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Sample records for earth radioactivity measurements

  1. The measuring complex for detection of radioactive waste in near-earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulin, S. E.; Vlasik, K. F.; Grachev, V. M.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Shustov, A. E.; Chernishova, I. V.; Bakhtigaraev, N. S.; Rykhlova, L. V.; Kazantsev, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Description of a measuring complex intended for detection and identification of radioactive waste in the near-earth space is presented. The complex consists of several xenon gamma-ray spectrometers, developed on the base of the thin-walled impulse ionization chamber with sensitive volume of four litres. Their main physics - technical characteristics are considered. An estimation probability for detection of various elements comprising radioactive waste by means of the measuring complex on board the spacecraft “Meteor” is given.

  2. Earth Radioactivity Measurements with a Deep Ocean Anti-neutrino Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Dye, S T; Learned, J G; Maricic, J; Matsuno, S; Pakvasa, S; Varner, G; Wilcox, M

    2006-01-01

    We consider the detector size, location, depth, backgrounds, and radio-purity required of a mid-Pacific deep-ocean instrument to accomplish the twin goals of making a definitive measurement of the electron anti-neutrino flux due to uranium and thorium decays from Earth's mantle and core, and of testing the hypothesis for a natural nuclear reactor at the core of Earth. We take the experience with the KamLAND detector in Japan as our baseline for sensitivity and background estimates. We conclude that an instrument adequate to accomplish these tasks should have an exposure of at least 10 kilotonne-years (kT-y), should be placed at least at 4 km depth, may be located close to the Hawaiian Islands (no significant background from them), and should aim for KamLAND radio-purity levels, except for radon where it should be improved by a factor of at least 40. With an exposure of 10 kT-y we should achieve a 24% measurement of the U/Th content of the mantle plus core. Exposure at multiple ocean locations for testing late...

  3. Radioactivity and its measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Garfinkel, S B

    1980-01-01

    Begins with a description of the discovery of radioactivity and the historic research of such pioneers as the Curies and Rutherford. After a discussion of the interactions of &agr;, &bgr; and &ggr; rays with matter, the energetics of the different modes of nuclear disintegration are considered in relation to the Einstein mass-energy relationship as applied to radioactive transformations. Radiation detectors and radioactivity measurements are also discussed

  4. Radioactivity measurements principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, W B; Spernol, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors have addressed the basic need for internationally consistent standards and methods demanded by the new and increasing use of radioactive materials, radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds. Particular emphasis is given to the basic and practical problems that may be encountered in measuring radioactivity. The text provides information and recommendations in the areas of radiation protection, focusing on quality control and the precautions necessary for the preparation and handling of radioactive substances. New information is also presented on the applications of both traditiona

  5. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtgen, C

    2001-04-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported.

  6. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtgen, C

    2002-04-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination and low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain and improve the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are reported.

  7. Mass measurement of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, H J; Scheidenberger, C

    2004-01-01

    The highest precision in mass measurements on short-lived radionuclides is obtained using trapping and cooling techniques. Here, the experimental storage ring (ESR) at GSI/Darmstadt and the tandem Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN play an important role. Status and recent results on mass measurements of radioactive nuclides with ESR and ISOLTRAP are summarized.

  8. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  9. Measurement and Calculation of Rare Earth Mine Tailings Radioactivity%稀土尾矿砂放射性活度的测量与计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苑超; 周程; 朱晓翔; 杨师俨; 戴耀东

    2015-01-01

    It is of great significance to measure and calculate rare earth tailing radioactivity for the develop-ment of appropriate standards and exemption disposal. The total activity concentration of the three natural decay series (uranium series, thorium series, actinium series) was analyzed under the equilibrium and disequi-librium state according to the selected characteristic γ-rays. At the same time, we calculated the total activity concentration and the radioactivity for each radionuclide based on the general kinetic equations of decay chain and studied the trend of each radionuclide of thorium-series under different degrees of disequilibrium with time. The results demonstrated that the total radioactivity of α and β calculated in disequilibrium state was more closed to the actual measurement results compared to that in equilibrium state. In addition, the activity changes with time of thorium series in disequilibrium state are related to the initial activity concentration of the mother nuclide and 228Ra. If the activity concentration of 228Ra is less than that of 232Th, the total activity peak will be 10 times to maternal activity and appear after 60 a when the thorium series become balance again. If the activity concentration of 228Ra is greater than that of 232Th, the maximum total activity will appear in 3.82 a, and will be the sum of 4.57 times of the initial activity concentration of the mother nuclide and 5.25 times of the initial activity concentration of the first daughter 228Ra. Therefore, the rare earth tailings have been in disequilibrium state, and its total activity concentration should be determined based on the activity concentration of several feature radionuclides. In addition, the maximum value of the activity concentration is profitable to judge whether the activity concentration is fit with relevant regulations and standards.%准确测量并计算稀土尾矿砂的放射性活度浓度及其变化规律对制定相应的豁免标准和日后

  10. Radioactivity measurements for the ERMES project at the STELLA facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallese B.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available STELLA (SubTErranean Low Level Assay is the ultra low background facility of the Gran Sasso National Laboratories (L.N.G.S. in Italy. It is mainly devoted to material screening and rare events physics due to its very low radioactive background. Nevertheless, also environmental samples are measured within the collaboration with the ERMES (Environmental Radioactivity Monitoring for Earth Sciences project. After a short description of the facility some on-going applications within the ERMES project will be briefly presented. The usefulness of doing environmental radioactivity measurements in a deep underground laboratory will be shortly discussed.

  11. Measurements of radioactive contaminants in semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Murray, Conal E.; McNally, Brendan D.

    2016-12-01

    The emission of alpha particles from materials used to manufacture semiconductors can contribute substantially to the single-event upset rate. The alpha particles originate from contamination in the materials, or from radioactive isotopes, themselves. In this review paper, we discuss the sources of the radioactivity and the measurement methods to detect the emitted particles.

  12. Nuclear Astrophysics Measurements with Radioactive Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael S.; Ernst Rehm, K.

    Radioactive nuclei play an important role in a diverse range of astrophysical phenomena including the early universe, the sun, red giant stars, nova explosions, X-ray bursts, supernova explosions, and supermassive stars. Measurements of reactions with beams of short-lived radioactive nuclei can, for the first time, probe the nuclear reactions occurring in these cosmic phenomena. This article describes the astrophysical motivation for experiments with radioactive beams, the techniques to produce these beams and perform astrophysically relevant measurements, results from recent experiments, and plans for future facilities.

  13. Do radioactive half-lives vary with the Earth-to-Sun distance?

    CERN Document Server

    Hardy, J C; Iacob, V E

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Jenkins, Fischbach and collaborators have claimed evidence that radioactive half-lives vary systematically over a +/- 0.1% range as a function of the oscillating distance between the Earth and the Sun, based on multi-year activity measurements. We have avoided the time-dependent instabilities to which such measurements are susceptible by directly measuring the half-life of 198Au (t1/2 = 2.695 d) on seven occasions spread out in time to cover the complete range of Earth-Sun distances. We observe no systematic oscillations in half-life and can set an upper limit on their amplitude of +/- 0.02%.

  14. An overview on measurements of natural radioactivity in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are always exposed during their lives to ionizing radiation arising outside and within the earth. The exposure to these radiation occurs from natural sources such as radioactive elements in rocks and soil, internal exposure form radioactive elements through water, food and air and cosmic rays entering from outer space to earth's atmosphere. About 87% of the radiation dose received by human beings is due to natural radiation, it is essential to assess the radiation doses in order to control possible health effects from such natural sources. In this regard, a number of articles have been appeared for Malaysia in international research journals, which have been reviewed and complied in this article. Most of these articles are about the measurement of activity concentrations of primordial (238U, 232Th, 226Ra and 40K and anthropogenic (137Cs radionuclide's and gamma dose rate in environmental samples using HPGe and NaI (Tl survey meter.

  15. NKS 1999 intercomparison of measurements of radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange Fogh, C. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2000-12-01

    34 laboratories have returned radioactivity measurements on six different environmental samples. The samples were analysed for their content of gamma emitters, Sr-90, transuranics and Tc-99. The samples materials are described and the results presented. Some scatter was observed in measurements of Cs-137 in low-level samples such as dry milk, meat and hay. The scatter was less pronounced for sediments and seaweed material that had higher levels of radioactivity. In general, the most of the results were consistent with a few laboratories reporting outlying values. An exception was seawater where no clear agreement could be found for the activity of Cs-137. (au)

  16. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Totsuka, Yumi; Murata, Jiro

    2014-03-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years), Cs-137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days), and Sr-90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  17. Nondestructive measurement of environmental radioactive strontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiba Shuntaro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The main radioactivity concerns after the accident are I-131 (half-life: 8.0 days, Cs-134 (2.1 years, Cs-137 (30 years, Sr-89 (51 days, and Sr-90 (29 years. We are aiming to establish a new nondestructive measurement and detection technique that will enable us to realize a quantitative evaluation of strontium radioactivity without chemical separation processing. This technique is needed to detect radiation contained in foods, environmental water, and soil, to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to radiation.

  18. Measures of radioactivity: a tool for understanding statistical data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Montalbano, Vera

    2012-01-01

    A learning path on radioactivity in the last class of high school is presented. An introduction to radioactivity and nuclear phenomenology is followed by measurements of natural radioactivity. Background and weak sources are monitored for days or weeks. The data are analyzed in order to understand the importance of statistical analysis in modern physics.

  19. Radioactivity measurements using storage phosphor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Y.T. [NeuTek, Darnestown, MD (United States); Hwang, J. [Advanced Technologies and Labs. International, Rockville, MD (United States); Hutchinson, M.R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    We propose to apply a recently developed charged particle radiation imaging concept in bio-medical research for fast, cost-effective characterization of radionuclides in contaminated sites and environmental samples. This concept utilizes sensors with storage photostimulable phosphor (SPP) technology as radiation detectors. They exhibit high sensitivity for all types of radiation and the response is linear over a wide dynamic range (>10{sup 5}), essential for quantitative analysis. These new sensors have an Active area of up to 35 cm x 43 cm in size and a spatial resolution as fine as 50 {mu}m. They offer considerable promise as large area detectors for fast characterization of radionuclides with an added ability to locate and identify hot spots. Tests with SPP sensors have found that a single alpha particle effect can be observed and an alpha field of 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} or a beta activity of 0.1 dpm/mm{sup 2} or gamma radiation of few {mu}R/hr can all be measured in minutes. Radioactive isotopes can further be identified by energy discrimination which is accomplished by placing different thicknesses of filter material in front of the sensor plate. For areas with possible neutron contamination, the sensors can be coupled to a neutron to charged particle converter screen, such as dysprosium foil to detect neutrons. Our study has shown that this approach can detect a neutron flux of 1 n/cm{sup 2}s or lower, again with only minutes of exposure time. The utilization of these new sensors can significantly reduce the time and cost required for many site characterization and environmental monitoring tasks. The {open_quotes}exposure{close_quotes} time for mapping radioactivity in an environmental sample may be in terms of minutes and offer a positional resolution not obtainable with presently used counting equipment. The resultant digital image will lend itself to ready analysis.

  20. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  1. Measurement Technology on 200 Liters Barrels of Radioactive Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Lei; SHAO; Jie-wen; LIU; Da-ming; LIU; Hong-bin; CHENG; Yi-mei; HE; Li-xia; ZHU; Li-qun

    2012-01-01

    <正>The measurement device on 200 liters barrel of radioactive waste is designed following the rule of orderly measurement automatically, by using the technology of non-destructive to measure the mass of radioactive waste produced from fuel cycle. Device objects as shown in Fig. 1, which consists of the

  2. Radioactivity measurement of radioactive contaminated soil by using a fiber-optic radiation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hanyoung; Kim, Rinah; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    A fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) was developed to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. The FORS was fabricated using an inorganic scintillator (Lu,Y)2SiO5:Ce (LYSO:Ce), a mixture of epoxy resin and hardener, aluminum foil, and a plastic optical fiber. Before its real application, the FORS was tested to determine if it performed adequately. The test result showed that the measurements by the FORS adequately followed the theoretically estimated values. Then, the FORS was applied to measure the gamma radiation from radioactive contaminated soil. For comparison, a commercial radiation detector was also applied to measure the same soil samples. The measurement data were analyzed by using a statistical parameter, the critical level to determine if net radioactivity statistically different from background was present in the soil sample. The analysis showed that the soil sample had radioactivity distinguishable from background.

  3. Natural radioactivity measurements in Pahang State, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabdo, Hamman Tukur; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Sanusi, Mohamad

    2016-06-01

    This study was aimed at providing the baseline data of terrestrial gamma dose rates and natural radioactivity to assess the corresponding health risk in the ambient environment of the Pahang State. Terrestrial gamma radiation (TGR) from 640 locations was measured with the mean value found to be 176 ± 5 nGy h(-1). Ninety-eight soil samples were analysed using a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe), and the mean concentrations of the radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K are 110 ± 3, 151 ± 5 and 542 ± 51 Bq kg(-1), respectively.(226)Ra and (232)Th concentrations were found to be three times the world average, while that of (40)K is quite higher than the world average value. The acid-intrusive geological formation has the highest mean concentrations for (226)Ra (215 ± 6 Bq kg(-1)), (232)Th (384 ± 12 Bq kg(-1)) and (40)K (1564 ± 153 Bq kg(-1)). The radium equivalent activities (Req) and the external hazard index (Hex) for the various soil types were also calculated. Some of the soil types were found to have values exceeding the internationally recommended levels of 370 Bq kg(-1) and the unity value, respectively.

  4. Natural radioactivity and Rare Earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia, E-mail: nadia_walley5@hotmail.co [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt); El-Shershaby, Amal [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt); Afifi, Sofia [Nuclear Materials Authority (Egypt); Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman [Department of physics, Faculty of girls for Art, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Heliopolis, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-05-15

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150 km{sup 2} of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg{sup -1} has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th and from 0 to 7894.6 BqKg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra{sub eq}), dose rate (D{sub R}) and external hazard (H{sub ex}) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  5. Natural radioactivity and rare earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-05-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150km(2) of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg(-1) has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7BqKg(-1) for (238)U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2BqKg(-1) for (232)Th and from 0 to 7894.6BqKg(-1) for (40)K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), dose rate (D(R)) and external hazard (H(ex)) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries.

  6. Bioleaching of rare earth and radioactive elements from red mud using Penicillium tricolor RM-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Lian, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate biological leaching of rare earth elements (REEs) and radioactive elements from red mud, and to evaluate the radioactivity of the bioleached red mud used for construction materials. A filamentous, acid-producing fungi named RM-10, identified as Penicillium tricolor, is isolated from red mud. In our bioleaching experiments by using RM-10, a total concentration of 2% (w/v) red mud under one-step bioleaching process was generally found to give the maximum leaching ratios of the REEs and radioactive elements. However, the highest extraction yields are achieved under two-step bioleaching process at 10% (w/v) pulp density. At pulp densities of 2% and 5% (w/v), red mud processed under both one- and two-step bioleaching can meet the radioactivity regulations in China.

  7. Radioactivity Measurement of Short Life Nuclide 89Rb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The radioactivity of short life nuclide 89Rb produced by fast radiochemical separation was measured by the digital coincidence counting (DCC) system. In this experiment, there were a large quantity of impurities

  8. Determining radioactive aerosol concentrations using a surface radioactive contamination measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, R; Johnova, K; Kozlovska, M; Otahal, P; Vosahlikova, I

    2015-06-01

    For experiments with dispersed radioactive aerosols in a radon-aerosol chamber (RAC), it is desirable to know the activity of the radioactive aerosols applied in the RAC. A COLIBRI TTC survey metre with an SABG-15+ probe (Canberra, USA) was purchased for this purpose. The probe is designed for surface contamination measurements, and it is intended to measure the activity of aerosols deposited on the filters during experiments in the RAC. Since the probe is calibrated in a different geometry, its response in the authors' experimental geometry was simulated by a Monte Carlo method. The authors present a Monte Carlo model using MCNPX and an experimental verification of this probe model.

  9. Partial radiogenic heat model for Earth revealed by geoneutrino measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamland Collaboration; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Decowski, M. P.

    2011-09-01

    The Earth has cooled since its formation, yet the decay of radiogenic isotopes, and in particular uranium, thorium and potassium, in the planet's interior provides a continuing heat source. The current total heat flux from the Earth to space is 44.2+/-1.0TW, but the relative contributions from residual primordial heat and radiogenic decay remain uncertain. However, radiogenic decay can be estimated from the flux of geoneutrinos, electrically neutral particles that are emitted during radioactive decay and can pass through the Earth virtually unaffected. Here we combine precise measurements of the geoneutrino flux from the Kamioka Liquid-Scintillator Antineutrino Detector, Japan, with existing measurements from the Borexino detector, Italy. We find that decay of uranium-238 and thorium-232 together contribute TW to Earth's heat flux. The neutrinos emitted from the decay of potassium-40 are below the limits of detection in our experiments, but are known to contribute 4TW. Taken together, our observations indicate that heat from radioactive decay contributes about half of Earth's total heat flux. We therefore conclude that Earth's primordial heat supply has not yet been exhausted.

  10. Use of Low Radioactive Rare-earth Waste for Sewage Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Low radioactive rare-earth waste (containing 232Th,specific activity 5 000-8 000 Bq*kg-1) were diluted 20 times by cement,sand and carbide ash and were made into special cement.The radioactivity of this special cement complied with the healthy protect standard for radioactive materials (GB6566-86).Test results showed that this special cement could lower COD,the degradation rate increased as the time went on.In acidic medium,this special cement could remove E Coli effectively.Applying aeration and adding lumps of cement,the degradation of COD versus time complied with Logistic model through fitting by computer.The two "S" curves indicated that aeration and adding lumps of cement had synergistic action on sewage treatment.

  11. Measurement and analysis of radioactive substances; Mesure et analyse de substances radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Here are gathered the abstracts presented to the 3. summer university of the year 2001 whose main themes were the destructive (5 conferences) and nondestructive (8 conferences) analyses applied to nuclear industry. The points of view of different organisms (as DSIN: Directorate for the Safety of Nuclear Installations, IPSN: Institute of Nuclear Protection and Safety, OPRI: Office of Protection against Ionizing Radiations, TUI: Institute for Transuranium Elements, COGEMA, EDF: Electric Utilities, ANDRA: French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management, CRLC Val d'Aurelle, France) concerning the needs involved in nuclear facilities control, the methods of radionuclide speciation in use internationally, the measurements and analyses of radioactive substances are given too as well as some general concepts concerning 1)the laser-matter interaction 2)the ions production 3)the quality applied to the measurements and analyses 4)the standard in activity metrology. (O.M.)

  12. Natural radioactivity measurements in building materials used in Samsun, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufan, M Çagatay; Disci, Tugba

    2013-01-01

    In this study, radioactivity levels of 35 different samples of 11 commonly used building materials in Samsun were measured by using a gamma spectrometry system. The analysis carried out with the high purity Germanium gamma spectrometry system. Radioactivity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K range from 6 to 54 Bq kg(-1), 5 to 88 Bq kg(-1) and 6 to 1070 Bq kg(-1), respectively. From these results, radium equivalent activities, gamma indexes, absorbed dose rates and annual effective doses were calculated for all samples. Obtained results were compared with the available data, and it was concluded that all the investigated materials did not have radiological risk.

  13. Challenges in proton radioactivity studies - new emitters in the rare earth region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzywacz, Robert

    2004-10-01

    Proton emitter studies offer a sensitive probe of the wave function composition for nuclei beyond the proton drip-line. In particular, the experiments on proton radioactivities in the rare earth region are allowing us to study the evolution of proton-emitting states as a function of changing deformation, from nearly spherical (e.g.^150Lu [1] or ^145Tm [2]) to strongly deformed (e.g. ^131Eu [3], ^135Tb [4] or ^141Ho [5]) shapes. The link between the measured observables (decay lifetimes and energies) and structure of the nuclei is provided by recently developed theories, which are able to model the proton tunneling process through the three dimensional potential barrier, see refs [6-8]. Very high detection efficiency and high sensitivity enable experiments at extremely low production cross sections, e.g. at the nanobarn level for the observation of ^135Tb in a (p6n) fusion-evaporation reaction channel [4]. Recent discoveries of proton radioactive nuclei will be reported. The experimental challenges will be illustrated with the example of the identification of new odd-odd emitter ^144Tm at the Recoil Mass Spectrometer [9] of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ^144Tm events were found in a weak ( 10 nb) p5n channel of the fusion reaction of ^58Ni beam at 340 MeV on a ^92Mo target. The observed decay energy of about 1.8 MeV and the half-life of the order of 1 μs suggest proton emission from the πh_11/2 orbital dominating the π-ν wave function. The detection of this very short proton emitter was made possible by use of a double-sided silicon strip detector connected to a fast data acquisition system [10] based on Digital Signal Processing. [1] P.G. Sellin et al., Phys. Rev. C47, 1933 (1993). [2] M. Karny et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90 , 012502 (2003). [3] A.A. Sonzogni et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 , 1116 (1999). [4] P.J. Woods et al., Phys. Rev. C69 , 051302(R) (2004). [5] K. Rykaczewski, K. P. et al., in Proc. of Int. Conf. on Nuclear Structure ``Mapping the Triangle

  14. EVALUATION OF RADIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF RARE-EARTH METALS WITH NATURAL RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Lisachenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the rare-earth metals with natural radioactive isotopes, lantan, lutetium and samarium are allocated a relatively high specific activity. The formation of the additional external radiation keep it close to the significance of the materials to the radiation categories of materials with a high content of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium family, lanthanum value is much less. Samarium, with acceptable toxicology content in the working area, forms the internal exposure to the limits for professionals. The use of these elements in science and industry requires the radiation-hygienic evaluation.

  15. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes with a Penning trap mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Bollen, G; Audi, G; Beck, D; Herfurth, F; Kluge, H J; Kohl, A; Lunney, M D; Moore, R B; De Saint-Simon, M; Schark, E; Schwarz, S; Szerypo, R B

    1999-01-01

    Penning trap mass measurements on short-lived isotopes are performed with the ISOLTRAP mass spectrometer at the radioactive beam facility ISOLDE/CERN. In the last years the applicability of the spectrometer has been considerably extended by the installation of an RFQ trap ion beam buncher and a new cooler Penning trap, which is operated as an isobar separator. These improvements allowed for the first time measurements on isotopes of rare earth elements and on isotopes with Z=80-85. In all cases an accuracy of $\\delta$m/m approximately =1$\\cdot$10$^{-7}$was achieved. (20 refs).

  16. In-situ measurements of the radioactive fallout deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korun, M.; Martinčič, R.; Pucelj, B.

    1991-02-01

    An improved method to determine radionuclide concentrations in soil and the radioactive fallout deposit is presented. The approach is based on in-situ gamma-ray spectrometric measurements performed with a portable high resolution gamma spectrometer and on calculations of the depth distribution based on the energy dependence of the attenuation of gamma rays in soil. The results are compared with laboratory analysis of collected soil samples.

  17. Precision mass measurements of radioactive nuclei at JYFLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, S; Eronen, T; Hager, U; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Kankainen, A; Moore, I D; Pentillä, H; Rinta-Antila, S; Rissanen, J; Saastamoinen, A; Sonoda, T; Weber, C; Äystö, J

    2007-01-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP was used to measure the atomic masses of radioactive nuclei with an uncertainty better than 10 keV. The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient nuclei around the N = Z line were measured to improve the understanding of the rp-process path and the SbSnTe cycle. Furthermore, the masses of the neutron-rich gallium (Z = 31) to palladium (Z = 46) nuclei have been measured. The physics impacts on the nuclear structure and the r-process paths are reviewed. A better understanding of the nuclear deformation is presented by studying the pairing energy around A = 100.

  18. GEMS: Underwater spectrometer for long-term radioactivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartini, Ludovica, E-mail: ludovica.sartini@ingv.i [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Genoa University, Genoa (Italy); Simeone, Francesco; Pani, Priscilla [' Sapienza' University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sect.Roma, Roma (Italy); Lo Bue, Nadia; Marinaro, Giuditta [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Grubich, Andry; Lobko, Alexander [Institute for Nuclear Problems (INP), Belarus State University, Minsk (Belarus); Etiope, Giuseppe [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Capone, Antonio [' Sapienza' University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sect.Roma, Roma (Italy); Favali, Paolo [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), Sect.Roma 2, Roma (Italy); Gasparoni, Francesco; Bruni, Federico [Tecnomare S.p.A., Venice (Italy)

    2011-01-21

    GEMS (Gamma Energy Marine Spectrometer) is a prototype of an autonomous radioactivity sensor for underwater measurements, developed in the framework for a development of a submarine telescope for neutrino detection (KM3NeT Design Study Project). The spectrometer is highly sensitive to gamma rays produced by {sup 40}K decays but it can detect other natural (e.g., {sup 238}U,{sup 232}Th) and anthropogenic radio-nuclides (e.g., {sup 137}Cs). GEMS was firstly tested and calibrated in the laboratory using known sources and it was successfully deployed for a long-term (6 months) monitoring at a depth of 3200 m in the Ionian Sea (Capo Passero, offshore Eastern Sicily). The instrument recorded data for the whole deployment period within the expected specifications. This monitoring provided, for the first time, a continuous time-series of radioactivity in deep-sea.

  19. Hair radioactivity as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, W. H.; Pories, W. J.; Fratianne, R. B.; Flynn, A.

    1972-01-01

    Since many radioisotopes accumulate in hair, this tropism was investigated by comparing the radioactivity of shaved with plucked hair collected from rats at various time intervals up to 24 hrs after intravenous injection of the ecologically important radioisotopes, iodine-131, manganese-54, strontium-85, and zinc-65. The plucked hair includes the hair follicles where biochemical transformations are taking place. The data indicate a slight surge of each radioisotpe into the hair immediately after injection, a variation of content of each radionuclide in the hair, and a greater accumulation of radioactivity in plucked than in shaved hair. These results have application not only to hair as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes, but also to tissue damage and repair at the hair follicle.

  20. Study of Radioactivity Measurement Using Well Type NaI(Tl) γ Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Xiao-qing; YANG; Qiao-ling; DIAO; Li-jun; CHEN; Xi-lin; LV; Xiao-xia

    2015-01-01

    Using a well type NaI(Tl)gamma spectrometer,the radioactivity of 125I was measured with absolute measurement method.125I radioactive source was prepared with the same batch of radioactive solution,and its activity range is 102-104 Bq.By different strength activity measurement

  1. A study of environmental radioactivity measurements for Cankiri, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapdan, Enis; Taskin, Halim; Kam, Erol; Osmanlioglu, A Erdal; Karahan, Gursel; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2012-07-01

    This study is the first to assess the level of background radiation for the Cankiri province of Turkey. Indoor air radon concentrations were determined using Columbia Resin-39 nuclear track detectors and the average (222)Rn activity was found to be 44 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 1.1 mSv). Measurements of gamma doses in outdoor air were performed using a portable plastic scintillation detector and the average gamma absorbed dose rate was found to be 8 μR h(-1) (corresponding to an annual effective dose of 87.7 μSv). Radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were measured through gamma-ray spectrometry and the average activities were determined as 17.7, 22.3, 357 and 4.1 Bq kg(-1) for the radionuclides (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The average annual effective dose from the natural radioactivity sources ((238)U series, (232)Th series and (40)K) was calculated to be 44.4 μSv. Radioactivity levels of drinking water samples were carried out using a low-background proportional counter and the average gross alpha and beta activities were obtained as 0.25 and 0.26 Bq l(-1), respectively (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 184 μSv). The average radon concentrations in indoor air and the average radionuclide activities in soil were found to be lower than most Turkish cities while higher levels of outdoor gamma dose rate and water radioactivity were observed. The results of this study showed that the region's background radioactivity level differs considerably from the reported data for Turkish cities.

  2. Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity field measurements at Olympic Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B.; Wilkis, M.; O`Brein, R.; Ganakas, G.

    1993-12-01

    On July 1, 1991 the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) commenced a two year project entitled - Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity, funded by a Mining and Quarrying Occupational Health and Safety Committee - grant (submission No. 9138). This study was set out to measure airborne radioactivity size distributions in an underground uranium mine, in order to provide better estimates of the health risks associated with inhalation of airborne radiation in the work place. These measurements included both active and passive measurement of radon gas, continuous and spot sample of radon daughter levels, as well as wire screen diffusion battery measurements of the radon daughter size distributions. The results of measurements at over 50 sites within the mine are reported, together with the calculated dose conversion factors derived from the older dosimetric models and from the new ICRP lung model using the computer code RADEP. The results showed that the ventilation is relatively uniform within the mine and the radon daughter concentrations are kept to less than 20% of the equilibrium concentration. The radon and radon daughter concentrations showed marked variability with both time and position within the mine. It is concluded that the present radiation protection methods and dose conversion factors used in Australia provide a good estimate of the radiation risk for the inhalation of radon progeny. 29 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs.

  3. Is natural radioactivity and ionizing radiation necessary for us and our earth?; Sind (natuerliche) Radioaktivitaet und ionisierende Strahlung fuer uns und unsere Erde notwendig?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelkle, Hansruedi [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Physikdepartement

    2017-04-01

    Artificial radioactive materials and ionizing radiation are used in medicine, industry and science. Is there also a purpose in the sense of Aristoteles that nothing on earth is unnecessary? The contribution discusses examples of natural radioactivity in the atmosphere, the production of geothermal energy and the role of radioactivity and ionizing radiation in evolution.

  4. GEMS: Underwater spectrometer for long-term radioactivity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    GEMS (Gamma Energy Marine Spectrometer) is a prototype of an autonomous radioactivity sensor for underwater measurements, developed in the framework of the KM3NeT Design Study (DS) EC project. The spectrometer is sensitive to gamma rays produced by 40K decays and it is also able to detect other natural (e.g., 238U, 232Th) and anthropogenic radionuclides (e.g. 137Cs). The decay of 40K, contained in sea salt, particulate and sediments, is one of the main sources of photon background...

  5. Radioactivity measurements of sewerage in 4 hospitals from Chongqing,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xian-ying; SHU Wei-qun; CAO Jia; LIU Yi-min

    2007-01-01

    @@ Monitoring of any release of radioactive materials to the environment is necessary for the environmental protection. Measurement of medical radioactive elements in the hospital sewerage is very important too. However, few study of radioactivity in hospital sewerage has been carried out or reported.

  6. On the thermal and magnetic histories of Earth and Venus: Influences of melting, radioactivity, and conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, P.; Bercovici, D.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the thermal evolution of Earth's interior is uncertain and controversial in many respects, from the interpretation of petrologic observations used to infer the temperature and dynamics of the interior, to the physics and material properties governing heat transport. The thermal history of Venus is even more uncertain, but the lack of a dynamo at present in an otherwise similar planet may provide additional constraints on terrestrial planet evolution. In this paper a one dimensional thermal history model is derived that includes heat loss due to mantle melt eruption at the surface to explore its influence on the thermal and magnetic history of Earth and Venus. We show that the thermal catastrophe of Earth's mantle, which occurs for a present day Urey ratio of 1/3 and convective heat loss exponent of β=1/3, can be avoided by assuming a rather high core heat flow of ∼15 TW. This core heat flow also avoids the new core paradox by allowing for the geodynamo to be thermally powered prior to inner core growth for core thermal conductivities as high as 130 Wm K. Dynamo regime diagrams demonstrate that the mantle melt eruption rate has a minor effect on the history of mobile lid planets due to the efficiency of plate tectonic convective heat loss. However, if Earth were in a stagnant lid regime prior to 2.5 Ga, as has been proposed, then at least ∼5% of mantle melt is required to erupt in order to thermally power the paleodynamo at that time. Dynamo regime diagrams for stagnant lid Venus models indicate that more than half of the melt generated in the mantle is required to erupt in order to overcome the insulation imposed by the stagnant lid and drive a dynamo. This implies that with an Earth-like mantle radioactivity the Venusian dynamo shut down ∼0.3 Ga for an eruption efficiency of 50%, and ∼3 Ga for an eruption efficiency of zero. Consequently, a stagnant lid alone does not prevent a core dynamo if melting of the upper mantle provides a substantial

  7. IAEA's ALMERA network: Supporting the quality of environmental radioactivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osvath, I; Tarjan, S; Pitois, A; Groening, M; Osborn, D

    2016-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency coordinates and provides methodological and analytical quality support to the network of Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (ALMERA), comprising 150 laboratories in 84 countries. Annual proficiency tests (PTs) are organized for the network laboratories using sets of different samples typically encountered in environmental and food monitoring laboratories. The PT system is designed to respond to the needs of the network for rapid response and reliable measurement results, and to metrological principles and international standards and guides. Comparison of performance of ALMERA and non-ALMERA laboratories in PTs indicates that the "PT - method development - training - PT" strategy adopted for capability building is beneficial to the network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural radioactivity measurements of building materials in Baotou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Caifeng; Lu, Xinwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Natural radioactivity due to (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the common building materials collected from Baotou city of Inner Mongolia, China was measured using gamma-ray spectrometry. The radiation hazard of the studied building materials was estimated by the radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), internal hazard index (H(in)) and annual effective dose (AED). The concentrations of the natural radionuclides and Ra(eq) in the studied samples were compared with the corresponding results of other countries. The Ra(eq) values of the building materials are below the internationally accepted values (370 Bq kg(-1)). The values of H(in) in all studied building materials are less than unity. The AEDs of all measured building materials are at an acceptable level.

  9. A low-cost miniaturised detector for environmental radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplin, Karen; Briggs, Aaron; Hastings, Peter; Harrison, R. Giles; Marlton, Graeme; Baird, Adam

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a low-cost (£ few hundred), low-power (40mA), low-mass (30g) detector for environmental radioactivity measurements, using scintillator and solid state technology. The detector can measure energy and therefore has the capability to distinguish between different types of energetic particle. Results from recent tests, when our detector was integrated with a meteorological radiosonde system, and flew on a balloon up to 25km, identified the transition region between energetic particles near the surface, dominated by terrestrial gamma emissions, and higher-energy particles in the free troposphere from cosmic rays. The detector can be used with Bluetooth technology for remote monitoring, which is particularly useful for hazardous areas. It is also small and cheap enough to be used in sensor networks for a wide range of applications, from atmospheric science to disaster monitoring.

  10. Environmental radioactivity measurements in Kastamonu region of northern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Erol; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2007-04-01

    Located in the north-western part of Turkey, the province of Kastamonu has lately been receiving national attention because of its cultural and touristic attractions. This study assesses the environmental radioactivity levels of the region through measurements of indoor radon concentrations and indoor/outdoor gamma absorbed dose in air and radionuclide activities in surface soil and drinking water. The indoor (222)Rn activity concentration was found to be 98.4 Bq/m(3) equivalent to an annual effective dose of 2.48 mSv. The indoor and outdoor gamma absorbed doses were measured as 54.81 and 48.03 nGy/h, respectively, corresponding to a total gamma radiation level (of terrestrial and cosmic origin) of 0.33 mSv/y. The activity concentrations in the soil samples collected from the study area were determined as 32.93, 27.17, 431.43 Bq/kg for the natural radionuclides (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively, and 8.02 Bq/kg for the fission product (137)Cs. These natural radioactivity sources result in a terrestrial gamma level of 60 microSv/y. The water samples collected from the region carry an average of 0.0089 Bq/l of gross alpha and 0.271 Bq/l of gross beta activities which together cause an annual effective dose of 1.83 microSv. The measurement results obtained in this study indicate that the region has a background radiation level that is within the natural limits and shows no significant departure from the other parts of the country.

  11. Quantitating error in blood flow measurements with radioactive microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, R.E. Jr.; Hauck, W.W.; Aldea, G.S.; Flynn, A.E.; Coggins, D.L.; Hoffman, J.I.

    1989-07-01

    Accurate determination of the reproducibility of measurements using the microsphere technique is important in assessing differences in blood flow to different organs or regions within organs, as well as changes in perfusion under various experimental conditions. The sources of error of the technique are briefly reviewed. In addition, we derived a method for combining quantifiable sources of error into a single estimate that was evaluated experimentally by simultaneously injecting eight or nine sets of microspheres (each with a different radionuclide label) into four anesthetized dogs. Each nuclide was used to calculate blood flow in 145-190 myocardial regions. We compared each flow determination (using a single nuclide label) with a weighted mean for the piece (based on the remaining nuclides). The difference was defined as ''measured'' error. In all, there were a total of 5,975 flow observations. We compared measured error with theoretical estimates based on the Poisson error of radioactive disintegration and microsphere entrapment, nuclide separation error, and reference flow error. We found that combined estimates based on these sources completely accounted for measured error in the relative distribution of microspheres. In addition, our estimates of the error in measuring absolute flows (which were established using microsphere reference samples) slightly, but significantly, underestimated measured error in absolute flow.

  12. Cross-Section Measurements with the Radioactive Isotope Accelerator (RIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, M A; Moody, K J; Wild, J F; Patin, J B; Shaughnessy, D A; Stoyer, N J; Harris, L J

    2002-11-19

    RIA will produce beams of exotic nuclei of unprecedented luminosity. Preliminary studies of the feasibility of measuring cross-sections of interest to the science based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) program will be presented, and several experimental techniques will be discussed. Cross-section modeling attempts for the A = 95 mass region will be shown. In addition, several radioactive isotopes could be collected for target production or medical isotope purposes while the main in-beam experiments are running. The inclusion of a broad range mass analyzer (BRAMA) capability at RIA will enable more effective utilization of the facility, enabling the performance of multiple experiments at the same time. This option will be briefly discussed.

  13. Measurement of the abrasion of radioactive teeth by dentifrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiyoshi, Katsunori; Murai, Syouji (Industrial Research Inst. of Kanagawa Prefecture, Yokohama (Japan)); Hayashi, Ken; Hirai, Taichirou

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the dentifrice abrasivity of both commercially available products and test products. The assessment of abrasivity was carried out by the measurement of {sup 32}P released from tooth by using radioactive dentifrice abrasion (RDA) method. In dentine, RDA values, which show in polishing ability for dentine, were 65-100 with dentifrices with normal cleaning power and 106-182 with those with high cleaning power, respectively. On the other hand, REA values which slow the polishing ability for enamel were 12-405 with both market products and test products. The difference of the REA values according to the dentrifrices appears to be largely influenced by the difference of polishing agents of each dentifrice. It is concluded that RDA method is useful for assessing of dentifrice abrasivity. However, particular attention should be given to the abrasion of dentine. (author).

  14. Neutron radioactivity-Lifetime measurements of neutron-unbound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlbow, J.; Caesar, C.; Aumann, T.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.

    2017-09-01

    A new technique to measure the lifetime τ of a neutron-radioactive nucleus that decays in-flight via neutron emission is presented and demonstrated utilizing MonteCarlo simulations. The method is based on the production of the neutron-unbound nucleus in a target, which at the same time slows down the produced nucleus and the residual nucleus after (multi-) neutron emission. The spectrum of the velocity difference of neutron(s) and the residual nucleus has a characteristic shape, that allows to extract the lifetime. If the decay happens outside the target there will be a peak in the spectrum, while events where the decay is in the target show a broad flat distribution due to the continuous slowing down of the residual nucleus. The method itself and the analysis procedure are discussed in detail for the specific candidate 26O. A stack of targets with decreasing target thicknesses can expand the measurable lifetime range and improve the sensitivity by increasing the ratio between decays outside and inside the target. The simulations indicate a lower limit of measurable lifetime τ ∼ 0 . 2 ps for the given conditions.

  15. Measurements of neutron cross sections of radioactive waste nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Toshio [Gifu College of Medical Technology, Seki, Gifu (Japan); Harada, Hideo; Nakamura, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu; Hatsukawa, Yuichi

    1998-01-01

    Accurate nuclear reaction cross sections of radioactive fission products and transuranic elements are required for research on nuclear transmutation methods in nuclear waste management. Important fission products in the nuclear waste management are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 135}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I because of their large fission yields and long half-lives. The present authors have measured the neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 99}Tc. The purpose of this study is to measure the neutron capture cross sections and resonance integrals of nuclides, {sup 129}I and {sup 135}Cs accurately. Preliminary experiments were performed by using Rikkyo University Reactor and JRR-3 reactor at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Then, it was decided to measure the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs by using the JRR-3 Reactor because this measurement required a high flux reactor. On the other hand, those of {sup 129}I were measured at the Rikkyo Reactor because the product nuclides, {sup 130}I and {sup 130m}I, have short half-lives and this reactor is suitable for the study of short lived nuclide. In this report, the measurements of the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs are described. To obtain reliable values of the cross section and resonance integral of {sup 135}Cs(n, {gamma}){sup 136}Cs reaction, a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used for the mass analysis of nuclide in the sample. A progress report on the cross section of {sup 134}Cs, a neighbour of {sup 135}Cs, is included in this report. A report on {sup 129}I will be presented in the Report on the Joint-Use of Rikkyo University Reactor. (author)

  16. Measurement and Monte Carlo Calculation of Waste Drum Filled With Radioactive Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Li-jun; ZHANG; Wei-dong; YE; Hong-sheng; LIN; Min; CHEN; Xi-lin; GUO; Xiao-qing

    2012-01-01

    <正>Theoretically the best calibrating source of gamma scan system (SGS) is a waste drum filled with uniform distribution of medium and radioactive nuclides. However, in reality, waste drums usually full of solid substance, which are difficult to be prepared in a completely uniformly distributed state. To reduce measurement uncertainty of the radioactivity of waste drums prepared using the method of shell source, a waste drum filled with radioactive aqueous solution was prepared. Besides, its radioactivity was measured by a SGS device and calculated using Monte Carlo method to verify the exact geometric model, which

  17. GEMS: underwater spectrometer for long-term radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartini, Ludovica

    2010-05-01

    GEMS (Gamma Energy Marine Spectrometer) is a prototype of an autonomous radioactivity sensor for underwater measurements, developed in the framework of the KM3NeT Design Study (DS) EC project. The spectrometer is sensitive to gamma rays produced by 40K decays and it is also able to detect other natural (e.g., 238U, 232Th) and anthropogenic radionuclides (e.g. 137Cs). The decay of 40K, contained in sea salt, particulate and sediments, is one of the main sources of photon background in the underwater environment. GEMS was first calibrated in the laboratory using known sources, also in order to evaluate the performance of the instrument. In November 2008 GEMS was deployed at a depth of 3200 m in the area of Capo Passero (in the Ionian Sea) to acquire data autonomously. After recovery of the spectrometer six months later (May 2009) it was found that the instrument had worked within the specifications and acquired data over the full deployment period. These data allowed us to investigate over a long period the possible variations of activity at the Capo Passero site. GEMS is suitable to be used either in autonomous mode or as payload of seafloor observatories or vehicles.

  18. Direct reaction measurements with a 132Sn radioactive ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, K L; Bardayan, D W; Blackmon, J C; Chae, K Y; Chipps, K A; Cizewski, J A; Erikson, L; Harlin, C; Hatarik, R; Kapler, R; Kozub, R L; Liang, J F; Livesay, R; Ma, Z; Moazen, B H; Nesaraja, C D; Nunes, F M; Pain, S D; Patterson, N P; Shapira, D; Shriner, J F; Smith, M S; Swan, T P; Thomas, J S

    2011-01-01

    The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of 132Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p1/2 state expected above the N=82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite range adiabatic wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sect...

  19. Natural radioactivity measurements in building materials in Southern Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobeissi, M A; El Samad, O; Zahraman, K; Milky, S; Bahsoun, F; Abumurad, K M

    2008-08-01

    Using gamma-spectroscopy and CR-39 detector, concentration C of naturally occurring radioactive nuclides (226)Ra, (222)Rn, (214)Bi, (228)Ac, (212)Pb, (212)Bi and (40)K, has been measured in sand, cement, gravel, gypsum, and paint, which are used as building materials in Lebanon. Sand samples were collected from 10 different sandbank locations in the southern part of the country. Gravel samples of different types and forms were collected from several quarries. White and gray cement fabricated by Shaka Co. were obtained. gamma-spectroscopy measurements in sand gave Ra concentration ranging from 4.2+/-0.4 to 60.8+/-2.2 Bq kg(-1) and Ra concentration equivalents from 8.8+/-1.0 to 74.3+/-9.2 Bq kg(-1). The highest Ra concentration was in gray and white cement having the values 73.2+/-3.0 and 76.3+/-3.0 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Gravel results showed Ra concentration between 20.2+/-1.0 and 31.7+/-1.4 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 27.5+/-1.3 Bq kg(-1). Radon concentration in paint was determined by CR-39 detector. In sand, the average (222)Rn concentration ranged between 291+/-69 and 1774+/-339 Bq m(-3) among the sandbanks with a total average value of 704+/-139 Bq m(-3). For gravel, the range was found to be from 52+/-9 to 3077+/-370 Bq m(-3) with an average value of 608+/-85 Bq m(-3). Aerial and mass exhalation rates of (222)Rn were also calculated and found to be between 44+/-7 and 2226+/-267 mBq m(-2)h(-1), and between 0.40+/-0.07 and 20.0+/-0.3 mBq kg(-1)h(-1), respectively.

  20. Measurement of natural and 137Cs radioactivity concentrations at Izmit Bay (Marmara Sea), Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öksüz, I.; Güray, R. T.; Özkan, N.; Yalçin, C.; Ergül, H. A.; Aksan, S.

    2016-03-01

    In order to determine the radioactivity level at Izmit Bay Marmara Sea, marine sediment samples were collected from five different locations. The radioactivity concentrations of naturally occurring 238U, 232Th and 40K isotopes and also that of an artificial isotope 137Cs were measured by using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Preliminary results show that the radioactivity concentrations of 238U and 232Th isotopes are lower than the average worldwide values while the radioactivity concentrations of the 40K are higher than the average worldwide value. A small amount of 137Cs contamination, which might be caused by the Chernobyl accident, was also detected.

  1. Measurement of radioactive nuclides in the `Mayak` region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasoedov, B.F. [V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Novikov, A.P. [V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    The study of environmental contamination caused by anthropogenic impact and, primarily, by radioactive nuclides is one of the main scientific problems facing contemporary science. Radioecological monitoring, decision making on remediation of polluted areas need detailed information about distribution of radioactive nuclides in the terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, knowledge about radioactive nuclide occurrence forms and migration patterns. Experimental tests of nuclear and thermonuclear weapon in atmosphere and underground, nuclear power engineering and numerous accidents that took place at the nuclear power plants (NPP), unauthorized dump of radioactive materials in various places of the ocean and pouring off the strongly dump of radioactive wastes from ships and submarine equipped with nuclear power engines made artificial radionuclides a constant and unretrievable component of the modern biosphere, becoming an additional unfavorable ecological factor. As regards Former Sovient Union (FSU) the most unfavorable regions are Southern Ural, zones suffered from Chernobyl Accident, Altay, Novaya Zemlya, some part of West Siberia near Seversk (Tomsk-7) and Zheleznogorsk (Krasnoyarsk-26). (orig.)

  2. Neutronic measurements of radioactive waste; Les mesures neutroniques des dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perot, B

    1997-12-31

    This document presents the general matters involved in the radioactive waste management and the different non destructive assays of radioactivity. The neutronic measurements used in the characterization of waste drums containing emitters are described with more details, especially the active neutronic interrogation assays with prompt or delayed neutron detection: physical principle, signal processing and evaluation of the detection limit. (author).

  3. Measurements of Natural Radioactivity in Submicron Aerosols in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Sterling, K.; Sturchio, N. C.

    2003-12-01

    Natural radionuclides can be useful in evaluating the transport of ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. Beryllium-7, which is produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and becomes adsorbed on fine aerosols, can be a useful indicator of upper air transport into a region. Lead-210 is produced by the decay of radon-222 out-gassed into the lower atmosphere from ground-based uranium deposits. Potassium-40, found in soils, can act as a measure of wind-blown dust and also comes from burning of wood and other biomass that is enriched in this natural radioisotope. Thus, both lead-210 and potassium-40 can aid in identification of aerosols sourced in the lower atmosphere. As part of our continuing interest in the lifetimes and sources of aerosols and their radiative effects, we report here measurements of fine aerosol radioactivity in Mexico City, one of the largest megacities in the world. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters by using cascade impactors (Sierra type, Anderson Instruments) and high-volume air samplers from the rooftop of the main laboratory of El Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Capacitacion Ambiental (CENICA). By using stage 4 of the impactor and timers, we were able to collect integrated samples of sizes > 1 micrometer and < 1 micrometer over 12-hr time periods daily for approximately one month in April 2003. Samples were counted at the University of Illinois at Chicago by using state-of-the-art gamma counting (beryllium-7, 477.6 keV; potassium-40, 1460.8 keV; lead-210, 46.5 keV). The beryllium-7 data indicate one possible upper-air transport event during April 2003. As expected, the lead-210 data indicate very little soil contribution to the fine aerosol. The potassium-40 data showed an increase in fine aerosol potassium during Holy Week that might be attributed to local combustion of biomass fuels. The data will be presented and discussed in light of future data analysis and comparison with other

  4. Natural radioactivity measurements in building materials in Southern Lebanon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobeissi, M.A.; El Samad, O.; Zahraman, K. [Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission, National Council for Scientific Research, P.O. Box 11-8281, Beirut (Lebanon); Milky, S.; Bahsoun, F. [Department of Physics, Lebanese University, Faculty of Sciences (I), Hadeth, Beirut (Lebanon); Abumurad, K.M. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, P.O. Box 566, Irbid 21163 (Jordan)], E-mail: abumurad@yu.edu.jo

    2008-08-15

    Using {gamma}-spectroscopy and CR-39 detector, concentration C of naturally occurring radioactive nuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Bi, {sup 228}Ac, {sup 212}Pb, {sup 212}Bi and {sup 40}K, has been measured in sand, cement, gravel, gypsum, and paint, which are used as building materials in Lebanon. Sand samples were collected from 10 different sandbank locations in the southern part of the country. Gravel samples of different types and forms were collected from several quarries. White and gray cement fabricated by Shaka Co. were obtained. {gamma}-Spectroscopy measurements in sand gave Ra concentration ranging from 4.2 {+-} 0.4 to 60.8 {+-} 2.2 Bq kg{sup -1} and Ra concentration equivalents from 8.8 {+-} 1.0 to 74.3 {+-} 9.2 Bq kg{sup -1}. The highest Ra concentration was in gray and white cement having the values 73.2 {+-} 3.0 and 76.3 {+-} 3.0 Bq kg{sup -1}, respectively. Gravel results showed Ra concentration between 20.2 {+-} 1.0 and 31.7 {+-} 1.4 Bq kg{sup -1} with an average of 27.5 {+-} 1.3 Bq kg{sup -1}. Radon concentration in paint was determined by CR-39 detector. In sand, the average {sup 222}Rn concentration ranged between 291 {+-} 69 and 1774 {+-} 339 Bq m{sup -3} among the sandbanks with a total average value of 704 {+-} 139 Bq m{sup -3}. For gravel, the range was found to be from 52 {+-} 9 to 3077 {+-} 370 Bq m{sup -3} with an average value of 608 {+-} 85 Bq m{sup -3}. Aerial and mass exhalation rates of {sup 222}Rn were also calculated and found to be between 44 {+-} 7 and 2226 {+-} 267 mBq m{sup -2} h{sup -1}, and between 0.40 {+-} 0.07 and 20.0 {+-} 0.3 mBq kg{sup -1} h{sup -1}, respectively.

  5. Exact method for determining subsurface radioactivity depth profiles from gamma spectroscopy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Van Siclen, Clinton DeW

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface radioactivity may be due to transport of radionuclides from a contaminated surface into the solid volume, as occurs for radioactive fallout deposited on soil, or from fast neutron activation of a solid volume, as occurs in concrete blocks used for radiation shielding. For purposes including fate and transport studies of radionuclides in the environment, decommissioning and decontamination of radiation facilities, and nuclear forensics, an in situ, nondestructive method for ascertaining the subsurface distribution of radioactivity is desired. The method developed here obtains a polynomial expression for the radioactivity depth profile, using a small set of gamma-ray count rates measured by a collimated detector directed towards the surface at a variety of angles with respect to the surface normal. To demonstrate its capabilities, this polynomial method is applied to the simple case where the radioactivity is maximal at the surface and decreases exponentially with depth below the surface, and to the ...

  6. Measuring Radioactivity from Fukushima Daiichi in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was damaged by the tsunami that followed the 'Great East Japan Earthquake,' and the reactor subsequently leaked radioactive material. In response, LANL augmented the routine ambient (AIRNET) and stack (Rad-NESHAP) measurements with three high-volume samplers: No.167 at the Old White Rock Fire Station; No.173 at the TA-49 gate, and No.211 at the Los Alamos Medical Center. Previous accidents, such as the Three-Mile-Island accident in 1979 and the Chernobyl accident in 1986, indicated that the most likely releases were (a) the noble gases: krypton and xenon; and (b) the volatile elements: cesium, tellurium, and iodine. At the latitude of Fukushima, the predominant winds across the Pacific Ocean are from west to east, and models predicted that the plume would arrive in the western US on about March 18. By this time the shorter-lived isotopes would have decayed. Therefore, the expected radionuclides were xenon-133, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132. As expected, cesium-134, cesium-136, cesium-137, tellurium-132, iodine-131, and iodine-132 were all detected by all three high-volume samplers during March 17-21. The concentrations peaked during the March 24-28 period. After this, concentrations of all nuclides declined. In general, the concentrations were consistent with those measured by the EPA RadNet system and many other monitoring systems throughout the world. At the time of writing, preliminary results from the AIRNET and Rad-NESHAP systems are being reported. More detailed results are described in LA-UR-11-10304 and will be reported in full in the annual environmental report for 2011. All previous releases from nuclear reactors have been dominated by noble gases, primarily krypton and xenon, which are not measured by the high-volume samplers or the AIRNET system. However, in sufficient concentrations these and other fission products would be detected by

  7. Measuring sidewalk distances using Google Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen Ian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity is an important determinant of health. Walking is the most common physical activity performed by adults and the presence of sidewalks along roads is a determinant of walking. Geographic information systems (GIS can be used to measure sidewalks; however, GIS sidewalk data are difficult to access. The purpose of this study was to present a new GIS method for measuring the distance and coverage of sidewalks along roadways. Methods The new method contains three stages. Stage 1 involves calculating the distance of all road segments within the region of interest (e.g., neighborhood, extracting geospatial information on these road segments, and saving this information as a Google Earth file. This stage was performed in ArcGIS software. Stage 2 involves opening the extracted road segment geospatial data in Google Earth, visually examining road segments to see if they contain sidewalks, and deleting road segments without sidewalks. Stage 3 involves importing the modified road geospatial data into ArcGIS and calculating the length of road segments with sidewalks. The new method was tested in 315 sites across Canada. Each site consisted of a one km radius circular buffer surrounding a school. Results A detailed, step-by-step protocol is provided in the paper. The length of road segments with sidewalks in the testing sites ranged from 0.00 to 55.05 km (median 16.20 km. When expressed relative to the length of all road segments, the length of road segments with sidewalks ranged from 0% to 100% (median 53%. By comparison to urban testing sites, rural sites had shorter sidewalk lengths and a smaller proportion of the roads had sidewalk coverage. Conclusion This study provides a new GIS protocol that researchers can use to measure the distance and coverage of sidewalks along roadways.

