρ (B ) for higher fields. This feature appears to be consistent with recent specific heat measurements [C. Marcenat et al., Nature Communications 6, 7927 (2015), 10.1038/ncomms8927]. The experimental data do not go to low fields at the lowest temperature 3 K. Thus, we cannot compare the density of state for the entire field range. Of course, the high temperature data are linear in the field at lower fields, as they should be, but our theory is only valid at very low temperatures, ideally at zero temperature. At lower fields and zero temperature we model the system as an ordered vortex lattice, and show that its density of states follows a dependence ρ (B ) ∝√{B } in agreement with the semiclassical results [JETP Lett 58, 469 (1993)].

  7. Screening of point charge impurities in highly anisotropic metals: application to mu+-spin relaxation in underdoped cuprate superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhter, Arkady; Shu, Lei; Aji, Vivek; MacLaughlin, D E; Varma, C M

    2008-11-28

    We calculate the screening charge density distribution due to a point charge, such as that of a positive muon (mu+), placed between the planes of a highly anisotropic layered metal. In underdoped hole cuprates the screening charge converts the charge density in the metallic-plane unit cells in the vicinity of the mu+ to nearly its value in the insulating state. The current-loop-ordered state observed by polarized neutron diffraction then vanishes in such cells, and also in nearby cells over a distance of order the intrinsic correlation length of the loop-ordered state. This strongly suppresses the magnetic field at the mu+ site. We estimate this suppressed field in underdoped YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xSrxCuO4, and find consistency with the observed approximately 0.2 G field in the former case and the observed upper bound of approximately 0.2 G in the latter case. This resolves the controversy between the neutron diffraction and mu-spin relaxation experiments.

  8. Ion beam irradiation of cuprate high-temperature superconductors: Systematic modification of the electrical properties and fabrication of nanopatterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, W., E-mail: wolfgang.lang@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Marksteiner, M. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Bodea, M.A.; Siraj, K.; Pedarnig, J.D. [Johannes-Kepler-University Linz, Institute of Applied Physics, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Kolarova, R.; Bauer, P. [Johannes-Kepler-University Linz, Institute of Experimental Physics, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Haselgruebler, K.; Hasenfuss, C. [Johannes-Kepler-University Linz, Center of Surface and Nanoanalytics, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Beinik, I.; Teichert, C. [University of Leoben, Institute of Physics, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2012-02-01

    Irradiation of thin films of the cuprate high-temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) with 75 keV He{sup +} ions leads to an exponential increase of the resistivity and a non-linear decrease of the critical temperature. At a fluence above 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15}cm{sup -2} the material becomes semiconducting. Calculations of ion-target interactions using the MARLOWE code indicated that these effects are due to the creation of point defects, primarily by displacing oxygen atoms, and that the lateral broadening of the ion's collision cascades is smaller than 10 nm in a 100 nm thick YBCO film. Irradiating a YBCO film through a silicon stencil mask with minimum aperture of 125 nm placed on top of the sample results in a local modification of its electrical properties. We demonstrate that this technique can be used to produce patterns of sub-100 nm size, visualized by scanning electron microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy. This simple one-step process does not require the removal of target material and avoids the contamination problems associated with chemical etching and focused ion beam techniques.

  9. Anomalous field-symmetric Nernst signal in striped cuprate La2-xBaxCuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, N. Phuan; Li, Lu; Tranquada, J. M.; Gu, Genda

    2011-03-01

    Starting at the structural transition temperature Td 2 = 54 K, the striped cuprate La 2-x Ba x Cu O4 (x =1/8 ) displays a remarkable cascade of transitions 1 at the characteristic temperatures Td 2 >T1* * >TBKT >Tc , beforesettlingdownto 3 Dsuperconductivitywithlong - rangecoherenceat Tc = 5 K . TheNernstsignal eN andthermopower S havebeeninvestigatedindetailinthesemultiplestates . AsinpureLaSrCuO , theNernstcoefficient N =limB --> 0eN / B (initiallynegative) acquiresapositivevortexcontributionat 120 Kthatgrowsrapidly . However , here , N saturatesintheinterval T d2 (54 K) to T1* * (34 K) . Asthevortexliquidbecomesincreasinglystabilizedbelow T1** , N resumesincreasingatanevensteeperrate . Surprisingly , below 34 K , eN acquiresa B - symmetriccomponentthatisverylargeandoscillatoryin B . Wehaveexcluded S and quasiparticles as the source of the anomalous term. We will discuss various origins including the possibility of vortex formation mechanisms that break time-reversal invariance. 1) J. M. Tranquada et al., Phys. Rev. B 78, 174529 (2008). Supported by NSF-DMR 0819860 (at Princeton) and US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 (at BNL).

  10. The collapse of the columnar spatial topology of pseudogap excitations in the underdoped-overdoped transition of cuprate superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehler, Juergen [Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The intensity I{sub Q{sub 0}} of the Q=0 nematic pseudogap excitations in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x} was found to increase between p ≥ 0.06 and 0.14 and to collapse at p{sub opt}=0.16, reaching zero at p=0.2. Evidentially it maps the growth and the collapse of the bulge in the doping dependence of the basal-plane area (ab) of p-type cuprates. The nematic topology of the pseudogap excitations results from the non-occupancy constraint for nn ZR-holes excluding 1a dimerization, but favoring 3a pair states with inequivalent O{sub x,y} sites. 3a pair states have hard core properties, yield d-type CDW excitations, and inflate the basal-plane area by a columnar topology against covalency-driven contraction. We show that optimal delocalization of ZR-holes at p{sub opt}=1/6 ≅ 0.17, tantamount to maximal connectedness of 3a pair states, will transform the columnar nematic pattern into isotropic tweedy striations, hence collapses I{sub Q{sub 0}}, and the bulge.

  11. High-temperature superconductivity in space-charge regions of lanthanum cuprate induced by two-dimensional doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiutti, F; Logvenov, G; Gregori, G; Cristiani, G; Wang, Y; Sigle, W; van Aken, P A; Maier, J

    2015-10-20

    The exploitation of interface effects turned out to be a powerful tool for generating exciting material properties. Such properties include magnetism, electronic and ionic transport and even superconductivity. Here, instead of using conventional homogeneous doping to enhance the hole concentration in lanthanum cuprate and achieve superconductivity, we replace single LaO planes with SrO dopant planes using atomic-layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (two-dimensional doping). Electron spectroscopy and microscopy, conductivity measurements and zinc tomography reveal such negatively charged interfaces to induce layer-dependent superconductivity (Tc up to 35 K) in the space-charge zone at the side of the planes facing the substrate, where the strontium (Sr) profile is abrupt. Owing to the growth conditions, the other side exhibits instead a Sr redistribution resulting in superconductivity due to conventional doping. The present study represents a successful example of two-dimensional doping of superconducting oxide systems and demonstrates its power in this field.

  12. Development of a fluorine-free chemical solution deposition route for rare-earth cuprate superconducting tapes and its application to reel-to-reel processing

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Xiao; Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Grundet nul modstand og ingen elektrisk energitab under el transmission, vil applikationen af superledere kunne levere en betydelig fordel, særligt taget den hurtige udvikling i betragtning på bekostning af høje energipriser. For operation ved flydende kvælstof temperatur, har REBCO visse fordele i at kunne bibeholde en høj strømningsdensitet under et stærkt magnetisk felt, således har REBCO højtemperatur superledere højt potentiale inden for højfelts tekniske applikationer.Sammenlignet med P...

  13. Development of a fluorine-free chemical solution deposition route for rare-earth cuprate superconducting tapes and its application to reel-to-reel processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Xiao

    and in consequence increase the Jc of the films. In Chapter 8, based on the effect of BaZrO3-doping in improving the in-field performance of YBCO films, and on the positive influence of Ag-doping in accelerating YBCO grain growth, which has been confirmed in Chapter 6, the effect of BaZrO3/Ag hybrid doping...

  14. A brief analysis of annealing pro cess for electron-dop ed cuprate sup erconductors%浅析电子型掺杂铜氧化物超导体的退火过程∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾艳丽; 龙有文; 朱北沂; 金魁; 杨桦; 袁洁; 于和善; 冯中沛; 夏海亮; 石玉君; 何格; 胡卫

    2015-01-01

    The high-Tc copper-oxide superconductors (cuprates) break the limit of superconducting transition temperature predicted by the BCS theory based on electron-phonon coupling, and thus it opens a new chapter in the superconductivity field. According to the valence of substitutents, the cuprates could be categorized into electron-and hole-doped types. So far, an enormous number of high-Tc cuprate superconductors have been intensively studied, most of them are hole-doped. In comparison with the hole-doped cuprates, the advantages of electron-doped cuprates (e.g. lower upper critical field, less-debated origin of “pseudogap”, etc.) make this family of compounds more suitable for unveiling the ground states. However, the difficulties in sample syntheses prevent a profound research in last several decades, in which the role of annealing process during sample preparation has been a big challenge. In this review article, a brief comparison between the electron-doped cuprates and the hole-doped counterparts is made from the aspect of electronic phase diagram, so as to point out the necessity of intensive work on the electron-doped cuprates. Since the electronic properties are highly sensitive to the oxygen content of the sample, the annealing process in sample preparation, which varies the oxygen content, turns out to be a key issue in constructing the phase diagram. Meanwhile, the distinction between electron- and hole-doped cuprates is also manifested in their lattice structures. It has been approved that the stability of the superconducting phase of electron-doped cuprates depends on the tolerance factor t (affected by dopants) doping concentration, temperature, and oxygen position. Yet it is known that the annealing process can vary the oxygen content as well as its position, the details how to adjust oxygen remain unclear. Recently, the experiment on Pr2−xCexCuO4−δsuggests that the oxygen position can be tuned by pressure. And, our new results on [La1.9Ce0.1CuO4

  15. Increase of production rate of RE-123 film by PLD system with the hot-wall type heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, K., E-mail: kkakimoto@fujikura.co.j [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan); Fuji, H.; Igarashi, M.; Hanada, Y.; Hanyu, S.; Hayashida, T.; Tashita, C.; Kutami, H.; Iijima, Y.; Saitoh, T. [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan)

    2009-10-15

    We have studied two types of heating systems to produce thick GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-X} (Gd123) films with high critical current (I{sub c}) stably at a high speed by the PLD method. Material yields of both PLD systems reached about 50-60% by optimization of evaporation condition. Hot-wall heating type (type 2) could fabricate the thicker Gd123 film with the higher I{sub c} compared to contact heating type (type 1) and maximum I{sub c} reached 1040 A at about 6 mum thick. Furthermore, it was estimated that type 2 could fabricate Gd123 film with an I{sub c} of about 700 A at about twice speed compared to type 1. Finally, it was considered that the hot-wall heating type was very advantageous to prepare thick Gd123 film with high I{sub c} at a high speed from the system structure.

  16. Scanning Hall-probe microscopy system for two-dimensional imaging of critical current density in RE-123 coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashikawa, K., E-mail: kohei@super.ees.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Inoue, M.; Kawaguchi, T.; Shiohara, K.; Imamura, K.; Kiss, T. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Iijima, Y.; Kakimoto, K.; Saitoh, T. [Material Technology Laboratory, Fujikura, 1-5-1, Kiba, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8512 (Japan); Izumi, T. [Superconductivity Research Laboratory, International Superconductivity Technology Center, 1-10-13 Shinonome, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0062 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Nondestructive characterization method of in-plane distribution of critical current density for coated conductors. Current distribution in a coated conductor compared with that from theoretical analysis. Relationship between local critical current density and local magnetic field. We have developed a characterization method for two-dimensional imaging of critical current density in coated conductors (CCs) based on scanning Hall-probe microscopy (SHPM). The distributions of the magnetic field around a sample were measured for several different conditions of external magnetic fields, and then were converted to those of the sheet current density which flowed to shield the external magnetic field or to trap the penetrated magnetic field. As a result, it was found that the amplitude of the sheet current density corresponded to that of critical current density almost in all the area of the sample except for the region where current direction changed. This indicates that we could obtain an in-plane distribution of the critical current density with a spatial resolution of around 100 {mu}m in non-destructive manner by this method. We believe that this measurement will be a multifunctional and comprehensive characterization method for coated conductors.

  17. High-speed deposition of RE123 film with large current capacity by hot-wall type PLD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, M., E-mail: m_igarashi@fujikura.co.j [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan); Kakimoto, K.; Hayashida, T.; Hanada, Y.; Fujita, S.; Morita, K.; Nakamura, N.; Hanyu, S.; Sutoh, Y.; Kutami, H.; Iijima, Y.; Saitoh, T. [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    We have studied a hot-wall heating system to produce GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} (GdBCO) films with large critical currents (I{sub c}) at a high production rate by a pulsed-laser-deposition (PLD) method. GdBCO films fabricated at a production rate of 30 m/h under the optimized conditions, especially a distance of 95 mm between the target and the substrate (T-S), exhibited high critical current densities (J{sub c}) of about 3 MA/cm{sup 2} and I{sub c} over 300 A at a thickness of 1-2 {mu}m. Furthermore, long GdBCO tapes prepared by repeated depositions at each tape-passing speed of 80 m/h showed uniform I{sub c} distribution along the longitudinal direction, because the hot-wall system enabled to stabilize temperature within a few degrees at 800 deg. C. A 170 m long tape with I{sub c} over 600 A was successfully fabricated at a production rate of 16 m/h using a laser power of 360 W.

  18. Doping Dependence of the $(\\pi,\\pi)$ Shadow Band in La-Based Cuprates Studied by Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Z. X.

    2011-08-15

    The ({pi},{pi}) shadow band (SB) in La-based cuprate family (La214) was studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) over a wide doping range from x = 0.01 to x = 0.25. Unlike the well-studied case of the Bi-based cuprate family, an overall strong, monotonic doping dependence of the SB intensity at the Fermi level (E{sub F}) was observed. In contrast to a previous report for the presence of the SB only close to x = 1/8, we found it exists in a wide doping range, associated with a doping-independent ({pi},{pi}) wave vector but strongly doping-dependent intensity: It is the strongest at x {approx} 0.03 and systematically diminishes as the doping increases until it becomes negligible in the overdoped regime. This SB with the observed doping dependence of intensity can in principle be caused by the antiferromagnetic fluctuations or a particular form of low-temperature orthorhombic lattice distortion known to persist up to x {approx} 0.21 in the system, with both being weakened with increasing doping. However, a detailed binding energy dependent analysis of the SB at x = 0.07 does not appear to support the former interpretation, leaving the latter as a more plausible candidate, despite a challenge in quantitatively linking the doping dependences of the SB intensity and the magnitude of the lattice distortion. Our finding highlights the necessity of a careful and global consideration of the inherent structural complications for correctly understanding the cuprate Fermiology and its microscopic implication.

  19. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  20. Uderstanding Snowball Earth Deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Earth, a normally clement planet comfortably in its star's habitable zone, suffered global or nearly global glaciation at least twice during the Neoproterozoic era (at about 635 and 710 million years ago). Viewed in the context of planetary evolution, these pan-global glaciations (Snowball Earth events) were extremely rapid, lasting only a few million years. The dramatic effect of the Snowball Earth events on the development of the planet can be seen through their link to rises in atmospheric oxygen and evolutionary innovations. These potential catastrophes on an otherwise clement planet can be used to gain insight into planetary habitability more generally. Since Earth is not currently a Snowball, a sound deglaciation mechanism is crucial for the viability of the Snowball Earth hypothesis. The traditional deglaciation mechanism is a massive build up of CO2 due to reduced weathering during Snowball Earth events until tropical surface temperatures reach the melting point. Once initiated, such a deglaciation might happen on a timescale of only dozens of thousands of years and would thrust Earth from the coldest climate in its history to the warmest. Therefore embedded in Snowball Earth events is an even more rapid and dramatic environmental change. Early global climate model simulations raised doubt about whether Snowball Earth deglaciation could be achieved at a CO2 concentration low enough to be consistent with geochemical data, which represented a potential challenge to the Snowball Earth hypothesis. Over the past few years dust and clouds have emerged as the essential missing additional processes that would allow Snowball Earth deglaciation at a low enough CO2 concentration. I will discuss the dust and cloud mechanisms and the modeling behind these ideas. This effort is critical for the broader implications of Snowball Earth events because understanding the specific deglaciation mechanism determines whether similar processes could happen on other planets.

  1. The Earth's early evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, S A; Housh, T

    1995-09-15

    The Archean crust contains direct geochemical information of the Earth's early planetary differentiation. A major outstanding question in the Earth sciences is whether the volume of continental crust today represents nearly all that formed over Earth's history or whether its rates of creation and destruction have been approximately balanced since the Archean. Analysis of neodymium isotopic data from the oldest remnants of Archean crust suggests that crustal recycling is important and that preserved continental crust comprises fragments of crust that escaped recycling. Furthermore, the data suggest that the isotopic evolution of Earth's mantle reflects progressive eradication of primordial heterogeneities related to early differentiation.

  2. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    , Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised...... of starlight by the Sun, and therefore directly observe the structure of space-time. This thesis explores several aspects of the observation of NEOs with Gaia, emphasising detection of NEOs and the quality of orbits computed from Gaia observations. The main contribution is the work on motion detection...

  3. Unusual Nernst effect suggesting time-reversal violation in the striped cuprate superconductor La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Alidoust, N; Tranquada, J M; Gu, G D; Ong, N P

    2011-12-30

    The striped cuprate La(2-x)Ba(x)CuO(4) (x=1/8) undergoes several transitions below the charge-ordering temperature T(co)=54  K. From Nernst experiments, we find that, below T(co), there exists a large, anomalous Nernst signal e(N,even)(H,T) that is symmetric in field H, and remains finite as H→0. The time-reversal violating signal suggests that, below T(co), vortices of one sign are spontaneously created to relieve interlayer phase frustration.

  4. Evidence for quantum critical behavior in the optimally doped cuprate Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valla; Fedorov; Johnson; Wells; Hulbert; Li; Gu; Koshizuka

    1999-09-24

    The photoemission line shapes of the optimally doped cuprate Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) were studied in the direction of a node in the superconducting order parameter by means of very high resolution photoemission spectroscopy. The peak width or inverse lifetime of the excitation displays a linear temperature dependence, independent of binding energy, for small energies, and a linear energy dependence, independent of temperature, for large binding energies. This behavior is unaffected by the superconducting transition, which is an indication that the nodal states play no role in the superconductivity. Temperature-dependent scaling suggests that the system displays quantum critical behavior.

