WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth observation satellites

  1. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  2. Landsat—Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-11-25

    Since 1972, Landsat satellites have continuously acquired space-based images of the Earth’s land surface, providing data that serve as valuable resources for land use/land change research. The data are useful to a number of applications including forestry, agriculture, geology, regional planning, and education. Landsat is a joint effort of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA develops remote sensing instruments and the spacecraft, then launches and validates the performance of the instruments and satellites. The USGS then assumes ownership and operation of the satellites, in addition to managing all ground reception, data archiving, product generation, and data distribution. The result of this program is an unprecedented continuing record of natural and human-induced changes on the global landscape.

  3. Operational evapotranspiration based on Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellens-Meulenberghs, Françoise; Ghilain, Nicolas; Arboleda, Alirio; Barrios, Jose-Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Geostationary satellites have the potential to follow fast evolving atmospheric and Earth surface phenomena such those related to cloud cover evolution and diurnal cycle. Since about 15 years, EUMETSAT has set up a network named 'Satellite Application Facility' (SAF, http://www.eumetsat.int/website/home/Satellites/GroundSegment/Safs/index.html) to complement its ground segment. The Land Surface Analysis (LSA) SAF (http://landsaf.meteo.pt/) is devoted to the development of operational products derived from the European meteorological satellites. In particular, an evapotranspiration (ET) product has been developed by the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium. Instantaneous and daily integrated results are produced in near real time and are freely available respectively since the end of 2009 and 2010. The products cover Europe, Africa and the Eastern part of South America with the spatial resolution of the SEVIRI sensor on-board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites. The ET product algorithm (Ghilain et al., 2011) is based on a simplified Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme, forced with MSG derived radiative products (LSA SAF short and longwave surface fluxes, albedo). It has been extensively validated against in-situ validation data, mainly FLUXNET observations, demonstrating its good performances except in some arid or semi-arid areas. Research has then been pursued to develop an improved version for those areas. Solutions have been found in reviewing some of the model parameterizations and in assimilating additional satellite products (mainly vegetation indices and land surface temperature) into the model. The ET products will be complemented with related latent and sensible heat fluxes, to allow the monitoring of land surface energy partitioning. The new algorithm version should be tested in the LSA-SAF operational computer system in 2016 and results should become accessible to beta-users/regular users by the end of 2016/early 2017. In

  4. Earth Observation Satellites Scheduling Based on Decomposition Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A decomposition-based optimization algorithm was proposed for solving Earth Observation Satellites scheduling problem. The problem was decomposed into task assignment main problem and single satellite scheduling sub-problem. In task assignment phase, the tasks were allocated to the satellites, and each satellite would schedule the task respectively in single satellite scheduling phase. We adopted an adaptive ant colony optimization algorithm to search the optimal task assignment scheme. Adaptive parameter adjusting strategy and pheromone trail smoothing strategy were introduced to balance the exploration and the exploitation of search process. A heuristic algorithm and a very fast simulated annealing algorithm were proposed to solve the single satellite scheduling problem. The task assignment scheme was valued by integrating the observation scheduling result of multiple satellites. The result was responded to the ant colony optimization algorithm, which can guide the search process of ant colony optimization. Computation results showed that the approach was effective to the satellites observation scheduling problem.

  5. Building Flexible Download Plans for Agile Earth-Observing Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Maillard, A.; Verfaillie, G.; Pralet, C.; J. Jaubert; Desmousceaux, T.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We consider the problem of downloading observa-tions for a next-generation agile Earth-observing satellite. The goal is to schedule file downloads during ground re-ception station visibility windows while minimizing infor-mation age and promoting the fair sharing of the satellite between users. It is a complex scheduling problem with constraints ranging from unsharable resources to time-dependent processing times. Usually, planning and sche-duling are done on the groun...

  6. Planning and Scheduling for Fleets of Earth Observing Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy; Jonsson, Ari; Morris, Robert; Smith, David E.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We address the problem of scheduling observations for a collection of earth observing satellites. This scheduling task is a difficult optimization problem, potentially involving many satellites, hundreds of requests, constraints on when and how to service each request, and resources such as instruments, recording devices, transmitters, and ground stations. High-fidelity models are required to ensure the validity of schedules; at the same time, the size and complexity of the problem makes it unlikely that systematic optimization search methods will be able to solve them in a reasonable time. This paper presents a constraint-based approach to solving the Earth Observing Satellites (EOS) scheduling problem, and proposes a stochastic heuristic search method for solving it.

  7. Model of load distribution for earth observation satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Shumin; Du, Min; Li, Wei

    2017-03-01

    For the system of multiple types of EOS (Earth Observing Satellites), it is a vital issue to assure that each type of payloads carried by the group of EOS can be used efficiently and reasonably for in astronautics fields. Currently, most of researches on configuration of satellite and payloads focus on the scheduling for launched satellites. However, the assignments of payloads for un-launched satellites are bit researched, which are the same crucial as the scheduling of tasks. Moreover, the current models of satellite resources scheduling lack of more general characteristics. Referring the idea about roles-based access control (RBAC) of information system, this paper brings forward a model based on role-mining of RBAC to improve the generality and foresight of the method of assignments of satellite-payload. By this way, the assignment of satellite-payload can be mapped onto the problem of role-mining. A novel method will be introduced, based on the idea of biclique-combination in graph theory and evolutionary algorithm in intelligence computing, to address the role-mining problem of satellite-payload assignments. The simulation experiments are performed to verify the novel method. Finally, the work of this paper is concluded.

  8. Earth Observing Satellite Orbit Design Via Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Earth Observing Satellite Orbit Design Via Particle Swarm Optimization Sharon Vtipil ∗ and John G. Warner ∗ US Naval Research Laboratory, Washington...number of passes per day given a satellite’s orbital altitude and inclination. These are used along with particle swarm optimization to determine optimal...well suited to use within a meta-heuristic optimization method such as the Particle Swarm Optimizer (PSO). This method seeks to find the optimal set

  9. Use of Earth Observing Satellites for Operational Hazard Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) relies on Earth observing satellite data to carry out its operational mission to monitor, predict, and assess changes in the Earth's atmosphere, land, and oceans. NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) uses satellite data to help lessen the impacts of natural and man-made disasters due to tropical cyclones, flash floods, heavy snowstorms, volcanic ash clouds (for aviation safety), sea ice (for shipping safety), and harmful algal blooms. Communications systems on NOAA satellites are used to support search and rescue and to relay data from data collection platforms to a variety of users. NOAA's Geostationary (GOES) and Polar (POES) Operational Environmental Satellites are used in conjunction with other satellites to support NOAA's operational mission. While NOAA's National Hurricane Center is responsible for predicting tropical cyclones affecting the U.S. mainland, NESDIS continuously monitors the tropics world wide, relaying valuable satellite interpretations of tropical systems strength and position to users throughout the world. Text messages are sent every six hours for tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific, South Pacific, and Indian Oceans. To support the monitoring, prediction, and assessment of flash floods and winter storms, NESDIS sends out text messages alerting U.S. weather forecast offices whenever NOAA satellite imagery indicates the occurrence of heavy rain or snow. NESDIS also produces a 24-hour rainfall composite graphic image covering those areas affected by heavy precipitation. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and other aviation concerns recognized the need to keep aviators informed of volcanic hazards. To that end, nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC's) were created to monitor volcanic ash plumes within their assigned airspace. NESDIS hosts one of the VAAC's. Although the NESDIS VAAC's primary responsibility is the

  10. X-band 22W SSPA for earth observation satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Zoyo, M.; Cartier, N.; Touchais, J.Y.; Maynadier, P.; Midan, E.; Sgard, P.; Buret, H.; Peschoud, M.

    1999-01-01

    An X-band high power Solid-State Power Amplifier (SSPA) using power HFET chip devices has been successfully developed for the earth observation satellite payload of the SPOT 5 program. The use of MMIC chips for the low power section allows to decrease significantly the mass and the size of this equipment and to reduce the production cycle due to the reduced tuning effort. The hybrid technology is used in the driver module and the power level section because it is attractive in terms of power ...

  11. Al Gore attends Fall Meeting session on Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    2011-12-01

    Former U.S. vice president Al Gore, making unscheduled remarks at an AGU Fall Meeting session, said, "The reason you see so many pictures" of the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite at this session is "that it already has been built." However, "because one of its primary missions was to help document global warming, it was canceled. So for those who are interested in struggling against political influence," Gore said, "the benefits have been documented well here." Gore made his comments after the third oral presentation at the 8 December session entitled "Earth Observations From the L1 (Lagrangian Point No. 1)," which focused on the capabilities of and progress on refurbishing DSCOVR. The satellite, formerly called Triana, had been proposed by Gore in 1998 to collect climate data. Although Triana was built, it was never launched: Congress mandated that before the satellite could be sent into space the National Academies of Science needed to confirm that the science it would be doing was worthwhile. By the time the scientific validation was complete, the satellite "was no longer compatible with the space shuttle manifest," Robert C. Smith, program manager for strategic integration at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, told Eos.

  12. Mapping of satellite Earth observations using moving window block kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, J. M.; Qiu, X.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    Global gridded maps (a.k.a. Level 3 products) of Earth system properties observed by satellites are central to understanding the spatiotemporal variability of these properties. They also typically serve either as inputs into biogeochemical models or as independent data for evaluating such models. Spatial binning is a common method for generating contiguous maps, but this approach results in a loss of information, especially when the measurement noise is low relative to the degree of spatiotemporal variability. Such "binned" fields typically also lack a quantitative measure of uncertainty. Geostatistical mapping has previously been shown to make higher spatiotemporal resolution maps possible, and also provides a measure uncertainty associated with the gridded products. This study proposes a flexible moving window block kriging method that can be used as a tool for creating high spatiotemporal resolution maps from satellite data. It relies only on the assumption that the observed physical quantity exhibits spatial correlation that can be inferred from the observations. The method has several innovations relative to previously applied methods: (1) it provides flexibility in the spatial resolution of the contiguous maps, (2) it is applicable for physical quantities with varying spatiotemporal coverage (i.e., density of measurements) by utilizing a more general and versatile data sampling approach, and (3) it provides rigorous assessments of the uncertainty associated with the gridded products. The method is demonstrated by creating Level 3 products from observations of column-integrated carbon dioxide (XCO2) from the GOSAT (Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite) satellite, and solar induced fluorescence (SIF) from the GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2) instrument.

  13. Mapping of satellite Earth observations using moving window block kriging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Tadić

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Global gridded maps (a.k.a. Level 3 products of Earth system properties observed by satellites are central to understanding the spatiotemporal variability of these properties. They also typically serve either as inputs into biogeochemical models, or as independent data for evaluating such models. Spatial binning is a common method for generating contiguous maps, but this approach results in a loss of information, especially when the measurement noise is low relative to the degree of spatiotemporal variability. Such "binned" fields typically also lack a quantitative measure of uncertainty. Geostatistical mapping has previously been shown to make higher spatiotemporal resolution maps possible, and also provides a measure of the uncertainty associated with the gridded products. This study proposes a flexible moving window block kriging method that can be used as a tool for creating high spatiotemporal resolution maps from satellite data. It relies only on the assumption that the observed physical quantity exhibits spatial correlation that can be inferred from the observations. The method has several innovations relative to previously applied methods: (1 it provides flexibility in the spatial resolution of the contiguous maps (2 it is applicable for physical quantities with varying spatiotemporal coverage (i.e., density of measurements by utilizing a more general and versatile data sampling approach, and (3 it provides rigorous assessments of the uncertainty associated with the gridded products. The method is demonstrated by creating Level 3 products from observations of column-integrated carbon dioxide (XCO2 from the GOSAT satellite, and solar induced fluorescence (SIF from the GOME-2 instrument.

  14. Co-ordination of satellite and data programs: The committee on earth observation satellites' approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, B. J. J.; Kingwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Every year, an average of eight new civilian remote sensing satellite missions are launched. Cumulatively, over 250 such missions, each with a cost equivalent in current value to between US 100 million to US 1000 million, have been sponsored by space agencies in perhaps two dozen countries. These missions produce data and information products which are vital for informed decision making all over the world, on matters relating to natural resource exploitation, health and safety, sustainable national development, infrastructure planning, and a host of other applications. By contributing to better scientific understanding of global changes in the atmosphere, land surface, oceans and ice caps, these silently orbiting sentinels in the sky make it possible for governments and industries to make wiser environmental policy decisions and support the economic development needs of humanity. The international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is the premier world body for co-ordinating and planning civilian satellite missions for Earth observation. Through its technical working groups and special task teams, it endeavours to: • maximise the international benefits from Earth observation satellites; and • harmonise practice in calibration, validation, data management and information systems for Earth observation. CEOS encompasses not only space agencies (data providers), but also the great international scientific and operational programs which rely on Earth science data from space. The user organisations affiliated with CEOS, together with the mission operators, attempt to reconcile user needs with the complex set of considerations — including national interests, cost, schedule — which affect the undertaking of space missions. Without such an internationally co-ordinated consensual approach, there is a much greater risk of waste through duplication, and of missed opportunity, or through the absence of measurements of some vital physical or biological

  15. Small Earth Observing Satellites Flying with Large Satellites in the A-Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Loverro, Adam; Case, Warren F.; Queruel, Nadege; Marechal, Chistophe; Barroso, Therese

    2009-01-01

    This paper/poster presents a real-life example of the benefits of flying small satellites with other satellites, large or small, and vice versa. Typically, most small satellites fly payloads consisting of one or two instruments and fly in orbits that are independent from that of other satellites. The science data from these satellites are either used in isolation or correlated with instrument data from other satellites. Data correlation with other satellites is greatly improved when the measurements of the same point or air mass are taken at approximately the same time. Scientists worldwide are beginning to take advantage of the opportunities for improved data correlation, or coincidental science, offered by the international Earth Observing Constellation known as the A-Train (sometimes referred to as the Afternoon Constellation). Most of the A-Train satellites are small - the A-Train is anchored by two large NASA satellites (EOS-Aqua and EOS-Aura), but consists also of 5 small satellites (CloudSat, CALIPSO, PARASOL, OCO and Glory these last two will join in 2009). By flying in a constellation, each mission benefits from coincidental observations from instruments on the other satellites in the constellation. Essentially, from a data point of view, the A-Train can be envisioned as a single, virtual science platform with multiple instruments. Satellites in the A-Train fly at 705 km in sun-synchronous orbits. Their mean local times at the equator are within seconds to a few minutes of each other. This paper describes the challenges of operating an international constellation of independent satellites from the U.S. and Europe to maximize the coincidental science opportunities while at the same time minimizing the level of operational interactions required between team members. The A-Train mission teams have been able to demonstrate that flying as members of an international constellation does not take away the flexibility to accommodate new requirements. Specific

  16. DETERMINATION OF THE EARTH’S GEOID BY SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determinations of the geoid made by different authors have differed by more than forty meters in some geographic locations. The authors differed in...conducted with Doppler observations on satellites have shown moderate variations (rarely as much as 30 meters) in the geoid determined if the number of...satellite orbital inclinations employed is reduced by one. Reduction of the number of gravity parameters used to represent the geoid also resulted in

  17. Present status and future plans of the Japanese earth observation satellite program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Kiyoshi; Arai, Kohei; Igarashi, Tamotsu

    Japan is now operating 3 earth observation satellites, i. e. MOS-1 (Marine Observation Satellite-1, Momo-1 in Japanese), EGS (Experimental Geodetic Satellite, Ajisai in Japanese) and GMS (Geostationary Meteorological Satellite, Himawari in Japanese). MOS-1 has 3 different sensors, MESSR (Multispectral Electronic Self Scanning Radiometer), VTIR (Visible and Thermal Infrared Radiometer) and MSR (Microwave Scanning Radiometer) in addition to DCS (Data Collection System). GMS has two sensors, VISSR (Visible and IR Spin Scan Radiometer) and SEM (Solar Environmental Monitor). EGS is equipped with reflecting mirrors of the sun light and laser reflecters. For the future earth observation satellites, ERS-1 (Earth Resources Satellite-1), MOS-1b, ADEOS (Advanced Earth Observing Satellite) are under development. Two sensors, AMSR (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer) and ITIR (Intermediate Thermal IR Radiometer) for NASA's polar platform are initial stage of development. Study and planning are made for future earth observation satellites including Japanese polor platform, TRMM, etc.). The study for the second generation GMS has been made by the Committee on the Function of Future GMS under the request of Japan Meteorological Agency in FY 1987.

  18. Spaceborne observations of a changing Earth - Contribution from ESÁ s operating and approved satellite missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    The overall vision for ESÁs Earth Observation activities is to play a central role in developing the global capability to understand planet Earth, predict changes, and mitigate negative effects of global change on its populations. Since Earth observation from space first became possible more than forty years ago, it has become central to monitoring and understanding how the dynamics of the Earth System work. The greatest progress has been in meteorology, where space-based observations have become indispensable, but it is now also progressively penetrating many of the fields making up Earth sciences. Exploiting Earth observation from space presents major multidisciplinary challenges to the researches working in the Earth sciences, to the technologists who build the state-of-the-art sensors, and to the scientists interpreting measurements made of processes occurring on or within the Earth's surface and in its atmosphere. The scientific community has shown considerable imagination in rising to these challenges, and in exploiting the latest technological developments to measure from space the complex processes and interactions that occur in the Earth System. In parallel, there has been significant progress in developing computer models that represent the many processes that make up the Earth System, and the interactions and feedback between them. Success in developing this holistic view is inextricably linked to the data provided by Earth Observation systems. Satellites provide the fundamental, consistent, regular and global measurements needed to drive, parameterise, test and improve those Earth System models. These developments, together with changes in society's awareness of the need for information on a changing world, have repetitively supported the decisions on how ESA can best focus its resources, and those of the European community that it serves, in order to address critical issues in Earth System science. Moreover, it is a fact that many operational

  19. Satellite Earth observation data to identify anthropogenic pressures in selected protected areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagendra, H.; Mairota, P.; Marangi, C.; Lucas, R.; Dimopoulos, P.; Honrado, J.P.; Niphadkara, M.; Mücher, C.A.; Tomaselli, V.; Panitsa, M.; Tarantino, C.; Manakos, I.; Blonda, P.

    2015-01-01

    Protected areas are experiencing increased levels of human pressure. To enable appropriate conservation action, it is critical to map and monitor changes in the type and extent of land cover/use and habitat classes, which can be related to human pressures over time. Satellite Earth observation (EO)

  20. High resolution earth observation satellites and services in the next decade a European perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Gunter; Dech, Stefan

    2005-07-01

    Projects to use very high resolution optical satellite sensor data started in the late 90s and are believed to be the major driver for the commercialisation of earth observation. The global political security situation and updated legislative frameworks created new opportunities for high resolution, dual use satellite systems. In addition to new optical sensors, very high resolution synthetic aperture radars will become in the next few years an important component in the imaging satellite fleet. The paper will review the development in this domain so far, and give perspectives on future emerging markets and opportunities. With dual-use satellite initiatives and new political frameworks agreed between the European Commission and the European Space Agency (ESA), the European market becomes very attractive for both service suppliers and customers. The political focus on "Global Monitoring for Environment and Security" (GMES) and the "European Defence and Security Policy" drive and amplify this demand which ranges from low resolution climate monitoring to very high resolution reconnaissance tasks. In order to create an operational and sustainable GMES in Europe by 2007, the European infrastructure need to be adapted and extended. This includes the ESA SENTINEL and OXYGEN programmes, aiming for a fleet of earth observation satellites and an open and operational earth observation ground segment. The harmonisation of national and regional geographic information is driven by the European Commission's INSPIRE programme. The necessary satellite capacity to complement existing systems in the delivery of space based data required for GMES is currently under definition. Embedded in a market with global competition and in the global political framework of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, European companies, agencies and research institutions are now contributing to this joint undertaking. The paper addresses the chances, risks and options for the future.

  1. Satellite Earth observation data to identify climate and anthropogenic pressures on Bucharest periurban forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoran, Maria; Savastru, Roxana; Savastru, Dan [National Institute of R& D for Optoelectronics, MG5 Bucharest-Magurele, 077125 Romania (Romania); Dida, Adrian [University Transylvania of Brasov, Brasov (Romania)

    2016-03-25

    Satellite Earth observation data in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) wavelengths represent a useful source of information for forest systems monitoring through derived biogeophysical parameters (vegetation index, leaf area index, canopy cover, fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, chlorophyll content, net primary production, canopy water stress, etc.). Use of satellite remote sensing data to assess forest spatio-temporal changes due to climatic or anthropogenic stressors is an excellent example of the value of multispectral and multitemporal observations. Fusion technique was applied to time-series multispectral and multitemporal satellite imagery (NOAA AVHRR, MODIS Terra/Aqua, Landsat ETM and IKONOS satellite data) for periurban forest areas Cernica-Branesti, placed in the neighboring of Bucharest town, Romania, over 2002-2014 period.

  2. Significant results from using earth observation satellites for mineral and energy resource exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, William D.

    1981-01-01

    A large number of Earth-observation satellites orbit our world several times each day, providing new information about the land and sea surfaces and the overlying thin layer of atmosphere that makes our planet unique. Meteorological satellites have had the longest history of experimental use and most are now considered operational. The geologic information collected by the Landsat, Polar Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (POGO), Magsat, Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) and Seasat land and ocean observation systems is being thoroughly tested, and some of these systems are now approaching operational use.

  3. Constellation design for earth observation based on the characteristics of the satellite ground track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xin; Wang, Maocai; Dai, Guangming; Song, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    This paper responds to the increasing need for Earth observation missions and deals with the design of Repeating Sun-Synchronous Constellations (RSSCs) which takes into consideration of constellations composed of one or more orbital planes. Based on the mature design approach of Repeating Sun-synchronous orbits, a novel technique to design RSSCs is presented, which takes the second gravitational zonal harmonic into consideration. In order to obtain regular cycles of observation of the Earth by a single satellite, the orbital relationships have to be satisfied firstly are illustrated. Then, by making full analyses of the characteristics of the satellite ground track, orbital parameters are properly calculated to make other satellites pass on the same or different ground track of the single satellite. Last, single-plane or multi-plane constellations are used to improve the repetitions of the observation and the ground resolution. RSSCs allow observing the same region once at the same local time in a solar day and several times at the different local time in a solar day. Therefore, this kind of constellations meets all requirements for the remote sensing applications, which need to observe the same region under the same or different visible conditions. Through various case studies, the calculation technique is successfully demonstrated.

  4. High-resolution sensing for precision agriculture: from Earth-observing satellites to unmanned aerial vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    McCabe, Matthew

    2016-10-25

    With global population projected to approach 9 billion by 2050, it has been estimated that a 40% increase in cereal production will be required to satisfy the worlds growing nutritional demands. Any such increases in agricultural productivity are likely to occur within a system that has limited room for growth and in a world with a climate that is different from that of today. Fundamental to achieving food and water security, is the capacity to monitor the health and condition of agricultural systems. While space-Agency based satellites have provided the backbone for earth observation over the last few decades, many developments in the field of high-resolution earth observation have been advanced by the commercial sector. These advances relate not just to technological developments in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), but also the advent of nano-satellite constellations that offer a radical shift in the way earth observations are now being retrieved. Such technologies present opportunities for improving our description of the water, energy and carbon cycles. Efforts towards developing new observational techniques and interpretative frameworks are required to provide the tools and information needed to improve the management and security of agricultural and related sectors. These developments are one of the surest ways to better manage, protect and preserve national food and water resources. Here we review the capabilities of recently deployed satellite systems and UAVs and examine their potential for application in precision agriculture.

  5. High-resolution sensing for precision agriculture: from Earth-observing satellites to unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Matthew F.; Houborg, Rasmus; Lucieer, Arko

    2016-10-01

    With global population projected to approach 9 billion by 2050, it has been estimated that a 40% increase in cereal production will be required to satisfy the worlds growing nutritional demands. Any such increases in agricultural productivity are likely to occur within a system that has limited room for growth and in a world with a climate that is different from that of today. Fundamental to achieving food and water security, is the capacity to monitor the health and condition of agricultural systems. While space-agency based satellites have provided the backbone for earth observation over the last few decades, many developments in the field of high-resolution earth observation have been advanced by the commercial sector. These advances relate not just to technological developments in the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), but also the advent of nano-satellite constellations that offer a radical shift in the way earth observations are now being retrieved. Such technologies present opportunities for improving our description of the water, energy and carbon cycles. Efforts towards developing new observational techniques and interpretative frameworks are required to provide the tools and information needed to improve the management and security of agricultural and related sectors. These developments are one of the surest ways to better manage, protect and preserve national food and water resources. Here we review the capabilities of recently deployed satellite systems and UAVs and examine their potential for application in precision agriculture.

  6. Implementing earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders for water resource and climate modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegh, E.; Dellwik, Ebba; Hahmann, Andrea N.;

    This paper discusses preliminary remote sensing (MODIS) based hydrological modelling results for the Danish island Sjælland (7330 km2) in relation to project objectives and methodologies of a new research project “Implementing Earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders...... for effective land surface representation in water resource modeling” (2009- 2012). The purpose of the new research project is to develop remote sensing based model tools capable of quantifying the relative effects of site-specific land use change and climate variability at different spatial scales....... For this purpose, a) internal catchment processes will be studied using a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system, b) Earth observations will be used to upscale from field to regional scales, and c) at the largest scale, satellite based atmospheric sounders and meso-scale climate modelling will be used...

  7. Remote Sensing Education and Development Countries: Multilateral Efforts through the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Leslie Bermann

    1998-01-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) is an international organization which coordinates space-based Earth observations world wide. Created in 1984, CEOS now comprises 38 national space agencies, regional organizations and international space-related and research groups. The aim of CEOS is to achieve international coordination in the planning of satellite missions for Earth observation and to maximize the utilization of data from these missions world-wide. With regard to developing countries, the fundamental aim of CEOS is to encourage the creation and maintenance of indigenous capability that is integrated into the local decision-making process, thereby enabling developing countries to obtain the maximum benefit from Earth observation. Obtaining adequate access to remote sensing information is difficult for developing countries and students and teachers alike. High unit data prices, the specialized nature of the technology , difficulty in locating specific data, complexities of copyright provisions, the emphasis on "leading edge" technology and research, and the lack of training materials relating to readily understood application are frequently noted obstacles. CEOS has developed an education CD-ROM which is aimed at increasing the integration of space-based data into school curricula, meeting the heretofore unsatisfied needs of developing countries for information about Earth observation application, data sources and future plans; and raising awareness around the world of the value of Earth observation data from space. The CD-ROM is designed to be used with an Internet web browser, increasing the information available to the user, but it can also be used on a stand-alone machine. It contains suggested lesson plans and additional resources for educators and users in developing countries.

  8. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ze

    2017-02-23

    This article investigates the dynamic topology control problemof satellite cluster networks (SCNs) in Earth observation (EO) missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs). The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites' relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT) strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime.

  9. Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Trigo, Isabel F.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2017-04-01

    The land surface forms an essential part of the climate system. It interacts with the atmosphere through the exchange of water and energy and hence influences weather and climate, as well as their predictability. Correspondingly, the land surface model (LSM) is an essential part of any weather forecasting system. LSMs rely on partly poorly constrained parameters, due to sparse land surface observations. With the use of newly available land surface temperature observations, we show in this study that novel satellite-derived datasets help to improve LSM configuration, and hence can contribute to improved weather predictability. We use the Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) and validate it comprehensively against an array of Earth observation reference datasets, including the new land surface temperature product. This reveals satisfactory model performance in terms of hydrology, but poor performance in terms of land surface temperature. This is due to inconsistencies of process representations in the model as identified from an analysis of perturbed parameter simulations. We show that HTESSEL can be more robustly calibrated with multiple instead of single reference datasets as this mitigates the impact of the structural inconsistencies. Finally, performing coupled global weather forecasts we find that a more robust calibration of HTESSEL also contributes to improved weather forecast skills. In summary, new satellite-based Earth observations are shown to enhance the multi-dataset calibration of LSMs, thereby improving the representation of insufficiently captured processes, advancing weather predictability and understanding of climate system feedbacks. Orth, R., E. Dutra, I. F. Trigo, and G. Balsamo (2016): Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., doi:10.5194/hess-2016-628

  10. Imaging-Duration Embedded Dynamic Scheduling of Earth Observation Satellites for Emergent Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Niu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present novel two-stage dynamic scheduling of earth observation satellites to provide emergency response by making full use of the duration of the imaging task execution. In the first stage, the multiobjective genetic algorithm NSGA-II is used to produce an optimal satellite imaging schedule schema, which is robust to dynamic adjustment as possible emergent events occur in the future. In the second stage, when certain emergent events do occur, a dynamic adjusting heuristic algorithm (CTM-DAHA is applied to arrange new tasks into the robust imaging schedule. Different from the existing dynamic scheduling methods, the imaging duration is embedded in the two stages to make full use of current satellite resources. In the stage of robust satellite scheduling, total task execution time is used as a robust indicator to obtain a satellite schedule with less imaging time. In other words, more imaging time is preserved for future emergent events. In the stage of dynamic adjustment, a compact task merging strategy is applied to combine both of existing tasks and emergency tasks into a composite task with least imaging time. Simulated experiments indicate that the proposed method can produce a more robust and effective satellite imaging schedule.

  11. Signals of Opportunity Earth Reflectometry (SoOp-ER): Enabling new microwave observations from small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, J. L.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Shah, R.; Lin, Y. C.; Du Toit, C. F.; Vega, M. A.; Knuble, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Several recent experiments have demonstrated remote sensing by reutilizing communication satellite transmissions as sources in a bistatic radar configuration. This technique, referred to as "Signals of Opportunity Earth Reflectometry" (SoOp-ER), combines aspects of passive radiometry, active scatterometry and radar altimetry, but is essentially a new and alternative approach to microwave remote sensing. Reflectometry was first demonstrated with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals, enabled by their use of pseudorandom noise (PRN) codes for ranging. Two decades of research in GNSS reflectometry has culminated in the upcoming launches of several satellite missions within the next few years (TechDemoSat-1, CYGNSS, and GEROS-ISS). GNSS signals, however, have low power and are confined to a few L-band frequencies allocated to radionavigation. Communication satellites, in contrast, transmit in nearly all bands penetrating the Earth's atmosphere at very high radiated powers to assure a low bit-error-rate. High transmission power and a forward scatter geometry result in a very high signal to noise ratio at the receiver. Surface resolution is determined by the signal bandwidth, not the antenna beam. In many applications, this will allow small, low gain antennas to be used to make scientifically useful measurements. These features indicate that SoOp-ER instruments would be an ideal technology for microwave remote sensing from small platforms. SoOp-ER observations are referenced at the specular point and a constellation of small satellites, evenly spaced in the same orbit, would provide global coverage through parallel specular point ground tracks. This presentation will summarize the current instrument development work by the authors on three different application of SoOp-ER: P-band (230-270 MHz) sensing of root-zone soil moisture (RZSM), S-band sensing of ocean winds and Ku/Ka-band altimetry. Potential mission scenarios using small satellite constellations

  12. Establishing the Antarctic Dome C community reference standard site towards consistent measurements from Earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, C.; Uprety, S.; Xiong, J.; Wu, A.; Jing, P.; Smith, D.; Chander, G.; Fox, N.; Ungar, S.