  8. Measuring Earth's Radiation Imbalance using Cubesat Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, W. D.; Courtade, S.; Immel, T. J.; Feldman, D.; Lorentz, S. R.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2016-12-01

    At present, the global annual-mean Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) is estimated to be of order 1 W/m2, although the uncertainty in ERI is much larger than this estimate. The best current satellite-only observational determinations of ERI range from -2 to +7 W/m2 unless major adjustments are made using ocean observations. Since measurements of ERI accurate to better than 0.5 W/m2 are essential for understanding and predicting changes in our climate, new missions to determine ERI in conjunction with ongoing ocean observations are urgently needed. These missions should reliably determine Earth's radiation balance at the temporal and spatial scales sufficient for relating ERI to the physical processes responsible for variability. The compelling objective of measuring ERI can be met using a constellation of satellites making global, high-frequency radiation measurements of the solar energy reflected and infrared energy radiated back to space with sufficient accuracy to determine the ERI to within 0.5 W/m2. In this presentation, we discuss the reasons and prospects for deploying a Cubesat constellation to realize this objective, simulations of the data that could be produced by this constellation, and the advantages of the spatial coverage and high temporal frequency afforded by the constellation. These advantages apply both to estimating long-term ERI and to quantifying the radiation budgets of individual synoptic-scale weather systems. The innovations in this system involve both the use of Cubesats and of compact, continuously calibrated wide-field-of-view radiometers. We demonstrate the feasibility of such a constellation using the ongoing proof-of-concept deployment of the target radiometers onboard the upcoming NASA RAVAN (Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes) mission.

  9. ASTROPHYSICAL SHRAPNEL: DISCRIMINATING AMONG NEAR-EARTH STELLAR EXPLOSION SOURCES OF LIVE RADIOACTIVE ISOTOPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, Brian J.; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Ellis, John R. [Theoretical Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, King' s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-10

    We consider the production and deposition on Earth of isotopes with half-lives in the range 10{sup 5}-10{sup 8} yr that might provide signatures of nearby stellar explosions, extending previous analyses of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) to include Electron-Capture Supernovae (ECSNe), Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch (SAGB) stars, Thermonuclear/Type Ia Supernovae (TNSNe), and Kilonovae/Neutron Star Mergers (KNe). We revisit previous estimates of the {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al signatures, and extend these estimates to include {sup 244}Pu and {sup 53}Mn. We discuss interpretations of the {sup 60}Fe signals in terrestrial and lunar reservoirs in terms of a nearby stellar ejection ∼2.2 Myr ago, showing that (1) the {sup 60}Fe yield rules out the TNSN and KN interpretations, (2) the {sup 60}Fe signals highly constrain SAGB interpretations but do not completely them rule out, (3) are consistent with a CCSN origin, and (4) are highly compatible with an ECSN interpretation. Future measurements could resolve the radioisotope deposition over time, and we use the Sedov blast wave solution to illustrate possible time-resolved profiles. Measuring such profiles would independently probe the blast properties including distance, and would provide additional constraints for the nature of the explosion.

  10. Astrophysical Shrapnel: Discriminating Among Near-Earth Stellar Explosion Sources of Live Radioactive Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, Brian J; Ellis, John R

    2015-01-01

    We consider the production and deposition on Earth of isotopes with half-lives in the range 10$^{5}$ to 10$^{8}$ years that might provide signatures of nearby stellar explosions, extending previous analyses of Core-Collapse Supernovae (CCSNe) to include Electron-Capture Supernovae (ECSNe), Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch (SAGBs) stars, Thermonuclear/Type Ia Supernovae (TNSNe), and Kilonovae/Neutron Star Mergers (KNe). We revisit previous estimates of the $^{60}$Fe and $^{26}$Al signatures, and extend these estimates to include $^{244}$Pu and $^{53}$Mn. We discuss interpretations of the $^{60}$Fe signals in terrestrial and lunar reservoirs in terms of a nearby stellar ejection ~2.2 Myr ago, showing that (i) the $^{60}$Fe yield rules out the TNSN and KN interpretations, (ii) the $^{60}$Fe signals highly constrain a SAGB interpretation but do not completely them rule out, (iii) are consistent with a CCSN origin, and (iv) are highly compatible with an ECSN interpretation. Future measurements could resolve the radio...

  11. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway. Annual report 1991; Maaling av radioaktivitet i Norge; Aarsrapport 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, T.C.

    1992-11-01

    A nation-wide network of 20 monitoring stations for continuous registration of radioactivity in the air has been established in Norway. Via the telecommunication network collected data are dayly automatically transmitted to the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). High radiation levels trigger an alarm for immediate transmission. The monitoring system and experiences in connection with its operation are described, and results from measurements in 1991 are presented. No unnormal radioactivity has been recorded in the period. 24 figs.

  12. Radioactive uranium measurement in vivo using a handheld interfaced analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Suw Young; Lee, Jin-Hui; Jung, Dong Ho

    2010-05-01

    A trace uranium (U) detection method was developed with a handheld voltammetric analyzer that was the size of a mobile phone, with working sensors made of simple graphite pencil electrode (PE). The optimum stripping voltammetric conditions were sought, and the following results were obtained: 0.0 to 0.08 ng/L working ranges and a statistically relative standard deviation of 1.78% (RSD; n=15) at a 10.0 microg/L U spike. The experiment accumulation time used was only 150 s. Under this condition, the diagnostic detection limit approached 0.007 ng/L. The method was applied to soil of a natural rock in a radioactive mineralogy site. Earthworms that resided at this site were assayed. The method was found to be applicable in biological diagnosis or in real-time in vivo survey.

  13. Radioactivity measurements in air over Europe after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raes, F.; Graziani, G.; Stanners, D.; Girardi, F. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre)

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive European data set of radioactivity in air caused by the accident at the Chenobyl nuclear power plant is presented. For the first 2 weeks after the beginning of the release, levels of particulate I-131, Cs-134 and Cs-137 (85 locations) and of total I-131 (10 locations) are given. All data are stored in a computerized data base. For the first time the passage of the Chenobyl cloud over Europe is mapped after re-averaging the time histories in each location to produce coherent daily concentrations. Cs-134/Cs-137 ratios were analysed: the 'European' average ratio calculated from 1239 samples is 0.55, with a standard deviation of 0.25. (author).

  14. Radioactivity measurements of ITER materials using the TFTR D-T neutron field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Loughlin, M.J. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-08-01

    The availability of high D-T fusion neutron yields at TFTR has provided a useful opportunity to directly measure D-T neutron-induced radioactivity in a realistic tokamak fusion reactor environment for materials of vital interest to ITER. These measurements are valuable for characterizing radioactivity in various ITER candidate materials. for validating complex neutron transport calculations, and for meeting fusion reactor licensing requirements. The radioactivity measurements at TFTR involve potential ITER materials including stainless steel 316, vanadium, titanium, chromium, silicon, iron, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, aluminum, copper, zinc. zirconium, niobium, and tungsten. Small samples of these materials were irradiated close to the plasma and just outside the vacuum vessel wall of TFTR, locations of different neutron energy spectra. Saturation activities for both threshold and capture reactions were measured. Data from dosimetric reactions have been used to obtain preliminary neutron energy spectra. Spectra from the first wall were compared to calculations from ITER and to measurements from accelerator-based tests.

  15. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  16. Measurement of airborne radon concentrations at several sites in a radioactivity research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M; Anzai, I

    1999-06-01

    Radon-222 is a natural, gaseous, radioactive nuclide released from the ground and building materials into the air. Radon and its daughter nuclides can be an important disturbance factor for the measurement of environmental radioactivity. Radon concentrations in air in a radiation laboratory were measured with PICO-RAD detectors, which directly adsorb radon gas on activated charcoal. Generally, radon concentration increased in the absence of ventilation; a high concentration was observed in a radioisotope storage room without ventilation. Concentrations were low in other rooms used for experiments and measurement, which suggests that the radiation control practice in this laboratory is satisfactory and that the influence of natural radon gas on the measurement of radioactivity is negligible.

  17. Measurement of radioactivity in bottled drinking water in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, M.; Penalver, A.; Borrull, F. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Edifici CTT-FURV, Av. Paisos Catalans 18, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Aguilar, C. [Unitat de Radioquimica Ambiental i Sanitaria, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Edifici CTT-FURV, Av. Paisos Catalans 18, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: carme.aguilar@urv.cat

    2007-10-15

    The radioactive parameters in the Spanish regulations on water intended for human consumption (law decree 140/2003) have been determined in 30 different brands of some of the most common bottled mineral waters produced and consumed in Spain. These waters are not included in this legislation but if their consumption increases, the dose of radiation in the population may also increase. After gross alpha activity, gross beta activity, gross beta without potassium contribution and tritium activity had been determined, only a few samples (16% of the samples analysed) were over the normative limit for gross alpha activity (0.1 Bq/l), whereas all the samples were below the normative limits for the other parameters. For samples with high gross alpha activity values, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 224}Ra were determined. The values were between 0.01 and 1.52 Bq/l, and between 0.01 and 0.38 Bq/l, respectively, so alpha activity should be considered to be of natural origin.

  18. Dose {sup 131}I radioactivity interfere with thyroglobulin measurement in patients undergoing radioactive iodine therapy with recombinant human TSH?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Bang, Ji In; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Sang Eun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH) is widely used in radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) to avoid side effects caused by hypothyroidism during the therapy. Owing to RIT with rhTSH, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is measured with high 131I concentrations. It is of concern that the relatively high energy of 131I could interfere with Tg measurement using the immunoradiometric assay (IRMA). We investigated the effect of 131I administration on Tg measurement with IRMA after RIT. A total of 67 patients with thyroid cancer were analysed retrospectively. All patients had undergone rhTSH stimulation for RIT. The patients’ sera were sampled 2 days after 131I administration and divided into two portions: for Tg measurements on days 2 and 32 after 131I administration. The count per minute (CPM) of whole serum (200 μl) was also measured at each time point. Student’s paired t-test and Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed for statistical analysis. Serum Tg levels were significantly concordant between days 2 and 32, irrespective of the serum CPM. Subgroup analysis was performed by classification based on the 131I dose. No difference was noted between the results of the two groups. IRMA using 125I did not show interference from 131I in the serum of patients stimulated by rhTSH.

  19. Solid-state detector system for measuring concentrations of tritiated water vapour and other radioactive gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J. C.; Surette, R. A.; Wood, M. J.

    1999-08-01

    A detector system was built using a silicon photodiode plus preamplifier and a cesium iodide scintillator plus preamplifier that were commercially available. The potential of the system for measuring concentrations of tritiated water vapour in the presence of other radioactive sources was investigated. For purposes of radiation protection, the sensitivity of the detector system was considered too low for measuring tritiated water vapour concentrations in workplaces such as nuclear power plants. Nevertheless, the spectrometry capability of the system was used successfully to differentiate amongst some radioactive gases in laboratory tests. Although this relatively small system can measure radioactive noble gases as well as tritiated water vapour concentrations, its response to photons remains an issue.

  20. LOWRAD 96. Methods and applications of low-level radioactivity measurements. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fietz, J. [ed.] [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The newest developments in the field of low-level radioactivity measurements and new applications for existing and low-level measuring facilities are presented. The contributions mostly were devoted to basic physical aspects and applications of low-level counting. Papers on chemical separation and preparation techniques and on low-level radiation dose determinations were also presented. (DG)

  1. Study on the Apparatus Accessory to Seal Radioactive Samples for XRD Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Xie-chun; LUO; Fang-xiang; LI; Hui-rong; XIAO; Song-tao; YANG; He; LAN; Tian; MENG; Zhao-kai

    2012-01-01

    <正>According to the principle of XRD determination, we tried to seal radioactive powder effectively when it was measured by XRD. After the measure- ments, we must make sure that the surroundings are not contaminated. Now, by a few times of modifica- tions, a suit of apparatus which is able to seal radio-

  2. Evaluation of induced radioactivity in 10 MeV-electron irradiated spices, (1); [gamma]-ray measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Katayama, Tadashi; Ito, Norio; Mizohata, Akira; Matsunami, Tadao; Shibata, Setsuko; Toratani, Hirokazu (Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Research Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology); Takeda, Atsuhiko

    1994-02-01

    Black pepper, white pepper, red pepper, ginger and turmeric were irradiated with 10 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator to a dose of 100 kGy and radioactivity was measured in order to estimate induced radioactivity in the irradiated foods. Induced radioactivity could not be detected significantly by [gamma]-ray spectrometry in the irradiated samples except for spiked samples which contain some photonuclear target nuclides in the list of photonuclear reactions which could produce radioactivity below 10 MeV. From the amount of observed radioactivities of short-lived photonuclear products in the spiked samples and calculation of H[sub 50] according to ICRP Publication 30, it was concluded that the induced radioactivity and its biological effects in the 10 MeV electron-irradiated natural samples were negligible in comparison with natural radioactivity from [sup 40]K contained in the samples. (author).

  3. Experience with local lymph node assay performance standards using standard radioactivity and nonradioactive cell count measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basketter, David; Kolle, Susanne N; Schrage, Arnhild; Honarvar, Naveed; Gamer, Armin O; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-08-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is the preferred test for identification of skin-sensitizing substances by measuring radioactive thymidine incorporation into the lymph node. To facilitate acceptance of nonradioactive variants, validation authorities have published harmonized minimum performance standards (PS) that the alternative endpoint assay must meet. In the present work, these standards were applied to a variant of the LLNA based on lymph node cell counts (LNCC) run in parallel as a control with the standard LLNA with radioactivity measurements, with threshold concentrations (EC3) being determined for the sensitizers. Of the 22 PS chemicals tested in this study, 21 yielded the same results from standard radioactivity and cell count measurements; only 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was positive by LLNA but negative by LNCC. Of the 16 PS positives, 15 were positive by LLNA and 14 by LNCC; methylmethacrylate was not identified as sensitizer by either of the measurements. Two of the six PS negatives tested negative in our study by both LLNA and LNCC. Of the four PS negatives which were positive in our study, chlorobenzene and methyl salicylate were tested at higher concentrations than the published PS, whereas the corresponding concentrations resulted in consistent negative results. Methylmethacrylate and nickel chloride tested positive within the concentration range used for the published PS. The results indicate cell counts and radioactive measurements are in good accordance within the same LLNA using the 22 PS test substances. Comparisons with the published PS results may, however, require balanced analysis rather than a simple checklist approach.

  4. Precision mass measurements at TITAN with radioactive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, A.A., E-mail: aniak@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Macdonald, T.D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada); Bale, J.C. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada); Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A.T. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Grossheim, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Mané, E.; Pearson, M.R.; Schultz, B.E.; Simon, M.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Simon, V.V. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultät für Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, 61920 Heidelberg (Germany); Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The TITAN facility is the sole online Penning trap mass spectrometer with charge breeding capabilities. • Use of highly charged exotic ions reduces the beam time requirements. • Threshold charge breeding was developed as a novel technique to separate isobaric species. • Recent mass measurements have been performed to investigate nuclear structure, tests of electroweak theory, and neutrino physics. -- Abstract: Measurements of the atomic mass further our understanding in many disciplines from metrology to physics beyond the standard model. The accuracy and precision of Penning trap mass spectrometry have been well demonstrated at TITAN, including measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes to investigate three-body forces in nuclear structure and within the island of inversion to study the mechanism of shell quenching and deformation. By charge breeding ions, TITAN has enhanced the precision of the measurement technique. The precision achieved in the measurement of the superallowed β-emitter {sup 74}Rb in the 8+ charge state rivaled earlier measurements with singly charged ions in a fraction of the time. By breeding {sup 78}Rb to the same charge state, the ground state could be easily distinguished from the isomer. Further developments led to threshold charge breeding, which permitted capturing and measuring isobarically and elementally pure ion samples in the Penning trap. This was demonstrated via the Q-value determination of {sup 71}Ge. An overview of the TITAN facility and recent results are presented herein.

  5. Measurement of nuclear cross sections using radioactive beams; Medicion de secciones eficaces nucleares usando haces radiactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizcano, D.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    One of the main applications of the production and use of nuclear radioactive beams is the measurement of nuclear cross sections. In this work is used a {sup 6} He nuclear radioactive beam ({beta} emitting with half life 806.7 ms) for the study of the reaction {sup 6} + {sup 209} Bi which could have several products. This investigation was realized in collaboration with the personnel of the Nuclear Structure laboratory at the University of Notre Dame (U.S.A.) and the National institute of Nuclear Research and CONACyT by Mexico. (Author)

  6. Characterization of brown rice as a certified reference material for Fukushima accident-related radioactivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unno, Yasuhiro; Hachinohe, Mayumi; Hamamatsu, Shioka; Todoriki, Setsuko; Yunoki, Akira; Miura, Tsutomu

    2014-05-01

    We developed a certified reference material of brown rice to measure radioactivity from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The rice was planted in the spring of 2011, just after the Fukushima accident occurred, and it was harvested in the autumn of 2011. The certified value of radioactivity concentration in the rice was 33.6 Bq kg(-1) of Cs-134 and 51.8 Bq kg(-1) of Cs-137 on August 1, 2012. The reference material is being widely distributed by the National Metrology Institute of Japan. To determine the radioactivity and its uncertainties in the brown rice, we employed gamma-ray spectrometry with a high-purity germanium detector and Monte Carlo simulation.

  7. Laboratory measurement of radioactivity purification for 212Pb in liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Fang, Jian; Yu, Bo-Xiang; Zhang, Xuan; Zhou, Li; Cai, Xiao; Sun, Li-Jun; Liu, Wan-Jin; Wang, Lan; Lü, Jun-Guang

    2016-09-01

    Liquid scintillator (LS) has been widely used in past and running neutrino experiments, and is expected also to be used in future experiments. Requirements on LS radio-purity have become higher and higher. Water extraction is a powerful method to remove soluble radioactive nuclei, and a mini-extraction station has been constructed. To evaluate the extraction efficiency and optimize the operation parameters, a setup to load radioactivity to LS and a laboratory scale setup to measure radioactivity using the 212Bi-212Po-208Pb cascade decay have been developed. Experience from this laboratory study will be useful for the design of large scale water extraction plants and the optimization of working conditions in the future. Supported by The Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA10010500), Natural Science Foundation of China (11390384)

  8. γ Ray Radioactivity Measurement of ~(88)Y and ~(22)Na Point Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Both 22Na and 88Y have adequate half life, they are broadly used in radioactive measuring field. They are also very important in different techniques application and usually used in γ ray detectors like as high purity germanium efficiency calibration.

  9. Measurement of airborne radioactivity from the Fukushima reactor accident in Tokushima, Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Fushimi, K; Sakama, M; Sakaguchi, Y

    2011-01-01

    The airborne radioactive isotopes from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant was measured in Tokushima, western Japan. The continuous monitoring has been carried out in Tokushima. From March 23, 2011 the fission product $^{131}$I was observed. The radioisotopes $^{134}$Cs and $^{137}$Cs were also observed in the beginning of April. However the densities were extremely smaller than the Japanese regulation of radioisotopes.

  10. Mass measurements on radioactive isotopes using the ISOLTRAP spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Dilling, J; Kluge, H J; Kohl, A; Lamour, E; Marx, G; Schwarz, S C; Bollen, G; Kellerbauer, A G; Moore, R B; Henry, S

    2000-01-01

    ISOLTRAP is a Penning trap mass spectrometer installed at the on line isotope separator ISOLDE at CERN. Direct measurements of the masses of short lived radio isotopes are performed using the existing triple trap system. This consists of three electromagnetic traps in tandem: a Paul trap to accumulate and bunch the 60 keV dc beam, a Penning trap for cooling and isobar separation, and a precision Penning trap for the determination of the masses by cyclotron resonance. Measurements of masses of unknown mercury isotopes and in the vicinity of doubly magic /sup 208/Pb are presented, all with an accuracy of delta m/m approximately=1*10/sup -7/. Developments to replace the Paul trap by a radiofrequency quadrupole ion guide system to increase the collection efficiency are presently under way and the status is presented. (10 refs).

  11. Measurements of extremely low radioactivity levels in BOREXINO

    CERN Document Server

    Arpesella, C

    2001-01-01

    The techniques researched, developed and applied towards the measurement of radioisotope concentrations at ultra-low levels in the real-time solar neutrino experiment BOREXINO at Gran Sasso are presented and illustrated with specific results of widespread interest. We report the use of low-level germanium gamma spectrometry, low-level miniaturized gas proportional counters and low background scintillation detectors developed in solar neutrino research. Each now sets records in its field. We additionally describe our techniques of radiochemical ultra-pure, few atom manipulations and extractions. Forefront measurements also result from the powerful combination of neutron activation and low-level counting. Finally, with our techniques and commercially available mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, new low-level detection limits for isotopes of interest are obtained.

  12. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS ON FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FOR RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION: STATUS AND PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, D; Ameon, R; Bombard, A; Brun, S; Byrde, F; Chen, J; Duda, J-M; Forte, M; Fournier, M; Fronka, A; Haug, T; Herranz, M; Husain, A; Jerome, S; Jiranek, M; Judge, S; Kim, S B; Kwakman, P; Loyen, J; LLaurado, M; Michel, R; Porterfield, D; Ratsirahonana, A; Richards, A; Rovenska, K; Sanada, T; Schuler, C; Thomas, L; Tokonami, S; Tsapalov, A; Yamada, T

    2016-11-24

    Radiological protection is a matter of concern for members of the public and thus national authorities are more likely to trust the quality of radioactivity data provided by accredited laboratories using common standards. Normative approach based on international standards aims to ensure the accuracy or validity of the test result through calibrations and measurements traceable to the International System of Units. This approach guarantees that radioactivity test results on the same types of samples are comparable over time and space as well as between different testing laboratories. Today, testing laboratories involved in radioactivity measurement have a set of more than 150 international standards to help them perform their work. Most of them are published by the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). This paper reviews the most essential ISO standards that give guidance to testing laboratories at different stages from sampling planning to the transmission of the test report to their customers, summarizes recent activities and achievements and present the perspectives on new standards under development by the ISO Working Groups dealing with radioactivity measurement in connection with radiological protection.

  13. Measuring the Earth's Magnetic Field in a Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartacci, A.; Straulino, S.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for measuring the Earth's magnetic field are described. In the former, according to Gauss, the Earth's magnetic field is compared with that of a permanent magnet; in the latter, a well-known method, the comparison is made with the magnetic field generated by a current. As all the used instruments are available off the shelf, both…

  14. Measuring neutrino mass with radioactive ions in a storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Mats; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We propose a method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. Then, by counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for $m_\

  15. (n, {gamma}) measurements on radioactive isotopes with DANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reifarth, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: reifarth@lanl.gov; Esch, E.-I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Alpizar-Vicente, A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Bond, E.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bredeweg, T.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Glover, S.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Greife, U. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Hatarik, R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Haight, R.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kronenberg, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rundberg, R.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwantes, J.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ullmann, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vieira, D.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wilhelmy, J.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wouters, J.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANSCE-3, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is designed as a high efficiency, highly segmented 4{pi} BaF2 detector for calorimetrically detecting gamma rays following a neutron capture. Coupled with the neutron spallation source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), DANCE measurements on unstable isotopes in the energy range between 10 meV and 500 keV will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements and will also provide vital information for the design of future reactor concepts.

  16. (n, γ) measurements on radioactive isotopes with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifarth, R.; Esch, E.-I.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Glover, S. E.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, R.; Haight, R. C.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is designed as a high efficiency, highly segmented 4π BaF2 detector for calorimetrically detecting gamma rays following a neutron capture. Coupled with the neutron spallation source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), DANCE measurements on unstable isotopes in the energy range between 10 meV and 500 keV will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements and will also provide vital information for the design of future reactor concepts.

  17. Reductive capacity measurement of waste forms for secondary radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jung-Seok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-12-01

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  18. Exploring the hidden interior of the Earth with directional neutrino measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyton, Michael; Dye, Stephen; Monroe, Jocelyn

    2017-07-01

    Roughly 40% of the Earth's total heat flow is powered by radioactive decays in the crust and mantle. Geo-neutrinos produced by these decays provide important clues about the origin, formation and thermal evolution of our planet, as well as the composition of its interior. Previous measurements of geo-neutrinos have all relied on the detection of inverse beta decay reactions, which are insensitive to the contribution from potassium and do not provide model-independent information about the spatial distribution of geo-neutrino sources within the Earth. Here we present a method for measuring previously unresolved components of Earth's radiogenic heating using neutrino-electron elastic scattering and low-background, direction-sensitive tracking detectors. We calculate the exposures needed to probe various contributions to the total geo-neutrino flux, specifically those associated to potassium, the mantle and the core. The measurements proposed here chart a course for pioneering exploration of the veiled inner workings of the Earth.

  19. Measuring Neutrino Mass with Radioactive Ions in a Storage Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, Mats; McElrath, Bob; Orme, Christopher; Schwetz, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    A method to measure the neutrino mass kinematically using beams of ions which undergo beta decay is proposed. The idea is to tune the ion beam momentum so that in most decays, the electron is forward moving with respect to the beam, and only in decays near the endpoint is the electron moving backwards. By counting the backward moving electrons one can observe the effect of neutrino mass on the beta spectrum close to the endpoint. In order to reach sensitivities for mν<0.2 eV, it is necessary to control the ion momentum with a precision better than δp/p<10-5, identify suitable nuclei with low Q-values (in the few to ten keV range), and one must be able to observe at least O(1018) decays.

  20. Nuclear charge radius measurements of radioactive beryllium isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure the nuclear charge radii of the beryllium isotopes $^{7,9,10}$Be and the one-neutron halo isotope $^{11}$Be using laser spectroscopy of trapped ions. Ions produced at ISOLDE and ionized with the laser ion source will be cooled and bunched in the radio-frequency buncher of the ISOLTRAP experiment and then transferred into a specially designed Paul trap. Here, they will be cooled to temperatures in the mK range employing sympathetic and direct laser cooling. Precision laser spectroscopy of the isotope shift on the cooled ensemble in combination with accurate atomic structure calculations will provide nuclear charge radii with a precision of better than 3%. This will be the first model-independent determination of a one-neutron halo nuclear charge radius.

  1. Improvement of the gamma radioactivity measurements in water by the evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, J. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Servicio de Radiaciones, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Serradell, V. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Servicio de Radiaciones, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: vserradell@iqn.upv.es; Gallardo, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Ballesteros, L.; Zarza, I. [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Servicio de Radiaciones, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    Frequently to measure gamma radioactivity in water, the water is poured in a tray covered with a plastic film and dried in an oven. Then, the film is folded and introduced in a Petri box to be measured in a Ge(HP) detector. The present paper studies the effect, that an irregular deposition of the residue left on the plastic film when evaporating the water, introduces in the results of the measurement. The quantitative analyses of gamma radioactivity imply a previous calibration of the instrument. Calibration samples are prepared in the same way as any other, then the calibration process becomes affected by the same previously mentioned effect. The study evaluates the maximum discrepancies that can be expected from this irregular deposition of the residue. Monte Carlo program MCNP is used to simulate the experimental measurements carried out, that easily allows to study intermediate situations. Lastly, a method to avoid this type of systematic error is recommended.

  2. Natural Radioactivity Measurements and Radiation Dose Estimation in Some Sedimentary Rock Samples in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Akkurt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural radioactivity existed since creation of the universe due to the long life time of some radionuclides. This natural radioactivity is caused by γ-radiation originating from the uranium and thorium series and 40K. In this study, the gamma radiation has been measured to determine natural radioactivity of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in collected sedimentary rock samples in different places of Turkey. The measurements have been performed using γ-ray spectrometer containing NaI(Tl detector and multichannel analyser (MCA. Absorbed dose rate (D, annual effective dose (AED, radium equivalent activities (Raeq, external hazard index (Hex, and internal hazard index (Hin associated with the natural radionuclide were calculated to assess the radiation hazard of the natural radioactivity in the sedimentary rock samples. The average values of absorbed dose rate in air (D, annual effective dose (AED, radium equivalent activity (Raeq, external hazard index (Hex, and internal hazard index (Hin were calculated and these were 45.425 nGy/h, 0.056 mSv/y, 99.014 Bq/kg, 0.267, and 0.361, respectively.

  3. Specific calibration problems for gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Wershofen, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples are always done in a close source detector geometry. This geometry causes coincidence-summing effects for measurements of multi-photon emitting nuclides. The measurements of radioactivity in environmental samples are also influenced by the absorption of photons in the materials which have to be analysed. Both effects must be taken into account by correction factors with respect to an energy-specific calibration of the detector system for a given geometry and a given composition of the calibration source. The importance of these corrections is emphasized. It is the aim of the present paper to compare different experimental and theoretical methods for the determination of these correction factors published by various authors and to report about efforts to refine them. (orig.)

  4. Containers and systems for the measurement of radioactive gases and related methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Watrous, Matthew G; Oertel, Christopher P; McGrath, Christopher A

    2017-06-20

    Containers for a fluid sample containing a radionuclide for measurement of radiation from the radionuclide include an outer shell having one or more ports between an interior and an exterior of the outer shell, and an inner shell secured to the outer shell. The inner shell includes a detector receptacle sized for at least partial insertion into the outer shell. The inner shell and outer shell together at least partially define a fluid sample space. The outer shell and inner shell are configured for maintaining an operating pressure within the fluid sample space of at least about 1000 psi. Systems for measuring radioactivity in a fluid include such a container and a radiation detector received at least partially within the detector receptacle. Methods of measuring radioactivity in a fluid sample include maintaining a pressure of a fluid sample within a Marinelli-type container at least at about 1000 psi.

  5. Implementation of Control Measures for Radioactive Waste Packages with Respect to the Materials Composition - 12365

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steyer, S.; Kugel, K. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS), Salzgitter (Germany); Brennecke, P. [Braunschweig (Germany); Boetsch, W.; Gruendler, D.; Haider, C. [ISTec, Cologne (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    In addition to the radiological characterization and control measures the materials composition has to be described and respective control measures need to be implemented. The approach to verify the materials composition depends on the status of the waste: - During conditioning of raw waste the control of the materials composition has to be taken into account. - For already conditioned waste a retrospective qualification of the process might be possible. - If retrospective process qualification is not possible, legacy waste can be qualified by spot checking according to the materials composition requirements The integration of the control of the material composition in the quality control system for radioactive waste is discussed and examples of control measures are given. With the materials-list and the packaging-list the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) provides an appropriate tool to describe the materials composition of radioactive waste packages. The control measures with respect to the materials composition integrate well in the established quality control framework for radioactive waste. The system is flexible enough to deal with waste products of different qualities: raw waste, qualified conditioned waste or legacy waste. Control measures to verify the materials composition can be accomplished with minimal radiation exposure and without undue burden on the waste producers and conditioners. (authors)

  6. Optimal Measures for Characterizing Water-rich Super-Earths

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-01-01

    The detection and atmospheric characterization of super-Earths is one of the major frontiers of exoplanetary science. Currently, extensive efforts are underway to detect molecules, particularly H2O, in super-Earth atmospheres. In the present work, we develop a systematic set of strategies to identify and observe potentially H2O-rich super-Earths that provide the best prospects for characterizing their atmospheres using existing instruments. Firstly, we provide analytic prescriptions and discuss factors that need to be taken into account while planning and interpreting observations of super-Earth radii and spectra. We discuss how observations in different spectral bandpasses constrain different atmospheric properties of a super-Earth, including radius and temperature of the planetary surface as well as the mean molecular mass, the chemical composition and thermal profile of the atmosphere. In particular, we caution that radii measured in certain bandpasses can induce biases in the interpretation of the interio...

  7. DANCE device for measurement of (n, {gamma}) reactions on radioactive species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Chamberlin, E.P.; Dragowsky, M.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (US)] [and others

    2002-08-01

    DANCE (Device for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4{pi} 162 element BaF{sub 2} array under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is designed to provide high granularity, fast timing and high photon detection efficiency. It will be located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center where neutrons are produced using 800 MeV proton induced spallation reactions on heavy element production targets. Using the pulsed high neutron fluence available at this facility combined with time of flight techniques it will be possible to make neutron capture measurements in the neutron energy range from eV to 100's keV on rate and radioactive target material at the milligram and below level. These measurements will provide critically needed data for the interpretation of the astrophysical s-process 'branching point' nuclei as well as information for reactions needed in understanding transmutation processes of radioactive species. (author)

  8. DANCE : Device for Measurement of (n.g.) Reactions on radioactive Species /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberlin, E. P. (Edwin P.); Dragowsky, M. (Michael); Fowler, Malcolm M.; Miller, G. G. (Geoffrey G.); Palmer, P. D. (Phillip D.); Pangualt, L. N. (Laurence N.); Rundberg, R. S. (Robert S.); Haight, Robert C.; Seabury, E. H. (Edward H.); Ullmann, J. L. (John L.); Strottman, D. D. (Daniel D.); Heil, M. (Michael); Kaeppeler, F. (Franz K.); Reifarth, R. (Rene); Wisshak, K.; Wilhelmy, J. B. (Jerry B.)

    2001-01-01

    DANCE (Device for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4{pi} 162 element BaF{sub 2} array under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is designed to provide high granularity, fast timing and high photon detection efficiency. It will be located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center where neutrons are produced using 800 MeV proton induced spallation reactions on heavy element production targets. Using the pulsed high neutron fluence available at this facility combined with time of flight techniques it will be possible to make neutron capture measurements in the neutron energy range from eV to 100's of keV on rare and radioactive target material at the milligram and below level. These measurements will provide critically needed data for the interpretation of the astrophysical s-process 'branching point' nuclei as well as information for reactions needed in understanding transmutation processes of radioactive species.

  9. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway. Annual report for 1995; Overvaaking av radioaktivitet i Norge. Aarsrapport 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, T.C.

    1996-12-31

    At the end of 1995 the Norwegian monitoring network for measuring radioactivity consists of 29 stations distributed all over the country although with increased density in the county of Finnmark in North Norway. The results for 1995 are given in this report. The work was part of the Norwegian governmental programme for pollution monitoring. No measured values have been found which cannot be ascribed to natural variations in the radiation level or to technical malfunctions. In addition to the measurements the report gives a survey of the stations, presents a new station, discusses the operation of the gamma spectrometers, discusses international cooperation and the use of NILU`s measuring airplane. 33 figs.

  10. Gradio - Earth gravity field measurement on Aristoteles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, D.; Meyer, Ph.; Bernard, A.; Touboul, P.

    1991-10-01

    The design and operation of Gradio, the instrument that was specifically designed for precise gradiometry measurements during the Aristoteles mission, are described. The Gradio is based on simultaneous measurements by four three-axis ultrasensitive accelerometers performed in several locations on a rigid stable structure, called gradio plate, which are then used to compute g gradients. The operational phase of Gradio will last 6 months; the orbit will be circular, near polar, and heliosynchronous, at an altitude of 200 km. It is estimated that Gradio will measure the two main components T(yy) and T(zz) of the gravity gradient tensor in the (0.005, 0.125) Hz frequency bandwidth with an accuracy of 0.01 E.U.

  11. Measurement of soil radioactivity levels and radiation hazard assessment in southern Rechna interfluvial region, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Arshed, Waheed; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem; Ahmad, Syed Salman; Akhter, Perveen; Rehman, Saeed-Ur; Anjum, Muhammad Iftikhar

    2010-10-01

    Rechna interfluvial region is one of the main regions of Punjab, Pakistan. It is the area which is lying between River Ravi and River Chenab, alluvial-filled. Radioactivity levels in soil samples, collected from southern Rechna interfluvial region, Pakistan, have been estimated by using gamma-ray spectrometric technique. (226)Ra, (232)Th, the primordial radionuclide (40)K, and the artificial radionuclide (137)Cs have been measured in the soil of the study area. The mean radioactivity levels of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs were found to be 50.6 +/- 1.7, 62.3 +/- 3.2, 662.2 +/- 32.1, and 3.1 +/- 0.3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The mean radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), outdoor radiation hazard index (H(out)), indoor radiation hazard index (H(in)), and terrestrial absorbed dose rate for the area under study were determined as 190.8 +/- 8.7 Bq kg(-1), 0.52, 0.65, and 69.8 nGy h(-1), respectively. The annual effective dose to the general public was found to be 0.43 mSv. This value lies well below the limit of 1 mSv for general public as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The measured values are comparable with other global radioactivity measurements and are found to be safe for the public and the environment.

  12. Diffraction and polarization effects in Earth radiation budget measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, J R; Barki, A R; Priestley, K J

    2016-12-01

    Thermal radiation emitted and reflected from the Earth and viewed from near-Earth orbit may be characterized by its spectral distribution, its degree of coherence, and its state of polarization. The current generation of broadband Earth radiation budget instruments has been designed to minimize the effect of diffraction and polarization on science products. We used Monte Carlo ray-trace (MCRT) models that treat individual rays as quasi-monochromatic, polarized entities to explore the possibility of improving the performance of such instruments by including measures of diffraction and polarization during calibration and operation. We have demonstrated that diffraction and polarization sensitivity associated with typical Earth radiation budget instrument design features has a negligible effect on measurements.

  13. A state of the art on the measurement of the radioactive contamination in the inner surface of the pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, B. K.; Lee, K. W.; Oh, W. Z.; Woo, Z. H.; Kim, G. H

    2004-11-15

    Many radioactive wastes are produced during the decommissioning of the nuclear facilities. Their radiological characterization must be estimated for disposal and reuse. Especially, it is very difficult to measure the in-pipe surface contamination, because of the difficulty of access. So, it is necessary to develop the measurement technology for the in-pipe surface contamination. In the developed counties of the decommissioning technology such as America, Japan etc. they developed the measuring device for the in-pipe radioactive contamination and performed the capacity estimation. In this report, the state of the art on the measurement of the radioactive contamination in the inner surface of the pipe and radiation detector for measuring the each radiation(alpha, beta, and gamma) proceeding around the world was analyzed. By means of such technology analysis, we will develop the measuring technology of the radioactive contamination in the inner surface of the pipe and apply to the decommissioning sites.

  14. Visualisation of Radioactivity in Real-Time on a Tablet Measured by a Hybrid Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)749233; Bantel, Michael; Grünhaupt, Ulrich

    This work explores a method to visualise and interact with radioactivity over time and space by means of augmented reality on a screen. A prototype, iPadPix, was built to demonstrate use as an intuitive new tool for educative and training purposes. Measured by a hybrid pixel detector, Timepix, traces of radioactive decays are displayed in real- time on a mobile device. Its detection principle and properties are detailed as well as the calibration of the sensor. An embedded board is used to process and forward the sensor data to a tablet over a wireless network connection. Software was developed to processes and overlay signatures of ionising radiation and particles on a live camera feed. It is described here and published as open source.

  15. The natural radioactivity in water by gross alpha and beta measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonotto, D.M. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: danielbonotto@yahoo.com.br; Bueno, T.O.; Tessari, B.W.; Silva, A. [Departamento de Petrologia e Metalogenia, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Av. 24-A No. 1515, C.P. 178, CEP 13506-900, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    An alternative method for evaluating gross alpha and beta radioactivity in water was developed by performing alpha counting using a surface barrier detector and gamma- ray spectrometry using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. Several experiments were realized under controlled conditions in the laboratory with the aim of establishing adequate calibration of the systems utilized for performing activity concentration measurements in water samples of variable salinity. Groundwater samples collected at several spas in Sao Paulo and Minas Gerais States in Brazil were submitted to the developed technique in order to assure its applicability in waters characterized by different Total Dissolved Solids content. The values obtained were compatible with the previous knowledge of the radioactivity of the studied water sources, thus indicating the reliability and usefulness of the method for generating information on investigations focusing environmental aspects and/or the evaluation of the drinking water quality in terms of radiological aspects.

  16. Measuring radioactivity level in various types of rice using NaI (Tl detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laith A. Najam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A study of long- lived gamma emitting radionuclides in rice consumed in Nineveh Province (IRAQ were performed. The study targeted the natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K .The rice samples originated from seven different countries. NaI(Tl detector was used to measure the radionuclides level. The radioactivity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K ranged from 51.15 to 109.26 Bq/kg,13.67 to 71.97 Bq/kg and 231.87 to 691.71Bq/kg. In order to evaluate the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, radium equivalent activity, gamma absorbed dose rate, internal and external hazard indices , gamma index and finally alpha index have been calculated . Hence rice consumption in Nineveh province (IRAQ is radiologically safe for the presence of the investigated radionuclides.

  17. Environmental radioactivity measurements and applications - Difficulties, current status and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostakis, Marios J.

    2015-11-01

    For several decades natural and artificial radioactivity in the environment have been extensively studied all around the world. Nuclear accidents - mainly that of Chernobyl - have led to the development of the field of radioecology, while detector systems and techniques - with predominant that of γ-spectrometry - have been continuously developed through the years to meet researchers' needs. The study of natural radionuclides that was originally limited to 226Ra, 232Th and 40K was then extended to include radionuclides such as 234Th, 210Pb, 235U and 7Be, which allowed the study of radioactive equilibrium. Besides their importance from the radiation protection point of view, many radionuclides are also used as tracers of environmental processes, such as aerosol and transportation of air masses studies (7Be, 10Be, 22Na), soil erosion, sedimentation and geochronology (210Pb, 137Cs), marine ecosystems studies and studies related to climate change. All these studies require specialized samplings strategies and sampling preparation techniques as well as high quality measurements, while the improvement of detection limits is often of vital importance. This work is a review of environmental radioactivity measurements and applications, mainly focused in the field of γ-spectrometry, for which difficulties and limitations will be presented, together with future trends, new challenges and applications.

  18. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway. Annual report 1997; Overvaaking av radioaktivitet i Norge. Aarsrapport 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Thor Chr

    1998-10-01

    The Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) is managing a radioactivity monitoring network commissioned by the Norwegian Pollution Control Authority (Statens forurensningstilsyn). By 1997 the network consists of 28 stations throughout the country, especially tight in Finnmark.In addition there is a station in Russia (Verhetnetulomski). The 29 surveillance stations consist of: 12 ionic chamber instruments, 6 stationary gamma spectrometers for surveillance, 12 part-time gamma spectrometers designed for nutritional radioactivity measurements in co-operation with the Norwegian Food Control Authority (Naeringsmiddeltilsynet), LORAKON. The joint venture with LORAKON uses the gamma spectrometers at the stations for nutritional control for surveillance when they are not active in nutritional radioactivity measurements. The spectrometer detector is taken out of the lead tower and placed in windows at the laboratories. Then the spectrometer is connected to a telecommunication modem. The NILU computer is calling regularly whether the spectrometer is connected or not and uses it immediately when connected. The stations have not registered values that can not be attributed to natural variations in the radiation level or technical irregularities in 1997.

  19. Understanding the shape of the Earth and measuring its size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltatzis, Evangelos; Galanaki, Angeliki

    2016-04-01

    Most elementary students have problems and misconceptions regarding the shape of the Earth. Teachers often contribute to this confusion telling the students that the Earth is almost spherical, but not explaining to them, how the Earth can be spherical while it appears. It would be helpful for students to understand how humanity came with the idea of the spherical Earth (to be precise the Earth is ellipsoid). Historically, most cultures describe the Earth as flat. That changes with the ancient Greek culture. We don't know exactly how the Greeks first understood the spherical shape of the Earth, but some Greek philosophers give some arguments why the Earth must be a sphere. We can discuss these arguments and observations with the students. First, if someone travels in the south, he can see the southern constellations rise higher above the horizon. We can give students pictures of the night sky in southern regions and compare them with observations of ''their'' night sky. Second, in the lunar eclipse we can see the round shadow of the Earth. Third, whenever a ship is on the horizon, his low part is invisible . This is known as "hull-down". Moreover, the low part of mountains is invisible from the sea, due to the curvature of the Earth. It is always better to make these observations in real life but it can also be done via videos and pictures. The realization of the spherical shape of the Earth was sine qua non for the first good measurement of its size. In the second part of the project, following the ancient mathematician Eratosthenes's steps, students can measure the size of the Earth, , find pleasure in doing experimental work and realize how important mathematics is in everyday life. Two sticks, situated a long distance away from each other, can give us approximately the circumference , the radius and the diameter of the Earth. Eratosthenes used geometry combined to the knowledge of ancient Greek culture that the Earth is spherical (360°). He knew the distance

  20. Radioactivity concentration measurement and analysis in construction floor materials of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G. H.; Lee, H. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the radioactive concentrations contained in samples of commonly used building floor materials were measured. This result can be used as basic information for public health and the environment. Among building floor materials, samples of induction blocks, cement bricks, artificial granite blocks and compact high-pressure blocks were chosen and used. A detailed gamma nuclide analysis was performed with a multichannel analyzer by putting these samples on a high-purity germanium detector which is a semiconductor detector. In order to measure the concentration of radionuclides, a spectrum file was obtained by analyzing the concentration of gamma radionuclides and setting the measurement time as 1000, 4000, 7000 and 10,000 s. According to the study results, K-40, Bi-214, Pb-214, Ra-226 and U-235 were detected in the induction blocks measured at 10,000 s and K-40, Th-230, Bi-214, Pb-214, Ra-226 and Na-22 were detected in the cement bricks measured at 10,000 s. K-40, Bi-214, Pb-214, Th-234, U-235 and Ra-223 were detected in the artificial granite blocks measured at 10,000 s and K-40, Bi-214, Pb-214, Th-234, Ra-226, Ra-223 and Mn-54 were detected in the compact high-pressure blocks. In conclusion, low-level radioactivity was detected in building floor materials, so it is thought that measures to reduce radioactivity and further studies on this will be needed.

  1. Systematic hardness measurements on some rare earth garnet crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D B Sirdeshmukh; L Sirdeshmukh; K G Subhadra; K Kishan Rao; S Bal Laxman

    2001-10-01

    Microhardness measurements were undertaken on twelve rare earth garnet crystals. In yttrium aluminium garnet and gadolinium gallium garnet, there was no measurable difference in the hardness values of pure and nominally Nd-doped crystals. The hardness values were correlated with the lattice and elastic constants. An analysis of hardness data in terms of the interatomic binding indicated a high degree of covalency.

  2. Field Measurements and Pullout Tests of Reinforced Earth Retaining Wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈群; 何昌荣; 朱分清

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, field measurements and pullout tests of a new type of reinforced earth retaining wall, which is reinforced by trapezoid concrete blocks connected by steel bar, are described. Field measurements included settlements of the earth fill, tensile forces in the ties and earth pressures on the facing panels during the construction and at completion. Based on the measurements, the following statements can be made: ( 1 ) the tensile forces in the ties increased with the height of backfill above the tie and there is a tensile force crest in most ties; (2) at completion, the measured earth pressures along the wall face were between the values of the active earth pressures and the pressures at rest; (3) larger settlements occurred near the face of the wall where a zone of drainage sand and gravel was not compacted properly and smaller settlements occurred in the well-compacted backfill. The results of field pullout tests indicated that the magnitudes of pullout resistances as well as tensile forces induced in the ties were strongly influenced by the relative displacements between the ties and the backfill, and pullout resistances increased with the height of backfill above the ties and the length of ties.

  3. Application of a CZT detector to in situ environmental radioactivity measurement in the Fukushima area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowatari, M; Kubota, T; Shibahara, Y; Fujii, T; Fukutani, S; Takamiya, K; Mizuno, S; Yamana, H

    2015-11-01

    Instead of conventional Ge semiconductor detectors and NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometers, an application of a CdZnTe semiconductor (CZT) whose crystal has the dimension of 1 cm cubic to the in situ environmental radioactivity measurement was attempted in deeply affected areas in Fukushima region. Results of deposition density on soil for (134)Cs/(137)Cs obtained seemed consistent, comparing obtained results with those measured by the Japanese government. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms. Current measured values (State: 2013); Radioaktive Kontamination von Speisepilzen. Aktuelle Messwerte (Stand: 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabai, Eva; Hiersche, Lydia

    2015-01-15

    The report includes the current measured values (2013) of the radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms in Southern Germany (Cs137 and K-40) and discusses the relation radio-cesium intake and radiation exposure now and and the future.

  5. Set up and application of an underwater Α-ray spectrometer for radioactivity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. TSABARIS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The set up and control of an underwater measuring instrument for radioactivity pollution in the marine environment is described. The detection system is based on a NaI scintillator (RADAM III with modifications for use in the marine environment with on-line measurements. The system is simple, has low power consumption and is stable for long-term monitoring (10 months. Before its deployment, the sensor was calibrated in the laboratory in a tank full of water to reproduce the marine environment. The calibrations were performed, by detecting the 661keV and 1461 keV gamma rays of known activity liquid sources 137 Cs and 40 K, respectively. The measured spectra in the laboratory were compared with spectra from a similar detector as acquired in the field. The analysis of the parallel measurement gave satisfactory agreement for the concentration of the potassium (40 K, as calculated from the salinity in the seawater, thus enabling the system for quantitative measurement of the seawater radioactivity.

  6. OPEN RADIATION: a collaborative project for radioactivity measurement in the environment by the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottollier-Depois, Jean-François; Allain, E.; Baumont, G.; Berthelot, N.; Clairand, I.; Couvez, C.; Darley, G.; Henry, B.; Jolivet, T.; Laroche, P.; Lebau-Livé, A.; Lejeune, V.; Miss, J.; Monange, W.; Quéinnec, F.; Richet, Y.; Simon, C.; Trompier, F.; Vayron, F.

    2017-09-01

    After the Fukushima accident, initiatives emerged from the public to carry out themselves measurements of the radioactivity in the environment with various devices, among which smartphones, and to share data and experiences through collaborative tools and social networks. Such measurements have two major interests, on the one hand, to enable each individual of the public to assess his own risk regarding the radioactivity and, on the other hand, to provide "real time" data from the field at various locations, especially in the early phase of an emergency situation, which could be very useful for the emergency management. The objective of the OPENRADIATION project is to offer to the public the opportunity to be an actor for measurements of the radioactivity in the environment using connected dosimetric applications on smartphones. The challenge is to operate such a system on a sustainable basis in peaceful time and be useful in case of emergency. In "peaceful situation", this project is based on a collaborative approach with the aim to get complementary data to the existing ones, to consolidate the radiation background, to generate alerts in case of problem and to provide education & training and enhanced pedagogical approaches for a clear understanding of measures for the public. In case of emergency situation, data will be available "spontaneously" from the field in "real time" providing an opportunity for the emergency management and the communication with the public. … The practical objective is i) to develop a website centralising data from various systems/dosimeters, providing dose maps with raw and filtered data and creating dedicated areas for specific initiatives and exchanges of data and ii) to develop a data acquisition protocol and a dosimetric application using a connected dosimeter with a bluetooth connection. This project is conducted within a partnership between organisms' representative of the scientific community and associations to create links

  7. Development of a HPGe shielding system for radioactivity measurements at Cheongpyeong Underground Radiation Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. I.; Huh, J. Y.; Lee, E. K.; Choi, S. H.; Hahn, I. S.; Kang, W. G.; Kim, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, K. W.; Park, S. Y.; Yoo, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    We constructed an underground laboratory called Cheongpyeong Underground Radiation Laboratory (CURL) for measuring the radioactivity levels of various samples by using HPGe detectors. CURL is located underground at a depth of 1000-m water equivalent in the Cheongpyeong Pumped Storage Power Plant. We developed a shielding system, which consists of 15-cm-thick Pb blocks and 5-cm-thick Cu blocks and completely surrounds a 100% HPGe detector. We measured the background radiations and the gamma peaks from sources with and without the shield. The shielding efficiencies were also estimated using MCNP5 simulations, and they were compared to our measured data. The shielding system blocked more than 99.99% of gamma rays with energies up to 3.0 MeV. The HPGe detector with the shielding system at CURL blocked both high-energy cosmic rays and background radiation from surrounding rocks and materials. Our CURL detector system was optimized for gamma-ray measurements of meterials with ultra-low radioactivity.

  8. Air radioactivity levels following the Fukushima reactor accident measured at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, P; Brudanin, V; Piquemal, F; Reyss, J-L; Stekl, I; Warot, G; Zampaolo, M

    2012-12-01

    The radioactivity levels in the air of the radionuclides released by the Fukushima accident were measured at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane, in the South-East of France, during the period 25 March-18 April 2011. Air-filters from the ventilation system exposed for one or two days were measured using low-background gamma-ray spectrometry. In this paper we present the activity concentrations obtained for the radionuclides (131)I, (132)Te, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (95)Nb, (95)Zr, (106)Ru, (140)Ba/La and (103)Ru. The activity concentration of (131)I was of the order of 100 μBq/m(3), more than 100 times higher than the activities of other fission products. The highest activities of (131)I were measured as a first peak on 30 March and a second peak on 3-4 April. The activity concentrations of (134)Cs and (137)Cs varied from 5 to 30 μBq/m(3). The highest activity concentration recorded for Cs corresponded to the same period as for (131)I, with a peak on 2-3 April. The results of the radioactivity concentration levels in grass and mushrooms exposed to the air in the Modane region were also measured. Activity concentrations of (131)I of about 100 mBq/m(2) were found in grass.

  9. A critical review of measures to reduce radioactive doses from drinking water and consumption of freshwater foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J T; Voitsekhovitch, O V; Håkanson, L; Hilton, J

    2001-01-01

    Following a radioactive fallout event, there are a number of possible intervention measures to reduce radioactive doses to the public via the surface water pathway. We have critically reviewed the options available to decision-makers in the event of radioactive contamination of surface waters. We believe that the most effective and viable measures to reduce radioactivity in drinking water are those which operate at the water treatment and distribution stage. Intervention measures to reduce concentrations of radioactivity in rivers and reservoirs are expected to be much less viable and efficient at reducing doses via the drinking water pathway. Bans on consumption of freshwater fish can be effective, but there are few viable measures to reduce radioactivity in fish prior to the preparation stage. Lake liming and biomanipulation have been found to be ineffective for radiocaesium, although the addition of potassium to lakewaters appears promising in some situations. Lake liming may be effective in reducing radiostrontium in fish, though this has not, to our knowledge, been tested. De-boning fish contaminated by strontium is probably the most effective food preparation measure, but salting and freezing can also reduce radiocaesium concentrations in fish. The provision of accurate information to the public is highlighted as a key element of countermeasure implementation.

  10. Simple System to Measure the Earth's Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoglu, R.; Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib

    2010-01-01

    Our aim in this proposal is to use Faraday's law of induction as a simple lecture demonstration to measure the Earths magnetic field (B). This will also enable the students to learn about how electric power is generated from rotational motion. Obviously the idea is not original, yet it may be attractive in the sense that no sophisticated devices…

  11. Measurement of Earth's Free-Oscillations using a Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, R D

    2006-01-01

    One of the best ways to measure low-frequency eigenmode oscillations of the Earth is to monitor a simple pendulum responding to tilt. A theoretical basis for the method is given, by investigating a particular, well-known standing wave-the one with 53 minute period corresponding to oblate/prolate spheroidal deviations from the geoid.

  12. Radioactivity measurements on migrating birds (Turdus philomelos) captured in the Comunidad Valenciana (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, E; Roldán, C; Cervera, J; Ferrero, J L

    1998-01-19

    The radionuclides 137Cs, 134Cs and 90Sr have been measured in edible tissues and bones of migratory birds (song-thrushes, Turdus philomelos) from central and northern Europe and captured in the Comunidad Valenciana, Spain in the 1994 autumn-winter season. Eight years after the Chernobyl accident, extensive agricultural lands in Europe are still contaminated and this study shows that there was a transfer of radioactive isotopes to the captured migratory song-thrushes. The whole-body dose commitment to humans consuming these birds is estimated.