  5. Doping and temperature dependence of the mass enhancement observed in the cuprate Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P D; Valla, T; Fedorov, A V; Yusof, Z; Wells, B O; Li, Q; Moodenbaugh, A R; Gu, G D; Koshizuka, N; Kendziora, C; Jian, S; Hinks, D G

    2001-10-22

    High-resolution photoemission is used to study the electronic structure of the cuprate superconductor, Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta), as a function of hole doping and temperature. A kink observed in the band dispersion in the nodal line in the superconducting state is associated with coupling to a resonant mode observed in neutron scattering. From the measured real part of the self-energy it is possible to extract a coupling constant which is largest in the underdoped regime, then decreasing continuously into the overdoped regime.

  6. Superconducting correlations above Tc in the pseudogap state of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ cuprates revealed by angular-dependent magnetotunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Th.; Katterwe, S. O.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present an angular-dependent magnetotunneling technique, which facilitates unambiguous separation of superconducting (supporting circulating screening currents) and nonsuperconducting (not supporting screening currents) contributions to the pseudogap phenomenon in layered Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 +δ cuprates. Our data indicate persistence of superconducting correlations at temperatures up to 1.5 Tc in a form of both phase and amplitude fluctuations of the superconducting order parameter. However, despite a profound fluctuations region, only a small fraction of the pseudogap spectrum is caused by superconducting correlations, while the dominating part comes from a competing nonsuperconducting order, which does not support circulating orbital currents.

  7. A NiCrAl pressure cell up to 4.6 GPa and its application to cuprate and pnictide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Naoki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Takehiko

    2014-05-01

    A pressurizing trial was performed for a hybrid NiCrAl hybrid pressure cell and a pressure of 4.6 GPa was achieved under a steady load of 15.0 ton, which marks the highest pressure ever known for a piston-cylinder-type pressure cell. The pressure efficiency at 15.0 ton was 75% and the expansion of the inner diameter of the NiCrAl cylinder partially reached 5%. The pressure cell was applied to nuclear-magnetic-resonance experiments on cuprate and pnictide superconductors.

  8. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Zaki; Lamb, Christopher A.; Ross, Shane D.

    2012-12-01

    The list of detected near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) is constantly growing. NEAs are likely targets for resources to support space industrialization, as they may be the least expensive source of certain needed raw materials. The limited supply of precious metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating in the form of asteroids around the solar system. Precious metals make up a significant fraction NEAs by mass, and even one metallic asteroid of ˜1km size and fair enrichment in platinum-group metals would contain twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are ˜1000 NEAs with a diameter of greater than 1 km. Capturing these asteroids around the Earth would expand the mining industry into an entirely new dimension. Having such resources within easy reach in Earth's orbit could provide an off-world environmentally friendly remedy for impending terrestrial shortages, especially given the need for raw materials in developing nations. In this paper, we develop and implement a conceptually simple algorithm to determine trajectory characteristics necessary to move NEAs into capture orbits around the Earth. Altered trajectories of asteroids are calculated using an ephemeris model. Only asteroids of eccentricity less than 0.1 have been studied and the model is restricted to the ecliptic plane for simplicity. We constrain the time of retrieval to be 10 years or less, based on considerations of the time to return on investment. For the heliocentric phase, constant acceleration is assumed. The acceleration required for transporting these asteroids from their undisturbed orbits to the sphere of influence of the Earth is the primary output, along with the impulse or acceleration necessary to effect capture to a bound orbit once the Earth's sphere of influence is reached. The initial guess for the constant acceleration is provided by a new estimation method, similar in spirit to Edelbaum's. Based on the

  9. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  10. The Earth's Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  11. Solid Earth: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, R.

    1991-10-01

    The principles of the solid Earth program are introduced. When considering the study of solid Earth from space, satellites are used as beacons, inertial references, free fall probes and carrying platforms. The phenomenon measured by these satellites and the processes which can be studied as a result of these measurements are tabulated. The NASA solid Earth program focusses on research into surface kinematics, Earth rotation, land, ice, and ocean monitoring. The ESA solid Earth program identifies as its priority the Aristoteles mission for determining the gravity and magnetic field globally, with high spatial resolution and high accuracy. The Aristoteles mission characteristics and goals are listed. The benefits of the improved gravity information that will be provided by this mission are highlighted. This information will help in the following research: geodesy, orbit mechanics, geodynamics, oceanography, climate sea level, and the atmosphere.

  12. Spatial distribution of superconducting and charge-density-wave order parameters in cuprates and its influence on the quasiparticle tunnel current (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabovich, Alexander M.; Voitenko, Alexander I.

    2016-10-01

    The state of the art concerning tunnel measurements of energy gaps in cuprate oxides has been analyzed. A detailed review of the relevant literature is made, and original results calculated for the quasiparticle tunnel current J(V) between a metallic tip and a disordered d-wave superconductor partially gapped by charge density waves (CDWs) are reported, because it is this model of high-temperature superconductors that becomes popular owing to recent experiments in which CDWs were observed directly. The current was calculated suggesting the scatter of both the superconducting and CDW order parameters due to the samples' intrinsic inhomogeneity. It was shown that peculiarities in the current-voltage characteristics inherent to the case of homogeneous superconducting material are severely smeared, and the CDW-related features transform into experimentally observed peak-dip-hump structures. Theoretical results were used to fit data measured for YBa2Cu3O7-δ and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ. The fitting demonstrated a good qualitative agreement between the experiment and model calculations. The analysis of the energy gaps in high-Tc superconductors is important both per se and as a tool to uncover the nature of superconductivity in cuprates not elucidated so far despite of much theoretical effort and experimental progress.

  13. Visualizing pair formation on the atomic scale and the search for the mechanism of superconductivity in high-T{sub c} cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, A [Joseph Henry Laboratories and Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)], E-mail: yazdani@princeton.edu

    2009-04-22

    We have developed several new experimental techniques, based on the scanning tunneling microscope, to visualize the process of pair formation on the atomic scale and to probe with high precision what controls the strength of pairing in high-T{sub c} cuprate superconductor compounds. These new experiments provide evidence that pairing in these exotic superconductors occurs above the bulk transition temperature and in nanoscale regions with sizes of 1-3 nm. The high temperature nucleation and proliferation of these nanoscale puddles have a strong connection to the temperature-doping phase diagram of these superconductors. On average we have found that the pairing gap {delta} and the temperature at which they first nucleate T{sub p} follow the simple relation: 2{delta}/k{sub B}T{sub p}{approx}8. Moreover, the variations of the pairing strength on the nanoscale can be examined to find microscopic clues to the mechanism of pairing. Specifically, we have found evidence that suggests that strong electronic correlation, as opposed to coupling of electrons to bosons, is responsible for the pairing mechanism in the cuprates. Surprisingly, we have found that nanoscale measurements of electronic correlations in the normal state (at temperatures as high as twice T{sub c}) can be used to predict the strength of the local pairing interaction at low temperatures.

  14. Mapping the Electronic Structure of Each Ingredient Oxide Layer of High-T\\{c} Cuprate Superconductor Bi{2}Sr{2}CaCu{2}O{8+δ}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yan-Feng; Wang, Wen-Lin; Peng, Jun-Ping; Ding, Hao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Lili; He, Ke; Ji, Shuai-Hua; Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Gu, Gen-Da; Song, Can-Li; Ma, Xu-Cun; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2015-12-04

    Understanding the mechanism of high transition temperature (T{c}) superconductivity in cuprates has been hindered by the apparent complexity of their multilayered crystal structure. Using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we report on layer-by-layer probing of the electronic structures of all ingredient planes (BiO, SrO, CuO{2}) of Bi{2}Sr{2}CaCu_2}O{8+δ} superconductor prepared by argon-ion bombardment and annealing technique. We show that the well-known pseudogap (PG) feature observed by STM is inherently a property of the BiO planes and thus irrelevant directly to Cooper pairing. The SrO planes exhibit an unexpected van Hove singularity near the Fermi level, while the CuO{2} planes are exclusively characterized by a smaller gap inside the PG. The small gap becomes invisible near T{c}, which we identify as the superconducting gap. The above results constitute severe constraints on any microscopic model for high T{c} superconductivity in cuprates.

  15. Thermoelectric power as evidence for a Quantum Phase Transition in electron-doped cuprates Pr2-xCexCuO4-y .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Greene, R. L.; Behnia, K.

    2006-03-01

    We report magnetic field driven normal state thermoelectric power (S) measurement in electron-doped cuprate system Pr2-xCexCuO4-y as a function of doping (x from 0.11 to 0.19) down to 2K. Consistent with the normal state Hall effect^a, S in the underdoped region (0.11-0.15) is negative. S changes sign at certain temperatures in overdoped samples (0.16-0.18), which supports the picture of a spin density wave rearrangement of the Fermi surface^b. More significantly, both S and S/T at 2K (at 9T) increase dramatically from x=0.11 to 0.16, and then saturate in the overdoped region. This kink around x=0.16 is similar to the previous Hall effect result^a in Pr2-xCexCuO4-y. Our results are further evidence for antiferromagnetism to paramagnetism quantum phase transition in electron-doped cuprates. a. Y. Dagan et al, Physical Review Letters, 92 (16) 167001, 2004 b. A. Zimmers et al, Europhysics Letters 70 (2) 225, 2005

  16. Earth as art three

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  17. Sun-Earth Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  18. Accretion of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canup, Robin M

    2008-11-28

    The origin of the Earth and its Moon has been the focus of an enormous body of research. In this paper I review some of the current models of terrestrial planet accretion, and discuss assumptions common to most works that may require re-examination. Density-wave interactions between growing planets and the gas nebula may help to explain the current near-circular orbits of the Earth and Venus, and may result in large-scale radial migration of proto-planetary embryos. Migration would weaken the link between the present locations of the planets and the original provenance of the material that formed them. Fragmentation can potentially lead to faster accretion and could also damp final planet orbital eccentricities. The Moon-forming impact is believed to be the final major event in the Earth's accretion. Successful simulations of lunar-forming impacts involve a differentiated impactor containing between 0.1 and 0.2 Earth masses, an impact angle near 45 degrees and an impact speed within 10 per cent of the Earth's escape velocity. All successful impacts-with or without pre-impact rotation-imply that the Moon formed primarily from material originating from the impactor rather than from the proto-Earth. This must ultimately be reconciled with compositional similarities between the Earth and the Moon.

  19. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.

  20. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  1. Earth before life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-09

    A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome includes the age of the Earth are consistent with observed data. The appearance of life after the formation of the Earth is consistent with the data set under examination.

  2. Optical spectroscopy of orbital and magnetic excitations in vanadates and cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benckiser, Eva Vera

    2007-10-15

    Within the scope of this thesis, the low-energy excitations of undoped Mott insulators RVO{sub 3} with R = Y, Ho, and Ce, (Sr,Ca)CuO{sub 2} and La{sub 8}Cu{sub 7}O{sub 19} have been investigated by means of optical spectroscopy. The compounds RVO{sub 3} with R=rare-earth ion recently have attracted a lot of interest because of their unusual structural, orbital, and magnetic properties. The compounds undergo a series of temperatureinduced phase transitions accompanied by a change of orbital and magnetic order. Furthermore, it has been proposed that YVO{sub 3} represents the first realization of a one-dimensional orbital liquid and an orbital Peierls phase, with a transition to an orbitally ordered phase at lower temperatures. In this thesis, we present the optical conductivity {sigma}({omega}) of RVO{sub 3} with R=Y, Ho, and Ce for energies from 0.1 to 1.6 eV as a function of temperature (10-300 K) and polarization of the incident light parallel to the crystallographic axes ({sigma}{sub a},{sigma}{sub b},{sigma}{sub c}). Our main experimental result is the observation of two absorption features at 0.55 eV in {sigma}{sub a}({omega}) and 0.4 eV in {sigma}{sub c}({omega}) which are assigned to collective orbital excitations, in contrast to conventional local crystal-field transitions. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that in RVO{sub 3} with R=Y, Ho, and Ce the orbital exchange interactions play a decisive role. In a second study, we have investigated the magnetic excitations of low-dimensional quantum magnets, namely the spin chain (Sr,Ca)CuO{sub 2} and the five-leg ladder La{sub 8}Cu{sub 7}O{sub 19}. For (Sr,Ca)CuO{sub 2}, two absorption features around 0.4 eV in {sigma}{sub c}({omega}) (chain direction) and {sigma}{sub b}({omega}) (inter-chain direction) are identified as magnetic contributions to the optical conductivity. The analysis of {sigma}{sub c}({omega}) enables the very precise determination of the nearest-neighbor exchange coupling J{sub c} as a

  3. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The i...

  4. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Brzezinski, Aleksander; Kosek, Wieslaw; Nastula, Jolanta

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals with monitoring of geodynamic phenomena. It contains analysis of geodynamic networks of local, and regional scale using space (GNSS and SLR) techniques, Earth tides monitoring with gravimeters and water-tube hydrostatic clinometer, and the determination of secular variation of the Earth' magnetic field.

  5. Earth science: Extraordinary world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, James M. D.

    2016-09-01

    The isotopic compositions of objects that formed early in the evolution of the Solar System have been found to be similar to Earth's composition -- overturning notions of our planet's chemical distinctiveness. See Letters p.394 & p.399

  6. Gambling with the earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Muir, H

    2000-01-01

    The probability that dangerous Earth-devouring particles will be born at a new accelerator in the US may be tiny, but scientists have played down the devastating potential costs in their risk assessments according to a physicist (1 page).

  7. Astronomy: Earth's seven sisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snellen, Ignas A. G.

    2017-02-01

    Seven small planets whose surfaces could harbour liquid water have been spotted around a nearby dwarf star. If such a configuration is common in planetary systems, our Galaxy could be teeming with Earth-like planets. See Letter p.456

  8. Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ July 20~31 Rare earth market still went downward, which was mainly led by sluggish demand for didymium products. Weak demand by domestic NdFeB market was attributed to continuous price falling of didymium mischmetal.

  9. Analyzing earth's surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D. J.; Elifrits, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Manual discusses simple inexpensive image analysis technique used to interpret photographs and scanner of data of Earth's surface. Manual is designed for those who have no need for sophisticated computer-automated analysis procedures.

  10. Managing Planet Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the human use of the planet earth. Describes the global patterns and the regional aspects of change. Four requirements for the cultivation of leadership and institutional competence are suggested. Lists five references for further reading. (YP)

  11. Earliest life on earth

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Suzanne D

    2010-01-01

    This volume integrates the latest findings on earliest life forms, identified and characterized in some of the oldest rocks on Earth. It places emphasis on the integration of analytical methods with observational techniques and experimental simulations.

  12. Earth/Lands

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Earth is an essentially original and misunderstood raw material with great potential, from the positive environmental and energy ratio, to its admirable capacity to integrate other materials such as stone, wood, brick, lime, vegetable fibres, etc., capable also of constituting the sole material for whole buildings in climactical and geographically extreme situations. Earth offers a great capacity to respond to the housing needs of millions of human beings, not only quantitative needs compa...

  13. Earth rotation and geodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bogusz Janusz; Brzezinski Aleksander; Kosek Wieslaw; Nastula Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the summary of research activities carried out in Poland in 2011-2014 in the field of Earth rotation and geodynamics by several Polish research institutions. It contains a summary of works on Earth rotation, including evaluation and prediction of its parameters and analysis of the related excitation data as well as research on associated geodynamic phenomena such as geocentre motion, global sea level change and hydrological processes. The second part of the paper deals wit...

  14. Toward other Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzes, Artie P.

    2016-04-01

    How common are habitable Earth-like planets? This is a key question that drives much of current research in exoplanets. To date, we have discovered over one thousand exoplanets, mostly through the transit method. Among these are Earth-size planets, but these orbit very close to the star (semi-major axis approximately 0.01 Astronomical Units). Potentially rocky planets have also been discovered in a star's habitable zone, but these have approximately twice the radius of the Earth. These certainly do not qualify as Earth "twins". Several hundreds of multi-planet systems have also been discovered, but these are mostly ultra-compact systems with up to seven planets all with orbital distances less than that of Mercury in our solar system. The detection of a planetary system that is the direct analog of our solar system still eludes us. After an overview of the current status of exoplanet discoveries I will discuss the prospects and challenges of finding such Earth analogs from the ground and from future space missions like PLATO. After over two decades of searching, we may well be on the brink of finding other Earths.

  15. Physics of Ultrathin Films and Heterostructures of Rare-Earth Nickelates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middey, S.; Chakhalian, J.; Mahadevan, P.; Freeland, J. W.; Millis, A. J.; Sarma, D. D.

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structure of transition metal oxides featuring correlated electrons can be rationalized within the Zaanen-Sawatzky-Allen framework. Following a brief description of the present paradigms of electronic behavior, we focus on the physics of rare-earth nickelates as an archetype of complexity emerging within the charge transfer regime. The intriguing prospect of realizing the physics of high-Tc cuprates through heterostructuring resulted in a massive endeavor to epitaxially stabilize these materials in ultrathin form. A plethora of new phenomena unfolded in such artificial structures due to the effect of epitaxial strain, quantum confinement, and interfacial charge transfer. Here we review the present status of artificial rare-earth nickelates in an effort to uncover the interconnection between the electronic and magnetic behavior and the underlying crystal structure. We conclude by discussing future directions to disentangle the puzzle regarding the origin of the metal-insulator transition, the role of oxygen holes, and the true nature of the antiferromagnetic spin configuration in the ultrathin limit.

  16. The earth's hydrological cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, R-M; Calisto, M; Destouni, G; Gurney, R; Johannessen, J; Kerr, Y; Lahoz, WA; Rast, M

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive presentation of our present understanding of the Earth's Hydrological cycle and the problems, consequences and impacts that go with this topic. Water is a central component in the Earth's system. It is indispensable for life on Earth in its present form and influences virtually every aspect of our planet's life support system. On relatively short time scales, atmospheric water vapor interacts with the atmospheric circulation and is crucial in forming the Earth's climate zones. Water vapor is the most powerful of the greenhouse gases and serves to enhance the tropospheric temperature. The dominant part of available water on Earth resides in the oceans. Parts are locked up in the land ice on Greenland and Antarctica and a smaller part is estimated to exist as groundwater. If all the ice over the land and all the glaciers were to melt, the sea level would rise by some 80 m. In comparison, the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is small; it amounts to ~ 25 kg/m2, or the ...