    2010-01-01

    Establishing satellite measurement consistency by using common desert sites has become increasingly more important not only for climate change detection but also for quantitative retrievals of geophysical variables in satellite applications. Using the Antarctic Dome C site (75°06′S, 123°21′E, elevation 3.2 km) for satellite radiometric calibration and validation (Cal/Val) is of great interest owing to its unique location and characteristics. The site surface is covered with uniformly distributed permanent snow, and the atmospheric effect is small and relatively constant. In this study, the long-term stability and spectral characteristics of this site are evaluated using well-calibrated satellite instruments such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Preliminary results show that despite a few limitations, the site in general is stable in the long term, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model works well, and the site is most suitable for the Cal/Val of reflective solar bands in the 0.4–1.0 µm range. It was found that for the past decade, the reflectivity change of the site is within 1.35% at 0.64 µm, and interannual variability is within 2%. The site is able to resolve calibration biases between instruments at a level of ~1%. The usefulness of the site is demonstrated by comparing observations from seven satellite instruments involving four space agencies, including OrbView-2–SeaWiFS, Terra–Aqua MODIS, Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) – Hyperion, Meteorological Operational satellite programme (MetOp) – Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Envisat Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) – dvanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR), and Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+). Dome C is a promising candidate site for climate quality calibration of satellite radiometers towards more consistent satellite measurements, as part

  13. Improving the Transition of Earth Satellite Observations from Research to Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven J.; Lapenta, William M.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2004-01-01

    There are significant gaps between the observations, models, and decision support tools that make use of new data. These challenges include: 1) Decreasing the time to incorporate new satellite data into operational forecast assimilation systems, 2) Blending in-situ and satellite observing systems to produce the most accurate and comprehensive data products and assessments, 3) Accelerating the transition from research to applications through national test beds, field campaigns, and pilot demonstrations, and 4) Developing the partnerships and organizational structures to effectively transition new technology into operations. At the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPORT) Center in Huntsville, Alabama, a NASA-NOAA-University collaboration has been developed to accelerate the infusion of NASA Earth science observations, data assimilation and modeling research into NWS forecast operations and decision-making. The SPoRT Center research focus is to improve forecasts through new observation capability and the regional prediction objectives of the US Weather Research Program dealing with 0-1 day forecast issues such as convective initiation and 24-hr quantitative precipitation forecasting. The near real-time availability of high-resolution experimental products of the atmosphere, land, and ocean from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), the Advanced Infrared Spectroradiometer (AIRS), and lightning mapping systems provide an opportunity for science and algorithm risk reduction, and for application assessment prior to planned observations from the next generation of operational low Earth orbiting and geostationary Earth orbiting satellites. This paper describes the process for the transition of experimental products into forecast operations, current products undergoing assessment by forecasters, and plans for the future. The SPoRT Web page is at (http://www.ghcc.msfc.nasa.gov/sport).

  14. Precise Ground-In-the-Loop Orbit Control for Low Earth Observation Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbinger, C.; D'Amico, S.; Eineder, M.

    The growing interest in earth observation missions equipped with space-borne optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors drives the accuracy requirements with respect to orbit determination and control. Especially SAR interferometry with its capability to resolve the velocity of on-ground objects (e.g. for traffic monitoring, ocean currents and glacier monitoring) and to determine highly precise digital elevation models is of significant interest for scientific applications. These goals may be achieved using along-track and repeat-pass interferometry with a satellite formation, based on the precise orbit control of one satellite with respect to the osculating trajectory of the second satellite. Such a control concept will be realized by the German TerraSAR-X mission, with an expected launch in 2006, using a virtual formation, where a single satellite will be controlled in a tight manner with respect to a predefined osculating reference trajectory. This is very challenging, since common orbit disturbances, like for close twin formations, do not cancel out in this scenario. The predefined trajectory in the TerraSAR-X case could also be the orbit of a second satellite. The paper describes the generation of such a virtual reference orbit, discusses the ground-in-the-loop control concept and presents results from a long-term simulation.

  15. Low-Thrust Transfer Design of Low-Observable Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Hua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With radar and surface-to-air missiles posing an increasing threat to on-orbit spacecraft, low-observable satellites play an important role in low-thrust transfers. This paper presents the design for a low-thrust geostationary earth orbit (GEO transfer control strategy which takes into consideration the low-observable constraint and discusses Earth shadow and perturbation. A control parameter optimization addresses the orbit transfer problem, and five thrust modes are used. Simulation results show that the method outlined in this paper is simple and feasible and results in reduced transfer time with a small amount of calculation. The method therefore offers a useful reference for low-thrust GEO transfer design.

  16. NASA Perspectives on Earth Observations from Satellite or 50 Years of Meteorological Satellite Experiments-The NASA Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einaudi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    The NASA was established in 1959. From those very eady days to the present NASA has been intimately involved with NOAA and the scientific community in the development and operation of satellite and sensor experiments. The early efforts included experiments on the TIROS and geostationary Applications Technology Satellites (ATS) series. In the latter case the spin-scan cameras conceived by Verner Suomi, along with the TIROS cameras, opened new vistas at what could be done in meteorological studies with the daily, nearly global, synoptic views from space-borne sensors As the years passed and the Nimbus series of satellites came into being in the 1960's, more quantitative observations with longer-lifetime, increasingly capable, better calibrated instruments came into being. NASA, in collaboration with and in support of NOAA, implemented operational systems that we now know as the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) series and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series that provided dependable, continuous, dedicated satellite observations for use by the weather and atmospheric science communities. Through the 1970's, 1980's, and 1990's improved, well-calibrated instruments with more spectral bands extending into the thermal and the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum were provided to obtain accurate soundings of the atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry constituents such as ozone, global sea surface temperature, snow and ice extent, vegetation dynamics, etc. In the 1990's and up to the present the NASA/Earth Observing System (EOS) has been developed, implemented, and operated over many years to provide a very comprehensive suite of observations of the atmosphere, as well as land and ocean parameters. The future looks bright wherein the development of new systems, broadly described by the National Academy of Science Decadal Study, is now underway. NASA, along with collaborations with NOAA, other agencies, and the

  17. Sentinel Convoy: Synergetic Earth Observation with Satellites Flying in Formation with European Operational Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Amanda; Silvestrin, Pierluigi; Fernandez, Diego

    2016-08-01

    The successful launch of Sentinel-1A, Sentinel-1B, Sentinel-2A and Sentinel-3A signify the beginning of the dedicated space segment for the Copernicus Programme, which is the result of the partnership between the European Commission (EC) and the European Space Agency (ESA). These Sentinels are the first of a long-term operational series of Earth Observation (EO) satellites to be launched by Europe that will complement the already well-established series of meteorological missions.For the first time, these missions will provide a continuous and long term European capability for systematic observations of the Earth surface, its oceans and atmosphere to unprecedented accuracies, resolutions, and temporal coverage. If additional cost- effective missions could be flown together with these operational missions (including operational meteorological satellite series such as MetOp (Second Generation - SG) then the possibilities for meeting new Earth science and application objectives could be far- reaching e.g. fulfilling observational gaps, synergistic measurements of Earth system processes, etc. To explore this potential, the ESA initiated three exploratory paper studies (known as the EO-Convoy studies). The aim of these studies is two fold: Firstly, to identify scientific and operational objectives and needs that would benefit from additional in-orbit support. Secondly, to identify and develop a number of cost- effective mission concepts that would meet these objectives and needs. Each EO Convoy study is dedicated to a specific theme, namely: Study 1 - Ocean and Ice Applications, Study 2 - Land Applications and Study 3 - Atmospheric Applications.This paper will present the results of the EO-Convoy studies including an overview of the user needs and derived convoy concept descriptions. This paper shall focus on the resulting science benefits. Example convoy concepts to be presented include a passive C-band SAR flying with Sentinel-1 and possible free flying thermal

  18. Continuous tailward flow in the near-Earth magnetotail observed by TC-1 satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LingQian; LIU ZhenXing; MA ZhiWei; PU ZuYin; WANG JiYe; SHEN Chao

    2007-01-01

    On July 11, 2004, a substorm process in the period of continuous tailward flow was observed by the joint exploration of the TC-1, IMAGE and ACE satellites. The substorm observed by the TC-1 in the near-Earth has three stages: the growth phase (from 11:43 to 12:19), the pre-expansion process (from 12:19 to 12:28) and the dipolarization process. The auroral brightening was at 12:26 recorded by the FUV instrument on IMAGE, and the dipolarization occurred two minutes later. During the 45 min period of the tailward flow, the magnetotail experienced the growth phase and the pre-expansion process. When the dipolarization process began, the TC-1 entered the plasma sheet and observed a high speed earthward flow. The field-aligned tailward flow is characterized by the low temperature and high density, which is consistent with the properties of the flow from the ionosphere detected in the near-Earth magnetotail by other satellites. The tailward flow is closely related with the southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and may have an important effect on the substorm.

  19. KAGLVis - On-line 3D Visualisation of Earth-observing-satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Marek; Ameri, Parinaz; Grabowski, Udo; Maatouki, Ahmad; Meyer, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    One of the goals of the Large-Scale Data Management and Analysis project is to provide a high-performance framework facilitating management of data acquired by Earth-observing satellites such as Envisat. On the client-facing facet of this framework, we strive to provide visualisation and basic analysis tool which could be used by scientists with minimal to no knowledge of the underlying infrastructure. Our tool, KAGLVis, is a JavaScript client-server Web application which leverages modern Web technologies to provide three-dimensional visualisation of satellite observables on a wide range of client systems. It takes advantage of the WebGL API to employ locally available GPU power for 3D rendering; this approach has been demonstrated to perform well even on relatively weak hardware such as integrated graphics chipsets found in modern laptop computers and with some user-interface tuning could even be usable on embedded devices such as smartphones or tablets. Data is fetched from the database back-end using a ReST API and cached locally, both in memory and using HTML5 Web Storage, to minimise network use. Computations, calculation of cloud altitude from cloud-index measurements for instance, can depending on configuration be performed on either the client or the server side. Keywords: satellite data, Envisat, visualisation, 3D graphics, Web application, WebGL, MEAN stack.

  20. SatelliteDL - An IDL Toolkit for the Analysis of Satellite Earth Observations - GOES, MODIS, VIIRS and CERES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, D. W.; Galloy, M. D.; Kindig, D.

    2013-12-01

    SatelliteDL is an IDL toolkit for the analysis of satellite Earth observations from a diverse set of platforms and sensors. The design features an abstraction layer that allows for easy inclusion of new datasets in a modular way. The core function of the toolkit is the spatial and temporal alignment of satellite swath and geostationary data. IDL has a powerful suite of statistical and visualization tools that can be used in conjunction with SatelliteDL. Our overarching objective is to create utilities that automate the mundane aspects of satellite data analysis, are extensible and maintainable, and do not place limitations on the analysis itself. Toward this end we have constructed SatelliteDL to include (1) HTML and LaTeX API document generation, (2) a unit test framework, (3) automatic message and error logs, (4) HTML and LaTeX plot and table generation, and (5) several real world examples with bundled datasets available for download. For ease of use, datasets, variables and optional workflows may be specified in a flexible format configuration file. Configuration statements may specify, for example, a region and date range, and the creation of images, plots and statistical summary tables for a long list of variables. SatelliteDL enforces data provenance; all data should be traceable and reproducible. The output NetCDF file metadata holds a complete history of the original datasets and their transformations, and a method exists to reconstruct a configuration file from this information. Release 0.1.0 of SatelliteDL is anticipated for the 2013 Fall AGU conference. It will distribute with ingest methods for GOES, MODIS, VIIRS and CERES radiance data (L1) as well as select 2D atmosphere products (L2) such as aerosol and cloud (MODIS and VIIRS) and radiant flux (CERES). Future releases will provide ingest methods for ocean and land surface products, gridded and time averaged datasets (L3 Daily, Monthly and Yearly), and support for 3D products such as temperature and

  1. A pseudo-magnetic flux rope observed by the THEMIS satellites in the Earth's magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafopoulos, D. V.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate an extraordinary event showing all the typical magnetic flux rope (MFR) signatures, although it is not really a MFR structure. It occurred on 1 March 2008 in the Earth's magnetotail and was observed by a major tail conjunction of Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellites. THEMIS B and C being located inside the central plasma sheet and almost symmetrically above and below the neutral sheet observed the same tailward retreating MFR-like structure: they indeed detected strong but oppositely directed cross-tail magnetic field excursions: positive “By core” for TH-C and negative for TH-B; an apparent inconsistency. We finally categorize the case under study as a pseudo-MFR event and we doubt that the previously studied MFR-like structures were really rope structures. We suggest that the By excursions are dictated by Ampere's law; they are produced by filamentary field-aligned currents (FACs) created in front of the “akis structure”, as it is introduced by Sarafopoulos (2008, 2010): In a locally thinned plasma sheet, the akis potentially causes charge separation due to non-adiabatic motion and stochastic scattering of ions. In turn, the newly tailward escaped ions drive field-aligned ionospheric currents in order to neutralize this region. We extensively discuss an additional and extremely rare phenomenon of “irregular MFR” cited in the literature and observed by the Cluster satellites; filamentary FACs suffice to reproduce all the observed magnetic field signatures, too.

  2. A study of L-dependent Pc3 pulsations observed by low Earth orbiting CHAMP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Ndiitwani

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Field line resonances (FLR driven by compressional waves are an important mechanism for the generation of ULF geomagnetic pulsations observed at all latitudes during local daytime. References to observations of toroidal standing Alfvén mode oscillations with clearly L-dependent frequencies from spacecraft in the outer magnetosphere for L>3 are limited in the literature. Such observations in the inner magnetosphere for L<3 have not yet been reported in the literature. This study offers two interesting case studies of observations of ULF waves by the low Earth orbiting CHAMP satellite. The magnetic field measurements from CHAMP, which are of unprecedented accuracy and resolution, are compared to Hermanus magnetometer data for times when CHAMP crosses the ground station L-shell, namely for 13 February 2002 and 18 February 2003. The data were analysed for Pc3 pulsation activity using the Maximum Entropy Spectral Analysis (MESA method to visualise FLRs in the vector magnetometer data. For the first time observations of Pc3 toroidal oscillations with clearly L-dependent frequencies for lower L-shell values (L<3 observed by an LEO satellite are reported. These observations show FLR frequencies increasing as a function of decreasing latitude down to L=1.6 and then decreasing as a result of the larger plasma density of the upper ionosphere. The L-dependent frequency oscillations were observed in the presence of a broadband compressional wave spectrum. Our observations thus confirm the well-known magnetohydrodynamic (MHD wave theoretical prediction of a compressional wave being the driver of the field line resonance.

  3. A Topology Control Strategy with Reliability Assurance for Satellite Cluster Networks in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Zhang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ze

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the dynamic topology control problem of satellite cluster networks (SCNs) in Earth observation (EO) missions by applying a novel metric of stability for inter-satellite links (ISLs). The properties of the periodicity and predictability of satellites’ relative position are involved in the link cost metric which is to give a selection criterion for choosing the most reliable data routing paths. Also, a cooperative work model with reliability is proposed for the situation of emergency EO missions. Based on the link cost metric and the proposed reliability model, a reliability assurance topology control algorithm and its corresponding dynamic topology control (RAT) strategy are established to maximize the stability of data transmission in the SCNs. The SCNs scenario is tested through some numeric simulations of the topology stability of average topology lifetime and average packet loss rate. Simulation results show that the proposed reliable strategy applied in SCNs significantly improves the data transmission performance and prolongs the average topology lifetime. PMID:28241474

  4. Fostering the uptake of satellite Earth Observation data for landslide hazard understanding: the CEOS Landslide Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Roessner, Sigrid

    2017-04-01

    Landslides occur around the world, on every continent, and play an important role in the evolution of landscapes. They also represent a serious hazard in many areas of the world. Despite their importance, it has been estimated that past landslide and landslide potential maps cover less than 1% of the slopes in these landmasses. Systematic information on the type, abundance, and distribution of existing landslides is lacking. Even in countries where landslide information is abundant (e.g. Italy), the vast majority of landslides caused by meteorological (intense or prolonged rainfall, rapid snowmelt) or geophysical (earthquake) triggers go undetected. This paucity of knowledge has consequences on the design of effective remedial and mitigation measures. Systematic use of Earth observation (EO) data and technologies can contribute effectively to detect, map, and monitor landslides, and landslide prone hillsides, in different physiographic and climatic regions. The CEOS (Committee on Earth Observation Satellites) Working Group on Disasters has recently launched a Landslide Pilot (period 2017-2019) with the aim to demonstrate the effective exploitation of satellite EO across the full cycle of landslide disaster risk management, including preparedness, response, and recovery at global, regional, and local scales, with a distinct multi-hazard focus on cascading impacts and risks. The Landslide Pilot is focusing efforts on three objectives: 1. Establish effective practices for merging different Earth Observation data (e.g. optical and radar) to better monitor and map landslide activity over time and space. 2. Demonstrate how landslide products, models, and services can support disaster risk management for multi-hazard and cascading landslide events. 3. Engage and partner with data brokers and end users to understand requirements and user expectations and get feedback through the activities described in objectives 1-2. The Landslide Pilot was endorsed in April 2016 and work

  5. 40 Years Young: Social Media for the World's Longest-Running Earth-Observation Satellite Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeek, H.; Rocchio, L. E.; Taylor, M.; Owen, T.; Allen, J. E.; Keck, A.

    2012-12-01

    With social media becoming a communication juggernaut it is essential to harness the medium's power to foster better science communication. On July 23, 2012, the Landsat Earth-observing satellite program celebrated the 40th anniversary of the first Landsat launch. To more effectively communicate the impact and importance of Landsat's four-decade long data record a carefully planned social media event was designed to supplement the day's traditional media communications. The social media event, dubbed the "Landsat Social," was modeled on and supported by the NASA Social methodology. The Landsat Social was the first such event for NASA Earth science not associated with a launch. For the Landsat Social, 23 social media-savvy participants were selected to attend a joint NASA/U.S. Geological Survey Landsat anniversary press event at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. The participants subsequently toured the NASA Goddard Space Flight Facility in Greenbelt, Maryland where they had the opportunity to learn about the latest Landsat satellite; visit the Landsat mission control; download and work with Landsat data; and meet Landsat scientists and engineers. All Landsat Social participants had Twitter accounts and used the #Landsat and #NASASocial hashtags to unify their commentary throughout the day. A few key Landsat messages were communicated to the Landsat Social participants at the event's onset. Propagation of this messaging was witnessed for the duration of the Landsat Social; and a spike in online Landsat interest followed. Here, we examine the Landsat 40th anniversary social event, explain impacts made, and report lessons learned.; Landsat Social attendees are busy tweeting, texting, and blogging as Project Scientist Dr. Jim Irons talks about the Landsat Data Continuity Mission in front of the Hyperwall at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Photo courtesy Bill Hrybyk.

  6. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, D., E-mail: dkaqua@kyudai.jp; Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D. [National Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil); Mozer, F. S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cardoso, F. R. [School of Engineering - EEL, University of São Paulo, Lorena, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (δ{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (δ{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  7. Low Earth orbit satellite-to-ground optical scintillation: comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Harold T; Kozlowski, David A

    2011-07-01

    Scintillation measurements of a 1064 nm laser at a 5 kHz sampling rate were made by an optical ground station at the European Space Agency observatory in Tenerife, Spain while tracking a low Earth orbit satellite during the spring and summer of 2010. The scintillation index (SI), the variance of irradiance normalized to the square of the mean, and power spectra measurements were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Kolmogorov spectrum, the Maui3 nighttime turbulence profile, weak scintillation finite-beam wave theory, included receiver, and source aperture averaging with no free-fitting parameters. Good agreement was obtained, not only for the magnitude of the observed fluctuations, but also for the corresponding elevation angle dependence and shape of the power spectra. Little variation was seen for the SI between daytime and nighttime links. For all elevation angles, ascending and descending, the observed scintillation over extensive regions of the atmosphere is consistent with log-normal statistics. Additionally, it appears from the results presented here that the nighttime turbulence profile for the atmosphere above the observatory in Tenerife is similar to that above Haleakala in Maui, Hawaii.

  8. Experiences in Applying Earth Observing Satellite Technology in SERVIR Regions with an Emphasis on Disasters: Successes, Lessons and Paths Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Earth observing satellites offer a unique perspective of our environment from the vantage point of space. Repeated measurements of the Earths subsystems such as the biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and of humans interactions with their environments, allow for a better understanding of Earth system processes, and they can provide input for decision making in areas of environmental management and disaster risk reduction. SERVIR is a joint initiative of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the US Agency for International Development (USAID) that began in 2005 and has been active in applying Earth observations for sustainable development in many regions around the world, recently the Lower Mekong and West Africa regions. This talk will highlight some successes achieved and lessons learned through SERVIR in Central America, Eastern Southern Africa, and the Hindu Kush-Himalaya region, focusing on disasters. We will also present opportunities for enhanced decision making with Earth observations and geospatial technologies in the Lower Mekong region.

  9. Space in environmental diplomacy: Exploring the role of earth observing satellites for monitoring international environmental agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Shaida Sahami

    This research determines under what conditions, and for what types of environmental treaties, Earth observation (EO) is useful for monitoring international environmental agreements. The research extracts specific monitoring requirements from nine multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) and explores how satellite EO data can be used to support them. The technical characteristics of the sensor systems and science data products associated with current and planned EO satellites were analyzed and mapped to the MEA requirements, providing a significant step toward linking the EO community with the international treaty community implementing these environmental agreements. The research results include a listing and analysis of the positive and negative factors that influence whether EO data are useful for monitoring and verifying MEAs, analysis of existing international EO institutions, and a set of key findings describing the conditions under which EO data are most useful to the treaties. The use of EO data in various treaty phases is also analyzed, drawing the conclusion that EO data are most useful for monitoring and treaty refinement and not very useful for compliance verification or enforcement. MEAs manage compliance using governance structures that offer expertise and resources to assist states that are reported to be in non-compliance, rather than enforce compliance with sanctions or other punishments. In addition, the temporal and spatial resolution of the current and planned fleet of satellites does not provide the required detail needed for MEA verification. Identifying specific treaty implementation deficiencies requires additional information that cannot be gathered from EO data; on-site economic, social, and environmental conditions are critical elements in assessing compliance verification. But for environmental monitoring and assessments, MEA effectiveness reviews, and national reporting required for each MEA, EO data are very useful. They provide

  10. FCJ-201 Visual Evidence from Above: Assessing the Value of Earth Observation Satellites for Supporting Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Notley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Public access to data collected by remote sensing Earth Observation Satellites has, until recently, been very limited. Now, citizens and rights advocacy groups are increasingly utilising satellite-collected images to interrogate justice issues; to document, prevent and verify rights abuses; and to imagine and propose social change. Yet while other communication technologies have received substantial critical analysis regarding their value as tools of social justice, activism and resistance, satellites have received comparatively scant attention. This article examines the uses of satellite-collected images in human rights contexts including the opportunities, challenges and risks they pose. We conclude this examination by arguing that if satellites are to be used effectively to collect evidence from above by rights advocates, greater attention to and capacity for ensuring accountability from below is required.

  11. Low-latitude Pi2 oscillations observed by polar Low Earth Orbiting satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neethal; Vichare, Geeta; Sinha, A. K.; Rawat, Rahul

    2015-09-01

    Low-latitude Pi2 pulsations in the topside ionosphere are investigated using vector magnetic field measurements from LEO satellite, CHAMP, and underneath ground station. Substorm-associated Pi2s are initially identified using high-resolution data from Indian station Shillong, during 2007-2009, and are further classified into three subgroups of Pi2 band (6-25 mHz), based on its frequency. During nighttime, coherent in-phase oscillations are observed in the compressional component at satellite and horizontal component at underneath ground station for all the Pi2 events, irrespective of the Pi2 frequency. We observe that the identification of daytime Pi2s at CHAMP (compressional component) depends on the frequency of Pi2 oscillation; i.e., 40%, 45%, and 100% of Pi2 events observed in dayside ground station with frequency between 6-10 mHz, 10-15 mHz, and 15-25 mHz were identified at satellite, respectively. At CHAMP during daytime, the presence of a dominant power in the lower frequencies of Pi2 band, which is unique to satellite, is consistently observed and can modify the Pi2 oscillations. Pi2s having frequency >15 mHz are less affected by these background frequencies, and a clear signature of daytime Pi2s at CHAMP is possible to observe, provided that contribution from non-Pi2 frequencies at satellite from the lower end of Pi2 band is eliminated. Daytime Pi2s identified in the topside ionosphere showed coherent but mostly opposite phase oscillations with underneath ground station, and satellite-to-ground amplitude ratio is, in general, found to be less than 1. Present results indicate that a combination of fast cavity-mode oscillations and an instantaneous transmission of Pi2 electric field from high- to low-latitude ionosphere is responsible for the observation of daytime Pi2s.

  12. Description and primary results of Total Solar Irradiance Monitor, a solar-pointing instrument on an Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongrui; Fang, Wei; Li, Huiduan

    2015-04-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Long-time data of solar activity is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, such as Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) record. Three Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) have been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics for China Meteorological Administration to maintain continuities of TSI data series which lasted for nearly 4 decades.The newest TSIM has recorded TSI daily with accurate solar pointing on the FY-3C meteorological satellite since Oct 2013. TSIM/FY-3C has a pointing system for automatic solar tracking, onboard the satellite designed mainly for Earth observing. Most payloads of FY-3C are developed for observation of land, ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, the FY-3C satellite is a nadir-pointing spacecraft with its z axis to be pointed at the center of the Earth. Previous TSIMs onboard the FY-3A and FY-3B satellites had no pointing system, solar observations were only performed when the sun swept through field-of-view of the instruments. And TSI measurements are influenced inevitably by the solar pointing errors. Corrections of the solar pointing errors were complex. The problem is now removed by TSIM/FY-3C.TSIM/FY-3C follows the sun accurately by itself using its pointing system based on scheme of visual servo control. The pointing system is consisted of a radiometer package, two motors for solar tracking, a sun sensor and etc. TSIM/FY-3C has made daily observations of TSI for more than one year, with nearly zero solar pointing errors. Short time-scale variations in TSI detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE.Instrument details, primary results of solar pointing control, solar observations and etc will be given in the presentation.

  13. Aircraft data collection in support of NASA's earth observing satellite missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    NASA's Earth observing missions have been providing global information on soil moisture, vegetation, and precipitation that is crucial for hydrological and agricultural applications. For example, accurate soil moisture information is a key component in land surface and agricultural models used for w...

  14. VNIR, MWIR, and LWIR source assemblies for optical quality testing and spectro-radiometric calibration of earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compain, Eric; Maquet, Philippe; Leblay, Pierrick; Gavaud, Eric; Marque, Julien; Glastre, Wilfried; Cortese, Maxime; Sugranes, Pierre; Gaillac, Stephanie; Potheau, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    This document presents several original OGSEs, Optical Ground Support Equipment, specifically designed and realized for the optical testing and calibration of earth observation satellites operating in a large spectral band from 0.4μm to 14.7μm. This work has been mainly supported by recent development dedicated to MTG, Meteosat Third Generation, the ESA next generation of meteorological satellites. The improved measurement capabilities of this new satellite generation has generated new challenging requirements for the associated optical test equipments. These improvements, based on design and component innovation will be illustrated for the MOTA, the GICS and the DEA OGSEs. MOTA and GICS are dedicated to the AIT, Assembly Integration and Test, of FCI, the Flexible Combined Imager of the imaging satellite MTG-I. DEA OGSE is dedicated to the AIT of the DEA, Detection Electronics Assembly, which is part of IRS instrument, an IR sounder part of MTG-S satellite. From an architectural point of view, the presented original designs enable to run many optical tests with a single system thanks to a limited configuration effort. Main measurement capabilities are optical quality testing (MTF based mainly on KEF measurement), Line of Sight (LoS) stability measurement, straylight analyses, VNIR-MWIR-LWIR focal plane array co-registration, and broadband large dynamic spectro-radiometric calibration. Depending on the AIT phase of the satellite, these source assemblies are operated at atmospheric pressure or under secondary vacuum. In operation, they are associated with an opto-mechanical projection system that enables to conjugate the image of the source assembly with the focal plane of the satellite instruments. These conjugation systems are usually based on high resolution, broadband collimator, and are optionally mounted on hexapod to address the entire field of instruments.

  15. Who launched what, when and why; trends in global land-cover observation capacity from civilian earth observation satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belward, Alan S.; Skøien, Jon O.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a compendium of satellites under civilian and/or commercial control with the potential to gather global land-cover observations. From this we show that a growing number of sovereign states are acquiring capacity for space based land-cover observations and show how geopolitical patterns of ownership are changing. We discuss how the number of satellites flying at any time has progressed as a function of increased launch rates and mission longevity, and how the spatial resolutions of the data they collect has evolved. The first such satellite was launched by the USA in 1972. Since then government and/or private entities in 33 other sovereign states and geopolitical groups have chosen to finance such missions and 197 individual satellites with a global land-cover observing capacity have been successfully launched. Of these 98 were still operating at the end of 2013. Since the 1970s the number of such missions failing within 3 years of launch has dropped from around 60% to less than 20%, the average operational life of a mission has almost tripled, increasing from 3.3 years in the 1970s to 8.6 years (and still lengthening), the average number of satellites launched per-year/per-decade has increased from 2 to 12 and spatial resolution increased from around 80 m to less than 1 m multispectral and less than half a meter for panchromatic; synthetic aperture radar resolution has also fallen, from 25 m in the 1970s to 1 m post 2007. More people in more countries have access to data from global land-cover observing spaceborne missions at a greater range of spatial resolutions than ever before. We provide a compendium of such missions, analyze the changes and shows how innovation, the need for secure data-supply, national pride, falling costs and technological advances may underpin the trends we document.

  16. Coherence and phase structure of compressional ULF waves at low-Earth-orbit observed by the Swarm satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Balázs; Sutcliffe, Peter R.

    2016-04-01

    Different types of ultra low frequency (ULF waves), such as dayside compressional Pc3-Pc4 waves, Pc2 and Pc1 waves, Pc3-Pc4 field line resonances, night side and day side Pi2s, etc. have been successfully identified in the topside ionosphere. ULF observations in this region can help us to understand the wave structure in the magnetosphere, wave propagation, and also the effects of the ionosphere (transmission, reflection, mode conversion). Because of the fast orbiting of the LEO satellites Fourier analysis is not applicable, special techniques (wavelet analysis, maximum entropy method) are needed to resolve ULF signals, as well as to discriminate between spatial and wave structures. In this paper we present results of a study of Pc3 compressional waves observed at low-Earth-orbit (LEO) by the Swarm satellites. The particular emphasis has been to investigate the distribution of wave coherence and phase difference as functions of magnetic latitude and local time. This is the first time that a study of this nature has been carried out using magnetic field data from multiple LEO satellites. We believe that our study provides the first observational evidence to support the prediction by the inductive thin ionosphere model that incident Alfvén mode waves are partially converted into compressional mode waves by the ionosphere.

  17. The evolution of Earth Observation satellites in Europe and its impact on the performance of emergency response services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Gil; de Boissezon, Hélène; Hosford, Steven; Pasco, Xavier; Montfort, Bruno; Ranera, Franck

    2016-10-01

    The paper reviews the evolution of Earth Observation systems in Europe and Worldwide and analyses the potential impact of their performance in support of emergency response services. Earth Observation satellites play already a significant role in supporting the action of first responders in case of major disasters. The main principle is the coordinated use of satellites in order to ensure a rapid response and the timely delivery of images and geospatial information of the area affected by the event. The first part of the paper reviews the main instruments and evaluates their current performance. The International Charter "Space and Major Disasters", signed in October 2000, was the first international initiative aimed at establishing a unified system for the acquisition of space data. The charter is a cooperation agreement between space agencies and operators of space systems. At regional level, a similar instrument exists in Asia: Sentinel-Asia. In the frame of the European programme Copernicus, the emergency management service was launched in 2009. Geo-information products derived from space imagery are delivered during all phases of the emergency management cycle, in either rush or non-rush mode, free of charge for the users. In both cases, the capacities were historically drawn from national missions, funded with public money and directly operated by the space agencies or by national operators.

  18. Approach for earth observation satellite real-time and playback data transmission scheduling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li

    2015-01-01

    The scheduling of earth observation satel ites (EOSs) data transmission is a complex combinatorial optimization prob-lem. Current researches mainly deal with this problem on the assumption that the data transmission mode is fixed, either play-back or real-time transmission. Considering the characteristic of the problem, a multi-satel ite real-time and playback data trans-mission scheduling model is established and a novel algorithm based on quantum discrete particle swarm optimization (QDPSO) is proposed. Furthermore, we design the longest compatible trans-mission chain mutation operator to enhance the performance of the algorithm. Final y, some experiments are implemented to vali-date correctness and practicability of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Cyberinfrastructure Initiatives of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. R.; Faundeen, J. L.; Petiteville, I.

    2005-12-01

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) was established in 1984 in response to a recommendation from the Economic Summit of Industrialized Nations Working Group on Growth, Technology, and Employment's Panel of Experts on Satellite Remote Sensing. CEOS participants are Members, who are national or international governmental organizations who operate civil spaceborne Earth observation satellites, and Associates who are governmental organizations with civil space programs in development or international scientific or governmental bodies who have an interest in and support CEOS objectives. The primary objective of CEOS is to optimize benefits of satellite Earth observations through cooperation of its participants in mission planning and in development of compatible data products, formats, services, applications and policies. To pursue its objectives, CEOS establishes working groups and associated subgroups that focus on relevant areas of interest. While the structure of CEOS has evolved over its lifetime, today there are three permanent working groups. One is the Working Group on Calibration and Validation that addresses sensor-specific calibration and validation and geophysical parameter validation. A second is the Working Group on Education, Training, and Capacity Building that facilitates activities that enhance international education and training in Earth observation techniques, data analysis, interpretation and applications, with a particular focus on developing countries. The third permanent working group is the Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS). The purpose of WGISS is to promote collaboration in the development of the systems and services based on international standards that manage and supply the Earth observation data and information from participating agencies' missions. WGISS places great emphasis on the use of demonstration projects involving user groups to solve the critical interoperability issues associated with the

  20. Techniques for computing regional radiant emittances of the earth-atmosphere system from observations by wide-angle satellite radiometers, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, J. F.; House, F. B.