  13. The observatories for the radioactivity. results of measures; Les observatoires de la radioactivite. resultats des mesures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This IPSN's report on the monitoring of the radioactivity in France provides many graphs and tables of measures results recorded during the year 2000. The graphs show the activity levels (Bq or Bq fraction, per mass or volume unit) of many radionuclides in selected indicators and for levels upper than the detection limits. The metrology and the selected samples are presented. These samples are different for the three types of observatories: atmospheric, coast and terrestrial observatories. A chronological account of the results from 1959 to 2000 is also provided for the Cesium 137 and the beryllium 7 in the aerosols. (A.L.B.)

  14. EAGLE GUIDE. Radioactivity from A to Z; EAGLE-GUIDE. Radioaktivitaet von A bis Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolz, Werner

    2011-07-01

    The booklet on radioactivity is a lexicon-type compendium of definitions, fundamental terms and information on radioactivity. Radioactive processes occur in the sun and on earth, live is dependent on these processes. Human beings are exposed to cosmic radiation, radiation from natural radioactive nuclides and artificial radiation sources. There is almost no possibility to protect oneself from natural radioactivity. The protection from artificial radioactivity can be reached by appropriate protection measures. Artificial radiation sources will certainly by part of mankind in the future, in nuclear medicine, radiation therapy and for research purposes. The booklet is aimed to provide information to everybody as a basis to be able to discuss the respective topics.

  15. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  16. Current Measures on Radioactive Contamination in Japan: A Policy Situation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, Stuart; Miyagawa, Shoji; Kasuga, Fumiko; Shibuya, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March 2011 and the subsequent Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster caused radioactive contamination in the surrounding environment. In the immediate aftermath of the accident the Government of Japan placed strict measures on radio-contamination of food, and enhanced radio-contamination monitoring activities. Japan is a pilot country in the WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG), and through this initiative has an opportunity to report on policy affecting chemicals and toxins in the food distribution network. Nuclear accidents are extremely rare, and a policy situation analysis of the Japanese government's response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a responsibility of Japanese scientists. This study aims to assess Japan government policies to reduce radio-contamination risk and to identify strategies to strengthen food policies to ensure the best possible response to possible future radiation accidents. We conducted a hand search of all publicly available policy documents issued by the Cabinet Office, the Food Safety Commission, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW), the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery (MAFF) and prefectural governments concerning food safety standards and changes to radiation and contamination standards since March 11th, 2011. We extracted information on food shipment and sales restrictions, allowable radio-contamination limits, monitoring activities and monitoring results. The standard for allowable radioactive cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) of 100 Bq/Kg in general food, 50 Bq/Kg in infant formula and all milk products, and 10 Bq/Kg in drinking water was enforced from April 2012 under the Food Sanitation Law, although a provisional standard on radio-contamination had been applied since the nuclear accident. Restrictions on the commercial sale and distribution of specific meat, vegetable and fish products were released for areas at risk of

  17. Post-Chernobyl accident radioactivity measurements in the Comunidad Autonoma de Valencia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, J; Ballesteros, L; Serradell, V

    1992-03-01

    Increased atmospheric radioactivity after the accident in Chernobyl was first detected on air filters. Measurements were begun in Valencia on May 2, 1986, with the maximum activity being observed around May 3-4, 1986. As a consequence of this accident, annual campaigns of measurements on migrating birds (several species of aquatic birds and song-thrushes) were started. The data corresponding to the campaign immediately after the accident (1986/87) show a generalized contamination (approximately 50% of the measured specimens). Significant levels of 134Cs, 137Cs and 110Agm were found. It is important to note that 110Agm is only present in Aythya ferina. In the successive campaigns in 1988/89 and 1989/91 few samples were found to be contaminated and only 137Cs was identified. Strontium-90 was measured and identified in some specimens, mainly in their bones.

  18. The Periodic Measurement of the Airborne Radioactivity In Controlled Area of KOMAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong-Min; Park, Sung-Kyun; Min, Yi-Sub; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) to start the performance operation in the second half of 2013, is currently operated in each beamline 20-MeV and 100-MeV. The accelerator operation period is simply divided by three operation cycles which are the maintenance checks period for accelerator device, the performance test period before driving accelerator and the operation period. During this operation period, beam is irradiated to target. At this time, the proton beams collide with the target material and a high dose of radiations such as gamma ray and neutron occurred. Radiation controlled area at the accelerator facility is divided into accelerator tunnel and beam utilization zone. As a result of measuring the airborne radioactivity in the controlled area in accordance with the operating cycle of the proton accelerator KOMAC, It was confirmed that the value of the airborne radioactivity does not significantly differ according to each accelerator operating cycles. And alpha and beta values measured inside the area that workers primarily work is very low indoor radon level than the value of the recommendations in multiple facilities.

  19. Gamma-ray measurements of natural radioactivity in sedimentary rocks from Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure concentrations and distributions of natural radionuclides occurring mentary rock samples from Eastern Desert (Um El-Huetat), Nile Valley (Gebel Owina) and from southwest Sinai (Wadi Ghweiba) were measured using a high-purity germanium detector. The samples under investigation (clay, shale and sandstone) were used as raw materials in the construction industry (bricks, ceramics, cement, fillers, etc.). Though the sediments of Egypt have already been investigated in the geological and mineralogical aspects, it is necessary to investigate the natural radioactivity in order to complete their classification. The average concentration values of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K in the surveyed samples were 47 ± 7,21± 5, 393±19 Bq.kg-1 (clay); 23 ± 5, 30 ± 6, 563 ± 24 Bq.kg-1(shale); and 17 ± 4, 14 ± 4, 299 ± 17 Bq.kg-1 (sandstone), respectively. All sediment samples have radium equivalent natural radionuclides present in the samples have been computed and compared with the global averages. In terms of the radiation safety, the natural radioactivity of the sediment in Egypt is below the recommended limits of the gamma dose rate. Therefore, they can be used for all kinds of public buildings.

  20. Measuring oxygen isotopes beyond the neutron dripline: Two-neutron emission and radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohley, Zach

    2013-10-01

    The availability of rare isotope beams has made it possible to extend nuclear structure measurements to nuclei far away from stability. Drastic changes in the structure, properties, and available decay-modes of these exotic isotopes have been observed in comparison to their stable counterparts. The oxygen isotopic chain has been particularly interesting with observations of new shell closures at N = 14 and N = 16. The MoNA-LISA/Sweeper setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University has allowed for studies of the oxygen isotopes to be extended beyond the neutron dripline. Recently, the 26O ground state was observed for the first time and shown to be unbound by less than 200 keV. The low energy ground state of the two-neutron unbound 26O opened the possibility for the discovery of two-neutron radioactivity. A new technique was developed to measure the lifetimes of neutron unbound nuclei in the picosecond range. This technique was applied to the 26O decay and a half-life of 4.5-1. 5 + 1 . 1 (stat.) +/-3 (sys.) ps was extracted. This corresponds to 26O having a finite lifetime at an 82% confidence level and, thus, suggests the possibility of two-neutron radioactivity. Supported by the National Science Foundation, under Grant No. PHY-1102511.

  1. Measurement of radioactive contamination in the high-resistivity silicon CCDs of the DAMIC experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A; Bertou, X; Bole, D; Butner, M; Cancelo, G; Vázquez, A Castañeda; Chavarria, A E; Neto, J R T de Mello; Dixon, S; D'Olivo, J C; Estrada, J; Moroni, G Fernandez; Torres, K P Hernández; Izraelevitch, F; Kavner, A; Kilminster, B; Lawson, I; Liao, J; López, M; Molina, J; Moreno-Granados, G; Pena, J; Privitera, P; Sarkis, Y; Scarpine, V; Schwarz, T; Haro, M Sofo; Tiffenberg, J; Machado, D Torres; Trillaud, F; You, X; Zhou, J

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of radioactive contamination in the high-resistivity silicon charge-coupled devices (CCDs) used by the DAMIC experiment to search for dark matter particles. Novel analysis methods, which exploit the unique spatial resolution of CCDs, were developed to identify $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ particles. Uranium and thorium contamination in the CCD bulk was measured through $\\alpha$ spectroscopy, with an upper limit on the $^{238}$U ($^{232}$Th) decay rate of 5 (15) kg$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$ at 95% CL. We also searched for pairs of spatially correlated electron tracks separated in time by up to tens of days, as expected from $^{32}$Si-$^{32}$P or $^{210}$Pb-$^{210}$Bi sequences of $\\beta$ decays. The decay rate of $^{32}$Si was found to be $80^{+110}_{-65}$ kg$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$ (95% CI). An upper limit of $\\sim$35 kg$^{-1}$ d$^{-1}$ (95% CL) on the $^{210}$Pb decay rate was obtained independently by $\\alpha$ spectroscopy and the $\\beta$ decay sequence search. These levels of radioactive contamination are su...

  2. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnelli, P.F.F. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Laboratorio TANDAR, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Almaraz-Calderon, S. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Rehm, K.E., E-mail: rehm@anl.gov [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P.F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fernández Niello, J. [Laboratorio TANDAR, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Campus Miguelete, B1650BWA San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Henderson, D.; Jiang, C.L. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Lai, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Marley, S.T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R.C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Ugalde, C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the {sup 10,13,15}C+{sup 12}C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  3. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15C+12C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  4. Study of extraterrestrial disposal of radioactive wastes. Part 2: Preliminary feasibility screening study of extraterrestrial disposal of radioactive wastes in concentrations, matrix materials, and containers designed for storage on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, R. E.; Wohl, M. L.; Thompson, R. L.; Finnegan, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The results are reported of a preliminary feasibility screening study for providing long-term solutions to the problems of handling and managing radioactive wastes by extraterrestrial transportation of the wastes. Matrix materials and containers are discussed along with payloads, costs, and destinations for candidate space vehicles. The conclusions reached are: (1) Matrix material such as spray melt can be used without exceeding temperature limits of the matrix. (2) The cost in mills per kw hr electric, of space disposal of fission products is 4, 5, and 28 mills per kw hr for earth escape, solar orbit, and solar escape, respectively. (3) A major factor effecting cost is the earth storage time. Based on a normal operating condition design for solar escape, a storage time of more than sixty years is required to make the space disposal charge less than 10% of the bus-bar electric cost. (4) Based on a 10 year earth storage without further processing, the number of shuttle launches required would exceed one per day.

  5. RNM and CRITER projects: providing access to environmental radioactivity measurements during crisis and in peacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leprieur, F.; Couvez, C.; Manificat, G. [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (France)

    2014-07-01

    The multiplicity of actors and sources of information makes it difficult to centralize environmental radioactivity measurements and to provide access to experts and policy makers, but also to the general public. In the event of a radiological accident, many additional measures will also be carried out in the field by those involved in crisis management. In order to answer this problem, two projects were launched by IRSN with the aim of developing tools to centralize information on environmental radioactivity in normal situation (RNM project: National network of radioactive measurements) and during radiological crisis (CRITER project: Crisis and field). The RNM's mission is to contribute to the estimation of doses from ionizing radiation to which people are exposed and to inform the public. In order to achieve this goal, this network collects and makes available to the public the results of measurements of environmental radioactivity obtained in a normal situation by the French stakeholders. More than 18,000 measurements are transmitted each month by all producers to the RNM. After more than 4 years of operation, the database contains nearly 1,200,000 results. The opening in 2010 of the public web site (www.mesure-radioactivite.fr) was also a major step forward toward transparency and information. In case of radiological emergency, IRSN's mission is to centralize and process at the national level, in a database, all the results of measurements or analysis by all stakeholders throughout the crisis, in order to precisely determine the radiological situation of the environment, before, during and after the event. The project CRITER therefore involves the collection of all possible data from all potential sources, transmission, organization, and the publication of the measurements in crisis or post-accident situation. The emergency nature of the situation requires a transmission in near real-time data, facilitated by the development of automatic sensors. For

  6. Environmental pollutant isotope measurements and natural radioactivity assessment for North Tushki area, south western desert, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sroor, A. E-mail: amanysroor@hotmail.com; Afifi, S.Y.; Abdel-Haleem, A.S.; Salman, A.B.; Abdel-Sammad, M

    2002-09-01

    Natural radioactive materials under certain conditions can reach hazardous radiological levels. The natural radionuclide ({sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K) contents of rock samples at various locations in the North Tushki area were investigated using gamma-spectrometric analysis. Estimates of the measured radionuclide content have been made for the absorbed dose rate of gamma radiation. The equivalent radium (R{sub eq}) and the external hazard index (H{sub ex}) which resulted from the natural radionuclides in soil are also calculated and tabulated. The studied samples have been collected from various rock exposures in the North Tushki area. The distribution of major oxides, U and Th were studied. It is found that the enrichment and depletion of the major oxides are mainly due to the effect of hydrothermal alteration, which caused mobility of some major oxides, which increases some elements and decreases others. It is important to mention that the study area is far from the development region of the Tushki project and is only a local hazard. Therefore, additional regional studies of the Tushki Project area should be under taken to explore any unexpected environmental hazard due to the high concentration of the radioactive elements, which have been observed at its north boundary.

  7. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Toraño, E.; Peyres, V.; Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C.; Salvat, F.

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  8. A review of the nationwide proficiency test on natural radioactivity measurements by gamma spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, N K; Yeltepe, E; Yücel, Ü

    2016-03-01

    This study is the review of the first proficiency test on radioactivity measurement organized in Turkey by Sarayköy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM) of Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK) in 2013. The objective of the test was to determine (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K activity concentrations in natural soil samples using gamma-ray spectrometry. The bulk material consisting of uranium- and thorium-rich soil and sand was milled, mixed thoroughly and sieved. Homogeneity of the final mix was tested with 6 randomly taken samples. 16 proficiency test samples were distributed to 16 participating laboratories. 12 laboratories reported results. The results were evaluated on the accuracy and precision criteria adopted by the IAEA Proficiency Testing Group. The percentage of acceptable scores was 49%. Some recommendations have been provided to the laboratories to improve the quality of their results. It is planned to extend these proficiency tests periodically for various radionuclides in various matrices.

  9. Highly sensitive measurements of radioactive noble gas nuclides in the BOREXINO solar neutrino experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simgen, H; Heusser, G; Zuzel, G

    2004-01-01

    Low background miniaturized proportional counters as developed for the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment can be applied to the detection of radioactive noble gas nuclides at very low activities. We have developed an apparatus that allows the activity of trace amounts of isotopes of the four noble gases Ar, Kr, Xe and Rn to be measured. The technique includes contamination-free chromatographic purification of raw gas samples and subsequent low-level counting. Minimum detectable activities of 100 microBq and below have been attained. The developed techniques can be used to determine the 222Rn and 85Kr concentration in nitrogen for the solar neutrino experiment BOREXINO. By applying efficient techniques to concentrate noble gases from nitrogen, minimum detectable activity concentrations below 1 microBq/m3 of nitrogen (STP) have been reached for both nuclides.

  10. Determination of the age of the earth from Kamland measurement of geo-neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Mohanty, Subhendra

    2003-01-01

    The low energy component of the antineutrino spectrum observed in the recent Kamland experiment has significant contribution from the radioactive decay of $^{238}U$ and $^{232}Th$ in the crust and mantle of the earth. By taking the ratio of the antineutrino events obeserved in two different energy ranges we can determine the present value $[Th/U]$ independent of the U,Th distribution in the earth. Comparing with the r-process initial value of $[Th/U]_0$ we determine the age of the earth as a ...

  11. Measurement methodology of natural radioactivity in the thermal establishments; Methodologies de mesure de la radioactivite naturelle dans les etablissements thermaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameon, R.; Robe, M.C

    2004-11-15

    The thermal baths have been identified as an activity susceptible to expose to ionizing radiations the workers through the natural sources of radon and radon 220. The new regulation obliges these facilities to realize radioactivity measurements. The principal ways of exposure are radon and its daughters inhalation,, exposure to gamma radiation, ingestion of radioelements in thermal waters. I.R.S.N. proposes two methods of measurements of the natural radioactivity in application to the regulation relative to the protection of persons and workers. Some principles to reduce exposure to radon are reminded. (N.C.)0.

  12. RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanetick, S.

    1962-03-01

    ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

  13. Low-Earth Orbit Determination from Gravity Gradient Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiucong; Macabiau, Christophe; Han, Chao

    2016-01-01

    An innovative orbit determination method which makes use of gravity gradients for Low-Earth-Orbiting satellites is proposed. The measurement principle of gravity gradiometry is briefly reviewed and the sources of measurement error are analyzed. An adaptive hybrid least squares batch filter based on linearization of the orbital equation and unscented transformation of the measurement equation is developed to estimate the orbital states and the measurement biases. The algorithm is tested with the actual flight data from the European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer. The orbit determination results are compared with the GPS-derived orbits. The radial and cross-track position errors are on the order of tens of meters, whereas the along-track position error is over one order of magnitude larger. The gravity gradient based orbit determination method is promising for potential use in GPS-denied spacecraft navigation.

  14. Current Measures on Radioactive Contamination in Japan: A Policy Situation Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Gilmour

    Full Text Available The Great East Japan Earthquake on 11th March 2011 and the subsequent Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster caused radioactive contamination in the surrounding environment. In the immediate aftermath of the accident the Government of Japan placed strict measures on radio-contamination of food, and enhanced radio-contamination monitoring activities. Japan is a pilot country in the WHO Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG, and through this initiative has an opportunity to report on policy affecting chemicals and toxins in the food distribution network. Nuclear accidents are extremely rare, and a policy situation analysis of the Japanese government's response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident is a responsibility of Japanese scientists. This study aims to assess Japan government policies to reduce radio-contamination risk and to identify strategies to strengthen food policies to ensure the best possible response to possible future radiation accidents.We conducted a hand search of all publicly available policy documents issued by the Cabinet Office, the Food Safety Commission, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fishery (MAFF and prefectural governments concerning food safety standards and changes to radiation and contamination standards since March 11th, 2011. We extracted information on food shipment and sales restrictions, allowable radio-contamination limits, monitoring activities and monitoring results. The standard for allowable radioactive cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137 of 100 Bq/Kg in general food, 50 Bq/Kg in infant formula and all milk products, and 10 Bq/Kg in drinking water was enforced from April 2012 under the Food Sanitation Law, although a provisional standard on radio-contamination had been applied since the nuclear accident. Restrictions on the commercial sale and distribution of specific meat, vegetable and fish products were released for

  15. Results of radiometric and geochemical measurement for the natural radioactivity map of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišo Andjelov

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1990, a program was initiated to cover Slovenia with portable gamma-ray spectrometer measurements on a 5 x 5 km grid. The measurements were performed with a four channel Scintrex GAD-6 spectrometer. Five gamma-ray measurements were taken at each of 816 locations. Samples of the upper 10 cm of soil profile were collected for laboratory analysis. Uranium in samples was determinedby delayed neutron method (DNC. Other 35 elements: Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be,Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, Ti,U, V, W, Y, Zn and Zr were analyzed by plasma-coupled emission spectrometry (ICP. The field gamma-ray measurements were converted to ground concentrationsof potassium, uranium and thorium. These show good correlation with the laboratory analyses of soil samples. Regardless of the wide spaced sampling, the produced maps show relatively good correlation with main geological units. They demonstrated that the methodology can be successfully implemented for environmental monitoring, geological mapping and mineral exploration. The product ofthis project is the frist natural background radioactivity map of Slovenia covering the entire country.

  16. Thermal evolution of Earth's mantle and core: Influence of reference viscosity and concentration of radioactive elements in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    In a series of studies on the thermal evolution of Earth’s mantle and core [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004; 2005; 2010], we have assumed a reference viscosity (at T=1600 K and P=0) of 1022 Pa.s and a concentration of radioactive elements based on the surface heat flux of the Earth’s mantle (6x10-12 W/kg). In addition, the initial mantle temperature in these studies was also based on the mantle adiabat estimated from present potential temperature (1600 K). Problems with these models are that (1) the average mantle temperature increases in the initial phase of the calculation and (2) the final (present-day) surface heat flux is a factor of two lower than expected from observational constraints (46 TW [Jaupart et al., 2007]), which means the Urey ratio is higher than the expected value (~0.3) [Jaupert et al., 2007; Korenaga, 2007]. Here we present results of a coupled model of thermo-chemical mantle convection in a 2-D spherical annulus and parameterized core heat balance, in which we vary (i) the reference viscosity down to 1020 Pa.s, giving a "surface" Rayleigh number of 109, (ii) the concentration of radioactive heat-producing elements in the mantle are tried (either a theoretical estimate [Schubert et al., 2001; 25 TW], geochemical estimate [McDonough and Sun, 1995; 20 TW] and modified geochemical estimate [Lyubetskaya and Korenaga, 2006; 16 TW]) and (iii) the initial mantle adiabat (up to 2500 K at the surface). Preliminary results indicate a preference for an initial mantle adiabat of more than 2500 K and the modified geochemical estimate of radioactive element concentration, in order to understand the current thermal state of Earth’s mantle when the reference viscosity is 1022 Pa s. Results with lower reference viscosity will be presented.

  17. Radioactive geochronometry from the treatise on geochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, H D

    2011-01-01

    The history of Earth in the Solar System has been unraveled using natural radioactivity. The sources of this radioactivity are the original creation of the elements and the subsequent bombardment of objects, including Earth, in the Solar System by cosmic rays. Both radioactive and radiogenic nuclides are harnessed to arrive at ages of various events and processes on Earth. This collection of chapters from the "Treatise on Geochemistry" displays the range of radioactive geochronometric studies that have been addressed by researchers in various fields of Earth science. These range from the age of Earth and the Solar System to the dating of the history of Earth that assists us in defining the major events in Earth history. In addition, the use of radioactive geochronometry in describing rates of Earth surface processes, including the climate history recorded in ocean sediments and the patterns of circulation of the fluid Earth, has extended the range of utility of radioactive isotopes as chronometric and tracer ...

  18. Recommendations to the NRC for review criteria for alternative methods of low-level radioactive waste disposal: Task 2b: Earth-mounded concrete bunkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denson, R.H.; Bennett, R.D.; Wamsley, R.M.; Bean, D.L.; Ainsworth, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The US Army Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) and US Army Engineer Division, Huntsville (HNDED) have developed general design criteria and specific design review criteria for the earth-mounded concrete bunker (EMCB) alternative method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. An EMCB is generally described as a reinforced concrete vault placed below grade, underneath a tumulus, surrounded by filter-blanket and drainage zones. The tumulus is covered over with a low permeability cover layer and top soil with vegetation. Eight major review criteria categories have been developed ranging from the loads imposed on the EMCB structure through material quality and durability considerations. Specific design review criteria have been developed in detail for each of the eight major categories. 63 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Evaluation and measurements of radioactive air emission and off-site doses at SLAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ivy; Liu, James; Tran, Henry

    2013-08-01

    SLAC, a high-energy (GeV) electron accelerator facility, performs experimental and theoretical research using high-energy electron and/or positron beams that can produce secondary neutron and gamma radiation when beam losses occur. Radioactive gas production (mainly C, N, O, Ar) and release is one of the environmental protection program issues. U.S. DOE Order 458.1 requires that 40 CFR 61 Subpart H's NESHAP requirements be followed. These regulations prescribe a total dose limit of 0.1 mSv y to the Maximally Exposed Individual (MEI) of the general public, a requirement for a continuous air monitoring system if a release point within a facility can cause > 1 × 10 mSv y to the MEI, and a requirement for periodic confirmatory measurements for minor sources which give releases that contribute ≤ 1 × 10 mSv y to the MEI. At SLAC, all air release points for current operations are evaluated to be minor sources. This paper describes SLAC's evaluation following NESHAP requirements; measurements using the Air Monitoring Station (AMS) as periodic confirmatory measurements are also discussed.

  20. Quality control laboratories for measuring radioactivity; Control de calidad en los laboratorios de medida de radiactividad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legarda, F.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Nunez, R.

    2010-07-01

    In those laboratories involved in the measurement of radioactivity it is considered that a good determination requires, among other issues, and adequate monitoring of equipment performance and reagents and tracers. In this paper some of the parameters, of equipment performance are described together with some of the problems associated with their control and outlining possible solutions. Later, routine determinations are considered. For it is taken into account that an adequate control of the goodness of the results requires checking the whole measurement system, from sample reception to results delivery. In addition, the pros and cons of carrying out the enlargement of the control system so as to include management and performance of the laboratory as a whole in order to obtain an accreditation as external acknowledgement of well doing are discussed. Finally, this kind of acknowledgement, accreditation, is compared with the other kind of external acknowledgement of well doing: certification, establishing the former as adequate way of controlling not only the measurement process but also the management system. (Author). 15 refs.

  1. The radioactivity, the sun, the Earth and Kelvin`s death. A difficult dialog between physicists and geologists; La radioactivite, le soleil, la terre et la mort de Kelvin. Un dialogue difficile entre physiciens et geologues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richet, P.

    1996-10-01

    The question of the age of the Earth has remained mythical for a long time. During the last quarter of the 19. century, this question was the center of a strong controversy initiated by a physicist, William Thomson, the future Lord Kelvin. During the beginning of the 20. century, the discoveries of Becquerel and Pierre and Marie Curie about radioactivity gave rise to a new generation of physicists who were able to propose radiometric estimations of the Earth`s age to geologists. This digest paper describes the historical aspects of the discovery of radioactivity and of the first attempts for dating the Earth using radiometric techniques, and the strong discussions within the geologists community. (J.S.). 25 refs.

  2. Measurements of radioactivity and dose assessments in some building materials in Bitlis, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayakökü, Halime; Karatepe, Şule; Doğru, Mahmut

    2016-09-01

    In this study, samples of perlite, pumice and Ahlat stones (Ignimbrite) extracted from mines in Bitlis and samples of other building materials produced in facilities in Bitlis were collected and analyzed. Activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of building materials were measured using NaI detector (NaI(Tl)) with an efficiency of 24%. The radon measurements of building material samples were determined using CR-39 nuclear track detectors. (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K radioactivity concentrations ranged from (29.6±5.9 to 228.2±38.1Bq/kg), (10.8±5.4 to 95.5±26.1Bq/kg) and (249.3±124.7 to 2580.1±266.9Bq/kg), respectively. Radon concentration, radium equivalent activities, absorbed dose rate, excess lifetime cancer risk and the values of hazard indices were calculated for the measured samples to assess the radiation hazards arising from using those materials in the construction of dwellings. Radon concentration ranged between 89.2±12.0Bq/m(3) and 1141.0±225.0Bq/m(3). It was determined that Raeq values of samples conformed to world standards except for perlite and single samples of brick and Ahlat stone. Calculated values of absorbed dose rate ranged from 81.3±20.5 to 420.6±42.8nGy/h. ELCR values ranged from (1.8±0.3)×10(-3) to (9.0±1.0)×10(-3). All samples had ELCR values higher than the world average. The values of Hin and Hex varied from 0.35±0.11 to 1.78±0.18 and from 0.37±0.09 to 1.17±0.13, respectively. The results were compared with standard radioactivity values determined by international organizations and with similar studies. There would be a radiation risk for people living in buildings made of perlite, Ahlat-1 and Brick-3.

  3. [Measurement of C14 beta-radioactivity of stable natural origin taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) in bovine bile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetano, G; Bisegna, F; Bisio, V; Parenti, M

    1994-01-01

    Taurine from natural sources has gained great importance as essential nutrient in milk for formula-fed infants. There is a strong request for a method capable of determining the natural origin of taurine. The measure of beta-radioactivity of 14C of taurine by means of liquid scintillation counting proved the most reliable. A simple method is reported.

  4. Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioactive materials from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP in March 2011 spread over a large area, increasing the atmospheric electric conductivity by their ionizing effect, and reducing the vertical (downward component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG. PG data at Kakioka, 150 km away from the FNPP, showed independent changes compared to the radiation dose rate, and a comparison of these data revealed the local dynamics of the radioactive dust.

    (1 The initial drop of the PG to almost zero during 14–15 March is most likely due to radioactive dust suspended in the air near the ground during cloudy weather. (2 An episode of PG increase to more than 50 V m−1 on 16 March is most likely due to the re-suspension of the radioactive dust from the surface and subsequent removal from Kakioka by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3 Low but finite values of the PG during 16–20 March most likely reflect a reduced amount of radioactive material near the ground after the above wind transported away the majority of the suspended radioactive dust. (4 Very low values of the PG after substantial rain on 20–22 March most likely reflect settlement of the radioactive material by rain-induced fallout. (5 Temporal recovery of daily variations from the end of March to the middle of April with low nighttime fair-weather baseline PG most likely reflects re-suspension of the radioactive dust into the air from the ground and trees, and subsequent transport to the other region or fallout to the ground until late April. (6 Weakening of the daily variation and gradual recovery of the nighttime fair-weather baseline after mid-April suggests a complete settlement of the radioactive material to the ground with partial migration to the subsurface.

  5. Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, M. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Takeda, M. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Data Analysis Center for Geomagnetism and Space Magnetism; Makino, M.; Miyagi, I. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Owada, T. [Japan Meteorological Agency, Ishioka (Japan). Kakioka Magnetic Observatory

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive materials from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP) in March 2011 spread over a large area, increasing the atmospheric electric conductivity by their ionizing effect, and reducing the vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG). PG data at Kakioka, 150 km away from the FNPP, showed independent changes compared to the radiation dose rate, and a comparison of these data revealed the local dynamics of the radioactive dust. (1) The initial drop of the PG to almost zero during 14-15 March is most likely due to radioactive dust suspended in the air near the ground during cloudy weather. (2) An episode of PG increase to more than 50Vm{sup -1} on 16 March is most likely due to the re-suspension of the radioactive dust from the surface and subsequent removal from Kakioka by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) Low but finite values of the PG during 16-20 March most likely reflect a reduced amount of radioactive material near the ground after the above wind transported away the majority of the suspended radioactive dust. (4) Very low values of the PG after substantial rain on 20-22 March most likely reflect settlement of the radioactive material by rain-induced fallout. (5) Temporal recovery of daily variations from the end of March to the middle of April with low nighttime fair-weather baseline PG most likely reflects re-suspension of the radioactive dust into the air from the ground and trees, and subsequent transport to the other region or fallout to the ground until late April. (6) Weakening of the daily variation and gradual recovery of the nighttime fair-weather baseline after mid-April suggests a complete settlement of the radioactive material to the ground with partial migration to the subsurface. (orig.)

  6. Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, M.; Takeda, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.; Miyagi, I.

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive materials from the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP) in March 2011 spread over a large area, increasing the atmospheric electric conductivity by their ionizing effect, and reducing the vertical (downward) component of the DC electric field near the ground, or potential gradient (PG). PG data at Kakioka, 150 km away from the FNPP, showed independent changes compared to the radiation dose rate, and a comparison of these data revealed the local dynamics of the radioactive dust. (1) The initial drop of the PG to almost zero during 14-15 March is most likely due to radioactive dust suspended in the air near the ground during cloudy weather. (2) An episode of PG increase to more than 50 V m-1 on 16 March is most likely due to the re-suspension of the radioactive dust from the surface and subsequent removal from Kakioka by the strong wind from the non-contaminated area. (3) Low but finite values of the PG during 16-20 March most likely reflect a reduced amount of radioactive material near the ground after the above wind transported away the majority of the suspended radioactive dust. (4) Very low values of the PG after substantial rain on 20-22 March most likely reflect settlement of the radioactive material by rain-induced fallout. (5) Temporal recovery of daily variations from the end of March to the middle of April with low nighttime fair-weather baseline PG most likely reflects re-suspension of the radioactive dust into the air from the ground and trees, and subsequent transport to the other region or fallout to the ground until late April. (6) Weakening of the daily variation and gradual recovery of the nighttime fair-weather baseline after mid-April suggests a complete settlement of the radioactive material to the ground with partial migration to the subsurface.

  7. Air renewal times and ventilation rate calculations for underground workings using radioactive measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayman A. El-Abnoudy⇑; Sayed F. Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Potential alpha emitters are of prime concern to the ventilation engineer due to their rapid concentration increasing once radon released in the mine atmosphere, causing tissue irradiation and lung cancer. Studying of the time based variations of the natural ventilation in tunnels and their relationship to the external parameters contribute to the air circulation assessment. Due to the continuous and high fluctu-ation of the meteorological conditions affecting the air circulation and intensity through the underground workings, there is a difficulty in the natural ventilation assessment by only the ordinary meteorological measurements. So, in this paper, the possibility of using the radioactive measurements, allowing for the air aging and ventilation quality to be qualified, is investigated through three different underground structures. Referring to the most confined structure of them, results show that one structure has a better exchange rate by a factor 1.8 and the other has the best rate by a factor 2.1. This parameter can be linked to the operating costs and size of a future ventilation system.

  8. Equipment for the continuous measurement and identification of gamma radioactivity on aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Riego, Albert; Garcia, Roger; Dies, Javier; Diaz, Pedro [Nuclear Engineering Research Group, Departament of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia, Barcelona (Spain); Toral, Juan [Raditel Serveis. Tarragona (Spain); Batalla, Enric [Radiological Activities Corrdination Service - SCAR, Generalitat de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    Presentation the Equipment for the Continuous Measurement and Identification of Gamma Radioactivity on Aerosols developed by the Nuclear Engineering Research Group (NERG) from the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) and the Raditel Company. The device is based on a fixed filter of glass fiber (100% borosilicate), this allows determine the concentration of activity of gamma emitters on aerosols in air. A specifically developed Spectrometry Analysis System has been developed. The analysis of the spectra allows the identification of the emitters and determine the concentration of activity. Nowadays four Stations with this equipment are operating on the Environmental Radiological Surveillance Network of the Catalonian Generalitat (Spain): two near the Asco and Vandellos Nuclear Power Plants in the province of Tarragona and one in the city of Barcelona. Soon a fourth monitor will be incorporated at Roses (province of Girona) and a fifth in Puigcerda (province of Barcelona). We present measurements and analysis of the evolution of the emitters identified on different stations of the Network. (authors)

  9. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical Field (ELF) measurement project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    There is a need for an inexpensive, extensive, long-lasting global electric field measurement system (ELF). The primary performance driver of this mission is the need to measure the attitude of each spacecraft in the Earth's electric field very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to know the electric charge generated by the satellite as it crosses the magnetic field lines (E equals V times B). In order to achieve the desired global coverage, a constellation of about 50 satellites in at least 18 different orbits will be used. To reduce the cost of each satellite, off-the-shelf, proven technology will be used whenever possible. Researchers have set a limit of $500,000 per satellite. Researchers expect the program cost, including the deployment of the entire constellation, to be less than $100 million. The minimum projected mission life is five years.

  10. Spacecraft Attitude Determination with Earth Albedo Corrected Sun Sensor Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    This thesis focuses on advanced modeling of the Earth albedo experienced by satellites in Earth orbit. The model of the Earth albedo maintains directional information of the Earth albedo irradiance from each partition on the Earth surface. This allows enhanced modeling of Sun sensor current outputs......-Method, Extended Kalman Filter, and Unscented Kalman Filter algorithms are presented and the results are compared. Combining the Unscented Kalman Filter with Earth albedo and enhanced Sun sensor modeling allows for three-axis attitude determination from Sun sensor only, which previously has been perceived...

  11. Neutron measurements in near-Earth orbit with COMPTEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D. J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Lockwood, J. A.; Mcconnell, M. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Peng, X.

    1995-01-01

    The fast neutron flux in near-Earth orbit has been measured with the COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). For this measurement one of COMPTEL's seven liquid scintillator modules was used as an uncollimated neutron detector with threshold of 12.8 MeV. The measurements cover a range of 4.8 to 15.5 GV in vertical cutoff rigidity and 3 deg to 177 deg in spacecraft geocenter zenith angle. One of the measurements occurred near the minimum of the deepest Forbush decrease ever observed by ground-level neutron monitors. After correction for solar modulation, the total flux is well fitted by separable functions in rigidity and zenith angle. With the spacecraft pointed near the nadir the flux is consistent with balloon measurements of the atmospheric neutron albedo. The flux varies by about a factor of 4 between the extremes of rigidity and a factor of 2 between the extremes of zenith angle. The effect of the spacecraft mass in shielding the detector from the atmospheric neutron albedo is much more important than its role as a source of additional secondary neutrons. The neutron spectral hardness varies little with rigidity or zenith angle and lies in the range spanned by earlier atmospheric neutron albedo measurements.

  12. Neutron measurements in near-Earth orbit with COMPTEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, D.J.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Lockwood, J.A.; Mcconnell, M.L.; Ryan, J.M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Peng, X. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)]|[SRON-Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands]|[European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk, Netherlands]|[University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, US

    1995-07-01

    The fast neutron flux in near-Earth orbit has been measured with the COMPTEL instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). For this measurement one of COMPTEL`s seven liquid scintillator modules was used as an uncollimated neutron detector with threshold of 12.8 MeV. The measurements cover a range of 4.8 to 15.5 GV in vertical cutoff rigidity and 3 deg to 177 deg in spacecraft geocenter zenith angle. One of the measurements occurred near the minimum of the deepest Forbush decrease ever observed by ground-level neutron monitors. After correction for solar modulation, the total flux is well fitted by separable functions in rigidity and zenith angle. With the spacecraft pointed near the nadir the flux is consistent with balloon measurements of the atmospheric neutron albedo. The flux varies by about a factor of 4 between the extremes of rigidity and a factor of 2 between the extremes of zenith angle. The effect of the spacecraft mass in shielding the detector from the atmospheric neutron albedo is much more important than its role as a source of additional secondary neutrons. The neutron spectral hardness varies little with rigidity or zenith angle and lies in the range spanned by earlier atmospheric neutron albedo measurements.

  13. Turbulent processes in Earth's magnetosheath by Cluster mission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, L. V.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Kronberg, E. A.; Prokhorenkov, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    Methods and approaches which can be used for the analysis of hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows are chosen for this study. It is defined that the best methods for determination of turbulent process types are the methods of statistical physics. Within the statistical approach the fractal analysis (height of the maximum of probability density fluctuations of the studied parameters) and multifractal analysis (study of a power dependence of high order statistical moments and construction of multifractal spectrum) are considered. It is indicated that the statistical analysis of turbulent process properties can be supplemented with spectral studies (wavelet analysis). Physical processes in the transition regions of the magnetosphere: foreshock, shock, post-shock and magnetosheath are investigated using high frequency measurements by Cluster satellites. Extended self-similarity analysis and structure function analysis demonstrate the presence of super-diffusion processes and the highest values of generalized diffusion coefficients observed in post-shock region. It can be noted that different approaches for the analysis of turbulent processes give similar results and indicate the presence of super-diffusion processes in the transition region of the Earth's magnetosphere. This fact must be taken into account when constructing quantitative models of a transfer process. Wavelet analysis shows the presence of cascade and inverse cascade processes in the Earth's magnetosheath. Good agreement with other studies and our new results contribute to improvement of our understanding of turbulence.

  14. Volumetric water content measurement probes in earth-dam construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardanis Michael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two frequency domain reflectometry (FDR probes have been used. They were used on compacted soils both in the laboratory and in the field. Measurements in the laboratory were intended for calibration. The range of densities and types of materials where insertion of the probes can be achieved was investigated first. The effect of sporadic presence of coarser grains and density on these calibrations, once insertion could be achieved, were investigated second. Measurements on laboratory prepared samples with the same moisture content were different when the sample was kept in the mould from when it was extruded from it. Also both these measurements were different from that in a sample of the same density but significantly larger in diameter. It was found that measurements with these probes are affected by dilation exhibited by soil around the rods of the probes during insertion. Readings immediately after insertion of the sensors on samples extruded from their moulds were the ones closer to measured values. These readings combined with total volume and mass obtained from sand-cone tests during the construction of an earth-dam allowed fairly accurate estimation of the dry unit weight but not the gravimetric water content.

  15. Measurement of the Earth tides with a MEMS gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemiss, R. P.; Samarelli, A.; Paul, D. J.; Hough, J.; Rowan, S.; Hammond, G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to measure tiny variations in the local gravitational acceleration allows, besides other applications, the detection of hidden hydrocarbon reserves, magma build-up before volcanic eruptions, and subterranean tunnels. Several technologies are available that achieve the sensitivities required for such applications (tens of microgal per hertz1/2): free-fall gravimeters, spring-based gravimeters, superconducting gravimeters, and atom interferometers. All of these devices can observe the Earth tides: the elastic deformation of the Earth’s crust as a result of tidal forces. This is a universally predictable gravitational signal that requires both high sensitivity and high stability over timescales of several days to measure. All present gravimeters, however, have limitations of high cost (more than 100,000 US dollars) and high mass (more than 8 kilograms). Here we present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device with a sensitivity of 40 microgal per hertz1/2 only a few cubic centimetres in size. We use it to measure the Earth tides, revealing the long-term stability of our instrument compared to any other MEMS device. MEMS accelerometers—found in most smart phones—can be mass-produced remarkably cheaply, but none are stable enough to be called a gravimeter. Our device has thus made the transition from accelerometer to gravimeter. The small size and low cost of this MEMS gravimeter suggests many applications in gravity mapping. For example, it could be mounted on a drone instead of low-flying aircraft for distributed land surveying and exploration, deployed to monitor volcanoes, or built into multi-pixel density-contrast imaging arrays.

  16. Enabling Earth Science Measurements with NASA UAS Capabilites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, Randal; Schoenung, Susan; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Cutler, Frank; Tagg, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Airborne Science Program (ASP) maintains a fleet of manned and unmanned aircraft for Earth Science measurements and observations. The unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) range in size from very large (Global Hawks) to medium (SIERRA, Viking) and relatively small (DragonEye). UAS fly from very low (boundary layer) to very high altitude (stratosphere). NASA also supports science and applied science projects using UAS operated by outside companies or agencies. The aircraft and accompanying data and support systems have been used in numerous investigations. For example, Global Hawks have been used to study both hurricanes and atmospheric composition. SIERRA has been used to study ice, earthquake faults, and coral reefs. DragonEye is being used to measure volcanic emissions. As a foundation for NASA's UAS work, Altair and Ikkana not only flew wildfires in the Western US, but also provided major programs for the development of real-time data download and processing capabilities. In early 2014, an advanced L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) also flew for the first time on Global Hawk, proving the utility of UAVSAR, which has been flying successfully on a manned aircraft. In this paper, we focus on two topics: 1) the results of a NASA program called UAS-Enabled Earth Science, in which three different science teams flew (at least) two different UAS to demonstrate platform performance, airspace integration, sensor performance, and applied science results from the data collected; 2) recent accomplishments with the high altitude, long-duration Global Hawks, especially measurements from several payload suites consisting of multiple instruments. The latest upgrades to data processing, communications, tracking and flight planning systems will also be described.

  17. Measurement of radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in different kinds of marbles and granites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dine, N W; El-Shershaby, A; Ahmed, F; Abdel-Haleem, A S

    2001-12-01

    Geological materials usually contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have become a focus of great attention. These NORM under certain conditions can reach hazardous contamination levels. Some contamination levels may be sufficiently severe that precautions must be taken. The present study deals with 60 geological samples (marble and granite) from both Egyptian and foreign locations. The studied samples were analyzed and the concentrations in Bq/kg dry weight of radioisotopes were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detector in Bq/kg dry weight. The absorbed dose rate due to the natural radioactivity in the samples under investigation ranged from 2.45 +/- 0.07 to 64.44 +/- 1.93 nGy/h for marble and from 41.55 +/- 1.25 to 111.94 +/- 3.36 nGy/h for granite. The radium equivalent activity varied from 5.46 +/- 0.16 to 150.52 +/- 4.52 Bq/kg for marble samples and from 229.52 +/- 6.89 to 92.16 +/- 2.76 Bq/kg for granite. The representative external hazard index values for the corresponding samples are also estimated and given. The radon exhalation rates for marble and granite samples were also calculated by using solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39). The value of radium exhalation rate varied from 8.0 +/- 2.39 to 30.20 +/- 5.06 Bq/m2/d for marble and 6.89 +/- 1.72 to 25.79 +/- 4.38 Bq/m2/d for granite and the effective radium content was found to vary from 1.700 +/- 0.51 to 6.42 +/- 1.08 Bq/kg for marble and 1.29 +/- 0.32 to 5.63 +/- 0.96 Bq/kg for granite. The values of the radon exhalation rate and effective radium content are found to correspond with the values of uranium concentration measured by the HPGe detector in the corresponding sample.

  18. Exploring Prompt Measurement Methods for (n,2n) Cross Sections on Radioactive Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahle, L

    2006-01-05

    This report summarizes a study of possible neutron detection technologies for performing prompt (n,2n) measurements on radioactive targets of the type that could be made at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). The report recommends conducting further research on high-pressure {sup 3}He gas scintillators as it is the best candidate technology. These detectors meet the requirements of a fast response time (fall times around 5-10 ns), gamma ray suppression, (all gamma rays below about 900 keV can be easily discriminated against), and can be easily configured into a 4{pi} array. The one requirement that these detectors fall short is efficiency, but less than a factor of 10 improvement is needed. The possibility of pulse shape discrimination should also be explored for these detectors as this would help to distinguish gamma rays above 900 keV from neutrons. In addition to R&D work on these detectors, Monte Carlo simulations and target development are also recommended areas of further study.

  19. A unique automation platform for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite identification studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Krauser

    Full Text Available Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using (14C or (3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector.

  20. A Unique Automation Platform for Measuring Low Level Radioactivity in Metabolite Identification Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using 14C or 3H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector. PMID:22723932

  1. A unique automation platform for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite identification studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauser, Joel; Walles, Markus; Wolf, Thierry; Graf, Daniel; Swart, Piet

    2012-01-01

    Generation and interpretation of biotransformation data on drugs, i.e. identification of physiologically relevant metabolites, defining metabolic pathways and elucidation of metabolite structures, have become increasingly important to the drug development process. Profiling using (14)C or (3)H radiolabel is defined as the chromatographic separation and quantification of drug-related material in a given biological sample derived from an in vitro, preclinical in vivo or clinical study. Metabolite profiling is a very time intensive activity, particularly for preclinical in vivo or clinical studies which have defined limitations on radiation burden and exposure levels. A clear gap exists for certain studies which do not require specialized high volume automation technologies, yet these studies would still clearly benefit from automation. Use of radiolabeled compounds in preclinical and clinical ADME studies, specifically for metabolite profiling and identification are a very good example. The current lack of automation for measuring low level radioactivity in metabolite profiling requires substantial capacity, personal attention and resources from laboratory scientists. To help address these challenges and improve efficiency, we have innovated, developed and implemented a novel and flexible automation platform that integrates a robotic plate handling platform, HPLC or UPLC system, mass spectrometer and an automated fraction collector.

  2. Implications of modelled radioactivity measurements along coastal Odisha, Eastern India for heavy mineral resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, S.; Agrahari, S.; Guin, R.; Sengupta, D.

    2017-01-01

    A radioelemental assemblage assessment of two beaches of Odisha is performed for the first time. The radiation is measured in two ways, both on field with the help of a hand held environmental survey meter and in the laboratory, where the concentrations of radionuclide's 238U, 232Th and 4K have been determined with the help of High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe). Mineralogical analysis of selected samples has been performed with the help of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF). A marked difference between the concentration of Uranium (274 Bq kg-1) and Thorium (2489 Bq kg-1) is observed and discussed based on the geology of the area. The placer deposits showing an enrichment of thorium can be an important source of nuclear fuel for the thorium based nuclear reactors. The ratio of thorium and uranium concentrations gives us an idea about the coastal processes associated with the beach. Statistical analysis of the data shows a positive correlation between 238U and 232Th and a strong negative correlation is indicated between 4 K and 238U, 232Th. A cross plot between the equivalent thorium and the equivalent uranium and the equivalent thorium and potassium, represents the nature of deposition and its association with the heavy mineral along with the radioactive elements. Heavy minerals exhibit an increasing trend towards Northeast-Southwest along the south eastern coast of India.

  3. Neutrino measurements from the Sun and Earth: Results from Borexino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, G.; Caccianiga, B.; D’Angelo, D.; Giammarchi, M.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Ranucci, G., E-mail: gioacchino.ranucci@mi.infn.it; Re, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli Studi e INFN, 20133 Milano (Italy); Benziger, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Bick, D.; Hagner, C.; Meyer, M. [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Bonfini, G.; Cavalcante, P.; Gabriele, F.; Gazzana, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Laubenstein, M. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, 67100 Assergi (Italy); and others

    2015-07-15

    Important neutrino results came recently from Borexino, a massive, calorimetric liquid scintillator detector installed at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. With its unprecedented radiopurity levels achieved in the core of the detection medium, it is the only experiment in operation able to study in real time solar neutrino interactions in the challenging sub-MeV energy region. The recently achieved breakthrough observation of the fundamental pp flux, the precise measurement of the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux, and the results concerning the pep, {sup 8}B and CNO fluxes, together with their physics implications, are described in this work. Moreover, the detector has also provided a clean detection of terrestrial neutrinos, from which they emerge as a new probe of the interior of the Earth.

  4. Radioactivity measurements and dose rate calculations using ERICA tool in the terrestrial environment of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulou, Maria; Florou, Heleny; Manolopoulou, Metaxia

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the radioactivity levels to which terrestrial non-human biota were exposed are examined. Organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) were collected during the period of 2010 to 2014 from grasslands where sheep and goats were free-range grazing. Natural background radionuclides ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (228)Th) and artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs, (134)Cs, (131)I) were detected in the collected samples using gamma spectrometry. The actual measured activity concentrations and site-specific data of the studied organisms were imported in ERICA Assessment Tool (version 1.2.0) in order to provide an insight of the radiological dose rates. The highest activity concentrations were detected in samples collected from Lesvos island and the lowest in samples collected from Attiki and Etoloakarnania prefectures. The highest contribution to the total dose rate was clearly derived from the internal exposure and is closely related to the exposure to alpha emitters of natural background ((226)Ra and (228)Th). The Fukushima-derived traces of (137)Cs, (134)Cs, and (131)I, along with the residual (137)Cs, resulted in quite low contribution to the total dose rate. The obtained results may strengthen the adaptation of software tools to a wider range of ecosystems and may be proved useful in further research regarding the possible impact of protracted low level ionizing radiation on non-human biota. This kind of studies may contribute to the effective incorporation of dosimetry tools in the development of integrated environmental and radiological impact assessment policies.

  5. Research and implementation of the monitor for in situ radioactivity measurements in the marine environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN; Guoxing; WEI; Zhiqiang; WANG; Xiaoying; ZHANG; Yingying; ZHANG; Guohua

    2015-01-01

    As the traditional methods can not meet the requirements of marine radioactivity monitoring,a radioactivity monitoring sensor used in marine field has been proposed.This sensor is based on Nal(TI) scintillation crystal and employs the special shielding method,the anticoincidence design,the spectrum stabilization algorithm of characteristic peaks and the Monte Carlo simulation fitting calibration formula.Through the continuous tests of terminals and the activity test for target nuclide 40K,it is found that the sensor is stable and the error is less than 10%.

  6. Radioactive contamination of edible mushrooms. Current measured values (State: 2014); Radioaktive Kontamination von Speisepilzen. Aktuelle Messwerte (Stand: 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabai, Eva; Hiersche, Lydia

    2015-09-15

    The report on the radioactive contamination of different wild edible mushrooms in southern Germany summarizes the actual situation in 2014 in comparison with the data since 2005. The mushrooms were fund in the regions contaminated as a consequence of the reactor accident in Chernobyl 1986. The data for Cs-137 and K-40 contamination of a large amount of wild edible mushrooms are tabulated for different sampling sites. Measured data of the years 2004 to 2013 are included.

  7. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  8. Partial radiogenic heat model for Earth revealed by geoneutrino measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Abe; . et al.; M.P. Decowski

    2011-01-01

    The Earth has cooled since its formation, yet the decay of radiogenic isotopes, and in particular uranium, thorium and potassium, in the planet’s interior provides a continuing heat source. The current total heat flux from the Earth to space is 44.2±1.0 TW, but the relative contributions from residu

  9. Measuring relative humidity in the radioactive environment of the IRRAD proton facility

    CERN Document Server

    Paerg, Marten

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the project was to obtain information on relative humidity conditions at different locations in the IRRAD proton facility. Due to high radiation levels inside the facility, different sensors had to be qualified and dedicated electronics had to be built to transfer the data of the sensors over long wires to a less radioactive area, where it could be collected.

  10. Radioactive air sampling methods

    CERN Document Server

    Maiello, Mark L

    2010-01-01

    Although the field of radioactive air sampling has matured and evolved over decades, it has lacked a single resource that assimilates technical and background information on its many facets. Edited by experts and with contributions from top practitioners and researchers, Radioactive Air Sampling Methods provides authoritative guidance on measuring airborne radioactivity from industrial, research, and nuclear power operations, as well as naturally occuring radioactivity in the environment. Designed for industrial hygienists, air quality experts, and heath physicists, the book delves into the applied research advancing and transforming practice with improvements to measurement equipment, human dose modeling of inhaled radioactivity, and radiation safety regulations. To present a wide picture of the field, it covers the international and national standards that guide the quality of air sampling measurements and equipment. It discusses emergency response issues, including radioactive fallout and the assets used ...

  11. Environmental radioactivity measurements in the autonomous community of Aragon; Medidas de la radiactividad ambiental en la comunidad autonoma de Aragon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvete, H.; Carrion, A.; Gale, C.; Garcia, E.; Nunez-Lagos, R.; Perez, C.; Puimedon, J.; Rodriguez, S.; Sanchez, P.; Sarsa, M. L.; Villar, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    To know the level of environmental radioactivity in the Autonomous Community of Aragon thermoluminescent dosimeters used to measure the cumulative dose over a period of time in each of its 33 counties. The project, funded by the Government of Aragon and La Caixa to carry a map of environmental radioactivity with the collaboration of Secondary Schools and public schools for the renovation and shipment of dosimeters. The selection of the different locations was carried out taking into account the points of interest in the project reflected Marna, by ENUSA and the CSN, on natural gamma radiation. The work program began in 2009 and to date working with 43 centers distributed throughout the community tried to cover a wide surface area of Aragon. (Author)

  12. Measurement of natural radioactivity in building materials of Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, India using gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravisankar, R; Vanasundari, K; Chandrasekaran, A; Rajalakshmi, A; Suganya, M; Vijayagopal, P; Meenakshisundaram, V

    2012-04-01

    The natural level of radioactivity in building materials is one of the major causes of external exposure to γ-rays. The primordial radionuclides in building materials are one of the sources of radiation hazard in dwellings made of these materials. By the determination of the radioactivity level in building materials, the indoor radiological hazard to human health can be assessed. This is an important precautionary measure whenever the dose rate is found to be above the recommended limits. The aim of this work was to measure the specific activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in commonly used building materials from Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, India, using gamma-ray spectrometer. The radiation hazard due to the total natural radioactivity in the studied building materials was estimated by different approaches. The concentrations of the natural radionuclides and the radium equivalent activity in studied samples were compared with the corresponding results of different countries. From the analysis, it is found that these materials may be safely used as construction materials and do not pose significant radiation hazards.