  17. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  18. Modeling the earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  19. Better Than Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do We Inhabit The Best O All Possible Worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  20. Better Than Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do we inhabit the best of all possible worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  1. Spin-Stripe Density Varies Linearly With the Hole Content in Single-Layer Bi2+xSr2-xCuO6+y Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, M.; Fujita, M.; Nishizaki, T.; Iikubo, S.; Singh, D. K.; Chang, S.; Tranquada, J. M.; Yamada, K.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on the single-layer cuprate Bi2+xSr2-xCuO6+y (Bi2201) with x=0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5, a doping range that spans the spin-glass to superconducting phase boundary. The doping evolution of low energy spin fluctuations (≲11meV) was found to be characterized by a change in the incommensurate modulation wave vector from the tetragonal [110] to [100]/[010] directions, while maintaining a linear relation between the incommensurability and the hole concentration, δ≈p. In the superconducting regime, the spectral weight is strongly suppressed below ˜4meV. Similarities and differences in the spin correlations between Bi2201 and the prototypical single-layer system La2-xSrxCuO4 are discussed.

  2. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high Tc cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbris, G.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 {\\AA}), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. Here we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La$_{1.875}$Ba$_{0.125}$CuO$_4$, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can only be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.

  3. Spin Susceptibility of Underdoped Cuprates: Insight from Stripe-Ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hücker, Markus; Gu, Gen D.; Tranquada, John M.

    2008-03-01

    The low-temperature decrease of the bulk magnetic susceptibility in underdoped high-temperature superconductors has commonly been cited as evidence for a pseudogap; however, the interpretations range from a Fermi-liquid perspective, with the susceptibility being proportional to the density of free carriers, to strong coupling pictures, with the susceptibility resulting from antiferromagnetic correlations among local moments. Analysis of the susceptibility of a particular cuprate, the stripe ordered La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, sheds new light on this remarkable system and puts tight constraints on possible interpretations. The recently discovered magnetic transition in high magnetic fields will also be discussed.[1] M. Hücker, G. D. Gu, J. M. Tranquada, cond- mat/0503417v2.[2] Q. Li, M. Hücker, G. D. Gu, A. M. Tsvelik, J. M. Tranquada, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 067001 (2007).

  4. New members of Sr-free Bi-2201 cuprates: Bi 2(La,A) 2CuO z (A = Na and K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakura, Hiroyuki

    1997-02-01

    New members of Sr-free Bi-based cuprates with the 2201 structure have been synthesized in the Bi 2(La,A),CuO z systems (A: Na and K). Almost-single phase samples can be obtained at the nominal composition of Bi 2La 1.5A 0.65CuO z, for both systems. The almost-single phase samples containing Na or K crystallize both in an orthorhombic lattice, and the lattice constants are a = 5.423 Å, b = 5.473 Å, c = 23.74 Å for the sample containing Na and a = 5.445 Å, b = 5.493 Å, c = 23.85 Å, for the sample containing K. Both samples show a temperature dependence of In ϱ ∝ T - {1}/{4} suggesting a three-dimensional variable range hopping conduction without any trace of superconductivity down to 5 K

  5. Extended Drude model analysis of n-doped cuprate, Pr0.85LaCe0.15CuO4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seok Bae; Jung, Eil Ho; Roh, Seul Ki; Hwang, Jung Seek [Dept. of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Dong Joon; Kim, Chang Young [Dept. of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We investigated optical properties of an electron-doped copper oxide high temperature superconductor, Pr0.85LaCe0.15CuO4 (PLCCO) single crystal. We obtained the optical conductivity from measured reflectance at various temperatures. We found our data contained c-axis longitudinal optical (LO) phonon modes due to miscut and intrinsic lattice distortion. We applied an extended Drude model to study the correlations between charge carriers in the system. The LO phonons appear as strong sharp peaks in the optical scattering rate. We tried to remove the LO phonon modes by using the energy loss function, which also shows the LO phonons as peaks, and could not remove them completely. We extracted the electron-boson spectral density function using a generalized Allen's formula. We observed that the resulting electron-boson density show similar temperature dependence as hole-doped cuprates.

  6. Saturation of resistivity and Kohler's rule in Ni-doped La1.85Sr0.15CuO4 cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, A.; Bezusyy, V. L.; Nowicki, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of electrical transport measurements of La1.85Sr0.15Cu1 -yNiyO4 thin single-crystal films at magnetic fields up to 9 T. Adding Ni impurity with strong Coulomb scattering potential to a slightly underdoped cuprate makes the signs of resistivity saturation at ρsat visible in the measurement temperature window up to 350 K. Employing the parallel-resistor formalism reveals that ρsat is consistent with the classical Ioffe-Regel-Mott limit and changes with carrier concentration n as ρsat∝1 /√{n } . Thermopower measurements show that Ni tends to localize mobile carriers, decreasing their effective concentration as n ≅0.15 -y . The classical unmodified Kohler's rule is fulfilled for magnetoresistance in the nonsuperconducting part of the phase diagram when applied to the ideal branch in the parallel-resistor model.

  7. LDA + GTB (generalized tight-binding) method for the electronic structure calculations of strongly correlated electron systems: Application for the band structure calculations of p-type cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, Maxim M. [L.V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of RAS, Akademgorodok, 660036 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Str. 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: maxim@mpipks-dresden.mpg.de; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Noethnitzer Str. 38, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-09-01

    Mean-field theory of the non-superconducting phase of the high-T{sub c} cuprates is formulated within the effective t-t'-t''-J model with three-site correlated hoppings. This model with the ab initio calculated parameters results from the LDA + GTB method. The static spin and kinematical correlation functions beyond Hubbard I approximation are calculated self-consistently taking into account hoppings to the first, the second, and the third neighboring sites, as well as the three-site correlated hoppings. The obtained Fermi surface evolves from hole-pockets at low-doping to large hole-type Fermi surface at higher doping concentrations. Calculated doping dependence of the nodal Fermi velocity, the effective mass and the chemical potential shift are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  9. How Big is Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  10. Alkaline earth metal thioindates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov-Ehmin, B.N.; Ivlieva, V.I.; Filatenko, L.A.; Zajtsev, B.E.; Kaziev, G.Z.; Sarabiya, M.G.

    1984-08-01

    Alkaline earth metal thioindates of MIn/sub 2/S/sub 4/ composition were synthesized by interaction of alkaline earth metal oxoindates with hydrogen sulfide during heating. Investigation into the compounds by X-ray analysis showed that calcium compound crystallizes in cubic crystal system and strontium and barium compounds in rhombic crystal system. Lattice parameters and the number of formula units were determined. Thioindates of M/sub 3/In/sub 2/S/sub 6/ composition were synthesized, their individuality was shown.

  11. Rare (Earth Elements [score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Méndez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rare (Earth Elements is a cycle of works for solo piano. The cycle was inspired by James Dillon’s Book of Elements (Vol. I-V. The complete cycle will consist of 14 pieces; one for each selected rare (earth element. The chosen elements are Neodymium, Erbium, Tellurium, Hafnium, Tantalum, Technetium, Indium, Dysprosium, Lanthanium, Cerium, Europium, Terbium, Yttrium and Darmstadtium. These elements were selected due to their special atomic properties that in many cases make them extremely valuable for the development of new technologies, and also because of their scarcity. To date, only 4 works have been completed Yttrium, Technetium, Indium and Tellurium.

  12. Teaching earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha, Tau Rho; Diggles, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains 17 teaching tools: 16 interactive HyperCard 'stacks' and a printable model. They are separated into the following categories: Geologic Processes, Earthquakes and Faulting, and Map Projections and Globes. A 'navigation' stack, Earth Science, is provided as a 'launching' place from which to access all of the other stacks. You can also open the HyperCard Stacks folder and launch any of the 16 stacks yourself. In addition, a 17th tool, Earth and Tectonic Globes, is provided as a printable document. Each of the tools can be copied onto a 1.4-MB floppy disk and distributed freely.

  13. Quantizing Earth surface deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O. Bowin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global analysis of Bowin (2010 used the global 14 absolute Euler pole set (62 Myr history from Gripp and Gordon (1990 and demonstrated that plate tectonics conserves angular momentum. We herein extend that analysis using the more detailed Bird (2003 52 present-day Euler pole set (relative to a fixed Pacific plate for the Earth's surface, after conversion to absolute Euler poles. Additionally, new analytical results now provide new details on upper mantle mass anomalies in the outer 200 km of the Earth, as well as an initial quantizing of surface deformations.

  14. IR and the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf; Stevenson, Hayley

    2017-01-01

    , in the end, one finite interconnected space. Together these two starting points make for the basic conundrum of Inter- national Relations and the Earth: how does a divided world live on a single globe? This introduction first provides an overview of the recent rise of ‘the environment’ in international......, ‘what has the environment ever done for IR?’, before the plan for the rest of the book sketches the content and direction of the ensuing chapters that explore the problematique of International Relations and the Earth....

  15. Multilayered cuprate superconductor Ba2Ca5Cu6O12(O1-x,Fx) 2 studied by temperature-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Akira; Ekino, Toshikazu; Gabovich, Alexander M.; Sekine, Ryotaro; Tanabe, Kenji; Tokiwa, Kazuyasu

    2017-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements were carried out on a multilayered cuprate superconductor Ba2Ca5Cu6O12 (O1 -x,Fx )2. STM topography revealed random spot structures with the characteristic length ≤0.5 nm. The conductance spectra d I /d V (V ) show the coexistence of smaller gaps ΔS and large gaps (pseudogaps) ΔL. The pseudogap-related features in the superconducting state were traced with the spatial resolution of ˜0.07 nm. Here, I and V are the tunnel current and bias voltage, respectively. The temperature, T , dependence of ΔS follows the reduced Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) dependence. The hallmark ratio 2 ΔS(T =0 ) /kBTc equals to 4.9, which is smaller than those of other cuprate superconductors. Here, Tc is the superconducting critical temperature and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The larger gap ΔL survives in the normal state and even increases with T above Tc. The T dependencies of the spatial distributions for both relevant gaps (Δ map), as well as for each gap separately (ΔS and ΔL), were obtained. From the histogram of Δ map, the averaged gap values were found to be Δ¯S=˜24 meV and Δ¯L=˜79 meV. The smaller gap ΔS shows a spatially homogeneous distribution while the larger gap ΔL is quite inhomogeneous, indicating that rather homogeneous superconductivity coexists with the patchy distributed pseudogap. The spatial variation length ξΔ L of ΔL correlates with the scale of the topography spot structures, being approximately 0.4 nm. This value is considerably smaller than the coherence length of this class of superconductors, suggesting that ΔL is strongly affected by the disorder of the apical O/F.

  16. Disorder effects in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vobornik, I.; Grioni, M.; Berger, Helmuth; Forro, Laszlo; Pavuna, Davor; Margaritondo, Giorgio; Karkin, A.; Kelley, Ronald J.; Onellion, Marshall

    2000-09-01

    We report on ab-plane resistivity ((rho) ) and angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) spectra for Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x single crystals irradiated with neutrons or electron-beam irradiation. Both the normal and superconducting states were measured with angle-resolved photoemission. Electron-beam irradiation leads to an increase in the residual resistivity, and a decrease in the superconducting transition temperature (Tc). The resistivity data does not indicate any pseudogap; the resistivity is linear from Tc to 300 K for all levels of disorder, and the slope (d(rho) /dT) is the same for all levels of disorder. The superconducting state ARPES data exhibits no change in the binding energy of the 'peak' for Brillouin zone locations near the (O,(pi) ) point. The peak spectral intensity decreases with increasing disorder, the gap fills in, but the peak neither shifts nor broadens. The normal state exhibits a pseudogap developing with disorder; the size of the pseudogap increases as the residual resistivity increases. The pseudogap is anisotropic, largest near the (O,(pi) ) point and zero in the direction. Neutron-beam irradiation causes an increase in the residual resistivity. The resistivity data exhibit a change of slope and indications of a pseudogap for neutron irradiation. For normal state ARPES data of neutron-beam irradiated samples, there is also an anisotropic pseudogap; it is also zero in the direction and large near the (O,(pi) ) point. We discuss implications of these data.

  17. Bones of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Jose Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The film "Bones of the Earth" (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014) is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective…

  18. Earth as art 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2016-03-29

    Landsat 8 is the latest addition to the long-running series of Earth-observing satellites in the Landsat program that began in 1972. The images featured in this fourth installment of the Earth As Art collection were all acquired by Landsat 8. They show our planet’s diverse landscapes with remarkable clarity.Landsat satellites see the Earth as no human can. Not only do they acquire images from the vantage point of space, but their sensors record infrared as well as visible wavelengths of light. The resulting images often reveal “hidden” details of the Earth’s land surface, making them invaluable for scientific research.As with previous Earth As Art exhibits, these Landsat images were selected solely for their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation—only for your viewing pleasure. What do you see in these unique glimpses of the Earth’s continents, islands, and coastlines?

  19. DIORAMA Earth Terrain Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-10

    When simulating near-surface nuclear detonations, the terrain of the Earth can have an effect on the observed outputs. The critical parameter is called the “height of burst”. In order to model the effect of terrain on the simulations we have incorporated data from multiple sources to give 9 km resolution data with global coverage.

  20. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.;

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  1. Google Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get…

  2. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  3. Olympus and Earth Day

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Let your gaze rest upon the poster for Earth Day on April 22. A small polar bear clings tightly to the stem of an aero-vane. Staring at the vanishing floating ice on the wild sea, his eyes are full of panic and fear.

  4. Google Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get…

  5. Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Rare earth market continued drop tendency.There was not much transaction of didymium oxide and the alloy. Affected by reduced order of NdFeB magnetic materials and inactive dealings of didymium mischmetal,price of didymium mischmetal had dropped from RMB ¥95,000~98,000/ton to RMBY 93,000~95,000/ton currently.

  6. Cosmic rays on earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allkofer, O.C.; Grieder, P.K.F.

    1984-01-01

    A data collection is presented that covers cosmic rays on earth. Included are all relevant data on flux and intensity measurements, energy spectra, and related data of all primary and secondary components of the cosmic radiation at all levels in the atmosphere, at sea level and underground. In those cases where no useful experimental data have been available, theoretical predictions were substituted.

  7. "Galileo Calling Earth..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This guide presents an activity for helping students understand how data from the Galileo spacecraft is sent to scientists on earth. Students are asked to learn about the concepts of bit-rate and resolution and apply them to the interpretation of images from the Galileo Orbiter. (WRM)

  8. Earth flyby anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, Michael Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, John D [PROPULSION LAB.

    2009-01-01

    In the planet-centric system, a spacecraft should have the same initial and final energies, even though its energy and angular momentum will change in the barycenter of the solar system. However, without explanation, a number of earth flybys have yielded small energy changes.

  9. Protect the Earth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永兴

    2011-01-01

    The earth, a blue globe, is very beautiful. It is the home to all the living things. But the environment around us is becoming worse and worse. People cut down trees to build houses and throw about litter. The air pollution is almost everywhere in the world!

  10. Citizens of Planet Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisk, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    The inability of the nation-state system to handle contemporary environmental issues comprehensively has spurred greater cooperation between religious and secular civil society actors. An empirical analysis of the Alliance of Religions and Conservation (ARC) contributes to knowledge about this pr...... (2010a) have termed Terrapolitan Earth Religion....

  11. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The initial whole-Earth decompression is expected to result in a global system of major primary decompression cracks appearing in the rigid crust which persist as the basalt feeders for the global, mid-oceanic ridge system. As the Earth subsequently decompresses, the area of the Earth's surface increases by the formation of secondary decompression cracks, often located near the continental margins, presently identified as oceanic trenches. These secondary decompression cracks are subsequently in-filled with basalt, extruded fr...

  12. The Earth's Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In the last five years, scientists have been able to monitor our changing planet in ways never before possible. The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), aboard the OrbView-2 satellite, has given researchers an unprecedented view of the biological engine that drives life on Earth-the countless forms of plants that cover the land and fill the oceans. 'There is no question the Earth is changing. SeaWiFS has enabled us, for the first time, to monitor the biological consequences of that change-to see how the things we do, as well as natural variability, affect the Earth's ability to support life,' said Gene Carl Feldman, SeaWiFS project manager at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. SeaWiFS data, based on continuous daily global observations, have helped scientists make a more accurate assessment of the oceans' role in the global carbon cycle. The data provide a key parameter in a number of ecological and environmental studies as well as global climate-change modeling. The images of the Earth's changing land, ocean and atmosphere from SeaWiFS have documented many previously unrecognized phenomena. The image above shows the global biosphere from June 2002 measured by SeaWiFS. Data in the oceans is chlorophyll concentration, a measure of the amount of phytoplankton (microscopic plants) living in the ocean. On land SeaWiFS measures Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, an indication of the density of plant growth. For more information and images, read: SeaWiFS Sensor Marks Five Years Documenting Earth'S Dynamic Biosphere Image courtesy SeaWiFS project and copyright Orbimage.

  13. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  14. Rotation and magnetism of Earth`s inner core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatzmaier, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Roberts, P.H. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-13

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the geodynamo suggest that a super-rotation of Earth`s solid inner core relative to the mantle is maintained by magnetic coupling between the inner core and an eastward thermal wind in the fluid outer core. This mechanism, which is analogous to a synchronous motor, also plays a fundamental role in the generation of Earth`s magnetic field. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  15. High-energy magnetic excitations in the cuprate superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ): towards a unified description of its electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, M P M; James, A J A; Springell, R S; Liu, X; Monney, C; Zhou, K J; Konik, R M; Wen, J S; Xu, Z J; Gu, G D; Strocov, V N; Schmitt, T; Hill, J P

    2013-04-05

    We investigate the high-energy magnetic excitation spectrum of the high-T(c) cuprate superconductor Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) (Bi-2212) using Cu L(3) edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. Broad, dispersive magnetic excitations are observed, with a zone boundary energy of ∼ 300 meV and a weak dependence on doping. These excitations are strikingly similar to the bosons proposed to explain the high-energy "kink" observed in photoemission. A phenomenological calculation of the spin response, based on a parametrization of the the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy derived electronic structure and Yang-Rice-Zhang quasiparticles, provides a reasonable prediction of the energy dispersion of the observed magnetic excitations. These results indicate a possible unified framework to reconcile the magnetic and electronic properties of the cuprates and we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such an approach.