    1975-01-01

    Radiometers on earth orbiting satellites measure the exchange of radiant energy between the earth-atmosphere (E-A) system and space at observation points in space external to the E-A system. Observations by wideangle, spherical and flat radiometers are analyzed and interpreted with regard to the general problem of the earth energy budget (EEB) and to the problem of determining the energy budget of regions smaller than the field of view (FOV) of these radiometers.

  1. Evaluating the strength of the land-atmosphere moisture feedback in Earth system models using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Paul A.; Randerson, James T.; Swenson, Sean C.; Lawrence, David M.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between terrestrial water storage (TWS) and atmospheric processes has important implications for predictability of climatic extremes and projection of future climate change. In places where moisture availability limits evapotranspiration (ET), variability in TWS has the potential to influence surface energy fluxes and atmospheric conditions. Where atmospheric conditions, in turn, influence moisture availability, a full feedback loop exists. Here we developed a novel approach for measuring the strength of both components of this feedback loop, i.e., the forcing of the atmosphere by variability in TWS and the response of TWS to atmospheric variability, using satellite observations of TWS, precipitation, solar radiation, and vapor pressure deficit during 2002-2014. Our approach defines metrics to quantify the relationship between TWS anomalies and climate globally on a seasonal to interannual timescale. Metrics derived from the satellite data were used to evaluate the strength of the feedback loop in 38 members of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) Large Ensemble (LENS) and in six models that contributed simulations to phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We found that both forcing and response limbs of the feedback loop in LENS were stronger than in the satellite observations in tropical and temperate regions. Feedbacks in the selected CMIP5 models were not as strong as those found in LENS, but were still generally stronger than those estimated from the satellite measurements. Consistent with previous studies conducted across different spatial and temporal scales, our analysis suggests that models may overestimate the strength of the feedbacks between the land surface and the atmosphere. We describe several possible mechanisms that may contribute to this bias, and discuss pathways through which models may overestimate ET or overestimate the sensitivity of ET to TWS.

  2. An efficient stable optical polariser module for calibration of the S4UVN earth observation satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolt, Stephen; Calcines, Ariadna; Lomanowski, Bartosz; Bramall, David; Shaw, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    We describe here an optical polariser module intended to deliver well characterised polarised light to an imaging spectrometer instrument. The instrument in question is the Sentinel-4/UVN Earth observation imaging spectrometer due to be deployed in 2019 in a geostationary orbit. The polariser module described here will be used in the ground based calibration campaign for this instrument. One critical task of the calibration campaign will be the highly accurate characterisation of the polarisation sensitivity of instrument. The polariser module provides a constant, uniform source of linearly polarised light whose direction can be adjusted without changing the output level or uniformity of the illumination. A critical requirement of the polariser module is that the illumination is uniform across the exit pupil. Unfortunately, a conventional Glan-Taylor arrangement cannot provide this uniformity due to the strong variation in transmission at a refractive surface for angles close to the critical angle. Therefore a modified prism arrangement is proposed and this is described in detail. Detailed tolerance modelling and straylight modelling is also reported here.

  3. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  4. Rapid, High-Resolution Detection of Environmental Change over Continental Scales from Satellite Data - the Earth Observation Data Cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Adam; Lymburner, Leo; Purss, Matthew B. J.; Brooke, Brendan; Evans, Ben; Ip, Alex; Dekker, Arnold G.; Irons, James R.; Minchin, Stuart; Mueller, Norman

    2015-01-01

    The effort and cost required to convert satellite Earth Observation (EO) data into meaningful geophysical variables has prevented the systematic analysis of all available observations. To overcome these problems, we utilise an integrated High Performance Computing and Data environment to rapidly process, restructure and analyse the Australian Landsat data archive. In this approach, the EO data are assigned to a common grid framework that spans the full geospatial and temporal extent of the observations - the EO Data Cube. This approach is pixel-based and incorporates geometric and spectral calibration and quality assurance of each Earth surface reflectance measurement. We demonstrate the utility of the approach with rapid time-series mapping of surface water across the entire Australian continent using 27 years of continuous, 25 m resolution observations. Our preliminary analysis of the Landsat archive shows how the EO Data Cube can effectively liberate high-resolution EO data from their complex sensor-specific data structures and revolutionise our ability to measure environmental change.

  5. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Ulyanov, Artyom; Gaikovich, Konstantin; Kuzin, Sergey; Pertsov, Andrey; Berghmans, David; Dominique, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth's upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO) satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA) and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the extinction coefficients

  6. Hybrid Differential Evolution Optimisation for Earth Observation Satellite Scheduling with Time-Dependent Earliness-Tardiness Penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the order acceptance and scheduling (OAS problem with time-dependent earliness-tardiness penalties in a single agile earth observation satellite environment where orders are defined by their release dates, available processing time windows ranging from earliest start date to deadline, processing times, due dates, sequence-dependent setup times, and revenues. The objective is to maximise total revenue, where the revenue from an order is a piecewise linear function of its earliness and tardiness with reference to its due date. We formulate this problem as a mixed integer linear programming model and develop a novel hybrid differential evolution (DE algorithm under self-adaptation framework to solve this problem. Compared with classical DE, hybrid DE employs two mutation operations, scaling factor adaptation and crossover probability adaptation. Computational tests indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms classical DE in addition to two other variants of DE.

  7. Copernicus Earth observation programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žlebir, Silvo

    European Earth observation program Copernicus is an EU-wide programme that integrates satellite data, in-situ data and modeling to provide user-focused information services to support policymakers, researchers, businesses and citizens. Land monitoring service and Emergency service are fully operational already, Atmosphere monitoring service and Marine environment monitoring service are preoperational and will become fully operational in the following year, while Climate change service and Security service are in an earlier development phase. New series of a number of dedicated satellite missions will be launched in the following years, operated by the European Space Agency and EUMETSAT, starting with Sentinel 1A satellite early this year. Ground based, air-borne and sea-borne in-situ data are provided by different international networks and organizations, EU member states networks etc. European Union is devoting a particular attention to secure a sustainable long-term operational provision of the services. Copernicus is also stated as a European Union’s most important contribution to Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The status and the recent development of the Copernicus programme will be presented, together with its future perspective. As Copernicus services have already demonstrated their usability and effectiveness, some interesting cases of their deployment will be presented. Copernicus free and open data policy, supported by a recently adopted EU legislative act, will also be presented.

  8. Use of the Earth Observing One (EO-1) Satellite for the Namibia SensorWeb Flood Early Warning Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart; Cappelaere, Pat; Handy, Matthew; Policelli, Fritz; Katjizeu, McCloud; Van Langenhove, Guido; Aube, Guy; Saulnier, Jean-Francois; Sohlberg, Rob; Silva, Julie; Kussul, Nataliia; Skakun, Sergii; Ungar, Stephen; Grossman, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite was launched in November 2000 as a one year technology demonstration mission for a variety of space technologies. After the first year, it was used as a pathfinder for the creation of SensorWebs. A SensorWeb is the integration of variety of space, airborne and ground sensors into a loosely coupled collaborative sensor system that automatically provides useful data products. Typically, a SensorWeb is comprised of heterogeneous sensors tied together with a messaging architecture and web services. Disasters are the perfect arena to use SensorWebs. One SensorWeb pilot project that has been active since 2009 is the Namibia Early Flood Warning SensorWeb pilot project. The Pilot Project was established under the auspices of the Namibian Ministry of Agriculture Water and Forestry (MAWF)/Department of Water Affairs, the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS)/Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) and moderated by the United Nations Platform for Space-based Information for Disaster Management and Emergency Response (UN-SPIDER). The effort began by identifying and prototyping technologies which enabled the rapid gathering and dissemination of both space-based and ground sensor data and data products for the purpose of flood disaster management and water-borne disease management. This was followed by an international collaboration to build small portions of the identified system which was prototyped during that past few years during the flood seasons which occurred in the February through May timeframe of 2010 and 2011 with further prototyping to occur in 2012. The SensorWeb system features EO-1 data along with other data sets from such satellites as Radarsat, Terra and Aqua. Finally, the SensorWeb team also began to examine the socioeconomic component to determine the impact of the SensorWeb technology and how best to assist in the infusion of this technology in lesser affluent areas with low levels of basic

  9. Validation of Earth atmosphere models using solar EUV observations from the CORONAS and PROBA2 satellites in occultation mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slemzin Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Knowledge of properties of the Earth’s upper atmosphere is important for predicting the lifetime of low-orbit spacecraft as well as for planning operation of space instruments whose data may be distorted by atmospheric effects. The accuracy of the models commonly used for simulating the structure of the atmosphere is limited by the scarcity of the observations they are based on, so improvement of these models requires validation under different atmospheric conditions. Measurements of the absorption of the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV radiation in the upper atmosphere below 500 km by instruments operating on low-Earth orbits (LEO satellites provide efficient means for such validation as well as for continuous monitoring of the upper atmosphere and for studying its response to the solar and geomagnetic activity. Method: This paper presents results of measurements of the solar EUV radiation in the 17 nm wavelength band made with the SPIRIT and TESIS telescopes on board the CORONAS satellites and the SWAP telescope on board the PROBA2 satellite in the occulted parts of the satellite orbits. The transmittance profiles of the atmosphere at altitudes between 150 and 500 km were derived from different phases of solar activity during solar cycles 23 and 24 in the quiet state of the magnetosphere and during the development of a geomagnetic storm. We developed a mathematical procedure based on the Tikhonov regularization method for solution of ill-posed problems in order to retrieve extinction coefficients from the transmittance profiles. The transmittance profiles derived from the data and the retrieved extinction coefficients are compared with simulations carried out with the NRLMSISE-00 atmosphere model maintained by Naval Research Laboratory (USA and the DTM-2013 model developed at CNES in the framework of the FP7 project ATMOP. Results: Under quiet and slightly disturbed magnetospheric conditions during high and low solar activity the

  10. Program on stimulating operational private sector use of Earth observation satellite information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, L. F., Jr.; Foshage, J.; Gomez, G.; Kirkpatrick, B.; Konig, B.; Stein, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Ideas for new businesses specializing in using remote sensing and computerized spatial data systems were developd. Each such business serves as an 'information middleman', buying raw satellite or aircraft imagery, processing these data, combining them in a computer system with customer-specific information, and marketing the resulting information products. Examples of the businesses the project designed are: (1) an agricultural facility site evaluation firm; (2) a mass media grocery price and supply analyst and forecaster; (3) a management service for privately held woodlots; (4) a brokerage for insulation and roofing contractors, based on infrared imagery; (5) an expanded real estate information service. In addition, more than twenty-five other commercially attractive ideas in agribusiness, forestry, mining, real estate, urban planning and redevelopment, and consumer information were created. The commercial feasibility of the five business was assessed. This assessment included market surveys, revenue projections, cost analyses, and profitability studies. The results show that there are large and enthusiastic markets willing to pay for the services these businesses offer, and that the businesses could operate profitably.

  11. Global land cover mapping using Earth observation satellite data: Recent progresses and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yifang; Gong, Peng; Giri, Chandra

    2015-05-01

    Land cover is an important variable for many studies involving the Earth surface, such as climate, food security, hydrology, soil erosion, atmospheric quality, conservation biology, and plant functioning. Land cover not only changes with human caused land use changes, but also changes with nature. Therefore, the state of land cover is highly dynamic. In winter snow shields underneath various other land cover types in higher latitudes. Floods may persist for a long period in a year over low land areas in the tropical and subtropical regions. Forest maybe burnt or clear cut in a few days and changes to bare land. Within several months, the coverage of crops may vary from bare land to nearly 100% crops and then back to bare land following harvest. The highly dynamic nature of land cover creates a challenge in mapping and monitoring which remains to be adequately addressed. As economic globalization continues to intensify, there is an increasing trend of land cover/land use change, environmental pollution, land degradation, biodiversity loss at the global scale, timely and reliable information on global land cover and its changes is urgently needed to mitigate the negative impact of global environment change.

  12. e-Infrastuctures interoperability: the Geohazards Exploitation Platform for the use of satellite earth observations in Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caumont, Herve; Brito, Fabrice; Mathot, Emmanuel; Barchetta, Francesco; Loeschau, Frank

    2015-04-01

    We present recent achievements with the Geohazards Exploitation Platform (GEP), a European contribution to the GEO SuperSites, and its interoperability with the MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes (MED-SUV) e- infrastructure. The GEP is a catalyst for the use of satellite Earth observation missions, providing data to initiatives such as the GEO Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories (GSNL), the Volcano and Seismic Hazards CEOS Pilots or the European Plate Observing System (EPOS). As satellite sensors are delivering increasing amounts of data, researchers need more computational science tools and services. The GEP contribution in this regard allows scientists to access different data types, relevant to the same area and phenomena and to directly stage selected inputs to scalable processing applications that deliver EO-based science products. With the GEP concept of operation for improved collaboration, a partner can bring its processing tools, use from his workspace other shared toolboxes and access large data repositories. GEP is based on Open Source Software components, on a Cloud Services architecture inheriting a range of ESA and EC funded innovations, and is associating the scientific community and SMEs in implementing new capabilities. Via MED-SUV, we are making discoverable and accessible a large number of products over the Mt. Etna, Vesu- vius/Campi Flegrei volcanic areas, which are of broader interest for Geosciences researchers, so they can process ENVISAT MERIS, ENVISAT ASAR, and ERS SAR data (both Level 1 and Level 2) hosted in the ESA clusters and in ESA's Virtual Archive, TerraSAR-X data hosted in DLR's Virtual Archive, as well as data hosted in other dedicated MED-SUV Virtual Archives (e.g. for LANDSAT, EOS-1). GEP will gradually access Sentinel-1A data, other space agencies data and value-added products. Processed products can also be published and archived on the MED-SUV e-Infrastructure. In this effort, data policy rules applied to the

  13. Spectral signatures of the ionospheric Alfvén resonator to be observed by low-Earth orbit satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkov, V. V.; Pilipenko, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    Interference of an incident and reflected Alfvén pulses propagating inside the ionospheric Alfvén resonator (IAR) is studied on the basis of a simple one-dimensional model. Particular emphasis has been placed on the analysis of spectral features of ultralow frequency (˜1-15 Hz) electric perturbations recently observed by Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite. This "fingerprint" multiband spectral structure was observed when satellite descended in the terminator vicinity. Among factors affecting spectral structure the satellite position and distance from the IAR boundaries are most significant. It is concluded that the observed spectrograms exhibit modulation with "period" depending on propagation delay time of reflected Alfvén pulses in such a way that this effect can mask a spectral resonance structure resulted from excitation of IAR eigenmodes. The proposed interference effect is capable to produce a spectral pattern resembling a fingerprint which is compatible with the satellite observations.

  14. Measurements by Mail: Satellite-Controlled Balloons for Making Real-Time Atmospheric Observations Anywhere on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, P. B.

    2008-12-01

    While most of the atmosphere is only a few tens of kilometers overhead, gaining access to this critical region of the earth system is notoriously difficult. Aircraft have been highly successful as atmospheric research platforms but their use can be limited by high costs, complex logistics, and need for ground-support infrastructure. While small Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) carry far fewer instruments, they promise to overcome some of these limitations, especially if regulatory and air safety issues can be resolved. Here we describe five years of development on a new type of unmanned platform that can be flown with far fewer restrictions than current UAS. This altitude-controlled balloon can be mailed to collaborators almost anywhere in the world, launched within hours, and flown remotely from our laboratory via satellite link. It can be commanded to perform soundings, track atmospheric layers, or navigate divergent wind fields over periods ranging from days to potentially weeks; meteorological and chemical observations from the balloon are processed on the ground and distributed via the internet in near real time. These controlled balloons have been used in several recent atmospheric research campaigns and are now providing new possibilities for long-distance collaboration, low-cost deployments, and research in previously inaccessible parts of the lower atmosphere.

  15. A Novel Double Cluster and Principal Component Analysis-Based Optimization Method for the Orbit Design of Earth Observation Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The weighted sum and genetic algorithm-based hybrid method (WSGA-based HM, which has been applied to multiobjective orbit optimizations, is negatively influenced by human factors through the artificial choice of the weight coefficients in weighted sum method and the slow convergence of GA. To address these two problems, a cluster and principal component analysis-based optimization method (CPC-based OM is proposed, in which many candidate orbits are gradually randomly generated until the optimal orbit is obtained using a data mining method, that is, cluster analysis based on principal components. Then, the second cluster analysis of the orbital elements is introduced into CPC-based OM to improve the convergence, developing a novel double cluster and principal component analysis-based optimization method (DCPC-based OM. In DCPC-based OM, the cluster analysis based on principal components has the advantage of reducing the human influences, and the cluster analysis based on six orbital elements can reduce the search space to effectively accelerate convergence. The test results from a multiobjective numerical benchmark function and the orbit design results of an Earth observation satellite show that DCPC-based OM converges more efficiently than WSGA-based HM. And DCPC-based OM, to some degree, reduces the influence of human factors presented in WSGA-based HM.

  16. Towards a standard licensing scheme for the access and use of satellite earth observation data for disaster management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nathan E.

    2017-10-01

    This paper explores from the view of the data recipient and user the complexities of creating a common licensing scheme for the access and use of satellite earth observation (EO) data in international disaster management (DM) activities. EO data contributions in major disaster events often involve numerous data providers with separate licensing mechanisms for controlling the access, uses, and distribution of data by the end users. A lack of standardization among the terminology, wording, and conditions within these licenses creates a complex legal environment for users, and often prevents them from using, sharing and combining datasets in an effective and timely manner. It also creates uncertainty among data providers as to the types of licensing controls that should be applied in disaster scenarios. This paper builds from an ongoing comparative analysis of the common and conflicting conditions among data licenses that must be addressed in order to facilitate easier access and use of EO data within the DM sector and offers recommendations towards the alignment of the structural and technical aspects of licenses among data providers.

  17. Coping with the deluge of ';Big Data': The challenge of exploiting satellite earth observation data in the new era of High Performance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purss, M. B.; Lewis, A.; Ip, A.; Wyborn, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Australia's Earth Observation Program has acquired and archived satellite data for the Australian Government since the establishment of the Australian Landsat Station in 1979. Data have been acquired from many sensors and platforms including ERS, EnviSAT, MODIS, ASTER, SPOT and ALOS, although the bulk of the continuous observations are from the Landsat instruments. The Landsat mission is the longest continuous environmental monitoring experiment in history; producing a global archive of earth observations spanning over 41 years. Geoscience Australia maintains an archive of Landsat data for Australia and produces products and information to support the delivery of government policy objectives. Future Earth observation missions promise an exponential increase in the volumes of open data from Earth observing satellites. For the Australian region the NASA/USGS Landsat-8 satellite is now contributing up to 50 GB of data per day and ESA's Sentinel-2 constellation (due for launch in early 2014) will provide close to 500 GB of data per day to Australia's existing archive of earth observation data. With just these two new data sources the Australian Satellite Earth Observation archive is expected to grow to around 1 PB by the end of 2014. Extracting information from satellite data is a long-standing challenge made more difficult by increased data volumes. Recognising this issue, the Australian Government funded the ';Unlocking the Landsat Archive' (ULA) consortium project from 2010 to 2013 to process Australia's Landsat archive to fully calibrated sensor and scene independent data products for the period from 1998 to 2012 and to investigate methods of arranging this archive so that it can be exploited to produce value added information products. The data outputs from the ULA project, currently totalling close to 400 TB, have become a fundamental component of Australia's eResearch infrastructure. The data are hosted on the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) and are

  18. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  19. Stereoscopic observations from meteorological satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, A. F.; Mack, R.; Negri, A.

    The capability of making stereoscopic observations of clouds from meteorological satellites is a new basic analysis tool with a broad spectrum of applications. Stereoscopic observations from satellites were first made using the early vidicon tube weather satellites (e.g., Ondrejka and Conover [1]). However, the only high quality meteorological stereoscopy from low orbit has been done from Apollo and Skylab, (e.g., Shenk et al. [2] and Black [3], [4]). Stereoscopy from geosynchronous satellites was proposed by Shenk [5] and Bristor and Pichel [6] in 1974 which allowed Minzner et al. [7] to demonstrate the first quantitative cloud height analysis. In 1978 Bryson [8] and desJardins [9] independently developed digital processing techniques to remap stereo images which made possible precision height measurement and spectacular display of stereograms (Hasler et al. [10], and Hasler [11]). In 1980 the Japanese Geosynchronous Satellite (GMS) and the U.S. GOES-West satellite were synchronized to obtain stereo over the central Pacific as described by Fujita and Dodge [12] and in this paper. Recently the authors have remapped images from a Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) to the coordinate system of a Geosynchronous Earth Orbiter (GEO) and obtained stereoscopic cloud height measurements which promise to have quality comparable to previous all GEO stereo. It has also been determined that the north-south imaging scan rate of some GEOs can be slowed or reversed. Therefore the feasibility of obtaining stereoscopic observations world wide from combinations of operational GEO and LEO satellites has been demonstrated. Stereoscopy from satellites has many advantages over infrared techniques for the observation of cloud structure because it depends only on basic geometric relationships. Digital remapping of GEO and LEO satellite images is imperative for precision stereo height measurement and high quality displays because of the curvature of the earth and the large angular separation of the

  20. Assessing gaps in irrigated agricultural productivity through satellite earth observations-A case study of the Fergana Valley, Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löw, Fabian; Biradar, Chandrashekhar; Fliemann, Elisabeth; Lamers, John P. A.; Conrad, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Improving crop area and/or crop yields in agricultural regions is one of the foremost scientific challenges for the next decades. This is especially true in irrigated areas because sustainable intensification of irrigated crop production is virtually the sole means to enhance food supply and contribute to meeting food demands of a growing population. Yet, irrigated crop production worldwide is suffering from soil degradation and salinity, reduced soil fertility, and water scarcity rendering the performance of irrigation schemes often below potential. On the other hand, the scope for improving irrigated agricultural productivity remains obscure also due to the lack of spatial data on agricultural production (e.g. crop acreage and yield). To fill this gap, satellite earth observations and a replicable methodology were used to estimate crop yields at the field level for the period 2010/2014 in the Fergana Valley, Central Asia, to understand the response of agricultural productivity to factors related to the irrigation and drainage infrastructure and environment. The results showed that cropping pattern, i.e. the presence or absence of multi-annual crop rotations, and spatial diversity of crops had the most persistent effects on crop yields across observation years suggesting the need for introducing sustainable cropping systems. On the other hand, areas with a lower crop diversity or abundance of crop rotation tended to have lower crop yields, with differences of partly more than one t/ha yield. It is argued that factors related to the infrastructure, for example, the distance of farms to the next settlement or the density of roads, had a persistent effect on crop yield dynamics over time. The improvement potential of cotton and wheat yields were estimated at 5%, compared to crop yields of farms in the direct vicinity of settlements or roads. In this study it is highlighted how remotely sensed estimates of crop production in combination with geospatial technologies

  1. The Role of Anchor Stations in the Validation of Earth Observation Satellite Data and Products. The Valencia and the Alacant Anchor Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Geraldo Ferreira, A.; Saleh-Contell, Kauzar

    Space technology facilitates humanity and science with a global revolutionary view of the Earth through the acquisition of Earth Observation satellite data. Satellites capture information over different spatial and temporal scales and assist in understanding natural climate processes and in detecting and explaining climate change. Accurate Earth Observation data is needed to describe climate processes by improving the parameterisations of different climate elements. Algorithms to produce geophysical parameters from raw satellite observations should go through selection processes or participate in inter-comparison programmes to ensure performance reliability. Geophysical parameter datasets, obtained from satellite observations, should pass a quality control before they are accepted in global databases for impact, diagnostic or sensitivity studies. Calibration and Validation, or simply "Cal/Val", is the activity that endeavours to ensure that remote sensing products are highly consistent and reproducible. This is an evolving scientific activity that is becoming increasingly important as more long-term studies on global change are undertaken, and new satellite missions are launched. Calibration is the process of quantitatively defining the system responses to known, controlled signal inputs. Validation refers to the process of assessing, by independent means, the quality of the data products derived from the system outputs. These definitions are generally accepted and most often used in the remote sensing context to refer specifically and respectively to sensor radiometric calibration and geophysical parameter validation. Anchor Stations are carefully selected locations at which instruments measure quantities that are needed to run, calibrate or validate models and algorithms. These are needed to quanti-tatively evaluate satellite data and convert it into geophysical information. The instruments collect measurements of basic quantities over a long timescale

  2. ESA's Earth Observation in Support of Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The intervention will present ESA's Earth Observation Programme and its contribution to Geoscience. ESA's Earth observation missions are mainly grouped into three categories: The Sentinel satellites in the context of the European Copernicus Programme, the scientific Earth Explorers and the meteorological missions. Developments, applications and scientific results for the different mission types will be addressed, along with overall trends and strategies. A special focus will be put on the Earth Explorers, who form the science and research element of ESA's Living Planet Programme and focus on the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and Earth's interior. In addition the operational Sentinel satellites have a huge potential for Geoscience. Earth Explorers' emphasis is also on learning more about the interactions between these components and the impact that human activity is having on natural Earth processes. The process of Earth Explorer mission selection has given the Earth science community an efficient tool for advancing the understanding of Earth as a system.

  3. A Political History of U.S. Commercial Remote Sensing, 1984-2007: Conflict, Collaboration, and the Role of Knowledge in the High-Tech World of Earth Observation Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Kenneth Parker

    2007-01-01

    The political history of U.S. commercial remote sensing began in 1984 when the U.S. government first attempted to commercialize its civil earth observation satellite system â Landsat. Since then, the high technology of earth imaging satellite systems has generated intense debates and policy conflicts, primarily centered on U.S. government concerns over the national security and foreign policy implications of high-resolution commercial satellite systems. Conversely, proponents of commerc...

  4. Earth rotation parameters from satellite techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Daniela; Beutler, Gerhard; Jäggi, Adrian; Meindl, Michael; Dach, Rolf; Sosnica, Krzysztof; Baumann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    It has been demonstrated since several years that satellite techniques are capable of determining Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) with a daily or even sub-daily resolution. Especially Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) with their huge amount of observations can determine time series of polar motion (PM) and length of day (LOD) rather well. But also SLR with its spherical satellites whose orbital motions are easy to model and that allow long orbital arc lengths can deliver valuable contributions to Earth rotation. We analyze GNSS solutions (using GPS and GLONASS) and SLR solutions (using LAGEOS) regarding their potential of estimating polar motion and LOD with daily and subdaily temporal resolution. A steadily improving modeling applied in the analysis of space-geodetic data aims at improved time series of geodetic parameters, e.g., the ERPs. The Earth's gravity field and especially its temporal variations are one point of interest for an improved modeling for satellite techniques. For modeling the short-periodic gravity field variations induced by mass variations in the atmosphere and the oceans the GRACE science team provides the Atmosphere and Ocean Dealiasing (AOD) products. They contain 6-hourly gravity fields of the atmosphere and the oceans. We apply these corrections in the analysis of satellite-geodetic data and show the impact on the estimated ERPs. It is well known that the degree-2 coefficients of the Earth's gravity field are correlated with polar motion and LOD. We show to what extent temporal variations in the degree-2 coefficients are influencing the ERP estimates.

  5. Observations of artificial satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MAMMANO

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available The following publication gives the results of photographic
    observations of artificial satellites made at Asiago during the second
    and third year of this programme. The fixed camera technique and that
    with moving film (the latter still in its experimental stage have been used.

  6. Robust Satellite Techniques for monitoring earth emitted radiation in the Japanese seismic area by using MTSAT observations in the TIR spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzano, Nicola; Filizzola, Carolina; Hattori, Katsumi; Lisi, Mariano; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Since eighties, the fluctuations of Earth's thermally emitted radiation, measured by satellite sensors operating in the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral range, have been associated with the complex process of preparation for major earthquakes. But, like other claimed earthquake precursors (seismological, physical, chemical, biological, etc.) they have been for long-time considered with some caution by scientific community. The lack of a rigorous definition of anomalous TIR signal fluctuations and the scarce attention paid to the possibility that other causes (e.g. meteorological) different from seismic activity could be responsible for the observed TIR variations were the main causes of such skepticism. Compared with previously proposed approaches the general change detection approach, named Robust Satellite Techniques (RST), showed good ability to discriminate anomalous TIR signals possibly associated to seismic activity, from the normal variability of TIR signal due to other causes. Thanks to its full exportability on different satellite packages, since 2001 RST has been implemented on TIR images acquired by polar (e.g. NOAA-AVHRR, EOS -MODIS) and geostationary (e.g. MSG-SEVIRI, NOAA-GOES/W, GMS-5/VISSR) satellite sensors, in order to verify the presence (or absence) of TIR anomalies in presence (absence) of earthquakes (with M>4) in different seismogenic areas around the world (e.g. Italy, Greece, Turkey, India, Taiwan, etc.). In this paper, the RST data analysis approach has been implemented on TIR satellite records collected over Japan by the geostationary satellite sensor MTSAT (Multifunctional Transport SATellites) and RETIRA (Robust Estimator of TIR Anomalies) index was used to identify Significant Sequences of TIR Anomalies (SSTAs) in a possible space-time relations with seismic events. Achieved results will be discussed in the perspective of a multi-parametric approach for a time-Dependent Assessment of Seismic Hazard (t-DASH).

  7. Earth Observing-1 Hyperion: 2001-Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Earth Observing-1(EO-1) satellite was launched on November 21, 2000 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  8. Earth Observing One - Hyperion (2001 - present) Privileged

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Earth Observing-1(EO-1) satellite was launched on November 21, 2000 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  9. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  10. Meteorological Satellites (METSAT) and Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is for the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) instruments that are being designed and manufactured for the Meteorological Satellites Project (METSAT) and the Earth Observing System (EOS) integrated programs. The FMEA analyzes the design of the METSAT and EOS instruments as they currently exist. This FMEA is intended to identify METSAT and EOS failure modes and their effect on spacecraft-instrument and instrument-component interfaces. The prime objective of this FMEA is to identify potential catastrophic and critical failures so that susceptibility to the failures and their effects can be eliminated from the METSAT/EOS instruments.

  11. Comprehensive Study on Small and Low Cost Satellite Technology for Earth Observation with Case Study for Indonesia: Projection for 2002-2022

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djojodihardjo, Harijono

    and economic progress, while facing global competitiveness locally as opportunities and challenges. Of particular importance is the utilization and development of earth observation capabilities for environmental natural resources imperatives to this end is quite significant. On one hand there may appear challenges to achieve unique and high quality requirements on many of the elements of social and economic progress, i.e. natural resources, human resources, market opportunities and geographical advantage; on the other hand one may face constraints in the financial system, cultural inertia and paradigm, and the need to carry forward large momentum that may pull back technological and economic progress that may be characterized by a "roller coaster" dynamics. Satellite Technology for Earth Observation, its Utilization and Development is carried out with Indonesian Development Interest in mind. Space System Services and Players are identified. Mission objectives associated with Urban and Rural Areas as well as Satellite-Based Multimedia Technology Applications For Promoting Rural Development will be identified. System design analysis and synthesis will be elaborated and some alternatives will be presented following a unified system outlook. Ground Segment and Space Segment Architecture will be elaborated by carrying out Architecture Optimization.

  12. High-Resolution NDVI from Planet's Constellation of Earth Observing Nano-Satellites: A New Data Source for Precision Agriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2016-09-19

    Planet Labs ("Planet") operate the largest fleet of active nano-satellites in orbit, offering an unprecedented monitoring capacity of daily and global RGB image capture at 3-5 m resolution. However, limitations in spectral resolution and lack of accurate radiometric sensor calibration impact the utility of this rich information source. In this study, Planet\\'s RGB imagery was translated into a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI): a common metric for vegetation growth and condition. Our framework employs a data mining approach to build a set of rule-based regression models that relate RGB data to atmospherically corrected Landsat-8 NDVI. The approach was evaluated over a desert agricultural landscape in Saudi Arabia where the use of near-coincident (within five days) Planet and Landsat-8 acquisitions in the training of the regression models resulted in NDVI predictabilities with an r2 of approximately 0.97 and a Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) on the order of 0.014 (~9%). The MAD increased to 0.021 (~14%) when the Landsat NDVI training image was further away (i.e., 11-16 days) from the corrected Planet image. In these cases, the use of MODIS observations to inform on the change in NDVI occurring between overpasses was shown to significantly improve prediction accuracies. MAD levels ranged from 0.002 to 0.011 (3.9% to 9.1%) for the best performing 80% of the data. The technique is generic and extendable to any region of interest, increasing the utility of Planet\\'s dense time-series of RGB imagery.