  13. Radioactive contamination processes during 14-21 March after the Fukushima accident: What does atmospheric electric field measurements tell us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, M.; Yamauchi, M.; Makino, M.; Owada, T.; Miyagi, I.

    2012-04-01

    Ionizing radiation from the radioactive material is known to increase atmospheric electric conductivity, and hence to decrease vertical downward atmospheric DC electric field at ground level, or potential gradient (PG). In the past, the drop of PG has been observed after rain-induced radioactive fallout (wet contamination) after nuclear tests or after the Chernobyl disaster. After the nuclear accident Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP) that started 11 March 2011, the PG also at Kakioka, 150 km southwest from the FNPP, also dropped a by one order of magnitude. Unlike the past examples, the PG drop was two-stepped on 14 March and 20 March. Both correspond to two largest southward release of radioactive material according to the data from the radiation dose rate measurement network. We compare the Kakioka's PG data with the radiation dose rate data at different places to examine the fallout processes of both on 14 March and on 20 March. The former turned out to be dry contamination by surface wind, leaving a substantial amount of fallout floating near the ground. The latter turned out to be wet contamination by rain after transport by relatively low-altitude wind, and the majority of the fallout settled to the ground at this time. It is recommended that all nuclear power plant to have a network of PG observation surrounding the plant. Takeda, et al. (2011): Initial effect of the Fukushima accident on atmospheric electricity, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L15811, doi:10.1029/2011GL048511. Yamauchi, et al. (2012): Settlement process of radioactive dust to the ground inferred from the atmospheric electric field measurement, Ann. Geophys., 30, 49-56, doi:10.5194/angeo-30-49-2012.

  14. Radioactivity measurements in soil samples collected in the Republic of Srpska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankovic, Marija [Institute Vinca, Radiation and Environmental Protection Department, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)], E-mail: marijam@vin.bg.ac.yu; Todorovic, Dragana [Institute Vinca, Radiation and Environmental Protection Department, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Savanovic, Milovan [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Mladena Stojanovica 2, 78000 Banjaluka, Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegowina)

    2008-09-15

    During 2005 and 2006, soil samples were collected from different regions in the Republic of Srpska, in order to evaluate their radioactivity. During the war that lasted from 1994 to 1995, it is known that some locations in the Republic of Srpska were imposed upon by NATO forces. Sampled locations were chosen far away from the bombed places in order to check whether the depleted uranium was dispersed over long distances. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in soil samples were determined by gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector, relative efficiency 23%). Results showed the presence of natural radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U as well as the produced radionuclide {sup 137}Cs (from the Chernobyl accident and nuclear probes). In order to evaluate the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma-absorbed dose rate, the annual effective dose rate and the external hazard index have been calculated.

  15. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  16. Bayesian Processing for the Detection of Radioactive Contraband from Uncertain Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V; Sale, K; Guidry, B; Breitfeller, E; Manatt, D; Chambers, D

    2007-06-26

    With the increase in terrorist activities throughout the world, the need to develop techniques capable of detecting radioactive contraband in a timely manner is a critical requirement. The development of Bayesian processors for the detection of contraband stems from the fact that the posterior distribution is clearly multimodal eliminating the usual Gaussian-based processors. The development of a sequential bootstrap processor for this problem is discussed and shown how it is capable of providing an enhanced signal for eventual detection.

  17. Use of flow scintillation analyzer combined with amino acid analyzer for measuring low-level radioactivity of tritium-labelled amino acids

    CERN Document Server

    Lukashina, E V; Fedoseev, V M; Ksenofontov, A L; Baratova, L A; Dobrov, E N

    2002-01-01

    Potential application of the Radiomatic 150TR Flow Scintillation Analyzer (Packard Instrument Co., USA) for measuring low radioactivity of tritium-labelled amino acids in eluate from the Amino Acid Analyzer 835 (Hitachi, Japan) was studied. Six scintillating cocktails were tested and the Hionic-Fluor and Ultima-Flo AP cocktails proved the most appropriate for flow measurement of radioactivity. Efficiency of tritium radioactivity recording under various conditions of analysis was determined. Under optimal conditions the lower detection limit for the Hionic-Fluor was 150, while for Ultima-Flo AP-100 decays/min in the peak of amino acid

  18. Measurements of radioactive and stable sulfur isotopes at Mt. Everest and its geochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Thiemens, M. H.; Zhang, Q.; Li, C.; Kang, S.; Hsu, S. C.; Zhang, Z.; Su, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Himalayas were recently identified as a global hotspot for deep stratosphere-to-troposphere transport (STT) during spring [1]. Although STT transport in this region may play a vital role in tropospheric chemistry, the hydrological cycle and aquatic ecosystems in Asia, there is no direct measurement of a specific chemical stratospheric tracer to verify and evaluate its possible impact. Here, cosmogenic 35S tracer (half-life: ~87 days) produced in the stratosphere was measured for the first time in surface snow and river runoff samples collected at Mt. Everest in April 2013 using a low-noise liquid scintillation spectroscopy [2]. Strikingly, we find extraordinarily high concentrations of 35S in these samples (>10 times higher than the southern Tibetan Plateau), verifying the Himalayas as a gateway of springtime STT. In light of this, two studies were conducted: a) Measurements of 35SO2 and 35SO42- at the southern Tibetan Plateau reveals that the oxidative life time of SO2 is reduced to 2.1 days under the influence of aged stratospheric air masses from the Himalayas. A concept box model for estimating the influence of STT on surface O3 using 35S tracer is proposed. b) Quadruple stable sulfur isotopes in a sediment core (~250 years) from the Gokyo Lake (the world's highest freshwater lake) [3] near Mt. Everest are being measured to investigate the possible impact of STT on sulfur budget at the Himalayas. The absence of sulfide suggests that bacterial sulfate reduction may be negligible in this lake. Enrichment of uranium (EF ≈ 10) in 20th century samples highlights the impact of atmospheric deposition. S-isotope sulfate anomalies are not found (∆33S and ∆36S ≈ 0‰), implying that sulfate in this lake may be mainly contributed by eolian dust or derived from rock. This is also supported by the low enrichments of most trace elements (EF ≈ 1). Rare earth elements will be used to assist in identifying the potential sources and interpreting the variation of

  19. Investigations of Two-Layer Earth Parameters at Low Voltage: Measurements and Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ramdan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The two-layer soil model at low magnitude voltage is assumed to be accurate for the measurement and calculation of the earth resistance of a combined grid-multiple rods electrode. The aim of this study is to measure and calculate the earth resistance of a combined grid-multiple rods electrode buried in a two-layer soil and to confirm the simplicity and accuracy of the used formula. Approach: Soil resistivity was measured using Wenner four point method. Advanced earth resistivity measurement interpretation techniques which include graphical curve matching based on master curves and an advanced computer program based on a genetic algorithm are used in this study. Results: Based on the resistivity data, the earth resistance value was calculated using the formulas obtained from the literature. Measurements of the earth resistance of the earthing system were also conducted using the fall of potential method. Conclusion/Recommendations: A very good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated earth resistance values. This research is the first time ever conducted where the measured earth resistance values are compared directly with the calculated earth values.

  20. The radioactivity measurements in soils and fertilizers using gamma spectrometry technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhenfouf, Wassila; Boucenna, Ahmed

    2011-04-01

    Because of their mineral content, soils are naturally radioactive and one of the sources of radioactivity other than those of natural origin is mainly due to the extensive use of fertilizers. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the fluxes of natural radionuclides in local production of phosphate fertilizers to determine the content of radioactivity in several commercial fertilizers produced in Algeria and to estimate their radiological impact in a cultivated soil even for the long-term exposure due to their application. For these purposes, virgin and fertilized soils were collected from outlying Setif region in Algeria and from phosphate fertilizers used in this area. Gamma spectrometry was exploited to determine activity concentration due to naturally occurring (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in five types of samples (two different sorts of fertilizers, virgin and fertilized soils and well water used for irrigation) taken from Setif's areas. The results show that these radionuclides were present in an average concentration of 134.7 ± 24.1, 131.8 ± 16.7, 11644 ± 550 Bq/kg for the first fertilizer NPK and 190.3 ± 30, 117.2 ± 10.3, 5312 ± 249 Bq/kg for the second fertilizer (NPKs). For the virgin and the fertilized soils, the corresponding values were respectively 47.01 ± 7.3, 33 ± 7, 329.4 ± 19.7 Bq/kg and 53.2 ± 10.6, 50.0 ± 7, 311.4 ± 18.7 Bq/kg. For well water, the values were 1.93 and 0.12 Bq/kg; however the third value was below the Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA). The radium equivalent activity (Raeq) and the representative level index I(γr) for all samples were also calculated. The data were discussed and compared with those given in the literature.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of a NaI(Tl) detector for in situ radioactivity measurements in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Li, Changkai; Liu, Dongyan; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yan

    2015-04-01

    To develop in situ NaI(Tl) detector for radioactivity measurement in the marine environment, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Transport Code was utilized to simulate the measurement of NaI(Tl) detector immersed in seawater, taking into account the material and geometry of the detector, and the interactions between the photons with the atoms of the seawater and the detector. The simulation results of the marine detection efficiency and distance were deduced and analyzed. In order to test their reliability, the field measurement was made at open sea and the experimental value of the marine detection efficiency was deduced and seems to be in good agreement with the simulated one. The minimum detectable activity for (137)Cs in the seawater of NaI(Tl) detector developed was determined mathematically at last. The simulation method and results in the paper can be used for the better design and quantitative calculation of in situ NaI(Tl) detector for radioactivity measurement in the marine environment, and also for some applications such as the installation on the marine monitoring platform and the quantitative analysis of radionuclides. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurements of Fission and Radioactive Capture Reaction Rates Inside the Fuel of the Ipen/MB-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mura, Luís Felipe L.; Bitelli, Ulysses d'Utra; Fanaro, Leda C. C. B.

    2011-05-01

    This work presents the measures of the nuclear reaction rates along the radial direction of the fuel pellet by irradiation and posterior gamma spectrometry of a thin slice of fuel pellet of UO2 at 4.3% enrichment. From its irradiation, the rate of radioactive capture and fission had been measured as a function of the radius of the pellet disk using a Ortec GMX HPGe detector. Lead collimators had been used for this purpose. Simulating the fuel pellet in the pin fuel of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor, a thin UO2 disk is used, being inserted in the interior of a dismountable fuel rod. This fuel rod is then placed in the central position of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor core and irradiated during 1 h under a neutron flux of 5 ×108 n/cm2 s. In gamma spectrometry, 10 collimators with different diameters have been used; consequently, the nuclear reactions of radioactive capture that occurs in atoms of 238U and the fission that occurs on both 235U and 238U are measured in function of 10 different regions (diameter of collimator) of the UO2 fuel pellet disk. Nuclear fission produces different fission products such as 143Ce with a yield fission of 5.9% which decay is monitored in this work. Corrections in geometric efficiency due to introduction of collimators on HPGe detection system were estimated using photon transport of MCNP-4C code. Some calculated values of nuclear reaction rate of radioactive capture and fission along the radial direction of the fuel pellet obtained by Monte Carlo methodology, using the MCNP-4C code, are presented and compared to the experimental data showing very good agreement.

  3. Corrosion Control Measures For Liquid Radioactive Waste Storage Tanks At The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B. J.; Subramanian, K. H.

    2012-11-27

    The Savannah River Site has stored radioactive wastes in large, underground, carbon steel tanks for approximately 60 years. An assessment of potential degradation mechanisms determined that the tanks may be vulnerable to nitrate- induced pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Controls on the solution chemistry and temperature of the wastes are in place to mitigate these mechanisms. These controls are based upon a series of experiments performed using simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks. The technical bases and evolution of these controls is presented in this paper.

  4. Preparing a dedicated set up for level lifetime measurements using the recoil Doppler shift technique with fast radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackstein, M.; Fransen, C.; Dewald, A.; Braun, N.; Braunroth, T.; Jolie, J.; Litzinger, J.; Moschner, K.; Reiter, P.; Pfeiffer, M.; Rother, W.; Taprogge, J.; Wendt, A.; Zell, K.O. [IKP, Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Algora, A.; Doncel, M.; Gadea, A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Ameil, F.; Boutachkov, P.; Gerl, J.; Grebosz, J.; Guastalla, G.; Habermann, T.; Kurz, N.; Merchan, E.; Nociforo, C.; Pietri, S.; Quitana, B.; Wollersheim, H. [KP II, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Corsi, A.; Louchar, C.; Obertelli, A. [CEA Saclay (France); Reese, M. [IKP, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Petkov, P. [INRNE, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a new plunger device especially designed to meet the constraints found at the fragment recoil separator (FRS) at GSI (Darmstadt) in combination with PRESPEC. The aim is to measure level lifetimes in the pico-second range using the recoil distance Doppler shift (RDDS) method of states in exotic nuclei excited via Coulomb excitation or knock-out reactions with radioactive beams at relativistic energies. We also report on the first results obtained from a first commissioning run performed recently with a stable {sup 54}Cr beam.

  5. The measurement of radioactivity in water and soil samples from Republic of Srpska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorovic, D.J.; Jankovic, M.M.

    2008-07-01

    During 2005 and 2006 water and soil samples were collected from different regions in Republic of Srpska, in order to evaluate their radioactivity. During the War lasted from 1994 to 1995, it is known that some locations in Bosnia and Herzegovina (Republic of Srpska belongs territorially to Bosnia and Herzegovina) were imposed by NATO forces and targeted by depleted uranium. For investigation we chose locations which are far away from the bombed places in order to check whether the depleted uranium was dispersed on long distances. The activity concentrations of radio-nuclides in water and soil samples were determined by gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector, relative efficiency 23%). Results showed the presence of natural radio-nuclides 226Ra, 232Th, 40K, 235U, 238U as well as the produced radionuclide 137Cs. In order to evaluate the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma-absorbed dose rate, the annual effective dose rate and the external hazard index have been calculated for soil samples. (author)(tk)

  6. Radioactivity a very short introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Tuniz, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Radioactivity: A Very Short Introduction explains radioactivity and discusses its fundamental role in nature. Radioactivity remains misunderstood and feared perhaps because nuclear radiation cannot be detected by human senses, and can undoubtedly do great harm if appropriate precautions are not taken. Radioactivity in the stars and in the Earth and its wide range of applications in biomedicine, science, industry, agriculture are described, as well as the mechanisms of nuclear fission and fusion, and the harnessing of nuclear power. The issues surrounding safety and security and the increasing concerns about nuclear terrorism are also considered.

  7. Measurement of radioactivity in an elevated radiation background area of Western Ghats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manigandan P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of monitoring the exposure of the general public to natural radioactivity, the activity concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil samples in an elevated radiation background area of Western Ghats was determined using gamma-ray spectrometry. Average values of the activity concentration of radionuclides, outdoor terrestrial gamma dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent and radiation hazard indices from soil activity were estimated. The activity concentrations of 232Th and average outdoor terrestrial gamma dose rate were found to be higher than the world average, possibly affecting the Western Ghats environment in general. Therefore, radiological risks to the general population from ionizing radiation from the naturally occurring radionuclides in the soil are considered to be significant. How- ever, other radiological hazard indices were found to be within permissible limits.

  8. The measurement of radioactive noble gases by DWD in the frame of the Global Atmospheric Watch programme of WMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkopff, T; Dyck, W; Frank, G; Frenzel, S; Salvamoser, J

    2004-01-01

    The Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD, German Meteorological Service) is integrated into the Global Atmospheric Watch programme (GAW) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). According to this programme a variety of chemical compounds and radionuclides are measured at global stations. At the research platform "Schneefernerhaus" 7Be, 222Rn, and its decay products, 14C in CO2, tritium as HTO, 85Kr and 133Xe are continuously monitored by the DWD or are sampled and then measured at the central laboratory in Offenbach. The results are used as additional information for studying atmospheric mixing processes or on the other hand as information about the background level of radioactivity. As a main subject of this paper the integration and partly the optimization of sampling and measuring procedures for the detection of noble gases are described. In particular, the methods of quality assurance are discussed for Kr and Xe.

  9. Effective method of measuring the radioactivity of [131I]-capsule prior to radioiodine therapy with significant reduction of the radiation exposure to the medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Marx, Malies; Imme, Thea; Assam, Isong; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Culman, Juaraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radio Oncology is of the utmost importance. Radioiodine therapy is a frequently used and effective method for the treatment of thyroid disease. Prior to each therapy the radioactivity of the [131I]-capsule must be determined to prevent misadministration. This leads to a significant radiation exposure to the staff. We describe an alternative method, allowing a considerable reduction of the radiation exposure. Two [131I]-capsules (A01 = 2818.5; A02 = 7355.0 MBq) were measured multiple times in their own delivery lead containers - that is to say, [131I]-capsules remain inside the containers during the measurements (shielded measurement) using a dose calibrator and a well-type and a thyroid uptake probe. The results of the shielded measurements were correlated linearly with the [131I]-capsules radioactivity to create calibration curves for the used devices. Additional radioactivity measurements of 50 [131I]-capsules of different radioactivities were done to validate the shielded measuring method. The personal skin dose rate (HP(0.07)) was determined using calibrated thermo luminescent dosimeters. The determination coefficients for the calibration curves were R2 > 0.9980 for all devices. The relative uncertainty of the shielded measurement was radioactivity.

  10. Crystal Fields in Dilute Rare-Earth Metals Obtained from Magnetization Measurements on Dilute Rare-Earth Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Høg, J.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal field parameters of Tb, Dy, and Er in Sc, Y, and Lu are summarized. These parameters are obtained from magnetization measurements on dilute single crystals, and successfully checked by a number of different methods. The crystal field parameters vary unpredictably with the rare-earth solute....... B40, B60, and B66 are similar in Y and Lu. Crystal field parameters for the pure metals Tb, Dy, and Er are estimated from the crystal fields in Y and Lu....

  11. Measuring Earth's Local Magnetic Field Using a Helmholtz Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I present a low-cost interactive experiment for measuring the strength of Earth's local magnetic field. This activity can be done in most high schools or two-year physics laboratories with limited resources, yet will have a tremendous learning impact. This experiment solidifies the three-dimensional nature of Earth's…

  12. Measuring the Eccentricity of the Earth's Orbit with a Nail and a Piece of Plywood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    I describe how to obtain a rather good experimental determination of the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit, as well as the obliquity of the Earth's rotation axis, by measuring, over the course of a year, the elevation of the Sun as a function of time during a day. With a very simple "instrument" consisting of an elementary sundial, first-year…

  13. Radioactive Material

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Group of the Safety Commission is responsible for shipping of radioactive material from CERN to any external institute or organisation. The RP group is equally responsible for the reception of radioactive material shipped to any of the CERN sites. Anyone who needs to ship from or import into CERN radioactive material must contact the Radioactive Shipping Service of the RP group in advance. Instructions are available at: http://cern.ch/rp-shipping or in the Radiation Protection Procedure PRP13: https://edms.cern.ch/document/346823 Radiation Protection Group

  14. Radioactive Material

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Group of the Safety Commission is responsible for shipping of radioactive material from CERN to any external institute or organisation. The RP group is equally responsible for the reception of radioactive material shipped to any of the CERN sites. Anyone who needs to ship from or import into CERN radioactive material must contact the Radioactive Shipping Service of the RP group in advance. Instructions are available at: http://cern.ch/rp-shipping or in the Radiation Protection Procedure PRP13: https://edms.cern.ch/document/346823 Radiation Protection Group

  15. Apparatus development for measurement of (134)Cs and (137)Cs radioactivity of soil contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Okashiro, Yasuharu; Kai, Hiroaki; Fujii, Syuuji; Mishima, Atsushi; Matsubara, Takahide; Yoshida, Shinji

    2016-09-01

    We developed an apparatus containing a NaI(Tl) scintillator to measure the (134)Cs and (137)Cs radioactivity of soil contaminated by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The unfolding method with the least-squares technique was used to determine the radioactivity. Detector responses for each radionuclide in soil were calculated with EGS5 code for the unfolding method. The radionuclides that were measured were (40)K, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (208)Tl, (214)Bi, and (228)Ac. The measured spectrum agreed well with the spectrum calculated from the response matrix and measured radioactivities. The unfolding method allows us to use the NaI(Tl) scintillator despite the overlap of peaks.

  16. Low level radioactivity measurements with phoswich detectors using coincident techniques and digital pulse processing analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente, R. de la [University of Leon, Escuela de Ingenieria Industrial, Leon 24071 (Spain); Celis, B. de [University of Leon, Escuela de Ingenieria Industrial, Leon 24071 (Spain)], E-mail: bcelc@unileon.es; Canto, V. del; Lumbreras, J.M. [University of Leon, Escuela de Ingenieria Industrial, Leon 24071 (Spain); Celis, Alonso B. de [King' s College London, IoP, De Crespigny Park, SE58AF (United Kingdom); Martin-Martin, A. [Laboratorio LIBRA, Edificio I-D, Paseo Belen 3. 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Facultad de Ciencias. Po Prado de la Magdalena, s/n. 47005 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: alonsomm@libra.uva.es; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J.L. [Laboratorio LIBRA, Edificio I-D, Paseo Belen 3. 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Facultad de Ciencias. Po Prado de la Magdalena, s/n. 47005 Valladolid (Spain)], E-mail: joselg@libra.uva.es

    2008-10-15

    A new system has been developed for the detection of low radioactivity levels of fission products and actinides using coincidence techniques. The device combines a phoswich detector for {alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}-ray recognition with a fast digital card for electronic pulse analysis. The phoswich can be used in a coincident mode by identifying the composed signal produced by the simultaneous detection of {alpha}/{beta} particles and X-rays/{gamma} particles. The technique of coincidences with phoswich detectors was proposed recently to verify the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (NTBT) which established the necessity of monitoring low levels of gaseous fission products produced by underground nuclear explosions. With the device proposed here it is possible to identify the coincidence events and determine the energy and type of coincident particles. The sensitivity of the system has been improved by employing liquid scintillators and a high resolution low energy germanium detector. In this case it is possible to identify simultaneously by {alpha}/{gamma} coincidence transuranic nuclides present in environmental samples without necessity of performing radiochemical separation. The minimum detectable activity was estimated to be 0.01 Bq kg{sup -1} for 0.1 kg of soil and 1000 min counting.

  17. Investigations of Two-Layer Earth Parameters at Low Voltage: Measurements and Calculations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. Ramdan; N. M. Nor; K. Ramar

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: The two-layer soil model at low magnitude voltage is assumed to be accurate for the measurement and calculation of the earth resistance of a combined grid-multiple rods electrode...

  18. Analysis of the new INTEGRAL Earth observations to measure the cosmic X-ray background

    CERN Document Server

    Türler, M; Pavan, L; Ferrigno, C; Bordas, P

    2013-01-01

    A new series of Earth occultation observations has been started in 2012 to refine the determination of the cosmic X-ray background by the INTEGRAL mission. We show here that the new detector lightcurves in the 3 to 160 keV range differ from the ones obtained in 2006. Instead of the expected modulation induced by the passage of the Earth through the field of view of the JEM-X, IBIS/ISGRI and SPI instruments, we record unrelated variability on shorter timescales. We discuss the differences obtained with the datasets of 2006 and 2012 in view of the changes in pointing direction, spacecraft orbit and solar cycle phase. We conclude that the Earth occultation signal in 2012 is likely blended by radioactive decay resulting from the activation of the spacecraft when crossing the proton radiation belt at perigee passage. The observed variability, on the other hand, results most likely from the current solar maximum. In addition to a variable particle environment from inhomogeneities of the solar wind, we also find evi...

  19. Structural and thermal properties of the Poly(styrene-ethyl acrylate) polymeric scintillation material for surface radioactive contamination measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ho Sang; Seo, Bum Kyoung; Lee, Kune Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Emulsion polymerization is a unique chemical process widely used to produce waterborne resins with various colloidal and physicochemical properties. These emulsion polymers find a wide range of applications such as synthetic rubbers, thermoplastics, coatings, adhesives, binders, rheological modifiers, plastics pigments, standards for the calibration of instruments, polymeric supports for the purification of proteins and drug delivery system, etc. Polystyrenes are widely employed as matrices in order to dope scintillating dyes for alpha and beta radiation sensors. For example, BC-400 (Bicron Direct Saint-Gobain, MA), a polyvinyltoluene-based scintillator doped with PPO and POPOP, is the best existing plastic scintillator for alpha particle detection. Using emulsion polymerization technique described in a previous communication, experiments have been performed to investigate the detection performance with the scintillators contents. In this paper, the properties of the polymer for radioactive contaminant measurement observed under various condition of polymerization and variously EA contents.

  20. Radioactivity; La radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This pedagogical document presents the origin, effects and uses of radioactivity: where does radioactivity comes from, effects on the body, measurement, protection against radiations, uses in the medical field, in the electric power industry, in the food (ionization, radio-mutagenesis, irradiations) and other industries (radiography, gauges, detectors, irradiations, tracers), and in research activities (dating, preservation of cultural objects). The document ends with some examples of irradiation levels (examples of natural radioactivity, distribution of the various sources of exposure in France). (J.S.)

  1. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  2. Precise measurement of the 222Rn half-life: a probe to monitor the stability of radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bellotti, E; Di Carlo, G; Laubenstein, M; Menegazzo, R

    2015-01-01

    We give the results of a study on the 222Rn decay we performed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS) by detecting the gamma rays from the radon progeny. The motivation was to monitor the stability of radioactivity measuring several times per year the half-life of a short lifetime (days) source instead of measuring over a long period the activity of a long lifetime (tens or hundreds of years) source. In particular, we give the reason of the large periodical fluctuations in the count rate of the gamma rays due to radon inside a closed canister which has been described in literature and which has been attributed to a possible influence of a component in the solar irradiation affecting the nuclear decay rates. We then provide the result of four half-life measurements we performed underground at LNGS in the period from May 2014 to January 2015 with radon diffused into olive oil. Briefly, we did not measure any change of the 222Rn half-life with a 8*10^-5 precision. Finally, we provide the most precise value for the ...

  3. Precise measurement of the 222Rn half-life: A probe to monitor the stability of radioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bellotti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We give the results of a study on the 222Rn decay we performed in the Gran Sasso Laboratory (LNGS by detecting the gamma rays from the radon progeny. The motivation was to monitor the stability of radioactivity measuring several times per year the half-life of a short lifetime (days source instead of measuring over a long period the activity of a long lifetime (tens or hundreds of years source. In particular, we give a possible reason of the large periodical fluctuations in the count rate of the gamma rays due to radon inside a closed canister which has been described in literature and which has been attributed to a possible influence of a component in the solar irradiation affecting the nuclear decay rates. We then provide the result of four half-life measurements we performed underground at LNGS in the period from May 2014 to January 2015 with radon diffused into olive oil. Briefly, we did not measure any change of the 222Rn half-life with a 8⋅10−5 precision. Finally, we provide the most precise value for the 222Rn half-life: 3.82146(16stat(4syst days.

  4. Space life sciences: radiation risk assessment and radiation measurements in low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The volume contains papers presented at COSPAR symposia in October 2002 about radiation risk assessment and radiation measurements in low Earth orbit. The risk assessment symposium brought together multidisciplinary expertise including physicists, biologists, and theoretical modelers. Topics included current knowledge about known and predicted radiation environments, radiation shielding, physics cross section models, improved ion beam transport codes, biological demonstrations of specific shielding materials and applications to a manned mission to Mars, advancements in biological measurement of radiation-induced protein expression profiles, and integration of physical and biological parameters to assess key elements of radiation risk. Papers from the radiation measurements in low Earth orbit symposium included data about dose, linear energy transfer spectra, and charge spectra from recent measurements on the International Space Station (ISS), comparison between calculations and measurements of dose distribution inside a human phantom and the neutron component inside the ISS; and reviews of trapped antiprotons and positrons inside the Earth's magnetosphere.

  5. Residual radioactivity measurement in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for the evaluation of DS86 neutron fluence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, K.; Endo, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima Univ., Kasumi, Hiroshima (JP)] [and others

    2000-05-01

    Residual {sup 152}Eu activity produced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured in seven mineral samples located up to 1142 m from the epicenter. Europium was chemically separated from the sample and gamma-ray measurement was carried out with a well-type Ge detector. Deduced specific activities were compared with previous measurements and with activation calculation based on the DS86 neutron fluence. Present results are slightly higher than the calculation at far distances. However, systematic discrepancy as has been observed in Hiroshima is not clear. Further measurements for samples beyond 1000 m from the hypocenter are necessary to ensure the discrepancy problem. (author)

  6. Quantum CPF gates between rare earth ions through measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yun-Feng; Han, Zheng-Fu; Yang, Yong; Guo, Guang-Can

    2004-09-01

    We propose a method to realize quantum controlled phase flip (CPF) through interaction between a single-photon pulse and two microsphere cavities with a single three-level ion respectively and final photonic measurement. Our CPF gates are scalable with extremely high fidelity and low error rate, and are more applicable based on current laboratory cavity-QED technology.

  7. Quantum CPF gates between rare earth ions through measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yunfeng [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China (CAS), Hefei 230026 (China)]. E-mail: yfxiao@mail.ustc.edu.cn; Han Zhengfu [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China (CAS), Hefei 230026 (China)]. E-mail: zfhan@ustc.edu.cn; Yang Yong [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China (CAS), Hefei 230026 (China); Guo Guangcan [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China (CAS), Hefei 230026 (China)]. E-mail: gcguo@ustc.edu.cn

    2004-09-20

    We propose a method to realize quantum controlled phase flip (CPF) through interaction between a single-photon pulse and two microsphere cavities with a single three-level ion respectively and final photonic measurement. Our CPF gates are scalable with extremely high fidelity and low error rate, and are more applicable based on current laboratory cavity-QED technology.

  8. Production cross section measurements of radioactive isotopes by BigRIPS separator at RIKEN RI Beam Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, H; Fukuda, N; Inabe, N; Kameda, D; Takeda, H; Yoshida, K; Kusaka, K; Yanagisawa, Y; Ohtake, M; Sato, H; Shimizu, Y; Baba, H; Kurokawa, M; Ohnishi, T; Tanaka, K; Tarasov, O B; Bazin, D; Morrissey, D J; Sherrill, B M; Ieki, K; Murai, D; Iwasa, N; Chiba, A; Ohkoda, Y; Ideguchi, E; Go, S; Yokoyama, R; Fujii, T; Nishimura, D; Nishibata, H; Momota, S; Lewitowicz, M; DeFrance, G; Celikovic, I; Steiger, K

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the production rates and production cross sections for a variety of radioactive isotopes which were produced from 124Xe, 48Ca, and 238U beams at an energy of 345 MeV/nucleon using the BigRIPS separator at the RIKEN Nishina Center RI Beam Factory (RIBF). Proton-rich isotopes with atomic numbers Z = 40 to 52 and neutron-rich isotopes with Z = 5 to 16 were produced by projectile fragmentation of the 124Xe and 48Ca beam on Be targets, respectively. Neutron-rich isotopes with Z = 20 to 59 were produced by in-flight fission of the 238U beam, in which both Be and Pb were used as production targets. The measured production rates and production cross sections were compared with those of the LISE++ calculations, and overall fairly good agreement has been obtained. Furthermore, in the measurements with the 124Xe beam, we have discovered four new isotopes on the proton-drip line, 85,86Ru and 81,82Mo, and obtained the clear evidence that 103Sb is particle unbound with an upper limit of 49 ns for the half-...

  9. Simulated Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  10. Radioactivity Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  11. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  12. Measuring the Earth's gravity field with cold atom interferometers

    CERN Document Server

    Carraz, Olivier; Massotti, Luca; Haagmans, Roger; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    The scope of the paper is to propose different concepts for future space gravity missions using Cold Atom Interferometers (CAI) for measuring the diagonal elements of the gravity gradient tensor, the spacecraft angular velocity and the spacecraft acceleration. The aim is to achieve better performance than previous space gravity missions due to a very low white noise spectral behaviour of the CAI instrument and a very high common mode rejection, with the ultimate goals of determining the fine structures of the gravity field with higher accuracy than GOCE and detecting time-variable signals in the gravity field.

  13. Rare earth elements stratigraphic significance in late Permian coal measure from Bijie City, Guizhou Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; YANG Ruidong; BAO Miao

    2008-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are good geological indicators. In order to understand REEs stratigraphic significance, REEs m Late Permian coal measure from Bijie City, western Guizhou Province, China were studied. The results showed that the contents of both light rare earth element (LREE) and ∑ REE were sharply increased in the boundary between Longtan Formation and Changxing Formation, which resulted from the gyration and discontinuity eruption of Emeishan basalt (REEs source) and frequent transgression-regression during forming coal. The coal measure and strata could be subdivided and correlate, and the sea-level change could be under stood by studying REEs content variation in coal measure.

  14. Uncertainty analysis of tile radioactivity measurement%瓷砖放射性测量的不确定度分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘晔

    2014-01-01

    本文依据GB 6566-2010《建筑材料放射性核素限量》标准对某瓷砖的放射性进行测量,并对其结果进行不确定度分析,找出影响放射性测量结果的主要因素,量化不确定度分量,合成不确定度,最终给出该瓷砖放射性测量结果及其不确定度。通过本文对某瓷砖放射性测量的不确定度分析,对提高放射性测量的准确度具有参考意义。%The radioactivity of a tile is measured on the basis of code of GB 6566-2010 "Limits of radionuclides in building materials", and the results uncertainty is analyzed to find out the main factors influencing the radioactive measurement result, quantify uncertainty com-ponents, obtain the synthesis of uncertainty.Finally the radioactive measurement results and the uncertainty of the ceramic tile are given .It has reference significance for improving the radioactive measurement accuracy.

  15. Measurement of the magnetic moment of the 2$^{+}$ state in neutron-rich radioactive $^{72,74}$Zn using the transient field technique in inverse kinematics

    CERN Multimedia

    Kruecken, R; Speidel, K; Voulot, D; Neyens, G; Gernhaeuser, R A; Fraile prieto, L M; Leske, J

    We propose to measure the sign and magnitude of the g-factors of the first 2$^{+}$ states in radioactive neutron-rich $^{72,74}$Zn applying the transient field (TF) technique in inverse kinematics. The result of this experiment will allow to probe the $\

  16. Measuring the Radius of the Earth from a Mountain Top Overlooking the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadharan, Dhevan

    2009-01-01

    A clear view of the ocean may be used to measure the radius of the Earth. To an observer looking out at the ocean, the horizon will always form some angle [theta] with the local horizontal plane. As the observer's elevation "h" increases, so does the angle [theta]. From measurements of the elevation "h" and the angle [theta],…

  17. Clearance measurement for waste concerning contained radioactivity; Frei(gabe)messung von Abfall hinsichtlich enthaltener Radioaktivitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokcic-Kostic, Marina; Schultheis, Roland [NUKEM Technologies Engineering Services GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Clearance measurements are always a compromise between requirements of the measurement technology and economic boundary conditions. Depending on the quantity and the type of waste, different solutions are obtained. For large volumes of more or less homogeneous waste, the conveyor belt method is the biggest favorite, which has already proved its suitability in practice. This is important, because numerous nuclear power stations are being decommissioned in Germany in the coming years and large quantities of waste will be arising. For some applications, e.g. Tritium or C-14, satisfying solutions either do not exist or are currently in the development stages. There is still great potential for the development of clearance methods.

  18. Radioactivity: Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (1962), (ICRU) Report 10 c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This handbook presents recommendations agreed upon at the meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) held in Montreux, Switzerland, in April 1962. It is written in a report form with a preface including symbols, abbreviations and definitions of terms used in the report. The report consists of four…

  19. Quantitative comparison between PGNAA measurements and MCNP calculations in view of the characterization of radioactive wastes in Germany and France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauerhofer, E. [FZJ, Institute for Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Wilhelm-Johnen-Strasse, D-52428 Juelich (Germany); Havenith, A.; Kettler, J. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Elisabethstrasse 16, D-52062 Aachen (Germany); Carasco, C.; Payan, E.; Ma, J. L.; Perot, B. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-04-19

    The Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (FZJ), together with the Aachen University Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache) are involved in a cooperation aiming at characterizing toxic and reactive elements in radioactive waste packages by means of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA). The French and German waste management agencies have indeed defined acceptability limits concerning these elements in view of their projected geological repositories. A first measurement campaign was performed in the new Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) facility called MEDINA, at FZJ, to assess the capture gamma-ray signatures of some elements of interest in large samples up to waste drums with a volume of 200 liter. MEDINA is the acronym for Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation. This paper presents MCNP calculations of the MEDINA facility and quantitative comparison between measurement and simulation. Passive gamma-ray spectra acquired with a high purity germanium detector and calibration sources are used to qualify the numerical model of the crystal. Active PGNAA spectra of a sodium chloride sample measured with MEDINA then allow for qualifying the global numerical model of the measurement cell. Chlorine indeed constitutes a usual reference with reliable capture gamma-ray production data. The goal is to characterize the entire simulation protocol (geometrical model, nuclear data, and postprocessing tools) which will be used for current measurement interpretation, extrapolation of the performances to other types of waste packages or other applications, as well as for the study of future PGNAA facilities.

  20. Quantitative comparison between PGNAA measurements and MCNP calculations in view of the characterization of radioactive wastes in Germany and France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauerhofer, E.; Havenith, A.; Carasco, C.; Payan, E.; Kettler, J.; Ma, J. L.; Perot, B.

    2013-04-01

    The Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (FZJ), together with the Aachen University Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA Cadarache) are involved in a cooperation aiming at characterizing toxic and reactive elements in radioactive waste packages by means of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) [1]. The French and German waste management agencies have indeed defined acceptability limits concerning these elements in view of their projected geological repositories. A first measurement campaign was performed in the new Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) facility called MEDINA, at FZJ, to assess the capture gamma-ray signatures of some elements of interest in large samples up to waste drums with a volume of 200 liter. MEDINA is the acronym for Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation. This paper presents MCNP calculations of the MEDINA facility and quantitative comparison between measurement and simulation. Passive gamma-ray spectra acquired with a high purity germanium detector and calibration sources are used to qualify the numerical model of the crystal. Active PGNAA spectra of a sodium chloride sample measured with MEDINA then allow for qualifying the global numerical model of the measurement cell. Chlorine indeed constitutes a usual reference with reliable capture gamma-ray production data. The goal is to characterize the entire simulation protocol (geometrical model, nuclear data, and postprocessing tools) which will be used for current measurement interpretation, extrapolation of the performances to other types of waste packages or other applications, as well as for the study of future PGNAA facilities.

  1. Gamma-ray measurements of naturally occurring radioactive samples from Cyprus characteristic geological rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Tzortzis, M; Christofides, S; Christodoulides, G

    2003-01-01

    Using high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the terrestrial gamma radiation in all the predominant types of geological rock formations appearing in Cyprus was measured. Soil samples were collected from each rock type, sealed in 1-litre plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory for 24 hours each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for Th-232 (range from 1.3 to 52.8 Bq/kg), U-238 (from 0.9 to 90.3 Bq/kg) and K-40 (from 13 to 894 Bq/kg). Elemental concentrations mean values of (2.8 +- 0.7) ppm, (1.3 +- 0.3) ppm and (0.6 +- 0.1) % were extracted, for thorium, uranium and potassium, respectively. Absorbed dose rates in air outdoors were calculated to be in the range of 0.1-50 nGy/h, depending on the geological features, with an overall mean value of (14.7 +- 7.3) nGy/h. The corresponding effective dose rates per person outdoors were estimated to be between 0.1 and 61.4 microSv/y, assuming a 20% occupancy factor.

  2. In-vivo whole body measurement of internal radioactivity in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risco Norrlid, L. del (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (Sweden)); Halldorsson, O. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority (Iceland)); Holm, S. (NM and PET at Copenhagen' s Univ. Hospital (Denmark)); Huikari, J. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland)); Isaksson, M. (Goeteborg Univ., Dept. Radiation Physics Sahlgren Academy (Sweden)); Lind, B. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Roed, H. (Danish State Institute for Radiation Protection (Denmark))

    2011-02-15

    The PIANOLIB activity aims to harmonize the calibrations of the measurement equipment in the region and to evaluate the quality status of this kind of measurement by means of a proficiency test exercise. In this report the first results of the PIANOLIB activity are presented, that is, a compilation of existent regional resources for in-vivo whole body measurement and the phantom library website. In 2010 the project PIANOLIB collected the relevant information about the regional facilities, distributed the exercise instructions and managed the circulation of the phantom IRINA among the participant laboratories. The inventory within the activity has showed that the regional whole body counting assets has relatively diminished compared to 2006, the last time an inventory of the kind was made. Both the field laboratories as the stationary ones are equipped with sophisticated whole-body counting systems with Ge-or NaI-detectors. The regional competence is good and still retains experienced staff, but it is clear that a new generation is coming that needs training and exchange of experiences. It is important to keep the practice of intercomparison and NKS continues to be the best framework for supporting this kind of activity. (Author)

  3. Determination of natural radioactivity by gross alpha and beta measurements in ground water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, S; Ozçitak, E; Taşkin, H; Varinlioğlu, A

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the activity concentrations of the gross α and β in ground water samples collected from the different drilled wells in Nevşehir province were measured to assess annual effective dose due to the ingestion of the water samples. Nevşehir province is one of the major cities of Cappadocia Region which is a popular tourist destination as it has many areas with unique geological, historic, and cultural features. Sampling and measurements were carried out in the autumn of 2011 and the spring of 2012. The values of the activity concentrations of the gross α and β measured in the water samples ranged from 80 to 380 mBq L(-1) with a mean of 192 mBq L(-1) and 120-3470 mBq L(-1) with a mean of 579 mBq L(-1) respectively. All values of the gross α were lower than the limit value of 500 mBq L(-1) while two ground water samples were found to have gross β activity concentrations of greater than 1000 mBq L(-1). Therefore two water samples were the subject of further radioisotope-specific analysis. The obtained result indicated that the elevated activity concentrations of the gross β in these water samples are dominated by (40)K activity. Annual effective doses ranged from 0.04 to 0.20 mSv y(-1).

  4. Underground measurements of artificial radioactivity in squids from the western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhi; Mi, Yu-Hao; He, Jian-Hua; Ma, Hao; Cheng, Jian-Ping

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident's radiological effect on marine ecosystem, ash samples of squids from the western Pacific Ocean were collected in May 2014 and measured using an underground gamma-ray spectrometer in the underground laboratory JinPing. Low levels of (108m)Ag, (110m)Ag, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were detected, which indicates that the influence of the FDNPP accident on marine ecosystem is lasting but decreasing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radioactivity determination of sealed pure beta-sources by surface dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Heon [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seongmoon [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kanghyuk; Son, Kwang-Jae; Lee, Jun Sig [Hanaro Applications Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ye, Sung-Joon, E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Center for Convergence Research on Robotics, Advance Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-21

    This study aims to determine the activity of a sealed pure beta-source by measuring the surface dose rate using an extrapolation chamber. A conversion factor (cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1}), which was defined as the ratio of surface dose rate to activity, can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation chamber measurement. To validate this hypothesis the certified activities of two standard pure beta-sources of Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 were compared with those determined by this method. In addition, a sealed test source of Sr/Y-90 was manufactured by the HANARO reactor group of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and used to further validate this method. The measured surface dose rates of the Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 standard sources were 4.615×10{sup −5} cGy s{sup −1} and 2.259×10{sup −5} cGy s{sup −1}, respectively. The calculated conversion factors of the two sources were 1.213×10{sup −8} cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1} and 1.071×10{sup −8} cGy s{sup −1} Bq{sup −1}, respectively. Therefore, the activity of the standard Sr/Y-90 source was determined to be 3.995 kBq, which was 2.0% less than the certified value (4.077 kBq). For Si/P-32 the determined activity was 2.102 kBq, which was 6.6% larger than the certified activity (1.971 kBq). The activity of the Sr/Y-90 test source was determined to be 4.166 kBq, while the apparent activity reported by KAERI was 5.803 kBq. This large difference might be due to evaporation and diffusion of the source liquid during preparation and uncertainty in the amount of weighed aliquot of source liquid. The overall uncertainty involved in this method was determined to be 7.3%. We demonstrated that the activity of a sealed pure beta-source could be conveniently determined by complementary combination of measuring the surface dose rate and Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Magnetometer suitable for Earth field measurement based on transient atomic response

    CERN Document Server

    Lenci, L; Valente, P; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of a simple atomic magnetometer using $^{87}$Rb vapor suitable for Earth magnetic field monitoring. The magnetometer is based on time-domain determination of the transient precession frequency of the atomic alignment around the measured field. A sensitivity of 1.5 nT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$ is demonstrated on the measurement of the Earth magnetic field in the laboratory. We discuss the different parameters determining the magnetometer precision and accuracy and predict a sensitivity of 30 pT/$\\sqrt{Hz}$

  7. Measurement of natural radioactivity in chemical fertilizer and agricultural soil: evidence of high alpha activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dipak; Deb, Argha; Bera, Sukumar; Sengupta, Rosalima; Patra, Kanchan Kumar

    2008-02-01

    People are exposed to ionizing radiation from the radionuclides that are present in different types of natural sources, of which phosphate fertilizer is one of the most important sources. Radionuclides in phosphate fertilizer belonging to 232Th and 238U series as well as radioisotope of potassium (40K) are the major contributors of outdoor terrestrial natural radiation. The study of alpha activity in fertilizers, which is the first ever in West Bengal, has been performed in order to determine the effect of the use of phosphate fertilizers on human health. The data have been compared with the alpha activity of different types of chemical fertilizers. The measurement of alpha activity in surface soil samples collected from the cultivated land was also performed. The sampling sites were randomly selected in the cultivated land in the Midnapore district, which is the largest district in West Bengal. The phosphate fertilizer is widely used for large agricultural production, mainly potatoes. The alpha activities have been measured using solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD), a very sensitive detector for alpha particles. The results show that alpha activity of those fertilizer and soil samples varies from 141 Bq/kg to 2,589 Bq/kg and from 109 Bq/kg to 660 Bq/kg, respectively. These results were used to estimate environmental radiation exposure on human health contributed by the direct application of fertilizers.

  8. Quantitative measurement of natural radioactivity in some roofing tile materials used in upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uosif, M A M

    2013-09-01

    The quantitative measurement of radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) in some roofing tile materials (granite, alabaster, marble, traditional and advanced ceramic) used in Upper Egypt is presented in this paper. Measurements were done by using gamma spectrometry (NaI (Tl) 3" × 3"). The values of concentration of natural radionuclides were in the following ranges: 12-78.9 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 8.4-113.1 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th and 94.9-509 Bq kg(-1)for (40)K. The activity concentration index (I), the specific dose rates indoors ( ) and the annual effective dose (DE) due to gamma radiation were calculated for each investigated sample. The lowest value of I is 0.19 for alabaster, while the highest one is 0.88 for traditional and advanced ceramic. The ranges of DE are between 0.03 and 0.13 mSv, it is below the maximal permitted values, so that the examined materials could be used as roofing tiles in the construction of new buildings.

  9. Radioactivity measurements in the environment of the Udhampur area, Jammu and Kashmir Himalayas, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Arvind; Singh, Yudhvir; Singh, Kawaljit; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Surinder

    LR-115 plastic track detectors have been used for the measurement of radon exhalation rate and radium concentration in soil samples collected from some villages of the Udhampur district, Jammu and Kashmir, India. Uranium concentration has also been determined in these soil samples using the fission track registration technique. Radium concentration in soil samples varies from 5.46 to 19.17 Bqkg-1, whereas uranium concentration varies from 2.53 to 3.65 ppm. The radon exhalation rate in these samples has been found to vary from 6.42 to 22.47 mB kg-1 hr-1. The work is undertaken for health risk assessments due to uranium and radium in the study area. A positive correlation has been observed between uranium and radium, as well as uranium and radon exhalation rate in soil samples.

  10. First measurement of radioactive isotope production through cosmic-ray muon spallation in Super-Kamiokande IV

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic-ray-muon spallation-induced radioactive isotopes with $\\beta$ decays are one of the major backgrounds for solar, reactor, and supernova relic neutrino experiments. Unlike in scintillator, production yields for cosmogenic backgrounds in water have not been exclusively measured before, yet they are becoming more and more important in next generation neutrino experiments designed to search for rare signals. We have analyzed the low-energy trigger data collected at Super-Kamiokande-IV in order to determine the production rates of $^{12}$B, $^{12}$N, $^{16}$N, $^{11}$Be, $^9$Li, $^8$He, $^9$C, $^8$Li, $^8$B and $^{15}$C. These rates were extracted from fits to time differences between parent muons and subsequent daughter $\\beta$'s by fixing the known isotope lifetimes. Since $^9$Li can fake an inverse-beta-decay reaction chain via a $\\beta + n$ cascade decay, producing an irreducible background with detected energy up to a dozen MeV, a dedicated study is needed for evaluating its impact on future measuremen...

  11. Application of the Monte Carlo method to the analysis of measurement geometries for the calibration of a HP Ge detector in an environmental radioactivity laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenas, Jose [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jrodenas@iqn.upv.es; Gallardo, Sergio; Ballester, Silvia; Primault, Virginie [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Ortiz, Josefina [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    A gamma spectrometer including an HP Ge detector is commonly used for environmental radioactivity measurements. The efficiency of the detector should be calibrated for each geometry considered. Simulation of the calibration procedure with a validated computer program is an important auxiliary tool for environmental radioactivity laboratories. The MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to simulate the detection process in order to obtain spectrum peaks and determine the efficiency curve for each modelled geometry. The source used for measurements was a calibration mixed radionuclide gamma reference solution, covering a wide energy range (50-2000 keV). Two measurement geometries - Marinelli beaker and Petri boxes - as well as different materials - water, charcoal, sand - containing the source have been considered. Results obtained from the Monte Carlo model have been compared with experimental measurements in the laboratory in order to validate the model.

  12. Earth's albedo variations 1998-2014 as measured from ground-based earthshine observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palle, E.; Goode, P. R.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Shumko, A.; Gonzalez-Merino, B.; Lombilla, C. Martinez; Jimenez-Ibarra, F.; Shumko, S.; Sanroma, E.; Hulist, A.; Miles-Paez, P.; Murgas, F.; Nowak, G.; Koonin, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The Earth's albedo is a fundamental climate parameter for understanding the radiation budget of the atmosphere. It has been traditionally measured not only from space platforms but also from the ground for 16 years from Big Bear Solar Observatory by observing the Moon. The photometric ratio of the dark (earthshine) to the bright (moonshine) sides of the Moon is used to determine nightly anomalies in the terrestrial albedo, with the aim of quantifying sustained monthly, annual, and/or decadal changes. We find two modest decadal scale cycles in the albedo, but with no significant net change over the 16 years of accumulated data. Within the evolution of the two cycles, we find periods of sustained annual increases, followed by comparable sustained decreases in albedo. The evolution of the earthshine albedo is in remarkable agreement with that from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System instruments, although each method measures different slices of the Earth's Bond albedo.

  13. Sunlight effects on the 3D polar current system determined from low Earth orbit measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Laundal, Karl M; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere is associated with large-scale currents in the ionosphere at polar latitudes that flow along magnetic field lines (Birkeland currents) and horizontally. These current systems are tightly linked, but their global behaviors are rarely analyzed together. In this paper, we present estimates of the average global Birkeland currents and horizontal ionospheric currents from the same set of magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field measurements, from the low Earth orbiting $\\textit{Swarm}$ and CHAMP satellites, are used to co-estimate poloidal and toroidal parts of the magnetic disturbance field, represented in magnetic apex coordinates. The use of apex coordinates reduces effects of longitudinal and hemispheric variations in the Earth's main field. We present global currents from both hemispheres during different sunlight conditions. The results show that the Birkeland currents vary with the conductivity, which depends most strongly on solar EUV ...

  14. Shielding calculations with SCALE/MAVRIC and comparison with measurements for the TN85 cask with vitrified high level radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Holger; Börst, Frank-Michael

    2017-09-01

    A series of dose rate/spectra measurements in the German interim storage facility Gorleben was carried out at a TN85 cask in April 2009. This type of cask is used for the transport and interim storage of vitrified high level radioactive waste (HAW) from reprocessing. The aim of this work is to assess the shielding component MAVRIC of the SCALE code system with these measurements for the use in the German Bundesamt für Kerntechnische Entsorgungssicherheit (BfE).

  15. Measurements of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement used in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujahid, S A; Rahim, A; Hussain, S; Farooq, M

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of activity due to the naturally occurring radionuclide has been carried out in different brands of cement available in Pakistan. The gamma spectra of the collected samples were obtained using high-purity germanium detector and analysed for the presence of 232Th, 238U and 40K. The assessment of radiological hazards due to these radionuclides has also been made. The studies concerning the determination of radon-exhalation rates from these samples of cement were also carried out using CR-39 based NRPB radon dosimeters. The range of activity concentrations were found for 226Ra (from 25.10 +/- 1.55 to 52.60 +/- 3.20 Bq kg(-1)), 232Th (from 10.30 +/- 0.65 to 30.40 +/- 1.70 Bq kg(-1)) and 40K (from 17.25 +/- 1.55 to 292.95 +/- 23.05 Bq kg(-1)). The estimated value of radium equivalent concentration was from 11.16 +/- 2.60 to 114.98 +/- 7.11 Bq kg(-1). The calculated absorbed dose rate in air and the annual effective dose were in the range from 18.54 +/- 1.17 to 52.90 +/- 3.31 nGy h(-1) and 0.09 +/- 0.01 to 0.26 +/- 0.02 mSv, respectively. The external and internal hazard indices were in the range from 0.11 +/- 0.01 to 0.31 +/- 0.02 and 0.18 +/- 0.01 to 0.45 +/- 0.03, respectively. The radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement were found in the range from 3.3 +/- 0.7 to 8.1 +/- 1.7 mBq kg(-1) h(-1).