  16. Earth Science Multimedia Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, A. F.

    1998-01-01

    The presentation will begin with the latest 1998 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. A compilation of the 10 days of animations of Hurricane Georges which were supplied daily on NASA to Network television will be shown. NASA's visualizations of Hurricane Bonnie which appeared in the Sept 7 1998 issue of TIME magazine. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1 -min GOES images that will appear in the October BAMS. The visualizations are produced by the Goddard Visualization & Analysis Laboratory, and Scientific Visualization Studio, as well as other Goddard and NASA groups using NASA, NOAA, ESA, and NASDA Earth science datasets. Visualizations will be shown from the "Digital-HyperRes-Panorama" Earth Science ETheater'98 recently presented in Tokyo, Paris and Phoenix. The presentation in Paris used a SGI/CRAY Onyx Infinite Reality Super Graphics Workstation at 2560 X 1024 resolution with dual synchronized video Epson 71 00 projectors on a 20ft wide screen. Earth Science Electronic Theater '999 is being prepared for a December 1 st showing at NASA HQ in Washington and January presentation at the AMS meetings in Dallas. The 1999 version of the Etheater will be triple wide with at resolution of 3840 X 1024 on a 60 ft wide screen. Visualizations will also be featured from the new Earth Today Exhibit which was opened by Vice President Gore on July 2, 1998 at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum in Washington, as well as those presented for possible use at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), Disney EPCOT, and other venues. New methods are demonstrated for visualizing, interpreting, comparing, organizing and analyzing immense Hyperimage remote sensing datasets and three dimensional numerical model results. We call the data from many new Earth sensing satellites

  17. Visualizing Earth Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.; Stibbon, E.; Harris, R.

    2016-12-01

    Earth materials are fundamental to art. They are pigments, they are clay, they provide form and color. Earth scientists, however, rarely attempt to make the physical properties of Earth materials visible through art, and similarly many artists use Earth materials without fully understanding their physical and chemical properties. Here we explore the intersection between art and science through study of the physical properties of Earth materials as characterized in the laboratory, and as transferred to paper using different techniques and suspending media. One focus of this collaboration is volcanic ash. Ash is interesting scientifically because its form provides information on the fundamental processes that drive volcanic eruptions, and determines its transport properties, and thus its potential to affect populations far downwind of the volcano. Ash properties also affect its behavior as an art material. From an aesthetic point of view, ash lends a granular surface to the image; it is also uncontrollable, and thus requires engagement between artist and medium. More fundamentally, using ash in art creates an exchange between the medium and the subject matter, and imparts something of the physical, visceral experience of volcanic landscapes to the viewer. Another component of this work uses powdered rock as a printing medium for geologic maps. Because different types of rock create powders with different properties (grain size distributions and shapes), the geology is communicated not only as color, but also by the physical characteristics of the material as it interacts with the paper. More importantly, the use of actual rocks samples as printing material for geologic maps not only makes a direct connection between the map and the material it represents, but also provides an emotional connection between the map, the viewer and the landscape, its colors, textures and geological juxtapositions. Both case studies provide examples not only of ways in which artists can

  18. Towards earth AntineutRino TomograpHy (EARTH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Meijer, R. J.; Smit, F. D.; Brooks, F. D.; Fearick, R. W.; Wortche, H. J.; Mantovani, F.

    2006-01-01

    The programme Earth AntineutRino TomograpHy (EARTH) proposes to build ten underground facilities each hosting a telescope. Each telescope consists of many detector modules, to map the radiogenic heat sources deep in the interior of the Earth by utilising direction sensitive geoneutrino detection.

  19. Enhanced microwave absorption near Tc in micron-size powders of cuprate superconductors. [YBaCuO; BiSrCaCuO; YBaZnCuO; BiPbSbScCaCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manheimer, M.A.; Lofland, S. (Lab. for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD (United States)); Gould, A.; Bhagat, S.M.; Halsey, B.; Green, S.M. (Dept. of Physics and Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)); Tyagi, S. (Dept. of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1991-11-20

    We report a systematic study of a large peak in the microwave losses near Tc in micron-size powders of high-Tc superconducting cuprates. It is demonstrated that the effect arises because all the grains do not have a single Tc. The onset of superconductivity in some particles enhances the RF field 'seen' by their neighbors leading to a net increase in absorption. The temperature regime of enhanced loss spans the extrema of the transition temperatures. (orig.).

  20. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ February, 2010 Rare earth separation plants and downstream producers like NdFeB magnetic materials and phosphor materials successively ceased production due to Spring Festival, Chinese New Year. Transactions in rare earth market were few affected by public holidays.

  1. Mirador - Earth Surface and Interior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. The goal of the Earth Surface and Interior focus area is to assess, mitigate and forecast the natural hazards that affect...

  2. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Active demands from downstream industry drove the price rise of rare earth products in Chinese domestic marketrecently, particularly didymium and dysprosium products. Prices of other rare earth products remained stable.

  3. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth market fluctuated slightly recently and the transactions remained sluggish. Environment control was strengthened in southern China and many rare earth plants had gone out of production. Some traders were considering selling commodities at low p

  4. NASA Benefits Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews several ways in which NASA research has benefited Earth and made life on Earth better. These innovations include: solar panels, recycled pavement, thermometer pill, invisible braces for straightening teeth, LASIK, aerodynamic helmets and tires for bicycles, cataract detection, technology that was used to remove Anthrax spores from mail handling facilities, study of atomic oxygen erosion of materials has informed the restoration of artwork, macroencapsulation (a potential mechanism to deliver anti cancer drugs to specific sites), and research on a salmonella vaccine. With research on the International Space Station just beginning, there will be opportunities for entrepreneurs and other government agencies to access space for their research and development. As well as NASA continuing its own research on human health and technology development.

  5. Life Before Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Sharov, Alexei A

    2013-01-01

    An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization, and emergence of novel functional niches associated with existing genes. Linear regression of genetic complexity on a log scale extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life 9.7 billion years ago. This cosmic time scale for the evolution of life has important consequences: life took ca. 5 billion years to reach the complexity of bacteria; the environments in which life originated and evolved to the prokaryote stage may have been quite different from those envisaged on Earth; there was no...

  6. Heat-pipe Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, William B; Webb, A Alexander G

    2013-09-26

    The heat transport and lithospheric dynamics of early Earth are currently explained by plate tectonic and vertical tectonic models, but these do not offer a global synthesis consistent with the geologic record. Here we use numerical simulations and comparison with the geologic record to explore a heat-pipe model in which volcanism dominates surface heat transport. These simulations indicate that a cold and thick lithosphere developed as a result of frequent volcanic eruptions that advected surface materials downwards. Declining heat sources over time led to an abrupt transition to plate tectonics. Consistent with model predictions, the geologic record shows rapid volcanic resurfacing, contractional deformation, a low geothermal gradient across the bulk of the lithosphere and a rapid decrease in heat-pipe volcanism after initiation of plate tectonics. The heat-pipe Earth model therefore offers a coherent geodynamic framework in which to explore the evolution of our planet before the onset of plate tectonics.

  7. Testing MOND on Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatiev, A Yu

    2014-01-01

    MOND is one of the most popular alternatives to Dark Matter (DM). While efforts to directly detect DM in laboratories have been steadily pursued over the years, the proposed Earth-based tests of MOND are still in their infancy. Some proposals recently appeared in the literature are briefly reviewed, and it is argued that collaborative efforts of theorists and experimenters are needed to move forward in this exciting new area. Possible future directions are outlined.

  8. Superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; D& #x27; Urso, Brian R [Clinton, TN

    2012-07-10

    A superhydrophobic powder is prepared by coating diatomaceous earth (DE) with a hydrophobic coating on the particle surface such that the coating conforms to the topography of the DE particles. The hydrophobic coating can be a self assembly monolayer of a perfluorinated silane coupling agent. The DE is preferably natural-grade DE where organic impurities have been removed. The superhydrophobic powder can be applied as a suspension in a binder solution to a substrate to produce a superhydrophobic surface on the substrate.

  9. Why Earth aurorae shine?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ By using the data obtained from three satellites of the Cluster mission launched by the European Space Agency (ESA), CAO Jinbin from the CAS Center for Space Science and Applied Research (CSSAR) and his US and European co-workers have clarified why Earth's aurorae shine.Their work entitled Joint Observations by Cluster Satellites of Bursty Bulk Flows in the Magnetotail was published in a recent issue of Journal of Geophysical Research.

  10. Life Before Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Sharov, Alexei A; Gordon, Richard

    2013-01-01

    An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization,...

  11. Mission to Planet Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilford, Shelby G.; Wilson, Gregory S.; Backlund, Peter W.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA program described is an international study to predict changes in the earth's environment by means of multidisciplinary remote sensing from satellites. An international consortium dedicates satellites with advanced sensors to data collection, and a data processing system is described to collect and analyze a large amount of terrestrial data. The program requires international multidisciplinary involvement to collect and interpret the data and thereby manage and preserve the global environment.

  12. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology ...

  13. Earth before life

    OpenAIRE

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Results Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome i...

  14. Absence of a proximity effect for a thin-films of a Bi2Se3 topological insulator grown on top of a Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ) cuprate superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, T; Pletikosić, I; Weber, A P; Sadowski, J T; Gu, G D; Caruso, A N; Sinkovic, B; Valla, T

    2014-08-08

    Proximity-induced superconductivity in a 3D topological insulator represents a new avenue for observing zero-energy Majorana fermions inside vortex cores. Relatively small gaps and low transition temperatures of conventional s-wave superconductors put hard constraints on these experiments. Significantly larger gaps and higher transition temperatures in cuprate superconductors might be an attractive alternative to considerably relax these constraints, but it is not clear whether the proximity effect would be effective in heterostructures involving cuprates and topological insulators. Here, we present angle-resolved photoemission studies of thin Bi(2)Se(3) films grown in situ on optimally doped Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) substrates that show the absence of proximity-induced gaps on the surfaces of Bi(2)Se(3) films as thin as a 1.5 quintuple layer. These results suggest that the superconducting proximity effect between a cuprate superconductor and a topological insulator is strongly suppressed, likely due to a very short coherence length along the c axis, incompatible crystal and pairing symmetries at the interface, small size of the topological surface state's Fermi surface, and adverse effects of a strong spin-orbit coupling in the topological material.

  15. Hunan Rare Earth Group Approved

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Following Guangdong,Guangxi,Fujian and Jiangxi,Hunan announced that it would consolidate its rare earth resources-the consolidation plan of Hunan Rare Earth Group has been approved. Consolidation of the rare earth industry of south China is in full swing.According to "Several Opinions of the State Council on Promoting the Sustainable and Healthy Development of Rare Earth Industry"(hereinafter referred to as "Several Opinions")released in 2011,

  16. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    September 20-30, 2011 Rare earth market remained steady recently. Quoted prices of didymium products by separation and smelting plants kept stable. Some rare earth industrial zones in Baotou, Sichuan and Ganzhou had suspended production with the intensified environmental protection control and consolidation of rare earth industry. Persons in the industry hold a positive attitude toward the rare earth market after the National Day' s holiday in China. The market will develop healthily and orderly in the future.

  17. Characterising Super-Earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of Super-Earths has formally begun with the detection of transiting low-mass exoplanets CoRoT-7b and GJ 1214b. In the path of characterising super-Earths, the first step is to infer their composition. While the discovery data for CoRoT-7b, in combination with the high atmospheric mass loss rate inferred from the high insolation, suggested that it was a rocky planet, the new proposed mass values have widened the possibilities. The combined mass range 1−10 M⊕ allows for a volatile-rich (and requires it if the mass is less than 4 M⊕ , an Earth-like or a super-Mercury-like composition. In contrast, the radius of GJ 1214b is too large to admit a solid composition, thus it necessarily to have a substantial gas layer. Some evidence suggests that within this gas layer H/He is a small but non-negligible component. These two planets are the first of many transiting low-mass exoplanets expected to be detected and they exemplify the limitations faced when inferring composition, which come from the degenerate character of the problem and the large error bars in the data.

  18. EARTH ROADS ARE EASY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David O. Whitten

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The earliest European immigrants in America traveled on waterways and on pathways worn into the earth by animals and Native Americans. Once their communities began to thrive, settlers widened paths and cleared new roads and streets then began experimenting with inexpensive surfacing to reduce dust in dry weather and mud in wet. “Earth Roads Are Easy” investigates materials and techniques used to maintain primitive thoroughfares with a minimum of effort and expense. The options range from the mundane—clay, sand, gravel, calcium chloride, oil, and tar—to the extraordinary—water glass, adobe clay, beet juice, and carpeting.There is no more dfficult problem confronting highway engineers than that of properly constructing and maintaining an earth road. The work may be less spectacular than the construction and maintenance of hard-surfaced roads, but there is greater latitude in location, methods of construction and choice of materials, consequently there is more scope for the exercise of sound judgment on the part of the engineer.1

  19. The Active Solid Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinger, Cynthia

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic processes in Earth's crust, mantle and core shape Earth's surface and magnetic field over time scales of seconds to millennia, and even longer time scales as recorded in the ca. 4 Ga rock record. Our focus is the earthquake-volcano deformation cycles that occur over human time scales, and their comparison with time-averaged deformation studies, with emphasis on mantle plume provinces where magma and volatile release and vertical tectonics are readily detectable. Active deformation processes at continental and oceanic rift and back arc zones provide critical constraints on mantle dynamics, the role of fluids (volatiles, magma, water), and plate rheology. For example, recent studies of the East African rift zone, which formed above one of Earth's largest mantle upwellings reveal that magma production and volatile release rates are comparable to those of magmatic arcs, the archetypal zones of continental crustal creation. Finite-length faults achieve some plate deformation, but magma intrusion in the form of dikes accommodates extension in continental, back-arc, and oceanic rifts, and intrusion as sills causes permanent uplift that modulates the local time-space scales of earthquakes and volcanoes. Volatile release from magma intrusion may reduce fault friction and permeability, facilitating aseismic slip and creating magma pathways. We explore the implications of active deformation studies to models of the time-averaged structure of plume and extensional provinces in continental and oceanic plate settings.

  20. Earth System Monitoring, Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John

    This section provides sensing and data collection methodologies, as well as an understanding of Earth's climate parameters and natural and man-made phenomena, to support a scientific assessment of the Earth system as a whole, and its response to natural and human-induced changes. The coverage ranges from climate change factors and extreme weather and fires to oil spill tracking and volcanic eruptions. This serves as a basis to enable improved prediction and response to climate change, weather, and natural hazards as well as dissemination of the data and conclusions. The data collection systems include satellite remote sensing, aerial surveys, and land- and ocean-based monitoring stations. Our objective in this treatise is to provide a significant portion of the scientific and engineering basis of Earth system monitoring and to provide this in 17 detailed articles or chapters written at a level for use by university students through practicing professionals. The reader is also directed to the closely related sections on Ecological Systems, Introduction and also Climate Change Modeling Methodology, Introduction as well as Climate Change Remediation, Introduction to. For ease of use by students, each article begins with a glossary of terms, while at an average length of 25 print pages each, sufficient detail is presented for use by professionals in government, universities, and industries. The chapters are individually summarized below.

  1. Afganistan and rare earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. Dobrescu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On our planet, over a quarter of new technologies for the economic production of industrial goods, are using rare earths, which are also called critical minerals and industries that rely on these precious items being worth of an estimated nearly five trillion dollars, or 5 percent of world gross domestic product. In the near future, competition will increase for the control of rare earth minerals embedded in high-tech products. Rare minerals are in the twenty-first century what oil accounted for in the twentieth century and coal in the nineteenth century: the engine of a new industrial revolution. Future energy will be produced increasingly by more sophisticated technological equipment based not just on steel and concrete, but incorporating significant quantities of metals and rare earths. Widespread application of these technologies will result in an exponential increase in demand for such minerals, and what is worrying is that minerals of this type are almost nowhere to be found in Europe and in other industrialized countries in the world, such as U.S. and Japan, but only in some Asian countries, like China and Afghanistan.

  2. Sun, Earth and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  3. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Supply of rare earth concentrate remained tight recently. Rare earth market exhibited rising tendency holistically Affected by tight supply of rare earth concentrate, many plants were operated under the capacity. Supply of didymium oxide got tighter and the price was on rising.

  4. Strategy for earth explorers in global earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the current NASA Earth System Science initiative is to obtain a comprehensive scientific understanding of the Earth as an integrated, dynamic system. The centerpiece of the Earth System Science initiative will be a set of instruments carried on polar orbiting platforms under the Earth Observing System program. An Earth Explorer program can open new vistas in the earth sciences, encourage innovation, and solve critical scientific problems. Specific missions must be rigorously shaped by the demands and opportunities of high quality science and must complement the Earth Observing System and the Mission to Planet Earth. The committee believes that the proposed Earth Explorer program provides a substantial opportunity for progress in the earth sciences, both through independent missions and through missions designed to complement the large scale platforms and international research programs that represent important national commitments. The strategy presented is intended to help ensure the success of the Earth Explorer program as a vital stimulant to the study of the planet.

  5. Science and technology of cuprate-based high temperature superconductor thin films, heterostructures and superlattices—the first 30 years (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermeier, H.-U.