  13. Uplink Power Control For Earth/Satellite/Earth Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy

    1994-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem adjusts power radiated by uplink transmitter in Earth station/satellite relay station/ Earth station communication system. Adjustments made to compensate for anticipated changes in attenuation by rain. Raw input is a received downlink beacon singal, amplitude of which affected not only by rain fade but also by scintillation, attenuation in atmospheric gases, and diurnal effects.

  14. Monitoring objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, Scot S.; Pertica, Alexander J.; Riot, Vincent J.; De Vries, Willem H.; Bauman, Brian J.; Nikolaev, Sergei; Henderson, John R.; Phillion, Donald W.

    2015-06-30

    An ephemeris refinement system includes satellites with imaging devices in earth orbit to make observations of space-based objects ("target objects") and a ground-based controller that controls the scheduling of the satellites to make the observations of the target objects and refines orbital models of the target objects. The ground-based controller determines when the target objects of interest will be near enough to a satellite for that satellite to collect an image of the target object based on an initial orbital model for the target objects. The ground-based controller directs the schedules to be uploaded to the satellites, and the satellites make observations as scheduled and download the observations to the ground-based controller. The ground-based controller then refines the initial orbital models of the target objects based on the locations of the target objects that are derived from the observations.

  15. Future Satellite Gravimetry and Earth Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Flury, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    Currently, a first generation of dedicated satellite missions for the precise mapping of the Earth’s gravity field is in orbit (CHAMP, GRACE, and soon GOCE). The gravity data from these satellite missions provide us with very new information on the dynamics of planet Earth. In particular, on the mass distribution in the Earth’s interior, the entire water cycle (ocean circulation, ice mass balance, continental water masses, and atmosphere), and on changes in the mass distribution. The results are fascinating, but still rough with respect to spatial and temporal resolution. Technical progress in satellite-to-satellite tracking and in gravity gradiometry will allow more detailed results in the future. In this special issue, Earth scientists develop visions of future applications based on follow-on high-precision satellite gravimetry missions.

  16. Geosynchronous Earth Orbit/Low Earth Orbit Space Object Inspection and Debris Disposal: A Preliminary Analysis Using a Carrier Satellite With Deployable Small Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Crockett, Derick A.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed observations of geosynchronous satellites from earth are very limited. To better inspect these high altitude satellites, the use of small, refuelable satellites is proposed. The small satellites are stationed on a carrier platform in an orbit near the population of geosynchronous satellites. A carrier platform equipped with deployable, refuelable SmallSats is a viable option to inspect geosynchronous satellites. The propellant requirement to transfer to a targeted geosynchronous sate...

  17. COMS normal operation for Earth Observation mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Min

    2012-09-01

    Communication Ocean Meteorological Satellite (COMS) for the hybrid mission of meteorological observation, ocean monitoring, and telecommunication service was launched onto Geostationary Earth Orbit on June 27, 2010 and it is currently under normal operation service since April 2011. The COMS is located on 128.2° East of the geostationary orbit. In order to perform the three missions, the COMS has 3 separate payloads, the meteorological imager (MI), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), and the Ka-band antenna. Each payload is dedicated to one of the three missions, respectively. The MI and GOCI perform the Earth observation mission of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively. For this Earth observation mission the COMS requires daily mission commands from the satellite control ground station and daily mission is affected by the satellite control activities. For this reason daily mission planning is required. The Earth observation mission operation of COMS is described in aspects of mission operation characteristics and mission planning for the normal operation services of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring. And the first year normal operation results after the In-Orbit-Test (IOT) are investigated through statistical approach to provide the achieved COMS normal operation status for the Earth observation mission.

  18. Operational monitoring and forecasting of bathing water quality through exploiting satellite Earth observation and models: The AlgaRisk demonstration service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutler, J. D.; Warren, M. A.; Miller, P. I.; Barciela, R.; Mahdon, R.; Land, P. E.; Edwards, K.; Wither, A.; Jonas, P.; Murdoch, N.; Roast, S. D.; Clements, O.; Kurekin, A.

    2015-04-01

    Coastal zones and shelf-seas are important for tourism, commercial fishing and aquaculture. As a result the importance of good water quality within these regions to support life is recognised worldwide and a number of international directives for monitoring them now exist. This paper describes the AlgaRisk water quality monitoring demonstration service that was developed and operated for the UK Environment Agency in response to the microbiological monitoring needs within the revised European Union Bathing Waters Directive. The AlgaRisk approach used satellite Earth observation to provide a near-real time monitoring of microbiological water quality and a series of nested operational models (atmospheric and hydrodynamic-ecosystem) provided a forecast capability. For the period of the demonstration service (2008-2013) all monitoring and forecast datasets were processed in near-real time on a daily basis and disseminated through a dedicated web portal, with extracted data automatically emailed to agency staff. Near-real time data processing was achieved using a series of supercomputers and an Open Grid approach. The novel web portal and java-based viewer enabled users to visualise and interrogate current and historical data. The system description, the algorithms employed and example results focussing on a case study of an incidence of the harmful algal bloom Karenia mikimotoi are presented. Recommendations and the potential exploitation of web services for future water quality monitoring services are discussed.

  19. Design of a Free and Open Source Data Processing, Archiving, and Distribution Subsystem for the Ground Receiving Station of the Philippine Scientific Earth Observation Micro-Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranas, R. K. D.; Jiao, B. J. D.; Magallon, B. J. P.; Ramos, M. K. F.; Amado, J. A.; Tamondong, A. M.; Tupas, M. E. A.

    2016-06-01

    The Philippines's PHL-Microsat program aims to launch its first earth observation satellite, DIWATA, on the first quarter of 2016. DIWATA's payload consists of a high-precision telescope (HPT), spaceborne multispectral imager (SMI) with liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF), and a wide field camera (WFC). Once launched, it will provide information about the Philippines, both for disaster and environmental applications. Depending on the need, different remote sensing products will be generated from the microsatellite sensors. This necessitates data processing capability on the ground control segment. Rather than rely on commercial turnkey solutions, the PHL-Microsat team, specifically Project 3:DPAD, opted to design its own ground receiving station data subsystems. This paper describes the design of the data subsystems of the ground receiving station (GRS) for DIWATA. The data subsystems include: data processing subsystem for automatic calibration and georeferencing of raw images as well as the generation of higher level processed data products; data archiving subsystem for storage and backups of both raw and processed data products; and data distribution subsystem for providing a web-based interface and product download facility for the user community. The design covers the conceptual design of the abovementioned subsystems, the free and open source software (FOSS) packages used to implement them, and the challenges encountered in adapting the existing FOSS packages to DIWATA GRS requirements.

  20. DESIGN OF A FREE AND OPEN SOURCE DATA PROCESSING, ARCHIVING, AND DISTRIBUTION SUBSYSTEM FOR THE GROUND RECEIVING STATION OF THE PHILIPPINE SCIENTIFIC EARTH OBSERVATION MICRO-SATELLITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. D. Aranas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Philippines’s PHL-Microsat program aims to launch its first earth observation satellite, DIWATA, on the first quarter of 2016. DIWATA’s payload consists of a high-precision telescope (HPT, spaceborne multispectral imager (SMI with liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF, and a wide field camera (WFC. Once launched, it will provide information about the Philippines, both for disaster and environmental applications. Depending on the need, different remote sensing products will be generated from the microsatellite sensors. This necessitates data processing capability on the ground control segment. Rather than rely on commercial turnkey solutions, the PHL-Microsat team, specifically Project 3:DPAD, opted to design its own ground receiving station data subsystems. This paper describes the design of the data subsystems of the ground receiving station (GRS for DIWATA. The data subsystems include: data processing subsystem for automatic calibration and georeferencing of raw images as well as the generation of higher level processed data products; data archiving subsystem for storage and backups of both raw and processed data products; and data distribution subsystem for providing a web-based interface and product download facility for the user community. The design covers the conceptual design of the abovementioned subsystems, the free and open source software (FOSS packages used to implement them, and the challenges encountered in adapting the existing FOSS packages to DIWATA GRS requirements.

  1. Polar Operational Environmental Satellites: Looking at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Roberto M.

    2000-01-01

    A broad overview of the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) Project is presented at a very high level. A general description of the scientific instruments on the Television Infrared Observational Satellite (TIROS) spacecraft is presented with emphasis put on their mission and the products derived from the data. Actual pictures produced from POES instruments data are shown to help the audience relate our work to their everyday life, as affected by the weather systems.

  2. Polar Operational Environmental Satellites: Looking at Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Roberto M.

    2000-01-01

    A broad overview of the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) Project is presented at a very high level. A general description of the scientific instruments on the Television Infrared Observational Satellite (TIROS) spacecraft is presented with emphasis put on their mission and the products derived from the data. Actual pictures produced from POES instruments data are shown to help the audience relate our work to their everyday life, as affected by the weather systems.

  3. Copernicus: a quantum leap in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbacher, Josef

    2015-04-01

    Copernicus is the most ambitious, most comprehensive Earth observation system world-wide. It aims at giving decision-makers better information to act upon, at global, continental, national and regional level. The European Union (EU) leads the overall programme, while the European Space Agency (ESA) coordinates the space component. Similar to meteorology, satellite data is combined with data from airborne and ground sensors to provide a holistic view of the state of the planet. All these data are fed into a range of thematic information services designed to benefit the environment and to support policy-makers and other stakeholders to make decisions, coordinate policy areas, and formulate strategies relating to the environment. Moreover, the data will also be used for predicting future climate trends. Never has such a comprehensive Earth-observation based system been in place before. It will be fully integrated into an informed decision making process, thus enabling economic and social benefits through better access to information globally. A key feature of Copernicus is the free and open data policy of the Sentinel satellite data. This will enable that Earth observation based information enters completely new domains of daily life. High quality, regularly updated satellite observations become available for basically everyone. To ensure universal access new ground segment and data access concepts need to be developed. As more data are made available, better decisions can made, more business will be created and science and research can be achieved through the upcoming Sentinel data.

  4. Action planning for agile earth-observing satellite mission planning problem%面向动作序列的敏捷卫星任务规划问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙凯; 白国庆; 陈英武; 贺仁杰; 邢立宁

    2012-01-01

    针对新一代敏捷卫星对地观测任务规划问题,考虑了直拍直传、立体成像、多条带拼接等复杂任务需求和观测、数据下传、对日定向等九种卫星动作,在任务规划的同时进行卫星动作规划.设计并实现了前瞻启发式构造算法,算法满足卫星存储、能量等复杂约束,在前瞻过程中每次决定当前任务是否安排.采用基于专家知识的多种启发式规则决定任务安排与安排卫星动作序列.仿真实例及实际工程应用表明,算法可以在很短的时间内给出较好的结果,证明了本文方法对于敏捷卫星任务规划问题的适用性.%The mission of Earth observing satellite (EOS) is to acquire photographs of specified areas on Earth surface at the requests of users. The goal is to select a feasible task sequence to maximize the sum of weights. This research presents the mission planning problem of the next-generation agile Earth-observing satellite(AEOS). The complex user requests(including multi-strip area, real time download request, and stereoscopic request) and complex satellite constraints were considered, covering eight satellite actions(including observe action, data download, SSR Erase action, attitude movement, heliocentric pointing, geocentric pointing, and instrument action) . A chronological look ahead algorithm was designed to solve the problem, heuristic rules based on expert knowledge were used to make choices and arrange satellite actions, which satisfy all satellite physical constraints and operational constraints. For the current experiment instances and applications, the algorithm can give results in very short time. Experiment results suggest that our algorithm works well for the agile earth-observing satellite planning problem.

  5. GEO中高分辨率民用光学对地观测卫星发展研究%Development Analysis on GEO Civil Optical Earth Observation Satellites with Mid-high Resolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于龙江; 刘云鹤

    2013-01-01

    The development of state-of-art GEO civil optical earth observation satellites with mid-high resolution is investigated, including COMS, GEO-Africa, GEO-Oculus, etc. The mission and main functions of these satellites are analyzed. The system level design and main technology approach of these satellites are summarized and compared. Finally, several issues that are important in GEO mid-high resolution civil optical earth observation satellites technology are discussed, such as selection of focal detector, high stability attitude control, jitter rejection, heat management in the night, etc. The research results could be instructions to the development of China's GEO civil optical earth observation satellites with mid-high resolution.%调研了国外地球静止轨道(GEO)中高分辨率民用光学对地观测卫星的发展情况,其中包括“通信海洋-气象卫星”(COMS)、GEO-Africa和GEO-Oculus等卫星;分析了卫星的任务范围和主要功能;对卫星总体设计方案和采用的主要技术途径进行了归纳和对比.对发展GEO中高分辨率民用光学对地观测卫星需要注意的探测器选型、高稳定度姿态控制、微振动抑制、夜晚阶段的热控等相关问题进行了分析,可为中国发展同类卫星提供参考.

  6. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: 2001-Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Earth Observing-1(EO-1) satellite was launched on November 21, 2000 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration...

  7. Earth observation for rangeland monitoring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available for the methodology is presented in Figure 1. Figure 1: Conceptual framework for the development of grass nutrient estimation models, using remote sensing at various scales Earth Observation for Rangeland Monitoring DR A RAMOELO, DR M CHO AND DR R MATHIEU CSIR... and canopy N conforms to the underlying geology (Figure 2). ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The authors would like to thank the Department of Science and Technology which contributed financially to this work through the grant ?Earth Observation Application Development...

  8. The NASA Earth Science Program and Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeck, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's changing environment impacts every aspect of life on our planet and climate change has profound implications on society. Studying Earth as a single complex system is essential to understanding the causes and consequences of climate change and other global environmental concerns. NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD) shapes an interdisciplinary view of Earth, exploring interactions among the atmosphere, oceans, ice sheets, land surface interior, and life itself. This enables scientists to measure global and climate changes and to inform decisions by Government, other organizations, and people in the United States and around the world. The data collected and results generated are accessible to other agencies and organizations to improve the products and services they provide, including air quality indices, disaster prediction and response, agricultural yield projections, and aviation safety. ESD's Flight Program provides the spacebased observing systems and supporting infrastructure for mission operations and scientific data processing and distribution that support NASA's Earth science research and modeling activities. The Flight Program currently has 21 operating Earth observing space missions, including the recently launched Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2), the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, and the International Space Station (ISS) RapidSCAT and Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) instruments. The ESD has 22 more missions and instruments planned for launch over the next decade. These include first and second tier missions from the 2007 Earth Science Decadal Survey, Climate Continuity missions to assure availability of key climate data sets, and small-sized competitively selected orbital missions and instrument missions of opportunity belonging to the Earth Venture (EV) Program. Small satellites (500 kg or less) are critical contributors to these current and future satellite missions

  9. Integration of satellite fire products into MPI Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystova, Iryna G.; Kloster, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    Fires are the ubiquitous phenomenon affecting all natural biomes. Since the beginning of the satellite Era, fires are being continuously observed from satellites. The most interesting satellite parameter retrieved from satellite measurements is the burned area. Combined with information on biomass available for burning the burned area can be translated into climate relevant carbon emissions from fires into the atmosphere. In this study we integrate observed burned area into a global vegetation model to derive global fire emissions. Global continuous burned area dataset is provided by the Global Fire Emissions Dataset (GFED). GFED products were obtained from MODIS (and pre-MODIS) satellites and are available for the time period of 14 years (1997-2011). This dataset is widely used, well documented and supported by periodical updates containing new features. We integrate the global burned area product into the land model JSBACH, a part of the Earth-System model developed at the Max Plank Institute for Meteorology. The land model JSBACH simulates land biomass in terms of carbon content. Fire is an important disturbance process in the Earth's carbon cycle and affects mainly the carbon stored in vegetation. In the standard JSBACH version fire is represented by process based algorithms. Using the satellite data as an alternative we are targeting better comparability of modeled carbon emissions with independent satellite measurements of atmospheric composition. The structure of burned vegetation inside of a biome can be described as the balance between woody and herbaceous vegetation. GFED provides in addition to the burned area satellite derived information of the tree cover distribution within the burned area. Using this dataset, we can attribute the burned area to the respective simulated herbaceous or woody biomass within the vegetation model. By testing several extreme cases we evaluate the quantitative impact of vegetation balance between woody and herbaceous

  10. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy - a 30 year adventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, R. H.

    1991-12-01

    The first information on the Earth's gravitational field from artificial satellite observations was published in 1958. The next years have seen a dramatic improvement in the resolution and accuracy of the series representation of the Earth's gravity field. The improvements have taken place slowly taking advantage of improved measurement accuracy and the increasing number of satellites. The proposed ARISTOTELES mission would provide the opportunity to take a significant leap in improving our knowledge of the Earth's gravity field.

  11. Globally Gridded Satellite observations for climate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, K.R.; Ansari, S.; Bain, C.L.; Bourassa, M.A.; Dickinson, M.J.; Funk, C.; Helms, C.N.; Hennon, C.C.; Holmes, C.D.; Huffman, G.J.; Kossin, J.P.; Lee, H.-T.; Loew, A.; Magnusdottir, G.

    2011-01-01

    Geostationary satellites have provided routine, high temporal resolution Earth observations since the 1970s. Despite the long period of record, use of these data in climate studies has been limited for numerous reasons, among them that no central archive of geostationary data for all international satellites exists, full temporal and spatial resolution data are voluminous, and diverse calibration and navigation formats encumber the uniform processing needed for multisatellite climate studies. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) set the stage for overcoming these issues by archiving a subset of the full-resolution geostationary data at ~10-km resolution at 3-hourly intervals since 1983. Recent efforts at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center to provide convenient access to these data include remapping the data to a standard map projection, recalibrating the data to optimize temporal homogeneity, extending the record of observations back to 1980, and reformatting the data for broad public distribution. The Gridded Satellite (GridSat) dataset includes observations from the visible, infrared window, and infrared water vapor channels. Data are stored in Network Common Data Format (netCDF) using standards that permit a wide variety of tools and libraries to process the data quickly and easily. A novel data layering approach, together with appropriate satellite and file metadata, allows users to access GridSat data at varying levels of complexity based on their needs. The result is a climate data record already in use by the meteorological community. Examples include reanalysis of tropical cyclones, studies of global precipitation, and detection and tracking of the intertropical convergence zone.

  12. The global Earth observation system of systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, José

    2010-05-01

    Recognizing the growing need for improved Earth observations, 140 governments and leading international organizations have established the Group on Earth Observations, or GEO, to collaborate and implement a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) by the year 2015. Countries and organizations are contributing their respective Earth monitoring systems, from satellites in space and in situ instruments on land, in the oceans and in the atmosphere. They are interlinking these systems so that, together, they provide a more complete picture of Earth's systems dynamics. GEO is developing common technical standards to pool observations and ensure their cross calibration and validation. It is building a web-based infrastructure to ensure easy access to the wealth of data and services contributed to, or generated by, GEOSS. GEO has been promoting the free and open sharing and dissemination of Earth observation data which has already driven significant changes in data distribution policies of several key Earth observing satellites: Landsat, Cbers and the future Sentinels of GMES. GEO is also reflecting on solutions to transition research systems into operational observing systems and ensure their long-term sustainability. First, the current status of GEOSS implementation and these core activities of GEO will be presented. Then, examples of global data sets and information systems or services developed through GEOSS will be presented: - a high-resolution global digital elevation model (DEM) based on Aster data was released by Japan and the USA. In situ measurements are now being used to improve the model as well as the stacking procedure used to develop it; - the Supersites initiative ensures coordinated access to data and information on natural hazards in geologically active regions. In light of the recent tragedy in Haiti, this project created a dedicated web site regularly updated with maps of seismicity, tectonics, Coulomb stress changes, topography, real and

  13. Surveying earth resources by remote sensing from satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otterman, J.; Lowman, P.D.; Salomonson, V.V.

    1976-04-01

    The techniques and recent results of orbital remote sensing, with emphasis on Landsat and Skylab imagery are reviewed. Landsat (formerly ERTS) uses electronic sensors (scanners and television) for repetitive observations with moderate ground resolution. The Skylab flights used a wider range of electro-optical sensors and returned film cameras with moderate and high ground resolution. Data from these programs have been used successfully in many fields. For mineral resources, satellite observations have proven valuable in geologic mapping and in exploration for metal, oil, and gas deposits, generally as a guide for other (conventional) techniques. Water resource monitoring with satellite data has included hydrologic mapping, soil moisture studies, and snow surveys. Marine resources have been studied, with applications in the fishing industry and in ocean transportation. Agricultural applications, benefiting from the repetitive coverage possible with satellites, have been especially promising. Crop inventories are being conducted, as well as inventories of timber and rangeland. Overgrazing has been monitored in several areas. Finally, environmental quality has also proven susceptible to orbital remote sensing; several types of water pollution have been successfully monitored. The effects of mining and other activities on the land can also be studied. The future of orbital remote sensing in global monitoring of the Earth's resources seems assured. However, efforts to extend spectral range, increase resolution, and solve cloud-cover problems must be continued. Broad applications of computer analysis techniques are vital to handle the immense amount of information produced by satellite sensors.

  14. Observing tectonic plate motions and deformations from satellite laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Klosko, S. M.; Torrence, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The scope of geodesy has been greatly affected by the advent of artificial near-earth satellites. The present paper provides a description of the results obtained from the reduction of data collected with the aid of satellite laser ranging. It is pointed out that dynamic reduction of satellite laser ranging (SLR) data provides very precise positions in three dimensions for the laser tracking network. The vertical components of the stations, through the tracking geometry provided by the global network and the accurate knowledge of orbital dynamics, are uniquely related to the center of mass of the earth. Attention is given to the observations, the methodologies for reducing satellite observations to estimate station positions, Lageos-observed tectonic plate motions, an improved temporal resolution of SLR plate motions, and the SLR vertical datum.

  15. Observing tectonic plate motions and deformations from satellite laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidis, D. C.; Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Klosko, S. M.; Torrence, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The scope of geodesy has been greatly affected by the advent of artificial near-earth satellites. The present paper provides a description of the results obtained from the reduction of data collected with the aid of satellite laser ranging. It is pointed out that dynamic reduction of satellite laser ranging (SLR) data provides very precise positions in three dimensions for the laser tracking network. The vertical components of the stations, through the tracking geometry provided by the global network and the accurate knowledge of orbital dynamics, are uniquely related to the center of mass of the earth. Attention is given to the observations, the methodologies for reducing satellite observations to estimate station positions, Lageos-observed tectonic plate motions, an improved temporal resolution of SLR plate motions, and the SLR vertical datum.

  16. Earth Observations for Global Water Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, Richard; Strauch, Adrian; Toll, David; Fekete, Balazs; Cripe, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    The combined effects of population growth, increasing demands for water to support agriculture, energy security, and industrial expansion, and the challenges of climate change give rise to an urgent need to carefully monitor and assess trends and variations in water resources. Doing so will ensure that sustainable access to adequate quantities of safe and useable water will serve as a foundation for water security. Both satellite and in situ observations combined with data assimilation and models are needed for effective, integrated monitoring of the water cycle's trends and variability in terms of both quantity and quality. On the basis of a review of existing observational systems, we argue that a new integrated monitoring capability for water security purposes is urgently needed. Furthermore, the components for this capability exist and could be integrated through the cooperation of national observational programmes. The Group on Earth Observations should play a central role in the design, implementation, management and analysis of this system and its products.

  17. Aspiring to Spectral Ignorance in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Enabling robust, defensible and integrated decision making in the Era of Big Earth Data requires the fusion of data from multiple and diverse sensor platforms and networks. While the application of standardised global grid systems provides a common spatial analytics framework that facilitates the computationally efficient and statistically valid integration and analysis of these various data sources across multiple scales, there remains the challenge of sensor equivalency; particularly when combining data from different earth observation satellite sensors (e.g. combining Landsat and Sentinel-2 observations). To realise the vision of a sensor ignorant analytics platform for earth observation we require automation of spectral matching across the available sensors. Ultimately, the aim is to remove the requirement for the user to possess any sensor knowledge in order to undertake analysis. This paper introduces the concept of spectral equivalence and proposes a methodology through which equivalent bands may be sourced from a set of potential target sensors through application of equivalence metrics and thresholds. A number of parameters can be used to determine whether a pair of spectra are equivalent for the purposes of analysis. A baseline set of thresholds for these parameters and how to apply them systematically to enable relation of spectral bands amongst numerous different sensors is proposed. The base unit for comparison in this work is the relative spectral response. From this input, determination of a what may constitute equivalence can be related by a user, based on their own conceptualisation of equivalence.

  18. The EarthCARE satellite payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kotska; Perez-Albinana, Abelardo; Lemanczyk, Jerzy; Heliere, Arnaud; Wehr, Tobias; Eisinger, Michael; Lefebvre, Alain; Nakatsuka, Hirotaka; Tomita, Eiichi

    2014-10-01

    EarthCARE is ESA's third Earth Explorer Core Mission, with JAXA providing one instrument. The mission facilitates unique data product synergies, to improve understanding of atmospheric cloud-aerosol interactions and Earth radiative balance, towards enhancing climate and numerical weather prediction models. This paper will describe the payload, consisting of two active instruments: an ATmospheric LIDar (ATLID) and a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), and two passive instruments: a Multi Spectral Imager (MSI) and a Broad Band Radiometer (BBR). ATLID is a UV lidar providing atmospheric echoes, with a vertical resolution of 100 m, up to 40 km altitude. Using very high spectral resolution filtering the relative contributions of particle (aerosols) and Rayleigh (molecular) back scattering will be resolved, allowing cloud and aerosol optical depth to be deduced. Particle scatter co- and cross-polarisation measurements will provide information about the cloud and aerosol particles' physical characteristics. JAXA's 94.05 GHz Cloud Profiling Radar operates with a pulse width of 3.3 μm and repetition frequency 6100 to 7500 Hz. The 2.5 m aperture radar will retrieve data on clouds and precipitation. Doppler shift measurements in the backscatter signal will furthermore allow inference of the vertical motion of particles to an accuracy of about 1 m/s. MSI's 500 m pixel data will provide cloud and aerosol information and give context to the active instrument measurements for 3-D scene construction. Four solar channels and three thermal infrared channels cover 35 km on one side to 115 km on the other side of the other instrument's observations. BBR measures reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation from the scene. To reduce uncertainty in the radiance to flux conversion, three independent view angles are observed for each scene. The combined data allows more accurate flux calculations, which can be further improved using MSI data.

  19. Frequent Rain Observation From Geostationary Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzarri, B.; Gomas Science Team

    The target 3-h observing cycle of GPM will meet requirements from Global NWP and, to a large extent, Regional NWP; and be supportive of VIS/IR-derived rain estimates from geostationary satellites for the purpose of Nowcasting. MW rain observation from geostationary orbit at, say, 15 min intervals, would fully meet Regional NWP requirements and have greatest impact on Nowcasting: but this implies either unprac- tically large antennas or unacceptably coarse resolution. Concepts to overcome this problem have been developed in the US within the study called GEM (Geostationary Microwave Observatory), and now there is in Europe a proposal for a demonstration satellite submitted to ESA as GOMAS (Geostationary Observatory for Microwave Atmospheric Sounding). To overcome the problem of resolution, use of Sub-mm fre- quencies is envisaged: e.g., at 425 GHz, a 10-km resolution at nadir would require a 3-m antenna. The observing principle is based on the use of absorption bands of oxygen (54, 118 and 425 GHz) and of water vapour (183 and 380 GHz). Narrow- bandwidths channels are implemented (for a total of about 40 in the five bands) so as to observe the full profile of temperature and water vapour. Profiles from different bands are differently affected by liquid and ice water of different drop size, and fi- nally by precipitation. Simultaneous retrieval of temperature/humidity profiles, cloud liquid/ice water (total-columns and gross profile) and precipitation rate is in principle possible, and partially demonstrated by several airborne MW/Sub-mm instruments. To transfer this demonstrations in the geostationary orbit, the problem of radiometric sensitivity (additional to that one of the antenna size) has to be solved. With current technology, it is feasible to get sufficient accuracy if scan is limited to about 1/12 of the Earth disk, which is sufficient to abundantly cover Europe, the Mediterranean and Eastern Atlantic. The imaged area can be moved everywhere within the disk

  20. Assessing the Impact of Earth Radiation Pressure Acceleration on Low-Earth Orbit Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielberg, Kristin; Forootan, Ehsan; Lück, Christina; Kusche, Jürgen; Börger, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    The orbits of satellites are influenced by several external forces. The main non-gravitational forces besides thermospheric drag, acting on the surface of satellites, are accelerations due to the Earth and Solar Radiation Pres- sure (SRP and ERP, respectively). The sun radiates visible and infrared light reaching the satellite directly, which causes the SRP. Earth also emits and reflects the sunlight back into space, where it acts on satellites. This is known as ERP acceleration. The influence of ERP increases with decreasing distance to the Earth, and for low-earth orbit (LEO) satellites ERP must be taken into account in orbit and gravity computations. Estimating acceler- ations requires knowledge about energy emitted from the Earth, which can be derived from satellite remote sensing data, and also by considering the shape and surface material of a satellite. In this sensitivity study, we assess ERP accelerations based on different input albedo and emission fields and their modelling for the satellite missions Challenging Mini-Satellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE). As input fields, monthly 1°x1° products of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant En- ergy System (CERES), L3 are considered. Albedo and emission models are generated as latitude-dependent, as well as in terms of spherical harmonics. The impact of different albedo and emission models as well as the macro model and the altitude of satellites on ERP accelerations will be discussed.

  1. Earth Observation Research for GMES Initial Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beijma, Sybrand; Balzter, Heiko; Nicolas-Perea, Virginia

    2013-04-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. GIONET is a partnership of leading Universities, research institutes and private companies from across Europe aiming to cultivate a community of early stage researchers in the areas of optical and radar remote sensing skilled for the emerging GMES land monitoring services during the GMES Initial Operations period (2011-2013) and beyond. GIONET is expected to satisfy the demand for highly skilled researchers and provide personnel for operational phase of the GMES and monitoring and emergency services. It will achieve this by: * Providing postgraduate training in Earth Observation Science that exposes students to different research disciplines and complementary skills, providing work experiences in the private and academic sectors, and leading to a recognized qualification (Doctorate). * Enabling access to first class training in both fundamental and applied research skills to early-stage researchers at world-class academic centres and market leaders in the private sector. * Building on the experience from previous GMES research and development projects in the land monitoring and emergency information services. * Developing a collaborative training network, through the placement of researchers for short periods in other GIONET organizations. Reliable, thorough and up-to-date environmental information is essential for understanding climate change the impacts it has on people's lives and ways to adapt to them. The GIONET researchers are being trained to understand the complex physical processes that determine how electromagnetic radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the land surface ultimately form the signal received by a satellite. In order to achieve this, the researchers have been placed in industry and universities across Europe, as

  2. Observation of the Earth system from space

    CERN Document Server

    Flury, Jakob; Reigber, Christoph; Rothacher, Markus; Boedecker, Gerd

    2006-01-01

    In the recent years, space-based observation methods have led to a subst- tially improved understanding of Earth system. Geodesy and geophysics are contributing to this development by measuring the temporal and spatial va- ations of the Earth's shape, gravity ?eld, and magnetic ?eld, as well as at- sphere density. In the frame of the GermanR&D programmeGEOTECHNO- LOGIEN,researchprojectshavebeen launchedin2002relatedto the satellite missions CHAMP, GRACE and ESA's planned mission GOCE, to comp- mentary terrestrial and airborne sensor systems and to consistent and stable high-precision global reference systems for satellite and other techniques. In the initial 3-year phase of the research programme (2002-2004), new gravity ?eld models have been computed from CHAMP and GRACE data which outperform previous models in accuracy by up to two orders of m- nitude for the long and medium wavelengths. A special highlight is the - termination of seasonal gravity variations caused by changes in continental water masses...