  16. Radioactivity in the Kuwait marine environment--Baseline measurements and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, S; Aba, A; Fowler, S W; Behbehani, M; Ismaeel, A; Al-Shammari, H; Alboloushi, A; Mietelski, J W; Al-Ghadban, A; Al-Ghunaim, A; Khabbaz, A; Alboloushi, O

    2015-11-30

    The Arabian Gulf region is moving towards a nuclear energy option with the first nuclear power plant now operational in Bushehr, Iran, and others soon to be constructed in Abu Dhabi and Saudi Arabia. Radiological safety is becoming a prime concern in the region. This study compiles available data and presents recent radionuclide data for the northern Gulf waters, considered as pre-nuclear which will be a valuable dataset for future monitoring work in this region. Radionuclide monitoring in the marine environment is a matter of prime concern for Kuwait, and an assessment of the potential impact of radionuclides requires the establishment and regular updating of baseline levels of artificial and natural radionuclides in various environmental compartments. Here we present baseline measurements for (210)Po, (210)Pb, (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (3)H in Kuwait waters. The seawater concentration of (3)H, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (137)Cs, and (90)Sr vary between 130-146, 0.48-0.68, 0.75-0.89, 1.25-1.38 and 0.57-0.78 mBq L(-1), respectively. The (40)K concentration in seawater varies between 8.9-9.3 Bq L(-1). The concentration of (40)K, total (210)Pb, (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (238)U, (235)U, (234)U, (239+240)Pu and (238)Pu were determined in sediments and range, respectively, between 353-445, 23.6-44.3, 1.0-3.1, 4.8-5.29, 17.3-20.5, 15-16.4, 28.7-31.4, 1.26-1.30, 29.7-30.0, 0.045-0.21 and 0.028-0.03 Bq kg(-1) dry weight. Since, radionuclides are concentrated in marine biota, a large number of marine biota samples covering several trophic levels, from microalgae to sharks, were analyzed. The whole fish concentration of (40)K, (226)Ra, (224)Ra, (228)Ra, (137)Cs, (210)Po and (90)Sr range between 230-447, 0.7-7.3, marine organisms with the highest (210)Po concentration found in Marica marmorata (193.5-215.6 Bq kg(-1) dry weight). (210)Po in most dissected fish samples shows increasing concentrations in the following order: edible tissue, gills, digestive system, liver and fecal

  17. Measurement of the earth radiation balance as an instrument design problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, H W

    1977-02-01

    The net radiation balance of the earth is important globally for synoptic scale models and long-term climatic trends. It is important at the mesoscale level because it is a strong driving force on local meteorological phenomena. Both synoptic and mesoscale measurements are possible only from earth orbiting spacecraft, and serious efforts have been made to implement them. They have not achieved sufficient accuracy, precision, and stability to be really meaningful meteorologically. Measuring a small difference between two large numbers-the input to the earth and the earth radiation to space-is quite difficult and compounded by the spectral differences between the two. The instrumental considerations to achieving improvements in net radiation balance are discussed. The ratio of input to outflow, like albedo, is a dimensionless number which is amenable to measurement without recourse to calibrated instruments. If the solar constant is indeed reasonably constant, this ratio, which is more easily measured than an absolute value of either quantity, will be acceptable. Instrument stability, both spectral and absolute, as well as calibration methods and accuracy will be discussed with specific emphasis on estimating how and to what degree they can be improved.

  18. Thermal infrared spectrometer for earth science remote sensing applications : instrument modifications and measurement procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hecker, C.; Hook, S.; Meijde, M. van der; Bakker, W.H.; Werff, H.M.A. van der; Wilbrink, H.J.; Ruitenbeek, F.J.A. van; Smeth, J.B. de; Meer, F.D. van der

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a new instrumental setup at the University of Twente Faculty ITC with an optimized processing chain to measure absolute directional-hemispherical reflectance values of typical earth science samples in the 2.5 to 16 μm range. A Bruker Vertex 70 FTIR spectrometer was chosen

  19. Alternative methods for dispoal of low-level radioactive wastes. Task 1. Description of methods and assessment of criteria. [Alternative methods are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults; earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, augered holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, R.D.; Miller, W.O.; Warriner, J.B.; Malone, P.G.; McAneny, C.C.

    1984-04-01

    The study reported herein contains the results of Task 1 of a four-task study entitled Criteria for Evaluating Engineered Facilities. The overall objective of this study is to ensure that the criteria needed to evaluate five alternative low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal methods are available to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Agreement States. The alternative methods considered are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults, earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, and augered holes. Each of these alternatives is either being used by other countries for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal or is being considered by other countries or US agencies. In this report the performance requirements are listed, each alternative is described, the experience gained with its use is discussed, and the performance capabilities of each method are addressed. Next, the existing 10 CFR Part 61 Subpart D criteria with respect to paragraphs 61.50 through 61.53, pertaining to site suitability, design, operations and closure, and monitoring are assessed for applicability to evaluation of each alternative. Preliminary conclusions and recommendations are offered on each method's suitability as an LLW disposal alternative, the applicability of the criteria, and the need for supplemental or modified criteria.

  20. Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Fields, Brian D

    2004-01-01

    Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate g...

  1. Radioactive Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Measuring Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Massive Constellation of Flux Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiscombe, W. J.; Chiu, J.; Ardanuy, P. E.; Barker, H.; Han, S.; Lorentz, S. R.; Schwartz, S. E.; Trenberth, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    The most important climate variable that is not now measured from space with sufficient accuracy (not even one significant digit on any time scale) is Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI), a subject of much discussion lately in relation to the "global warming hiatus". The greatest temporal challenges for ERI measurements are very long (decadal) and very short (diurnal) time scales. The decadal challenge is mainly one of calibration and continuity, whereas the diurnal challenge is mainly one of temporal coverage. ERI measurements must meet both challenges. We discuss here a massive constellation of flux radiometers in Low Earth Orbit that is capable of meeting both challenges. At least 30-40 satellites are required for diurnal coverage, an order of magnitude more than in any previous Earth science mission. This same diurnal coverage would make possible, for the first time, the use of ERI measurements in data assimilation, as well as providing a much more temporally resolved dataset for tuning and evaluating climate models. Although a large number of instruments on many satellites might seem to pose a gargantuan calibration challenge, actually, the more satellites, the better the intercalibration: satellites can not only follow each other closely in the same orbit plane, viewing exactly the same scene a few minutes apart, but they can engage in a spider web of crossovers in the polar regions, allowing many further such intercalibrations. Furthermore, keystone satellites can roll over to obtain an absolute calibration from the Sun and deep space, which can then be transferred to the other satellites. Simulations of ERI from such a constellation will be shown, along with the tradeoffs necessary to create an optimal configuration and to mitigate the problems experienced by previous generations of Earth radiation budget radiometers. A tentative instrument design will also be described.Constellation of flux radiometers for measuring Earth Radiation Imbalance

  3. The BIOMASS mission — An ESA Earth Explorer candidate to measure the BIOMASS of the earth's forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scipal, K.; Arcioni, M.; Chave, J.

    2010-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) released a Call for Proposals for the next Earth Explorer Core Mission in March 2005, with the aim to select the 7th Earth Explorer (EE-7) mission for launch in the next decade. Twenty-four proposals were received and subject to scientific and technical assessment....

  4. TELEPENSOUTH project Measurement of the Earth gravitomagnetic field in a terrestrial laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Sánchez, J F

    2003-01-01

    We will expose a preliminary study on the feasibility of an experiment leading to a direct measurement of the gravitomagnetic field generated by the rotational motion of the Earth. This measurement would be achieved by means of an appropriate coupling of a TELEscope and a Foucault PENdulum in a laboratory on ground, preferably at the SOUTH pole. An experiment of this kind was firstly proposed by Braginski, Polnarev and Thorne, 18 years ago, but it was never re-analyzed.

  5. Using a Video Camera to Measure the Radius of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joshua; Hughes, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A simple but accurate method for measuring the Earth's radius using a video camera is described. A video camera was used to capture a shadow rising up the wall of a tall building at sunset. A free program called ImageJ was used to measure the time it took the shadow to rise a known distance up the building. The time, distance and length of…

  6. Satellite laser ranging measurements in South Africa: Contributions to earth system sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Botai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reassesses progress in the development of satellite laser ranging (SLR technology and its scientific and societal applications in South Africa. We first highlight the current global SLR tracking stations within the framework of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS and the artificial satellites currently being tracked by these stations. In particular, the present work focuses on analysing SLR measurements at Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO, South Africa, based on the MOBLAS-6 SLR configuration. Generally, there is a weak geometry of ILRS stations in the southern hemisphere and the SLR tracking station at HartRAO is the only active ILRS station operating on the African continent. The SLR-derived products such as station positions and velocities, satellite orbits, components of earth's gravity field and their temporal variations, earth orientation parameters are collected, merged, achieved and distributed by the ILRS under the Crustal Dynamic Data Information System. These products are used in various research fields such as detection and monitoring of tectonic plate motion, crustal deformation, earth rotation, polar motion, and the establishment and monitoring of International Terrestrial Reference Frames, as well as modelling of the spatio-temporal variations of the earth's gravity field. The MOBLAS-6 tracking station is collocated with other geodetic techniques such as very long baseline interferometry and Global Navigation Satellite Systems, thus making this observatory a fiducial geodetic location. Some applications of the SLR data products are described within the context of earth system science.

  7. Natural radioactivity measurements in agricultural soil, fertilizer and crops in some specific areas of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, Shaikh Abdul; Kinsara, Abdulraheem Abdulrahman; Molla, Nurul Islam; Nassef, Mohamed Hamed [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Engineering

    2014-09-01

    High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector gamma-ray spectrometry with 500 cc Marinelli beaker geometry was used for radioactivity measurement in some specific areas of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The detection limits of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K in soil, fertilizers, and vegetables lie mostly below 1 Bq/kg. The activity concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra in local phosphate fertilizers were measured in the range of 236.8-879.0 Bq/kg and 101.5-297.0 Bq/kg, respectively. The respective activity concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra measured in one charge of German phosphate fertilizer are in the range of 552.7-790.0 Bq/kg and 280.6-317.0 Bq/kg. The activity concentrations of {sup 232}Th are assessed to have maximum values up to 2.24 Bq/kg in locally manufactured phosphate fertilizers. Local urea exhibited concentration level (Bq/kg) of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K below the detection limit. Mean values of activity concentrations of {sup 238}U in agricultural soil of Wadi Fatima, Taif, Hada Al-Sham, Madina City and Abyar Al-MashiMadina are 21.7 ± 3.24, 38.2 ± 4.1, 17.6 ± 2.1, 34.3 ± 3.5 and 32.7 ± 2.4 Bq/kg, respectively. The respective mean of {sup 226}Ra activity concentrations in those areas are 12.16 ± 1.16, 20.2 ± 1.33, 11.21 ± 0.4, 21.4 ± 1.7 and 21.0 ± 1.22 Bq/kg. The specific activity of {sup 232}Th in the respective areas has been measured as 12.6 ± 1.3, 25.3 ± 0.8, 11.5 ± 0.9, 20.4 ± 2.4 and 20.0 ± 1.2 Bq/kg. Activity concentrations of {sup 210}Pb, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in the vegetable samples are mostly found in the range of 0.37 Bq/kg to 37.8 Bq/kg. The {sup 40}K specific activity lies in the range of 44.4-196 Bq/kg. The calculated absorbed dose rates in the representative locations are 24.07-53.28 nGy/h. (orig.)

  8. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model. Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio [Universita del Salento, Dipartimento Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Lecce (Italy); Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Paolozzi, Antonio; Paris, Claudio [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Museo della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Rome (Italy); Pavlis, Erricos C. [University of Maryland, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), Baltimore County (United States); Koenig, Rolf [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Ries, John [University of Texas at Austin, Center for Space Research, Austin (United States); Gurzadyan, Vahe; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Matzner, Richard [University of Texas at Austin, Theory Center, Austin (United States); Penrose, Roger [University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom); Sindoni, Giampiero [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure μ = (0.994 ± 0.002) ± 0.05, where μ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity. (orig.)

  9. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model: Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  10. Gamma-Ray Measurements of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Sludge, Scale and Well Cores of the Oil Industry in Southern Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ridha Hussain SUBBER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Radioactivity of nuclides 238U, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K was measured in soil by γ-ray spectrometry using a NaI (Li detector. A criterion was set in order to analyze sludge samples from oil fields and oil well-cores in southern Basrah, in the Iraq oil fields. More than 3 γ-ray energy peaks were used for the determination of 226Ra and 232Th activity concentrations to obtain results that are more accurate. Relationships between the measured radionuclides were discussed. Radionuclides 238U and 226Ra were found in disequilibrium with ratio of specific activities (238 U/226 Ra less than unity for most of the sludge and core samples. The content of radioactive elements in the sludge, scale and well core is found within the range of other petroleum countries in the region.doi:10.14456/WJST.2014.93

  11. Measurement of particle directions in low earth orbit with a Timepix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohl, St.; Bergmann, B.; Granja, C.; Owens, A.; Pichotka, M.; Polansky, S.; Pospisil, S.

    2016-11-01

    In Low Earth Orbit (LEO) in space electronic equipment aboard satellites and space crews are exposed to high ionizing radiation levels. To reduce radiation damage and the exposure of astronauts, to improve shielding and to assess dose levels, it is valuable to know the composition of the radiation fields and particle directions. The presented measurements are carried out with the Space Application of Timepix Radiation Monitor (SATRAM). There, a Timepix detector (300 μm thick silicon sensor, pixel pitch 55 μm, 256 × 256 pixels) is attached to the Proba-V, an earth observing satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA). The Timepix detector's capability was used to determine the directions of energetic charged particles and their corresponding stopping powers. Data are continuously taken at an altitude of 820 km on a sun-synchronous orbit. The particles pitch angles with respect to the sensor layer were measured and converted to an Earth Centred Earth Fixed (ECEF) coordinate system. Deviations from an isotropic field are extracted by normalization of the observed angular distributions by a Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation —taking the systematics of the reconstruction algorithm and the pixelation into account.

  12. Spectral and Spin Measurement of Two Small and Fast-Rotating Near-Earth Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Polishook, D; Lockhart, M; DeMeo, F E; Golisch, W; Bus, S J; Gulbis, A A S

    2012-01-01

    In May 2012 two asteroids made near-miss "grazing" passes at distances of a few Earth-radii: 2012 KP24 passed at nine Earth-radii and 2012 KT42 at only three Earth-radii. The latter passed inside the orbital distance of geosynchronous satellites. From spectral and imaging measurements using NASA's 3-m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we deduce taxonomic, rotational, and physical properties. Their spectral characteristics are somewhat atypical among near-Earth asteroids: C-complex for 2012 KP24 and B-type for 2012 KT42, from which we interpret the albedos of both asteroids to be between 0.10 and 0.15 and effective diameters of 20+-2 and 6+-1 meters, respectively. Among B-type asteroids, the spectrum of 2012 KT42 is most similar to 3200 Phaethon and 4015 Wilson-Harrington. Not only are these among the smallest asteroids spectrally measured, we also find they are among the fastest-spinning: 2012 KP24 completes a rotation in 2.5008+-0.0006 minutes and 2012 KT42 rotates in 3.634+-0.001 minutes.

  13. Comparison of the measured radiation dose-rate by the ionization chamber and G (Geiger-Mueller) counter after radioactive lodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kwang Hun [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungbuk National University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kgu Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Radioactive iodine(131I) treatment reduces recurrence and increases survival in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. However, it is important in terms of radiation safety management to measure the radiation dose rate generated from the patient because the radiation emitted from the patient may cause the exposure. Research methods, it measured radiation dose-rate according to the elapsed time from 1 m from the upper abdomen of the patient by intake of radioactive iodine. Directly comparing the changes over time, high dose rate sensitivity and efficiency is statistically significant, and higher chamber than GM counter(p<0.05). Low dose rate sensitivity and efficiency in the chamber had lower levels than gm counter, but not statistically significant(p>0.05). In this study confirmed the characteristics of calibrated ionization chamber and GM counter according to the radiation intensity during high-dose radioactive iodine therapy by measuring the accurate and rapid radiation dose rate to the patient explains, discharged patients will be reduced to worry about radiation hazard of family and others person.

  14. Radioactivity in food crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  15. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  16. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  17. Nadir measurements of the Earth's atmosphere with the ACE FTS: first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. J. Evans

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the Canadian SCISAT mission is to investigate the processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere. The SCISAT satellite consists of two major science instruments: an Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE high-resolution Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS and an ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared spectrograph. These instruments primarily function in occultation mode; however, during the dark portion of the orbit the Earth passes between the sun and the satellite. This configuration provides the opportunity to acquire some nadir-view FTIR spectra of the Earth. Nadir spectra obtained with the ACE FTS are presented and analyzed for methane, ozone and nitrous oxide. The measurements show that the instrument should have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to determine column gas amounts of the major trace constituents in the atmosphere. Possible applications of these measurements to the study of global warming and air pollution monitoring are discussed.

  18. Earth's albedo variations 1998-2014 as measured from ground-based earthshine observations

    CERN Document Server

    Palle, E; Montanes-Rodriguez, P Pilar; Shumko, A; Gonzalez-Merino, B; Lombilla, C Martinez; Jimenez-Ibarra, F; Shumko, S; Sanroma, E; Hulist, A; Miles-Paez, P; Murgas, F; Nowak, G; Koonin, SE

    2016-01-01

    The Earth's albedo is a fundamental climate parameter for understanding the radiation budget of the atmosphere. It has been traditionally measured from space platforms, but also from the ground for sixteen years from Big Bear Solar Observatory by observing the Moon. The photometric ratio of the dark (earthshine) to the bright (moonshine) sides of the Moon is used to determine nightly anomalies in the terrestrial albedo, with the aim is of quantifying sustained monthly, annual and/or decadal changes. We find two modest decadal scale cycles in the albedo, but with no significant net change over the sixteen years of accumulated data. Within the evolution of the two cycles, we find periods of sustained annual increases, followed by comparable sustained decreases in albedo. The evolution of the earthshine albedo is in remarkable agreement with that from the CERES instruments, although each method measures different slices of the Earth's Bond albedo.

  19. One year in the Earth's magnetosphere: A global MHD simulation and spacecraft measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Facsko, G; Zivkovic, T; Palin, L; Kallio, E; Agren, K; Opgenoorth, H; Tanskanen, E I; Milan, S E

    2016-01-01

    The response of the Earth's magnetosphere to changing solar wind conditions are studied with a 3D Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. One full year (155 Cluster orbits) of the Earth's magnetosphere is simulated using Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling simulation (GUMICS-4) magnetohydrodynamic code. Real solar wind measurements are given to the code as input to create the longest lasting global magnetohydrodynamics simulation to date. The applicability of the results of the simulation depends critically on the input parameters used in the model. Therefore, the validity and the variance of the OMNIWeb data is first investigated thoroughly using Cluster measurement close to the bow shock. The OMNIWeb and the Cluster data were found to correlate very well before the bow shock. The solar wind magnetic field and plasma parameters are not changed significantly from the $L_1$ Lagrange point to the foreshock, therefore the OMNIWeb data is appropriate input to the GUMICS-4. The Cluster SC3 footprints are dete...

  20. Study of the source-detector system geometry using the MCNP-X code in the flowrate measurement with radioactive tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avilan Puertas, Eddie, E-mail: epuertas@nuclear.ufrj.br [Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV), Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Braz, Delson, E-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Brandao, Luis E.; Salgado, Cesar M., E-mail: brandao@ien.gov.br, E-mail: otero@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use radioactive tracers for flow rate measurement is applied to a great variety of situations, however the accuracy of the technique is highly dependent of the adequate choice of the experimental measurement conditions. To measure flow rate of fluids in ducts partially filled, is necessary to measure the fluid flow velocity and the fluid height. The flow velocity can be measured with the cross correlation function and the fluid level, with a fluid level meter system. One of the error factors when measuring flow rate, is on the correct setting of the source-detector of the fluid level meter system. The goal of the present work is to establish by mean of MCNP-X code simulations the experimental parameters to measure the fluid level. The experimental tests will be realized in a flow rate system of 10 mm of diameter of acrylic tube for water and oil as fluids. The radioactive tracer to be used is the {sup 82}Br and for the detection will be employed two 1″ NaI(Tl) scintillator detectors, shielded with collimators of 0.5 cm and 1 cm of circular aperture diameter. (author)

  1. iPadPix—A novel educational tool to visualise radioactivity measured by a hybrid pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Keller, O; Müller, A; Benoit, M

    2016-01-01

    With the ability to attribute signatures of ionising radiation to certain particle types, pixel detectors offer a unique advantage over the traditional use of Geiger-Müller tubes also in educational settings. We demonstrate in this work how a Timepix readout chip combined with a standard 300 μ m pixelated silicon sensor can be used to visualise radioactivity in real-time and by means of augmented reality. The chip family is the result of technology transfer from High Energy Physics at CERN and facilitated by the Medipix Collaboration. This article summarises the development of a prototype based on an iPad mini and open source software detailed in ref. [1]. Appropriate experimental activities that explore natural radioactivity and everyday objects are given to demonstrate the use of this new tool in educational settings.

  2. iPadPix—A novel educational tool to visualise radioactivity measured by a hybrid pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, O.; Schmeling, S.; Müller, A.; Benoit, M.

    2016-11-01

    With the ability to attribute signatures of ionising radiation to certain particle types, pixel detectors offer a unique advantage over the traditional use of Geiger-Müller tubes also in educational settings. We demonstrate in this work how a Timepix readout chip combined with a standard 300μm pixelated silicon sensor can be used to visualise radioactivity in real-time and by means of augmented reality. The chip family is the result of technology transfer from High Energy Physics at CERN and facilitated by the Medipix Collaboration. This article summarises the development of a prototype based on an iPad mini and open source software detailed in ref. [1]. Appropriate experimental activities that explore natural radioactivity and everyday objects are given to demonstrate the use of this new tool in educational settings.

  3. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  4. Development of Optical Parametric Amplifier for Lidar Measurements of Trace Gases on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Riris, Haris; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Kawa, Stephen R.; Krainak, Michael; Abshire, James

    2011-01-01

    Trace gases in planetary atmospheres offer important clues as to the origins of the planet's hydrology, geology. atmosphere. and potential for biology. Wc report on the development effort of a nanosecond-pulsed optical parametric amplifier (OPA) for remote trace gas measurements for Mars and Earth. The OP A output light is single frequency with high spectral purity and is widely tunable both at 1600 nm and 3300 nm with an optical-optical conversion efficiency of approximately 40%. We demonstrated open-path atmospheric measurements ofCH4 (3291 nm and 1651 nm). CO2 (1573 nm), H20 (1652 nm) with this laser source.

  5. Sunlight effects on the 3D polar current system determined from low Earth orbit measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laundal, Karl M.; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    analyzed together. In this paper, we present estimates of the average global Birkeland currents and horizontal ionospheric currents from the same set of magnetic field measurements. The magnetic field measurements, from the low Earth orbiting Swarm and CHAMP satellites, are used to co-estimate poloidal...... show that the Birkeland currents vary with the conductivity, which depends most strongly on solar EUV emissions on the dayside and on particle precipitation at pre-midnight magnetic local times. In sunlight, the horizontal equivalent current flows in two cells, resembling an opposite ionospheric...

  6. The measurement of the earth's radiation budget as a problem in information theory - A tool for the rational design of earth observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    1983-01-01

    The measurement of the earth's radiation budget has been chosen to illustrate the technique of objective system design. The measurement process is an approximately linear transformation of the original field of radiant exitances, so that linear statistical techniques may be employed. The combination of variability, measurement strategy, and error propagation is presently made with the help of information theory, as suggested by Kondratyev et al. (1975) and Peckham (1974). Covariance matrices furnish the quantitative statement of field variability.

  7. Arduino based radioactive tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Rashid, Mohd Fazlie Bin Abdul; Rahman, Anwar Bin Abdul; Ramlan, Atikah

    2017-01-01

    There is a clear need to strengthen security measures to prevent any malevolent use or accidental misuse of radioactive sources. Some of these radioactive sources are regularly transported outside of office or laboratory premises for work and consultation purposes. This paper present the initial development of radioactive source tracking system, which combined Arduino microcontroller, Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global System for Mobile communication (GSM) technologies. The tracking system will help the owner to monitor the movement of the radioactive sources. Currently, the system is capable of tracking the movement of radioactive source through the GPS satellite signals. The GPS co-ordinate could either be transmitted to headquarters at fixed interval via Short Messaging Service (SMS) to enable real time monitoring, or stored in a memory card for offline monitoring and data logging.

  8. A Procedure to Measure the in-Situ Hygrothermal Behavior of Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Antoine Chabriac

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rammed earth is a sustainable material with low embodied energy. However, its development as a building material requires a better evaluation of its moisture-thermal buffering abilities and its mechanical behavior. Both of these properties are known to strongly depend on the amount of water contained in wall pores and its evolution. Thus the aim of this paper is to present a procedure to measure this key parameter in rammed earth or cob walls by using two types of probes operating on the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR principle. A calibration procedure for the probes requiring solely four parameters is described. This calibration procedure is then used to monitor the hygrothermal behavior of a rammed earth wall (1.5 m × 1 m × 0.5 m, instrumented by six probes during its manufacture, and submitted to insulated, natural convection and forced convection conditions. These measurements underline the robustness of the calibration procedure over a large range of water content, even if the wall is submitted to quite important temperature variations. They also emphasize the importance of gravity on water content heterogeneity when the saturation is high, as well as the role of liquid-to-vapor phase change on the thermal behavior.

  9. Quality assurance for measurements of the radioactivity in the area of the"Horia Hulubei" National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, IFIN-HH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochioiu, Ana; Luca, Aurelian; Sahagia, Maria; Margineanu, Romul Mircea; Tudor, Ion

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents one part of the activities deployed by the Laboratory for Environment and Personnel Dosimetry (LDPM) of IFIN-HH, namely the radiological monitoring of the environment within the Institute's area and its surrounding influence zone, according to the program approved by the National Regulatory Body for Nuclear Activities, CNCAN. The representative reports regard the radioactive content of soil, surface and underground water, cultivated and spontaneous vegetation, aerosols and atmospheric fallout, sediments. The common requirement is that the measured quantities be precise and the reported values be reliable and credible. This goal is achieved by maintaining a Quality System, verified within the obtaining and maintaining of the laboratory accreditation, according to the international standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005.The LDPM is accredited by the Romanian accreditation body, RENAR, member of the European Accreditation, EA and is designed by CNCAN as a notified testing laboratory. Many measurements were performed in collaboration with the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory (RML) from IFIN-HH, RENAR accredited and CNCAN notified for calibration and for testing in the field of radioactivity measurement. This paper proposes a short presentation of the important aspects in our activity: i. description of equipment, samplingmethods, processing and measurement of environmental samples; ii. validation of equipment and methods by participation in international and national proficiency tests; iii. a five year follow chart, containing the results in measurement of samples; iv. a recent application, with a wide impact in Romanian mass media: the credible daily report on the possible influence of Fukushima accident over the Romanian environmental radioactivity.

  10. Novel system using microliter order sample volume for measuring arterial radioactivity concentrations in whole blood and plasma for mouse PET dynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Seki, Chie; Hashizume, Nobuya; Yamada, Takashi; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Nishimoto, Takahiro; Hatano, Kentaro; Kitamura, Keishi; Toyama, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao

    2013-11-21

    This study aimed to develop a new system, named CD-Well, for mouse PET dynamic study. CD-Well allows the determination of time-activity curves (TACs) for arterial whole blood and plasma using 2-3 µL of blood per sample; the minute sample size is ideal for studies in small animals. The system has the following merits: (1) measures volume and radioactivity of whole blood and plasma separately; (2) allows measurements at 10 s intervals to capture initial rapid changes in the TAC; and (3) is compact and easy to handle, minimizes blood loss from sampling, and delay and dispersion of the TAC. CD-Well has 36 U-shaped channels. A drop of blood is sampled into the opening of the channel and stored there. After serial sampling is completed, CD-Well is centrifuged and scanned using a flatbed scanner to define the regions of plasma and blood cells. The length measured is converted to volume because the channels have a precise and uniform cross section. Then, CD-Well is exposed to an imaging plate to measure radioactivity. Finally, radioactivity concentrations are computed. We evaluated the performance of CD-Well in in vitro measurement and in vivo (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and [(11)C]2-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane studies. In in vitro evaluation, per cent differences (mean±SE) from manual measurement were 4.4±3.6% for whole blood and 4.0±3.5% for plasma across the typical range of radioactivity measured in mouse dynamic study. In in vivo studies, reasonable TACs were obtained. The peaks were captured well, and the time courses coincided well with the TAC derived from PET imaging of the heart chamber. The total blood loss was less than 200 µL, which had no physiological effect on the mice. CD-Well demonstrates satisfactory performance, and is useful for mouse PET dynamic study.

  11. Space-based and Earth-based Prospects for Measuring the Moment of Inertia of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, Jean-Luc; Campbell, Donald B.; Ghigo, Frank D.

    2016-10-01

    The moment of inertia is an essential integral constraint on models of planetary interiors. Our ignorance about Venus's moment of inertia prevents us from obtaining definite answers to key questions related to the size of the core, the thermal evolution history of the planet, the absence of a global magnetic field, and the evolution of the spin state. The technical challenge and cost of Venus landers make a direct measurement of the core size with seismology unlikely in the near future. For the same reasons, lander-based measurements of the spin precession rate, which yields the moment of inertia, are improbable in the near term. Tracking of the spin axis orientation with spacecraft or Earth-based radar over a decade or more offers more promising avenues. We use a precession model and the characteristics of existing data sets to quantify measurement prospects. The best Magellan estimates of the pole orientation have uncertainties of ~15 arcseconds (Konopliv et al., 1999) and an epoch that corresponds to the mid-point of the observations (~Oct. 1993). We describe achievable measurement uncertainties for a variety of scenarios including an additional spacecraft data point (e.g., at epoch 2023) with comparable or better precision than that of Magellan. Our 14 existing Earth-based radar observations obtained in 2006-2014 are sufficient to improve upon the best Magellan values and to unambiguously detect Venus's spin precession. We describe these results and quantify the uncertainties achievable on spin precession rate and moment of inertia with additional observations in the 2016-2023 interval. The Earth-based radar technique yielded a measurement of the spin axis orientation of Mercury with <5 arcsecond precision (Margot et al., 2012) that was later validated to <1 arcsecond level agreement with an independent, MESSENGER-based estimate (Stark et al., 2015).

  12. Radioactivity standardization in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simpson, BRS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africa's national radioactivity measurement standard is maintained at a satellite laboratory in Cape Town by the National Metrology Laboratory (NML) of the Council-for Scientific and Industrial Research. Standardizations are undertaken by a...

  13. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Richard K.; Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of mp = 10.4 +/- M(Earth) and orbits a star of Mstar = 0.56 +/- 0.09 M(Sun) at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 + 1.9/-0.5 AU, and an orbital period of 7.6 +7.7/-1.5 yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are due to the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect. This measurement was primarily due to the orbital motion of the Earth, but the analysis also demonstrates the capability measure micro lensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a failed gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets

  14. Cluster Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poenaru, Dorin N.; Greiner, Walter

    One of the rare examples of phenomena predicted before experimental discovery, offers the opportunity to introduce fission theory based on the asymmetric two center shell model. The valleys within the potential energy surfaces are due to the shell effects and are clearly showing why cluster radioactivity was mostly detected in parent nuclei leading to a doubly magic lead daughter. Saddle point shapes can be determined by solving an integro-differential equation. Nuclear dynamics allows us to calculate the half-lives. The following cluster decay modes (or heavy particle radioactivities) have been experimentally confirmed: 14C, 20O, 23F, 22,24-26Ne, 28,30Mg, 32,34Si with half-lives in good agreement with predicted values within our analytical superasymmetric fission model. The preformation probability is calculated as the internal barrier penetrability. An universal curve is described and used as an alternative for the estimation of the half-lives. The macroscopic-microscopic method was extended to investigate two-alpha accompanied fission and true ternary fission. The methods developed in nuclear physics are also adapted to study the stability of deposited atomic clusters on the planar surfaces.

  15. Measure the Earth's Radius and the Speed of Light with Simple and Inexpensive Computer-Based Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    With new and inexpensive computer-based methods, measuring the speed of light and the Earth's radius--historically difficult endeavors--can be simple enough to be tackled by high school and college students working in labs that have limited budgets. In this article, the author describes two methods of estimating the Earth's radius using two…

  16. Measure the Earth's Radius and the Speed of Light with Simple and Inexpensive Computer-Based Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    With new and inexpensive computer-based methods, measuring the speed of light and the Earth's radius--historically difficult endeavors--can be simple enough to be tackled by high school and college students working in labs that have limited budgets. In this article, the author describes two methods of estimating the Earth's radius using two…

  17. Handbook of radioactivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The updated and much expanded Third Edition of the "Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis" is an authoritative reference providing the principles, practical techniques, and procedures for the accurate measurement of radioactivity from the very low levels encountered in the environment to higher levels measured in radioisotope research, clinical laboratories, biological sciences, radionuclide standardization, nuclear medicine, nuclear power, fuel cycle facilities and in the implementation of nuclear forensic analysis and nuclear safeguards. The Third Edition contains seven new chapters providing a reference text much broader in scope than the previous Second Edition, and all of the other chapters have been updated and expanded many with new authors. The book describes the basic principles of radiation detection and measurement, the preparation of samples from a wide variety of matrices, assists the investigator or technician in the selection and use of appropriate radiation detectors, and presents state-of-the-ar...

  18. On the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM): Bringing NASA's Earth System Science Program to the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical and subtropical rainfall using a variety of remote sensing instrumentation, including the first spaceborne rain-measuring radar. Since the energy released when tropical rainfall occurs is a primary "fuel" supply for the weather and climate "engine"; improvements in computer models which predict future weather and climate states may depend on better measurements of global tropical rainfall and its energy. In support of the STANYS conference theme of Education and Space, this presentation focuses on one aspect of NASA's Earth Systems Science Program. We seek to present an overview of the TRMM mission. This overview will discuss the scientific motivation for TRMM, the TRMM instrument package, and recent images from tropical rainfall systems and hurricanes. The presentation also targets educational components of the TRMM mission in the areas of weather, mathematics, technology, and geography that can be used by secondary school/high school educators in the classroom.

  19. Space Technology 5 Multi-point Measurements of Near-Earth Magnetic Fields: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Le, G.; Strangeway, R. L.; Wang, Y.; Boardsen, S.A.; Moldwin, M. B.; Spence, H. E.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) mission successfully placed three micro-satellites in a 300 x 4500 km dawn-dusk orbit on 22 March 2006. Each spacecraft carried a boom-mounted vector fluxgate magnetometer that returned highly sensitive and accurate measurements of the geomagnetic field. These data allow, for the first time, the separation of temporal and spatial variations in field-aligned current (FAC) perturbations measured in low-Earth orbit on time scales of approximately 10 sec to 10 min. The constellation measurements are used to directly determine field-aligned current sheet motion, thickness and current density. In doing so, we demonstrate two multi-point methods for the inference of FAC current density that have not previously been possible in low-Earth orbit; 1) the "standard method," based upon s/c velocity, but corrected for FAC current sheet motion, and 2) the "gradiometer method" which uses simultaneous magnetic field measurements at two points with known separation. Future studies will apply these methods to the entire ST-5 data set and expand to include geomagnetic field gradient analyses as well as field-aligned and ionospheric currents.

  20. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    CERN Document Server

    Muraki, Y; Bennett, D P; Suzuki, D; Monard, L A G; Street, R; Jorgensen, U G; Kundurthy, P; Skowron, J; Becker, A C; Albrow, M D; Fouque, P; Heyrovsky, D; Barry, R K; Beaulieu, J -P; Wellnitz, D D; Bond, I A; Sumi, T; Dong, S; Gaudi, B S; Bramich, D M; Dominik, M; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Hayashi, F; Hearnshaw, J B; Hosaka, S; Itow, Y; Kamiya, K; Korpela, A V; Kilmartin, P M; Lin, W; Ling, C H; Makita, S; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Nishimoto, K; Ohnishi, K; Perrott, Y C; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Skuljan, L; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Christie, G W; DePoy, D L; Gorbikov, E; Gould, A; Kaspi, S; Lee, C -U; Mallia, F; Maoz, D; McCormick, J; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Polishook, D; Shporer, A; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Allan, A; Browne, P; Horne, K; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I; Tsapras, Y; Batista, V; Bennett, C S; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, R; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Menzies, J; Sahu, K C; Waldman, I; Zub, A Williams M; Bourhrous, H; Matsuoka, Y; Nagayama, T; Oi, N; Randriamanakoto, Z; Bozza, V; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dreizler, S; Finet, F; Glitrup, M; Harpsoe, K; Hinse, T C; Hundertmark, M; Liebig, C; Maier, G; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Surdej, J; Southworth, J; Wambsganss, J; Zimmer, F; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Wyrzykowski, L; Ulaczyk, K; Szymanski, M K; Kubiak, M; Pietrzynski, G; Soszynski, I

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of m_p = 10.4 +- 1.7 Earth masses and orbits a star of mass M_* = 0.56 +- 0.09 Solar masses at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 (+1.9 -0.5) AU and an orbital period of P = 7.6 (+7.7 -1.5} yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are enabled by the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect, which is seen primarily in the light curve distortion due to the orbital motion of the Earth. But, the analysis also demonstrates the capability to measure microlensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a "failed" gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the preval...

  1. Rainfall measurement from opportunistic use of earth-space link in Ku Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barthès

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the development of a low cost microwave device devoted to measure average rain rate observed along earth – satellite links. The principle is to use rain atmospheric attenuation along Earth – space links in Ku-band to deduce the path averaged rain rate. These links are characterized by a path length of a few km through the troposphere. Ground based power measurements are carried out by receiving TV channels from different geostationary satellites in Ku-band.

    The major difficulty in this study is to retrieve rain characteristics among many fluctuations of the received signal which are due to atmospheric scintillations, changes in the composition of the atmosphere (water vapour concentration, cloud water content or satellite features (variation of the emitted power, satellite motions. In order to perform a feasibility study of such a device, a measurement campaign has been performed for five months near Paris. This paper proposes an algorithm based on an artificial neural network to identify drought and rainy periods and to suppress the variability of the received signal due to no-rain effects. Taking into account the height of the rain layer, rain attenuation is then inverted to obtain path averaged rain rate. Obtained rainfall rates are compared with co-located rain gauges and radar measurements on the whole experiment period, then the most significant rainy events are analyzed.

  2. Geoneutrinos and the Earth inner parts structure

    CERN Document Server

    Sinev, V V

    2010-01-01

    The connection between geoneutrino registration and the Earth theory test is discussed. We compare standard theory of lithosphere plates and hypothesis of hydride Earth. Last hypothesis adds additional neutrino source $-$ planet core in which the initial Earth composition is conserved. Large volume scintillation detector is supposed to install at Baksan neutrino observatory INR RAS at Caucasus. The detector will register all possible neutrino fluxes, but mainly geo-neutrinos. So kind a detector (or detector net) placed in a number of sites on the Earth surface can measure all radioactivity from $^{238}$U and $^{232}$Th, because their neutrino energy exceeds the inverse beta-decay reaction threshold. By this way it will it possible to understand if there are any more neutrino sources in the Earth other than the crust and mantle.

  3. Malicious release of radioactive materials in urban area. Exposure of the public and emergency staff, protective measures; Boeswillige Freisetzung radioaktiver Stoffe in urbanen Bereichen. Exposition von Bevoelkerung und Einsatzpersonal, Schutzmassnahmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, Wolfgang [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin ITEM, Hannover (Germany). Bereich Aerosolforschung und Analytische Chemie; Lange, Florentin

    2016-07-01

    The preparedness for hypothetical radiological scenarios is part of the tasks for governmental authorities, safety and emergency organizations and the staff in case of the incident. The EURATOM guideline for radiation protection has to be implemented into national laws. According to the guidelines it is required that emergency planning has to be prepared for hypothetical radiological scenarios including terroristic or other maliciously motivated attacks using radioactive materials. The study includes assumptions on the released respirable radioactivity, restriction of the hazardous area, wind induced re-suspension of radioactive dusts and inhalation exposure, and mitigation measures.

  4. Evaluation of wall materials radioactivity measurements uncertainty%墙体材料放射性测量结果不确定度的评定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石龙华; 王迪; 柏光山

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of radioactive material through the wall of uncertainty in measurement and analysis of the various factors affecting the test results provide guidance for improving the level of detection and accuracy.%通过对墙体材料放射性测量结果不确定度的评定,分析影响试验结果的各种因素,为提高检测水平和精确度提供指导。

  5. Doppler lidar atmospheric wind sensors - A comparative performance evaluation for global measurement applications from earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison is made of four prominent Doppler lidar systems, ranging in wavelength from the near UV to the middle IR, which are presently being studied for their potential in an earth-orbiting global tropospheric wind field measurement application. The comparison is restricted to relative photon efficiencies, i.e., the required number of transmitted photons per pulse is calculated for each system for midtropospheric velocity estimate uncertainties ranging from + or - 1 to + or - 4 m/s. The results are converted to laser transmitter pulse energy and power requirements. The analysis indicates that a coherent CO2 Doppler lidar operating at 9.11-micron wavelength is the most efficient.

  6. Lateral Earth Pressure at Rest and Shear Modulus Measurements on Hanford Sludge Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Arduino, P.; Keller, P. J.

    2010-09-30

    This report describes the equipment, techniques, and results of lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus measurements on kaolin clay as well as two chemical sludge simulants. The testing was performed in support of the problem of hydrogen gas retention and release encountered in the double- shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) are being transferred to double-shell tanks (DSTs) for safety reasons (some SSTs are leaking or are in danger of leaking), but the available DST space is limited.

  7. Use of Radioactive Ion Beams for Biomedical Research 2. in-vivo dosimetry using positron emitting rare earth isotopes with the rotating prototype PET scanner at the Geneva Cantonal Hospital

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS331 \\\\ \\\\ The use of radioactive metal ions (such as $^{90}$Y, $^{153}$Sm or $^{186}$Re) in cancer therapy has made some progress, but has been hampered by factors that could be addressed at CERN with a greater likelihood of success than at any other installation in the world. The present proposal seeks to use the unique advantage of CERN ISOLDE to get round these problems together with the PET scanners at the Cantonal Hospital Geneva (PET~=~positron emission tomography). Radioisotope production by spallation at ISOLDE makes available a complete range of isotopes having as complete a diversity of types and energy of radiation, of half-life, and of ionic properties as one would wish. Among these isotopes several positron-emitters having clinical relevance are available.\\\\ \\\\Some free rare earth chelatas are used presently in palliation of painful bone metastases. Curative effects are not able for the moment with this kind of radiopharmaceuticals. More and better data on the biokinetics and bio-distribution...

  8. The natural radioactivity measurements in coastal sediment samples along the East Coast of Tamilnadu using gamma spectrometry technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramohan, J. [E.G.S Pillay Engineering College, Nagapattinam, 611002, Tamilnadu (India); Tholkappian, M. [Sri Vari College of Education, Then Arasampattu, Tiruvannamalai, 606611, Tamilnadu (India); Harikrishnan, N.; Ravisankar, R., E-mail: ravisankarphysics@gmail.com [Post Graduate and Research Department of Physics, Government Arts College, Tiruvannamalai 606603, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-08-28

    The natural radioactivity concentration in beach sediment samples collected from Pattipulam to Devanampattinam of East Coast of Tamilnadu have been determined by NaI (TI) gamma ray spectrometer. The specific activity concentrations range from ≤ 2.21 (BDL) to 37.02 Bq kg{sup −1} with a mean of 3.79 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 238}U, ≤ 2.11 (BDL) to 643.77 Bqkg{sup −1} with a mean of 49.60 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 232}Th and 300.34 Bqkg{sup −1} to 449.08 Bqkg{sup −1} with a mean of 360.23 Bqkg{sup −1} for {sup 40}K. The potential radiological hazards due to natural radionuclides content such as Radium Equivalent activity (Ra{sub eq}), Representative level index (RLI), External hazard index (H{sub ex}), absorbed gamma does rate (D{sub R}), and Annual effective dose rate (AEDR) are estimated to assess the radiation hazard associated with the sediments. The obtained data are compared with the recommended safety limits and international approved values. All the values are well below the recommended safety limits indicating that radiation levels do not poses any significant health hazard to the public in the area as a result of the natural radioactivity of beach sediments. This study may help the baseline data for more extensive works in the same subjects of future studies.

  9. Nitric oxide delta band emission in the earth's atmosphere - Comparison of a measurement and a theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, D. W.; Sharp, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to the altitude dependent emission rate in the delta-bands of nitric oxide as measured in the earth's atmosphere at night by a scanning ultraviolet spectrometer. It is noted that the reaction responsible is the two-body association of nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The measurements show a vertical intensity beneath the layer for the delta-band system of 19 R. The horizontal emission rate is found to increase from 70 R at 117 km to 140 R at 150 km. The data are analyzed with a one-dimensional, time-dependent, vertical-transport model of odd nitrogen photochemistry. The calculated and measured intensities agree so long as the quenching of N(2D) by atomic oxygen is near 5 x 10 to the -13 cu cm/sec.

  10. The safe transport of radioactive materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, R

    1966-01-01

    The Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials is a handbook that details the safety guidelines in transporting radioactive materials. The title covers the various regulations and policies, along with the safety measures and procedures of radioactive material transport. The text first details the 1963 version of the IAEA regulation for the safe transport of radioactive materials; the regulation covers the classification of radionuclides for transport purposes and the control of external radiation hazards during the transport of radioactive materials. The next chapter deals with concerns in the im

  11. Ultrasonic Velocity Measurements in Conjunction With Synchrotron Radiation to the Conditions of the Earth's Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Kung, J.; Liebermann, R. C.; Weidner, D. J.; Uchida, T.; Wang, Y.

    2002-12-01

    In conjunction with synchrotron radiation, our capabilities in ultrasonic experiments have been greatly increased in multiple dimensions. The experimental set-up installed at X17B1 of NSLS at Brookhaven National Lab enables us to conduct simultaneous studies of sound wave velocity using ultrasonic interferomtery and crystal structure refinement using X-ray diffraction at the conditions of the Earth's mantle. In these experiments, a complete characterization of the sample, such as sample length and stress at high pressure and high temperature, can be quantitatively addressed. The stress is measured using multi-element/multi-position detectors mounted at fixed diffraction angle, while the sample length is recorded using X-ray imaging techniques. Measurements at high pressure and high temperature not only provide the determination of pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli without using secondary pressure standard, but also can be used to establish the absolute pressure scale. Higher order elastic constants can also be investigate with the current experimental set-up. We have successfully applied these advanced techniques to the study of the elastic properties of unquenchable mantle phases (Calcium silicate perovskite) and materials undergone phase transitions (pyroxenes), melting, plastic deformation, and multi-phase aggregate (KLB-1) at high pressure and temperature, in which the sample length can not be retrieved from other techniques. More over, the utilization of digital equipment provides fast data collection, enabling us to capture instant variation or the time dependence of the elastic properties under above circumstances. These new developments will bring us high quality elasticity data for mantle phases at Earth's mantle conditions, providing crucial information in interpreting seismic observations and constraining the composition of the Earth's interior.

  12. Mathematical modeling of a survey-meter used to measure radioactivity in human thyroids: Monte Carlo calculations of the device response and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Kutsen, Semion; Minenko, Victor; Khrouch, Valeri; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of the SRP-68-01 survey meter used to measure exposure rates near the thyroid glands of persons exposed to radioactivity following the Chernobyl accident. This device was not designed to measure radioactivity in humans. To estimate the uncertainty associated with the measurement results, a mathematical model of the SRP-68-01 survey meter was developed and verified. A Monte Carlo method of numerical simulation of radiation transport has been used to calculate the calibration factor for the device and evaluate its uncertainty. The SRP-68-01 survey meter scale coefficient, an important characteristic of the device, was also estimated in this study. The calibration factors of the survey meter were calculated for (131)I, (132)I, (133)I, and (135)I content in the thyroid gland for six age groups of population: newborns; children aged 1 yr, 5 yr, 10 yr, 15 yr; and adults. A realistic scenario of direct thyroid measurements with an "extended" neck was used to calculate the calibration factors for newborns and one-year-olds. Uncertainties in the device calibration factors due to variability of the device scale coefficient, variability in thyroid mass and statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo method were evaluated. Relative uncertainties in the calibration factor estimates were found to be from 0.06 for children aged 1 yr to 0.1 for 10-yr and 15-yr children. The positioning errors of the detector during measurements deviate mainly in one direction from the estimated calibration factors. Deviations of the device position from the proper geometry of measurements were found to lead to overestimation of the calibration factor by up to 24 percent for adults and up to 60 percent for 1-yr children. The results of this study improve the estimates of (131)I thyroidal content and, consequently, thyroid dose estimates that are derived from direct thyroid measurements performed in Belarus shortly after the Chernobyl accident.

  13. Radioactivity of the Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-03-01

    The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

  14. Radioactivity measurements in the vicinity of the mine waste heap at Crossen and radiation dose assessment; Radioaktivitaetsmessungen in der Umgebung der Bergehalde Crossen und Abschaetzung der Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulzer, R.

    1998-09-01

    The radiation dose to the population living in the vicinity of the mine waste heap is assessed. The measurements carried out were to verify the dose relevance of ambient radioactivity on site, in particular the ingestion and inhalation pathways and the external exposure pathways. The nuclide Pb-210 was used as an indicator because of its large dose factor for assessment of ingestion and its airborne dispersion as an Rn-222 daughter product. The waste heap material releases large quantities of this nuclide. Ingestion of radioactivity from the waste heap may be caused by wind-borne erosion and activity deposition on plants in the area. Thererfore, the specific activities of Pb-210 and Ra-226 have been measured in soil and plant specimens sampled at various distances from the waste heap. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Strahlenexposition der in der Naehe einer Bergehalde lebenden Bevoelkerung wird bestimmt. Zu diesem Zweck wurden Messungen realisiert, die den Ingestions- und Inhalationspfad sowie die externe Exposition fuer die vorgefundene Situation auf ihre Dosisrelevanz ueberpruefen sollten. Hierzu diente das Nuklid Pb-210 mit seinem grossen Dosisfaktor fuer die Ingestion und seiner besonderen Verbreitungsmoeglichkeit ueber die Luft als Tochter von Rn-222. Dieses wird aus dem Haldenmaterial in grossen Mengen freigesetzt. Haldenmaterial kann ueber den Ingestionspfad in den menschlichen Koerper aufgenommen werden, wenn es durch Winderosion auf Pflanzenoberflaechen in der Umgebung abgelagert wird.Deshalb wurden die spezifischen Aktivitaeten an Pb-210 und Ra-226 von Boden- und Pflanzenproben in verschiedenen Entfernungen zur Halde bestimmt.

  15. INTERNAL DOSES OF THREE PERSONS STAYING 110 KM SOUTH OF THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION DURING THE ARRIVAL OF RADIOACTIVE PLUMES BASED ON DIRECT MEASUREMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Tani, Kotaro; Kim, Eunjoo; Momose, Takumaro

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe the results of direct measurements made on three persons who stayed in Tokai-mura, a village located ∼110 km south of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), during the arrival of significant radioactive plumes released from the FDNPS as a consequence of the Tohoku earthquake/tsunami/FDNPS accident in March 2011. These measurements were made using a NaI(Tl) spectrometer and a whole-body counter shortly after the accident. Their thyroid equivalent doses ((131)I) were estimated to be 0.9-1.4 mSv under the assumption of acute intake via inhalation on 15 March, when the first significant release event was observed. Although greatly depending on the physicochemical form of iodine, the intake amount ratios of (131)I to (137)Cs for the three subjects were calculated as 2.7-3.7, which were much smaller than the radioactivity ratio (7.8) found in air sampling at the same site.

  16. Radioactivity measurements in the vicinity of the mine waste heap at Crossen and radiation dose assessment; Radioaktivitaetsmessungen in der Umgebung der Bergehalde Crossen und Abschaetzung der Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulzer, R.

    1998-09-01

    The radiation dose to the population living in the vicinity of the mine waste heap is assessed. The measurements carried out were to verify the dose relevance of ambient radioactivity on site, in particular the ingestion and inhalation pathways and the external exposure pathways. The nuclide Pb-210 was used as an indicator because of its large dose factor for assessment of ingestion and its airborne dispersion as an Rn-222 daughter product. The waste heap material releases large quantities of this nuclide. Ingestion of radioactivity from the waste heap may be caused by wind-borne erosion and activity deposition on plants in the area. Thererfore, the specific activities of Pb-210 and Ra-226 have been measured in soil and plant specimens sampled at various distances from the waste heap. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Strahlenexposition der in der Naehe einer Bergehalde lebenden Bevoelkerung wird bestimmt. Zu diesem Zweck wurden Messungen realisiert, die den Ingestions- und Inhalationspfad sowie die externe Exposition fuer die vorgefundene Situation auf ihre Dosisrelevanz ueberpruefen sollten. Hierzu diente das Nuklid Pb-210 mit seinem grossen Dosisfaktor fuer die Ingestion und seiner besonderen Verbreitungsmoeglichkeit ueber die Luft als Tochter von Rn-222. Dieses wird aus dem Haldenmaterial in grossen Mengen freigesetzt. Haldenmaterial kann ueber den Ingestionspfad in den menschlichen Koerper aufgenommen werden, wenn es durch Winderosion auf Pflanzenoberflaechen in der Umgebung abgelagert wird.Deshalb wurden die spezifischen Aktivitaeten an Pb-210 und Ra-226 von Boden- und Pflanzenproben in verschiedenen Entfernungen zur Halde bestimmt.

  17. Measurement of Near Earth Radiation Environment in Japan—Overview and Plan—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goka, Tateo; Matsumoto, Haruhisa

    2009-06-01

    The current status of measuring radiation using JAXA satellites is reviewed. Starting with Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V; KIKU-5 in Japanese) in 1987, efforts to conduct radiation measurements in space have continued using almost all Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA formerly NASDA) satellites (ETS-VI, ADEOS, ADEOS-II, MDS-1, DRTS (ongoing), and ALOS (ongoing)), in geostationary orbit (GEO), geostationary -transfer orbit (GTO), and low-Earth orbit (LEO). Electrons, protons, alpha particles, and heavy ions have been the main objects of study. Future plans for radiation monitoring in JAXA, including GOSAT, Jason-2 (in ollaboration with CNES), SmartSat (in collaboration with NICT), and ISS/JEM/Exposure Facility/SEDA-AP, are presented.

  18. Excited State Lifetime Measurements in Rare Earth Nuclei with Fast Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Bonett-Matiz, M.; Williams, E.; Régis, J.-M.; Rudigier, M.; Ahn, T.; Anagnostatou, V.; Berant, Z.; Bunce, M.; Elvers, M.; Heinz, A.; Ilie, G.; Jolie, J.; Radeck, D.; Savran, D.; Smith, M.

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the collectivity of the lowest excited 2+ states of even-even rare earth nuclei. The B(E2) excitation strengths of these nuclei should directly correlate to the size of the valence space, and maximize at mid-shell. The previously identified saturation of B(E2) strength in well-deformed rotors at mid-shell is put to a high precision test in this series of measurements. Lifetimes of the 2+1 states in 168Hf and 174W have been measured using the newly developed LaBr3 scintillation detectors. The excellent energy resolution in conjunction with superb time properties of the new material allows for reliable handling of background, which is a source of systematic error in such experiments. Preliminary lifetime values are obtained and discussed in the context of previous and ongoing work.

  19. Estimating river discharge from earth observation measurement of river surface hydraulic variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Negrel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available River discharge is a key variable to quantify the water cycle, its fluxes and stocks at different scales, from local scale for the efficient management of water resource to global scale for the monitoring of climate change. Therefore, developing Earth observation (EO techniques for the measurement or estimation of river discharge is a major challenge. A key question deals with the possibility of deriving river discharge values from EO surface variables (width, level, slope, velocity the only one accessible through EO without any in situ measurement. Based on a literature study and original developments, the possibilities of estimating water surface variables using remote-sensing techniques have been explored, mainly RADAR altimetry as well as across-track and along-track interferometry.

  20. A Gravity of Earth Measurement with a qBOUNCE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cronenberg, G; Thalhammer, M; Jenke, T; Abele, H; Geltenbort, P

    2015-01-01

    We report a measurement of the local acceleration $g$ with ultracold neutrons based on quantum states in the gravity potential of the Earth. The new method uses resonant transitions between the states $|1> -> |3>$ and for the first time between $|1> -> |4>$. The measurements demonstrate that Newton's Inverse Square Law of Gravity is understood at micron distances at an energy level of $10^{-14}$ eV with $\\frac{\\Delta g}{g}=4\\times10^{-3}$. The results provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction at a micrometer interaction range. In particular, a dark energy candidate, the chameleon field is restricted to $\\beta<6.9\\times10^{6}$ for $n=2$ (95\\% C.L.).