    2016-10-01

    During the three decades after the discovery of superconductivity at high temperatures in copper oxides, intense research activities generated a tremendous progress in both, mastering the scientific challenges underpinning the understanding of the properties of these chemically and structurally complex materials as well as achieving a mature technology in preparing single phase bulk specimens—including single crystals—and epitaxially grown single crystalline thin films. This review covers in addition to more basic physics oriented developments mainly technological aspects of complex oxide thin film deposition as an enabling technology to explore the physics of these materials. It consists of two parts: after a brief introduction to the materials development prior to the discovery of superconducting copper oxides, a description of the relevant properties of copper oxide superconductors with focus on YBa2Cu3O7-δ is given, followed by the coverage of essentials of complex oxide thin film deposition technology with the copper oxides at its core. Here, the major physical vapor deposition technologies (evaporation and oxide molecular beam technology, sputtering and pulsed laser deposition) are described followed by an overview of substrate requirements to deposit high quality thin films. Opportunities by choosing special substrates with unique properties far beyond the usual mechanical support for a film are introduced with examples aside from usual lattice mismatch induced strain effects. One is the continuous modification of the strain state by poling ferroelectric oxide substrates linked to a piezoelectric effect, the other is the nanoscale tailoring of substrate step-and-terrace structures resulting in a controllable generation of planar defects in complex oxides, thus contributing to the physics of flux-line pinning in cuprate superconductors. In the second part of this review, first some highlights of single layer thin film research are given such as to tailor

  6. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-02-08

    A general theory for all classes of unconventional superconductors is still one of the unsolved key issues in condensed-matter physics. Actually, it is not yet fully settled if there is a common underlying pairing mechanism. Instead, it might be possible that several distinct sources for unconventional (not phonon-mediated) superconductivity have to be considered, or an electron-phonon interaction is not negligible. The focus of this thesis is on the most probable mechanism for the formation of Cooper pairs in unconventional superconductors, namely a strictly electronic one where spin fluctuations are the mediators. Studying different superconductors in this thesis, the emphasis is put on material-independent features of the pairing mechanism. In addition, the investigation of the phase diagrams enables a view on the vicinity of superconductivity. Thus, it is possible to clarify which competing quantum fluctuations enhance or weaken the propensity for a superconducting state. The broad range of superconducting materials requires the use of more than one numerical technique to study an appropriate microscopic description. This is not a problem but a big advantage because this facilitates the approach-independent description of common underlying physics. For this evaluation, the strongly correlated cuprates are simulated with the variational cluster approach. Especially the question of a pairing glue is taken into consideration. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between retarded and non-retarded contributions to the gap function. The cuprates are confronted with the cobaltate Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} and graphene. These weakly correlated materials are investigated with the functional renormalization group (fRG) and reveal a comprehensive phase diagram, including a d+id-wave superconductivity, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding gap function is nodeless, but for NaCoO, it features a doping-dependent anisotropy. In addition, some general

  7. Bones of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Correa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The film Bones of the Earth (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014 is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective creation is built. A sense of community, on-going inquiry, connections and social commitment inform the creative process. As a result, the video’s nearly five intense minutes are a metaphor for the search for personal meaning, connection with nature and intersubjective positioning in a world that undergoes constant change.

  8. The earth's gravitational field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    of the tides) have a very small effect on the apparent strength of Earth's gravity, depending on their relative positions; typical variations are 2 µm/s² (0.2 mGal) over the course of a day. Gravity measurements at sea The gravity measurements at sea... quoted as an acceleration, which in SI units is measured in m/s 2 (metres per second per second, equivalently written as m·s −2 ). It has an approximate value of 9.8 m/s 2 , which means that, ignoring air resistance, the speed of an object falling...

  9. Solid Earth: The priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, P.

    1991-10-01

    The European Space Agency's strategy concerning the solid Earth program is reviewed. Improvement of current knowledge of the global geopotential fields, both gravity and magnetic, was stressed as the highest priority. It was agreed that the objectives and goals of the planned Aristoteles mission correspond to this priority, and the need to realize this part of the program was stated. The interdisciplinary links of the program were identified, and it was decided that this program could make substantial contributions to research of oceans, climate and global change, atmosphere, ice and land surfaces.

  10. Japanese Rare Earth Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Since China cancelled export rebate in May this year,prices of magnetic materials related rare earth productscontinuously rose. Increasing production cost is largelyattributed to investment in environmental protectionequipments. Prices of Nd and Dy metals rose 20~30% over thebeginning of this year.Price of Nd was USD 11.5 - 12/Kg from USD 9/Kg at theend of 2004, up 30%. Price of Dy rose to USD 65- 70/Kg fromUSD 50/Kg early this year, up 20%. Price of Pr climbed to USD13.5 - 14/Kg from USD 11/Kg, up 30%. Pri...

  11. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  12. Preliminary reference Earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewonski, Adam M.; Anderson, Don L.

    1981-06-01

    A large data set consisting of about 1000 normal mode periods, 500 summary travel time observations, 100 normal mode Q values, mass and moment of inertia have been inverted to obtain the radial distribution of elastic properties, Q values and density in the Earth's interior. The data set was supplemented with a special study of 12 years of ISC phase data which yielded an additional 1.75 × 10 6 travel time observations for P and S waves. In order to obtain satisfactory agreement with the entire data set we were required to take into account anelastic dispersion. The introduction of transverse isotropy into the outer 220 km of the mantle was required in order to satisfy the shorter period fundamental toroidal and spheroidal modes. This anisotropy also improved the fit of the larger data set. The horizontal and vertical velocities in the upper mantle differ by 2-4%, both for P and S waves. The mantle below 220 km is not required to be anisotropic. Mantle Rayleigh waves are surprisingly sensitive to compressional velocity in the upper mantle. High S n velocities, low P n velocities and a pronounced low-velocity zone are features of most global inversion models that are suppressed when anisotropy is allowed for in the inversion. The Preliminary Reference Earth Model, PREM, and auxiliary tables showing fits to the data are presented.

  13. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  14. Active Near Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Past activity from Near Earth Asteroids is recorded in the meteoroid streams that cause our meteor showers. Automated meteoroid orbit surveys by photographic, low-light video, specular radar, and head-echo radar reflections are providing the first maps of meteor shower activity at different particle sizes. There are distinct differences in particle size distributions among streams. The underlaying mechanisms that created these streams are illuminated: fragmentation from spin-up or thermal stresses, meteoroid ejection by water vapor drag, and ejection of icy particles by CO and CO2 sublimation. The distribution of the meteoroid orbital elements probe the subsequent evolution by planetary perturbations and sample the range of dynamical processes to which Near Earth Asteroids are exposed. The non-stream "sporadic" meteors probe early stages in the evolution from meteoroid streams into the zodiacal dust cloud. We see that the lifetime of large meteoroids is generally not limited by collisions. Results obtained by the CAMS video survey of meteoroid orbits are compared to those from other orbit surveys. Since October 2010, over 200,000 meteoroid orbits have been measured. First results from an expansion into the southern hemisphere are also presented, as are first results from the measurement of main element compositions. Among the many streams detected so far, the Geminid and Sextantid showers stand out by having a relatively high particle density and derive from parent bodies that appear to have originated in the main belt.

  15. Copernicus Earth observation programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žlebir, Silvo

    European Earth observation program Copernicus is an EU-wide programme that integrates satellite data, in-situ data and modeling to provide user-focused information services to support policymakers, researchers, businesses and citizens. Land monitoring service and Emergency service are fully operational already, Atmosphere monitoring service and Marine environment monitoring service are preoperational and will become fully operational in the following year, while Climate change service and Security service are in an earlier development phase. New series of a number of dedicated satellite missions will be launched in the following years, operated by the European Space Agency and EUMETSAT, starting with Sentinel 1A satellite early this year. Ground based, air-borne and sea-borne in-situ data are provided by different international networks and organizations, EU member states networks etc. European Union is devoting a particular attention to secure a sustainable long-term operational provision of the services. Copernicus is also stated as a European Union’s most important contribution to Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The status and the recent development of the Copernicus programme will be presented, together with its future perspective. As Copernicus services have already demonstrated their usability and effectiveness, some interesting cases of their deployment will be presented. Copernicus free and open data policy, supported by a recently adopted EU legislative act, will also be presented.

  16. School, Earth and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Anna; Grieco, Giovanni; Oneta, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Geology needs to be explained and narrated to the people, focusing on the goal of making that big change of mindset that will allow individuals and the entire community to tune into the timing and the ways in which the Earth evolves. In order to achieve these important goals it is necessary to educate children from an early age so that they learn to live an environmentally friendly life. With the project "School, Earth and imagination" we introduce, with a fun and new way, notions and topics in geological and environmental sciences in schools at all levels with the final goal of improving both knowledge and sensibility for these topics into the community. Through this project we start from the children (kindergarten and primary school, ages between 3 and 8 years) because they are the foundation of our society, and without foundations nothing can be built. The "School, Earth and imagination" project wants to give the children a real opportunity to approach reality and in general the surrounding environment, for the first time even before the traditional scholastic experience, with a scientific point of view, experimenting some basic physical concepts like temperature, weight, hardness and so on directly through their body. The project is structured and developed in modules that provide a high flexibility in order to meet needs and requirements of different schools in different situations. Each module is part of the journey of Mariolino, a character that represents a very curious child who introduces basic concepts associating them to geological processes. The Journey of Mariolino, as each module, follows an insistent scheme that starts from the presentation of the problem, follows with its discussion through direct questions and ends with experimentation of the hypotheses that children have proposed to validate the solution of the problem. Each module is independent and never ends without giving children a solution and is always structured with a practical activity

  17. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  18. Comparison of Low Earth Orbit and Geosynchronous Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The technological, environmental, social, and political ramifications of low Earth orbits as compared to geosynchronous Earth orbits for the solar power satellite (SPS) are assessed. The capital cost of the transmitting facilities is dependent on the areas of the antenna and rectenna relative to the requirement of high efficiency power transmission. The salient features of a low orbit Earth orbits are discussed in terms of cost reduction efforts.

  19. Investigation of a CDDW Hamiltonian to Explore Possibility of Magneto-Quantum Oscillations in Electronic Specific Heat of Hole-Doped Cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha Goswami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a chiral d-density wave (CDDW mean field model Hamiltonian in the momentum space suitable for the hole-doped cuprates, such as YBCO, in the pseudogap phase to obtain the Fermi surface (FS topologies, including the anisotropy parameter(́ and the elastic scattering by disorder potential (|0|. For ́=0, with the chemical potential =−0.27 eV for 10% doping level and |0|≥|| (where ||=0.25 eV is the first neighbor hopping, at zero/non-zero magnetic field (, the FS on the first Brillouin zone is found to correspond to electron pockets around antinodal regions and barely visible patches around nodal regions. For ́≠0, we find Pomeranchuk distortion of FS. We next relate our findings regarding FS to the magneto-quantum oscillations in the electronic specific heat. Since the nodal quasiparticle energy values for =0 are found to be greater than for |0|≥||, the origin of the oscillations for nonzero corresponds to the Fermi pockets around antinodal regions. The oscillations are shown to take place in the weak disorder regime (|0|=0.25eV only.

  20. Crystal Growth and Electronic Raman Scattering Study of Model High-Tc Cuprate HgBa2 CaCu2 O6 +Ä

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lichen; Li, Yuan; Luo, Xiangpeng; Li, Jiarui; Yuan Li's Group in ICQM Team

    In this talk, I will report our recent progress on crystal growth of HgBa2CaCu2O6 +x (Hg1212), which possesses a simple tetragonal crystal structure and the highest ambient-pressure Tc (128 K) among all cuprate superconductors with two CuO2 sheets in the primitive cell. Improvement in single-crystal synthesis was made possible by using self-designed high-pressure furnaces and a two-layer encapsulation method, and we demonstrate that the hole concentration can be homogeneously tuned in the underdoped region by post-growth annealing. Our electronic Raman scattering experiments reveal that the maximum of the d-wave superconducting gap increases from single-layer HgBa2CuO4 +x to double-layer Hg1212. In the same spectra, it is found that the characteristic energy of spin excitations, as manifested by the energy of the two-magnon signal, also increases in a nearly proportional fashion. This result is consistent with the idea that magnetic interactions are closely related to the Cooper pairing mechanism.

  1. Anisotropy of the Seebeck Coefficient in the Cuprate Superconductor YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y}: Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Bidirectional Charge Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cyr-Choinière

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{y} is measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, at hole dopings p=0.11 and p=0.12, for heat currents along the a and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal structure. For both directions, S/T decreases and becomes negative at low temperature, a signature that the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction due to broken translational symmetry. Above a clear threshold field, a strong new feature appears in S_{b}, for conduction along the b axis only. We attribute this feature to the onset of 3D-coherent unidirectional charge-density-wave modulations seen by x-ray diffraction, also along the b axis only. Because these modulations have a sharp onset temperature well below the temperature where S/T starts to drop towards negative values, we infer that they are not the cause of Fermi-surface reconstruction. Instead, the reconstruction must be caused by the quasi-2D bidirectional modulations that develop at significantly higher temperature. The unidirectional order only confers an additional anisotropy to the already reconstructed Fermi surface, also manifest as an in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity.

  2. A fermi liquid electric structure and the nature of the carriers in high-T/sub c/ cuprates: A photoemission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A.J.; List, R.S.; Bartlett, R.J.; Cheong, S.W.; Fisk, Z.; Thompson, J.D.; Olson, C.G.; Yang, A.B.; Liu, R.; Gu, C.; Veal, B.W.; Liu, J.Z.; Paulikas, A.P.; Vandervoort, K.; Claus, H.; Campuzano, J.C.; Schirber, J.E.; Shinn, N.D.

    1989-01-01

    We have performed angle-integrated and angle-resolved photoemission measurements at 20 K on well-characterized single crystals of high-T/sub c/ cuprates (both 1:2:3-type and 2:2:1:2-type) cleaved in situ, and find a relatively large, resolution limited Fermi edge which shows large amplitude variations with photon energy, indicative of band structure final state effects. The lineshapes of the spectra of the 1:2:3 materials as a function of photon energy are well reproduced by band structure predictions, indicating a correct mix of 2p and 3d orbitals on the calculations, while the energy positions of the peaks agree with calculated bands only to within /approx/0.5 eV. This may yet prove to reflect the effects of Coulomb correlation. We nevertheless conclude that a Fermi liquid approach to conductivity is appropriate. Angle-resolved data, while still incomplete, suggest agreement with the Fermi surface predicted by the LDA calculations. A BCS-like energy gap is observed in the 2:2:1:2 materials, whose magnitude is twice the weak coupling BCS value (i.e., 2/Delta/ = 7 KT/sub c/). 49 refs., 11 figs.

  3. HTSC cuprate phase diagram using a modified Boson-Fermion-Gossamer model describing competing orders, a quantum critical point and possible resonance complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Richard H.; March, Norman H.; Booth, Michael L.

    There has been considerable effort expended toward understanding high temperature superconductors (HTSC), and more specifically the cuprate phase diagram as a function of doping level. Yet, the only agreement seems to be that HTSC is an example of a strongly correlated material where Coulomb repulsion plays a major role. This manuscript proposes a model based on a Feshbach resonance pairing mechanism and competing orders. An initial BCS-type superconductivity at high doping is suppressed in the two particle channel by a localized preformed pair (PP) (Nozieres and Schmitt-Rink, J Low Temp Phys, 1985, 59, 980) (circular density wave) creating a quantum critical point. As doping continues to diminish, the PP then participates in a Feshbach resonance complex that creates a new electron (hole) pair that delocalizes and constitutes HTSC and the characteristic dome (Squire and March, Int J Quantum Chem, 2007, 107, 3013; 2008, 108, 2819). The resonant nature of the new pair contributes to its short coherence length. The model we propose also suggests an explanation (and necessity) for an experimentally observed correlated lattice that could restrict energy dissipation to enable the resonant Cooper pair to move over several correlation lengths, or essentially free. The PP density wave is responsible for the pseudogap as it appears as a "localized superconductor" since its density of states and quasiparticle spectrum are similar to those of a superconductor (Peierls-Fröhlich theory), but with no phase coherence between the PP.

  4. Pseudogap in cuprates driven by d-wave flux-phase order proximity effects: a theoretical analysis from Raman and ARPES experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Andrés; Bejas, Matías

    2014-12-01

    One of the puzzling characteristics of the pseudogap phase of high-Tc cuprates is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. While the nodal quasiparticles have a Fermi liquid behaviour, the antinodal ones show non-Fermi liquid features and an associated pseudogap. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and electronic Raman scattering are two valuable tools which have shown universal features which are rather material-independent, and presumably intrinsic to the pseudogap phase. The doping and temperature dependence of the Fermi arcs and the pseudogap observed by photoemission near the antinode correlates with the non-Fermi liquid behaviour observed by Raman for the B1g mode. In contrast, and similar to the nodal quasiparticles detected by photoemission, the Raman B2g mode shows Fermi liquid features. We show that these two experiments can be analysed, in the context of the t-J model, by self-energy effects in the proximity to a d-wave flux-phase order instability. This approach supports a crossover origin for the pseudogap, and a scenario of two competing phases. The B2g mode shows, in an underdoped case, a depletion at intermediate energy which has attracted renewed interest. We study this depletion and discuss its origin and relation with the pseudogap.

  5. Charge density waves as the origin of dip-hump structures in the differential tunneling conductance of cuprates: The case of d-wave superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabovich, Alexander M., E-mail: gabovich@iop.kiev.ua; Voitenko, Alexander I., E-mail: voitenko@iop.kiev.ua

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • d-Wave superconductivity and charge-density waves compete for the Fermi surface. • Charge-density waves induce pseudogaps and peak-dip-hump structures in cuprates. • Tunnel spectra are non-symmetric due to the dielectric order-parameter phase fixation. • Scatter of the dielectric order parameter smears the tunnel spectra peculiarities. - Abstract: Quasiparticle differential current–voltage characteristics (CVCs) G(V) of non-symmetric tunnel junctions between d-wave superconductors with charge-density waves (CDWs) and normal metals were calculated. The dependences G(V) were shown to have a V-like form at small voltages V and low temperatures, and to be asymmetric at larger V owing to the presence of CDW peak in either of the V-branches. The spatial scatter of the dielectric (CDW) order parameter smears the CDW peak into a hump and induces a peak-dip-hump structure (PDHS) typical of CVCs observed for such junctions. At temperatures larger than the superconducting critical one, the PDHS evolves into a pseudogap depression. The results agree well with the scanning tunneling microscopy data for Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}. The results differ substantially from those obtained earlier for CDW s-wave superconductors.

  6. High-Field magnetotransport in the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Toni; Kartsovnik, M.V.; Biberacher, W.; Erb, A.; Gross, R. [Walther-Meissner-Institute, Garching (Germany); Kampert, E.; Putzke, C.; Wosnitza, J. [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Dresden (Germany); Grigoriev, P.D. [L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Baddoux, S.; Proust, C.; Sheikin, I. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses CNRS, Toulouse-Grenoble (France); Kiswandhi, A.; Brooks, J.S.; Choi, E.S. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The current status of the high-field magnetotransport studies of the Fermi surface in the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Nd{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4} is presented. Both the magnetic quantum oscillations and semiclassical angle-dependent magnetoresistance give evidence of a weak (π/a, π/a)-superlattice potential existing at the overdoped regime, 0.15 ≤ x ≤ 0.17. The relevant energy gap is very small, ∝ 10-2 eV; it is gradually suppressed at increasing the doping level, extrapolating to zero right at the edge of the superconducting dome, x = 0.175. On the other hand, decreasing the doping below the optimal level leads to dramatic changes in the behavior of magnetotransport including the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, magnetoresistance and Hall effect. Our data suggest a Fermi surface transformation leading to a collapse of the classical closed cyclotron orbits responsible for the conventional galvanomagnetic effects.