  3. Development and characterization of Carbon Observing Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Lin, Chao; Zheng, Yuquan; Wang, Wenquan; Tian, Longfei; Liu, Dongbin; Li, Shuai

    2016-04-01

    Carbon Observing Satellite (Tan-Sat) is the first satellite of China designed to monitor column-averaged atmospheric carbon dioxide (X) by detecting gas absorption spectra of the solar shortwave infrared radiation reflected from the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Two instruments are accommodated on Tan-Sat: the high resolution hyperspectral sensor for carbon observation grating spectrometer (HRHS-GS) and the cloud and aerosol polarimetric imager (CAPI). HRHS-GS will provide the space-based measurements of CO2 on a scale and with the accuracy and precision to quantify terrestrial sources and sinks of CO2. CAPI is used to identify the contamination by optically thick clouds and to minimize the impact of scattering by aerosol. These two instruments work together to collect global column CO2 concentrations with correction for cloud and aerosol contamination. The instrument design of HRHS-GS is presented. Ocean reflectivity and the incident radiation of the instrument for transverse electric and transverse magnetic polarizations in glint mode are discussed. The changes to glint mode operation are described. The spectral characteristics of HRHS-GS were determined through the laser-based spectral calibration. The onboard spectral calibration method based on spectrum matching is introduced. The availability was verified, satisfying the onboard spectral calibration accuracy requirement of better than Δλ/10 (Δλ is spectral resolution).

  4. SWARM - An earth Observation Mission investigating Geospace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Lühr, H.; Knudsen, D.;

    2008-01-01

    The Swarm mission was selected as the 5th mission in ESA's Earth Explorer Programme in 2004. This mission aims at measuring the Earth's magnetic field with unprecedented accuracy. This will be done by a constellation of three satellites, where two will fly at lower altitude, measuring the gradient...... of the magnetic field, and one satellite will fly at higher altitude. The measured magnetic field is the sum of many contributions including both magnetic fields and currents in the Earth's interior and electrical currents in Geospace. In order to separate all these sources electric field and plasma measurements...... will also be made to complement the primary magnetic field measurements. Together these will allow the deduction of information on a series of solid earth processes responsible for the creation of the fields measured. The completeness of the measurements on each satellite and the constellation aspect...

  5. SATELLITE GRAVITY SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH OF EARTH'S GRAVITY FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Jinsheng

    2003-01-01

    This is a summarized paper. Two topics are discussed: Firstly, the concept, development and application of four kinds of satellite gravity surveying technology are introduced; Secondly, some problems of theory and method, which must be considered in the study of the Earth's gravity field based on satellite gravity data, are expounded.

  6. High-Resolution NDVI from Planet’s Constellation of Earth Observing Nano-Satellites: A New Data Source for Precision Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Houborg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Planet Labs (“Planet” operate the largest fleet of active nano-satellites in orbit, offering an unprecedented monitoring capacity of daily and global RGB image capture at 3–5 m resolution. However, limitations in spectral resolution and lack of accurate radiometric sensor calibration impact the utility of this rich information source. In this study, Planet’s RGB imagery was translated into a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI: a common metric for vegetation growth and condition. Our framework employs a data mining approach to build a set of rule-based regression models that relate RGB data to atmospherically corrected Landsat-8 NDVI. The approach was evaluated over a desert agricultural landscape in Saudi Arabia where the use of near-coincident (within five days Planet and Landsat-8 acquisitions in the training of the regression models resulted in NDVI predictabilities with an r2 of approximately 0.97 and a Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD on the order of 0.014 (~9%. The MAD increased to 0.021 (~14% when the Landsat NDVI training image was further away (i.e., 11–16 days from the corrected Planet image. In these cases, the use of MODIS observations to inform on the change in NDVI occurring between overpasses was shown to significantly improve prediction accuracies. MAD levels ranged from 0.002 to 0.011 (3.9% to 9.1% for the best performing 80% of the data. The technique is generic and extendable to any region of interest, increasing the utility of Planet’s dense time-series of RGB imagery.

  7. ESA Earth Observation missions at the service of geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschbacher, Josef

    2017-04-01

    The intervention will present ESA's Earth Observation programmes and their relevance to geoscience. ESA's Earth observation missions are mainly grouped into three categories: The Sentinel satellites in the context of the European Copernicus Programme, the scientific Earth Explorers and the meteorological missions. Developments, applications and scientific results for the different mission types will be addressed, along with overall trends and boundary conditions. The Earth Explorers, who form the science and research element of ESA's Living Planet Programme, focus on the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and Earth's interior. The Earth Explorers also aim at learning more about the interactions between these components and the impact that human activity is having on natural Earth processes. The Sentinel missions provide accurate, timely, long term and uninterrupted data to provide key information services, improving the way the environment is managed, and helping to mitigate the effects of climate change. The operational Sentinel satellites can also be exploited for scientific endeavours. Meteorological satellites help to predict the weather and feature the most mature application of Earth observation. Over the last four decades satellites have been radically improving the accuracy of weather forecasts by providing unique and indispensable input data to numerical computation models. In addition, Essential Climate Variables (ECV) are constantly monitored within ESA's Climate Change Initiative in order to create a long-term record of key geophysical parameters. All of these activities can only be carried out in international cooperation. Accordingly, ESA maintains long-standing partnerships with other space agencies and relevant institutions worldwide. In running its Earth observation programmes, ESA responds to societal needs and challenges as well as to requirements resulting from political priorities, such as the United Nations' Sustainable Development

  8. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  9. Using NASA Earth Observing Satellites and Statistical Model Analysis to Monitor Vegetation and Habitat Rehabilitation in Southwest Virginia's Reclaimed Mine Lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Z.; Dusenge, D.; Elliot, T. S.; Hafashimana, P.; Medley, S.; Porter, R. P.; Rajappan, R.; Rodriguez, P.; Spangler, J.; Swaminathan, R. S.; VanGundy, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    The majority of the population in southwest Virginia depends economically on coal mining. In 2011, coal mining generated $2,000,000 in tax revenue to Wise County alone. However, surface mining completely removes land cover and leaves the land exposed to erosion. The destruction of the forest cover directly impacts local species, as some are displaced and others perish in the mining process. Even though surface mining has a negative impact on the environment, land reclamation efforts are in place to either restore mined areas to their natural vegetated state or to transform these areas for economic purposes. This project aimed to monitor the progress of land reclamation and the effect on the return of local species. By incorporating NASA Earth observations, such as Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM), re-vegetation process in reclamation sites was estimated through a Time series analysis using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). A continuous source of cloud free images was accomplished by utilizing the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STAR-FM). This model developed synthetic Landsat imagery by integrating the high-frequency temporal information from Terra/Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and high-resolution spatial information from Landsat sensors In addition, the Maximum Entropy Modeling (MaxENT), an eco-niche model was used to estimate the adaptation of animal species to the newly formed habitats. By combining factors such as land type, precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), and slope from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), the MaxENT model produced a statistical analysis on the probability of species habitat. Altogether, the project compiled the ecological information which can be used to identify suitable habitats for local species in reclaimed mined areas.

  10. Scheduler for monitoring objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J; Riot, Vincent J; De Vries, Willem H; Bauman, Brian J; Nikolaev, Sergei; Henderson, John R; Phillion, Donald W

    2015-04-28

    An ephemeris refinement system includes satellites with imaging devices in earth orbit to make observations of space-based objects ("target objects") and a ground-based controller that controls the scheduling of the satellites to make the observations of the target objects and refines orbital models of the target objects. The ground-based controller determines when the target objects of interest will be near enough to a satellite for that satellite to collect an image of the target object based on an initial orbital model for the target objects. The ground-based controller directs the schedules to be uploaded to the satellites, and the satellites make observations as scheduled and download the observations to the ground-based controller. The ground-based controller then refines the initial orbital models of the target objects based on the locations of the target objects that are derived from the observations.

  11. Resonance Caused by the Gravitational waves On an Earth Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Radwan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the motion of an Earth satellite taking into account the oblateness of the Earth and of a passing Gravitational wave. The oblateness of the Earth is truncated beyond the second zonal harmonic, J2, which plays the role of the small parameter of the problem. The conditions for resonance are determined and the resonance resulting from the commensurabilities between the wave frequency and the mean motions of the satellite, the nodal regression, and the apsidal rotation are analyzed.

  12. Coccolithophore surface distributions in the North Atlantic and their modulation of the air-sea flux of CO2 from 10 years of satellite Earth observation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Shutler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Coccolithophores are the primary oceanic phytoplankton responsible for the production of calcium carbonate (CaCO3. These climatically important plankton play a key role in the oceanic carbon cycle as a major contributor of carbon to the open ocean carbonate pump (~50% and their calcification can affect the atmosphere-to-ocean (air-sea uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2 through increasing the seawater partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2. Here we document variations in the areal extent of surface blooms of the globally important coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi, in the North Atlantic over a 10-year period (1998–2007, using Earth observation data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS. We calculate the annual mean sea surface areal coverage of E. huxleyi in the North Atlantic to be 474 000 ± 104 000 km2, which results in a net CaCO3 carbon (CaCO3-C production of 0.14–1.71 Tg CaCO3-C per year. However, this surface coverage (and, thus, net production can fluctuate inter-annually by −54/+8% about the mean value and is strongly correlated with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO climate oscillation index (r=0.75, pE. huxleyi blooms in the North Atlantic can increase the pCO2 and, thus, decrease the localised air-sea flux of atmospheric CO2. In regions where the blooms are prevalent, the average reduction in the monthly air-sea CO2 flux can reach 55%. The maximum reduction of the monthly air-sea CO2 flux in the time series is 155%. This work suggests that the high variability, frequency and distribution of these calcifying plankton and their impact on pCO2 should be considered if we are to fully understand the variability of the North Atlantic air-to-sea flux of CO2. We estimate that these blooms can reduce the annual N. Atlantic net sink atmospheric CO2 by between 3–28%.

  13. Imaging artificial satellites: An observational challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. A.; Hill, D. C.

    2016-10-01

    According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, as of the beginning of 2016 there are 1381 active satellites orbiting the Earth, and the United States' Space Surveillance Network tracks about 8000 manmade orbiting objects of baseball-size and larger. NASA estimates debris larger than 1 cm to number more than half a million. The largest ones can be seen by eye—unresolved dots of light that move across the sky in minutes. For most astrophotographers, satellites are annoying streaks that can ruin hours of work. However, capturing a resolved image of an artificial satellite can pose an interesting challenge for a student, and such a project can provide connections between objects in the sky and commercial and political activities here on Earth.

  14. Discovery of a Satellite around a Near-Earth Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    In the course of the major observational programme of asteroids by the Institute of Planetary Exploration of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) [1] in Berlin, two of the staff astronomers, Stefano Mottola and Gerhard Hahn , have discovered a small satellite (moon) orbiting the asteroid (3671) Dionysus. The new measurements were obtained with the DLR CCD Camera attached at the 60-cm Bochum telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. This is only the second known case of an asteroid with a moon. Moons and planets Until recently, natural satellites were only known around the major planets . The Moon orbits the Earth, there are two tiny moons around Mars, each of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune has many more, and even the smallest and outermost, Pluto, is accompanied by one [2]. However, the new discovery now strengthens the belief of many astronomers that some, perhaps even a substantial number of the many thousands of minor planets (asteroids) in the solar system may also possess their own moons. The first discovery of a satellite orbiting an asteroid was made by the NASA Galileo spacecraft, whose imagery, obtained during a fly-by of asteroid (253) Ida in August 1993, unveiled a small moon that has since been given the name Dactyl. (3671) Dionysus: an Earth-crossing asteroid In the framework of the DLR asteroid monitoring programme, image sequences are acquired to measure an asteroid's brightness variations caused by the changing amount of sunlight reflected from the asteroid's illuminated surface as it spins, due to its irregular shape. The brightness variations may be used to derive the asteroid's rotational properties, such as speed of rotation and spin axis orientation. Asteroid Dionysus [3] was put on the observing list because it belongs to a special class of asteroids, the members of which occasionally come very close to the Earth and have a small, but non-negligible chance of colliding with our planet. Most of

  15. Estimating Soil Moisture from Satellite Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; VandeGriend, A. A.; deJeu, R.; deVries, J.; Seyhan, E.

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative research in microwave remote sensing between the Hydrological Sciences Branch of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Earth Sciences Faculty of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam began with the Botswana Water and Energy Balance Experiment and has continued through a series of highly successful International Research Programs. The collaboration between these two research institutions has resulted in significant scientific achievements, most notably in the area of satellite-based microwave remote sensing of soil moisture. The Botswana Program was the first joint research initiative between these two institutions, and provided a unique data base which included historical data sets of Scanning Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (SN4NM) data, climate information, and extensive soil moisture measurements over several large experimental sites in southeast Botswana. These data were the basis for the development of new approaches in physically-based inverse modelling of soil moisture from satellite microwave observations. Among the results from this study were quantitative estimates of vegetation transmission properties at microwave frequencies. A single polarization modelling approach which used horizontally polarized microwave observations combined with monthly composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was developed, and yielded good results. After more precise field experimentation with a ground-based radiometer system, a dual-polarization approach was subsequently developed. This new approach realized significant improvements in soil moisture estimation by satellite. Results from the Botswana study were subsequently applied to a desertification monitoring study for the country of Spain within the framework of the European Community science research programs EFEDA and RESMEDES. A dual frequency approach with only microwave data was used for this application. The Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) was calculated from 37 GHz data

  16. Precise Orbit Determination of Earth's Satellites for Climate Change Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespe, Francesco

    The tremendous improvement of the gravity field models which we are achieving with the last Earth's satellite missions like, CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE devoted to its recovery could make feasibile the use of precise orbit determination (POD) of Earth satellites as a tool for sensing global changes of some key atmosphere parameters like refractivity and extinction. Such improvements indeed, coupled with the huge number of running Earth's satellites and combinations of their orbital parameters (namely the nodes) in a gravity field free fashion (hereafter GFF) can magnify the solar radiation pressure acting on medium earth orbit satellites :GPS, Etalon and, in near real future GALILEO and its smooth modulation through the Earth's atmosphere (penumbra). We would remind that The GFF technique is able to cancel out with "n" satellite orbital parameters the first n-1 even zonal harmonics of the gravity field. Previously it was demonstrated that the signal we want to detect could in principle emerge from the noise threshold but, more refined models of the atmosphere would be needed to perform a more subtle analysis. So we will re-compute the signal features of penumbra by applying more refined atmospheric models. The analysis will be performed by including in GFF Earth's satellites equipped with DORIS systems (Jason, Spot 2-3-4-5, ENVISAT etc.) other than those ranged with SLR and GPS. The introduction of DORIS tracked satellites indeed will allow to cancel higher and higher order of even zonal harmonics and will make still more favourable the signal to noise budget. The analysis will be performed over a time span of at least few tens of years just to enhance probable climate signatures.

  17. Earth observation big data for climate change research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Hua-Dong; ZHANG; Li; ZHU; Lan-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Earth observation technology has provided highly useful information in global climate change research over the past few decades and greatly promoted its development,especially through providing biological,physical,and chemical parameters on a global scale.Earth observation data has the 4V features(volume,variety,veracity,and velocity) of big data that are suitable for climate change research.Moreover,the large amount of data available from scientific satellites plays an important role.This study reviews the advances of climate change studies based on Earth observation big data and provides examples of case studies that utilize Earth observation big data in climate change research,such as synchronous satelliteeaerialeground observation experiments,which provide extremely large and abundant datasets; Earth observational sensitive factors(e.g.,glaciers,lakes,vegetation,radiation,and urbanization); and global environmental change information and simulation systems.With the era of global environment change dawning,Earth observation big data will underpin the Future Earth program with a huge volume of various types of data and will play an important role in academia and decisionmaking.Inevitably,Earth observation big data will encounter opportunities and challenges brought about by global climate change.

  18. The ESA earth observation polar platform programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, M.; Readings, C. J.

    1991-08-01

    The overall scenario of ESA earth observation polar platform program is reviewed with particular attention given to instruments currently being considered for flight on the first European polar platforms. The major objectives of the mission include monitoring the earth's environment on various scales; management and monitoring of the earth's resources; improvement of the service provided to the worldwide operational meteorological community, investigation of the structure and dynamics of the earth's crust and interior. The program encompasses four main elements: an ERS-1 follow-on mission (ERS-2), a solid earth gravity mission (Aristoteles), a Meteosat Second Generation, and a series of polar orbit earth observation missions.

  19. Earth Observing System Covariance Realism Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda Romero, Juan A.; Miguel, Fred

    2017-01-01

    This presentation will be given at the International Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meetings June 13-15, 2017 to discuss the Earth Observing System Covariance Realism updates.

  20. From order to chaos in Earth satellite orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Gkolias, Ioannis; Gachet, Fabien; Rosengren, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    We consider Earth satellite orbits in the range of semi-major axes where the perturbing effects of Earth's oblateness and lunisolar gravity are of comparable order. This range covers the medium-Earth orbits (MEO) of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems and the geosynchronous orbits (GEO) of the communication satellites. We recall a secular and quadrupolar model, based on the Milankovitch vector formulation of perturbation theory, which governs the long-term orbital evolution subject to the predominant gravitational interactions. We study the global dynamics of this two-and-a-half degrees of freedom Hamiltonian system by means of the fast Lyapunov indicator (FLI), used in a statistical sense. Specifically, we characterize the degree of chaoticity of the action space using angles-averaged normalized FLI maps, thereby overcoming the angle dependencies of the conventional stability maps. Emphasis is placed upon the phase-space structures near secular resonances which are of first importance to the space debris...

  1. Integration of Earth Observation Satellite Data and Real Time 137Cs Measurements in the Greek Marine Environment to GIS for Advances in Radiological Remote Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrokefalou, Georgia; Florou, Heleny; Sykioti, Olga; Parcharidis, Issaak

    2016-08-01

    In the present study an innovative tool is explored in terms of the radiological remote control. The levels of radionuclides in the marine environment, especially the soluble ones, are associated with other physical parameters. For this purpose, sea parameters such as sea surface temperature and ocean colour issued from satellite and field measurements have been utilized, in order to investigate potential relations with 137Cs activity concentrations. Such potential relations are expected to lead to an innovative tool based on remote sensing data and in situ 137Cs measurements for the remote radioactivity detection of the Greek marine ecosystem both for routine control and emergency recordings. Here, the first findings on the spatial correlations of 137Cs measurements with MODIS L3 ocean data in the Aegean Sea are presented, whereas temporal correlations of 137Cs measurements with MODIS L2 ocean and POSEIDON buoy data in Souda Bay area (Crete island) are also shown.

  2. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS) configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP). The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan t...

  3. The future of Earth observation in hydrology

    KAUST Repository

    McCabe, Matthew F.

    2017-07-28

    In just the past 5 years, the field of Earth observation has progressed beyond the offerings of conventional space-agency-based platforms to include a plethora of sensing opportunities afforded by CubeSats, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and smartphone technologies that are being embraced by both for-profit companies and individual researchers. Over the previous decades, space agency efforts have brought forth well-known and immensely useful satellites such as the Landsat series and the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) system, with costs typically of the order of 1 billion dollars per satellite and with concept-to-launch timelines of the order of 2 decades (for new missions). More recently, the proliferation of smartphones has helped to miniaturize sensors and energy requirements, facilitating advances in the use of CubeSats that can be launched by the dozens, while providing ultra-high (3–5 m) resolution sensing of the Earth on a daily basis. Start-up companies that did not exist a decade ago now operate more satellites in orbit than any space agency, and at costs that are a mere fraction of traditional satellite missions. With these advances come new space-borne measurements, such as real-time high-definition video for tracking air pollution, storm-cell development, flood propagation, precipitation monitoring, or even for constructing digital surfaces using structure-from-motion techniques. Closer to the surface, measurements from small unmanned drones and tethered balloons have mapped snow depths, floods, and estimated evaporation at sub-metre resolutions, pushing back on spatio-temporal constraints and delivering new process insights. At ground level, precipitation has been measured using signal attenuation between antennae mounted on cell phone towers, while the proliferation of mobile devices has enabled citizen scientists to catalogue photos of environmental conditions, estimate daily average temperatures from battery state, and sense

  4. The future of Earth observation in hydrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. McCabe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In just the past 5 years, the field of Earth observation has progressed beyond the offerings of conventional space-agency-based platforms to include a plethora of sensing opportunities afforded by CubeSats, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, and smartphone technologies that are being embraced by both for-profit companies and individual researchers. Over the previous decades, space agency efforts have brought forth well-known and immensely useful satellites such as the Landsat series and the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE system, with costs typically of the order of 1 billion dollars per satellite and with concept-to-launch timelines of the order of 2 decades (for new missions. More recently, the proliferation of smartphones has helped to miniaturize sensors and energy requirements, facilitating advances in the use of CubeSats that can be launched by the dozens, while providing ultra-high (3–5 m resolution sensing of the Earth on a daily basis. Start-up companies that did not exist a decade ago now operate more satellites in orbit than any space agency, and at costs that are a mere fraction of traditional satellite missions. With these advances come new space-borne measurements, such as real-time high-definition video for tracking air pollution, storm-cell development, flood propagation, precipitation monitoring, or even for constructing digital surfaces using structure-from-motion techniques. Closer to the surface, measurements from small unmanned drones and tethered balloons have mapped snow depths, floods, and estimated evaporation at sub-metre resolutions, pushing back on spatio-temporal constraints and delivering new process insights. At ground level, precipitation has been measured using signal attenuation between antennae mounted on cell phone towers, while the proliferation of mobile devices has enabled citizen scientists to catalogue photos of environmental conditions, estimate daily average temperatures from battery

  5. The future of Earth observation in hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Matthew F.; Rodell, Matthew; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Miralles, Diego G.; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Wagner, Wolfgang; Lucieer, Arko; Houborg, Rasmus; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Franz, Trenton E.; Shi, Jiancheng; Gao, Huilin; Wood, Eric F.

    2017-07-01

    In just the past 5 years, the field of Earth observation has progressed beyond the offerings of conventional space-agency-based platforms to include a plethora of sensing opportunities afforded by CubeSats, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and smartphone technologies that are being embraced by both for-profit companies and individual researchers. Over the previous decades, space agency efforts have brought forth well-known and immensely useful satellites such as the Landsat series and the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) system, with costs typically of the order of 1 billion dollars per satellite and with concept-to-launch timelines of the order of 2 decades (for new missions). More recently, the proliferation of smartphones has helped to miniaturize sensors and energy requirements, facilitating advances in the use of CubeSats that can be launched by the dozens, while providing ultra-high (3-5 m) resolution sensing of the Earth on a daily basis. Start-up companies that did not exist a decade ago now operate more satellites in orbit than any space agency, and at costs that are a mere fraction of traditional satellite missions. With these advances come new space-borne measurements, such as real-time high-definition video for tracking air pollution, storm-cell development, flood propagation, precipitation monitoring, or even for constructing digital surfaces using structure-from-motion techniques. Closer to the surface, measurements from small unmanned drones and tethered balloons have mapped snow depths, floods, and estimated evaporation at sub-metre resolutions, pushing back on spatio-temporal constraints and delivering new process insights. At ground level, precipitation has been measured using signal attenuation between antennae mounted on cell phone towers, while the proliferation of mobile devices has enabled citizen scientists to catalogue photos of environmental conditions, estimate daily average temperatures from battery state, and sense other

  6. Lidar instruments for ESA Earth observation missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hélière, Arnaud; Armandillo, Errico; Durand, Yannig; Culoma, Alain; Meynart, Roland

    2004-06-01

    The idea of deploying a lidar system on an Earth-orbiting satellite stems from the need for continuously providing profiles of our atmospheric structure with high accuracy and resolution and global coverage. Interest in this information for climatology, meteorology and the atmospheric sciences in general is huge. Areas of application range from the determination of global warming and greenhouse effects, to monitoring the transport and accumulation of pollutants in the different atmospheric regions (such as the recent fires in Southeast Asia), to the assessment of the largely unknown microphysical properties and the structural dynamics of the atmosphere itself. Spaceborne lidar systems have been the subject of extensive investigations by the European Space Agency since mid 1970's, resulting in mission and instrument concepts, such as ATLID, the cloud backscatter lidar payload of the EarthCARE mission, ALADIN, the Doppler wind lidar of the Atmospheric Dynamics Mission (ADM) and more recently a water vapour Differential Absorption Lidar considered for the WALES mission. These studies have shown the basic scientific and technical feasibility of spaceborne lidars, but they have also demonstrated their complexity from the instrument viewpoint. As a result, the Agency undertook technology development in order to strengthen the instrument maturity. This is the case for ATLID, which benefited from a decade of technology development and supporting studies and is now studied in the frame of the EarthCARE mission. ALADIN, a Direct Detection Doppler Wind Lidar operating in the Ultra-Violet, will be the 1st European lidar to fly in 2007 as payload of the Earth Explorer Core Mission ADM. WALES currently studied at the level of a phase A, is based upon a lidar operating at 4 wavelengths in near infrared and aims to profile the water vapour in the lower part of the atmosphere with high accuracy and low bias. Lastly, the European Space Agency is extending the lidar instrument field

  7. Satellite Observations of Ionospheric Earthquake Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimal'Skij, V. V.; Ivchenko, V. N.; Lizunov, G. V.

    The authors review satellite observations of seismogenic phenomena in the ionosphere. Based on literature data, hypothetical patterns of seismogenic phenomena were reconstructed. The authors discuss the reasons which allow the ionospheric "anomalies" to be correlated with eartquake precursors.

  8. Artificial Satellites and How to Observe Them

    CERN Document Server

    Schmude, Jr , Richard

    2012-01-01

    Astronomers' Observing Guides provide up-to-date information for amateur astronomers who want to know all about what it is they are observing. This is the basis for the first part of the book. The second part details observing techniques for practical astronomers, working with a range of different instruments. Every amateur astronomer sees "stars" that aren't natural objects steadily slide across the background of the sky. Artificial satellites can be seen on any night, and some are as bright as the planets. But can you identify which satellite or spent launch vehicle casing you are seeing? Do you know how to image it? Artificial Satellites and How to Observe Them describes all of the different satellites that can be observed, including communication, scientific, spy satellites, and of course, the International Space Station. Richard Schmude describes how to recognize them and even how to predict their orbits. The book tells how to observe artificial satellites with the unaided eye, binoculars and with telesc...

  9. AMOS Galaxy 15 Satellite Observations and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.

    2011-09-01

    In early April 2010, the Galaxy 15 geosynchronous satellite experienced an on-orbit anomaly. Even though the satellite's transmitters and articulating solar panel were still functioning, ground controllers lost the ability to command and maneuver the satellite. With its orbital position no longer maintained, Galaxy 15 began to drift eastward. This forced several other satellites to make collision avoidance maneuvers during the following months. Soon after the initial anomaly, Galaxy 15's operators predicted that the satellite’s reaction wheels would eventually become saturated, causing a loss of both spacecraft attitude and proper sunward orientation of the solar panels. This "off-pointing" event finally occurred in late December, ultimately leading to a depletion of Galaxy 15's batteries. This near-death experience had a fortunate side effect, however, in that it forced the satellite’s command unit to reboot and once again be able to both receive and execute ground commands. The satellite operators have since recovered control of the satellite. AMOS conducted non-resolved photometric observations of Galaxy 15 before, during and after these events. Similar observations were conducted of Galaxy 12, the nearly-identical replacement satellite. This presentation presents and discusses these temporal brightness signatures in detail, comparing the changing patterns in the observations to the known sequence of events.

  10. Observing the solid Earth, oceans and land waters from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazenave A.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a number of significant results related to the solid Earth and its fluid envelopes obtained in the recent years/decades using remote sensing techniques. We first discuss measurements of the Earth gravity field at different spatial scales and the recovery of seafloor topography from satellite altimetry. We briefly mention precise positioning results based on GPS and other space techniques, and applications to tectonic motions and crustal deformations. Next we discuss recent advances in ocean dynamics based on high-precision satellite altimetry missions, and focus on sea level rise. We also discuss how remote sensing techniques, including space gravimetry, inform on the mass balance of the ice sheets and corresponding contribution to sea level rise. As a final example, we report on the monitoring of surface water levels (lakes, rivers, floodplains by satellite altimetry and on total land water storage change at river basin scale, using space gravimetry observations.

  11. In-Orbit Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) Battery Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Anisa; Enciso, Marlon; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) power system and battery history. ERBS spacecraft and battery cell failures are listed with the reasons for failure. The battery management decision and stabilization of the batteries is discussed. Present battery operations are shown to be successful.

  12. Observing storm surges from satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guoqi

    2016-07-01

    Storm surges can cause catastrophic damage to properties and loss of life in coastal communities. Thus it is important to enhance our capabilities of observing and forecasting storm surges for mitigating damage and loss. In this presentation we show examples of observing storm surges around the world using nadir satellite altimetry, during Hurricane Sandy, Igor, and Isaac, as well as other cyclone events. The satellite observations are evaluated against tide-gauge observations and discussed for dynamic mechanisms. We also show the potential of a new wide-swath altimetry mission, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT), for observing storm surges.

  13. A Dynamic Earth: 50 Years of Observations from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the surface of the Earth began more than a half century ago with the earliest space missions. The global geopolitical environment at the beginning of the space age fueled advances in rocketry and human exploration, but also advances in remote sensing. At the same time that space-based Earth Observations were developing, global investments in infrastructure that were initiated after World War II accelerated large projects such as the construction of highways, the expansion of cities and suburbs, the damming of rivers, and the growth of big agriculture. These developments have transformed the Earth s surface at unprecedented rates. Today, we have a remarkable library of 50 years of observations of the Earth taken by satellite-based sensors and astronauts, and these images and observations provide insight into the workings of the Earth as a system. In addition, these observations record the footprints of human activities around the world, and illustrate how our activities contribute to the changing face of the Earth. Starting with the iconic "Blue Marble" image of the whole Earth taken by Apollo astronauts, we will review a timeline of observations of our planet as viewed from space.

  14. Introducing multisensor satellite radiance-based evaluation for regional Earth System modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Santanello, J.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.-K.; Wu, D.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kemp, E.; Chin, M.; Starr, D.; Sekiguchi, M.; Aires, F.

    2014-07-01

    Earth System modeling has become more complex, and its evaluation using satellite data has also become more difficult due to model and data diversity. Therefore, the fundamental methodology of using satellite direct measurements with instrumental simulators should be addressed especially for modeling community members lacking a solid background of radiative transfer and scattering theory. This manuscript introduces principles of multisatellite, multisensor radiance-based evaluation methods for a fully coupled regional Earth System model: NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model. We use a NU-WRF case study simulation over West Africa as an example of evaluating aerosol-cloud-precipitation-land processes with various satellite observations. NU-WRF-simulated geophysical parameters are converted to the satellite-observable raw radiance and backscatter under nearly consistent physics assumptions via the multisensor satellite simulator, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. We present varied examples of simple yet robust methods that characterize forecast errors and model physics biases through the spatial and statistical interpretation of various satellite raw signals: infrared brightness temperature (Tb) for surface skin temperature and cloud top temperature, microwave Tb for precipitation ice and surface flooding, and radar and lidar backscatter for aerosol-cloud profiling simultaneously. Because raw satellite signals integrate many sources of geophysical information, we demonstrate user-defined thresholds and a simple statistical process to facilitate evaluations, including the infrared-microwave-based cloud types and lidar/radar-based profile classifications.

  15. Introducing Multisensor Satellite Radiance-Based Evaluation for Regional Earth System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Santanello, J.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.-K.; Wu, D.; Peters-Lidard, C.; Kemp, E.; Chin, M.; Starr, D.; Sekiguchi, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Earth System modeling has become more complex, and its evaluation using satellite data has also become more difficult due to model and data diversity. Therefore, the fundamental methodology of using satellite direct measurements with instrumental simulators should be addressed especially for modeling community members lacking a solid background of radiative transfer and scattering theory. This manuscript introduces principles of multisatellite, multisensor radiance-based evaluation methods for a fully coupled regional Earth System model: NASA-Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) model. We use a NU-WRF case study simulation over West Africa as an example of evaluating aerosol-cloud-precipitation-land processes with various satellite observations. NU-WRF-simulated geophysical parameters are converted to the satellite-observable raw radiance and backscatter under nearly consistent physics assumptions via the multisensor satellite simulator, the Goddard Satellite Data Simulator Unit. We present varied examples of simple yet robust methods that characterize forecast errors and model physics biases through the spatial and statistical interpretation of various satellite raw signals: infrared brightness temperature (Tb) for surface skin temperature and cloud top temperature, microwave Tb for precipitation ice and surface flooding, and radar and lidar backscatter for aerosol-cloud profiling simultaneously. Because raw satellite signals integrate many sources of geophysical information, we demonstrate user-defined thresholds and a simple statistical process to facilitate evaluations, including the infrared-microwave-based cloud types and lidar/radar-based profile classifications.

  16. Fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. Part 4: Compound satellite structures on orbits with synchronized nodal regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razoumny, Yury N.