  1. [Measures against Radiation Exposure Due to Large-Scale Nuclear Accident in Distant Place--Radioactive Materials in Nagasaki from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Sera, Koichiro; Takatsuji, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    To investigate human health effects of radiation exposure due to possible future nuclear accidents in distant places and other various findings of analysis of the radioactive materials contaminating the atmosphere of Nagasaki due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The concentrations of radioactive materials in aerosols in the atmosphere of Nagasaki were measured using a germanium semiconductor detector from March 2011 to March 2013. Internal exposure dose was calculated in accordance with ICRP Publ. 72. Air trajectories were analyzed using NOAA and METEX web-based systems. (134)Cs and (137)Cs were repeatedly detected. The air trajectory analysis showed that (134)Cs and (137)Cs flew directly from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from March to April 2011. However, the direct air trajectories were rarely detected after this period even when (134)Cs and (137)Cs were detected after this period. The activity ratios ((134)Cs/(137)Cs) of almost all the samples converted to those in March 2011 were about unity. This strongly suggests that the (134)Cs and (137)Cs detected mainly originated from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011. Although the (134)Cs and (137)Cs concentrations per air volume were very low and the human health effects of internal exposure via inhalation is expected to be negligible, the specific activities (concentrations per aerosol mass) were relatively high. It was found that possible future nuclear accidents may cause severe radioactive contaminations, which may require radiation exposure control of farm goods to more than 1000 km from places of nuclear accidents.

  2. CPMIP: measurements of real computational performance of Earth system models in CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Venkatramani; Maisonnave, Eric; Zadeh, Niki; Lawrence, Bryan N.; Biercamp, Joachim; Fladrich, Uwe; Aloisio, Giovanni; Benson, Rusty; Caubel, Arnaud; Durachta, Jeffrey; Foujols, Marie-Alice; Lister, Grenville; Mocavero, Silvia; Underwood, Seth; Wright, Garrett

    2017-01-01

    A climate model represents a multitude of processes on a variety of timescales and space scales: a canonical example of multi-physics multi-scale modeling. The underlying climate system is physically characterized by sensitive dependence on initial conditions, and natural stochastic variability, so very long integrations are needed to extract signals of climate change. Algorithms generally possess weak scaling and can be I/O and/or memory-bound. Such weak-scaling, I/O, and memory-bound multi-physics codes present particular challenges to computational performance. Traditional metrics of computational efficiency such as performance counters and scaling curves do not tell us enough about real sustained performance from climate models on different machines. They also do not provide a satisfactory basis for comparative information across models. codes present particular challenges to computational performance. We introduce a set of metrics that can be used for the study of computational performance of climate (and Earth system) models. These measures do not require specialized software or specific hardware counters, and should be accessible to anyone. They are independent of platform and underlying parallel programming models. We show how these metrics can be used to measure actually attained performance of Earth system models on different machines, and identify the most fruitful areas of research and development for performance engineering. codes present particular challenges to computational performance. We present results for these measures for a diverse suite of models from several modeling centers, and propose to use these measures as a basis for a CPMIP, a computational performance model intercomparison project (MIP).

  3. Once, someone just took a geiger counter. Development and state of the art of radio-activity measurement techniques; Einst nahm man einen Geigerzaehler. Entwicklung und Stand der Radioaktivitaets-Messtechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, Christoph [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany). Physikalisches Messlabor

    2009-07-01

    The development of activity measurement techniques started together with the discovery of radioactivity in 1896. A great impulse was given to the development by the rising of nuclear technology in the 50s. The detection techniques used today have been developed mainly at that time and in the following years. With the huge progress in semiconductor industry and in computer technology, the application of measuring processes developed then has become much simpler. Today, even commercial measuring systems for low-level-measurements of radioactivity are available. (orig.)

  4. Residual radioactivity of treated green diamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, Philippe; Notari, Franck; Lépy, Marie-Christine; Caplan, Candice; Pierre, Sylvie; Hainschwang, Thomas; Fritsch, Emmanuel

    2017-08-01

    Treated green diamonds can show residual radioactivity, generally due to immersion in radium salts. We report various activity measurements on two radioactive diamonds. The activity was characterized by alpha and gamma ray spectrometry, and the radon emanation was measured by alpha counting of a frozen source. Even when no residual radium contamination can be identified, measurable alpha and high-energy beta emissions could be detected. The potential health impact of radioactive diamonds and their status with regard to the regulatory policy for radioactive products are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Chorus source region localization in the Earth's outer magnetosphere using THEMIS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Agapitov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Discrete ELF/VLF chorus emissions, the most intense electromagnetic plasma waves observed in the Earth's radiation belts and outer magnetosphere, are thought to propagate roughly along magnetic field lines from a localized source region near the magnetic equator towards the magnetic poles. THEMIS project Electric Field Instrument (EFI and Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM measurements were used to determine the spatial scale of the chorus source localization region on the day side of the Earth's outer magnetosphere. We present simultaneous observations of the same chorus elements registered onboard several THEMIS spacecraft in 2007 when all the spacecraft were in the same orbit. Discrete chorus elements were observed at 0.15–0.25 of the local electron gyrofrequency, which is typical for the outer magnetosphere. We evaluated the Poynting flux and wave vector distribution and obtained chorus wave packet quasi-parallel propagation to the local magnetic field. Amplitude and phase correlation data analysis allowed us to estimate the characteristic spatial correlation scale transverse to the local magnetic field to be in the 2800–3200 km range.

  6. Environmental radioactivity survey in Suwon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Keun; Park, Jong Mi [Kyunghee Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Suwon, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Suwon regional monitoring station m 2003. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of environmental samples such as soil, drinking water, indicator plant(mugwort, pine-needle), agricultural and forest products, and processed food(tea)

  7. Radioactivity measurements applied to the dating and authentication of old wines;Mesures de radioactivite appliquees a la datation et a l'authenticite des vins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberta, Ph.; Perrot, F. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan (CENBG), 33 - Gradignan (France); Gaye, J.; Medina, B. [Direction Generale de la Concurrence, de la Consommation et de la Repression des Fraudes (DGCCRF), 33 - Pessac (France); Pravikoff, M.S. [Chimie Nucleaire Analytique et Bio-environnementale (CNAB), 33 - Gradignan (France)

    2009-09-15

    For many years the neutrino group in the CENBG has been involved in the development of low background gamma-ray spectrometers, based on the use of HPGe crystals. When applied to radioactivity measurements of wine in bottles, it has been shown that besides the well-known isotope {sup 40}K, the wine contains also trace amounts of {sup 137}Cs (less than 1 Bq/l) with an activity depending on the vintage. This technique has thus led to the possibility to date the wine bottles of vintages between 1952 and approx 1980 and to verify the year written on the label or on the cork. Since the measurements do not require opening the bottle, the technique has also proved to be very useful for detecting counterfeit wines of the 19. century and first half of the 20. century. (authors)

  8. Radioactivity measurements in soils surrounding four coal-fired power plants in Serbia by gamma-ray spectrometry and estimated dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Ivana Ž.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of spatial distribution of activity concentration of 238U, 226Ra, 210Pb, 232Th, 40K, and 137Cs radionuclides in the surface soil samples (n = 42 collected in the vicinity of four coal-fired power plants in Serbia is presented. Radioactivity measurements in soils performed by gamma-ray spectrometry showed values [Bqkg-1] in the range: 15-117 for 238U, 21-115 for 226Ra, 33-65 for 210Pb, 20-69 for 232Th, 324-736 for 40K, and 2-59 for 137Cs. Surface soil radio-activity that could have resulted from deposition of radionuclides from airborne discharges or resuspension of ash from disposal sites showed no enhanced levels. It was found that variation of soil textural properties, pH values, and carbonate content influenced activity levels of natural radionuclides while radiocesium activities were associated with soil organic matter content. Modification of some soil properties was observed in the immediate vicinity (<1 km of power plants where the soil was more alkaline with coarser particles (0.2-0.05 mm and carbonates accumulated. Calculated average values of the absorbed gamma dose rate and annual external effective dose originating from the terrestrial radionuclides were 69.4 nGy/h and 0.085 mSv, respectively. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 4007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  9. Trace Gas Measurements on Mars and Earth Using Optical Parametric Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Kenji; Haris, Riris; Li, Steve; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James Brice

    2010-01-01

    Trace gases and their isotopic ratios in planetary atmospheres offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of a planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. An orbiting laser remote sensing instrument is capable of measuring trace gases on a global scale with unprecedented accuracy, and higher spatial resolution that can be obtained by passive instruments. We have developed an active sensing instrument for the remote measurement of trace gases in planetary atmospheres (including Earth). The technique uses widely tunable, seeded optical parametric generation (OPG) to measure methane, CO2, water vapor, and other trace gases in the near and mid-infrared spectral regions. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and it is also a potential biogenic marker on Mars and other planets. Methane in the Earth's atmosphere survives for a shorter time than CO2 but its impact on climate change can be larger than CO2. Methane levels have remained relatively constant over the last decade around 1.78 parts per million (ppm) but recent observations indicate that methane levels may be on the rise. Increasing methane concentrations may trigger a positive feedback loop and a subsequent runaway greenhouse effect, where increasing temperatures result in increasing methane levels. The NRC Decadal Survey recognized the importance of global observations of greenhouse gases and called for simultaneous CH4, CO, and CO2 measurements but also underlined the technological limitations for these observations. For Mars, methane measurements are of great interest because of its potential as a strong biogenic marker. A remote sensing instrument that can measure day and night over all seasons and latitudes can identify and localize sources of biogenic gas plumes produced by subsurface chemistry or biology, and aid in the search for extra-terrestrial life. It can identify the dynamics of methane generation over time and latitude and identify future lander mission sites

  10. Measurement requirements for a near-Earth asteroid impact mitigation demonstration mission

    CERN Document Server

    Wolters, Stephen D; Wells, Nigel; Saunders, Christopher; McBride, Neil

    2011-01-01

    A concept for an Impact Mitigation Preparation Mission, called Don Quijote, is to send two spacecraft to a Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA): an Orbiter and an Impactor. The Impactor collides with the asteroid while the Orbiter measures the resulting change in the asteroid's orbit, by means of a Radio Science Experiment (RSE) carried out before and after impact. Three parallel Phase A studies on Don Quijote were carried out for the European Space Agency: the research presented here reflects outcomes of the study by QinetiQ. We discuss the mission objectives with regards to the prioritisation of payload instruments, with emphasis on the interpretation of the impact. The Radio Science Experiment is described and it is examined how solar radiation pressure may increase the uncertainty in measuring the orbit of the target asteroid. It is determined that to measure the change in orbit accurately a thermal IR spectrometer is mandatory, to measure the Yarkovsky effect. The advantages of having a laser altimeter are discusse...

  11. Measurement requirements for a Near-Earth Asteroid impact mitigation demonstration mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Stephen D.; Ball, Andrew J.; Wells, Nigel; Saunders, Christopher; McBride, Neil

    2011-10-01

    A concept for an Impact Mitigation Preparation Mission, called Don Quijote, is to send two spacecrafts to a Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA): an Orbiter and an Impactor. The Impactor collides with the asteroid while the Orbiter measures the resulting change in the asteroid's orbit, by means of a Radio Science Experiment (RSE) carried out before and after the impact. Three parallel Phase A studies on Don Quijote were carried out for the European Space Agency: the research presented here reflects the outcomes of the study by QinetiQ. We discuss the mission objectives with regard to the prioritisation of payload instruments, with emphasis on the interpretation of the impact. The Radio Science Experiment is described and it is examined how solar radiation pressure may increase the uncertainty in measuring the orbit of the target asteroid. It is determined that to measure the change in orbit accurately a thermal IR spectrometer is mandatory, to measure the Yarkovsky effect. The advantages of having a laser altimeter are discussed. The advantages of a dedicated wide-angle impact camera are discussed and the field-of-view is initially sized through a simple model of the impact.

  12. The influence of Earth rotation in neutrino speed measurements between CERN and the OPERA detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, Markus G

    2011-01-01

    The OPERA neutrino experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory recently reported, in arXiv:1109.4897v1, high-accuracy velocity measurements of neutrinos from the CERN CNGS beam over the 730 km distance between the two laboratories. This raised significant interest, as the observed neutrinos appeared to arrive at the OPERA detector about 60 ns (or equivalently 18 m) earlier than would have been expected if they had traveled at the speed of light, with high statistical significance. As the authors did not indicate whether and how they took into account the Coriolis effect that Earth's rotation has on the (southeastwards traveling) neutrinos, this brief note quantifies this effect. It would explain only a 2.2 ns earlier arrival time.

  13. Development of Dynamic Ellipsometry for Measurements or Iron Conductivity at Earth's Core Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Sean Campbell [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Ao, Tommy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davis, Jean-Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Seagle, Christopher T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Jung-Fu [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bernstein, Aaron [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The CHEDS researchers are engaged in a collaborative research project to study the properties of iron and iron alloys under Earth’s core conditions. The Earth’s core, inner and outer, is composed primarily of iron, thus studying iron and iron alloys at high pressure and temperature conditions will give the best estimate of its properties. Also, comparing studies of iron alloys with known properties of the core can constrain the potential light element compositions found within the core, such as fitting sound speeds and densities of iron alloys to established inner- Earth models. One of the lesser established properties of the core is the thermal conductivity, where current estimates vary by a factor of three. Therefore, one of the primary goals of this collaboration is to make relevant measurements to elucidate this conductivity.

  14. Measured force on elongated bodies in a simulated low-Earth orbit environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, C. A.; Ketsdever, A. D. [University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO 80918 (United States); Gimelshein, S. F. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2014-12-09

    An overview of the development of a magnetically filtered atomic oxygen plasma source and the application of the source to study low-Earth orbit drag on elongated bodies is presented. Plasma diagnostics show that the magnetic filter plasma source produces atomic oxygen ions (O{sup +}) with streaming energies equivalent to the relative orbital environment of approximately 5eV and can supply the appropriate density for LEO simulation. Previous research has demonstrated that momentum transfer between ions and metal surfaces is equivalent to the momentum transfer expected for neutral molecules with similar energy, due to charge exchange occurring prior to momentum transfer. Total drag measurements of aluminum cuboid geometries of varying length to diameter ratios immersed in the extracted plasma plume are presented as a function of streaming ion energy.

  15. Intermittency of the turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere detected from the ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Marina; Foppiano, Alberto; Ovalle, Elias; Antonova, Elizavieta; Troshichev, Oleg

    2008-11-01

    Turbulent processes in the Earth's magnetosphere are reflected in the dynamical behavior of the geomagnetic indices and other parameters determined from ground based observations. Intermittent properties of one minute Polar Cap (PC) index and auroral radio wave absorption are studied using 1995-2000 data sets. It was found that the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of both PC-index and absorption fluctuations display a strong non-Gaussian shape. This indicates that they are not characterized by a global time self-similarity but rather exhibit intermittency, as previously reported for solar wind velocity and auroral electrojet index values. In the case of the auroral absorption it was also found that intermittency strongly depends on the magnetic local time, being largest in the nighttime sector. This shows that the acceleration of precipitating particles is intermittent, especially near the substorm eye, where the level of turbulence increases. Application of the Local Intermittency Measure (LIM) technique confirms the aforementioned results to a better precision.

  16. Measurement of tributyl phosphate (TBP) in groundwater at a legacy radioactive waste site and its possible role in contaminant mobilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowling, Brett; Kinsela, Andrew S; Comarmond, M Josick; Hughes, Catherine E; Harrison, Jennifer J; Johansen, Mathew P; Payne, Timothy E

    2017-07-04

    At many legacy radioactive waste sites, organic compounds have been co-disposed, which may be a factor in mobilisation of radionuclides at these sites. Tri-butyl phosphate (TBP) is a component of waste streams from the nuclear fuel cycle, where it has been used in separating actinides during processing of nuclear fuels. Analyses of ground waters from the Little Forest Legacy Site (LFLS) in eastern Australia were undertaken using solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry (GCMS). The results indicate the presence of TBP several decades after waste disposal, with TBP only being detected in the immediate vicinity of the main disposal area. TBP is generally considered to degrade in the environment relatively rapidly. Therefore, it is likely that its presence is due to relatively recent releases of TBP, possibly stemming from leakage due to container degradation. The ongoing presence and solubility of TBP has the potential to provide a mechanism for nuclide mobilisation, with implications for long term management of LFLS and similar legacy waste sites. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Primordial radioactivity ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) measurements for soils of Ludhiana district of Punjab, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhan, K; Mehra, R

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the activity concentration and absorbed gamma dose rates due to primordial radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) for the soil of different villages of Ludhiana district of Punjab, India using a high-purity germanium detector based on high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in the soil samples have been found to be 28.58, 50.95 and 569.59 Bq kg(-1), respectively, which gives the total gamma dose rate contribution of 68.50 nGy h(-1). To evaluate the radiological hazard of the natural radioactivity, the radium equivalent activity, the external hazard index, the absorbed dose rate and the effective dose rate have been calculated. The calculated radium equivalent activity values are on the lower side of the recommended safe limit value of 370 Bq kg(-1) by Organization of Economic and Control Department. The calculated value of external health hazard index is lower than unity.

  18. DOAS measurements of NO2 from an ultralight aircraft during the Earth Challenge expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Toledo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on airborne Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS measurements of NO2 tropospheric columns above South Asia, Arabic peninsula, North Africa, and Italy in November and December 2009. The DOAS instrument was installed on an ultralight aircraft involved in the Earth Challenge project, an expedition of seven pilots flying on four ultralight aircraft between Australia and Belgium. The instrument recorded spectra in limb geometry with a large field-of-view, a set-up which provides a high sensitivity to the boundary layer NO2 while minimizing the uncertainties related to the attitude variations. We compare our measurements with OMI and GOME-2 tropospheric NO2 products when the latter are available. Above Rajasthan and the Po Valley, two areas where the NO2 field is homogeneous, data sets agree very well. Our measurements in this areas are respectively 0.1 ± 0.1 to 2.8 ± 1 × 1015 molec cm−2 and 2.5 ± 0.5 × 1016 molec cm−2. Flying downwind of Riyadh, our NO2 measurements show with a higher spatial resolution than OMI the structure of the megacities'exhaust plume. Moreover, our measurements indicate larger columns (up to 70% than the one seen by satellites. We also derived tropopsheric columns when no satellite data was available, if it was possible to get information on the visibility from satellite measurements of aerosol optical thickness. The maximum column we measured was above Benghazi, with 5.7 ± 2 × 1016 molec cm−2. This experiment also provides a confirmation for the recent finding of a soil signature above desert.

  19. A pin-point selection of underground water and hot spring sources by using natural radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurata, Nobuo [Sokuchi Tansui Risachisenta K.K. (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    It is proved by many actually excavated results that there is an underground water vein at a place where void space like fragmentation zone exits continuously to underground depth. A natural radioactive matter rises through cracks and tears of rocks to reach surface of ground, from where it seems to emit into air with many other kinds of radiation. A used tester is a special detector scintillation type and is made up so as to measure radiation by dividing radiations to underground, on and from earth surface, and in air. And, from difference between both measured values, which are count numbers of Bi and Tl, a radioactivity intensity can be recorded automatically through a calculation circuit. Here were described on underground fragmentation zone surveying method using gamma ray selection type tester, relationship between characteristic point of natural radioactivity and fragmentation zone, introduction of pin-pint method using a graphical example, and application of resources showing rock fragmentation zone. (G.K.)

  20. Application on the SGS Technology in the Measurement of Radioactive Solid Waste Conditioning%SGS 技术在放射性固体废物整备检测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫继锋; 李美山; 张存平; 韩红臣; 蒋磊

    2014-01-01

    介绍了利用分段γ扫描( SGS)技术在放射性固体废物整备无损检测中的应用,根据某核科研基地废物特点建立了放射性固体废物整备处理技术路线。该技术路线利用桶装废物放射性无损检测装置,获取废物γ放射性信息,指导废物分拣及分类整备,从而将极低放废物和豁免废物从中、低放废物中分拣出来,使放射性废物达到最少化。实验结果表明桶装γ放射性废物无损检测装置具有测量性能稳、测量误差小等优点,能满足放射性固体废物检测要求。%It describes the application of segmented gamma scanner in the conditioning of radioactive solid waste,and establishes a technology for conditioning of radioactive solid waste on the basis of nuclear ? waste characteristics .The technology adopts a method of gamma non -destructive assay and acquires radioactive in-formation of waste in order to guide waste sorting and classification .The very low level radioactive waste and ex-empt waste were sorted out from low and intermediate level radioactive solid waste to minimize the radioactive waste .The experimental results show that the non -destructive assay system of gamma radioactive waste has the advantages of stable performance and small measurement error ,can meet the testing requirements of radioactive solid waste .

  1. Full Meridian of Glory Perilous Adventures in the Competition to Measure the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Murdin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The Paris Meridian is the name of the line running north-south through the astronomical observatory in Paris. One of the original intentions behind the founding of the Paris Observatory was to determine and measure this line. To that end, the French government financed the Paris Academy of Sciences to do so in the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries employing both astronomers – people who study and measure the stars – and geodesists – people who study and measure the Earth. This book is about what they did and why. Full Meridian of Glory is the first English language presentation of this historical material in its entirety. It is an attractively written story of the scientists who created the Paris Meridian. They collaborated and worked together in alliances, like scientists everywhere; they also split into warring factions. They transcended national and political disputes, as scientists do now, their eyes fixed on ideals of accuracy, truth and objectivity. Yet also when their work served national inter...

  2. Optical Fiber Sensors for Infrasonic Wind Noise Reduction and Earth Strain Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolf, Scott

    Fiber-based interferometers provide the means to sense very small displacements over long baselines, and have the advantage of being nearly completely passive in their operation, making them particularly well suited for geophysical applications. This work presents the development and results from four new systems: one in atmospheric acoustics and three in Earth strain. Turbulent pressure fluctuations (wind noise) are a significant limiting factor in low-frequency atmospheric acoustic measurements. The Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor (OFIS) provides an alternative to traditional infrasonic wind noise reduction (WNR) techniques by providing an instantaneous average over a large spatial extent. This study shows that linear OFISs ranging in length from 30 to 270 m provide a WNR of up to 30 dB in winds up to 5 m/s, in good agreement with a new analytical model. Arrays of optical fiber strainmeters were deployed to measure sediment compaction at two sites in Bangladesh. One array at Jamalganj (in the north) consists of 20, 40, 60, and 100 m long strainmeters, while the second near Khulna (in the south) also includes lengths of 80 and 300 m. Two years of weekly measurements show a clear seasonal signal and subsidence at both sites that is in reasonable agreement with collocated GPS receivers. A new 250-meter, interferometric vertical borehole strainmeter has been developed based completely on passive optical components. Details of the prototyping, design, and deployment at the Pinon Flat Observatory (PFO) are presented. Power spectra show an intertidal noise level of -130 dB (re. 1 epsilon/Hz), consistent within 1-3 dB between redundant components. Examination of its response to Earth tides and earthquakes relative to the areal strain recorded by an orthogonal pair of collocated, 730 m horizontal laser strainmeters yield a Poisson's ratio of 0.26. Two prototype horizontal strainmeters were also developed to explore the use of similar interferometric optical fiber

  3. Seismic measurements to reveal short-term variations in the elastic properties of the Earth crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Davide; Zaccarelli, Lucia; Pastori, Marina; Margheriti, Lucia; Pio Lucente, Francesco; De Gori, Pasquale; Faenza, Licia; Soldati, Gaia

    2013-04-01

    Since the late the late '60s-early '70s era seismologists started developed theories that included variations of the elastic property of the Earth crust and the state of stress and its evolution crust prior to the occurrence of a large earthquake. Among the others the theory of the dilatancy (Scholz et al., 1973): when a rock is subject to stress, the rock grains are shifted generating micro-cracks, thus the rock itself increases its volume. Inside the fractured rock, fluid saturation and pore pressure play an important role in earthquake nucleation, by modulating the effective stress. Thus measuring the variations of wave speed and of anisotropic parameter in time can be highly informative on how the stress leading to a major fault failure builds up. In 80s and 90s such kind of research on earthquake precursor slowed down and the priority was given to seismic hazard and ground motions studies, which are very important since these are the basis for the building codes in many countries. Today we have dense and sophisticated seismic networks to measure wave-fields characteristics: we archive continuous waveform data recorded at three components broad-band seismometers, we almost routinely obtain high resolution earthquake locations. Therefore we are ready to start to systematically look at seismic-wave propagation properties to possibly reveal short-term variations in the elastic properties of the Earth crust. One seismological quantity which, since the '70s, is recognized to be diagnostic of the level of fracturation and/or of the pore pressure in the rock, hence of its state of stress, is the ratio between the compressional (P-wave) and the shear (S-wave) seismic velocities, the Vp/Vs (Nur, 1972; Kisslinger and Engdahl, 1973). Variations of this ratio have been recently observed and measured during the preparatory phase of a major earthquake (Lucente et al. 2010). In active fault areas and volcanoes, tectonic stress variation influences fracture field orientation

  4. Shell structure underlying the evolution of quadrupole collectivity in S-38 and S-40 probed by transient-field g-factor measurements on fast radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Stuchbery, A E; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Cook, J M; Davidson, P M; Davies, A D; Dinca, D C; Gade, A; Liddick, S N; Mantica, P F; Mertzimekis, T J; Müller, W F; Terry, J R; Tomlin, B E; Wilson, A N; Yoneda, K; Zwahlen, H

    2006-01-01

    The shell structure underlying shape changes in neutron-rich nuclei between N=20 and N=28 has been investigated by a novel application of the transient field technique to measure the first-excited state g factors in S-38 and S-40 produced as fast radioactive beams. Details of the new methodology are presented. In both S-38 and S-40 there is a fine balance between the proton and neutron contributions to the magnetic moments. Shell model calculations which describe the level schemes and quadrupole properties of these nuclei also give a satisfactory explanation of the g factors. In S-38 the g factor is extremely sensitive to the occupation of the neutron p3/2 orbit above the N=28 shell gap as occupation of this orbit strongly affects the proton configuration. The g factor of deformed S-40 does not resemble that of a conventional collective nucleus because spin contributions are more important than usual.

  5. Physical properties, structure, and shape of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident derived from soil, bamboo and shiitake mushroom measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimura, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Kenji; Tuyen, Ninh Duc; Komatsuzaki, Masakazu; Motohashi, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    We conducted an elution experiment with contaminated soils using various aqueous reagent solutions and autoradiography measurements of contaminated bamboo shoots and shiitake mushrooms to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Based on our study results and data in the literature, we conclude that the active Cs emitted by the accident fell to the ground as granular non-ionic materials. Therefore, they were not adsorbed or trapped by minerals in the soil, but instead physically adhere to the rough surfaces of the soil mineral particles. Granular Cs* can be transferred among media, such as soils and plants. The physical properties and dynamic behavior of the granular Cs* is expected to be helpful in considering methods for decontamination of soil, litter, and other media.

  6. Mathematical modeling of a survey-meter used to measure radioactivity in human thyroids: Monte Carlo calculations of the device response and uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrutchinsky, Arkady [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobruiskaya Street, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Drozdovitch, Vladimir, E-mail: drozdovv@mail.nih.gov [DHHS, NIH, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, 6120 Executive Blvd, EPS 7100, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kutsen, Semion [Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, 11 Bobruiskaya Street, Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Minenko, Victor [Belarusian Medical Academy of Post-Graduate Education, 3 Brovki Street, Minsk 220714 (Belarus); Khrouch, Valeri [Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center, 46 Zhivopisnaya Street, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Luckyanov, Nickolas [DHHS, NIH, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, 6120 Executive Blvd, EPS 7100, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Voilleque, Paul [MJP Risk Assessment, Inc., P.O. Box 200937, Denver, CO 80220-0937 (United States); Bouville, Andre [DHHS, NIH, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, 6120 Executive Blvd, EPS 7100, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    This paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of the SRP-68-01 survey meter used to measure exposure rates near the thyroid glands of persons exposed to radioactivity following the Chernobyl accident. This device was not designed to measure radioactivity in humans. To estimate the uncertainty associated with the measurement results, a mathematical model of the SRP-68-01 survey meter was developed and verified. A Monte Carlo method of numerical simulation of radiation transport has been used to calculate the calibration factor for the device and evaluate its uncertainty. The SRP-68-01 survey meter scale coefficient, an important characteristic of the device, was also estimated in this study. The calibration factors of the survey meter were calculated for {sup 131}I, {sup 132}I, {sup 133}I, and {sup 135}I content in the thyroid gland for six age groups of population: newborns; children aged 1 yr, 5 yr, 10 yr, 15 yr; and adults. A realistic scenario of direct thyroid measurements with an 'extended' neck was used to calculate the calibration factors for newborns and one-year-olds. Uncertainties in the device calibration factors due to variability of the device scale coefficient, variability in thyroid mass and statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo method were evaluated. Relative uncertainties in the calibration factor estimates were found to be from 0.06 for children aged 1 yr to 0.1 for 10-yr and 15-yr children. The positioning errors of the detector during measurements deviate mainly in one direction from the estimated calibration factors. Deviations of the device position from the proper geometry of measurements were found to lead to overestimation of the calibration factor by up to 24 percent for adults and up to 60 percent for 1-yr children. The results of this study improve the estimates of {sup 131}I thyroidal content and, consequently, thyroid dose estimates that are derived from direct thyroid measurements performed in Belarus shortly after

  7. Composition and Structure of Earth's Lower Mantle from Elasticity and Rheology Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Hauke; Kurnosov, Alexander; Frost, Daniel; Boffa Ballaran, Tiziana; Ziberna, Luca; Miyagi, Lowell; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Speziale, Sergio; Immoor, Julia

    2016-04-01

    In this contribution, we present results of two novel experimental data sets on the elasticity and rheology of lower mantle minerals and discuss how the results contribute to our understanding of the composition, structure and dynamics of the shallow lower mantle. (1) We report first high-pressure single-crystal elasticity data on Al-Fe-bearing bridgmanite (Mg0.88Fe0.12Si0.89Al0.11)O3, the dominant phase in Earth's lower mantle, using high-pressure Brillouin spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction on focused ion beam (FIB) cut samples in a novel self-consistent approach. We combine our elasticity data with previous experimental measurements of the phase assemblages and element partitioning in a pyrolitic mantle and present a mineral-physics based seismic profile of the uppermost lower mantle. Within the resolution of our model, we find excellent agreement of our mineral physics prediction with the seismic Preliminary Reference Earth Model up to at least 1000 km depth, indicating chemical homogeneity of upper and shallow lower mantle. (2) We present results from synchrotron radial x-ray diffraction measurements on the deformation behavior of (Mg0.8Fe0.2)O ferropericlase, the second most abundant mineral in the lower mantle, at high-pressures and temperatures of up to 1400 K. From our data, we calculate the flow strength of ferropericlase, which we find to increase at pressures >20 GPa. Modelling based on our experimental data indicates a strong increase of viscosity around subducting slabs in the upper 900 km of a lower mantle with a pyrolitic composition. This viscosity increase takes place in the shallow lower mantle without the need for a compositional change with depth or a phase transition. It can therefore provide a plausible mechanism to explain the stagnation of sinking slabs in the shallow lower mantle as observed by seismic tomography that is consistent with the compositional constraints from our elasticity measurements on bridgmanite.

  8. Validation of an efficiency calibration procedure for a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector used for the measurement of environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morera-Gómez, Yasser, E-mail: ymore24@gamail.com [Centro de Estudios Ambientales de Cienfuegos, AP 5. Ciudad Nuclear, CP 59350 Cienfuegos (Cuba); Departamento de Química y Edafología, Universidad de Navarra, Irunlarrea No 1, Pamplona 31009, Navarra (Spain); Cartas-Aguila, Héctor A.; Alonso-Hernández, Carlos M.; Nuñez-Duartes, Carlos [Centro de Estudios Ambientales de Cienfuegos, AP 5. Ciudad Nuclear, CP 59350 Cienfuegos (Cuba)

    2016-05-11

    To obtain reliable measurements of the environmental radionuclide activity using HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detectors, the knowledge of the absolute peak efficiency is required. This work presents a practical procedure for efficiency calibration of a coaxial n-type and a well-type HPGe detector using experimental and Monte Carlo simulations methods. The method was performed in an energy range from 40 to 1460 keV and it can be used for both, solid and liquid environmental samples. The calibration was initially verified measuring several reference materials provided by the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Finally, through the participation in two Proficiency Tests organized by IAEA for the members of the ALMERA network (Analytical Laboratories for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity) the validity of the developed procedure was confirmed. The validation also showed that measurement of {sup 226}Ra should be conducted using coaxial n-type HPGe detector in order to minimize the true coincidence summing effect. - Highlights: • An efficiency calibration for a coaxial and a well-type HPGe detector was performed. • The calibration was made using experimental and Monte Carlo simulations methods. • The procedure was verified measuring several reference materials provided by IAEA. • Calibrations were validated through the participation in 2 ALMERA Proficiency Tests.

  9. The Research Radioactive Aerosol Size Distribution Measurement Software%放射性气溶胶粒径分布测量软件研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯锋; 刘良军

    2012-01-01

    为基于筛网扩散组的放射性气溶胶粒径分布测量系统研制了一套测量分析软件,软件的运行环境为基于ARM的嵌入式硬件系统和linux嵌入式操作系统.软件使用开源QT套件开发.系统功能包括测量过程控制,筛网扩散组透过率计算,粒径分布的测量,测量数据分析计算的EM算法和Twomey算法,粒径分布的显示,系统通讯等功能.%Based on screen diffusion battery of particle size distribution of the radioactive aerosol measuring system developed a measurement and analysis software,the software operating environment was the embedded ARM - based hardware system and embedded linux operating system. The software is developed by the open source package QT. System functions included the measurement process control, screen diffusion battery transmittance calculations, particle size distribution measurement, measurement data analysed by the EM algorithm and Twomey algorithms, particle size distribution showed .system communication and other functions.

  10. Climatology of high-β plasma measurements in Earth's inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ross; Gerrard, Andrew J.; Lanzerotti, Louis J.; Soto-Chavez, A. R.; Kim, Hyomin; Manweiler, Jerry W.

    2017-01-01

    Since their launch in August 2012, the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instruments on the NASA Van Allen Probes spacecraft have been making continuous high-resolution measurements of Earth's ring current plasma environment. After a full traversal through all magnetic local times, a climatology (i.e., a survey of observations) of high-beta (β) plasma events (defined here as β > 1) as measured by the RBSPICE instrument in the ˜45 keV to ˜600 keV proton energy range in the inner magnetosphere (L hours. While most of these events have a β less than 2, there are a number of observations reaching β greater than 4. Other observations of particular note are high-β events during relatively minor geomagnetic storms and examples of very long duration high-β plasmas. We show that high-β plasmas are a relatively common occurrence in the inner magnetosphere during both quiet and active times. As such, the waves generated by these plasmas may have an underappreciated role in the inner magnetosphere, and thus the study of these plasmas and their instabilities may be more important than has been currently addressed.

  11. Effective dose measured with a life size human phantom in a low Earth orbit mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    The biggest concern about the health risk to astronauts is how large the stochastic effects (cancers and hereditary effects) of space radiation could be. The practical goal is to determine the "effective dose" precisely, which is difficult for each crew because of the complex transport processes of energetic secondary particles. The author and his colleagues thus attempted to measure an effective dose in space using a life-size human phantom torso in the STS-91 Shuttle-Mir mission, which flew at nearly the same orbit as that of the International Space Station (ISS). The effective dose for about 10-days flight was 4.1 mSv, which is about 90% of the dose equivalent (H) at the skin; the lowest H values were seen in deep, radiation-sensitive organs/tissues such as the bone marrow and colon. Succeeding measurements and model calculations show that the organ dose equivalents and effective dose in the low Earth orbit mission are highly consistent, despite the different dosimetry methodologies used to determine them.

  12. Systematic influences of gamma-ray spectrometry data near the decision threshold for radioactivity measurements in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorko, Benjamin; Korun, Matjaž; Mora Canadas, Juan Carlos; Nicoulaud-Gouin, Valerie; Chyly, Pavol; Blixt Buhr, Anna Maria; Lager, Charlotte; Aquilonius, Karin; Krajewski, Pawel

    2016-07-01

    Several methods for reporting outcomes of gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of environmental samples for dose calculations are presented and discussed. The measurement outcomes can be reported as primary measurement results, primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit, best estimates obtained by the Bayesian posterior (ISO 11929), best estimates obtained by the probability density distribution resembling shifting, and the procedure recommended by the European Commission (EC). The annual dose is calculated from the arithmetic average using any of these five procedures. It was shown that the primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit could lead to an underestimation of the annual dose. On the other hand the best estimates lead to an overestimation of the annual dose. The annual doses calculated from the measurement outcomes obtained according to the EC's recommended procedure, which does not cope with the uncertainties, fluctuate between an under- and overestimation, depending on the frequency of the measurement results that are larger than the limit of detection. In the extreme case, when no measurement results above the detection limit occur, the average over primary measurement results modified according to the quantification limit underestimates the average over primary measurement results for about 80%. The average over best estimates calculated according the procedure resembling shifting overestimates the average over primary measurement results for 35%, the average obtained by the Bayesian posterior for 85% and the treatment according to the EC recommendation for 89%.

  13. Establishing the Antarctic Dome C community reference standard site towards consistent measurements from Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C.; Uprety, S.; Xiong, J.; Wu, A.; Jing, P.; Smith, D.; Chander, G.; Fox, N.; Ungar, S.

    2010-01-01

    Establishing satellite measurement consistency by using common desert sites has become increasingly more important not only for climate change detection but also for quantitative retrievals of geophysical variables in satellite applications. Using the Antarctic Dome C site (75°06′S, 123°21′E, elevation 3.2 km) for satellite radiometric calibration and validation (Cal/Val) is of great interest owing to its unique location and characteristics. The site surface is covered with uniformly distributed permanent snow, and the atmospheric effect is small and relatively constant. In this study, the long-term stability and spectral characteristics of this site are evaluated using well-calibrated satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Preliminary results show that despite a few limitations, the site in general is stable in the long term, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model works well, and the site is most suitable for the Cal/Val of reflective solar bands in the 0.4–1.0 µm range. It was found that for the past decade, the reflectivity change of the site is within 1.35% at 0.64 µm, and interannual variability is within 2%. The site is able to resolve calibration biases between instruments at a level of ~1%. The usefulness of the site is demonstrated by comparing observations from seven satellite instruments involving four space agencies, including OrbView-2–SeaWiFS, Terra–Aqua MODIS, Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) – Hyperion, Meteorological Operational satellite programme (MetOp) – Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Envisat Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) – dvanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Dome C is a promising candidate site for climate quality calibration of satellite radiometers towards more consistent satellite measurements, as part

  14. Radioactivity in consumer products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

    1978-08-01

    Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

  15. A New Approach to Isolating External Magnetic Field Components in Spacecraft Measurements of the Earth's Magnetic Field Using Global Positioning System observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, C.; Hajj, G.

    1994-01-01

    We review the problem of separating components of the magnetic field arising from sources in the Earth's core and lithosphere, from those contributions arising external to the Earth, namely ionospheric and magnetospheric fields, in spacecraft measurements of the Earth's magnetic field.

  16. Studying the Earth with Geoneutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ludhova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Geoneutrinos, electron antineutrinos from natural radioactive decays inside the Earth, bring to the surface unique information about our planet. The new techniques in neutrino detection opened a door into a completely new interdisciplinary field of neutrino geoscience. We give here a broad geological introduction highlighting the points where the geoneutrino measurements can give substantial new insights. The status-of-art of this field is overviewed, including a description of the latest experimental results from KamLAND and Borexino experiments and their first geological implications. We performed a new combined Borexino and KamLAND analysis in terms of the extraction of the mantle geo-neutrino signal and the limits on the Earth's radiogenic heat power. The perspectives and the future projects having geo-neutrinos among their scientific goals are also discussed.

  17. Demonstration Project of Radioactive Solid Waste Retrieval and Conditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The construction goal of the project is to construct a set of special equipments for radioactive solid waste retrieval, sorting, pre-compacting and radioactive measurement, to provide a set of engineering

  18. Resolving Spacecraft Earth-Flyby Anomalies with Measured Light Speed Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Doppler shift observations of spacecraft, such as Galileo, NEAR, Cassini, Rosetta and MESSENGER in earth flybys, have all revealed unexplained speed “anomalies” — that the Doppler-shift determined speeds are inconsistent with expected speeds. Here it is shown that these speed anomalies are not real and are actually the result of using an incorrect relationship between the observed Doppler shift and the speed of the space- craft — a relationship based on the assumption that the speed of light is isotropic in all frames, viz invariant. Taking account of the repeatedly measured light-speed anisotropy the anomalies are resolved ab initio . The Pioneer 10 / 11 anomalies are discussed, but not resolved. The spacecraft observations demonstrate again that the speed of light is not invariant, and is isotropic only with respect to a dynamical 3-space. The existing Doppler shift data also offers a resource to characterise a new form of gravitational waves, the dynamical 3-space turbulence, that has also been detected by other tech- niques. The Einstein spacetime formalism uses a special definition of space and time coordinates that mandates light speed invariance for all observers, but which is easily misunderstood and misapplied.

  19. Global land ice measurements from space (GLIMS): remote sensing and GIS investigations of the Earth's cryosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michael P.; Olsenholler, Jeffrey A.; Shroder, John F.; Barry, Roger G.; Rasup, Bruce H.; Bush, Andrew B. G.; Copland, Luke; Dwyer, John L.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Haeberli, Wilfried; Kaab, Andreas; Paul, Frank; Hall, Dorothy K.; Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Molnia, Bruce F.; Trabant, Dennis C.; Wessels, Rick L.

    2004-01-01

    Concerns over greenhouse‐gas forcing and global temperatures have initiated research into understanding climate forcing and associated Earth‐system responses. A significant component is the Earth's cryosphere, as glacier‐related, feedback mechanisms govern atmospheric, hydrospheric and lithospheric response. Predicting the human and natural dimensions of climate‐induced environmental change requires global, regional and local information about ice‐mass distribution, volumes, and fluctuations. The Global Land‐Ice Measurements from Space (GLIMS) project is specifically designed to produce and augment baseline information to facilitate glacier‐change studies. This requires addressing numerous issues, including the generation of topographic information, anisotropic‐reflectance correction of satellite imagery, data fusion and spatial analysis, and GIS‐based modeling. Field and satellite investigations indicate that many small glaciers and glaciers in temperate regions are downwasting and retreating, although detailed mapping and assessment are still required to ascertain regional and global patterns of ice‐mass variations. Such remote sensing/GIS studies, coupled with field investigations, are vital for producing baseline information on glacier changes, and improving our understanding of the complex linkages between atmospheric, lithospheric, and glaciological processes.

  20. Study of proton radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J. [and others

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  1. Feasibility of a Constellation of Miniature Satellites for Performing Measurements of the Magnetic Field of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter;

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the requirements for a small constellation of satellites to perform measurements of the magnetic field of the Earth and a payload and boom design for such a mission is discussed. After studying communication, power and mass requirements it is found that it is feasible to develop...

  2. Measuring the Tilt of the Earth's Axis with the Help of a Plastic Pipe and a Piece of Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isildak, R. Suat

    2016-01-01

    In this project, a method that had been developed using a single setup was employed to correctly measure the tilt of the Earth's axis on 21 June 2015. The method is an easily comprehensible and applicable technique that can be used in elementary science and astronomy courses and understood by students of every age group.

  3. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  4. Natural radioactivity and radon specific exhalation rate of zircon sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Righi, S.; Verita, S.; Bruzzi, L. [Bologna Univ., Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca per le Scienze Ambientali and Dipt. di Fisica, Ravenna (Italy); Albertazzi, A. [Italian Ceramic Center, Bologna (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The study focuses on the radon emanation from zircon sands and their derivatives, which are widely used in many sectors of industry. In particular, the results obtained by experimental measurements on samples of zircon sands and zircon flours commonly used in Italian ceramic industries are reported. Zircon sands contain a significant concentration of natural radioactivity because Th and U may substitute zirconium in the zircon crystal lattice. The relevant routes of exposure of workers to T.E.N.O.R.M. from zircon materials are external radiation and internal exposure, either by inhalation of aerosols in dusty working conditions or by inhalation of radon in workplaces. The main objective of this investigation is to provide experimental data able to better calculate the internal exposure of workers due to radon inhalation. Zircon samples were surveyed for natural radioactivity, radon specific exhalation rate and emanation fraction. Measurements of radioactivity concentration were carried out using {gamma}-spectrometry. Methods used for determining radon consisted in determining the {sup 222}Rn activity accumulated in a vessel after a given accumulation build-up time. The average activity concentrations of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th in samples result about 2600 and 550 Bq kg-1, respectively; these concentrations are significantly higher than the world average noticed in soils, rocks and Earth crust. The {sup 222}Rn specific exhalation rates result very low probably due to the low porosity of the material and the consequent difficulty for radon to be released from the zircon crystal lattice. (author)

  5. Report of radioactivity survey research in fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    In National Institute of Radiological Sciences, a survey was made on radioactivities in the environment due to the substances released from nuclear installations and radioactive fall-out brought out by nuclear explosion tests since 1959. As the marked progress of non-military utilization of nuclear energy the national concern on environmental radioactivity has been increasing in Japan and thus it has become more and more important to make a survey research of radioactivities, which might affect the environment and human health. In these situations, the institute attempted to make the following six surveys in the fiscal year of 1996; `a survey on radioactive levels in environment, foods and human bodies`, `survey on the radioactive level in the regions around nuclear installations`, `works in radioactive data center`, `fundamental survey on the evaluation of the results from radioactivity survey`, `workshop for technical experts of environmental radioactivity monitoring` and `survey research on the measurement and countermeasures for emergency exposure`. (M.N.)

  6. Report of radioactivity survey research in fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    In National Institute of Radiological Sciences, a survey was made on radioactivities in the environment due to the substances released from nuclear installations and radioactive fall-out brought out by nuclear explosion tests since 1959. As the marked progress of non-military utilization of nuclear energy the national concern on environmental radioactivity has been increasing in Japan and thus it has become more and more important to make a survey research of radioactivities, which might affect the environment and human health. In these situations, the institute attempted to make the following six surveys in the fiscal year of 1997; `a survey on radioactive levels in environment, foods and human bodies`, `survey on the radioactive level in the regions around nuclear installations`, `works in radioactive data center`, `fundamental survey on the evaluation of the results from radioactivity survey`, `workshop for technical experts of environmental radioactivity monitoring` and `survey research on the measurement and countermeasures for emergency exposure`. (J.P.N.)

  7. Measurements of the large-scale direct-current Earth potential and possible implications for the geomagnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-05

    The magnitude of the large-scale direct-current earth potential was measured on a section of a recently laid transatlantic telecommunications cable. Analysis of the data acquired on the 4476-kilometer cable yielded a mean direct-current potential drop of less than about 0.072 +/- 0.050 millivolts per kilometer. Interpreted in terms of a generation of the potential by the earth's geodynamo, such a small value of the mean potential implies that the toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields of the dynamo are approximately equal at the core-mantle boundary.

  8. An information theory approach for evaluating earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements - Nonuniform sampling of reflected shortwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Direskeneli, Haldun; Halyo, Nesim

    1992-01-01

    An information theory approach to examine the temporal nonuniform sampling characteristics of shortwave (SW) flux for earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements is suggested. The information gain is computed by computing the information content before and after the measurements. A stochastic diurnal model for the SW flux is developed, and measurements for different orbital parameters are examined. The methodology is applied to specific NASA Polar platform and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) orbital parameters. The information theory approach, coupled with the developed SW diurnal model, is found to be promising for measurements involving nonuniform orbital sampling characteristics.

  9. Measurement of airborne radioactivity and its meteorological application. Part VIII. Annual report, 1 August 1976-31 October 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, R.; Kanter, H. J.; Sladkovic, R.; Jaeger, H.; Poetzl, K.

    1980-12-01

    Studies of the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange were continued. Continuous data of the concentration of cosmogenic radionuclides /sup 7/Be, /sup 32/P, /sup 33/P, as well as of fallout and daily means of ozone concentrations, measured at 3000 m ASL are presented for the reporting period. Installation of two additional ozone measuring stations at 1800 and 740 m ASL provided the means for getting insight into the balance of the tropospheric ozone. First results of routine monitoring of the stratospheric aerosol with a high resolution lidar are shown. Accuracy of the method is discussed. Control of the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange by solar activity is examined with the aid of the key day method using an 8-year measuring sequence. Relevant literature available on the subject is reviewed.

  10. Novel Solvent for the Simultaneous recovery of Radioactive Nuclides from Liquid Radioactive Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanovskiy, Valeriy Nicholiavich; Smirnov, Lgor V.; Babain, Vasiliy A.; Todd, Terry A.; Brewer, Ken N.

    1999-10-07

    The present invention relates to solvents, and methods, for selectively extracting and recovering radionuclides, especially cesium and strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive wastes. More specifically, the invention relates to extracting agent solvent compositions comprising complex organoboron compounds, substituted polyethylene glycols, and neutral organophosphorus compounds in a diluent. The preferred solvent comprises a chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, diphenyl-dibutylmethylenecarbamoylphosphine oxide, PEG-400, and a diluent of phenylpolyfluoroalkyl sulfone. The invention also provides a method of using the invention extracting agents to recover cesium, strontium, rare earths and actinides from liquid radioactive waste.

  11. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect.

  12. A Geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture Provides for Disaster Management, Measurement of Soil Moisture, and Measurement of Earth-Surface Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Soren; Komar, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A GEO-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) could provide daily coverage of basically all of North and South America with very good temporal coverage within the mapped area. This affords a key capability to disaster management, tectonic mapping and modeling, and vegetation mapping. The fine temporal sampling makes this system particularly useful for disaster management of flooding, hurricanes, and earthquakes. By using a fairly long wavelength, changing water boundaries caused by storms or flooding could be monitored in near real-time. This coverage would also provide revolutionary capabilities in the field of radar interferometry, including the capability to study the interferometric signature immediately before and after an earthquake, thus allowing unprecedented studies of Earth-surface dynamics. Preeruptive volcano dynamics could be studied as well as pre-seismic deformation, one of the most controversial and elusive aspects of earthquakes. Interferometric correlation would similarly allow near real-time mapping of surface changes caused by volcanic eruptions, mud slides, or fires. Finally, a GEO SAR provides an optimum configuration for soil moisture measurement that requires a high temporal sampling rate (1-2 days) with a moderate spatial resolution (1 km or better). From a technological point of view, the largest challenges involved in developing a geosynchronous SAR capability relate to the very large slant range distance from the radar to the mapped area. This leads to requirements for large power or alternatively very large antenna, the ability to steer the mapping area to the left and right of the satellite, and control of the elevation and azimuth angles. The weight of this system is estimated to be 2750 kg and it would require 20 kW of DC-power. Such a system would provide up to a 600 km ground swath in a strip-mapping mode and 4000 km dual-sided mapping in a scan-SAR mode.

  13. Measuring the extent of total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma using radioactive iodine imaging: relationship with serum thyroglobulin and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsinger, F Christopher; Ramaswamy, Uma; Cabanillas, Maria E; Lang, Juntian; Lin, Heather Y; Busaidy, Naifa L; Grubbs, Elizabeth; Rahim, Sania; Sturgis, Erich M; Lee, Jeffrey E; Weber, Randal S; Clayman, Gary L; Rohren, Eric M

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE Despite performing total thyroidectomy (TT), postoperative radioactive iodine (RAI) imaging often demonstrates the presence of residual thyroid tissue within the operative bed. OBJECTIVE To measure the extent of TT using postoperative RAI imaging and assessing serum thyroglobulin (Tg) level for patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We evaluated 245 patients undergoing TT for clinically staged cT1-3N0M0 DTC, who underwent diagnostic postoperative RAI imaging. INTERVENTIONS Total thyroidectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES On the basis of quantitative measurements, RAI uptake (RAIU) in the thyroid bed of 0.2% of administered activity was selected as the cutpoint to determine the presence or absence of thyroid remnant. RESULTS By postoperative RAI imaging, TT in 106 patients (43%) resulted in RAIU of less than 0.2%. In the remaining 139 patients (57%), there was measurable iodine-avid thyroid tissue and/or tumor in the thyroid bed (n = 117 [84%]), the neck (n = 4 [3%]), or both (n = 18 [13%]). For the entire study population, mean 24-hour RAIU was 0.62%. Stimulated serum Tg levels were obtained in 232 of 245 patients (95%). Measurable stimulated Tg level (≥1 ng/mL) (to convert to micrograms per liter, multiply by 1) was found in 26 of 102 patients (25%) without thyroid remnant and in 87of 133 patients (65%) with thyroid remnant (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE A goal of postthyroidectomy RAIU of less than 0.2% helps maximize the likelihood of an unmeasurable postoperative Tg level, potentially simplifying follow-up evaluation and reducing the use of postoperative RAI in order to facilitate surveillance.

  14. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  15. Monte-Carlo-simulation for measuring the radioactivity of waste material to optimize the accuracy of measurement; Monte-Carlo-Simulationsrechnungen zur Aktivitaetsbestimmung des Messgutes in Freimessanlagen zur Optimierung der Messgenauigkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weggen, J.; Simiae, S.; Breckow, J. [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (DE). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2009-07-01

    Associated with dismantling nuclear power plants is the production of a huge mass of radioactive waste material. This waste must be controlled in order to determine whether or not it can be released for exemption or clearance. In practise, frequently the total-gamma measuring method is used in order to get a high mass flow. To calibrate the measuring system a high operating expense is necessary. In this paper a new approach is presented, to simulate the geometry calibration with a computer program. The software EGSnrc is based on Monte-Carlo algorithm to simulate the particle and photon transport within material. By means of this program it is possible to calculate calibration factors which characterize the energy absorption of the measured material. The results of the simulation are plausible. It should be possible to substitute the practical method by the computer simulation. Further investigation are required, e.g. the comparison with conventional calibration methods to consolidate the presented method. (orig.)

  16. Variation in alpha radioactivity of plants with the use of different fertilizers and radon measurement in fertilized soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Pooja; Chauhan, Rishi Pal

    2014-01-01

    People are exposed to ionizing radin from the radionuclides that are present in different types of natural sources, of which phosphate fertilizer is one of the most important sources. Fertilizers are commonly used in agricultural field worldwide to enhance the crop yield. In the present investigation, a control study was carried out on the lady's finger plants grown in earthen pots. To observe the effect of fertilizers their equal amounts were added to the soil just before the plantation. The alpha track densities were measured using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), a sensitive detector for alpha particles. The measured alpha track densities (T cm(-2)d(-1)) in lady's finger plants on top and bottom face of leaves after 30, 50 and 70 days of plantation varied from 49 ± 11 to 206 ± 2.6, 49 ± 16 to 248 ± 16 and 57 ± 8.5 to 265 ± 32 respectively in various leaf samples. The alpha track densities were found to vary with nature of fertilizers added to the soil and an increase was also observed with time. The alpha track densities were also measured in soil samples mixed with different fertilizers. The radon exhalation rates in various soil samples and soil to plant transfer factor (TF) of alpha tracks were also calculated.