  7. Anisotropy of the Seebeck Coefficient in the Cuprate Superconductor YBa2 Cu3 Oy : Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Bidirectional Charge Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr-Choinière, O.; Badoux, S.; Grissonnanche, G.; Michon, B.; Afshar, S. A. A.; Fortier, S.; LeBoeuf, D.; Graf, D.; Day, J.; Bonn, D. A.; Hardy, W. N.; Liang, R.; Doiron-Leyraud, N.; Taillefer, Louis

    2017-07-01

    The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate YBa2 Cu3 Oy is measured in magnetic fields large enough to suppress superconductivity, at hole dopings p =0.11 and p =0.12 , for heat currents along the a and b directions of the orthorhombic crystal structure. For both directions, S /T decreases and becomes negative at low temperature, a signature that the Fermi surface undergoes a reconstruction due to broken translational symmetry. Above a clear threshold field, a strong new feature appears in Sb, for conduction along the b axis only. We attribute this feature to the onset of 3D-coherent unidirectional charge-density-wave modulations seen by x-ray diffraction, also along the b axis only. Because these modulations have a sharp onset temperature well below the temperature where S /T starts to drop towards negative values, we infer that they are not the cause of Fermi-surface reconstruction. Instead, the reconstruction must be caused by the quasi-2D bidirectional modulations that develop at significantly higher temperature. The unidirectional order only confers an additional anisotropy to the already reconstructed Fermi surface, also manifest as an in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity.

  8. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    June 20-30 2012 Affected by a sustained slump in the demand from downstream industries, rare earth market remained flat recently. There were not many inquiries for rare earth products in the spot market. Consumers lacked of confidence in the future market. As for the downstream industries, the market of NdFeB magnetic materials and phosphors were in the doldrums. Ceramic, catalyst and polishing powder industries maintained weak. Affected by the global economy, export market of rare earth was weak.

  9. Cosmic rays and Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    During the last solar cycle the Earth's cloud cover underwent a modulation in phase with the cosmic ray flux. Assuming that there is a causal relationship between the two, it is expected and found that the Earth's temperature follows more closely decade variations in cosmic ray flux than other...... solar activity parameters. If the relationship is real the state of the Heliosphere affects the Earth's climate....

  10. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth market remained weak recently. Dealings of light and heavy rare earth products were sluggish. Demand for didymium and dysprosium related products was soft and purchasers were not interested in replenishing their stocks. The market of NdFeB magnetic materials and phosphors remained inactive. Meanwhile, ceramic, catalyst and polishing powder industries were weak. Affected by global economical recession, export market of rare earth remained weak.

  11. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth market was weak recently. There was still no sign of recovery in NdFeB magnetic materials and phosphors market. The market of ceramic, catalyst and polishing powder were in the doldrums. Rare earth deep processing enterprisers hesitated to purchase rare earth products and considered that there was room for further price reduction. Global economy slowed down and there was no sign of improvement yet. The export market was sluggish and transactions were inactive.

  12. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth market was relatively stable recently. There was not much change to the quotations by suppliers. Inquiries for most products increased in spot market and so did to the transactions. Recently, rare earth special invoices attracted the attention in the industry again. It is likely to result in price rise of many rare earth products if the special invoice system can put into effect in the near term.

  13. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    November 1-10, 2012 Some key rare earth producers had paused production since the last ten day period of October in order to retain normal production and market order and stabilize rare earth prices. The production suspension measure by the plants together with severe cracking down on illegal mining by the government had some influence on sluggish market recently. Data showed rapid price increase of major rare earth products after sharp decline previously.

  14. Earth's early biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Understanding our own early biosphere is essential to our search for life elsewhere, because life arose on Earth very early and rocky planets shared similar early histories. The biosphere arose before 3.8 Ga ago, was exclusively unicellular and was dominated by hyperthermophiles that utilized chemical sources of energy and employed a range of metabolic pathways for CO2 assimilation. Photosynthesis also arose very early. Oxygenic photosynthesis arose later but still prior to 2.7 Ga. The transition toward the modern global environment was paced by a decline in volcanic and hydrothermal activity. These developments allowed atmospheric O2 levels to increase. The O2 increase created new niches for aerobic life, most notably the more advanced Eukarya that eventually spawned the megascopic fauna and flora of our modern biosphere.

  15. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  16. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice. PMID:26778863

  17. One Day on Earth

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    In collaboration with the CineGlobe Film Festival, the One Day on Earth global film project invites you to share your story of scientific inspiration, scientific endeavors and technological advancement on 11 November 2011 (11.11.11).   Technology in the 21st century continuously inspires us to re-imagine the world. From outer-space to cyberspace, new ideas that we hope will improve the lives of future generations keep us in a state of change. However, these new technologies may alter the nature of our shared existence in ways not yet known. On 11.11.11, we invite you to record the exciting ways that science is a part of your life, together with people around the world who will be documenting their lives on this day of global creation. See www.onedayonearth.org for details on how to participate.

  18. Earth Gravitational Model 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D.; Factor, J. K.; Holmes, S. A.; Ingalls, S.; Presicci, M. R.; Beale, J.; Fecher, T.

    2015-12-01

    The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency [NGA], in conjunction with its U.S. and international partners, has begun preliminary work on its next Earth Gravitational Model, to replace EGM2008. The new 'Earth Gravitational Model 2020' [EGM2020] has an expected public release date of 2020, and will likely retain the same harmonic basis and resolution as EGM2008. As such, EGM2020 will be essentially an ellipsoidal harmonic model up to degree (n) and order (m) 2159, but will be released as a spherical harmonic model to degree 2190 and order 2159. EGM2020 will benefit from new data sources and procedures. Updated satellite gravity information from the GOCE and GRACE mission, will better support the lower harmonics, globally. Multiple new acquisitions (terrestrial, airborne and shipborne) of gravimetric data over specific geographical areas, will provide improved global coverage and resolution over the land, as well as for coastal and some ocean areas. Ongoing accumulation of satellite altimetry data as well as improvements in the treatment of this data, will better define the marine gravity field, most notably in polar and near-coastal regions. NGA and partners are evaluating different approaches for optimally combining the new GOCE/GRACE satellite gravity models with the terrestrial data. These include the latest methods employing a full covariance adjustment. NGA is also working to assess systematically the quality of its entire gravimetry database, towards correcting biases and other egregious errors where possible, and generating improved error models that will inform the final combination with the latest satellite gravity models. Outdated data gridding procedures have been replaced with improved approaches. For EGM2020, NGA intends to extract maximum value from the proprietary data that overlaps geographically with unrestricted data, whilst also making sure to respect and honor its proprietary agreements with its data-sharing partners.

  19. Theory of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Earth is an isolated, cooling planet that obeys the 2nd law. Interior dynamics is driven from the top, by cold sinking slabs. High-resolution broad-band seismology and geodesy has confirmed that mantle flow is characterized by narrow downwellings and ~20 broad slowly rising updrafts. The low-velocity zone (LVZ) consists of a hot melange of sheared peridotite intruded with aligned melt-rich lamellae that are tapped by intraplate volcanoes. The high temperature is a simple consequence of the thermal overshoot common in large bodies of convecting fluids. The transition zone consists of ancient eclogite layers that are displaced upwards by slabs to become broad passive, and cool, ridge feeding updrafts of ambient mantle. The physics that is overlooked in canonical models of mantle dynamics and geochemistry includes; the 2nd law, convective overshoots, subadiabaticity, wave-melt interactions, Archimedes' principle, and kinetics (rapid transitions allow stress-waves to interact with melting and phase changes, creating LVZs; sluggish transitions in cold slabs keep eclogite in the TZ where it warms up by extracting heat from mantle below 650 km, creating the appearance of slab penetration). Canonical chemical geodynamic models are the exact opposite of physics and thermodynamic based models and of the real Earth. A model that results from inverting the assumptions regarding initial and boundary conditions (hot origin, secular cooling, no external power sources, cooling internal boundaries, broad passive upwellings, adiabaticity and whole-mantle convection not imposed, layering and self-organization allowed) results in a thick refractory-yet-fertile surface layer, with ancient xenoliths and cratons at the top and a hot overshoot at the base, and a thin mobile D" layer that is an unlikely plume generation zone. Accounting for the physics that is overlooked, or violated (2nd law), in canonical models, plus modern seismology, undermines the assumptions and conclusions of these

  20. Sun, Earth and Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1995-01-01

    The Sun is enveloped by a hot, tenuous million-degree corona that expands to create a continuous solar wind that sweeps past all the planets and fills the heliosphere. The solar wind is modulated by strong gusts that are initiated by powerful explosions on the Sun, including solar flares and coronal mass ejections. This dynamic, invisible outer atmosphere of the Sun is currently under observation with the soft X-ray telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft, whose results are presented. We also show observations from the Ulysses spacecraft that is now passing over the solar pole, sampling the solar wind in this region for the first time. Two other spacecraft, Voyager 1 and 2, have recently detected the outer edge of the invisible heliosphere, roughly halfway to the nearest star. Magnetic solar activity, the total radiative output from the Sun, and the Earth's mean global surface temperature all vary with the 11-year sunspot cycle in which the total number of sunspots varies from a maximum to a minimum and back to a maximum again in about 11 years. The terrestrial magnetic field hollows out a protective magnetic cavity, called the magnetosphere, within the solar wind. This protection is incomplete, however, so the Sun feeds an unseen world of high-speed particles and magnetic fields that encircle the Earth in space. These particles endanger spacecraft and astronauts, and also produce terrestrial aurorae. An international flotilla of spacecraft is now sampling the weak points in this magnetic defense. Similar spacecraft have also discovered a new radiation belt, in addition to the familiar Van Allen belts, except fed by interstellar ions instead of electrons and protons from the Sun.

  1. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    October 21-31,2012 Recently, dealings of rare earth remained stagnant. Consumers hesitated to increase their stocks for the fear of further decline in rare earth prices. It was difficult for suppliers to sell products and they had reduced quotations to attract buyers. It did not show demand from end users could rebound in short terms. Dealings of rare earth products in spot market were few. The market of NdFeB magnetic materials, phosphors, catalysts, polishing powders and ceramics remained sluggish. There was no sign of picking up in world economy. Export market of rare earths maintained inactive.

  2. The earth and the moon

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    The moon is the only body in the solar system outside of the Earth that has been visited by humans. More than 440 pounds of lunar material are brought by NASA and Soviet space missions to Earth for study. The information gleaned about the moon from this relatively small pile of rocks is mind-boggling and stands as the greatest proof that Martian planetary science would be greatly enhanced by returning samples to Earth. Compositional studies of lunar rocks show that the moon and the Earth are made of similar material, and because lunar material has not been reworked through erosion and plate te

  3. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth market remained sluggish and quiet holistically recently. Didymium-related market was quiet and the consumers were hesitating in replenishing their inventories. Inquiries for dysprosium-related products were few and the transactions were inactive, Demand for europium oxide (99.99%) was weak and the trade was far from brisk. Baogang Rare Earth suspended production, which has a positive effect in stabilizing the whole rare earth market. But prices of rare earth products did not go up rapidly. This means there were still large inventories in the market.

  4. Uplink Power Control For Earth/Satellite/Earth Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy

    1994-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem adjusts power radiated by uplink transmitter in Earth station/satellite relay station/ Earth station communication system. Adjustments made to compensate for anticipated changes in attenuation by rain. Raw input is a received downlink beacon singal, amplitude of which affected not only by rain fade but also by scintillation, attenuation in atmospheric gases, and diurnal effects.

  5. China's rare-earth industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction China's dominant position as the producer of over 95 percent of the world output of rare-earth minerals and rapid increases in the consumption of rare earths owing to the emergence of new clean-energy and defense-related technologies, combined with China's decisions to restrict exports of rare earths, have resulted in heightened concerns about the future availability of rare earths. As a result, industrial countries such as Japan, the United States, and countries of the European Union face tighter supplies and higher prices for rare earths. This paper briefly reviews China's rare-earth production, consumption, and reserves and the important policies and regulations regarding the production and trade of rare earths, including recently announced export quotas. The 15 lanthanide elements-lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, and lutetium (atomic numbers 57-71)-were originally known as the rare earths from their occurrence in oxides mixtures. Recently, some researchers have included two other elements-scandium and yttrium-in their discussion of rare earths. Yttrium (atomic number 39), which lies above lanthanum in transition group III of the periodic table and has a similar 3+ ion with a noble gas core, has both atomic and ionic radii similar in size to those of terbium and dysprosium and is generally found in nature with lanthanides. Scandium (atomic number 21) has a smaller ionic radius than yttrium and the lanthanides, and its chemical behavior is intermediate between that of aluminum and the lanthanides. It is found in nature with the lanthanides and yttrium. Rare earths are used widely in high-technology and clean-energy products because they impart special properties of magnetism, luminescence, and strength. Rare earths are also used in weapon systems to obtain the same properties.

  6. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  7. Teaching Waves with Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logiurato, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Google Earth is a huge source of interesting illustrations of various natural phenomena. It can represent a valuable tool for science education, not only for teaching geography and geology, but also physics. Here we suggest that Google Earth can be used for introducing in an attractive way the physics of waves. (Contains 9 figures.)

  8. Introductory mathematics for earth scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2009-01-01

    Any quantitative work in earth sciences requires mathematical analysis and mathematical methods are essential to the modelling and analysis of the geological, geophysical and environmental processes involved. This book provides an introduction to the fundamental mathematics that all earth scientists need.

  9. Polar Misunderstandings: Earth's Dynamic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the movement of Earth's north and south poles. The Earth's poles may be a bit more complex and dynamic than what many students and teachers believe. With better understanding, offer them up as a rich landscape for higher-level critical analysis and subject integration. Possible curriculum tie-ins include magnets, Earth…

  10. Teaching Waves with Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logiurato, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Google Earth is a huge source of interesting illustrations of various natural phenomena. It can represent a valuable tool for science education, not only for teaching geography and geology, but also physics. Here we suggest that Google Earth can be used for introducing in an attractive way the physics of waves. (Contains 9 figures.)

  11. Low Earth Orbiter: Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Steven E.; Bundick, Steven N.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the current government budgetary environment that requires the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to do more with less, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility has developed and implemented a class of ground stations known as a Low Earth Orbiter-Terminal (LEO-T). This development thus provides a low-cost autonomous ground tracking service for NASA's customers. More importantly, this accomplishment provides a commercial source to spacecraft customers around the world to purchase directly from the company awarded the NASA contract to build these systems. A few years ago, NASA was driven to provide more ground station capacity for spacecraft telemetry, tracking, and command (TT&C) services with a decreasing budget. NASA also made a decision to develop many smaller, cheaper satellites rather than a few large spacecraft as done in the past. In addition, university class missions were being driven to provide their own TT&C services due to the increasing load on the NASA ground-tracking network. NASA's solution for this ever increasing load was to use the existing large aperture systems to support those missions requiring that level of performance and to support the remainder of the missions with the autonomous LEO-T systems. The LEO-T antenna system is a smaller, cheaper, and fully autonomous unstaffed system that can operate without the existing NASA support infrastructure. The LEO-T provides a low-cost, reliable space communications service to the expanding number of low-earth orbiting missions around the world. The system is also fostering developments that improve cost-effectiveness of autonomous-class capabilities for NASA and commercial space use. NASA has installed three LEO-T systems. One station is at the University of Puerto Rico, the second system is installed at the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks, Alaska, and the third system is installed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. This paper

  12. Thermodynamics of the Earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Frank D [CSIRO Exploration and Mining, PO Box 883, Kenmore, Qld. 4069 (Australia)], E-mail: Frank.Stacey@csiro.au

    2010-04-15

    Applications of elementary thermodynamic principles to the dynamics of the Earth lead to robust, quantitative conclusions about the tectonic effects that arise from convection. The grand pattern of motion conveys deep heat to the surface, generating mechanical energy with a thermodynamic efficiency corresponding to that of a Carnot engine operating over the adiabatic temperature gradient between the heat source and sink. Referred to the total heat flux derived from the Earth's silicate mantle, the efficiency is 24% and the power generated, 7.7 x 10{sup 12} W, causes all the material deformation apparent as plate tectonics and the consequent geological processes. About 3.5% of this is released in seismic zones but little more than 0.2% as seismic waves. Even major earthquakes are only localized hiccups in this motion. Complications that arise from mineral phase transitions can be used to illuminate details of the motion. There are two superimposed patterns of convection, plate subduction and deep mantle plumes, driven by sources of buoyancy, negative and positive respectively, at the top and bottom of the mantle. The patterns of motion are controlled by the viscosity contrasts (>10{sup 4} : 1) at these boundaries and are self-selected as the least dissipative mechanisms of heat transfer for convection in a body with very strong viscosity variation. Both are subjects of the thermodynamic efficiency argument. Convection also drives the motion in the fluid outer core that generates the geomagnetic field, although in that case there is an important energy contribution by compositional separation, as light solute is rejected by the solidifying inner core and mixed into the outer core, a process referred to as compositional convection. Uncertainty persists over the core energy balance because thermal conduction is a drain on core energy that has been a subject of diverse estimates, with attendant debate over the need for radiogenic heat in the core. The geophysical

  13. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  14. Intrinsic Hydrophobicity of Rammed Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, M.; Stone, C.; Balintova, M.; Grul, R.

    2015-11-01

    Rammed earth is well known for its vapour diffusion properties, its ability to regulate humidity within the built environment. Rammed earth is also an aesthetically iconic material such as marble or granite and therefore is preferably left exposed. However exposed rammed earth is often coated with silane/siloxane water repellents or the structure is modified architecturally (large roof overhangs) to accommodate for the hydrophilic nature of the material. This paper sets out to find out optimal hydrophobicity for rammed earth based on natural composite fibres and surface coating without adversely affecting the vapour diffusivity of the material. The material is not required to be waterproof, but should resist at least driving rain. In order to evaluate different approaches to increase hydrophobicity of rammed earth surface, peat fibres and four types of repellents were used.

  15. Crystal structures of bis­[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth­oxy-17-methyl­morphinanium] tetra­chlorido­cobaltate and tetra­chlorido­cuprate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauchat, Eric; Nazarenko, Alexander Y.