    2016-12-01

    Basing on the theory results considered in the previous papers of the series for traditional one-tiered constellation formed on the orbits with the same values of altitudes and inclinations for all the satellites of the constellation, the method for constellation design using compound satellite structures on orbits with different altitudes and inclinations and synchronized nodal regression is developed. Compound, multi-tiered, satellite structures (constellations) are based on orbits with different values of altitude and inclination providing nodal regression synchronization. It is shown that using compound satellite constellations for Earth periodic coverage makes it possible to sufficiently improve the Earth coverage, as compared to the traditional constellations based on the orbits with common altitude and inclination for all the satellites of the constellation, and, as a consequence, to get new opportunities for the satellite constellation design for different types of prospective space systems regarding increasing the quality of observations or minimization of the number of the satellites required.

  17. The microwave noise environment at a geostationary satellite caused by the brightness of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E. K.; Njoku, E. G.

    1985-01-01

    The microwave antenna temperature due to the earth in the satellite antenna beam has been computed for a series of longitudes for a satellite in geostationary orbit and for frequencies of 1 to 50 GHz. An earth-coverage beam is assumed for simplicity, but the technique is applicable to arbitrary beam shapes. Detailed calculations have been performed to account for varying land-ocean fractions within the field of view. Emission characteristics of the earth's atmosphere and surface are used with an accurate radiation transfer program to compute observed brightness temperatures. The value of 290 K commonly used for antenna temperature in satellite communication noise calculations is overly conservative, with more realistic values lying in the 60 to 240 K range.

  18. Earth rotation, station coordinates and orbit determination from satellite laser ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Masaaki

    The Project MERIT, a special program of international colaboration to Monitor Earth Rotation and Intercompare the Techniques of observation and analysis, has come to an end with great success. Its major objective was to evaluate the ultimate potential of space techniques such as VLBI and satellite laser ranging, in contrast with the other conventional techniques, in the determination of rotational dynamics of the earth. The National Aerospace Laboratory (NAL) has officially participated in the project as an associate analysis center for satellite laser technique for the period of the MERIT Main Campaign (September 1983-October 1984). In this paper, the NAL analysis center results are presented.

  19. Interdisciplinary Earth Science Applications Using Satellite Radar Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.; Shum, C.; Lee, H.; Dai, C.; Yi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite altimetry was conceived as a space geodetic concept for ocean surface topography mapping in the NASA-sponsored 1969 Williamstown, MA Conference, and was tested as part of the passive and active radar payload (S192), along with a radiometer and a scatterometer, on Skylab-1 in May 14, 1973. Since then, numerous radar and laser satellite altimetry missions orbiting/flying-by the Earth, Mars, Mercury, Titan and the Moon have been launched, evolving from the original scientific objective of marine gravity field mapping to a geodetic tool to address interdisciplinary Earth and planetary sciences. The accuracy of the radar altimeter has improved from 0.9 m RMS for the S-192 Skylab Ku-band compressed-pulse altimeter, to 2 cm RMS (2 second average) for the dual-frequency pulse-limited radar altimetry and associated sensors onboard TOPEX/POSEIDON. Satellite altimetry has evolved into a unique cross-disciplinary geodetic tool in addressing contemporary Earth science problems including sea-level rise, large-scale general ocean circulation, ice-sheet mass balance, terrestrial hydrology, and bathymetry. Here we provide a concise review and describe specific results on the additional recent innovative and unconventional applications of interdisciplinary science research using satellite radar altimetry, including geodynamics, land subsidence, snow depth, wetland and cold region hydrology.

  20. From Order to Chaos in Earth Satellite Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkolias, Ioannis; Daquin, Jérôme; Gachet, Fabien; Rosengren, Aaron J.

    2016-11-01

    We consider Earth satellite orbits in the range of semimajor axes where the perturbing effects of Earth’s oblateness and lunisolar gravity are of comparable order. This range covers the medium-Earth orbits (MEO) of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems and the geosynchronous orbits (GEO) of the communication satellites. We recall a secular and quadrupolar model, based on the Milankovitch vector formulation of perturbation theory, which governs the long-term orbital evolution subject to the predominant gravitational interactions. We study the global dynamics of this two-and-a-half degrees-of-freedom Hamiltonian system by means of the fast Lyapunov indicator (FLI), used in a statistical sense. Specifically, we characterize the degree of chaoticity of the action space using angle-averaged normalized FLI maps, thereby overcoming the angle dependencies of the conventional stability maps. Emphasis is placed upon the phase-space structures near secular resonances, which are of primary importance to the space debris community. We confirm and quantify the transition from order to chaos in MEO, stemming from the critical inclinations and find that highly inclined GEO orbits are particularly unstable. Despite their reputed normality, Earth satellite orbits can possess an extraordinarily rich spectrum of dynamical behaviors and, from a mathematical perspective, have all the complications that make them very interesting candidates for testing the modern tools of chaos theory.

  1. Infrared detectors for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.; Davis, R. P.; Knowles, P.; Shorrocks, N.

    2016-05-01

    IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), developed by CNES and launched since 2006 on the Metop satellites, is established as a major source of data for atmospheric science and weather prediction. The next generation - IASI NG - is a French national contribution to the Eumetsat Polar System Second Generation on board of the Metop second generation satellites and is under development by Airbus Defence and Space for CNES. The mission aim is to achieve twice the performance of the original IASI instrument in terms of sensitivity and spectral resolution. In turn, this places very demanding requirements on the infrared detectors for the new instrument. Selex ES in Southampton has been selected for the development of the infrared detector set for the IASI-NG instruments. The wide spectral range, 3.6 to 15.5 microns, is covered in four bands, each served by a dedicated detector design, with a common 4 x 4 array format of 1.3 mm square macropixels. Three of the bands up to 8.7 microns employ photovoltaic MCT (mercury cadmium telluride) technology and the very long wave band employs photoconductive MCT, in common with the approach taken between Airbus and Selex ES for the SEVIRI instrument on Second Generation Meteosat. For the photovoltaic detectors, the MCT crystal growth of heterojunction photodiodes is by the MOVPE technique (metal organic vapour phase epitaxy). Novel approaches have been taken to hardening the photovoltaic macropixels against localised crystal defects, and integrating transimpedance amplifiers for each macropixel into a full-custom silicon read out chip, which incorporates radiation hard design.

  2. Pull vs. Push: How OmniEarth Delivers Better Earth Observation Information to Subscribers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, C.; Slagowski, S.; Dyrud, L.; Fentzke, J.; Hargis, B.; Steerman, M.

    2015-04-01

    Until very recently, the commercialization of Earth observation systems has largely occurred in two ways: either through the detuning of government satellites or the repurposing of NASA (or other science) data for commercial use. However, the convergence of cloud computing and low-cost satellites is enabling Earth observation companies to tailor observation data to specific markets. Now, underserved constituencies, such as agriculture and energy, can tap into Earth observation data that is provided at a cadence, resolution and cost that can have a real impact to their bottom line. To connect with these markets, OmniEarth fuses data from a variety of sources, synthesizes it into useful and valuable business information, and delivers it to customers via web or mobile interfaces. The "secret sauce" is no longer about having the highest resolution imagery, but rather it is about using that imagery - in conjunction with a number of other sources - to solve complex problems that require timely and contextual information about our dynamic and changing planet. OmniEarth improves subscribers' ability to visualize the world around them by enhancing their ability to see, analyze, and react to change in real time through a solutions-as-a-service platform.

  3. Celebrate with SATELLITES: An International Polar Year Partnership to Study Earth's Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, Mikell Lynne; Czajkowski, Kevin; Struble, Janet; Benko, Terri; Shellito, Brad; Sheridan, Scott; Stasiuk, Mandy Munroe

    2009-01-01

    The SATELLITES program uses geospatial technologies to study surface temperatures of Earth's materials, such as sand, soil, grass, and water. Data are collected using Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) protocols, which are then used in research projects that are a part of the International Polar Year (IPY).…

  4. ESA's Earth Observation Programmes in the Changing Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, Volker

    2016-07-01

    The intervention will present ESA's Earth Observation programmes and their relevance to studying the anthropocene. ESA's Earth observation missions are mainly grouped into three categories: The Sentinel satellites in the context of the European Copernicus Programme, the scientific Earth Explorers and the meteorological missions. Developments, applications and scientific results for the different mission types will be addressed, along with overall trends and strategies. The Earth Explorers, who form the science and research element of ESA's Living Planet Programme, focus on the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere and Earth's interior. The Earth Explorers also aim at learning more about the interactions between these components and the impact that human activity is having on natural Earth processes. The Sentinel missions provide accurate, timely, long term and uninterrupted data to provide key information services, improving the way the environment is managed, and helping to mitigate the effects of climate change. The operational Sentinel satellites can also be exploited for scientific studies of the anthropocene. In the anthropocene human activities affect the whole planet and space is a very efficient means to measure their impact, but for relevant endeavours to be successful they can only be carried out in international cooperation. ESA maintains long-standing partnerships with other space agencies and institutions worldwide. In running its Earth observation programmes, ESA responds to societal needs and challenges and to requirements resulting from political priorities set by decision makers. Activities related to Climate Change are a prime example. Within ESA's Climate Change Initiative, 13 Essential Climate Variables are constantly monitored to create a long-term record of key geophysical parameters.

  5. Satellite Type Estination from Ground-based Photometric Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Suzuki, J.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.

    2016-09-01

    The optical photometric observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding of the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. At first, we measured in laboratory the surface reflectance of common satellite materials, for example, Multi-layer Insulation (MLI), mono-crystalline silicon cells, and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP). Next, we calculated visual magnitude of a satellite by simplified shape and albedo. In this calculation model, solar panels have dimensions of 2 by 8 meters, and the bus area is 2 meters squared with measured optical properties described above. Under these conditions, it clarified the brightness can change the range between 3 and 4 magnitudes in one night, but color index changes only from 1 to 2 magnitudes. Finally, we observed the color photometric data of several GEO satellites visible from Japan multiple times in August and September 2014. We obtained that light curves of GEO satellites recorded in the B and V bands (using Johnson filters) by a ground-base optical telescope. As a result, color index changed approximately from 0.5 to 1 magnitude in one night, and the order of magnitude was not changed in all cases. In this paper, we briefly discuss about satellite type estimation using the relation between brightness and color index obtained from the photometric observation.

  6. Satellite co-locations as a link between SLR, GPS and Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melachroinos, S. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Chinn, D. S.; Nicolas, J. B.; Zelensky, N. P.; Wimert, J.; Radway, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The procedure applied for the determination of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) requires the combination of all four major techniques of Space Geodesy. This combination is only possibly realized by the introduction of the local-ties between co-located techniques. A local-tie is the lever arm vector between the marker points on the sites where two or more space geodesy instruments operate. The local ties are used as additional observations with proper variances. They are usually derived from local surveys using either classical geodesy or the global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). The Global Positioning System (GPS) plays a major role in the ITRF combination by linking together all the other three techniques SLR, DORIS and VLBI (Altamimi and Collilieux 2009). However, discrepancies between local ties and space geodesy estimates are well known although the reasons for these discrepancies are often not clear. These discrepancies could be either due to errors in local ties and in coordinate estimates or in both. In this study, we use the tracking to G05-35 and G06-36 and one LEO by SLR sites and their combined orbits, earth rotation parameters (ERPs) and station positions in order to establish space-based co-location ties on the stations. The LEO satellite used in this experiment is Jason-2, which carries both GPS and SLR. Therefore from the data-processing point of view the LEO satellite is used as a fast moving station (Thaller et al. 2011). Jason-2 is also equipped with DORIS, but it will be included into another combined analysis. Subsequently, we compare the consistency of our space-based co-locations to the ones from ITRF08 and SLRF08 - IGb08 solutions.

  7. Lunar-based Earth observation geometrical characteristics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuanzhen; Liu, Guang; Ye, Hanlin; Guo, Huadong; Ding, Yixing; Chen, Zhaoning

    2016-07-01

    As is known to all, there are various platforms for carrying sensors to observe Earth, such as automobiles, aircrafts and satellites. Nowadays, we focus on a new platform, Moon, because of its longevity, stability and vast space. These advantages make it to be the next potential platform for observing Earth, enabling us to get the consistent and global measurements. In order to get a better understanding of lunar-based Earth observation, we discuss its geometrical characteristics. At present, there are no sensors on the Moon for observing Earth and we are not able to obtain a series of real experiment data. As a result, theoretical modeling and numerical calculation are used in this paper. At first, we construct an approximate geometrical model of lunar-based Earth observation, which assumes that Earth and Moon are spheres. Next, we calculate the position of Sun, Earth and Moon based on the JPL ephemeris. With the help of positions data and geometrical model, it is possible for us to decide the location of terminator and substellar points. However, in order to determine their precise position in the conventional terrestrial coordinate system, reference frames transformations are introduced as well. Besides, taking advantages of the relative positions of Sun, Earth and Moon, we get the total coverage of lunar-based Earth optical observation. Furthermore, we calculate a more precise coverage, considering placing sensors on different positions of Moon, which is influenced by its attitude parameters. In addition, different ephemeris data are compared in our research and little difference is found.

  8. System implementation for Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. E.; Woerner, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the instrument system which is needed for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS). The system is to be composed of instruments on two of NOAA's near-polar sun-synchronous Tiros-N/NOAA A through G series of operational satellites and on a NASA midinclination satellite of the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) type referred to as ERBS-A/AEM. The Tiros-N/NOAA satellites will be in nominal 833 km altitude circular orbits with orbital inclinations of 98 deg. The AEM satellite will be in a circular orbit with an inclination of approximately 56 deg and a nominal altitude of 600 km. Each satellite will carry wide field-of-view (WFOV) and medium field-of-view (MFOV) sensors, a sensor for measuring the solar constant, and a narrow field-of-view (NFOV) cross-track scanner. The conceptual design of the W/MFOV instrument is discussed along with the conceptual design of the scanner.

  9. Scheduling observations of celestial objects for Earth observing sensor calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Truman; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-10-01

    Radiometric calibration of Earth-observing satellite sensors is critical for tracking on-orbit gain changes throughout the satellite's mission. The Moon, being a stable, well-characterized radiometric target, has been used effectively for tracking the relative gain changes of the reflective solar bands for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board EOS AM-1 (Terra) and PM-1 (Aqua). The Moon is viewed through the MODIS space-view port, and the relative phase of the Moon is restricted to within 0.5 degrees of a chosen target phase to increase the accuracy of the calibration. These geometric restrictions require spacecraft maneuvers in order to bring space-view port into proper alignment with the position of the Moon when the phase requirement is met. In this paper, we describe a versatile tool for scheduling such maneuvers based on the required geometry and lunar phase restrictions for a general spacecraft bound instrument. The results of the scheduling tool have been verified using lunar images from Aqua and Terra MODIS after a scheduled roll maneuver was performed. This tool has also been tested for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder on-board the Suomi-NPP spacecraft. As an extension of this work, we have also developed a tool for scheduling views of bright stars. These stars provide another well-characterized radiometric source that can be used for sensor calibration. This tool has been implemented to determine the times in which a chosen star can be viewed by the high gain stages of the day/night band for the VIIRS instrument.

  10. USGEO Common Framework For Earth Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, J.; de la Beaujardiere, J.; Bristol, S.

    2015-12-01

    The United States Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) Data Management Working Group (DMWG) is an interagency body established by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The primary purpose of this group is to foster interagency cooperation and collaboration for improving the life cycle data management practices and interoperability of federally held earth observation data consistent with White House documents including the National Strategy for Civil Earth Observations, the National Plan for Civil Earth Observations, and the May 2013 Executive Order on Open Data (M-13-13). The members of the USGEO DMWG are working on developing a Common Framework for Earth Observation Data that consists of recommended standards and approaches for realizing these goals as well as improving the discoverability, accessibility, and usability of federally held earth observation data. These recommendations will also guide work being performed under the Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI). This talk will summarize the Common Framework, the philosophy behind it, and next steps forward.

  11. Management approach recommendations. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study (EOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Management analyses and tradeoffs were performed to determine the most cost effective management approach for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) Phase C/D. The basic objectives of the management approach are identified. Some of the subjects considered are as follows: (1) contract startup phase, (2) project management control system, (3) configuration management, (4) quality control and reliability engineering requirements, and (5) the parts procurement program.

  12. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Years of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.; Kotsiaros, S.

    2015-12-01

    Two years of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites and alongtrack first differences we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from two years of Swarm satellite data by comparison with other recent models that also include non-Swarm magnetic observations.

  13. Neptunian Satellites observed with Keck AO system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchis, F.; Urata, R.; de Pater, I.; Gibbard, S.; Hammel, H. B.; Berthier, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Neptunian system was observed on 9 different nights between July 2002 and October 2003 with the 10-m Keck telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and its facility instrument NIRC2 coupled with the Adaptive Optics system. Data were recorded in J (1.2μ m), and H (2.2μ m) bands. The angular resolution achieved on a one-minute integration time image is 0.50 arcsec, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 1100 km. The images display small structures such as the rings (de Pater et al. 2004), clouds in the atmosphere (Gibbard et al. 2003), and inner satellites, mainly Proteus, Larissa, Galatea, Despina, and Thalassa. On the 40 images, the positions and intensities of the satellites detected were accurately measured fitting the signal with a gaussian profile. The center of Neptune was obtained by fitting the disk position with an ellipse. After correcting for the detector distortion, we compared the satellite positions with the predicted ones delivered by several ephemerides. We used the JPL (NEP016 + NEP022 + DE405) and two IMCCE ephemerides, an old version (VSOP87+Owen et al., 1991) and a more recent one (DE405+Le Guyader et al., 1993). All cases, we confirmed the presence of an apparent shift between the predicted and the observed positions. Table 1 (see http://astron.berkeley.edu/ fmarchis/Science/Neptune/Satellites/) summarizes the mean distance of the shift for satellites most frequently observed and the various ephemerides. In this presentation, we will report the positions of the satellites, and present their color and possible photometric variations derived from the observations. This work has been partially supported by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST - 9876783.

  14. Electric Propulsion for Low Earth Orbit Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleson, Steven R.

    1997-01-01

    Electric propulsion was evaluated for orbit insertion, satellite positioning and de-orbit applications on big (hundreds of kilograms) and little (tens of kilograms) low earth orbit communication satellite constellations. A simple, constant circumferential thrusting method was used. This technique eliminates the complex guidance and control required when shading of the solar arrays must be considered. Power for propulsion was assumed to come from the existing payload power. Since the low masses of these satellites enable multiple spacecraft per launch, the ability to add spacecraft to a given launch was used as a figure of merit. When compared to chemical propulsion ammonia resistojets, ion, Hall, and pulsed plasma thrusters allowed an additional spacecraft per launch Typical orbit insertion and de-orbit times were found to range from a few days to a few months.

  15. Tracking target objects orbiting earth using satellite-based telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, Willem H; Olivier, Scot S; Pertica, Alexander J

    2014-10-14

    A system for tracking objects that are in earth orbit via a constellation or network of satellites having imaging devices is provided. An object tracking system includes a ground controller and, for each satellite in the constellation, an onboard controller. The ground controller receives ephemeris information for a target object and directs that ephemeris information be transmitted to the satellites. Each onboard controller receives ephemeris information for a target object, collects images of the target object based on the expected location of the target object at an expected time, identifies actual locations of the target object from the collected images, and identifies a next expected location at a next expected time based on the identified actual locations of the target object. The onboard controller processes the collected image to identify the actual location of the target object and transmits the actual location information to the ground controller.

  16. Magnus Effect on a Spinning Satellite in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjatan, Sahadeo; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Yew, Alvin Garwai

    2016-01-01

    A spinning body in a flow field generates an aerodynamic lift or Magnus effect that displaces the body in a direction normal to the freestream flow. Earth orbiting satellites with substantial body rotation in appreciable atmospheric densities may generate a Magnus force to perturb orbital dynamics. We investigate the feasibility of using this effect for spacecraft at a perigee of 80km using the Systems Tool Kit (STK). Results show that for a satellite of reasonable properties, the Magnus effect doubles the amount of time in orbit. Orbital decay was greatly mitigated for satellites spinning at 10000 and 15000RPM. This study demonstrates that the Magnus effect has the potential to sustain a spacecraft's orbit at a low perigee altitude and could also serve as an orbital maneuver capability.

  17. A Grid portal for Earth Observation community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloisio, G.; Cafaro, M.; Cartenì, G.; Epicoco, I.; Quarta, G.

    2005-03-01

    Earth Observation techniques offer many powerful instruments for Earth planet study, urban development planning, military intelligence helping and so on. Terabytes of EO and geospatial data about lands, oceans, glaciers, cities, etc. are continuously downloaded through remote-sensing infrastructures and stored into heterogeneous, distributed repositories usually belonging to different virtual organizations. A problem-solving environment can be a viable solution to handle, coordinate and share heterogeneous and distributed resources. Moreover, grid computing is an emerging technology to solve large-scale problems in dynamic, multi-institutional Virtual Organizations coordinated by sharing resources such as high-performance computers, observation devices, data and databases over high-speed networks, etc. In this paper we present the Italian Grid for Earth Observation (I-GEO) project, a pervasive environment based on grid technology to help the integration and processing of Earth Observation data, providing a tool to share and access data, applications and computational resources among several organizations.

  18. An Earth Orbiting Satellite Service and Repair Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Andrew; Cardoza, Mike; Chen, John; Daley, Gunter; Frizzell, Andy; Linton, Richard; Rast, Wayne

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design was produced for the Geosynchronous Satellite Servicing Platform (GSSP), an orbital facility capable of repairing and servicing satellites in geosynchronous orbit. The GSSP is a man-tended platform, which consists of a habitation module, operations module, service bay and truss assembly. This design review includes an analysis of life support systems, thermal and power requirements, robotic and automated systems, control methods and navigation, and communications systems. The GSSP will utilize existing technology available at the time of construction, focusing mainly on modifying and integrating existing systems. The entire facility, along with two satellite retrieval vehicles (SRV), will be placed in geosynchronous orbit by the Advanced Launch System. The SRV will be used to ferry satellites to and from the GSSP. Technicians will be transferred from Earth to the GSSP and back in an Apollo-derived Crew Transfer Capsule (CTC). These missions will use advanced telerobotic equipment to inspect and service satellites. Four of these missions are tentatively scheduled per year. At this rate, the GSSP will service over 650 satelites during the projected 25 year lifespan.

  19. Harnessing Satellite Imageries in Feature Extraction Using Google Earth Pro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Sim Joseph; Milano, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Climate change has been a long-time concern worldwide. Impending flooding, for one, is among its unwanted consequences. The Phil-LiDAR 1 project of the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), Republic of the Philippines, has developed an early warning system in regards to flood hazards. The project utilizes the use of remote sensing technologies in determining the lives in probable dire danger by mapping and attributing building features using LiDAR dataset and satellite imageries. A free mapping software named Google Earth Pro (GEP) is used to load these satellite imageries as base maps. Geotagging of building features has been done so far with the use of handheld Global Positioning System (GPS). Alternatively, mapping and attribution of building features using GEP saves a substantial amount of resources such as manpower, time and budget. Accuracy-wise, geotagging by GEP is dependent on either the satellite imageries or orthophotograph images of half-meter resolution obtained during LiDAR acquisition and not on the GPS of three-meter accuracy. The attributed building features are overlain to the flood hazard map of Phil-LiDAR 1 in order to determine the exposed population. The building features as obtained from satellite imageries may not only be used in flood exposure assessment but may also be used in assessing other hazards and a number of other uses. Several other features may also be extracted from the satellite imageries.

  20. Data Assimilation: Making Sense of Earth Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Albert Lahoz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate change, air quality and environmental degradation are important societal challenges for the 21st Century. These challenges require an intelligent response from society, which in turn requires access to information about the Earth System. This information comes from observations and prior knowledge, the latter typically embodied in a model describing relationships between variables of the Earth System. Data assimilation provides an objective methodology to combine observational and model information to provide an estimate of the most likely state and its uncertainty for the whole Earth System. This approach adds value to the observations – by filling in the spatio-temporal gaps in observations; and to the model – by constraining it with the observations. In this review paper we motivate data assimilation as a methodology to fill in the gaps in observational information; illustrate the data assimilation approach with examples that span a broad range of features of the Earth System (atmosphere, including chemistry; ocean; land surface; and discuss the outlook for data assimilation, including the novel application of data assimilation ideas to observational information obtained using Citizen Science. Ultimately, a strong motivation of data assimilation is the many benefits it provides to users. These include: providing the initial state for weather and air quality forecasts; providing analyses and reanalyses for studying the Earth System; evaluating observations, instruments and models; assessing the relative value of elements of the Global Observing System (GOS; and assessing the added value of future additions to the GOS.

  1. Global Warming: Evidence from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.

    2001-01-01

    Observations made in Channel 2 (53.74 GHz) of the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer, flown on-board sequential, sun-synchronous, polar orbiting NOAA operational satellites, indicate that the mean temperature of the atmosphere over the globe increased during the period 1980 to 1999. In this study we have minimized systematic errors in the time series introduced by the satellite orbital drift in an objective manner. This is done with the help the onboard warm black body temperature, which is used in the calibration of the MSU radiometer. The corrected MSU Channel 2 observations of the NOAA satellite series reveal that the vertically weighted global mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid-troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13 K per decade (with an uncertainty of 0.05 K per decade) during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite deuced result.

  2. Chinese Surveying and Control Network for Earth-Orbit Satellites and Deep Space Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the surveying and control network(CSN) for earth-orbit satellite and spatial geodesy, and the relationship between the CSN for deep space celestial bodies and detectors, and deep space detection are briefly summarized, and so are the basic technical needs of the deep space surveying and control network(DSN). Then, the techniques, the constituents and the distributing of Chinese satellite CSN (CSCSN) and other radio observing establishments in China are introduced. Lastly, with the primary CSCSN and other observing establishments, some projects for China to rebuild a more perfect CSCSN, and to establish a DSN are analyzed and stated.

  3. Fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. Part 1: Analytic emulation of the Earth coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razoumny, Yury N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper opens a series of articles expounding the fundamentals of the route theory for satellite constellation design for Earth discontinuous coverage. In Part 1 of the series the analytical model for Earth coverage by satellites' swath conforming to the essential of discontinuous coverage, in contrast to continuous coverage, is presented. The analytic relations are consecutively derived for calculation of single- and multi-satellite Earth surface latitude coverage as well as for generating full set of typical satellite visibility zone time streams realized in the repeating latitude coverage pattern for given arbitrary satellite constellation. The analytic relations mentioned are used for developing the method for analysis of discontinuous coverage of fixed arbitrary Earth region for given satellite constellation using both deterministic and stochastic approaches. The method provides analysis of the revisit time for given satellite constellation, as a result of high speed (fractions of a second or seconds) computer calculations in a wide range of possible revisit time variations for different practical purposes with high accuracy which is at least on par with that provided by known numerical simulating methods based on direct modeling of the satellite observation mission, or in a number of cases is even superior to it.

  4. Earth observations from space: History, promise, and reality. Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In this report the Committee on Earth Studies (CES), a standing committee of the Space Studies Board (SSB) within the National Research Council (NRC), reviews the recent history (nominally from 1981 to 1995) of the U.S. earth observations programs that serve civilian needs. The principal observations programs examined are those of NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The Air Force' s Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) is discussed, but only from the perspective of its relationship to civil needs and the planned merger with the NOAA polar-orbiting system. The report also reviews the interfaces between the earth observations satellite programs and the major national and international environmental monitoring and research programs. The monitoring and research programs discussed are the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP), the World Climate Research Program (WCRP), related international scientific campaigns, and operational programs for the sharing and application of environmental data. The purpose of this report is to provide a broad historical review and commentary based on the views of the CES members, with particular emphasis on tracing the lengthy record of advisory committee recommendations. Any individual topic could be the subject of an extended report in its own right. Indeed, extensive further reviews are already under way to that end. If the CES has succeeded in the task it has undertaken. This report will serve as a useful starting point for any such more intensive study. The report is divided into eight chapters: ( I ) an introduction, (2) the evolution of the MTPE, (3) its relationship to the USGCRP, (4) applications of earth observations data, (5) the role that smaller satellites can play in research and operational remote sensing, (6) earth system modeling and information systems, (7) a number of associated activities that contribute to the MTPE

  5. Linking Satellites Via Earth "Hot Spots" and the Internet to Form Ad Hoc Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, Dan; Frye, Stu; Grosvenor, Sandra; Ingram, Mary Ann; Langley, John; Miranda, Felix; Lee, Richard Q.; Romanofsky, Robert; Zaman, Afoz; Popovic, Zoya

    2004-01-01

    As more assets are placed in orbit, opportunities emerge to combine various sets of satellites in temporary constellations to perform collaborative image collections. Often, new operations concepts for a satellite or set of satellites emerge after launch. To the degree with which new space assets can be inexpensively and rapidly integrated into temporary or "ad hoc" constellations, will determine whether these new ideas will be implemented or not. On the Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) satellite, a New Millennium Program mission, a number of experiments were conducted and are being conducted to demonstrate various aspects of an architecture that, when taken as a whole, will enable progressive mission autonomy. In particular, the target architecture will use adaptive ground antenna arrays to form, as close as possible, the equivalent of wireless access points for low earth orbiting satellites. Coupled with various ground and flight software and the Internet. the architecture enables progressive mission autonomy. Thus, new collaborative sensing techniques can be implemented post-launch. This paper will outline the overall operations concept and highlight details of both the research effort being conducted in satellites. Keywords: collaborative remote sensing smart antennas, adaptive antenna arrays, sensor webs. ad hoc constellations, mission autonomy and

  6. Possible satellite-based observations of the 1997 Leonid meteoroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pongratz, M.B.; Carlos, R.C.; Cayton, T.

    1998-12-01

    The Block IIA GPS satellites are equipped with a sensor designed to detect electromagnetic transients. Several phenomena will produce triggers in this sensor. They include earth-based electromagnetic transients such as lightning and two space-based phenomena--deep dielectric discharge and meteoroid or hyper-velocity micro-gram particle impact (HMPI). Energetic electrons in the GPS environment cause the deep dielectric charging. HMPIs cause triggers through the transient electric fields generated by the ejecta plasma. During the 1997 Leonid passage the energetic particle fluxes were very low. In the presence of such low fluxes the typical median trigger rate is 20 per minute with a standard deviation of about 20 per minute. Between 0800 UT and 1200 UT on November 17, 1997, the sensor on a specially configured satellite observed trigger rates more than 10 sigma above the nominal median rate. Sensors on other Block IIA GPS satellites also observed excess triggers during November. Detection is enhanced when the sensor antenna is oriented into the Leonid radiant. While many questions persist the authors feel that it is likely that the excess events during the November interval were caused by the close approach of the satellites to the Leonid meteoroid path.

  7. Terrestrial kilometric radiation: 1: Spatial structures studies. [from satellite observation (Explorer 2 satellite) of lunar occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. K.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1976-01-01

    Observations are presented of lunar occultations of the earth at 250 kHz obtained with the Radio-Astronomy-Explorer-2 satellite which were used to derive two dimensional maps of the location of the sources of terrestrial kilometric radiation (TKR). By examining the two dimensional source distributions as a function of the observer's location (lunar orbit) with respect to the magnetosphere, the average three dimensional location of the emission regions can be estimated. Although TKR events at 250 kHz can often be observed at projected distances corresponding to the 250 kHz electron gyro or plasma level (approximately 2 earth radii), many events are observed much farther from the earth (between 5 and 15 earth radii). Dayside emission apparently in the region of the polar cusp and the magnetosheath and night emission associated with regions of the magnetotail are examined. The nightside emission is suggestive of a mechanism involving plasma sheet electron precipitation in the pre-midnight sector.

  8. Simulation of Motion of Satellite under the Effect of Oblateness of Earth and Atmospheric Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Jaita; Pirzada, U M; Shah, Vishant

    2016-01-01

    The equations governing motion of the satellite under the effect of oblateness of Earth and atmospheric drag have been simulated, for a fixed initial position and three different initial velocities, till satellite collapses on Earth. Simulation of motion of artificial Earth satellite subject to the combined effects of oblate Earth and atmospheric drag is presented. The atmospheric model considered here takes in to account of exponential variation of the density with initial distance of Satellite from Earth's surface, scale height and radial distance. The minimum and maximum values of orbital elements and their variation over a time for different initial velocities have been reported.

  9. Earth Observation from Space: Competition or Cooperation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    begin in earnest in April of 1960 with the launch of TIPOS (Television and Infrared Observation Satellite) which observed weather patterns in the United...data became a candidate for entry into the commercial sector where there appeared to be an imagery market . Responsibility for system operations was...it has not been fully developed. The slow emergence of remote sensing as a commercial enterprise has been attributed to two factors; 1) poor market

  10. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  11. SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS FOR EDUCATION OF CLIMATE CHANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILONA PAJTÓK-TARI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper surveys the key statements of the IPCC (2007 Reportbased mainly on the satellite-borne observations to support teaching climatechange and geography by using the potential of this technology. In theIntroduction we briefly specify the potential and the constraints of remote sensing.Next the key climate variables for indicating the changes are surveyed. Snow andsea-ice changes are displayed as examples for these applications. Testing theclimate models is a two-sided task involving satellites, as well. Validation of theability of reconstructing the present climate is the one side of the coin, whereassensitivity of the climate system is another key task, leading to consequences onthe reality of the projected changes. Finally some concluding remarks arecompiled, including a few ideas on the ways how these approaches can be appliedfor education of climate change.