  17. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  18. On the scale estimation using truncated swath measurements from low Earth orbiting satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi

    2013-05-01

    Truncation effect caused by limited swath width of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites results in inevitable underestimation of object scale when using pixel-counting methods. A new approach is proposed to obtain more accurate object scale through truncated measurements. The approach is based upon the mean object area fraction (MOAF), which depicts the relative population of object points in a varying-size domain and proves to be less sensitive to truncation effect. The MOAF-equivalent radius (MER) is deduced by comparing the actual MOAF with the standard one inferred from a circle object. Numerical simulations are implemented to demonstrate the MER characteristics. In contrast to area-equivalent radius (AER) that is merely determined by the absolute amount of object points, MER relies on the overall spatial structure of the object. For objects with irregular shapes, the MER value is generally smaller than AER in the absence of truncation. Nevertheless, taking the actual AER as true scale, MER has significantly reduced biases compared to AER once the object is truncated. This advantage can be reinforced when focusing on size statistics of analogous objects, because negative and positive biases associated with various truncation situations coexist in MER, against the uniform negative biases of AER. When applied to MODIS cloud mask data that are restricted in individual granules, MER has consistently larger values than AER for most truncated clouds. Compared with the explicitly problematic estimation from AER due to truncation, MER offers a notable elevation on the estimated cloud size and gets closer to the truth.

  19. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  20. Full Scale Earth Fault Experiments on 10 kV laboratory network with comparative Measurements on Conventional CT's and VT's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Stefan; Nielsen, Hans Ove; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    . The necessity of high bandwidth measurement equipment for earth fault measurements on compensated distribution networks can be undermined, since it will be shown that the transient signal transfer through conventional CT?s and VT?s for further signal analysis is sufficient. Caused the inadequacy three phase...... transformers (CT?s) and voltage transformers (VT?s) by an optical link. Comparison with a similar earlier performed experiment caried out autumn 1998, where current and voltage measurements were measured with high bandwidth Rugowski-coils and high voltage Tektronix probes, gave remarkable results...

  1. Development of several chromatography extraction separations for the measurement of minority elements present in high level radioactive solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillard, Christophe; Esbelin, Eric; Dautheriebes, Jean-Luc [CEA, Bagnols sur Ceze (France). Analysis and Materials Metrology Lab.

    2016-05-01

    Five chromatography extraction separation methods using Triskem columns were developed for the measurement of minority elements present in high level activity solutions produced by various programs (processes of hydrometallurgical extraction, dissolution of hulls and spent fuels) implemented in the Atalante facility at CEA Marcoule. The first three concern the Purex process, for which it is necessary to quantify Np + Pu traces in the main raffinate, Np traces in the ''U-Pu production'' step, and Tc traces in the ''U production'' to qualify its performances. Total recovery of these traces was obtained with a good macro-element decontamination factor, thus permitting their determination by L-line X-ray fluorescence or by ICP-QMS. The fourth separation focussed on the total recovery of U and Pu traces from a hull dissolution solution. The decontamination and recovery performances were very good and enabled the determination of U and Pu by L-line X-ray fluorescence. The last method concerns the separation of Zr from an irradiated fuel dissolution solution, for its isotopic composition determination by ICP-QMS. Excellent agreement was obtained between the experimental measurements and computer code estimates.

  2. Environmental radioactivity intercomparison measurements; Nord-Cotentin 2000 radioactivite de l'environnement mesures d'intercomparaison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the context of the North Cotentin radioecological group set up in 1997 by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Secretariat d'Etat a la Sante, the Swiss Federal Office of Public health, a national organization of independent status with respect to nuclear energy, conducted a series of measurements in the north Cotentin in 1998. Some sites proposed by local association 'Angry mothers' were examined in particular. This association has now taken the initiative to organize a large scale international intercomparison, ' North Cotentin 2000', in the vicinity of local nuclear installations. Besides the scientific aspect of the intercomparison, a specific aim of this intercomparison consists in providing to the local population with a real opportunity for direct exchange with participating international teams. The primary concern of the workshop is the determination, by in situ gamma spectrometry, of both natural and artificial concentrations and resulting ambient dose rates at selected marine ( beach) and terrestrial sites. A particular aim of the workshop also is to test the capacity of mobile teams to produce reliable results in the field of low level measurements on trace of special radionuclides (I{sup 129}, Sr{sup 90}, H{sup 3}, C{sup 14}, and alpha emitters) from environmental samples, using both direct ( in situ) and differed ( laboratory methods). an overview of the results obtained will be prepared for the benefit of the public. (N.C.)

  3. Measurement and simulation of the turbulent dispersion of a radioactive tracer in a two-phase flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensel, F.; Rohde, U.

    1998-10-01

    The turbulent dispersion of a radiotracer in an experimental setup with a natural convection liquid-gaseous flow was investigated. A liquid-gaseous bubbly flow was generated in a narrow tank by injection of pressurized air into water or by catalytic disintegration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for gas and tracer dispersion were varied. In the case of higher gas superficial velocities (J{sub gas}{approx}5-15 mm/s), a reasonable agreement was achieved between calculated and measured tracer transport velocity and dispersion coefficient values. A nearly linear correlation between j{sub gas} and D was found in agreement with other authors. The calculation results contribute to a better understanding of the phenomena and interpretation of the measurement results as well as to the validation of the CFD code for turbulent two-phase flow applications. Further investigations are necessary to improve the agreement in the cases of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} disintegration and low gas superficial velocities. (orig.)

  4. Environmental radioactivity intercomparison measurements; Nord-Cotentin 2000 radioactivite de l'environnement mesures d'intercomparaison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In the context of the North Cotentin radioecological group set up in 1997 by the Ministry of the Environment and the Ministry of the Secretariat d'Etat a la Sante, the Swiss Federal Office of Public health, a national organization of independent status with respect to nuclear energy, conducted a series of measurements in the north Cotentin in 1998. Some sites proposed by local association 'Angry mothers' were examined in particular. This association has now taken the initiative to organize a large scale international intercomparison, ' North Cotentin 2000', in the vicinity of local nuclear installations. Besides the scientific aspect of the intercomparison, a specific aim of this intercomparison consists in providing to the local population with a real opportunity for direct exchange with participating international teams. The primary concern of the workshop is the determination, by in situ gamma spectrometry, of both natural and artificial concentrations and resulting ambient dose rates at selected marine ( beach) and terrestrial sites. A particular aim of the workshop also is to test the capacity of mobile teams to produce reliable results in the field of low level measurements on trace of special radionuclides (I{sup 129}, Sr{sup 90}, H{sup 3}, C{sup 14}, and alpha emitters) from environmental samples, using both direct ( in situ) and differed ( laboratory methods). an overview of the results obtained will be prepared for the benefit of the public. (N.C.)

  5. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, T., E-mail: tomomi.fujita@riken.jp [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Department of Physics (Japan); Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Department of Applied Physics (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics (Japan); Ueno, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center (Japan); Asahi, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Japan); Shimoda, T. [Osaka University, Department of Physics (Japan); Matsuo, Y. [Hosei University, Department of Advanced Sciences (Japan); Collaboration: OROCHI Collaboration

    2015-11-15

    A new laser spectroscopic method named “OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)” has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with {sup 84−87}Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  6. Solar Radiation and Near-Earth Asteroids: Thermophysical Modeling and New Measurements of the Yarkovsky Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Carolyn Rosemary

    were taken at a single phase angle, and this thermophysical model constrains K to less than 0.01 W m-1 K-1. By running Monte Carlo simulations that varied diameter and thermal conductivity over a reasonable range of values, thermal inertia was constrained to be less than 110 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1 . This value is consistent with other measurements of thermal conductivity and inertia for near-Earth asteroids. This dissertation represents a new and original contribution to the study of NEAs. We increased the number of published predicted Yarkovsky drifts by an order of magnitude, increased the number of Yarkovsky detections by a factor of four, and developed new code to derive thermophysical parameters of asteroids that in turn drive their susceptibility to the Yarkovsky drift.

  7. Dependence of NaI(Tl) detector intrinsic effciency on source-detector distance, energy and off-axis distance: Their implications for radioactivity measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F O Ogundare; E O Oniya; F A Balogun

    2008-05-01

    In this work the dependence of intrinsic effciency of a NaI(Tl) detector of radius 3.82 cm and height 7.62 cm on source{detector distance (), source-off-axis distance (0) and -photon energy have been investigated using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The results showed that, for a given off-axis distance, there exists a value of the ratio of source-detector distance () to detector radius () where intrinsic efficiency is minimum. This / value at which minimum e±ciency occurs approaches zero as off-axis distance increases and it is almost constant with increase in energy. In the region where / < 0:01, a criteria given by Jehouani et al [1] for good photon detection, intrinsic efficiency decreases with increasing off-axis distance. The implications of the results for radioactivity measurement and radiation protection are discussed. Chacteristics of intrinsic e±ciency in the regions / < 0:01 and / > 10 are also compared.

  8. Measurement of intrinsic radioactive backgrounds from the 137Cs and U/Th chains in CsI(Tl) crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Kui; Yue, Qian; Lin, Shin-Ted; Li, Yuan-Jing; Tang, Chang-Jian; Wong Tsz-King, Henry; Xing, Hao-Yang; Yang, Chao-Wen; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Jing-Jun

    2015-04-01

    The inorganic CsI(Tl) crystal scintillator is a candidate anti-compton detector for the China Dark matter Experiment. Studying the intrinsic radiopurity of the CsI(Tl) crystal is an issue of major importance. The timing, energy and spatial correlations, as well as the capability of pulse shape discrimination provide powerful methods for the measurement of intrinsic radiopurities. The experimental design, detector performance and event-selection algorithms are described. A total of 359×3 kg-days data from three prototypes of CsI(Tl) crystals were taken at China Jinping Underground Laboratory (CJPL), which offers a good shielding environment. The contamination levels of internal isotopes from 137Cs, 232Th and 238U series, as well as the upper bounds of 235U series are reported. Identification of the whole α peaks from U/Th decay chains and derivation of those corresponding quenching factors are achieved. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11275107, 11175099)

  9. Radioactivity and Environment. Radioactividad y Medio Ambiente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Leon, J.G. (Jefe de Seguridad Nuclear de la Fabrica de Juzbado. Empresa Nacional de Uranio. (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    Radioactivity is one of the most studied natural phenomena. Most of irradiation suffered by the human being is produced by natural sources. The second source in order of importance is nuclear medicine. The average level of radiation received by the man is 2.4 mSv/year and this value can be modified naturally in 20-30%. The author provides a review on radioactivity sources like natural (cosmic rays, extraterrestrial radiation, internal earth radiation, radon) and artificial (Nuclear explosions, professional exposure, nuclear medicine, nuclear power plants and accidents).

  10. Approach to Managing MeaSURES Data at the GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Bruce; Kempler, Steven J.; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2009-01-01

    A major need stated by the NASA Earth science research strategy is to develop long-term, consistent, and calibrated data and products that are valid across multiple missions and satellite sensors. (NASA Solicitation for Making Earth System data records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) 2006-2010) Selected projects create long term records of a given parameter, called Earth Science Data Records (ESDRs), based on mature algorithms that bring together continuous multi-sensor data. ESDRs, associated algorithms, vetted by the appropriate community, are archived at a NASA affiliated data center for archive, stewardship, and distribution. See http://measures-projects.gsfc.nasa.gov/ for more details. This presentation describes the NASA GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) approach to managing the MEaSUREs ESDR datasets assigned to GES DISC. (Energy/water cycle related and atmospheric composition ESDRs) GES DISC will utilize its experience to integrate existing and proven reusable data management components to accommodate the new ESDRs. Components include a data archive system (S4PA), a data discovery and access system (Mirador), and various web services for data access. In addition, if determined to be useful to the user community, the Giovanni data exploration tool will be made available to ESDRs. The GES DISC data integration methodology to be used for the MEaSUREs datasets is presented. The goals of this presentation are to share an approach to ESDR integration, and initiate discussions amongst the data centers, data managers and data providers for the purpose of gaining efficiencies in data management for MEaSUREs projects.

  11. Comparisons between radioactive and non-radioactive gas lantern mantles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, E; Yoshizawa, Y; Aburai, T

    2000-12-01

    Gas lantern mantles containing radioactive thorium have been used for more than 100 years. Although thorium was once believed to be indispensable for giving a bright light, non-radioactive mantles are now available. From the radioactivities of the daughter nuclides, we estimated the levels of radioactivity of 232Th and 228Th in 11 mantles. The mantles contained various levels of radioactivity from background levels to 1410 +/- 140 Bq. Our finding that radioactive and non-radioactive mantles are equally bright suggests that there is no advantage in using radioactive mantles. A remaining problem is that gas lantern mantles are sold without any information about radioactivity.

  12. PERSPECTIVE: Fireworks and radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenecker, Katharina

    2009-09-01

    both reaction products and unburnt constituents of a pyrotechnic mixture. One major environmental concern in pyrotechnics focuses on the emission of heavy metals. This is the topic discussed in the article by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek in this issue [4]. A possible interrelationship between respiratory effects and fireworks emissions of barium-rich aerosols was also raised last year [5]. In recent years the potential hazard of naturally occurring radioactive material has become of importance to the scientific community. Naturally occurring radionuclides can be of terrestrial or cosmological origin. Terrestrial radionuclides were present in the presolar cloud that later contracted in order to build our solar system. These radionuclides—mainly heavy metals—and their non-radioactive isotopes are nowadays fixed in the matrix of the Earth's structure. Usually, their percentage is quite small compared to their respective stable isotopes—though there are exceptions like in the case of radium. The problem with environmental pollution due to naturally occurring radioactive material begins when this material is concentrated due to mining and milling, and later further processed [6]. Environmental pollution due to radioactive material goes back as far as the Copper and Iron Ages, when the first mines were erected in order to mine ores (gold, silver, copper, iron, etc), resulting in naturally occurring radioactive material being set free with other dusts into the atmosphere. So where is the link between pyrotechnics and radioactivity? In this article presented by Georg Steinhauser and Andreas Musilek [4], the pyrotechnic ingredients barium nitrate and strontium nitrate are explored with respect to their chemical similarities to radium. The fundamental question, therefore, was whether radium can be processed together with barium and strontium. If so, the production and ignition of these pyrotechnic ingredients could cause atmospheric pollution with radium aerosols

  13. Nuclear radioactive techniques applied to materials research

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, João Guilherme; Wahl, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we review materials characterization techniques using radioactive isotopes at the ISOLDE/CERN facility. At ISOLDE intense beams of chemically clean radioactive isotopes are provided by selective ion-sources and high-resolution isotope separators, which are coupled on-line with particle accelerators. There, new experiments are performed by an increasing number of materials researchers, which use nuclear spectroscopic techniques such as Mössbauer, Perturbed Angular Correlations (PAC), beta-NMR and Emission Channeling with short-lived isotopes not available elsewhere. Additionally, diffusion studies and traditionally non-radioactive techniques as Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy, Hall effect and Photoluminescence measurements are performed on radioactive doped samples, providing in this way the element signature upon correlation of the time dependence of the signal with the isotope transmutation half-life. Current developments, applications and perspectives of using radioactive ion beams and tech...

  14. Crystal surface integrity and diffusion measurements on Earth and planetary materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.; Thomas, J. B.; Hanchar, J. M.; Wirth, R.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization of diffusion behavior in minerals is key to providing quantitative constraints on the ages and thermal histories of Earth and planetary materials. Laboratory experiments are a vital source of the needed diffusion measurements, but these can pose challenges because the length scales of diffusion achievable in a laboratory time are commonly less than 1 μm. An effective strategy for dealing with this challenge is to conduct experiments involving inward diffusion of the element of interest from a surface source, followed by quantification of the resulting diffusive-uptake profile using a high-resolution depth-profiling technique such as Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), or ion microprobe (SIMS). The value of data from such experiments is crucially dependent on the assumption that diffusion in the near-surface of the sample is representative of diffusion in the bulk material. Historical arguments suggest that the very process of preparing a polished surface for diffusion studies introduces defects-in the form of dislocations and cracks-in the outermost micrometer of the sample that make this region fundamentally different from the bulk crystal in terms of its diffusion properties. Extensive indirect evidence suggests that, in fact, the near-surface region of carefully prepared samples is no different from the bulk crystal in terms of its diffusion properties. A direct confirmation of this conclusion is nevertheless clearly important. Here we use transmission electron microscopy to confirm that the near-surface regions of olivine, quartz and feldspar crystals prepared using careful polishing protocols contain no features that could plausibly affect diffusion. This finding does not preclude damage to the mineral structure from other techniques used in diffusion studies (e.g., ion implantation), but even in this case the role of possible structural damage can be objectively assessed and controlled. While all

  15. Design of a Slab Waveguide Multiaperture Fourier Spectrometer for Water Vapor Measurements in Earth's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kenneth; Florjańczyk, Mirosław; Solheim, Brian; Scott, Alan; Quine, Ben; Cheben, Pavel

    Concept, theory and design of a new type of waveguide device, a multiaperture Fourier-transform planar waveguide spectrometer[1], implemented as a prototype instrument is pre-sented. The spectrometer's objective is to demonstrate the ability of the new slab waveguide technology for application in remote sensing instruments[2]. The spectrometer will use a limb viewing configuration to detect the 1.36um waveband allowing concentrations of water vapor in earth's atmosphere to be measured[3]. The most challenging aspects of the design, assembly and calibration are presented. Focus will be given to the effects of packaging the spectrometer and interfacing to the detector array. Stress-induced birefringence will affect the performance of the waveguides, therefore the design of a stress-free mounting over a range of temperatures is important. Spectral retrieval algo-rithms will have to correct for expected fabrication errors in the waveguides. Data processing algorithms will also be developed to correct for non-uniformities of input brightness through the array, making use of MMI output couplers to capture both the in-phase and anti-phase interferometer outputs. A performance assessment of an existing breadboard spectrometer will demonstrate the capability of the instrument. REFERENCES 1. M. Florjáczyk, P. Cheben, S. Janz, A. Scott, B. Solheim, and D.-X. Xu, "Multiaper-n ture planar waveguide spectrometer formed by arrayed Mach-Zehnder interferometers," Opt. Expr. 15(26), 18176-18189 (2007). 2. M. Florjáczyk, P. Cheben, S. Janz, B. Lamontagne, J. n Lapointe, A. Scott, B. Solheim, and D.-X. Xu, "Slab waveguiode spatial heterodyne spectrom-eters for remote sensing from space," Optical sensors 2009. Proceedings of the SPIE, Volume 7356 (2009)., pp. 73560V-73560V-7 (2009). 3. A. Scott, M. Florjáczyk, P. Cheben, S. Janz, n B. Solheim, and D.-X. Xu, "Micro-interferometer with high throughput for remote sensing." MOEMS and Miniaturized Systems VIII. Proceedings of the SPIE

  16. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schweitzer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss these influences, assessing effects from refraction, trace species absorption, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering in detail, and addressing clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation as well. We show that the influence of refractive defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle with a close frequency spacing of LIO absorption and reference signals within 0.5%. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and terrestrial thermal radiation are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions, but this influence can be made negligible by a close time spacing (within 5 ms of interleaved laser-pulse and background signals. Cloud extinction loss generally blocks SWIR signals, except very thin or sub-visible cirrus clouds, which can be addressed by retrieving a cloud layering profile and exploiting it in the trace species retrieval. Wind can have a small influence on the trace species absorption, which can be made negligible by using a simultaneously retrieved or a moderately accurate background wind speed profile. We

  17. Correlations and linkages between the sun and the earth's atmosphere: Needed measurements and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the sequence of processes that lead from some change in solar input to the earth to a change in tropospheric circulation and weather. Topics discussed include: inputs from the sun, the solar wind, and the magnetosphere; bremsstrahlung, ionizing radiation, cirrus clouds, thunderstorms, wave propagation, and gravity waves.

  18. Analysis methods for airborne radioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ala-Heikkilä, Jarmo J

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry is an analysis method well suitable for monitoring airborne radioactivity. Many of the natural radionuclides and a majority of anthropogenic nuclides are prominent gamma-ray emitters. With gamma-ray spectrometry different radionuclides are readily observed at minute concentrations that are far from health hazards. The gamma-ray spectrometric analyses applied in air monitoring programmes can be divided into particulate measurements and gas measurements. I...

  19. A study on heavy radioactive pollution: Radon and Radium in streams and drinking water of Ramsar region by measured Prassi system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Inhalation of radon gas 222Rn, which is a decay product of 226Ra, and its decay products accounts for typically about half of the effective doses received by public from all natural sources of ionizing radiation. Radon alpha particles can initiate a series of molecular and cellular events that culminates in the development of lung and other cancers. Also, 226Ra in the environment is widely distributed, being present in various concentrations in waters, soils and rocks. When radium is ingested, the majority of material is rapidly excreted. However, since radium is chemically similar to calcium, a significant fraction is absorbed into the bloodstream and deposited mainly in the skeleton. So, presence of these radioactive contaminants in water is dangerous and many studies especially about radon have been done in this area. For these reasons and becauses some areas of Ramsar, a city in northern Iran in mazandaran province, have been among the highest known background radiation levels in the world we measured radon and radium concentrations in water sources of Ramsar region. In this study, Radon and radium concentrations of the 22 streams and 20 drinking water samples were measured by PRASSI system. According to the data, the arithmetic mean of radon concentration for all samples was 3.030 ± 1.122 Bq/l. Similarly, arithmetic mean of radium for all samples was 0.185 ± 0.055 Bq/l. Also 1 sample of streams and 1 sample of drinking water showed radon concentration higher than 10Bq/l as normal level. Radium-226 alone, in 11 samples of streams and 8 samples of drinking water had concentrations higher than 0.185Bq/l as normal level for the combined Radium-226 and Radium-228.

  20. Regularity of the wear control of radioactive sources from the nuclear measurers; Regularidad del control del desgaste de fuentes radioactivas de los medidores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira L, M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242 - Cidade Universitaria -CEP(ZC) 05508-900, tel: (005511) 3816-9215, Sao Paulo, (Brazil)]. e-mail: mflima@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    The control of radioactive sources in Brazil is regulated by the CNEN (National Comissao of Nuclear Energy). The Laboratory of Descontaminacao of the IPEN (Institute of Energy Y Nuclear Investigations) it offers to the companies that work with nuclear measurers, essays for control of the source wear according to the ISO 9978/1992 through the smear tests Y of leakage. The analyses are taken in alpha Y beta detectors of low bottom radiation with annual detection limits around 1 Bq. Certificates of the accepted analyses by the CNEN for sources that already passed its time of validity assured by the makers, but its continue operational are emitted. The smear test is repeated the whole year, while the leakage test repeats to every two years. A balance of the last two years of the activities of the laboratory shows the regularity of the clients Y the growth of companies specialized in radioprotection with official of radioprotection, credited by the regulatory authority that its act as intermediaries in the process, contacting the clients, gathering the samples next to the proprietors of sources Y hiring our services. Overalls, proves that the inspection activities by part of the regulatory authority are fulfil. In 2004, 192 sources were analyzed by the smear method Y 86 sources by leakage. In 2005, 232 sources were analyzed by the smear method Y 60 sources by leakage. All the leakage tests was made in sources of Americium of oneself Y only client that brings the sources so that they dismantle them to him in the Sources production laboratory of the IPEN. By the quantity Y age of the sources that were analyzed in those two years, it is proven that the number of sources without use conditions (total activity measured by the two added methods smaller than 180Bq) it doesn't arrive to 2%. (Author)

  1. A Space Weather Information Service Based Upon Remote and In-Situ Measurements of Coronal Mass Ejections Heading for Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Birgit; Miles, Oscar; Rußwurm, Michael; Scully, Stephen; Roldán, Andrés; Hartkorn, Oliver; Jüstel, Peter; Réville, Victor; Lupu, Sorina; Ruffenach, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet's magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past forty years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can significantly disturb the Earth's magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field's orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather (SW) forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CM...

  2. What does Earth's electromagnetic field from ground and space measurements tell us about conductivity of the mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayver, Alexander; Morschhauser, Achim; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    This contribution presents an overview of new models of Earth's mantle conductivity that have been derived using new methodologies and data from magnetic observatories and satellite missions such as CHAMP and Swarm. The electrical conductivity of the mantle provides a wealth of information on composition and temperature of the mantle material at depths. Lateral and vertical variations of this physical property allow us to constrain rheological and dynamic states of the tectonic processes in the subsurface. Electromagnetic (EM) induction methods is the only tool that can be used to study electrical conductivity at depth. They exploit natural electromagnetic field variations to derive frequency-dependent responses that are used to conduct Earth sounding. These variations originate from electric current systems in magnetosphere, ionosphere and even oceans. Over the last 17 years, almost continuous operation of low-orbit satellites measuring Earth's magnetic field, installation of new magnetic observatories in remote locations as well as substantial improvements in processing and modeling have enabled us to study mantle electrical conductivity using a variety of EM methods either globally or/and at different locations on Earth.

  3. A laboratory activity for teaching natural radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilakouta, M.; Savidou, A.; Vasileiadou, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an educational approach for teaching natural radioactivity using commercial granite samples. A laboratory activity focusing on the topic of natural radioactivity is designed to develop the knowledge and understanding of undergraduate university students on the topic of radioactivity, to appreciate the importance of environmental radioactivity and familiarize them with the basic technology used in radioactivity measurements. The laboratory activity is divided into three parts: (i) measurements of the count rate with a Geiger-Muller counter of some granite samples and the ambient background radiation rate, (ii) measurement of one of the samples using gamma ray spectrometry with a NaI detector and identification of the radioactive elements of the sample, (iii) using already recorded 24 h gamma ray spectra of the samples from the first part (from the Granite Gamma-Ray Spectrum Library (GGRSL) of our laboratory) and analyzing selected peaks in the spectrum, students estimate the contribution of each radioactive element to the total specific activity of each sample. A brief description of the activity as well as some results and their interpretation are presented.

  4. Rates of change of the earth's magnetic field measured by recent analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Huang, Qilin

    1990-01-01

    Typical rates of change of the earth's magnetic field are presented as a function of the earth's spherical harmonics. Harmonics up to the eight degree are analyzed. With the increase in the degree of the harmonics an increase in the relative rate of change can be observed. For higher degrees, the rate of change can be predicted. This enables a differentiation between harmonics originating in the core and harmonics caused by crustal magnetization. The westward drift of the magnetic field depends on the longitudinal gradient of the field. In order to determine the longitudinal motions, harmonics up to degree 20 can be utilized. The average rate of secular acceleration increases with the degree of harmonics from 0.001 deg/sq yr for a dipole term to an average of 0.05 deg/sq yr for degree eight harmonics.

  5. A New Non-linear Technique for Measurement of Splitting Functions of Normal Modes of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachhai, S.; Masters, G.; Tkalcic, H.

    2014-12-01

    Normal modes are the vibrating patterns of the Earth in response to the large earthquakes. Normal mode spectra are split due to Earth's rotation, ellipticity, and heterogeneity. The normal mode splitting is visualized through splitting functions, which represent the local radial average of Earth's structure seen by a mode of vibration. The analysis of the splitting of normal modes can provide unique information about the lateral variation of the Earth's elastic properties that cannot be directly imaged in body wave tomographic images. The non-linear iterative spectral fitting of the observed complex spectra and autoregressive linear inversion have been widely utilized to compute the Earth's 3-D structure. However, the non-linear inversion requires a model of the earthquake source and the retrieved 3-D structure is sensitive to the initial constraints. In contrast, the autoregressive linear inversion does not require the source model. However, this method requires many events to achieve full convergence. In addition, significant disagreement exists between different studies because of the non-uniqueness of the problem and limitations of different methods. We thus apply the neighbourhood algorithm (NA) to measure splitting functions. The NA is an efficient model space search technique and works in two steps: In the first step, the algorithm finds all the models compatible with given data while the posterior probability density of the model parameters are obtained in the second step. The NA can address the problem of non-uniqueness by taking advantage of random sampling of the full model space. The parameter trade-offs are conveniently visualized using joint marginal distributions. In addition, structure coefficients uncertainties can be extracted from the posterior probability distribution. After demonstrating the feasibility of NA with synthetic examples, we compute the splitting functions for the mode 13S2 (sensitive to the inner core) from several large

  6. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  7. Radioactive Wastes. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Charles H.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This booklet deals with the handling, processing and disposal of radioactive wastes. Among the topics discussed are: The Nature of Radioactive Wastes; Waste Management; and Research and Development. There are…

  8. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  9. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  10. Gamma residual radioactivity measurements on rats and mice irradiated in the thermal column of a TRIGA Mark II reactor for BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protti, Nicoletta; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Alloni, Daniele; Ballarini, Francesca; di Tigliole, Andrea Borio; Bortolussi, Silva; Bruschi, Piero; Cagnazzo, Marcella; Garioni, Maria; Postuma, Ian; Reversi, Luca; Salvini, Andrea; Altieri, Saverio

    2014-12-01

    The current Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) experiments performed at the University of Pavia, Italy, are focusing on the in vivo irradiations of small animals (rats and mice) in order to evaluate the effectiveness of BNCT in the treatment of diffused lung tumors. After the irradiation, the animals are manipulated, which requires an evaluation of the residual radioactivity induced by neutron activation and the relative radiological risk assessment to guarantee the radiation protection of the workers. The induced activity in the irradiated animals was measured by high-resolution open geometry gamma spectroscopy and compared with values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. After an irradiation time of 15 min in a position where the in-air thermal flux is about 1.2 × 10(10) cm(-2) s(-1), the specific activity induced in the body of the animal is mainly due to 24Na, 38Cl, 42K, 56Mn, 27Mg and 49Ca; it is approximately 540 Bq g(-1) in the rat and around 2,050 Bq g(-1) in the mouse. During the irradiation, the animal body (except the lung region) is housed in a 95% enriched 6Li shield; the primary radioisotopes produced inside the shield by the neutron irradiation are 3H by the 6Li capture reaction and 18F by the reaction sequence 6Li(n,α)3H → 16O(t,n)18F. The specific activities of these products are 3.3 kBq g(-1) and 880 Bq g(-1), respectively.

  11. Measures of the Earth Obliquity during the 1701 Winter Solstice at the Clementine Meridian Line in Rome

    CERN Document Server

    Andrei, Alexandre Humberto; Regoli, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The great meridian line in the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome was built in 1701/1702 with the scope of measuring the obliquity of the Earth's orbit in the following eight centuries, upon the will of Pope Clement XI. During the winter solstice of 1701 the first measurements of the obliquity were taken by Francesco Bianchini. He was the astronomer who designed the meridian line, upgrading the similar instrument realized by Giandomenico Cassini in San Petronio, Bononia. The accuracy of the data is discussed from the point of view of the use of the pinhole.

  12. Atmospheric influences on infrared-laser signals used for occultation measurements between Low Earth Orbit satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Schweitzer

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available LEO-LEO infrared-laser occultation (LIO is a new occultation technique between Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites, which applies signals in the short wave infrared spectral range (SWIR within 2 μm to 2.5 μm. It is part of the LEO-LEO microwave and infrared-laser occultation (LMIO method, recently introduced by Kirchengast and Schweitzer (2011, that enables to retrieve thermodynamic profiles (pressure, temperature, humidity and accurate altitude levels from microwave signals and profiles of greenhouse gases and further variables such as line-of-sight wind speed from simultaneously measured LIO signals. For enabling trace species retrieval based on differential transmission, the LIO signals are spectrally located as pairs, one in the centre of a suitable absorption line of a target species (absorption signal and one close by but outside of any absorption lines (reference signal. Due to the novelty of the LMIO method, detailed knowledge of atmospheric influences on LIO signals and of their suitability for accurate trace species retrieval did not yet exist. Here we discuss the atmospheric influences on the transmission and differential transmission of LIO signals. Refraction effects, trace species absorption (by target species, and cross-sensitivity to foreign species, aerosol extinction and Rayleigh scattering are studied in detail. The influences of clouds, turbulence, wind, scattered solar radiation and terrestrial thermal radiation are discussed as well. We show that the influence of defocusing, foreign species absorption, aerosols and turbulence is observable, but can be rendered small to negligible by use of the differential transmission principle and by a design with close frequency spacing of absorption and reference signals within 0.5 %. The influences of Rayleigh scattering and thermal radiation on the received signal intensities are found negligible. Cloud-scattered solar radiation can be observable under bright-day conditions but this

  13. On the influence of Aerosols in measurement of electric field from Earth surface using a Field-Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Sundar De, Syam; Paul, Suman; Hazra, Pranab; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Aerosol particles influence the electrical conductivity of air. The value is reduced through the removal of small ions responsible for the conductivity. The metropolitan city, Kolkata (latitude 22.56° N, longitude 88.5° E) is densely populated surrounded by various types of Industries. Air is highly invaded by pollutant particles here for which the city falls under small-scale fair-weather condition where electric field and air-earth current get perturbed by ionization and different aerosols produced locally. Fine particles having diameter measurement of potential gradient and air-earth current will be presented. Different parameters like air-conductivity, relative abundance of smoke, visibility would offer new signatures of aerosol-influence on electric potential gradient. Some of those will be reported here.

  14. Technical note: First spectral measurement of the Earth's upwelling emission using an uncooled wideband Fourier transform spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Palchetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first spectral measurement of Earth's emitted radiation to space in the wideband range from 100 to 1400 cm−1 with 0.5 cm−1 spectral resolution is presented. The measurement was performed from a stratospheric balloon in tropical region using a Fourier transform spectrometer, during a field campaign held in Brazil in June 2005. The instrument, which has uncooled components including the detector module, is a prototype developed as part of the study for the REFIR (Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed space mission. This paper shows the results of the field campaign with particular attention to the measurement capabilities of the prototype. The results are compared with measurements taken by IASI-balloon (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer – Balloon version, aboard the same platform, and with forward model estimations. The infrared signature of clouds is observed in the measurements.

  15. An information theory approach for evaluating earth radiation budget (ERB) measurements - Nonuniform sampling of diurnal longwave flux variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Nesim; Direskeneli, Haldun; Barkstrom, Bruce R.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite measurements are subject to a wide range of uncertainties due to their temporal, spatial, and directional sampling characteristics. An information-theory approach is suggested to examine the nonuniform temporal sampling of ERB measurements. The information (i.e., its entropy or uncertainty) before and after the measurements is determined, and information gain (IG) is defined as a reduction in the uncertainties involved. A stochastic model for the diurnal outgoing flux variations that affect the ERB is developed. Using Gaussian distributions for the a priori and measured radiant exitance fields, the IG is obtained by computing the a posteriori covariance. The IG for the monthly outgoing flux measurements is examined for different orbital parameters and orbital tracks, using the Earth Observing System orbital parameters as specific examples. Variations in IG due to changes in the orbit's inclination angle and the initial ascending node local time are investigated.

  16. Development of a phoswich detector for neutron dose rate measurements in the Earth's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doensdorf, Esther Miriam

    2014-04-30

    The Earth is constantly exposed to a stream of energetic particles from outer space. Through the interaction of this radiation with the Earth's magnetosphere and atmosphere a complex radiation field is formed which varies with the location inside the Earth's atmosphere. This radiation field consists of charged and uncharged particles leading to the constant exposure of human beings to radiation. As this ionizing radiation can be harmful for humans, it is necessary to perform dose rate measurements in different altitudes in the Earth's atmosphere. Due to their higher biological effectiveness the exposure to neutrons is more harmful than the exposure to γ-rays and charged particles, which is why the determination of neutron dose rates is the focus of this work. In this work the prototype of a Phoswich detector called PING (Phoswich Instrument for Neutrons and Gammas) is developed to determine dose rates caused by neutrons in the Earth's atmosphere and to distinguish these from γ-rays. The instrument is composed of two different scintillators optically coupled to each other and read out by one common photomultiplier tube. The scintillator package consists of an inner plastic scintillator made of the material BC-412 and a surrounding anti-coincidence made of sodium doped caesium iodide (CsI(Na)). In this work the instrument is calibrated, tested and flown and a procedure for a pulse shape analysis for this instrument is developed. With this analysis it is possible to distinguish pulses from the plastic scintillator and pulses from the CsI(Na). The pulses from the plastic scintillator are mainly due to the interaction of neutrons but there is an energy-dependent contribution of γ-rays to these events. Measurements performed on board an airplane show that the dose rates measured with the developed detector are in the same order of magnitude as results of other instruments. During measurements on board stratospheric balloons the altitude dependence

  17. 环境样品低水平γ放射性的活度测量%Low levels of radioactivity in environmental samples γactivity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隗莲; 沈明启; 刘春雨

    2014-01-01

    There are a variety of radionuclides in the soil , including higher levels of nuclear 40 K, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 238 U.These four standard sources was used as a basis for measure-ment, and the calculations of the branching ratio and detection efficiency of full -energy peaks were performed , so as to calculate the activity of these radionuclides .The detection ef-ficiencies of energy scale of experimental apparatus , and the standard soil source such as 40 K, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 238 U were measured using BH1936 multichannel gamma spectrometer with low background as a laboratory instrument , and the mixture of 60 Co and 137 Cs radiation source as the known energy source .The energy spectrum analysis of environmental samples mainly included radioactivity of soil samples and samples of building materials .Therefore, the specific activity of standard sources representative ( 40 K,226 Ra, 232 Th and 238 U) was ob-tained.%土壤中含有多种放射性核素,其中含量较高的核素有40 K、226 Ra、232 Th和238 U,以这四种的标准源为基础进行实验测量,计算各种能量所对应的全能峰的分支比和探测效率,从而计算出这些放射性核素的活度。通过实验的方法,用BH1936型低本底多道γ能谱仪作为实验仪器,把60 Co和137 Cs的混合放射源作为能量刻度的已知能量源,对实验仪器能量刻度,以及对标准土壤源40 K、226 Ra、232 Th和238 U的探测效率进行实验测量。以此为基础对环境样品进行了能谱分析,主要是测量和分析了环境土壤样品和建材样品的放射性活度,得到了标准源(40 K、226 Ra、232 Th和238 U)为代表的核素的比活度。

  18. Evaluation of Grounding Impedance of a Complex Lightning Protective System Using Earth Ground Clamp Measurements and ATP Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Carlos T.; Rakov, V. A.; Mata, Angel G.

    2010-01-01

    A new Lightning Protection System (LPS) was designed and built at Launch Complex 39B (LC39B), at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, which consists of a catenary wire system (at a height of about 181 meters above ground level) supported by three insulators installed atop three towers in a triangular configuration. A total of nine downconductors (each about 250 meters long, on average) are connected to the catenary wire system. Each of the nine downconductors is connected to a 7.62-meter radius circular counterpoise conductor with six equally spaced 6-meter long vertical grounding rods. Grounding requirements at LC39B call for all underground and above ground metallic piping, enclosures, raceways, and cable trays, within 7.62 meters of the counterpoise, to be bounded to the counterpoise, which results in a complex interconnected grounding system, given the many metallic piping, raceways, and cable trays that run in multiple direction around LC39B. The complexity of this grounding system makes the fall of potential method, which uses multiple metallic rods or stakes, unsuitable for measuring the grounding impedances of the downconductors. To calculate the downconductors grounding impedance, an Earth Ground Clamp (a stakeless grounding resistance measuring device) and a LPS Alternative Transient Program (ATP) model are used. The Earth Ground Clamp is used to measure the loop impedance plus the grounding impedance of each downconductor and the ATP model is used to calculate the loop impedance of each downconductor circuit. The grounding impedance of the downconductors is then calculated by subtracting the ATP calculated loop impedances from the Earth Ground Clamp measurements.

  19. Resent Progress in Research on Calibration Instrument for Radioactive Aerosol Monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xi-lin; CHEN; Yong-yong; WU; Chang-ping; XING; Yu; MENG; Jun; YANG; Qiao-ling

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive aerosol monitors are widely used in monitoring the radioactivity concentration of the artificial nuclides in gaseous effluents from the nuclear facilities.An on-developing calibration instrument for radioactive aerosol monitors consists of an α and β aerosol generating unit,aerosol transferring unit,measurement unit of radioactivity concentration of aerosol for instruments calibrated and the waste gas

  20. Measurements of neutron fluxes with energies from thermal to several MeV in near-Earth space: SINP results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavrin, P I; Kuzhevskij, B M; Kuznetsov, S N; Nechaev, O Yu; Panasyuk, M I; Ryumin, S P; Yushkov, B Yu; Bratolyubova-Tsulukidze, L S; Lyagushin, V I; Germantsev, Yu L

    2002-10-01

    Neutron measurement results obtained at SINP MSU since 1970 are presented. These measurements were made using techniques based on neutron moderation and subsequent detection in a Li6I(Eu) crystal or a He3 coronal counter. The measurements were mainly carried out in orbits with inclination of 52 degrees and altitudes of 200-450 km. The spatial and angular distributions of the measured neutron fluxes were studied. The albedo neutron flux was estimated according to the count rate difference for opposite detector orientations towards Earth and away from it. This flux is comparable to the local neutron flux outside the Brazil anomaly region, where local neutrons dominate. Neutron fluxes, generated by solar protons, were detected during a solar flare on June 6, 1991 for the first time. Their spectrum was estimated as a power law with alpha>2.

  1. Application of red and near infrared emission from rare earth ions for radiation measurements based on optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, E.; Hosono, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Nakazawa, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science; Kakuta, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamazaki, M. [Sumita Optical Glass, Inc., Urawa, Saitama (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    When optical fiber radiation measurements are applied for a high dose rate area, there has been a problem of radiation induced loss in the optical fibers. In this study, red and near infrared (IR) fluorescence from rare earth ions has been used to reduce the problem. From continuous measurements using Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Pr{sup 3+}, the superiority of using long wavelength emission has been shown from the view point of radiation hardness. Linear relation between dose rate and peak counts was confirmed and it shows the possibility of using the long wavelength emission for radiation measurements. For calibration of the radiation induced loss, the Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR) technique has been applied. It has been shown that this method can broaden the dose rate limit of the optical fiber based measurements. Also, glass samples doped with rare-earth ions have been made and irradiated by gamma rays. Emission at longer wavelength than 700 nm has been observed for Eu{sup 3+} ions doped into silica, fluorophosphate and ZBLAN glass samples. Considering that it is easy to make silica glass and to connect it to usual silica glass optical fiber, silica glass doped with Eu{sup 3+} is thought to be the most promising material for new scintillating fibers with high radiation resistivity.

  2. Comparison of radioactivity data measured in PM10 aerosol samples at two elevated stations in northern Italy during the Fukushima event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tositti, Laura; Brattich, Erika; Cinelli, Giorgia; Previti, Alberto; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2012-12-01

    The follow-up of Fukushima radioactive plume resulting from the 11th March 2011 devastating tsunami is discussed for two Italian stations in the northern Apennines: Mt. Cimone (Modena) and Montecuccolino (Bologna). Radioactivity data collected at both stations are described, including comparison between local natural background of airborne particulate and artificial radioactivity referable to the arrival of the radioactive plume and its persistence and evolution. Analysis of back-trajectories was used to confirm the arrival of artificial radionuclides following atmospheric transport and processing. The Fukushima plume was first detected on 3rd April 2011 when high volume sampling revealed the presence of the artificial radionuclides (131)I, (137)Cs and (134)Cs. The highest activity concentrations of these nuclides were detected on 5th April 2011 at the Montecuccolino site. Fukushima radioactivity data at the two stations were usually comparable, suggesting a good vertical mixing of the plume; discrepancies were occasional and attributed to different occurrence of wet removal, typically characterized by a scattered spatial pattern. To understand the relevance to the local population of the extra dose due to the Fukushima plume, atmospheric activities of the related artificial nuclides were compared to those of the main natural radionuclides in ambient particulate, and found to be lower by over one order of magnitude. Radiation doses referable to Fukushima, maximized for a whole year occurrence at the highest activity level observed at our stations in the weeks affected by the Japanese plume, were estimated at 1.1 μSv/year. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Data List - Specifying and Acquiring Earth Science Data Measurements All at Once

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, C. L.; Teng, W. L.; Liu, Z.; Hearty, T. J., III; Shen, S.; Li, A.; Hegde, M.; Bryant, K.; Seiler, E.; Kempler, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Natural phenomena, such as tropical storms (e.g., hurricane/typhoons), winter storms (e.g., blizzards) volcanic eruptions, floods, and drought, have the potential to cause immense property damage, great socioeconomic impact, and tragic losses of human life. In order to investigate and assess these natural hazards in a timely manner, there needs to be efficient searching and accessing of massive amounts of heterogeneous scientific data from, particularly, satellite and model products. This is a daunting task for most application users, decision makers, and science researchers. The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) has, for many years, archived and served massive amounts of Earth science data, along with value-added information and services. In order to facilitate the GES DISC users in acquiring their data of interest "all at once," with minimum effort, the GES DISC has started developing a value-added and knowledge-based data service framework. This framework allows the preparation and presentation to users of collections of data and their related resources for natural disaster events or other scientific themes. These collections of data, initially termed "Data Bundle" and then "Virtual Collections" and finally "Data Lists," contain suites of annotated Web addresses (URLs) that point to their respective data and resource addresses, "all at once" and "virtually." Because these collections of data are virtual, there is no need to duplicate the data. Currently available "Data Lists" for several natural disaster phenomena and the architecture of the data service framework will be presented.

  4. Mass measurements of singly and highly charged radioactive ions at TITAN: A new Q{sub EC}-value measurement of {sup 10}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, Anna A.; Chaudhuri, Ankur; Schultz, Bradley E.; Simon, Martin C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Chowdhury, Usman [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gallant, Aaron T.; Macdonald, Tegan D.; Dilling, Jens [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    Superallowed {beta}-decay strengths or corrected F t values provide some of the most stringent limits for physics beyond the standard three-quark model. For this reason, the Q{sub EC} -value {sup 10}C has been measured and found to be 3468.31(51) keV with the TITAN Penning trap mass spectrometer. The facility is unique in coupling such an online spectrometer to a charge breeder, permitting a mass measurement of another superallowed {beta}-emitter, {sup 74}Rb, in the 8+ charge state. An overview of the TITAN facility and recent highlights are presented alongside the new Q{sub EC} -value determination of {sup 10}C. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. [Determination of radioactivity by smartphones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, H; Freudenberg, R; Andreeff, M; Kotzerke, J

    2013-01-01

    The interest in the detection of radioactive materials has strongly increased after the accident in the nuclear power plant Fukushima and has led to a bottleneck of suitable measuring instruments. Smartphones equipped with a commercially available software tool could be used for dose rate measurements following a calibration according to the specific camera module. We examined whether such measurements provide reliable data for typical activities and radionuclides in nuclear medicine. For the nuclides 99mTc (10 - 1000 MBq), 131I (3.7 - 1800 MBq, therapy capsule) and 68Ga (50 - 600 MBq) radioactivity with defined geometry in different distances was measured. The smartphones Milestone Droid 1 (Motorola) and HTC Desire (HTC Corporation) were compared with the standard instruments AD6 (automess) and DoseGUARD (AEA Technology). Measurements with the smartphones and the other devices show a good agreement: linear signal increase with rising activity and dose rate. The long time measurement (131I, 729 MBq, 0.5 m, 60 min) demonstrates a considerably higher variation (by 20%) of the measured smartphone data values compared with the AD6. For low dose rates (rates resulting from typical nuclear medicine procedures can be measured reliably (e. g., dismissal dose after radioiodine therapy). The signal shows a high correlation to measured values of conventional dose measurement devices.

  6. Rare earth elements in nuclear medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Kodina G.E.; Kulakov V.N.; Sheino I.N.

    2014-01-01

    The review focuses on the key applications of stable and radioactive isotopes of rare earth elements in the technology of nuclear medicine, radionuclide diagnostics and therapy, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and binary radiotherapy technologies.

  7. Rare earth elements in nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodina G.E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The review focuses on the key applications of stable and radioactive isotopes of rare earth elements in the technology of nuclear medicine, radionuclide diagnostics and therapy, as well as magnetic resonance imaging and binary radiotherapy technologies.

  8. Primary research on neoplasm needle track implantation metastasis after radioactive seeds implantation and preventive measures%放射性粒子植入导致肿瘤针道种植转移及预防

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Wang; Weihong Gong; Huige Fan; Aixia Sui; Na Zhao; Yongqing Shen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the possibility of neoplasm needle track implantation after radioactive seeds implantation and seek preventive measures to avoid it. Methods: Superficial tissue of 250 seeding needle cores and 250 stylophores employed in neoplasm radioactive seeds implantation was smeared on slides to search for tumor cells. All patients received chemotherapy or endocrine therapy after operations. Ultrasound B-mode or computer tomography (CT) was performed at 10th day, 30th day, 60th day, and 180th day post operation to detect neoplasm implantation metastasis through needle tracks.Results: Positive cells were found on 13 of 250 (5.20%) cores, and 7 of 250 (2.80%) stylophores. The difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The positive cells frequency of needles those traversed distance less than 3 cm in normal tissue was 6.19% (13/210), while the frequency of the others those traversed longer distance in normal tissue was 2.41% (7/290).The positive cells frequency of needles traversing different distances in normal tissues is significantly different (P < 0.05). No neoplasm was detected through needle tracks by ultrasound B-mode or CT in 180 days after operation. Conclusion: Tumor cells could ablate into the needle track during radioactive seed implantation. Some preventive measures, such as optimization of pre-operation and intra-operation treatment plan, chemotherapy or endocrine therapy after operation, may be beneficial to avoid the implantation metastasis of neoplasm in seeding needle tracks.

  9. Measures to restore metallurgical mine wasteland using ecological restoration technologies: A case study at Longnan Rare Earth Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yunzhang; Gu, Ruizhi; Guo, Ruikai; Zhang, Xueyan

    2017-01-01

    Whereas mining activities produce the raw materials that are crucial to economic growth, such activities leave extensive scarring on the land, contributing to the waste of valuable land resources and upsetting the ecological environment. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate various ecological technologies to restore metallurgical mine wastelands. These technologies include measures such as soil amelioration, vegetation restoration, different vegetation planting patterns, and engineering technologies. The Longnan Rare Earth Mine in the Jiangxi Province of China is used as the case study. The ecological restoration process provides a favourable reference for the restoration of a metallurgical mine wasteland.

  10. Feasibility of a Constellation of Miniature Satellites for Performing Measurements of the Magnetic Field of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the requirements for a small constellation of satellites to perform measurements of the magnetic field of the Earth and a payload and boom design for such a mission is discussed. After studying communication, power and mass requirements it is found that it is feasible to develop...... a 10 x 10 x 30 cm(3) satellite with a mass of about 2.5 kg, which can fulfill such a mission. We also study the feasibility of controlling a constellation of such small satellites by means of air drag by extracting one or more flaps. It is found that it is indeed possible, but for best performance...

  11. Measuring the initial earth pressure of granite using hydraulic fracturing test; Goseong and Yuseong areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Chun Soo; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Young Kwon; Won, Kyung Sik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    This report provides the initial earth pressure of granitic rocks obtained from Deep Core Drilling Program which is carried out as part of the assessment of deep geological environmental condition. These data are obtained by hydraulic fracturing test in three boreholes drilled up to 350{approx}500 m depth at the Yuseong and Goseong sites. These sites were selected based on the result of preliminary site evaluation study. The boreholes are NX-size (76 mm) and vertical. The procedure of hydraulic fracturing test is as follows: - Selecting the testing positions by preliminary investigation using BHTV logging. - Performing the hydraulic fracturing test at each selected position with depth.- Estimating the shut-in pressure by the bilinear pressure-decay-rate method. - Estimating the fracture reopening pressure from the pressure-time curves.- Estimating the horizontal principal stresses and the direction of principal stresses. 65 refs., 39 figs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  12. Insolation data for solar energy conversion derived from satellite measurements of earth radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the irradiance of the sun at ground locations is essential for the design and evaluation of solar energy conversion systems. The primary source of such data is the global network of weather stations. Such stations are often too far apart and for most locations the data available are only daily total irradiance or monthly averages. Solar energy conversion programs require insolation data with considerably higher geographical and temporal resolution. Meteorological satellites gather routinely extensive data on the energy reflected and scattered into space by the earth-atmosphere system. A program has been initiated to use such data for deriving ground insolation for energy conversion. Some of the preliminary results of this program will be discussed.

  13. Evaluating the design of satellite scanning radiometers for earth radiation budget measurements with system simulations. Part 1: Instantaneous estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Larry; Ardanuy, Philip; Hucek, Richard; Abel, Peter; Jacobowitz, Herbert

    1991-10-01

    A set of system simulations was performed to evaluate candidate scanner configurations to fly as a part of the Earth Radiation Budget Instrument (ERBI) on the polar platforms during the 1990's. The simulation is considered of instantaneous sampling (without diurnal averaging) of the longwave and shortwave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). After measurement and subsequent inversion to the TOA, the measured fluxes were compared to the reference fluxes for 2.5 deg lat/long resolution targets. The reference fluxes at this resolution are obtained by integrating over the 25 x 25 = 625 grid elements in each target. The differences between each of these two resultant spatially averaged sets of target measurements (errors) are taken and then statistically summarized. Five instruments are considered: (1) the Conically Scanning Radiometer (CSR); (2) the ERBE Cross Track Scanner; (3) the Nimbus-7 Biaxial Scanner; (4) the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument (CERES-1); and (5) the Active Cavity Array (ACA). Identical studies of instantaneous error were completed for many days, two seasons, and several satellite equator crossing longitudes. The longwave flux errors were found to have the same space and time characteristics as for the shortwave fluxes, but the errors are only about 25 pct. of the shortwave errors.

  14. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  15. Temporary Personal Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Fred

    2012-01-01

    As part of a bone scan procedure to look for the spread of prostate cancer, I was injected with radioactive technetium. In an effort to occupy/distract my mind, I used a Geiger counter to determine if the radioactive count obeyed the inverse-square law as a sensor was moved away from my bladder by incremental distances. (Contains 1 table and 2…

  16. Peak Satellite-to-Earth Data Rates Derived From Measurements of a 20 Gbps Bread-Board Modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, David G.; Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Sun, Jun Y.; Winn, James S.; Laraway, Stephen A.; McIntire, William K.; Metz, John L.; Smith, Francis J.

    2011-01-01

    A prototype data link using a Ka-band space qualified, high efficiency 200 W TWT amplifier and a bread-board modem emulator were created to explore the feasibility of very high speed communications in satellite-to-earth applications. Experiments were conducted using a DVB-S2-like waveform with modifications to support up to 20 Gbps through the addition of 128-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM). Limited by the bandwidth of the amplifier, a constant peak symbol rate of 3.2 Giga-symbols/sec was selected and the modulation order was varied to explore what peak data rate might be supported by an RF link through this amplifier. Using 128-QAM, an implementation loss of 3 dB was observed at 20 Gbps, and the loss decreased as data rate or bandwidth were reduced. Building on this measured data, realistic link budget calculations were completed. Low-Earth orbit (LEO) missions based on this TWTA with reasonable hardware assumptions and antenna sizing are found to be bandwidth-limited, rather than power-limited, making the spectral efficiency of 9/10-rate encoded 128-QAM very attractive. Assuming a bandwidth allocation of 1 GHz, these computations indicate that low-Earth orbit vehicles could achieve data rates up to 5 Gbps-an order of magnitude beyond the current state-of-practice, yet still within the processing power of a current FPGA-based software-defined modem. The measured performance results and a description of the experimental setup are presented to support these conclusions.