    2017-01-01

    (9S,13S,14S)-3-Meth­oxy-17-methyl­morphinan (dextromethorphan) forms two isostructural salts with (a) tetra­chlorido­cobaltate, namely bis­[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth­oxy-17-methyl­morphinanium] tetra­chlorido­cobaltate, (C18H26NO)2[CoCl4], and (b) tetra­chlorido­cuprate, namely bis­[(9S,13S,14S)-3-meth­oxy-17-methyl­morphinanium] tetra­chlorido­cuprate, (C18H26NO)2[CuCl4]. The distorted tetra­hedral anions are located on twofold rotational axes. The dextromethorphan cation can be described as being composed of two ring systems, a tetra­hydro­naphthalene system A+B and a deca­hydro­isoquinolinium subunit C+D, that are nearly perpendicular to one another: the angle between mean planes of the A+B and C+D moieties is 78.8 (1)° for (a) and 79.0 (1)° for (b). Two symmetry-related cations of protonated dextromethorphan are connected to the tetra­chlorido­cobaltate (or tetra­chlorido­cuprate) anions via strong N—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming neutral ion associates. These associates are packed in the (001) plane with no strong attractive bonding between them. Both compounds are attractive crystalline forms for unambiguous identification of the dextromethorphan and, presumably, of its optical isomer, levomethorphan. PMID:28083138

  16. Google Earth 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. E.; Sfraga, M.

    2008-12-01

    For the Spring 2008 semester the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Geography Department developed a new 3-credit course entitled "Exploring the Virtual Earth". The goal of the course was to introduce students to neogeography tools such as Virtual Globes, Google SketchUp and Second Life, and demonstrating how these applications can be used to visualize geoscience datasets. The classes were a combination of lectures, demonstrations and practical exercises, with a particular emphasis on teaching students to author Keyhole Markup Language (KML) files. The assessment of grades included scores based on attendance, KML exercises, a SketchUp modeling project and exams. In addition, all students had to create and present a KML-based project, preferably using their own original geospatial data where available. Some of the more successful students even presented this work to the university community and invited guests at a one-day workshop "KML in the North". By AGU's Fall 2008 meeting, the course will have be taught again, with a syllabus that has been refined based on feedback from students in the Spring. We present the positive and negative lessons learnt, and other insights garnered from a year of teaching this original and unique course.

  17. Uncovering Earth's virome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez-Espino, David; Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Thomas, Alex D; Huntemann, Marcel; Mikhailova, Natalia; Rubin, Edward; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-08-25

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on Earth, but challenges in detecting, isolating, and classifying unknown viruses have prevented exhaustive surveys of the global virome. Here we analysed over 5 Tb of metagenomic sequence data from 3,042 geographically diverse samples to assess the global distribution, phylogenetic diversity, and host specificity of viruses. We discovered over 125,000 partial DNA viral genomes, including the largest phage yet identified, and increased the number of known viral genes by 16-fold. Half of the predicted partial viral genomes were clustered into genetically distinct groups, most of which included genes unrelated to those in known viruses. Using CRISPR spacers and transfer RNA matches to link viral groups to microbial host(s), we doubled the number of microbial phyla known to be infected by viruses, and identified viruses that can infect organisms from different phyla. Analysis of viral distribution across diverse ecosystems revealed strong habitat-type specificity for the vast majority of viruses, but also identified some cosmopolitan groups. Our results highlight an extensive global viral diversity and provide detailed insight into viral habitat distribution and host–virus interactions.

  18. Earth Science Imagery Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Morisette, Jeffrey; Cole-Rhodes, Arlene; Johnson, Kisha; Netanyahu, Nathan S.; Eastman, Roger; Stone, Harold; Zavorin, Ilya

    2003-01-01

    The study of global environmental changes involves the comparison, fusion, and integration of multiple types of remotely-sensed data at various temporal, radiometric, and spatial resolutions. Results of this integration may be utilized for global change analysis, as well as for the validation of new instruments or for new data analysis. Furthermore, future multiple satellite missions will include many different sensors carried on separate platforms, and the amount of remote sensing data to be combined is increasing tremendously. For all of these applications, the first required step is fast and automatic image registration, and as this need for automating registration techniques is being recognized, it becomes necessary to survey all the registration methods which may be applicable to Earth and space science problems and to evaluate their performances on a large variety of existing remote sensing data as well as on simulated data of soon-to-be-flown instruments. In this paper we present one of the first steps toward such an exhaustive quantitative evaluation. First, the different components of image registration algorithms are reviewed, and different choices for each of these components are described. Then, the results of the evaluation of the corresponding algorithms combining these components are presented o n several datasets. The algorithms are based on gray levels or wavelet features and compute rigid transformations (including scale, rotation, and shifts). Test datasets include synthetic data as well as data acquired over several EOS Land Validation Core Sites with the IKONOS and the Landsat-7 sensors.

  19. Personal Inquiry in the Earth Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, W. Paul

    Designed as a basic workbook using the inquiry process or as a supplementary text in the classroom, this 129 page booklet is divided into five units: Moving in on the Earth From Space, The Earth's Great Bodies of Water, Composition of the Solid Earth, The Earth's Crust is Constantly Changing, and Studying the Earth's History. The exercises are…

  20. Fourteen Times the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    ESO HARPS Instrument Discovers Smallest Ever Extra-Solar Planet Summary A European team of astronomers [1] has discovered the lightest known planet orbiting a star other than the sun (an "exoplanet"). The new exoplanet orbits the bright star mu Arae located in the southern constellation of the Altar. It is the second planet discovered around this star and completes a full revolution in 9.5 days. With a mass of only 14 times the mass of the Earth, the new planet lies at the threshold of the largest possible rocky planets, making it a possible super Earth-like object. Uranus, the smallest of the giant planets of the Solar System has a similar mass. However Uranus and the new exoplanet differ so much by their distance from the host star that their formation and structure are likely to be very different. This discovery was made possible by the unprecedented accuracy of the HARPS spectrograph on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, which allows radial velocities to be measured with a precision better than 1 m/s. It is another clear demonstration of the European leadership in the field of exoplanet research. PR Photo 25a/04: The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope PR Photo 25b/04: Observed Velocity Variation of mu Arae (3.6m/HARPS, 1.2m Swiss/CORALIE, AAT/UCLES) PR Photo 25c/04: Velocity Variation of mu Arae Observed by HARPS (3.6m/HARPS) PR Photo 25d/04: "Velocity Curve" of mu Arae A unique planet hunting machine ESO PR Photo 25a/04 ESO PR Photo 25a/04 The HARPS Spectrograph and the 3.6m Telescope [Preview - JPEG: 602 x 400 pix - 211k] [Normal - JPEG: 1202 x 800 pix - 645k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 25a/04 represents a montage of the HARPS spectrograph and the 3.6m telescope at La Silla. The upper left shows the dome of the telescope, while the upper right illustrates the telescope itself. The HARPS spectrograph is shown in the lower image during laboratory tests. The vacuum tank is open so that some of the high-precision components inside can be seen. Since the first

  1. Magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  2. Novel Interplay between High-Tc Superconductivity and Antiferromagnetism in Tl-Based Six-CuO2-Layered Cuprates: 205Tl- and 63Cu-NMR Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuda, Hidekazu; Shiki, Nozomu; Kimoto, Naoki; Yashima, Mitsuharu; Kitaoka, Yoshio; Tokiwa, Kazuyasu; Iyo, Akira

    2016-08-01

    We report 63Cu- and 205Tl-NMR studies on six-layered (n = 6) high-Tc superconducting (SC) cuprate TlBa2Ca5Cu6O14+δ (Tl1256) with Tc ˜ 100 K, which reveal that antiferromagnetic (AFM) order takes place below TN ˜ 170 K. In this compound, four underdoped inner CuO2 planes [n(IP) = 4] sandwiched by two outer planes (OPs) are responsible for the onset of AFM order, whereas the nearly optimally-doped OPs responsible for the onset of bulk SC. It is pointed out that an increase in the out-of-plane magnetic interaction within an intra-unit-cell causes TN ˜ 45 K for Tl1245 with n(IP) = 3 to increase to ˜170 K for Tl1256 with n(IP) = 4. It is remarkable that the marked increase in TN and the AFM moments for the IPs does not bring about any reduction in Tc, since Tc ˜ 100 K is maintained for both compounds with nearly optimally doped OP. We highlight the fact that the SC order for n ≥ 5 is mostly dominated by the long-range in-plane SC correlation even in the multilayered structure, which is insensitive to the magnitude of TN and the AFM moments at the IPs or the AFM interaction among the IPs. These results demonstrate a novel interplay between the SC and AFM orders when the charge imbalance between the IPs and OP is significantly large.

  3. Processing of rare earth concentrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela Alex; R. C. Hubli; A.K. Suri

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes process details for extraction of rare earths from an intermediate grade concentrate of Madhya Pradesh region in India and a South African slag. The xenotime concentrate obtained from the former place was an intermediate grade (47%) rare earth phosphate containing both monazite and xenotime. The South African slag was a low-grade waste product typically containing only 4% of rare earths. The rare earth resource concentrates have been treated individually by different methods such as alkali fusion and alkali leaching to convert them into their mixed oxides. Both types of materials have been processed and greater than 98% solubilization of metal values has been achieved in the intermediate grade xenotime and 80% from the South African slag. The residue of xenotime hydroxide has been washed thoroughly to collect the sodium phosphate, as by-product and the slurry pH have been adjusted to separate rare earths from thorium effectively. Other impurities such as uranium and iron have been removed by precipitation of rare earths by oxalic acid. It has been possible to recover >95% yttrium along with other rare earth oxides.

  4. Our Sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbach, Raymond L.

    2013-03-01

    Recent evidence demonstrates that the Earth has been warming monotonically since 1980. Transient to equilibrium temperature changes take centuries to develop, as the upper levels of the ocean are slow to respond to atmospheric temperature changes. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations, from ice core and observatory measurements, display consistent increases from historical averages, beginning in about 1880. They can be associated with the use of coal ecause of the spread of the industrial revolution from Great Britain to the European continent and beyond. The climactic consequence of this human-dominated increase in atmospheric CO2 has been suggested to define a geologic epoch, termed the ``Anthropocene.'' This could be a short term, relatively minor change in global climate, or an extreme deviation that lasts for thousands of years. In order to stabilize global temperatures, sharp reductions in CO2 emissions are required: an 80% reduction beginning in 2050. U.S. emissions have declined sharply recently because of market conditions leading to the substitution of natural gas for coal for electricity generation. Whether this is the best use for this resource may be questioned, but it nevertheless reduces CO2 production by 67% from a coal-fired power plant, well on the way to the 80% reduction required for global temperature stabilization. Current methods for CO2 capture and storage are not cost effective, and have been slow (if not absent) to introduce at scale. This paper describes research into some potentially economically feasible approaches: cost-effective capture and storage of CO2 from injection of flue gas into subterranean methane-saturated aquifers at the surface; fuels from sunlight without CO2 production; and large-scale electrical energy storage for intermittent (and even constant) electricity generating sources.

  5. Other Worlds, Other Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbury, Susan; Gould, R. R.

    2011-05-01

    The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics is developing a two-to-three week NSF-funded program for middle and high school students using telescope-based investigations of real world cutting edge scientific questions. The goal is to reveal and enhance students' understanding of core concepts in the physical sciences as well as to develop their proficiency in the practice of scientific inquiry. Specifically, students and teachers are joining scientists in the search for habitable worlds by exploring transiting exoplanets. Using robotic telescopes, image processing software and simulations, students take images and then measure the brightness of their target star to create a portrait of a transiting planet including how large it is; the tilt of its orbit; how far it is from its star and what its environment might be like. Once classes collect and analyze their own data, they can begin to compare, combine, and communicate their findings with others in the community. Interactive models help students predict what they might expect to find and interpret what they do find. During the past two years, the Center for Astrophysics has tested the concept in fifty middle-and high-school classrooms, enrichment classes and after school science clubs in 13 states across the United States. To date, astronomy, earth science, and physics students have successfully detected Jupiter-sized planets transiting stars such as TRES-3, HATP-10, and HATP-12. Preliminary results indicate that learning of core concept did occur. Gains in content were most significant in middle school students as this project delivered new information to them while it served primarily as a review of concepts and application of skills for advanced placement classes. A significant change also occurred in students’ self reported knowledge of exoplanets. There was also an increase in students’ awareness of exoplanets and attitudes about science after participating in this project.

  6. Applications to particle transport in the Earth`s aurora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasperse, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The visual display of light called the aurora borealis occurs when energetic (1 to 100-keV) electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms from the Earth`s magnetosphere enter the Earth`s upper atmosphere and collide with the ambient neutral particles. Two kinds of auroras occur in nature: those excited by incident electrons and those excited by incident protons and hydrogen atoms. In this paper, we consider only the latter. The proton-hydrogen aurora may be divided into two altitude regions: high altitudes ({approximately}250 to {approximately}600 km) where charge-changing collisions dominate and energy-loss collisions may be neglected and low altitudes ({approximately}100 to {approximately}250 km) where energy-loss collisions also become important and cause rapid energy degradation. The focus of this review is on the high-altitude region where the one-group approximation is valid.

  7. Heat transport within the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to interpret Earth's dynamic processes based upon heat transport concepts derived from ordinary experience. But, ordinary experience can be misleading, especially when underlain by false assumptions. Geodynamic considerations traditionally have embraced three modes of heat transport: conduction, convection, and radiation. Recently, I introduced a fourth, "mantle decompression thermal tsunami" that, I submit, is responsible for emplacing heat at the base of the Earth's crust. Here, I review thermal transport within the Earth and speculate that there might be a fifth mode: "heat channeling", involving heat transport from the core to "hot-spots" such as those that power the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland.

  8. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth market remained stagnant recently. The buyers did not show willingness to replenish raw materials affected by weak demand. Most persons in rare earth circle were not confident with the short-term rare earth market. Demand for didymium mischmetal was soft recently. The market of dysprosium related products was quiet and NdFeB magnet producers were inactive in the purchase. Phosphor market was stagnant as well. Buyers were cautious on replenishing the material. There were few inquiries for europium oxide (99.9%) in spot market and transactions were difficult.

  9. The earth's shape and gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Garland, G D; Wilson, J T

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's Shape and Gravity focuses on the progress of the use of geophysical methods in investigating the interior of the earth and its shape. The publication first offers information on gravity, geophysics, geodesy, and geology and gravity measurements. Discussions focus on gravity measurements and reductions, potential and equipotential surfaces, absolute and relative measurements, and gravity networks. The text then elaborates on the shape of the sea-level surface and reduction of gravity observations. The text takes a look at gravity anomalies and structures in the earth's crust; interp

  10. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Novascone, Stephen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Wright, Jerry P [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-05-29

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  11. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Phillip B.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Wright, Jerry P.

    2011-09-27

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  12. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Systems (ESDS) Program has evolved over the last two decades, and currently has several core and community components. Core components provide the basic operational capabilities to process, archive, manage and distribute data from NASA missions. Community components provide a path for peer-reviewed research in Earth Science Informatics to feed into the evolution of the core components. The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a core component consisting of twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) and eight Science Investigator-led Processing Systems spread across the U.S. The presentation covers how the ESDS Program continues to evolve and benefits from as well as contributes to advances in Earth Science Informatics.

  13. Encyclopedia of earth system science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nierenberg, William Aaron

    1992-01-01

    .... The very diversity of the articles attests to the complexity of earth system science as a unique interdisciplinary venture to place humanity in a position to move wisely to protect the global habitat...

  14. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  15. Earth Day Illustrated Haiku Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    As part of their 2007 Chemists Celebrate Earth Day Celebration, the American Chemical Society is sponsoring an illustrated haiku contest for students in grades K 12 around the theme, Recycling—Chemistry Can!

  16. Bringing Education Down to Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Robert F.

    1996-01-01

    Argues for a curriculum based on the earth itself that could offer ideas and insights to help students as they mature. Explains that history, geography, literature, science, philosophy, and economics are enriched by the unifying concept of ecology. (DDR)

  17. China Rare Earth Holdings Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    China Rare Earth Holdings Limited is a large trans-area corporation and a public company listed in Hong Kong Stock Exchange (Name: China Rare Earth, Code: 0769), with headquarter in Hong Kong. Located on the bank of beautiful Taihu Lake, the subsidiary in Yinxing covers area of 200,000 m2. It has nearly 1,000 employees, 30% of whom are technical staffs. After self-administration and effort, the company passed ISO 9001: 2000 and ISO 14000 Certificaitons.

  18. Near Earth Object Survey Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Near Earth Object Survey Telescope (NEOST), located at the Xuyi station of the Purple Mountain Observatory, is a telescope with the most powerful detection capacity, the highest efficiency and the best performance in the fields of near Earth object survey and optical imaging in China. NEOST is an 171.8 Schmidt type telescope with a 1.20 meter primary mirror and a 1.04 meter corrector,

  19. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Rare earth market remained depressed after the New Year affected by the weak demand. Purchaser preferred to consume inventories rather than increase the stockpile. There was a strong wait-and-see atmosphere in the market. Driven by the intense desire to sell out the commodities, traders further decreased their quoted price for rare earth products. Most persons in the market preferred to hold commodities and waited for a rise in the market after the Spring Festival.

  20. China rare earth market review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    March 21-31,2012 Rare earth market rebounded holistically recently. Price of didymium products rose slightly after being stable for one month. There were also increases in the prices of europium oxide and terbium oxide, which led to a rush by phosphor plants. The market of yttrium-medium and europium-rich minerals remained stagnant though the rare earth market recovered. Price of the mineral was around RMB ¥210,000-250,000/ton.

  1. China Rare Earth Market Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    November 20-30.2011 Weak demand resulted in the slack rare market. Consumers did not intend to rep earth enish inventories yet and transactions of rare earth products were stagnant. The market of didymium-related products was in the doldrums. Demand for dysprosium-related products was sluggish. Inquiries for europium oxide (99.9%) were few and dealings of the product were difficult.

  2. Solar influence on Earth's climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that variations in solar activity have had a significant influence on Earth's climate. However, the mechanisms responsible for a solar influence are still not known. One possibility is that atmospheric transparency is influenced by changing cloud properties...... and thereby influence the radiative properties of clouds. If the GCR-Cloud link is confirmed variations in galactic cosmic ray flux, caused by changes in solar activity and the space environment, could influence Earth's radiation budget....