  12. Earth observations from space: A dream deferred?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, John H.

    Earth observations from space are one of the great successes of the space age. However, because the promise of this technology is a long way from being realized, the joy of success is tinged with disappointment for both researchers and operational users of the data. U.S. Earth observation programs have been in turmoil since their inception, with confusion coming to a crescendo over the past 6 years. Neither the executive or legislative branches of the government have shown that they can successfully manage this technological capability created by the space program.

  13. 对地观测卫星任务规划的启发式动态调整算法%Heuristic dynamic adjust of task scheduling for earth observing satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张利宁; 黄小军; 邱涤珊; 李皓平

    2011-01-01

    针对对地观测卫星任务规划,分析了单个资源失效与多个高优先级任务动态插入情况下已有任务规划方案的动态调整问题.以最大化规划方案任务权值总和为优化目标,提出了基于任务替换的启发式动态调整算法,包括选择替换任务的五种启发式策略:最大灵活度,最小冲突集,最小争议部分、区间剪枝以及任务剪枝策略.分析了影响动态调整算法运行效率的两个关键因素:冲突任务集与动态搜索深度.采用任务重规划率、规划权值变化率与算法运行时间三项指标考察算法效果,通过仿真实验验证了算法的可行性和有效性.%The dynamic adjust problem of task scheduling for multi-earth observing satellite is analyzed,in cases of single resource fail and multi-prior tasks' dynamic insertion.The optimizing objective is to maximize the sum of all scheduled tasks. The heuristic dynamic adjust algorithm has been proposed based on task swapping, including five heuristic strategies to choosing swapped task:maximum flexibility,minimum conflict set,minimum contention,interval prune and task prune.Two critical elements that impact efficiency of the algorithm have been analyzed also.Three indices, including re-scheduling ratio, change ratio of sum weight and total running time are deployed to check the result of this algorithm;the feasibility and effectiveness have been tested through simulation,and promised result is fulfilled.

  14. Optimal approach to the investigation of the Earth's gravitational field by means of satellite gradiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovskaya, M. S.

    The conventional approach to the recovery of the Earth's gravitational field from satellite gradiometry observations is based on constructing, from the start, several boundary value (BV) relations, each of them corresponding to a separate observable component of the gravity gradient (GG) tensor or a certain combination of them. In particular, one of such projects, the ARISTOTELES mission, assumes that only the radial and across-track components are accessible (by technical reasons). The purpose of the present paper is mainly to discuss the principle aspects of the problem of the Earth's potential recovering from satellite gradiometry, to give an optimal formulation of the problem and derive the basic boundary value equation in different forms.

  15. Solar power satellites: our next generation of satellites will deliver the sun's energy to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flournoy, Don M.

    2009-12-01

    The paper addresses the means for gathering energy from sunlight in space and transmitting it to Earth via Solar Power Satellites. The motivating factor is that the output of our sun is the largest potential energy source available, with the capability of providing inexhaustible quantities of clean electrical energy to every location on Earth. The challenge is that considerable financial, intellectual and diplomatic resources must be focused on designing and implementing new types of energy infrastructures in space and on the ground. These include: 1) next-generation space platforms, arrays, and power transmission systems; 2) more flexible and powerful launch vehicles for delivering materials to space; 3) specialized receivers, converters and storage systems on earth, and the in-orbit position allocations, spectrum and software that make these systems work together efficiently and safely.

  16. 3D Orbit Visualization for Earth-Observing Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Plesea, Lucian; Chafin, Brian G.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2011-01-01

    This software visualizes orbit paths for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), but was designed to be general and applicable to any Earth-observing mission. The software uses the Google Earth user interface to provide a visual mechanism to explore spacecraft orbit paths, ground footprint locations, and local cloud cover conditions. In addition, a drill-down capability allows for users to point and click on a particular observation frame to pop up ancillary information such as data product filenames and directory paths, latitude, longitude, time stamp, column-average dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide, and solar zenith angle. This software can be integrated with the ground data system for any Earth-observing mission to automatically generate daily orbit path data products in Google Earth KML format. These KML data products can be directly loaded into the Google Earth application for interactive 3D visualization of the orbit paths for each mission day. Each time the application runs, the daily orbit paths are encapsulated in a KML file for each mission day since the last time the application ran. Alternatively, the daily KML for a specified mission day may be generated. The application automatically extracts the spacecraft position and ground footprint geometry as a function of time from a daily Level 1B data product created and archived by the mission s ground data system software. In addition, ancillary data, such as the column-averaged dry air mole fraction of carbon dioxide and solar zenith angle, are automatically extracted from a Level 2 mission data product. Zoom, pan, and rotate capability are provided through the standard Google Earth interface. Cloud cover is indicated with an image layer from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) aboard the Aqua satellite, which is automatically retrieved from JPL s OnEarth Web service.

  17. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew E.; Behnke, Jeanne; Lowe, Dawn; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of NASA Earth observation program for over 10 years. It is one of the largest civilian science information system in the US, performing ingest, archive and distribution of over 3 terabytes of data per day much of which is from NASA s flagship missions Terra, Aqua and Aura. The system supports a variety of science disciplines including polar processes, land cover change, radiation budget, and most especially global climate change. The EOSDIS data centers, collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, archive and distribute standard data products produced by science investigator-led processing systems. Key to the success of EOSDIS is the concept of core versus community requirements. EOSDIS supports a core set of services to meet specific NASA needs and relies on community-developed services to meet specific user needs. EOSDIS offers a metadata registry, ECHO (Earth Observing System Clearinghouse), through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA s Earth science data and services. Users can search, manage, and access the contents of ECHO s registries (data and services) through user-developed and community-tailored interfaces or clients. The ECHO framework has become the primary access point for cross-Data Center search-and-order of EOSDIS and other Earth Science data holdings archived at the EOSDIS data centers. ECHO s Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST) is the primary web-based client for discovering and ordering cross-discipline data from the EOSDIS data centers. The architecture of the EOSDIS provides a platform for the publication, discovery, understanding and access to NASA s Earth Observation resources and allows for easy integration of new datasets. The EOSDIS also has developed several methods for incorporating socioeconomic data into its data collection. Over the years, we have developed several methods for determining

  18. Application of altitude control techniques for low altitude earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, K. G.; Herder, R. W.; Glass, A. B.; Cooley, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The applications sensors of many low altitude earth satellites designed for recording surface or atmospheric data require near zero orbital eccentricities for maximum usefulness. Coverage patterns and altitude profiles require specified values of orbit semimajor axis. Certain initial combinations of semimajor axis, eccentricity, and argument of perigee can produce a so called 'frozen orbit' and minimum altitude variation which enhances sensor coverage. This paper develops information on frozen orbits and minimum altitude variation for all inclinations, generalizing previous results. In the altitude regions where most of these satellites function (between 200 and 1000 kilometers) strong atmospheric drag effects influence the evolution of the initial orbits. Active orbital maneuver control techniques to correct evolution of orbit parameters while minimizing the frequency of maneuvers are presented. The paper presents the application of theoretical techniques for control of near frozen orbits and expands upon the methods useful for simultaneously targeting several inplane orbital parameters. The applications of these techniques are illustrated by performance results from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-3 and -5) missions and in preflight maneuver analysis and plans for the Seasat Oceanographic Satellite.

  19. Orbit Propagation and Determination of Low Earth Orbit Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents orbit propagation and determination of low Earth orbit (LEO satellites. Satellite global positioning system (GPS configured receiver provides position and velocity measures by navigating filter to get the coordinates of the orbit propagation (OP. The main contradictions in real-time orbit which is determined by the problem are orbit positioning accuracy and the amount of calculating two indicators. This paper is dedicated to solving the problem of tradeoffs. To plan to use a nonlinear filtering method for immediate orbit tasks requires more precise satellite orbit state parameters in a short time. Although the traditional extended Kalman filter (EKF method is widely used, its linear approximation of the drawbacks in dealing with nonlinear problems was especially evident, without compromising Kalman filter (unscented Kalman Filter, UKF. As a new nonlinear estimation method, it is measured at the estimated measurements on more and more applications. This paper will be the first study on UKF microsatellites in LEO orbit in real time, trying to explore the real-time precision orbit determination techniques. Through the preliminary simulation results, they show that, based on orbit mission requirements and conditions using UKF, they can satisfy the positioning accuracy and compute two indicators.

  20. Shuttle user analysis (study 2.2). Volume 3: Business risk and value of operations in space (BRAVO). Part 5: Analysis of GSFC Earth Observation Satellite (EOS) system mission model using BRAVO techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Cost comparisons were made between three modes of operation (expend, ground refurbish, and space resupply) for the Earth Observation System (EOS-B) to furnish data to NASA on alternative ways to use the shuttle/EOS. Results of the analysis are presented in tabular form.

  1. The Common Framework for Earth Observation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, J.; Stryker, T. S.; Sherman, R.

    2016-12-01

    Each year, the Federal government records petabytes of data about our home planet. That massive amount of data in turn provides enormous benefits to society through weather reports, agricultural forecasts, air and water quality warnings, and countless other applications. To maximize the ease of transforming the data into useful information for research and for public services, the U.S. Group on Earth Observations released the first Common Framework for Earth Observation Data in March 2016. The Common Framework recommends practices for Federal agencies to adopt in order to improve the ability of all users to discover, access, and use Federal Earth observations data. The U.S. Government is committed to making data from civil Earth observation assets freely available to all users. Building on the Administration's commitment to promoting open data, open science, and open government, the Common Framework goes beyond removing financial barriers to data access, and attempts to minimize the technical impediments that limit data utility. While Earth observation systems typically collect data for a specific purpose, these data are often also useful in applications unforeseen during development of the systems. Managing and preserving these data with a common approach makes it easier for a wide range of users to find, evaluate, understand, and utilize the data, which in turn leads to the development of a wide range of innovative applications. The Common Framework provides Federal agencies with a recommended set of standards and practices to follow in order to achieve this goal. Federal agencies can follow these best practices as they develop new observing systems or modernize their existing collections of data. This presentation will give a brief on the context and content of the Common Framework, along with future directions for implementation and keeping its recommendations up-to-date with developing technology.

  2. The future of Earth observation in hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCabe, Matthew F.; Rodell, Matthew; Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Miralles, Diego G.; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Wagner, Wolfgang; Lucieer, Arko; Houborg, Rasmus; Verhoest, Niko E.C.; Franz, Trenton E.

    2017-01-01

    In just the past 5 years, the field of Earth observation has progressed beyond the offerings of conventional space-agency-based platforms to include a plethora of sensing opportunities afforded by CubeSats, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and smartphone technologies that are being embraced by

  3. Sensing Planet Earth - Chalmers' MOOCs on Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Stöhr, Christian; Murtagh, Donal; Forkman, Peter; Galle, Bo; Mellquist, Johan; Soja, Maciej; Berg, Anders; Carvajal, Gisela; Eriksson, Leif; Haas, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of universities around the globe produce and conduct Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). In the beginning of 2016, Chalmers University of Technology ran two MOOCs on the topic of Earth observations on the edX platform. Both four week long courses were at introductory level and covered topics related to solid Earth, atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and cryosphere. It was discussed how one can measure and trace global change and use remote sensing tools for disaster monitoring. Research has attempted to assess the learners' motivations to participate in MOOCs, but there is a need for further case studies about motivations, opportunities and challenges for teachers engaging in MOOC development. In our presentation, we are going to report about the experiences gained from both the MOOC production and the actual course run from the instructors' perspective. After brief introduction to MOOCs in general and at Chalmers in particular, we share experiences and challenges of developing lecture and assessment material, the video production and coordination efforts between and within different actors involved in the production process. Further, we reflect upon the actual run of the course including course statistics and feedback from the learners. We discuss issues such as learner activation and engagement with the material, teacher-learner and student-student interaction as well as the scalability of different learning activities. Finally, we will present our lessons-learned and conclusions on the applicability of MOOCs in the field of Earth science teaching.

  4. Earth Camp: Exploring Earth Change through the Use of Satellite Images and Scientific Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, A.; Buxner, S.; Crown, D. A.; Colodner, D.; Orchard, A.; King, B.; Schwartz, K.; Prescott, A.; Prietto, J.; Titcomb, A.

    2014-07-01

    Earth Camp is a NASA-funded program that gives students and teachers opportunities to explore local, regional, and global earth change through a combination of hands-on investigations and the use of satellite images. Each summer, 20 middle school and 20 high school students participate in a two-week leadership program investigating contemporary issues (e.g., changes in river sheds, water quality, and land use management) through hands-on investigations, analyzing remote sensing data, and working with experts. Each year, 20 teachers participate in a year-long professional development program that includes monthly workshops, field investigations on Mt. Lemmon in Tucson, Arizona, and a week-long summer design workshop. Teachers conduct investigations of authentic questions using satellite images and create posters to present results of their study of earth change. In addition, teachers design lesson plans to expand their students' ability to investigate earth change with 21st Century tools. Lessons can be used as classroom exercises or for after-school club programs. Independent evaluation has been an integral part of program development and delivery for all three audiences, enabling the program staff and participants to reflect on and continually improve their practice and learning over the three-year period.

  5. Design Concepts for a Small Space-Based GEO Relay Satellite for Missions Between Low Earth and near Earth Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Warner, Joseph D.; Oleson, Steven; Schier, James

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the Small Space-Based Geosynchronous Earth orbiting (GEO) satellite is to provide a space link to the user mission spacecraft for relaying data through ground networks to user Mission Control Centers. The Small Space Based Satellite (SSBS) will provide services comparable to those of a NASA Tracking Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) for the same type of links. The SSBS services will keep the user burden the same or lower than for TDRS and will support the same or higher data rates than those currently supported by TDRS. At present, TDRSS provides links and coverage below GEO; however, SSBS links and coverage capability to above GEO missions are being considered for the future, especially for Human Space Flight Missions (HSF). There is also a rising need for the capability to support high data rate links (exceeding 1 Gbps) for imaging applications. The communication payload on the SSBS will provide S/Ka-band single access links to the mission and a Ku-band link to the ground, with an optical communication payload as an option. To design the communication payload, various link budgets were analyzed and many possible operational scenarios examined. To reduce user burden, using a larger-sized antenna than is currently in use by TDRS was considered. Because of the SSBS design size, it was found that a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket could deliver three SSBSs to GEO. This will greatly reduce the launch costs per satellite. Using electric propulsion was also evaluated versus using chemical propulsion; the power system size and time to orbit for various power systems were also considered. This paper will describe how the SSBS will meet future service requirements, concept of operations, and the design to meet NASA users' needs for below and above GEO missions. These users' needs not only address the observational mission requirements but also possible HSF missions to the year 2030. We will provide the trade-off analysis of the communication payload design in terms of

  6. Earth Observation for the Preservation of the Bacalar Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Raffaella; Iervolino, Pasquale; Freemantle, Terri; Spittle, Stephen; Minchella, Andrea; Marti, Paula; Napiorkowska, Milena; Howard, Gemma; Hernandez Arana, Hector; Cabrera Alvarado, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    Near-Real-Time applications have been designed to monitor the impact of human activities in the Bacalar region in Mexico. In particular, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and optical images have been used for this purpose and satellite derived products have been created to study urban growth, change of mangrove cover over time, and land use. The Earth Observation (EO) derived products have been integrated into a web-based geospatial data platform developed under the project, with the aim of allowing ease of data visualisation and manipulation.

  7. Earth observation Water Cycle Multi-Mission Observation Strategy (WACMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Su

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Observing and monitoring the different components of the global water cycle and their dynamics are essential steps to understand the climate of the Earth, forecast the weather, predict natural disasters like floods and droughts, and improve water resources management. Earth observation technology is a unique tool to provide a global understanding of many of the essential variables governing the water cycle and monitor their evolution over time from global to basin scales. In the coming years an increasing number of Earth observation missions will provide an unprecedented capacity to quantify several of these variables on a routine basis. In this context, the European Space Agency (ESA, in collaboration with the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP, launched the Water Cycle Multi-Mission Observation Strategy (WACMOS project in 2009. The project aims at developing and validating a novel set of geo-information products relevant to the water cycle covering the following thematic areas: evapotranspiration, soil moisture, cloud characterization and water vapour. The generation of these products is based on a number of innovative techniques and methods aiming at exploiting the synergies of different types of Earth observation data available today to the science community. This paper provides an overview of the major findings of the project with the ultimate goal of demonstrating the potential of innovative multi-mission based strategies to improve current observations by maximizing the synergistic use of the different types of information provided by the currently available observation systems.

  8. GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Perea, V.; Balzter, H.

    2012-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. GIONET is a partnership of leading Universities, research institutes and private companies from across Europe aiming to cultivate a community of early stage researchers in the areas of optical and radar remote sensing skilled for the emerging GMES land monitoring services during the GMES Initial Operations period (2011-2013) and beyond. GIONET is expected to satisfy the demand for highly skilled researchers and provide personnel for operational phase of the GMES and monitoring and emergency services. It will achieve this by: -Providing postgraduate training in Earth Observation Science that exposes students to different research disciplines and complementary skills, providing work experiences in the private and academic sectors, and leading to a recognized qualification (Doctorate). -Enabling access to first class training in both fundamental and applied research skills to early-stage researchers at world-class academic centers and market leaders in the private sector. -Building on the experience from previous GMES research and development projects in the land monitoring and emergency information services. The training program through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics (each carried out by an Early Stage Researchers based in one of the partner organization) divided in 5 main areas: Forest monitoring: Global biomass information systems Forest Monitoring of the Congo Basin using Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) Multi-concept Earth Observation Capabilities for Biomass Mapping and Change Detection: Synergy of Multi-temporal and Multi-frequency Interferometric Radar and Optical Satellite Data Land cover and change: Multi-scale Remote Sensing Synergy for Land Process Studies: from field Spectrometry to Airborne Hyperspectral and

  9. Spacecraft design project: Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, Dave; Lashbrook, Dave; Mckibben, Barry; Gardener, Nigel; Rivers, Thane; Nottingham, Greg; Golden, Bill; Barfield, Bill; Bruening, Joe; Wood, Dave

    1991-01-01

    This is the final product of the spacecraft design project completed to fulfill the academic requirements of the Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course (AE-4871) taught at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School. The Spacecraft Design and Integration 2 course is intended to provide students detailed design experience in selection and design of both satellite system and subsystem components, and their location and integration into a final spacecraft configuration. The design team pursued a design to support a Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) communications system (GLOBALSTAR) currently under development by the Loral Cellular Systems Corporation. Each of the 14 team members was assigned both primary and secondary duties in program management or system design. Hardware selection, spacecraft component design, analysis, and integration were accomplished within the constraints imposed by the 11 week academic schedule and the available design facilities.

  10. Utilizing Earth Observations for Societal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades a tremendous progress has been made in the Earth science space-based remote sensing observations, technologies and algorithms. Such advancements have improved the predictability by providing lead-time and accuracy of forecast in weather, climate, natural hazards, and natural resources. It has further reduced or bounded the overall uncertainties by partially improving our understanding of planet Earth as an integrated system that is governed by non-linear and chaotic behavior. Many countries such as the US, European Community, Japan, China, Russia, India has and others have invested billions of dollars in developing and launching space-based assets in the low earth (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) orbits. However, the wealth of this scientific knowledge that has potential of extracting monumental socio-economic benefits from such large investments have been slow in reaching the public and decision makers. For instance, there are a number of areas such as water resources and availability, energy forecasting, aviation safety, agricultural competitiveness, disaster management, air quality and public health, which can directly take advantage. Nevertheless, we all live in a global economy that depends on access to the best available Earth Science information for all inhabitants of this planet. This presentation discusses a process to transition Earth science data and products for societal needs including NASA's experience in achieving such objectives. It is important to mention that there are many challenges and issues that pertain to a number of areas such as: (1) difficulties in making a speedy transition of data and information from observations and models to relevant Decision Support Systems (DSS) or tools, (2) data and models inter-operability issues, (3) limitations of spatial, spectral and temporal resolution, (4) communication limitations as dictated by the availability of image processing and data compression techniques. Additionally, the

  11. Utilizing Earth Observations for Societal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades a tremendous progress has been made in the Earth science space-based remote sensing observations, technologies and algorithms. Such advancements have improved the predictability by providing lead-time and accuracy of forecast in weather, climate, natural hazards, and natural resources. It has further reduced or bounded the overall uncertainties by partially improving our understanding of planet Earth as an integrated system that is governed by non-linear and chaotic behavior. Many countries such as the US, European Community, Japan, China, Russia, India has and others have invested billions of dollars in developing and launching space-based assets in the low earth (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) orbits. However, the wealth of this scientific knowledge that has potential of extracting monumental socio-economic benefits from such large investments have been slow in reaching the public and decision makers. For instance, there are a number of areas such as water resources and availability, energy forecasting, aviation safety, agricultural competitiveness, disaster management, air quality and public health, which can directly take advantage. Nevertheless, we all live in a global economy that depends on access to the best available Earth Science information for all inhabitants of this planet. This presentation discusses a process to transition Earth science data and products for societal needs including NASA's experience in achieving such objectives. It is important to mention that there are many challenges and issues that pertain to a number of areas such as: (1) difficulties in making a speedy transition of data and information from observations and models to relevant Decision Support Systems (DSS) or tools, (2) data and models inter-operability issues, (3) limitations of spatial, spectral and temporal resolution, (4) communication limitations as dictated by the availability of image processing and data compression techniques. Additionally, the

  12. ASTER satellite observations for international disaster management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, K.A.; Abrams, M.

    2012-01-01

    When lives are threatened or lost due to catastrophic disasters, and when massive financial impacts are experienced, international emergency response teams rapidly mobilize to provide urgently required support. Satellite observations of affected areas often provide essential insight into the magnitude and details of the impacts. The large cost and high complexity of developing and operating satellite flight and ground systems encourages international collaboration in acquiring imagery for such significant global events in order to speed delivery of critical information to help those affected, and optimize spectral, spatial, and temporal coverage of the areas of interest. The International Charter-Space and Major Disasters was established to enable such collaboration in sensor tasking during times of crisis and is often activated in response to calls for assistance from authorized users. Insight is provided from a U.S. perspective into sensor support for Charter activations and other disaster events through a description of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), which has been used to support emergency situations for over a decade through its expedited tasking and near real-time data delivery capabilities. Examples of successes achieved and challenges encountered in international collaboration to develop related systems and fulfill tasking requests suggest operational considerations for new missions as well as areas for future enhancements.

  13. Earth as an Extrasolar Planet: Earth Model Validation Using EPOXI Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Deming, Drake; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Charbonneau, David; Livengood, Timothy A.; Seager, Sara; Barry, Richard; Hearty, Thomas; hide

    2011-01-01

    The EPOXI Discovery Mission of Opportunity reused the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to obtain spatially and temporally resolved visible photometric and moderate resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of Earth. These remote observations provide a rigorous validation of whole disk Earth model simulations used to better under- stand remotely detectable extrasolar planet characteristics. We have used these data to upgrade, correct, and validate the NASA Astrobiology Institute s Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional line-by-line, multiple-scattering spectral Earth model (Tinetti et al., 2006a,b). This comprehensive model now includes specular reflectance from the ocean and explicitly includes atmospheric effects such as Rayleigh scattering, gas absorption, and temperature structure. We have used this model to generate spatially and temporally resolved synthetic spectra and images of Earth for the dates of EPOXI observation. Model parameters were varied to yield an optimum fit to the data. We found that a minimum spatial resolution of approx.100 pixels on the visible disk, and four categories of water clouds, which were defined using observed cloud positions and optical thicknesses, were needed to yield acceptable fits. The validated model provides a simultaneous fit to the Earth s lightcurve, absolute brightness, and spectral data, with a root-mean-square error of typically less than 3% for the multiwavelength lightcurves, and residuals of approx.10% for the absolute brightness throughout the visible and NIR spectral range. We extend our validation into the mid-infrared by comparing the model to high spectral resolution observations of Earth from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, obtaining a fit with residuals of approx.7%, and temperature errors of less than 1K in the atmospheric window. For the purpose of understanding the observable characteristics of the distant Earth at arbitrary viewing geometry and observing cadence, our validated

  14. Earth Rotation Parameter Estimation by GPS Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yibin

    2006-01-01

    The methods of Earth rotation parameter (ERP) estimation based on IGS SINEX file of GPS solution are discussed in detail. There are two different ways to estimate ERP: one is the parameter transformation method, and the other is direct adjustment method with restrictive conditions. By comparing the estimated results with independent copyright program to IERS results, the residual systemic error can be found in estimated ERP with GPS observations.

  15. NASA's Earth Observing Data and Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. E.; Behnke, J.; Lowe, D.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2009-12-01

    NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) has been a central component of NASA Earth observation program for over 10 years. It is one of the largest civilian science information system in the US, performing ingest, archive and distribution of over 3 terabytes of data per day much of which is from NASA’s flagship missions Terra, Aqua and Aura. The system supports a variety of science disciplines including polar processes, land cover change, radiation budget, and most especially global climate change. The EOSDIS data centers, collocated with centers of science discipline expertise, archive and distribute standard data products produced by science investigator-led processing systems. Key to the success of EOSDIS is the concept of core versus community requirements. EOSDIS supports a core set of services to meet specific NASA needs and relies on community-developed services to meet specific user needs. EOSDIS offers a metadata registry, ECHO (Earth Observing System Clearinghouse), through which the scientific community can easily discover and exchange NASA’s Earth science data and services. Users can search, manage, and access the contents of ECHO’s registries (data and services) through user-developed and community-tailored interfaces or clients. The ECHO framework has become the primary access point for cross-Data Center search-and-order of EOSDIS and other Earth Science data holdings archived at the EOSDIS data centers. ECHO’s Warehouse Inventory Search Tool (WIST) is the primary web-based client for discovering and ordering cross-discipline data from the EOSDIS data centers. The architecture of the EOSDIS provides a platform for the publication, discovery, understanding and access to NASA’s Earth Observation resources and allows for easy integration of new datasets. The EOSDIS also has developed several methods for incorporating socioeconomic data into its data collection. Over the years, we have developed several methods for

  16. Earth Observations: Experiences from Various Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja Bye, Bente

    2015-04-01

    With Earth observations and the Group of Earth Observations as the common thread, a variety of communication strategies have been applied showcasing the use of Earth observations in geosciences such as climate change, natural hazards, hydrology and more. Based on the experiences from these communication strategies, using communication channels ranging from popular articles in established media, video production, event-based material and social media, lessons have been learned both with respect to the need of capacity, skills, networks, and resources. In general it is not difficult to mobilize geoscientists willing to spend some time on outreach activities. Time for preparing and training is however scarce among scientists. In addition, resources to cover the various aspects of professional science outreach is far from abundant. Among the challenges is the connection between the scientific networks and media channels. Social media competence and capacity are also issues that needs to be addressed more explicitly and efficiently. An overview of the experiences from several types of outreach activities will be given along with some input on possible steps towards improved communication strategies. Steady development of science communication strategies continuously integrating trainging of scientists in use of new outreach tools such as web technology and social innovations for more efficient use of limited resources will remain an issue for the scientific community.

  17. Earth Observation Training and Education with ESA LearnEO!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, Valborg; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Dobson, Malcolm; Rosmorduc, Vinca; Del Frate, Fabio; Banks, Chris; Picchiani, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    For society to benefit fully from its investment in Earth observation, EO data must be accessible and familiar to a global community of users who have the skills, knowledge and understanding to use the observations appropriately in their work. Achieving this requires considerable education effort. LearnEO! (www.learn-eo.org) is a new ESA education project that contributes towards making this a reality. LearnEO! has two main aims: to develop new training resources that use data from sensors on ESA satellites to explore a variety of environmental topics, and to stimulate and support members of the EO and education communities who may be willing to develop and share new education resources in the future. The project builds on the UNESCO Bilko project, which currently supplies free software, tutorials, and example data to users in 175 countries. Most of these users are in academic education or research, but the training resources are also of interest to a growing number of professionals in government, NGOs and private enterprise. Typical users are not remote sensing experts, but see satellite data as one of many observational tools. They want an easy, low-cost means to process, display and analyse data from different satellite sensors as part of their work in environmental research, monitoring and policy development. Many of the software improvements and training materials developed in LearnEO! are in response to requests from this user community. The LearnEO! tutorial and peer-reviewed lessons are designed to teach satellite data processing and analysis skills at different levels, from beginner to advanced - where advanced lessons requires some previous experience with Earth observation techniques. The materials are aimed at students and professionals in various branches of Earth sciences who have not yet specialised in specific EO technologies. The lessons are suitable for self-study, university courses at undergraduate to MSc level, or for continued professional

  18. Reconstructing the orbit of the Chelyabinsk meteor using satellite observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proud, Simon Richard

    2013-01-01

    The large number of objects in a range of orbits around the Sun means that some will inevitably intersect the Earth, becoming a meteor. These objects are commonly comet fragments or asteroids. To determine the type of a particular meteor requires knowledge of its trajectory and orbital path...... that is typically estimated by using ground-based observations such as images or radar measurements. A lack of data can, however, make this difficult and create large uncertainties in the reconstructed orbit. Here I show a new method for estimating a meteor's trajectory, and hence allowing computation of the orbit......, based upon measurements from satellite sensors. The meteor that fell on 15 February 2013 is used as an example and the resulting orbit is in broad agreement with estimates from other observations. This new technique represents an alternative method for trajectory determination that may be particularly...

  19. Citizen Observatories and the New Earth Observation Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Grainger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Earth observation is diversifying, and now includes new types of systems, such as citizen observatories, unmanned aerial vehicles and wireless sensor networks. However, the Copernicus Programme vision of a seamless chain from satellite data to usable information in the hands of decision makers is still largely unrealized, and remote sensing science lacks a conceptual framework to explain why. This paper reviews the literatures on citizen science, citizen observatories and conceptualization of remote sensing systems. It then proposes a Conceptual Framework for Earth Observation which can be used in a new Earth observation science to explain blockages in the chain from collecting data to disseminating information in any Earth observation system, including remote sensing systems. The framework differs from its predecessors by including social variables as well as technological and natural ones. It is used here, with evidence from successful citizen science projects, to compare the factors that are likely to influence the effectiveness of satellite remote sensing systems and citizen observatories. The paper finds that constraints on achieving the seamless “Copernicus Chain” are not solely technical, as assumed in the new Space Strategy for Europe, but include social constraints too. Achieving the Copernicus Chain will depend on the balance between: (a the ‘forward’ momentum generated by the repetitive functioning of each component in the system, as a result of automatic operation or human institutions, and by the efficiency of interfaces between components; and (b the ‘backward’ flow of information on the information needs of end users. Citizen observatories will face challenges in components which for satellite remote sensing systems are: (a automatic or straightforward, e.g., sensor design and launch, data collection, and data products; and (b also challenging, e.g., data processing. Since citizen observatories will rely even more on

  20. SERB, a nano-satellite dedicated to the Earth-Sun relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Bamas, Étienne; Cambournac, Pierre; Cherabier, Philippe; Demarets, Romain; Denis, Gaspard; Dion, Axel; Duroselle, Raphaël.; Duveiller, Florence; Eichner, Laetitia; Lozeve, Dimitri; Mestdagh, Guillaume; Ogier, Antoine; Oliverio, Romane; Receveur, Thibault; Souchet, Camille; Gilbert, Pierre; Poiet, Germain; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Sarkissian, Alain

    2016-05-01

    The Solar irradiance and Earth Radiation Budget (SERB) mission is an innovative proof-of-concept nano-satellite, with three ambitious scientific objectives. The nano-satellite aims at measuring on the same platform the absolute value of the total solar irradiance (TSI) and its variability, the ultraviolet (UV) solar spectral variability, and the different components of the Earth radiation budget. SERB is a joint project between CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), Ecole polytechnique, and LATMOS (Laboratoire Atmospheres, Milieux, Observations Spatiales) scheduled for a launch in 2020-2021. It is a three-unit CubeSat (X-CubeSat II), developed by students from ´Ecole polytechnique. Critical components of instrumental payloads of future large missions (coatings, UV filters, etc.) can acquire the technical maturity by flying in a CubeSat. Nano-satellites also represent an excellent alternative for instrumentation testing, allowing for longer flights than rockets. More-over, specific scientific experiments can be performed by nano-satellites. This paper is intended to present the SERB mission and its scientific objectives.