  17. From digital earth to digital neighbourhood: A study of subjective measures of walkability attributes in objectively assessed digital neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, S.; Ho, C. S.

    2014-02-01

    According to IEA report (2011), about 23% of the World's CO2 emissions result from transport and this is one of the few areas where emissions are still rapidly increasing. The use of private vehicles is one of the principle contributors to green house gas emissions from transport sector. Therefore this paper focuses on the shift to more sustainable and low carbon forms of transportation mode such as walking. Neighbourhood built environment attributes may influence walkability. For this study, the author used a modified version of the "Neighbourhood Environment Walkability Scale" to make comparison between respondents' perceptions regarding attributes of two neighborhoods of Putrajaya. The 21st Century really needs planners to use the Digital Earth Concept, to go from global to regional to national to very local issues, using integrated, advanced technologies such as earth observation, GIS, virtual reality, etc. For this research, two (2) neighborhoods of different densities (High and Low density) were selected. A sample total of 381(195 and 186) between 7 to 65 years old participants were selected For subjective measures we used 54 questions questionnaire survey where as for the objective measures we used desktop 9.3 version of Arc GIS soft ware. Our results shows that respondents who reside in high-walkable neighbourhood precinct 9 in Putrajaya rated factors such as residential density, land use mix, proximity to destination and street connectivity, consistently higher then did respondents of the low walkable neighbourhood precinct 8 in Putrajaya.

  18. Thermodynamic stability of radioactivity standard solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iroulard, M.G

    2007-04-15

    The basic requirement when preparing radioactivity standard solutions is to guarantee the concentration of a radionuclide or a radioelement, expressed in the form of activity concentration (Ac = A/m (Bq/g), with A: activity and m: mass of solution). Knowledge of the law of radioactive decay and the half-life of a radionuclide or radioelement makes it possible to determine the activity concentration at any time, and this must be confirmed subsequently by measurement. Furthermore, when radioactivity standard solutions are prepared, it is necessary to establish optimal conditions of thermodynamic stability of the standard solutions. Radioactivity standard solutions are prepared by metrology laboratories from original solutions obtained from a range of suppliers. These radioactivity standard solutions must enable preparation of liquid and/or solid radioactivity standard sources of which measurement by different methods can determine, at a given instant, the activity concentration of the radionuclide or radioelement present in the solution. There are a number of constraints associated with the preparation of such sources. Here only those that relate to the physical and chemical properties of the standard solution are considered, and therefore need to be taken into account when preparing a radioactivity standard solution. These issues are considered in this document in accordance with the following plan: - A first part devoted to the chemical properties of the solutions: - the solubilization media: ultra-pure water and acid media, - the carriers: concentration, oxidation state of the radioactive element and the carrier element. - A second part describing the methodology of the preparation, packaging and storage of standard solutions: - glass ampoules: the structure of glasses, the mechanisms of their dissolution, the sorption phenomenon at the solid-solution interface, - quartz ampoules, - cleaning and packaging: cleaning solutions, internal surface coatings and

  19. Natural radioactivity levels (K, Th and Ra in some areas of Punjab, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sanjeev

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Radioactivity, natural and man-made, is omnipresent in the earth's crust in different amounts. Natural radioactive materials under certain conditions can reach hazardous radiological levels. So, it becomes necessary to study the natural radioactivity levels in soil to assess the dose for the population in order to know the health risks and to have a baseline for future changes in the environmental radioactivity due to human activities. 226Ra, 232Th and 40K analysis has been carried out in soil samples collected from some areas of Punjab, India using gamma-ray spectrometry. Phe technique of gamma ray spectrometry was applied using high purity germanium gamma-ray detector and a PC based MCA. Radium equivalent activities are calculated for the analyzed samples to assess radiation hazards arising due to the use of these soil samples in construction of dwellings. Phe measured activity in the soil ranges from 23.17 to 57.87 Bq kg−1, 59.03 to 160.40 Bq kg−1 and 228.06 to 501.03 Bq kg−1 for 226Ra, 232Ph and 40K with mean values of 37.93, 84.47 and 351.17Bqkg−1 respectively. It has been observed that on the average the outdoor terrestrial gamma air absorbed dose rate is about 84.65nGyh−1.

  20. Radiation budget and related measurements in 1985 and beyond. [earth radiation budget satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Development of systems for obtaining radiation budget and cloud data is discussed. Instruments for measuring total solar irradiance, total infrared flux, reflected solar flux, and cloud heights and properties are considered. Other topics discussed include sampling by multiple satellites, user identification, and determination of the parameters that need to be measured.

  1. Radioactive materials transport accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSweeney, T.I.; Maheras, S.J.; Ross, S.B. [Battelle Memorial Inst. (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Over the last 25 years, one of the major issues raised regarding radioactive material transportation has been the risk of severe accidents. While numerous studies have shown that traffic fatalities dominate the risk, modeling the risk of severe accidents has remained one of the most difficult analysis problems. This paper will show how models that were developed for nuclear spent fuel transport accident analysis can be adopted to obtain estimates of release fractions for other types of radioactive material such as vitrified highlevel radioactive waste. The paper will also show how some experimental results from fire experiments involving low level waste packaging can be used in modeling transport accident analysis with this waste form. The results of the analysis enable an analyst to clearly show the differences in the release fractions as a function of accident severity. The paper will also show that by placing the data in a database such as ACCESS trademark, it is possible to obtain risk measures for transporting the waste forms along proposed routes from the generator site to potential final disposal sites.

  2. Information Centre Radioactivity Switzerland; Beratungsstelle Radioaktivitaet Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosimann, N.; Balsiger, B.; Burger, M. [Bundesamt fuer Bevoelkerungsschutz (Switzerland). LABOR SPIEZ

    2016-07-01

    The Information Centre Radioactivity Switzerland is meant to assess the radiological condition and serves for psychological-medical care of affected members of the Swiss public following an event of increased radioactivity in the environment. The Centre is structured in a modular way consisting of the following modules: ''Entry Measurement'': The visitors are registered and measured for contamination, ''Decontamination'': Contaminated visitors are decontaminated, ''Additional Measurements'': If required, thyroid and whole body measurements are performed, ''Information'': The visitors are informed about radioactivity, radiation protection, the current situation and their individual next steps, ''Exit'': Administrative release from the Information Centre.

  3. Analytical Results of Radionuclide Immission Measurements for Radioactive Waste Storage Facility ZWILAG 1997-2001: Final Report; Spezialnuklid-Analysen fuer die Beweissicherung ZWILAG 1997-2001: Abschlussbericht der Immissionsmessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eikenberg, J.; Bajo, S.; Hitz, J.; Beer, H.; Gann, C.; Ruethi, M.; Wyer, L.; Ziegler, J

    2002-07-01

    between 200-500 (average 300) Bq/kg for {sup 40}K, between 15-30 (average 24) Bq/kg for {sup 226}Ra (decay product within the {sup 238}U- series) and between 20-30 (average 27) Bq/kg for {sup 228}Ra (decay product within the {sup 232}Th-series). This corresponds to typical soil concentrations of 10 g/kg I (potassium), 2 mg/kg (uranium) und 6 mg/kg (thorium). The cosmogenic isotope {sup 7}Be (T{sub 1/2} 45 days) could be detected only occasionally and only in those samples taken from top-soil layers. The values obtained ( < 3 -16 I Bq/kg) are about 1 -2 orders of magnitude below typical {sup 7}Be activity concentrations in soil samples taken from agriculturally used regions. This difference can be explained via preferential deposition of {sup 7}Be onto tree leaves in forest ecosystems and subsequent radioactive decay prior to deposition onto the earth surface. (author)

  4. Realistic Earth matter effects and a method to measure small \\theta_{13} in the detection of supernova neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Xin-Heng; Young, Bing-Lin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we first calculate the realistic Earth matter effects on the detection of type II supernova neutrinos at the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment which is currently under construction. It is found that the Earth matter effects depend on the neutrino incident angle \\theta, the neutrino mass hierarchy \\Delta m_{31}^{2}, the crossing probability at the high resonance region inside the supernova, P_H, the neutrino temperature, T_{\\alpha}, and the pinching parameter in the neutrino spectrum, \\eta_{\\alpha}. We give the expression for the dependence of P_H on the neutrino mixing angle \\theta_{13}. With this we obtain the relations between \\theta_{13} and the event numbers for various reaction channels of supernova neutrinos. Using these relations, we propose a possible way to measure \\theta_{13} smaller than 1.5^\\circ. Such a sensitivity cannot be achieved by the Daya Bay neutrino experiment (the sensitivity of the Daya Bay experiment is \\theta_{13}\\sim 3^\\circ). Furthermore, we apply this method to o...

  5. Measure the Propagation of a Halo CME and Its Driven Shock with the Observations from a Single Perspective at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lei; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Li; Liu, Siming; Zhao, Xinhua

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed study of an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection (full-halo CME) event that happened on 2011 February 15, making use of white-light observations by three coronagraphs and radio observations by Wind/WAVES. We applied three different methods to reconstruct the propagation direction and traveling distance of the CME and its driven shock. We measured the kinematics of the CME leading edge from white-light images observed by Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Aand B, tracked the CME-driven shock using the frequency drift observed by Wind/WAVES together with an interplanetary density model, and obtained the equivalent scattering centers of the CME by the polarization ratio (PR) method. For the first time, we applied the PR method to different features distinguished from LASCO/C2 polarimetric observations and calculated their projections onto white-light images observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B. By combining the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) forward modeling with the PR method, we proposed a new GCS-PR method to derive 3D parameters of a CME observed from a single perspective at Earth. Comparisons between different methods show a good degree of consistence in the derived 3D results.

  6. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  7. Measurement of the PPN parameter γ by testing the geometry of near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Dian-Hong; Qin, Cheng-Gang; Shao, Cheng-Gang

    2016-06-01

    The Beyond Einstein Advanced Coherent Optical Network (BEACON) mission was designed to achieve an accuracy of 10^{-9} in measuring the Eddington parameter γ , which is perhaps the most fundamental Parameterized Post-Newtonian parameter. However, this ideal accuracy was just estimated as a ratio of the measurement accuracy of the inter-spacecraft distances to the magnitude of the departure from Euclidean geometry. Based on the BEACON concept, we construct a measurement model to estimate the parameter γ with the least squares method. Influences of the measurement noise and the out-of-plane error on the estimation accuracy are evaluated based on the white noise model. Though the BEACON mission does not require expensive drag-free systems and avoids physical dynamical models of spacecraft, the relatively low accuracy of initial inter-spacecraft distances poses a great challenge, which reduces the estimation accuracy in about two orders of magnitude. Thus the noise requirements may need to be more stringent in the design in order to achieve the target accuracy, which is demonstrated in the work. Considering that, we have given the limits on the power spectral density of both noise sources for the accuracy of 10^{-9}.

  8. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  9. Learning more about radioactivity; En savoir plus sur la radioactivite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This digest brochure explains what radioactivity is, where it comes from, how it is measured, what are its effects on the body and the way to protect it against these effects, the uses of radioactivity (In the medical field, In industry, In the food industry, and In the cultural world). It ends with some examples of irradiation levels, of natural radioactivity and with the distribution in France of various sources of exposure. (J.S.)

  10. Searching for modifications to the exponential radioactive decay law with the Cassini spacecraft

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Data from the power output of the radioisotope thermoelectric generators aboard the Cassini spacecraft are used to test the conjecture that small deviations observed in terrestrial measurements of the exponential radioactive decay law are correlated with the Earth-Sun distance. No significant deviations from exponential decay are observed over a range of 0.7 - 1.6 A.U. A 90% Cl upper limit of 0.84 x 10^-4 is set on a term in the decay rate of Pu-238 proportional to 1/R^2 and 0.99 x 10^-4 for a term proportional to 1/R.

  11. Probing shell structure and shape changes in neutron-rich sulfur isotopes through transient-field g factor measurements on fast radioactive beams of 38S and 40S

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, A D; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Cook, J M; Davidson, P M; Dinca, D C; Gade, A; Liddick, S N; Mantica, P F; Mertzimekis, T J; Müller, W F; Stuchbery, A E; Terry, J R; Tomlin, B E; Wilson, A N; Yoneda, K; Zwahlen, H

    2006-01-01

    The shell structure underlying shape changes in neutron-rich nuclei near N=28 has been investigated by a novel application of the transient field technique to measure the first-excited state g factors in 38S and 40S produced as fast radioactive beams. There is a fine balance between proton and neutron contributions to the magnetic moments in both nuclei. The g factor of deformed 40S does not resemble that of a conventional collective nucleus because spin contributions are more important than usual.

  12. Calculation of uncertainties associated to environmental radioactivity measurements and their functions. Practical Procedure; Calculo de la incertidumbre asociada al recuento en medidas de radiactividad ambiental y funciones basadas en ella. Procedimiento practico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasco Leonarte, C; Anton Mateos, M. P.

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the procedure used to calculate the uncertainties associated to environmental radioactivity measurements, focusing on those obtained by radiochemical separation in which tracers have been added. Uncertainties linked to activity concentration calculations, isotopic rat iso, inventories, sequential leaching data, chronology dating by using C.R.S. model and duplicate analysis are described in detail. The objective of this article is to serve as a guide to people not familiarized with this kind of calculations, showing clear practical examples. The input of the formulas and all the data needed to achieve these calculations into the Lotus 1, 2, 3 WTN is outlined as well. (Author) 13 refs.

  13. Radioactivity doubles up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Bertram

    2008-05-01

    More than a century after Henri Becquerel discovered radioactivity, there is still much that physicists do not understand about this spontaneous natural phenomenon. Through Becquerel's use of simple photographic plates to the sophisticated nuclear experiments carried out in today's laboratories, researchers have unearthed a total of nine different ways in which an atomic nucleus can decay. The most well known of these decay modes - alpha (α), beta (β) and gamma (γ) radioactivity - are widely used in applications ranging from medicine to archaeology; the others are much rarer.

  14. Discovery and measurement of an isotopically distinct source of sulfate in Earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gerardo; Jackson, Terri; Brothers, Lauren; Barnett, Burton; Nguyen, Bryan; Thiemens, Mark H

    2008-09-01

    Sulfate (SO(4)) and its precursors are significant components of the atmosphere, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Recently, our triple-isotope ((16)O, (17)O, (18)O) measurements of atmospheric sulfate have provided specific insights into the oxidation pathways leading to sulfate, with important implications for models of the sulfur cycle and global climate change. Using similar isotopic measurements of aerosol sulfate in a polluted marine boundary layer (MBL) and primary sulfate (p-SO(4)) sampled directly from a ship stack, we quantify the amount of p-SO(4) found in the atmosphere from ships. We find that ships contribute between 10% and 44% of the non-sea-salt sulfate found in fine [diameter (D) international maritime law, and atmospheric chemistry.

  15. Transmittance Measurement of a Heliostat Facility used in the Preflight Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  16. Transmittance measurement of a heliostat facility used in the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-08-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  17. Sound Velocity Measurements in Textured hcp-Iron and the Anisotropy and Structure of Earth's Inner Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, D.; Occelli, F.; Badro, J.; Requardt, H.; Fiquet, G.; Krisch, M.

    2003-12-01

    Seismological studies show that the Earth's inner core is elastically anisotropic. The anisotropy has an axial symmetry and an amplitude of about 3-4%, with the fast direction oriented parallel to the Earth's rotation axis. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this feature, but the lack of evidence from mineral physics does not allow to address them. Indeed, the experimental determination of sound velocity anisotropy in hcp-iron, the main constituent of the inner core, is of primary importance. Studies include first-principle calculations [1-5] and x-ray radial diffraction measurements [6], but the results show general disagreement, not only in magnitude, but in direction as well. We will report new inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) data on polycrystalline hcp-iron as a function of pressure, complementing and extending previous IXS data [7]. The derived longitudinal and transverse sound velocities will be compared with the calculations and the experimental results present in literature. Furthermore, the issue of elastic anisotropy will be addressed. Taking advantage of the texturing developed by uniaxially compressed hcp-metals [8], and making use of a properly designed diamond anvil cell characterized by an angular aperture of more than \\begin{math} 90^{o} , we measured the sound velocity at 22 and 112 GPa in two different geometries with respect to the compression axis, probing the longitudinal sound propagation at \\begin{math} 50^{o} and \\begin{math} 90^{o} with respect to it. A difference in acoustic sound velocity of about 5% has been detected at the highest pressure. This effective anisotropy on a textured polycrystalline sample is comparable with the one observed in the Earth, further relaxing the requirement of a nearly perfect alignment of iron crystal grains sustained by previous theoretical investigations [1,4]. [1] L. Stixrude, R.E. Cohen, Science 267, 1972 (1995). [2] P. Soderlind et al., Phys. Rev. B 53, 14063 (1996). [3] R. E. Cohen et

  18. Evil radioactivity. Subjective perception of radioactivity in patients with thyroid disease prior to treatment with radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, L.S. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Grevenbroich (Germany); Beyer, T.; Mueller, S.P.; Goerges, R.; Bockisch, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Hopfenbach, A. [Radiologisch-Nuklearmedizinische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Grevenbroich (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: We assess the perspective of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity by means of a cultural-anthropological approach based on qualitative measures and quantitative scores. From the interviews with the patients we evaluate as to how much radioactivity is accepted as an abstract term or as a benefit within the medical context. Patients, methods: 68 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (35 women, 33 men, 32-81 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1=positive, 5=negative) to quantify their attitudes. Results: The responses of all patients towards radioactivity in general were heterogeneous with most responses reflecting a negative perception. Many patients expressed their associated fears about atomic energy, malignant diseases and radioactive contamination. The scoring system reflected a mostly negative opinion base. However, patients became more positive once they assumed an immediate benefit of radioactivity for the treatment of their own disease (p=0.01). Conclusions: Knowing about significant differences in patient's perception about radioactivity in general or in the clinical context may help to optimise and tailor the initial, pre-therapeutical interview towards the patient. (orig.)

  19. Radon measurements by etched track detectors applications in radiation protection, earth sciences and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Durrani, Saeed A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to radon gas, which is present in the environment naturally, constitutes over half the radiation dose received by the general public annually. At present, the most widely used method of measuring radon concentration levels throughout the world, both in dwellings and in the field, is by etched track detectors - also known as Solid State Nuclear Detectors (SSNTDs). Although this is not only the most widely used method but is also the simplest and the cheapest, yet there is at present no book available on the market globally, devoted exclusively or largely to the methodology of, and deal

  20. The permeability variations on the Wenchuan Fault measured on the water level response to solid Earth tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Brodsky, E. E.; Li, H.; Wang, H.; Pei, J.

    2011-12-01

    The mechanics of slip during an earthquake depends critically on the hydrologic properties. The in situ fault zone hydrological properties are difficult to measure and have never directly been constrained on the fault zone immediately after a large earthquake. In this work, we analyze 1.5 years of continuous data from the Wenchuan Fault Zone which was the site of the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. By using the solid Earth tides response we can constrain the average hydraulic properties of the damage zone at 800-1200 m below the surface (~200-600 m from the principal slip zone). We find that the hydraulic diffusivity D of Wenchuan Fault Zone is 0.03 m2/s, which is three orders of magnitude larger than pump test values on the Chelungpu Fault which is the site of the Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake. This measurement at Wenchuan was made by continuously monitoring the response of the well to the solid Earth tides. The solid earth tides impose a dilatational strain on the formation that pumps water cyclically in and out of the well. By measuring the phase and amplitude response, we can infer the transmissivity and storage near the fault assuming an isotropic, homogeneous and laterally extensive aquifer. We evaluated the phase and amplitude responses for solid Earth tide in both frequency domain and time domain. In the frequency domain analysis, we divide Fourier transform of the water levels by that of a synthetic tide to get the amplitude response and phase shift of the water level relative to the dilatational strain at the frequency of the largest semidiurnal tide M2. In the time domain, we use a least-square fit of prediction tidal harmonics to the water levels. Then we solve for phase and amplitude response at the frequency for M2. These two separate methods yield almost identical results. The average phase lag is ~ 25 degree, and the average amplitude response is 6×10-7 strain/m. According to the Heish model, we solve for storage coefficient S 2.2×10-4 and transmissivity

  1. Singular measures versus nondifferentiability: from the solid earth to the atmosphere and their interface (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovejoy, S.; Schertzer, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    In the 1980’s, the paradigm of Fractal Geometry popularized the fact that the ubiquitous geostatistical power laws imply nondifferentiabilty of the corresponding fractal sets, fractal functions. The prototypical examples of such scaling have flucutations Δf which change with scale Δx accordng to laws of the form Δf ≈ φΔx**H where H is the scaling exponent and φ is flux. The famous Kolmorogov turbulence law is the special case where Δf = Δv for velocity fluctuations across a distance Δx with H = 1/3 and φ = ɛ**1/3 where ɛ is the turbulent energy flux. Similarly, there is much evidence that topographic altitude fluctuations Δh are of the same form with Δf = Δh , H ≈1/2 and with φ a fundamental flux field governing topography dynamics. In both cases the basic laws are quite classical going back to 1941 (Kolmogorov; Δv) and to 1951 (Venig-Meinsz; Δh) respectively. From the above form we see that Δf/Δx ≈ φΔx**(H-1) which (when Hderivative. Indeed, all (fractional) derivatives of order >H diverge. The focus on the geometry / differentiability properties puts the spotlight on the old H parameter. This has unfortunately drawn attention away from the more important consequences of our new understanding of the nonclassical flux φ as a singular multifractal measure. Over the last 25 years it has become clear that nonlinear processes that are scale invariant over wide ranges generically give rise to singular measures with statistics satisfying the relation ≈ λ**K(q) where λ is the resolution (defined as the ratio of the largest scale of the variability to the averaging scale), q is an arbitrary order of moment “” means statistical averaging, and K(q) is a scaling exponent function which characterizes the statistics of the flux at all the scales λ. Since φ(λ) is the ratio of the (Lebesque) integral of φ over a λ-resolution line, square or cube to the corrsponding length, area or volume of the integration set, such fluxes are singular

  2. Bioleaching of rare earth elements from monazite sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Vanessa L; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    Three fungal strains were found to be capable of bioleaching rare earth elements from monazite, a rare earth phosphate mineral, utilizing the monazite as a phosphate source and releasing rare earth cations into solution. These organisms include one known phosphate solubilizing fungus, Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015, as well as two newly isolated fungi: an Aspergillus terreus strain ML3-1 and a Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F. Although monazite also contains the radioactive element Thorium, bioleaching by these fungi preferentially solubilized rare earth elements over Thorium, leaving the Thorium in the solid residual. Adjustments in growth media composition improved bioleaching performance measured as rare earth release. Cell-free spent medium generated during growth of A. terreus strain ML3-1 and Paecilomyces spp. strain WE3-F in the presence of monazite leached rare earths to concentrations 1.7-3.8 times those of HCl solutions of comparable pH, indicating that compounds exogenously released by these organisms contribute substantially to leaching. Organic acids released by the organisms included acetic, citric, gluconic, itaconic, oxalic, and succinic acids. Abiotic leaching with laboratory prepared solutions of these acids was not as effective as bioleaching or leaching with cell-free spent medium at releasing rare earths from monazite, indicating that compounds other than the identified organic acids contribute to leaching performance.

  3. Earth's lithospheric magnetic field determined to spherical harmonic degree 90 from CHAMP satellite measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maus, S.; Rother, M.; Hemant, K.;

    2006-01-01

    The CHAMP magnetic field mission is providing highly reliable measurements from which the global lithospheric magnetic field can be determined in unprecedented resolution and accuracy. Using almost 5 yr of data, we derive our fourth generation lithospheric field model termed MF4, which is expanded...... to spherical harmonic degree and order 90. After subtracting from the full magnetic field observations predicted fields from an internal field model up to degree 15, an external field model up to degree two, and the predicted magnetic field signatures for the eight dominant ocean tidal constituents, we fit...... of the lithospheric field down to an altitude of about 50 km at lower latitudes, with reduced accuracy in the polar regions. Crustal features come out significantly sharper than in previous models. In particular, bands of magnetic anomalies along subduction zones become visible by satellite for the first time....

  4. Disposal of radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dorp, Frits; Grogan, Helen; McCombie, Charles

    The aim of radioactive and non-radioactive waste management is to protect man and the environment from unacceptable risks. Protection criteria for both should therefore be based on similar considerations. From overall protection criteria, performance criteria for subsystems in waste management can be derived, for example for waste disposal. International developments in this field are summarized. A brief overview of radioactive waste sorts and disposal concepts is given. Currently being implemented are trench disposal and engineered near-surface facilities for low-level wastes. For low-and intermediate-level waste underground facilities are under construction. For high-level waste site selection and investigation is being carried out in several countries. In all countries with nuclear programmes, the predicted performance of waste disposal systems is being assessed in scenario and consequence analyses. The influences of variability and uncertainty of parameter values are increasingly being treated by probabilistic methods. Results of selected performance assessments show that radioactive waste disposal sites can be found and suitable repositories can be designed so that defined radioprotection limits are not exceeded.

  5. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  6. AIR RADIOACTIVITY MONITOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, R.L.; Thomas, J.W.

    1961-04-11

    The monitor is designed to minimize undesirable background buildup. It consists of an elongated column containing peripheral electrodes in a central portion of the column, and conduits directing an axial flow of radioactively contaminated air through the center of the column and pure air through the annular portion of the column about the electrodes. (AEC)

  7. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  8. Radioactive Sources Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Please note that the radioactive sources service will be open by appointment only every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during CERN working hours (instead of alternate weeks). In addition, please note that our 2007 schedule is available on our web site: http://cern.ch/service-rp-sources

  9. Radioactive Sources Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Please note that the radioactive sources service will be open by appointment only every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during CERN working hours (instead of alternate weeks). In addition, please note that our 2007 schedule is available on our web site. http://cern.ch/service-rp-sources

  10. Survey monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Jeju area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U, Zang Kual; Kang, Tae Woo; Park, Won Pyo [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    The project is carried out to monitor the change of environmental radioactivity in Jeju, and to provide a systematic data for radiation monitoring and counter measurement at a radiological emergency situation. Also the survey of natural environmental radioactivities in the samples was conducted to make the reliable data base for evaluation of internal exposure and environmental contamination of radiation. This report contains the data of gamma exposure rates and radioactivities of airborne dust, fallout, precipitation and tap water which were analyzed periodically by Jeju Regional Monitoring Station in 2002. Also it contains the data of natural radioactivity levels of food stuff such as agricultural and marine products, including drinking waters.

  11. Revealing the Earth's mantle from the tallest mountains using the Jinping Neutrino Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrámek, Ondřej; Roskovec, Bedřich; Wipperfurth, Scott A; Xi, Yufei; McDonough, William F

    2016-09-09

    The Earth's engine is driven by unknown proportions of primordial energy and heat produced in radioactive decay. Unfortunately, competing models of Earth's composition reveal an order of magnitude uncertainty in the amount of radiogenic power driving mantle dynamics. Recent measurements of the Earth's flux of geoneutrinos, electron antineutrinos from terrestrial natural radioactivity, reveal the amount of uranium and thorium in the Earth and set limits on the residual proportion of primordial energy. Comparison of the flux measured at large underground neutrino experiments with geologically informed predictions of geoneutrino emission from the crust provide the critical test needed to define the mantle's radiogenic power. Measurement at an oceanic location, distant from nuclear reactors and continental crust, would best reveal the mantle flux, however, no such experiment is anticipated. We predict the geoneutrino flux at the site of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment (Sichuan, China). Within 8 years, the combination of existing data and measurements from soon to come experiments, including Jinping, will exclude end-member models at the 1σ level, define the mantle's radiogenic contribution to the surface heat loss, set limits on the composition of the silicate Earth, and provide significant parameter bounds for models defining the mode of mantle convection.

  12. Natural diatomite process for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2007-01-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physical properties and has found diversified industrial utilization. The filtration characteristics are particularly significant in the purification of liquids. The purpose of this study was to test natural diatomaceous earth (diatomite) as an alternative material that could be used for removal of radioactivity from liquid waste. A pilot-scale column-type device was designed. Natural diatomite samples were ground, sieved and prepared to use as sorption media. In this study, real waste liquid was used as radioactive liquid having special conditions. The liquid waste contained three radionuclides (Cs-137, Cs-134 and Co-60). Following the treatment by diatomite, the radioactivity of liquid waste was reduced from the initial 2.60 Bq/ml to less than 0.40 Bq/ml. The results of this study show that most of the radioactivity was removed from the solution by processing with diatomite.

  13. Development of In-situation radioactivity Inspection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Sujung; Lee, Sanghun; Kim, Miyoung; Kim, Myungjin; Lee, Unjang [ORIONENC Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jungkyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Many Korean people worry about radioactive contamination of Japanese and Korean marine products. Radioactive contamination of processed foodstuffs, livestock, marine products, farm products imported from Japan and fishes caught in coastal waters of Korea has become an important social issue. Radioactivity inspections of those foods are executed manually with portable measuring instruments or at labs using their samples. In consequence, there are some problem of time delay and low reliability. To protect the health of citizens from radioactivity contained in Japanese marine products imported to Korea, a system to inspect radioactivity in real time will be developed. The system is to measure the radioactivity level of farm and marine products continuously and automatically at inspection sites of an agency checking radiation of imported foodstuffs to determine radioactive contamination. Product performance assessment and tests will be conducted later. When the system develops and its commercialization begins, people's anxiety about radioactive contamination of foods after the Fukushima nuclear accident will be eased and people will be able to trust the radioactive inspection.

  14. A comparison of Doppler lidar wind sensors for Earth-orbit global measurement applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1985-01-01

    Now, there are four Doppler lidar configurations which are being promoted for the measurement of tropospheric winds: (1) the coherent CO2 Lidar, operating in the 9 micrometer region using a pulsed, atmospheric pressure CO2 gas discharge laser transmitter, and heterodyne detection; (2) the coherent Neodymium doped YAG or Glass Lidar, operating at 1.06 micrometers, using flashlamp or diode laser optical pumping of the solid state laser medium, and heterodyne detection; (3) the Neodymium doped YAG/Glass Lidar, operating at the doubled frequency (at 530 nm wavelength), again using flashlamp or diode laser pumping of the laser transmitter, and using a high resolution tandem Fabry-Perot filter and direct detection; and (4) the Raman shifted Xenon Chloride Lidar, operating at 350 nm wavelength, using a pulsed, atmospheric pressure XeCl gas discharge laser transmitter at 308 nm, Raman shifted in a high pressure hydrogen cell to 350 nm in order to avoid strong stratospheric ozone absorption, also using a high resolution tandem Fabry-Perot filter and direct detection. Comparisons of these four systems can include many factors and tradeoffs. The major portion of this comparison is devoted to efficiency. Efficiency comparisons are made by estimating the number of transmitted photons required for a single pulse wind velocity estimate of + or - 1 m/s accuracy in the middle troposphere, from an altitude of 800 km, which is assured to be reasonable for a polar orbiting platform.

  15. CLOUD-MAP Field Campaign Measurements of the Earth's Lower Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nicholas; Avery, Alyssa; Jacob, Jamey

    2016-11-01

    CLOUD-MAP (Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics) is a 4 year, 4 university collaboration to develop capabilities that will allow meteorologists and atmospheric scientists to use unmanned aircraft as a common, useful everyday tool. Currently, we know that systems can be used for meteorological measurements, but they are far from being practical or robust for everyday field diagnostics by the average meteorologist or scientist. In particular, UAS are well suited for the lower atmosphere, namely the lower boundary layer that has a large impact on the atmosphere and where much of the weather phenomena begin. A sensor set called MDASS (Meteorological Data Acquisition Sonde System) was developed and used to collect and transmit live data necessary for developing such forecasts as well as be usable on multiple platforms ranging from fixed-wing and multi-rotor UAVs to rockets. The data transmitted from MDASS is viewed and stored on a ground control station via LabVIEW in a program developed for real-time data analysis. Results from the first CLOUD-MAP are presented. The campaign resulted in nearly 250 unmanned aircraft flights of 12 separate platforms over a 3 day period, collecting meteorological data at 3 different sites.

  16. Implantation of the NC ISO 9001 in the Radioactivity measurement service in junks of CPHR; Implantacion de la NC ISO 9001 en el servicio de medicion de radiactividad en chatarras de CPHR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos V, E.O.; Dominguez L, O.; Capote F, E.; Fernandez G, I.M.; Caveda R, C.; Alonso A, D.; Barroso P, I.; Madraso M, S. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47 Playa, C.P. 11300, Ciudad La Habana, Direccion Postal A.P. 6195, C.P. 10600 (Cuba)]. e-mail: odalys@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    In the last years in the international environment, radiological incidents have been reported, due to the presence of radioactive materials in the junk, that have implied the adoption of measures in matter of radiological safety, to avoid affectations in the public and the environment, as well as in the international trade. The establishment of the radiological control of junk during it commercialization requires of the implantation of a quality management program. In such sense, the present work exposes the experience of our institution in the design and organization of a service for the radioactivity measurement in junks based on a quality administration system based on the requirements of the quality standards ISO 9001:2000, ISO/IEC 17050 and ISO/IEC 17025:2000. In coherence with the postulates defined in the institutional strategy related to the implantation of a total quality system and the international demands on this matter. To such ends the processes that compose the service were identified, the corresponding and implemented procedures were elaborated, the registrations associated to the same one, being worked in the design of a quality assurance program that allowed the evaluation of the conformity of the product and the customer. (Author)

  17. Self-constructed detectors for environmental radiation sources. Instruments for detecting and measuring electric and magnetic fields as well as radioactive radiation; Selbstgebaute Detektoren fuer Strahlenquellen in der Umwelt. Pruef- und Messgeraete fuer elektrische und magnetische Felder sowie radioaktive Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The book presents experiments for detecting and measuring radiation sources. This includes detectors for electric and magnetic fields, radioactive radiation and even cosmic radiation, all of which can be detected by simple (electronic) circuits. Apart from the practical experiments, also basic physical knowledge is provided. The book comprises the following chapters: 1. Introduction; 2. Electrostatic fields in the environment; 3. Magnetostatic fields; 4. Electrodynamic fields; 5. Magnetodynamic fields; 6. Electromagnetic radiation in the environment; 7. Radioactive radiation in the environment; 8. Cosmic radiation; 9. PC interface; 10. Professional radiation measurement; 11. Risk potential. [German] In diesem Buch werden Experimente vorgestellt, mit denen man die verschiedenen Strahlenquellen nachweisen und messtechnisch erfassen kann. Darunter zaehlen Detektoren zum Nachweis elektrischer und magnetischer Felder, radioaktiver Strahlung und sogar von Strahlen aus dem Weltall. Mit einfachen (elektronischen) Schaltungen werden diese Gefahrenquellen aufgespuert. Neben vielen praxiserprobten Experimenten wird auch das physikalische Grundwissen vermittelt. Das Buch ist in folgende Kapitel aufgeteilt: 1. Einfuehrung; 2. Elektrostatische Felder in der Umwelt; 3. Magnetostatische Felder; 4. Elektrodynamische Felder; 5. Magentodynamische Felder; 6. Elektromagnetische Strahlen in der Umwelt; 7. Radioaktive Strahlen in der Umwelt; 8. Strahlen aus dem Weltall; 9. PC-Schnittstelle; 10. Professionelle Strahlenmessung; 11. Gefahrenpotenzial.

  18. Endangered and Extinct Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leising, M. D.

    1993-07-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual nucleosynthesis events, via observations of short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring global galactic nucleosynthesis today with detections of longer-lived radioactivity. Many of the astrophysical issues addressed by these observations are precisely those that must be understood in order to interpret observations of extinct radioactivity in meteorites. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both 56Co [1] and 57Co [2] were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions. Live 26Al in the galaxy might come from Type II supernovae and their progenitors, and if this is eventually shown to be the case, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, the galactic Type II supernova rate, and even models of the chemical evolution of the galaxy [3]. Titanium-44 is produced primarily in the alpha-rich freezeout from nuclear statistical equilibrium, possibly in Type Ia [4] and almost certainly in Type II supernovae [5]. The galactic recurrence time of these events is comparable to the 44Ti lifetime, so we expect to be able to see at most a few otherwise unseen 44Ti remnants at any given time. No such remnants have been detected yet [6]. Very simple arguments lead to the expectation that about 4 x 10^-4 M(sub)solar mass of 44Ca are produced per century. The product of the supernova frequency times the 44Ti yield per event must equal this number. Even assuming that only the latest event would be seen, rates in excess of 2 century^-1 are ruled out at >=99% confidence by the gamma ray limits. Only rates less than 0.3 century^-1 are acceptable at >5% confidence, and this means that the yield per event must be >10^-3 M(sub)solar mass to produce the requisite 44Ca. Rates this low are incompatible with current estimates for Type II supernovae and yields this high are also very

  19. iRadioactivity — Possibilities and Limitations for Using Smartphones and Tablet PCs as Radioactive Counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Molz, Alexander; Gröber, Sebastian; Frübis, Jan

    2014-09-01

    A study conducted in 2013 showed that about 70-80% of teens and young adults in the United States own a smartphone.1 Furthermore the number of tablet PC users in the United States will increase up to more than 80% by 2015.2 As a result, these devices have increasingly become everyday tools, particularly for the younger generation. In recent years, various articles have been published about the use of smartphones and tablet PCs as experimental tools especially in the physics classroom. This is possible because today's smartphones and tablet PCs are equipped with many sensors, which can be used to perform quantitative measurements of sound, acceleration, magnetic flux density, air pressure, light intensity, humidity, angular velocity, temperature, or position on Earth (GPS). While previous articles mainly present experiments on mechanics or acoustics, in which the acceleration sensor or the microphone is used (for a synopsis of different examples, see Ref. 3; for recent papers, see Refs.), in this article we focus on experiments for studying radioactivity using the camera sensor.

  20. Radioactivity introduction and history, from the quantum to quarks

    CERN Document Server

    L'Annunziata, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    As a comprehensive review of radioactivity from natural and artificial sources on earth and radiation of cosmic origins, this book provides users with a chronological account of the significant historical events on the topic dating from 1895 to the present, along with an introduction to the atom and its nucleus.

  1. assessment of radioactivity concentration in soil of some mining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Natural radioactive mineral deposits are found in suitable ... radiation protection and safety regulations are adhered to. Several ... (NORM) in the earth and in the mining by-products, and wastes derived from ... MATERIALS AND METHODS ... random escape and you stored for a minimum of 24 days. This.

  2. A Space weather information service based upon remote and in-situ measurements of coronal mass ejections heading for Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritter Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s magnetosphere is formed as a consequence of interaction between the planet’s magnetic field and the solar wind, a continuous plasma stream from the Sun. A number of different solar wind phenomena have been studied over the past 40 years with the intention of understanding and forecasting solar behavior. One of these phenomena in particular, Earth-bound interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs, can significantly disturb the Earth’s magnetosphere for a short time and cause geomagnetic storms. This publication presents a mission concept consisting of six spacecraft that are equally spaced in a heliocentric orbit at 0.72 AU. These spacecraft will monitor the plasma properties, the magnetic field’s orientation and magnitude, and the 3D-propagation trajectory of CMEs heading for Earth. The primary objective of this mission is to increase space weather forecasting time by means of a near real-time information service, that is based upon in-situ and remote measurements of the aforementioned CME properties. The obtained data can additionally be used for updating scientific models. This update is the mission’s secondary objective. In-situ measurements are performed using a Solar Wind Analyzer instrumentation package and fluxgate magnetometers, while for remote measurements coronagraphs are employed. The proposed instruments originate from other space missions with the intention to reduce mission costs and to streamline the mission design process. Communication with the six identical spacecraft is realized via a deep space network consisting of six ground stations. They provide an information service that is in uninterrupted contact with the spacecraft, allowing for continuous space weather monitoring. A dedicated data processing center will handle all the data, and then forward the processed data to the SSA Space Weather Coordination Center which will, in turn, inform the general public through a space weather forecast. The data

  3. Results of dose sensors measurements in the middle-Earth orbit for the period of 2009-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopopov, Grigory; Shatov, Pavel; Tasenko, Sergey; Lyakhov, Igor; Makarova, Nina; Balashov, Sergey; Sitnikova, Ninel

    2016-07-01

    The measurements results of space radiation exposure on electronic components carried out by dose sensors are presented in the paper. Dose sensors operate on metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor dosimetry pricniple. The flight data have been receiving for more than 6 years. The measurements results are compared with others flight data on different orbits. The analysis of the received data from 2009 to 2015 allows us to find out the periods with sharp increase of dose rate and to define values of such increases. We had analyzed space radiation characteristics data from other monitoring systems (such as GOES, Electro-L) in dates of dose rate sharp increase. Results of the analysis of dose rate increase, which had been fixed by TID sensors in 2015, will be presented in full paper. We had calculated average dose rates for different space models in the middle-Earth orbit (AE8, AE9 and others) and determined the most relevant models to the experimental data (with account for relaxation effect of dose sensor outputs). The comparison results for different models will be presented in the full paper. We had used different approaches for simulating of dose sensors shielding geometry, such as semi-sphere, semi-infinite plate, sector analysis, with taking account of different shielding elements. The analysis results of shielding configuration influence on calculated values of dose rate will be presented in the full paper.

  4. Detection of thin current sheets and associated reconnection in the Earth's turbulent magnetosheath using cluster multi-point measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Retino, Alessandro; Sahraoui, Fouad; Greco, Antonella; Vaivads, Andris; Sundkvist, David; Canu, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection occurs in turbulent plasma within a large number of volume-filling thin current sheets and is one major candidate for energy dissipation of turbulent plasma. Such dissipation results in particle heating and non-thermal particle acceleration. In situ observations are needed to study the detailed properties of thin current sheets and associated reconnection, in order to determine its importance as a dissipation mechanism at small scales. In particular, multi-point measurements are crucial to unambiguously identify spatial scales (e.g current sheet thickness) and estimate key quantities such as E*J. Here we present a study of the properties of thin current sheets detected in the Earths magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock by using Cluster spacecraft data. The current sheets were detected by the rotation of the magnetic field as computed by four-point measurements. We study the distribution of current sheets as a function of the magnetic shear angle θ, their duration and the waiting time between consecutive current sheets. We found that high shear (θ > 90 degrees) current sheets show different properties with respect to low shear current sheets (θ < 90 degrees). These high-shear current sheets account for about ˜ 20% of the total and have an average thickness comparable to the ion inertial length. We also compare our four-point detection method with other single-point methods (e.g. Partial Variance of Increments - PVI) and we discuss the results of such comparison.

  5. Low Radioactivities Center. Report presented to the Scientific Committee, July 19, 1994; Centre des Faibles Radioactivites. Rapport presente au Comite Scientifique, 19 juillet 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    This document is the annual report of the Low Radioactivities Center for the year 1994. The Center is a joint CEA-CNRS laboratory devoted to biogeochemical, climate and Earth science studies. It has developed refined methods for the measurement of small amounts of stable and radioactive isotopes (lead, thorium, cesium, radium, radon, polonium, potassium, argon, beryllium, carbon, oxygen, helium..), in particular isotope dating methods such as K/Ar and C14 methods. The research activities are regrouped in four topics: the study and modelling of great biogeochemical cycles (troposphere physico-chemistry, carbon cycle, mass transfers between atmosphere, ocean and sediments); the evolution of climate (thermohaline circulation and heat transfers); the interactions between the internal activity of the Earth and the Earth`s surface (magnetic field instabilities, oceanic volcanism, geodynamics of orogenic domains, active volcanism); the outstanding events of the Earth`s history (Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, cosmic phenomena, Quaternary evolution of the fossil man and of its environment). A complete list of the laboratory publications is given in the appendix together with a listing of the other activities (teaching, external collaborations, oceanic campaigns, seminars..). (J.S.). 659 refs., 39 figs., 1 tab., 3 photos., 4 appends.

  6. Nuclear power plants. Fundamentals, application and hazards of radioactivity; Atomkraftwerke. Grundlagen, Nutzung, Gefahren der Radioaktivitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, Michael

    2011-07-01

    The book includes the following chapters: (1) Fundamentals of atomic physics.(2) Radioactive radiation. (3) Nuclear power plants. (4) Reactor types: light water-cooled reactor, heavy-water reactor, high-temperature reactor, breeding reactor. (5) Fuel cycle: uranium mining, uranium isotope enrichment, NPP operation, spent fuel processing, radioactive waste disposal. (6) Measured variables and units: radiation, radiation dose, mass end energy. (7) Radioactivity measurement. (8) Hazards due to radioactive radiation.

  7. Radioactive waste today - an asset tomorrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstrand, M. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    Mining of Rare Earth Elements (REE) causes radioactive pollution, as ores which contain REE also contain an elevated concentration of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Wastes from REE mining are therefore regarded as being inherently radioactive. One of the potential economically viable REE resources in Norway is in the Fensfield area in Telemark County, which is recognized as one of the world's largest thorium resources. If REE was mined in this area, a large volume of radioactive waste would be created. The authorities would then need to know how to regulate the waste so that the environmental impact would be as low as reasonably achievable when societal and economic factors having been accounted for (ALARA). Radioactive pollution from REE tailings could be a threat to the environment, biota and humans. However, naturally occurring thorium is practically not mobile nor bioavailable and has a relatively low specific activity and might therefore safely be deposited in a landfill. An environmental risk assessment should be used to evaluate if it is justifiable to deposit the radioactive tailings in a landfill or if alternative ways of handling, such as extraction of thorium in addition to extraction of REE from the ore, might be better. The risk assessment must start with a source term, the native carbonatite rocks, and an investigation on how the chemical properties of the rock changes when it's milled and treated with chemicals. Changes in the physical and chemical properties and changes in the environment where the processed rock are deposited might mobilize and/or make thorium bioavailable, thus increasing the environmental risk. Removal of thorium from the raw materials or tailings from the REE mining industry prior to deposition could be seen as one form of environmental protection with many benefits, for instance reducing the potential of external and internal radiation in biota and humans. We could also speculate about the

  8. Radioactive ion beam development in Berkeley

    CERN Document Server

    Wutte, D C; Leitner, M A; Xie, Z Q

    1999-01-01

    Two radioactive ion beam projects are under development at the 88" Cyclotron, BEARS (Berkeley Experiment with accelerated radioactive species) and the 14O experiment. The projects are initially focused on the production of 11C and 14O, but it is planned to expand the program to 17F, 18F, 13N and 76Kr. For the BEARS project, the radioactivity is produced in form of either CO2 or N2O in a small medical 10 MeV proton cyclotron. The activity is then transported through a 300 m long He-jet line to the 88" cyclotron building, injected into the AECR-U ion source and accelerated through the 88" cyclotron to energies between 1 to 30 MeV/ nucleon. The 14O experiment is a new experiment at the 88" cyclotron to measure the energy-shape of the beta decay spectrum. For this purpose, a target transfer line and a radioactive ion beam test stand has been constructed. The radioactivity is produced in form of CO in a hot carbon target with a 20 MeV 3He from the 88" Cyclotron. The activity diffuses through an 8m long stainless s...

  9. Radioactive waste management; Gerencia de rejeitos radioativos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-11-15

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan.

  10. Experimental evaluation of self-calibrating cavity radiometers for use in earth flux radiation balance measurements from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, J. R.; Karoli, A. R.; Alton, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    A method for evaluating out-of-field response of wide-field, earth-viewing satellite radiometers is described. The equipment which simulates the earth and space consists of a central blackbody surrounded by a cooled ring. The radiometric and orbital considerations are discussed. Some test results for prototype ERBE cavity sensors are included. This presentation is restricted to longwave radiative transfer

  11. Natural radiation and radioactivity in education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu [Kanazawa Univ., Takarazuka, Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    To understand radiation and radioactivity, it is important to recall the history of their investigation. At first, the works made by Elster and Geitel with a leaf electroscope about 100 years age are introduced. Then the variations of environmental radiation level are shown by the results obtained with a large volume NaI(Tl) detector on my car travelling all over Japan and the data with a pocket dosimeter during my tours in Europe. Among environmental radioactivity, radon and tritium are specially remarked from the historical and educational points of view, with various methods for their measurements. (author)

  12. Integration of Earth Observation Satellite Data and Real Time 137Cs Measurements in the Greek Marine Environment to GIS for Advances in Radiological Remote Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrokefalou, Georgia; Florou, Heleny; Sykioti, Olga; Parcharidis, Issaak

    2016-08-01

    In the present study an innovative tool is explored in terms of the radiological remote control. The levels of radionuclides in the marine environment, especially the soluble ones, are associated with other physical parameters. For this purpose, sea parameters such as sea surface temperature and ocean colour issued from satellite and field measurements have been utilized, in order to investigate potential relations with 137Cs activity concentrations. Such potential relations are expected to lead to an innovative tool based on remote sensing data and in situ 137Cs measurements for the remote radioactivity detection of the Greek marine ecosystem both for routine control and emergency recordings. Here, the first findings on the spatial correlations of 137Cs measurements with MODIS L3 ocean data in the Aegean Sea are presented, whereas temporal correlations of 137Cs measurements with MODIS L2 ocean and POSEIDON buoy data in Souda Bay area (Crete island) are also shown.

  13. Measurements of whole body and urine of the inhabitants of the neighbouring to the Radioactive Waste Storage Center (CADER); Mediciones de cuerpo entero y de orina de los habitantes de las poblaciones vecinas al CADER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro L, M.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1998-10-15

    The existence of the Center of Storage of Radioactive Wastes (CADER) in the Municipality of Temascalapa, Estado de Mexico has generated restlessness among the inhabitants from it installation. In March 1998, its appeared in diverse media, notes and reports attributing illnesses and sufferings to the CADER activities. In coordination with the health authorities of the Estado de Mexico and of the Municipality of Temascalapa, the doctors of the ININ assisted people that converged to the centers. For the above-mentioned, in the period understood among the months of May to September 1998, its were carried out measurements in 338 urine samples and 45 whole-body of voluntary people of the surroundings of the CADER. This document has the purpose of presenting the information on the carried out measurements. (Author)

  14. The IAEA radioactive waste safety standards programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourtellotte, James R.

    1995-12-31

    The IAEA is currently reviewing more than thirty publications in its Safety Series with a view toward consolidating and organizing information pertaining to radioactive waste. the effort is entitled Radioactive Waste Safety Standards programme (RADWASS). RADWASS is a significant undertaking and may have far reaching effects on radioactive waste management both in the international nuclear community and in individual nuclear States. This is because IAEA envisions the development of a consensus on the final document. In this circumstance, the product of RADWASS may ultimately be regarded as an international norm against which future actions of Member States may be measured. This program is organized in five subjects: planning, pre-disposal, disposal, uranium and thorium waste management and decommissioning, which has four levels: safety fundamentals, safety standards, safety guides and safety practices. (author).

  15. Development of a Radioactive Waste Assay System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Duck Won; Song, Myung Jae; Shin, Sang Woon; Sung, Kee Bang; Ko, Dae Hach [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Jeong; Park, Jong Mook; Jee, Kwang Yoong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear Act of Korea requires the manifest of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated at nuclear power plants prior to disposal sites.Individual history records of the radioactive waste should be contained the information about the activity of nuclides in the drum, total activity, weight, the type of waste. A fully automated nuclide analysis assay system, non-destructive analysis and evaluation system of the radioactive waste, was developed through this research project. For the nuclides that could not be analysis directly by MCA, the activities of the representative {gamma}-emitters(Cs-137, Co-60) contained in the drum were measured by using that system. Then scaling factors were used to calculate the activities of {alpha}, {beta}-emitters. Furthermore, this system can automatically mark the analysis results onto the drum surface. An automated drum handling system developed through this research project can reduce the radiation exposure to workers. (author). 41 refs., figs.

  16. Natural Radioactivity of Some Mongolian Building Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbish, S; Ganchimeg, G

    2000-01-01

    The natural radioactivity of some building materials used in cities of Darkhan, Ulaanbaatar and Erdenet in Mongolia was measured by gamma-ray spectrometry with HP-Ge-detector. The radium equivalent concentration and the gamma absorbed dose rate in air, were estimated as the external and internal hazard indices. The results indicate that these materials are not a major source of exposure.

  17. Radioactive ion beams in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialanella, L.

    2016-09-01

    Unstable nuclei play a crucial role in the Universe. In this lecture, after a short introduction to the field of Nuclear Astrophysics, few selected cases in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis are discussed to illustrate the importance and peculiarities of processes involving unstable species. Finally, some experimental techniques useful for measurements using radioactive ion beams and the perspectives in this field are presented.

  18. SHIPPING OF RADIOACTIVE ITEMS

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS/RP Group

    2001-01-01

    The TIS-RP group informs users that shipping of small radioactive items is normally guaranteed within 24 hours from the time the material is handed in at the TIS-RP service. This time is imposed by the necessary procedures (identification of the radionuclides, determination of dose rate, preparation of the package and related paperwork). Large and massive objects require a longer procedure and will therefore take longer.

  19. White sea radioactivity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, R.A. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics]|[Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Chemistry Dept.]|[Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Shirshov Inst. of Oceanology; Kalmykov, S.N.; Lisitzin, A.P. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Chemistry Dept.

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the present work is to estimate potential sources and chronology of pollution of the White Sea (Russia) by artificial radionuclides. White Sea is semi-closed water body connected with Barents Sea by a narrow strait. Thus, pollution of White Sea may be caused by highly polluted Barents waters and river (mainly Northern Dvina) run-off. This is the first detailed investigation of radioactivity of White Sea sediment records. (orig.)

  20. Measurements of natural carbonate rare earth elements in femtogram quantities by inductive coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chuan-Chou; Wu, Chung-Che; Liu, Yi; Yu, Jimin; Chang, Ching-Chih; Lam, Doan Dinh; Chou, Chien-Ju; Lo, Li; Wei, Kuo-Yen

    2011-09-01

    A rapid and precise standard-bracketing method has been developed for measuring femtogram quantity rare earth element (REE) levels in natural carbonate samples by inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry that does not require chemical separation steps. A desolvation nebulization system was used to effectively reduce polyatomic interference and enhance sensitivity. REE/Ca ratios are calculated directly from the intensities of the ion beams of (46)Ca, (139)La, (140)Ce, (141)Pr, (146)Nd, (147)Sm, (153)Eu, (160)Gd, (159)Tb, (163)Dy, (165)Ho, (166)Er, (169)Tm, (172)Yb, and (175)Lu using external matrix-matched synthetic standards to correct for instrumental ratio drifting and mass discrimination. A routine measurement time of 3 min is typical for one sample containing 20-40 ppm Ca. Replicate measurements made on natural coral and foraminiferal samples with REE/Ca ratios of 2-242 nmol/mol show that external precisions of 1.9-6.5% (2 RSD) can be achieved with only 10-1000 fg of REEs in 10-20 μg of carbonate. We show that different sources for monthly resolved coral ultratrace REE variability can be distinguished using this method. For natural slow growth-rate carbonate materials, such as sclerosponges, tufa, and speleothems, the high sample throughput, high precision, and high temporal resolution REE records that can be produced with this procedure have the potential to provide valuable time-series records to advance our understanding of paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental dynamics on different time scales.