  3. Earth observation for rangeland monitoring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available for the methodology is presented in Figure 1. Figure 1: Conceptual framework for the development of grass nutrient estimation models, using remote sensing at various scales Earth Observation for Rangeland Monitoring DR A RAMOELO, DR M CHO AND DR R MATHIEU CSIR... and canopy N conforms to the underlying geology (Figure 2). ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The authors would like to thank the Department of Science and Technology which contributed financially to this work through the grant ?Earth Observation Application Development...

  4. Long-length IBAD-MgO buffer layers for high performance RE-123 coated conductors by a large ion beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, S., E-mail: s_hanyu@fujikura.co.j [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan); Tashita, C.; Hayashida, T.; Hanada, Y.; Morita, K.; Sutoh, Y.; Nakamura, N.; Kutami, H.; Igarashi, M.; Kakimoto, K.; Iijima, Y.; Saitoh, T. [Fujikura Ltd., 1440 Mutsuzaki, Sakura, Chiba 285-8550 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    In Fujikura, a large-scale ion-beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) system with a large ion source has been employed to fabricate biaxially textured MgO films. The large-scale IBAD system has multiple deposition lanes where substrate tapes move, and therefore we have to optimize experimental conditions at each lane. We selected an appropriate deposition area and, finally, we successfully fabricated a 1 km-length IBAD-MgO film at a production rate of 1 km/h. We also studied pulsed-laser-deposited (PLD) CeO{sub 2} films directly on the IBAD-MgO films in spite of a large lattice mismatch between CeO{sub 2} and MgO. From transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations at an interface between MgO and CeO{sub 2} films, it is revealed that there is domain-matching-epitaxy relationship between MgO and CeO{sub 2} films. We also fabricated thin (1.0 {mu}m) and thick (3.7 {mu}m) PLD - GdBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (GdBCO) film on the long-length CeO{sub 2}/MgO substrate (over 150 m). Critical currents (I{sub c}) and current density (J{sub c}) were over 300 A and 3 MA/cm{sup 2} respectively for the thin GdBCO film and were about 645 A and 1.7 MA/cm{sup 2} for the thick GdBCO film at 77 K in self-field.

  5. Next-generation Digital Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Michael F; Guo, Huadong; Annoni, Alessandro; Bian, Ling; de Bie, Kees; Campbell, Frederick; Craglia, Max; Ehlers, Manfred; van Genderen, John; Jackson, Davina; Lewis, Anthony J; Pesaresi, Martino; Remetey-Fülöpp, Gábor; Simpson, Richard; Skidmore, Andrew; Wang, Changlin; Woodgate, Peter

    2012-07-10

    A speech of then-Vice President Al Gore in 1998 created a vision for a Digital Earth, and played a role in stimulating the development of a first generation of virtual globes, typified by Google Earth, that achieved many but not all the elements of this vision. The technical achievements of Google Earth, and the functionality of this first generation of virtual globes, are reviewed against the Gore vision. Meanwhile, developments in technology continue, the era of "big data" has arrived, the general public is more and more engaged with technology through citizen science and crowd-sourcing, and advances have been made in our scientific understanding of the Earth system. However, although Google Earth stimulated progress in communicating the results of science, there continue to be substantial barriers in the public's access to science. All these factors prompt a reexamination of the initial vision of Digital Earth, and a discussion of the major elements that should be part of a next generation.

  6. Helium in Earth's early core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Jephcoat, Andrew P.; Heber, Veronika S.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2013-11-01

    The observed escape of the primordial helium isotope, 3He, from the Earth's interior indicates that primordial helium survived the energetic process of planetary accretion and has been trapped within the Earth to the present day. Two distinct reservoirs in the Earth's interior have been invoked to account for variations in the 3He/4He ratio observed at the surface in ocean basalts: a conventional depleted mantle source and a deep, still enigmatic, source that must have been isolated from processing throughout Earth history. The Earth's iron-based core has not been considered a potential helium source because partitioning of helium into metal liquid has been assumed to be negligible. Here we determine helium partitioning in experiments between molten silicates and iron-rich metal liquids at conditions up to 16GPa and 3,000K. Analyses of the samples by ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry yield metal-silicate helium partition coefficients that range between 4.7×10-3 and 1.7×10-2 and suggest that significant quantities of helium may reside in the core. Based on estimated concentrations of primordial helium, we conclude that the early core could have incorporated enough helium to supply deep-rooted plumes enriched in 3He throughout the age of the Earth.

  7. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  8. Critical Doping for the Onset of Fermi-Surface Reconstruction by Charge-Density-Wave Order in the Cuprate Superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Badoux

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Seebeck coefficient S of the cuprate superconductor La_{2-x}Sr_{x}CuO_{4} (LSCO was measured in magnetic fields large enough to access the normal state at low temperatures, for a range of Sr concentrations from x=0.07 to x=0.15. For x=0.11, 0.12, 0.125, and 0.13, S/T decreases upon cooling to become negative at low temperatures. The same behavior is observed in the Hall coefficient R_{H}(T. In analogy with other hole-doped cuprates at similar hole concentrations p, the negative S and R_{H} show that the Fermi surface of LSCO undergoes a reconstruction caused by the onset of charge-density-wave modulations. Such modulations have indeed been detected in LSCO by x-ray diffraction in precisely the same doping range. Our data show that in LSCO this Fermi-surface reconstruction is confined to 0.085

  9. Spin dynamics of the high-T{sub c} cuprates in the metallic state as a result of dual itinerant. Localised nature of magnetism in strongly correlated CuO{sub 2} plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onufrieva, F.

    1994-12-31

    Spin dynamics in cuprates is analysed in the framework of a new theory (based on the t-t`-J model and the diagrammatic technique for Hubbard operators) developed to treat correctly strong electron correlations within CuO{sub 2} plane. The dynamic magnetic susceptibility is determined by two contributions different in nature, the ``localized`` and ``itinerant`` ones. The ``itinerant`` contribution reflects a response in the spin susceptibility on Cu related to the propagating carrier quasiparticles. The ``localized`` contribution reflects the existence of short-range correlations between localized spins. As a result of their competition, the spin dynamics evolves continuously within the metallic state from a normal-metal behaviour at high doping (overdoped regime) to a quantum spin-liquid-type dynamics with magnon-like excitations at low doping through a non-Fermi-liquid behaviour in all intermediate regimes. The picture of the spin dynamics in the metallic state of cuprates as a whole and in details in concern to INS and NMR experimental data is presented. Many exotic features of {chi}({Kappa},{omega}) revealed by these experiments find a natural explanation within the proposed scenario. (author). 64 refs., 17 figs.

  10. Strong electronic consequences of intercalation in cuprate superconductors: the case of a trigonal planar AuI(3) complex stabilized in the Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(y) lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munzarová, Markéta L; Hoffmann, Roald

    2002-05-15

    Recently, a molecular AuI(3) complex was stabilized in the interlayer space of the Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(y) (Bi2212) high-T(c) superconducting phase, adopting an exceptional D(3)(h) structure (Choy, J.-H.; et al. J. Phys.Chem. B 2000, 104, 7273). If the gold were formally Au(III), a strong Jahn-Teller distortion to T- and Y-shaped structures would be expected. In this work, we try to understand the structural preferences of AuI(3) in both the gas phase and the Bi2212 lattice, as well as the influence of the AuI(3) intercalation on the superconductor lattice. What we think actually happens is that there is an effective electron transfer from the s-type Bi lone pair to the gold, increasing the formal oxidation state of Bi from +3 to +5 and decreasing that of Au from +3 to +1. A trigonal Au(I) trihalide is just fine. The DFT results confirm in the Bi-rich regions the same kind of electron transfer as encountered on the EHT level of theory, but they reveal additional complexities of the problem. The effect of the Bi to intercalating molecule electron transfer on the cuprate layer may be important, quite apart from this specific example, in tuning superconductivity in the cuprates.

  11. Beyond Earth: Using Google Earth to Visualize Other Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancher, M.; Beyer, R.; Broxton, M.; Gorelick, N.; Kolb, E.; Weiss-Malik, M.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual globes have revolutionized the way we visualize and understand the Earth, but there are other planetary bodies that can be visualized as well. We will demonstrate the use of Google Earth, KML, and other modern mapping tools for visualizing data that's literally out of this world. Extra-terrestrial virtual globes are poised to revolutionize planetary science, bring an exciting new dimension to science education, and allow users to explore the increasingly breathtaking imagery being sent back to Earth by modern planetary science satellites. We will demonstrate several uses of the latest Google Earth and KML features to visualize planetary data. Global maps of planetary bodies---not just visible imagery maps, but also terrain maps, infra-red maps, minerological maps, and more---can be overlaid on the Google Earth globe using KML, and a number of sources are already making many such maps available. Coverage maps show the polygons that have been imaged by various satellite sensors, with links to the imagery and science data. High-resolution regionated ground overlays allow you to explore the most breathtaking imagery at full resolution, in its geological context, just as we have become accustomed to doing with Earth imagery. Panoramas from landed missions to the Moon and Mars can even be embedded, giving users a first-hand experience of other worlds. We will take you on a guided tour of how these features can best be used to visualize places other than the Earth, and provide pointers to KML from many sources---ourselves and others---that users can build on in constructing their own KML content of other planetary bodies. Using this paradigm for sharing geospatial data will not only enable planetary scientists to more easily build and share data within the scientific community, but will also provide an easy platform for public outreach and education efforts, and will easily allow anyone to layer geospatial information on top of planetary data.

  12. EarthLabs - Investigating Hurricanes: Earth's Meteorological Monsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2007-12-01

    Earth science is one of the most important tools that the global community needs to address the pressing environmental, social, and economic issues of our time. While, at times considered a second-rate science at the high school level, it is currently undergoing a major revolution in the depth of content and pedagogical vitality. As part of this revolution, labs in Earth science courses need to shift their focus from cookbook-like activities with known outcomes to open-ended investigations that challenge students to think, explore and apply their learning. We need to establish a new model for Earth science as a rigorous lab science in policy, perception, and reality. As a concerted response to this need, five states, a coalition of scientists and educators, and an experienced curriculum team are creating a national model for a lab-based high school Earth science course named EarthLabs. This lab course will comply with the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The content will focus on Earth system science and environmental literacy. The lab experiences will feature a combination of field work, classroom experiments, and computer access to data and visualizations, and demonstrate the rigor and depth of a true lab course. The effort is being funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. One of the prototype units of the course is Investigating Hurricanes. Hurricanes are phenomena which have tremendous impact on humanity and the resources we use. They are also the result of complex interacting Earth systems, making them perfect objects for rigorous investigation of many concepts commonly covered in Earth science courses, such as meteorology, climate, and global wind circulation. Students are able to use the same data sets, analysis tools, and research techniques that scientists employ in their research, yielding truly authentic learning opportunities. This month-long integrated unit uses hurricanes as the story line by

  13. Baltic Earth - Earth System Science for the Baltic Sea Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Markus; Rutgersson, Anna; Lehmann, Andreas; Reckermann, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    The Baltic Sea region, defined as its river catchment basin, spans different climate and population zones, from a temperate, highly populated, industrialized south with intensive agriculture to a boreal, rural north. It encompasses most of the Scandinavian Peninsula in the west; most of Finland and parts of Russia, Belarus, and the Baltic states in the east; and Poland and small parts of Germany and Denmark in the south. The region represents an old cultural landscape, and the Baltic Sea itself is among the most studied sea areas of the world. Baltic Earth is the new Earth system research network for the Baltic Sea region. It is the successor to BALTEX, which was terminated in June 2013 after 20 years and two successful phases. Baltic Earth stands for the vision to achieve an improved Earth system understanding of the Baltic Sea region. This means that the research disciplines of BALTEX continue to be relevant, i.e. atmospheric and climate sciences, hydrology, oceanography and biogeochemistry, but a more holistic view of the Earth system encompassing processes in the atmosphere, on land and in the sea as well as in the anthroposphere shall gain in importance in Baltic Earth. Specific grand research challenges have been formulated, representing interdisciplinary research questions to be tackled in the coming years. A major means will be scientific assessments of particular research topics by expert groups, similar to the BACC approach, which shall help to identify knowledge gaps and develop research strategies. Preliminary grand challenges and topics for which Working Groups have been installed include: • Salinity dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Land-Sea biogeochemical feedbacks in the Baltic Sea region • Natural hazards and extreme events in the Baltic Sea region • Understanding sea level dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Understanding regional variability of water and energy exchange • Utility of Regional Climate Models • Assessment of Scenario Simulations

  14. NASA Earth Exchange: A Collaborative Earth Science Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemani, R. R.; Votava, P.; Michaelis, A.; Melton, F. S.; Hashimoto, H.; Milesi, C.; Wang, W.; Ganguly, S.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) is a collaboration platform for the Earth science community creating new ways for scientific interaction and knowledge sharing. Funded through ARRA, NEX combines state-of-the-art supercomputing, Earth system modeling, workflow management, NASA remote sensing data feeds, and a social networking platform to deliver a complete work environment in which users can explore and analyze large datasets, run modeling codes, collaborate on new or existing projects, and quickly share results among the Earth science communities. The work environment provides NEX members with community supported modeling, analysis and visualization software in conjunction with datasets that are common to the Earth systems science domain. By providing data, software, and large-scale computing power together in a flexible framework, NEX reduces the need for duplicated efforts in downloading data, developing pre-processing software tools, and expanding local compute infrastructures—while accelerating fundamental research, development of new applications, and reducing project costs. The social networking platform provides a forum for NEX members to efficiently share datasets, results, algorithms, codes, and expertise with other members. Since all members' work environments reside on the collaborative platform, sharing may be done without the transfer of large volumes of data or the porting of complex codes—making NEX an ideal platform for building upon and exchanging research, and fostering innovation. Architecture of NEX integrating social networking, super-computing and data center. The prototyping facility allows users to test their models, algorithms prior to deploying them on the super-computers when required.

  15. Earth as an Extrasolar Planet: Earth Model Validation Using EPOXI Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Deming, Drake; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Charbonneau, David; Livengood, Timothy A.; Seager, Sara; Barry, Richard; Hearty, Thomas; hide

    2011-01-01

    The EPOXI Discovery Mission of Opportunity reused the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to obtain spatially and temporally resolved visible photometric and moderate resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of Earth. These remote observations provide a rigorous validation of whole disk Earth model simulations used to better under- stand remotely detectable extrasolar planet characteristics. We have used these data to upgrade, correct, and validate the NASA Astrobiology Institute s Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional line-by-line, multiple-scattering spectral Earth model (Tinetti et al., 2006a,b). This comprehensive model now includes specular reflectance from the ocean and explicitly includes atmospheric effects such as Rayleigh scattering, gas absorption, and temperature structure. We have used this model to generate spatially and temporally resolved synthetic spectra and images of Earth for the dates of EPOXI observation. Model parameters were varied to yield an optimum fit to the data. We found that a minimum spatial resolution of approx.100 pixels on the visible disk, and four categories of water clouds, which were defined using observed cloud positions and optical thicknesses, were needed to yield acceptable fits. The validated model provides a simultaneous fit to the Earth s lightcurve, absolute brightness, and spectral data, with a root-mean-square error of typically less than 3% for the multiwavelength lightcurves, and residuals of approx.10% for the absolute brightness throughout the visible and NIR spectral range. We extend our validation into the mid-infrared by comparing the model to high spectral resolution observations of Earth from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, obtaining a fit with residuals of approx.7%, and temperature errors of less than 1K in the atmospheric window. For the purpose of understanding the observable characteristics of the distant Earth at arbitrary viewing geometry and observing cadence, our validated

  16. A hypothesis of earth quake

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Yeong-Shyeong

    2008-01-01

    Without a model, it is impossible for a geophysicist to study the possibility of forecasting earth quakes. In order to make a simple model, we make a hypothesis of earth quakes. The hypothesis is: (i) There are two kinds of earth quakes, one is the triggered breaking (earth quake), the other is spontaneous breaking (earth quake). (ii) Most major quakes in continental plates Eurasian Plate, North America Plate, South America Plate, Africa Plate and Australia Plate are triggered breaking. (iii) These triggered quakes are triggered by the movements of high pressure centers and low pressure centers of the atmosphere on continental plates. (iv) How can the movements of the high pressure centers trigger a quake? It depends on the extent of the high pressure center and the speed of the movement. Here, we stress high pressure center instead of low pressure center because it is dominated by high pressure center mostly. Of course, the boundary of the plates must have stored enough energy to have quakes, that is, near t...

  17. Development Trend of Rare Earth Standardion Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jie; Lin Jirong; Zhao Fei; Zhang Xiuyan

    2004-01-01

    Rare earth standardization was developed along with rare earth industry.In recent decades, great advances have been made in China rare earth industry.This paper describes the status of rare earth standardization, problems existed and ways to perfect.Now the number of Chinese Rare Earth Standards has increased to 232 with expanding of the categories and covering scope of rare earth products.But the present standard system cannot be completely suited with rare earth production and trade, and not keep pace with the advance of technology.Standards are important rules in world trade and must be acted on.

  18. ESA's Earth Observation in Support of Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The intervention will present ESA's Earth Observation Programme and its contribution to Geoscience. ESA's Earth observation missions are mainly grouped into three categories: The Sentinel satellites in the context of the European Copernicus Programme, the scientific Earth Explorers and the meteorological missions. Developments, applications and scientific results for the different mission types will be addressed, along with overall trends and strategies. A special focus will be put on the Earth Explorers, who form the science and research element of ESA's Living Planet Programme and focus on the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and Earth's interior. In addition the operational Sentinel satellites have a huge potential for Geoscience. Earth Explorers' emphasis is also on learning more about the interactions between these components and the impact that human activity is having on natural Earth processes. The process of Earth Explorer mission selection has given the Earth science community an efficient tool for advancing the understanding of Earth as a system.

  19. Revolutions that made the earth

    CERN Document Server

    Lenton, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The Earth that sustains us today was born out of a few remarkable, near-catastrophic revolutions, started by biological innovations and marked by global environmental consequences. The revolutions have certain features in common, such as an increase in the complexity, energy utilization, and information processing capabilities of life. This book describes these revolutions, showing the fundamental interdependence of the evolution of life and its non-living environment. We would not exist unless these upheavals had led eventually to 'successful' outcomes - meaning that after each one, at length, a new stable world emerged. The current planet-reshaping activities of our species may be the start of another great Earth system revolution, but there is no guarantee that this one will be successful. This book explains what a successful transition through it might look like, if we are wise enough to steer such a course. This book places humanity in context as part of the Earth system, using a new scientific synthe...

  20. Earth's Heat Source - The Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Manuel, Oliver K

    2009-01-01

    The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.