  1. Stratospheric dryness: model simulations and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the extreme dryness of the stratosphere have been debated for decades. A key difficulty has been the lack of comprehensive models which are able to reproduce the observations. Here we examine results from the coupled lower-middle atmosphere chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 together with satellite observations. Our model results match observed temperatures in the tropical lower stratosphere and realistically represent the seasonal and inter-annual variability of water vapor. The model reproduces the very low water vapor mixing ratios (below 2 ppmv periodically observed at the tropical tropopause near 100 hPa, as well as the characteristic tape recorder signal up to about 10 hPa, providing evidence that the dehydration mechanism is well-captured. Our results confirm that the entry of tropospheric air into the tropical stratosphere is forced by large-scale wave dynamics, whereas radiative cooling regionally decelerates upwelling and can even cause downwelling. Thin cirrus forms in the cold air above cumulonimbus clouds, and the associated sedimentation of ice particles between 100 and 200 hPa reduces water mass fluxes by nearly two orders of magnitude compared to air mass fluxes. Transport into the stratosphere is supported by regional net radiative heating, to a large extent in the outer tropics. During summer very deep monsoon convection over Southeast Asia, centered over Tibet, moistens the stratosphere.

  2. Observing and Modeling Earth's Energy Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews, from the authors' perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within ±2 W m-2. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute

  3. Aerodynamic Stability of Satellites in Elliptic Low Earth Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Matthew; Mancas, Stefan C; Udrea, Bogdan; Umeadi, Uchenna

    2013-01-01

    Topical observations of the thermosphere at altitudes below $200 \\, km$ are of great benefit in advancing the understanding of the global distribution of mass, composition, and dynamical responses to geomagnetic forcing, and momentum transfer via waves. The perceived risks associated with such low altitude and short duration orbits has prohibited the launch of Discovery-class missions. Miniaturization of instruments such as mass spectrometers and advances in the nano-satellite technology, associated with relatively low cost of nano-satellite manufacturing and operation, open an avenue for performing low altitude missions. The time dependent coefficients of a second order non-homogeneous ODE which describes the motion have a double periodic shape. Hence, they will be approximated using Jacobi elliptic functions. Through a change of variables the original ODE will be converted into Hill's ODE for stability analysis using Floquet theory. We are interested in how changes in the coefficients of the ODE affect the ...

  4. The effect of lunarlike satellites on the orbital infrared light curves of Earth-analog planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Nicholas A; Gaidos, Eric; Williams, Darren M

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated the influence of lunarlike satellites on the infrared orbital light curves of Earth-analog extrasolar planets. Such light curves will be obtained by NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA's Darwin missions as a consequence of repeat observations to confirm the companion status of a putative planet and determine its orbit. We used an energy balance model to calculate disk-averaged infrared (bolometric) fluxes from planet-satellite systems over a full orbital period (one year). The satellites are assumed to lack an atmosphere, have a low thermal inertia like that of the Moon, and span a range of plausible radii. The planets are assumed to have thermal and orbital properties that mimic those of Earth, while their obliquities and orbital longitudes of inferior conjunction remain free parameters. Even if the gross thermal properties of the planet can be independently constrained (e.g., via spectroscopy or visible-wavelength detection of specular glint from a surface ocean), only the largest (approximately Mars-sized) lunarlike satellites can be detected by light curve data from a TPF-like instrument (i.e., one that achieves a photometric signal-to-noise ratio of 10 to 20 at infrared wavelengths). Nondetection of a lunarlike satellite can obfuscate the interpretation of a given system's infrared light curve so that it may resemble a single planet with high obliquity, different orbital longitude of vernal equinox relative to inferior conjunction, and in some cases drastically different thermal characteristics. If the thermal properties of the planet are not independently established, then the presence of a lunarlike satellite cannot be inferred from infrared data, which would thus demonstrate that photometric light curves alone can only be used for preliminary study, and the addition of spectroscopic data will be necessary.

  5. Assessment of Global Annual Atmospheric Energy Balance from Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Stackhouse, Paul; Minnis, Patrick; Wielicki, Bruce A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun, Wenbo; Fan, Tai-Fang (Alice); Hinkelman, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Global atmospheric energy balance is one of the fundamental processes for the earth's climate system. This study uses currently available satellite data sets of radiative energy at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface and latent and sensible heat over oceans for the year 2000 to assess the global annual energy budget. Over land, surface radiation data are used to constrain assimilated results and to force the radiation, turbulent heat, and heat storage into balance due to a lack of observation-based turbulent heat flux estimations. Global annual means of the TOA net radiation obtained from both direct measurements and calculations are close to zero. The net radiative energy fluxes into the surface and the surface latent heat transported into the atmosphere are about 113 and 86 Watts per square meter, respectively. The estimated atmospheric and surface heat imbalances are about -8 9 Watts per square meter, values that are within the uncertainties of surface radiation and sea surface turbulent flux estimates and likely systematic biases in the analyzed observations. The potential significant additional absorption of solar radiation within the atmosphere suggested by previous studies does not appear to be required to balance the energy budget the spurious heat imbalances in the current data are much smaller (about half) than those obtained previously and debated at about a decade ago. Progress in surface radiation and oceanic turbulent heat flux estimations from satellite measurements significantly reduces the bias errors in the observed global energy budgets of the climate system.

  6. The Coverage Analysis for Low Earth Orbiting Satellites at Low Elevation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkelzen Cakaj

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellites are used for public networking and for scientific purposes. Communication via satellite begins when the satellite is positioned in its orbital position. Ground stations can communicate with LEO satellites only when the satellite is in their visibility region. The duration of the visibility and the communication vary for each LEO satellite pass over the station, since LEO satellites move too fast over the Earth. The satellite coverage area is defined as a region of the Earth where the satellite is seen at a minimum predefined elevation angle. The satellite’s coverage area on the Earth depends on orbital parameters. The communication under low elevation angles can be hindered by natural barriers. For safe communication and for savings within a link budget, the coverage under too low elevation is not always provided. LEO satellites organized in constellations act as a convenient network solution for real time global coverage. Global coverage model is in fact the complementary networking process of individual satellite’s coverage. Satellite coverage strongly depends on elevation angle. To conclude about the coverage variation for low orbiting satellites at low elevation up to 10º, the simulation for attitudes from 600km to 1200km is presented through this paper.

  7. Influence of satellite motion on polarization qubits in a Space-Earth quantum communication link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Cristian; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Jennewein, Thomas; Pernechele, Claudio; Villoresi, Paolo; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-10-16

    In a Space quantum-cryptography experiment a satellite pointing system is needed to send single photons emitted by the source on the satellite to the polarization analysis apparatus on Earth. In this paper a simulation is presented regarding how the satellite pointing systems affect the polarization state of the single photons, to help designing a proper compensation system.

  8. Quantifying Atmospheric Moist Processes from Earth Observations. Really?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    The amount of water in the Earth's atmosphere is tiny compared to all other sources of water on our planet, fresh or otherwise. However, this tiny amount of water is fundamental to most aspects of human life. The tiny amount of water that cycles from the Earth's surface, through condensation into clouds in the atmosphere returning as precipitation falling is not only natures way of delivering fresh water to land-locked human societies but it also exerts a fundamental control on our climate system producing the most important feedbacks in the system. The representation of these processes in Earth system models contain many errors that produce well now biases in the hydrological cycle. Surprisingly the parameterizations of these important processes are not well validated with observations. Part of the reason for this situation stems from the fact that process evaluation is difficult to achieve on the global scale since it has commonly been assumed that the static observations available from snap-shots of individual parameters contain little information on processes. One of the successes of the A-Train has been the development of multi-parameter analysis based on the multi-sensor data produced by the satellite constellation. This has led to new insights on how water cycles through the Earth's atmosphere. Examples of these insights will be highlighted. It will be described how the rain formation process has been observed and how this has been used to constrain this process in models, with a huge impact. How these observations are beginning to reveal insights on deep convection and examples of the use these observations applied to models will also be highlighted as will the effects of aerosol on clouds on radiation.

  9. Chemical Data Assimilation &Optimized Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lary, D.

    2003-04-01

    Issues such as ozone depletion, acid rain, and photochemical smog are all of considerable environmental importance. These issues are studied using the dual approach of observations and numerical modelling. In making balanced assessments of these issues it is vital to make the best use of all the information available to us, both theoretical and observational. This is a non-trivial task. The technique of "data assimilation" is a powerful tool which allows us to address this issue. It is revolutionising the way we can study atmospheric chemistry. Data assimilation allows us to simultaneously make good use of however many observations are available to us, our theoretical understanding, and any apriori information we have, within a mathematical framework. It even allows us to infer information about chemical constituents which are not observed. It is a technique which is set to grow in importance. It is also applicable to any system for which we have both observations, a deterministic model, and estimates of uncertainty. Such applications could be from laboratory kinetics to metabolic pathways. Looking ahead we can envision Data assimilation as part of a Optimized Earth Observation System by developing a dynamic data retrieval control system. The dynamic data retrieval control system will dynamically adapt the what, where, and when for the observations made in an online fashion to maximize information content, minimize uncertainty in characterizing the system’s state vector, and minimize both the required storage and data processing time for a given observation capability (with the possibility of even directing unmanned sub-orbital platforms, drones, to make additional observations). This is particularly desirable to facilitate the dynamic tracking of evolving sharp gradients, for example, those in chemical tracer fields often located at the polar vortex edge, the tropopause and the day-night division. The basic idea is the desire for symbiotic communication to

  10. Looking Down on the Earth: How Satellites Have Revolutionized Our Understanding of Our Home Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Earth is a complex, dynamic system we do not yet fully understand. The Earth system, like the human body, comprises diverse components that interact in complex ways. We need to understand the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and biosphere as a single connected system. Our planet is changing on all spatial and temporal scales. This presentation will highlight how satellite observations are revolutionizing our understanding of and its response to natural or human-induced changes, and to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards. Bio: MICHAEL H. FREILICH, Director of the Earth Science Division, Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. Prior to NASA, he was a Professor and Associate Dean in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. He received Ph.D. in Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Univ. of CA., San Diego) in 1982. Dr. Freilich's research focuses on the determination, validation, and geophysical analysis of ocean surface wind velocity measured by satellite-borne microwave radar and radiometer instruments. He has developed scatterometer and altimeter wind model functions, as well as innovative validation techniques for accurately quantifying the accuracy of spaceborne environmental measurements. Dr. Freilich has served on many NASA, National Research Council (NRC), and research community advisory and steering groups, including the WOCE Science Steering Committee, the NASA EOS Science Executive Committee, the NRC Ocean Studies Board, and several NASA data system review committees. Freilich's non-scientific passions include nature photography and soccer refereeing at the youth, high school, and adult levels.

  11. Looking Down on the Earth: How Satellites Have Revolutionized Our Understanding of Our Home Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Earth is a complex, dynamic system we do not yet fully understand. The Earth system, like the human body, comprises diverse components that interact in complex ways. We need to understand the Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and biosphere as a single connected system. Our planet is changing on all spatial and temporal scales. This presentation will highlight how satellite observations are revolutionizing our understanding of and its response to natural or human-induced changes, and to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards. Bio: MICHAEL H. FREILICH, Director of the Earth Science Division, Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters. Prior to NASA, he was a Professor and Associate Dean in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. He received Ph.D. in Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Univ. of CA., San Diego) in 1982. Dr. Freilich's research focuses on the determination, validation, and geophysical analysis of ocean surface wind velocity measured by satellite-borne microwave radar and radiometer instruments. He has developed scatterometer and altimeter wind model functions, as well as innovative validation techniques for accurately quantifying the accuracy of spaceborne environmental measurements. Dr. Freilich has served on many NASA, National Research Council (NRC), and research community advisory and steering groups, including the WOCE Science Steering Committee, the NASA EOS Science Executive Committee, the NRC Ocean Studies Board, and several NASA data system review committees. Freilich's non-scientific passions include nature photography and soccer refereeing at the youth, high school, and adult levels.

  12. The Group on Earth Observations and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achache, J.

    2006-05-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is leading a worldwide effort to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) over the next 10 years. The GEOSS vision, articulated in its 10-Year Implementation Plan, represents the consolidation of a global scientific and political consensus: the assessment of the state of the Earth requires continuous and coordinated observation of our planet at all scales. GEOSS aims to achieve comprehensive, coordinated and sustained observations of the Earth system in order to improve monitoring of the state of the Earth; increase understanding of Earth processes; and enhance prediction of the behaviour of the Earth system. After the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002 highlighted the urgent need for coordinated observations relating to the state of the Earth, GEO was established at the Third Earth Observation Summit in February 2005 and the GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan was endorsed. GEO currently involves 60 countries; the European Commission; and 43 international organizations and has begun implementation of the GEOSS 10-Year Implementation Plan. GEO programme activities cover nine societal benefit areas (Disasters; Health; Energy; Climate; Water; Weather; Ecosystems; Agriculture; Biodiversity) and five transverse or crosscutting elements (User Engagement; Architecture; Data Management; Capacity Building; Outreach). All these activities have as their final goal the establishment of the "system of systems" which will yield a broad range of basic societal benefits, including the reduction of loss of life and property from tsunamis, hurricanes, and other natural disasters; improved water resource and energy management; and improved understanding of environmental factors significant to public health. As a "system of systems", GEOSS will work with and build upon existing national, regional, and international systems to provide comprehensive, coordinated Earth observations from thousands of instruments worldwide

  13. Satellite observations of ground water changes in New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2002 NASA launched the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. GRACE consists of two satellites with a separation of about 200 km.  By accurately measuring the separation between the twin satellites, the differences in the gravity field can be determined. Monthly observ...

  14. The Matsu Wheel: A Cloud-based Framework for Efficient Analysis and Reanalysis of Earth Satellite Imagery

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, Maria T; Bennett, Collin; Bruggemann, Jacob; Grossman, Robert; Handy, Matthew; Ly, Vuong; Mandl, Dan; Pederson, Shane; Pivarski, Jim; Powell, Ray; Spring, Jonathan; Wells, Walt

    2016-01-01

    Project Matsu is a collaboration between the Open Commons Consortium and NASA focused on developing open source technology for the cloud-based processing of Earth satellite imagery. A particular focus is the development of applications for detecting fires and floods to help support natural disaster detection and relief. Project Matsu has developed an open source cloud-based infrastructure to process, analyze, and reanalyze large collections of hyperspectral satellite image data using OpenStack, Hadoop, MapReduce, Storm and related technologies. We describe a framework for efficient analysis of large amounts of data called the Matsu "Wheel." The Matsu Wheel is currently used to process incoming hyperspectral satellite data produced daily by NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. The framework is designed to be able to support scanning queries using cloud computing applications, such as Hadoop and Accumulo. A scanning query processes all, or most of the data, in a database or data repository. We also descri...

  15. Who Uses Earth Observations? User Types in Group on Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, K. S.

    2011-12-01

    How can we communicate concepts in the physical sciences unless we know our audience? The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) User Interface Committee (UIC) has a responsibility within GEO to support and advocate for the user community in the development of Global Earth Observations System of Systems (GEOSS) and related work. As part of its efforts, the UIC has been working on developing a taxonomy that can be used to characterize the broad spectrum of users of GEOSS and its data, services, and applications. The user type taxonomy is designed to be broad and flexible but aims at describing the needs of the users GEOSS is going to serve. These user types represent a continuum of users of Earth observations from research through to decision support activities, and it includes organizations that use GEOSS as a tool to provide data and services for customers and consumers of the information. The classification scheme includes factors about skills and capacity for using Earth observations, sophistication level, spatial resolution, latency, and frequency of data. As part of the effort to develop a set of User Types, the GEO UIC foresees that those inside and outside GEO can use the typologies to understand how to engage users at a more effective level. This talk presents the GEOSS User Type taxonomy, explaining the development and highlights of key feedback. The talk will highlight possible ways to use the User Type taxonomy to communicate concepts and promote the use of Earth observations to a wide variety of users.

  16. Determination of global Earth outgoing radiation at high temporal resolution using a theoretical constellation of satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristey, Jake J.; Chiu, J. Christine; Gurney, Robert J.; Han, Shin-Chan; Morcrette, Cyril J.

    2017-01-01

    New, viable, and sustainable observation strategies from a constellation of satellites have attracted great attention across many scientific communities. Yet the potential for monitoring global Earth outgoing radiation using such a strategy has not been explored. To evaluate the potential of such a constellation concept and to investigate the configuration requirement for measuring radiation at a time resolution sufficient to resolve the diurnal cycle for weather and climate studies, we have developed a new recovery method and conducted a series of simulation experiments. Using idealized wide field-of-view broadband radiometers as an example, we find that a baseline constellation of 36 satellites can monitor global Earth outgoing radiation reliably to a spatial resolution of 1000 km at an hourly time scale. The error in recovered daily global mean irradiance is 0.16 W m-2 and -0.13 W m-2, and the estimated uncertainty in recovered hourly global mean irradiance from this day is 0.45 W m-2 and 0.15 W m-2, in the shortwave and longwave spectral regions, respectively. Sensitivity tests show that addressing instrument-related issues that lead to systematic measurement error remains of central importance to achieving similar accuracies in reality. The presented error statistics therefore likely represent the lower bounds of what could currently be achieved with the constellation approach, but this study demonstrates the promise of an unprecedented sampling capability for better observing the Earth's radiation budget.

  17. China Land Observation Satellite Third User Conference Promotes The Applications Of Domestic Satellite Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong He

    2009-01-01

    @@ China Land Observation Satellite Third User Conference with the theme of "Strengthening cooperation,enlarging sharing and promoting the application of domestic satellite data" was held on July 16,2009 in Beijing. The conference was hosted by China Centre for Resources Satellite Data and Applications(CRESDA),a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC).

  18. Earth as an extrasolar planet: Earth model validation using EPOXI earth observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tyler D; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Deming, Drake; A'hearn, Michael F; Charbonneau, David; Livengood, Timothy A; Seager, Sara; Barry, Richard K; Hearty, Thomas; Hewagama, Tilak; Lisse, Carey M; McFadden, Lucy A; Wellnitz, Dennis D

    2011-06-01

    The EPOXI Discovery Mission of Opportunity reused the Deep Impact flyby spacecraft to obtain spatially and temporally resolved visible photometric and moderate resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic observations of Earth. These remote observations provide a rigorous validation of whole-disk Earth model simulations used to better understand remotely detectable extrasolar planet characteristics. We have used these data to upgrade, correct, and validate the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional line-by-line, multiple-scattering spectral Earth model. This comprehensive model now includes specular reflectance from the ocean and explicitly includes atmospheric effects such as Rayleigh scattering, gas absorption, and temperature structure. We have used this model to generate spatially and temporally resolved synthetic spectra and images of Earth for the dates of EPOXI observation. Model parameters were varied to yield an optimum fit to the data. We found that a minimum spatial resolution of ∼100 pixels on the visible disk, and four categories of water clouds, which were defined by using observed cloud positions and optical thicknesses, were needed to yield acceptable fits. The validated model provides a simultaneous fit to Earth's lightcurve, absolute brightness, and spectral data, with a root-mean-square (RMS) error of typically less than 3% for the multiwavelength lightcurves and residuals of ∼10% for the absolute brightness throughout the visible and NIR spectral range. We have extended our validation into the mid-infrared by comparing the model to high spectral resolution observations of Earth from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, obtaining a fit with residuals of ∼7% and brightness temperature errors of less than 1 K in the atmospheric window. For the purpose of understanding the observable characteristics of the distant Earth at arbitrary viewing geometry and observing cadence, our validated forward model can be

  19. Upgraded Radiometer Improves Observation of Meteorological Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new meteorological satellite, Fengyun-2C,was successfully launched at 9:20 am on Oct. 19 in Xichang Satellite Launch Center in China's southwest province of Sichuan. The Fengyun-2 (or FY-2,meaning "winds and clouds" in Chinese) is a geostationary meteorological satellite series of China.China started its FY-2 development program in 1980 and has sent two experimental models of FY-2 series in 1997 and 2000 respectively. The FY2-C is China's first professional one in the series.

  20. Polarimetric remote sensing of the Earth from satellites: a perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, M. I.; Glory APS Science Team

    2011-12-01

    attempt to launch a more accurate aerosol-cloud polarimeter, called APS, as part of the NASA Glory Mission failed on 4 March 2011. However, much useful information has been obtained with the air-borne version of APS called RSP. In this talk I will briefly summarize the main results obtained with POLDER and RSP and discuss the prospects of polarimetric remote sensing from Earth-orbiting satellites.

  1. Near-Earth asteroid satellite spins under spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, Shantanu P.; Margot, Jean-Luc [Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We develop a fourth-order numerical integrator to simulate the coupled spin and orbital motions of two rigid bodies having arbitrary mass distributions under the influence of their mutual gravitational potential. We simulate the dynamics of components in well-characterized binary and triple near-Earth asteroid systems and use surface of section plots to map the possible spin configurations of the satellites. For asynchronous satellites, the analysis reveals large regions of phase space where the spin state of the satellite is chaotic. For synchronous satellites, we show that libration amplitudes can reach detectable values even for moderately elongated shapes. The presence of chaotic regions in the phase space has important consequences for the evolution of binary asteroids. It may substantially increase spin synchronization timescales, explain the observed fraction of asychronous binaries, delay BYORP-type evolution, and extend the lifetime of binaries. The variations in spin rate due to large librations also affect the analysis and interpretation of light curve and radar observations.

  2. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... data, showing significant improvement in the Earth albedo induced current estimates. Additionally an algorithm for utilizing the Earth albedo model in obtaining a vector observation pair which is superior to the solar line of sight vector pair. It is concluded that the Earth albedo model is valid...

  3. Evaluating NOx Emissions Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, G. J.; Kim, S.; Brioude, J.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, M.; Heckel, A.; Hilboll, A.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Gleason, J. F.; Boersma, K. F.; Hsie, E.; Lee, S.; Angevine, W. M.; Granier, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellites can provide a useful top-down assessment of bottom-up NOx emissions inventories. We present three case studies of an approach to evaluate NOx emissions at a sector level by comparing satellite retrievals to regional chemical-transport model calculations of NO2 columns. In the first example, the atmospheric impact of implementing NOx controls at eastern US power plants is demonstrated. In the second study, we use NOx monitors at western US power plants to calibrate our satellite-model comparisons. We then apply our approach to evaluate bottom-up estimates of NOx emissions from western US cities. In the third example, we validate our satellite-model approach using in-situ aircraft measurements and assess NOx emissions from power plants, cities, industrial facilities, and ports in eastern Texas. We conclude with some general insights on the usefulness of this approach and suggestions for future areas of research.

  4. Origin of Lα{sup x} satellite in the light rare earths on the basis of plasmon theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Manjula, E-mail: rainbow-mjain@yahoo.co.in [Physics Department, Madhav Science College, Ujjain – 456010 (India); Shrivastava, B. D., E-mail: rashmibasant@gmail.com [School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain – 456010 (India)

    2015-07-31

    The origin of most of the X-ray satellites can be explained on the basis of multiple ionization theory. However, there are several satellites which can be explained on the basis of plasmon theory. When a plasmon is excited during the X-ray emission process, one can get a low energy satellite because energy is used up in exciting the plasmon oscillations in the electron gas. A plasmon on decay can also transfer its energy to the transiting electron which subsequently fills the core vacancy giving rise to a high energy satellite. In our laboratory, a new high energy satellite Lα{sup x} has been observed in the Lα - emission spectra of the oxides of some light rare earths on the high energy side of the diagram line Lα{sub 1}. In the present paper, the origin of this high energy satellite has been explained using the theory of plasma oscillations in solids. The energy separation of the satellite from the emission line Lα{sub 1} has been calculated and then compared with the theoretical separation based on the plasmon theory. The agreement between the theoretical and experimental values is found to be good. Hence, the observed satellite can be designated as plasmon satellite.

  5. Observer-based Satellite Attitude Control and Simulation Researches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王子才; 马克茂

    2002-01-01

    Observer design method is applied to the realization of satellite attitude control law baaed on simplified control model. Exact mathematical model of the satellite attitude control system is also constructed, together with the observer-based control law, to conduct simulation research. The simulation results justify the effectiveness andfeasibility of the observer-based control method.

  6. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Year of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars;

    More than two year of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth’s magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its...... Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm...... satellites and alongtrack first differences we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from two years...

  7. Earth observation scientific workflows in a distributed computing environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, TL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Geospatially Enabled Scientific Workflows offer a promising paradigm to facilitate researchers, in the earth observation domain, with many aspects of the scientific process. One such aspect is that of access to distributed earth observation data...

  8. Changing inclination of earth satellites using the gravity of the moon

    OpenAIRE

    Karla de Souza Torres; Prado, A. F. B. A.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the problem of the orbital control of an Earth's satellite using the gravity of the Moon. The main objective is to study a technique to decrease the fuel consumption of a plane change maneuver to be performed in a satellite that is in orbit around the Earth. The main idea of this approach is to send the satellite to the Moon using a single-impulsive maneuver, use the gravity field of the Moon to make the desired plane change of the trajectory, and then return the satellite to its n...

  9. The Sentinel satellites revolutionise environmental observation; Los satelites Sentinel revolucionan la observacion medioambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    River, A.

    2016-08-01

    Europe has in orbit three Sentinel satellites that are the backbone of the ambitious Copernicus system. Aimed at revolutionising environmental observation from both the scientific and commercial points of view, their objective is to capture massive volumes of data on the Earth with a view to ensuring progress in research into climate change, the oceans and the evolution of ice formations. (Author)

  10. Flexible Description and Adaptive Processing of Earth Observation Data through the BigEarth Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgan, Dorian; Bacu, Victor; Stefanut, Teodor; Nandra, Cosmin; Mihon, Danut

    2016-04-01

    of some Earth Observation oriented applications based on flexible description of processing, and adaptive and portable execution over Cloud infrastructure. Main references for further information: [1] BigEarth project, http://cgis.utcluj.ro/projects/bigearth [2] Gorgan, D., "Flexible and Adaptive Processing of Earth Observation Data over High Performance Computation Architectures", International Conference and Exhibition Satellite 2015, August 17-19, Houston, Texas, USA. [3] Mihon, D., Bacu, V., Colceriu, V., Gorgan, D., "Modeling of Earth Observation Use Cases through the KEOPS System", Proceedings of the Intelligent Computer Communication and Processing (ICCP), IEEE-Press, pp. 455-460, (2015). [4] Nandra, C., Gorgan, D., "Workflow Description Language for Defining Big Earth Data Processing Tasks", Proceedings of the Intelligent Computer Communication and Processing (ICCP), IEEE-Press, pp. 461-468, (2015). [5] Bacu, V., Stefan, T., Gorgan, D., "Adaptive Processing of Earth Observation Data on Cloud Infrastructures Based on Workflow Description", Proceedings of the Intelligent Computer Communication and Processing (ICCP), IEEE-Press, pp.444-454, (2015).

  11. Satellite observed preferential states in soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilasa, Luis U.; De Jeu, Richard A. M.; Dolman, Han A. J.; Wang, Guojie

    2013-04-01

    This study presents observational evidence for the existence of preferential states in soil moisture content. Recently there has been much debate about the existence, location and explanations for preferential states in soil moisture. A number of studies have provided evidence either in support or against the hypothesis of a positive feedback mechanism between soil moisture and subsequent precipitation in certain regions. Researchers who support the hypothesis that preferential states in soil moisture holds information about land atmosphere feedback base their theory on the impact of soil moisture on the evaporation process. Evaporation recycles moisture to the atmosphere and soil moisture has a direct impact on the supply part of this process but also on the partitioning of the available energy for evaporation. According to this theory, the existence of soil moisture bimodality can be used as an indication of possible land-atmosphere feedbacks, to be compared with model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. On the other hand, other researchers argue that seasonality in the meteorological conditions in combination with the non-linearity of soil moisture response alone can induce bimodality. In this study we estimate the soil moisture bimodality at a global scale as derived from the recently available 30+ year ESA Climate Change Initative satellite soil moisture dataset. An Expectation-Maximization iterative algorithm is used to find the best Gaussian Mixture Model, pursuing the highest likelihood for soil moisture bimodality. With this approach we mapped the regions where bi-modal probability distribution of soil moisture appears for each month for the period between 1979-2010. These bimodality areas are analyzed and compared to maps of model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. The areas where more than one preferential state exists compare surprisingly well with the map of land-atmosphere coupling strength from model simulations. This approach might

  12. Approximate analytic method for high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashkovyaka, M. A.; Zaslavskii, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an approach to the study of the evolution of high-apogee twelve-hour orbits of artificial Earth's satellites. We describe parameters of the motion model used for the artificial Earth's satellite such that the principal gravitational perturbations of the Moon and Sun, nonsphericity of the Earth, and perturbations from the light pressure force are approximately taken into account. To solve the system of averaged equations describing the evolution of the orbit parameters of an artificial satellite, we use both numeric and analytic methods. To select initial parameters of the twelve-hour orbit, we assume that the path of the satellite along the surface of the Earth is stable. Results obtained by the analytic method and by the numerical integration of the evolving system are compared. For intervals of several years, we obtain estimates of oscillation periods and amplitudes for orbital elements. To verify the results and estimate the precision of the method, we use the numerical integration of rigorous (not averaged) equations of motion of the artificial satellite: they take into account forces acting on the satellite substantially more completely and precisely. The described method can be applied not only to the investigation of orbit evolutions of artificial satellites of the Earth; it can be applied to the investigation of the orbit evolution for other planets of the Solar system provided that the corresponding research problem will arise in the future and the considered special class of resonance orbits of satellites will be used for that purpose.

  13. Design of a Representative Low Earth Orbit Satellite to Improve Existing Debris Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S.; Dietrich, A.; Werremeyer, M.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the process and methodologies used in the design of a small-satellite, DebriSat, that represents materials and construction methods used in modern day Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. This satellite will be used in a future hypervelocity impact test with the overall purpose to investigate the physical characteristics of modern LEO satellites after an on-orbit collision. The major ground-based satellite impact experiment used by DoD and NASA in their development of satellite breakup models was conducted in 1992. The target used for that experiment was a Navy Transit satellite (40 cm, 35 kg) fabricated in the 1960 s. Modern satellites are very different in materials and construction techniques from a satellite built 40 years ago. Therefore, there is a need to conduct a similar experiment using a modern target satellite to improve the fidelity of the satellite breakup models. The design of DebriSat will focus on designing and building a next-generation satellite to more accurately portray modern satellites. The design of DebriSat included a comprehensive study of historical LEO satellite designs and missions within the past 15 years for satellites ranging from 10 kg to 5000 kg. This study identified modern trends in hardware, material, and construction practices utilized in recent LEO missions, and helped direct the design of DebriSat.

  14. Observations of Near Earth Objects with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, David E.; Mommert, Michael; Hora, Joseph L.; Chesley, Steven R.; Emery, Joshua P.; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Harris, Alan; Mueller, Michael; Smith, Howard Alan

    2016-10-01

    We are carrying out an Exploration Science Warm Spitzer program entitled NEOSurvey in which we are observing 550 Near Earth Objects in 710 hours of Spitzer time. For each object we use a thermal model to derive diameter and albedo. For each object we also derive a (partial) lightcurve; total elapsed observing times range from 15 minutes to 3.2 hours. This catalog of 500+ NEO lightcurves is a substantial increase over the number of NEO lightcurves presently known. In addition to creating a large catalog of NEO properties, we are also able to study the properties of individual NEOs, including those with low delta V values (i.e., accessible asteroids) and those that might be dead comets. The final observations in this program will be obtained by 30 Sept 2016, so at the DPS meeting we will present a first look at our entire catalog of results. All results are posted at nearearthobjects.nau.edu usually within days of the data being released by the Spitzer Science Center. This work was supported in part by funding from the Spitzer Science Center.

  15. GIONET (GMES Initial Operations Network for Earth Observation Research Training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, V.; Balzter, H.

    2013-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. Copernicus (previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) is a joint undertaking of the European Space Agency and the European Commission. It develops fully operational Earth Observation monitoring services for a community of end users from the public and private sector. The first services that are considered fully operational are the land monitoring and emergency monitoring core services. In GIONET, 14 early stage researchers are being trained at PhD level in understanding the complex physical processes that determine how electromagnetic radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the land surface ultimately form the signal received by a satellite. In order to achieve this, the researchers are based in industry and universities across Europe, as well as receiving the best technical training and scientific education. The training programme through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics. Each topic is carried out by an Early Stage Researcher based in one of the partner organisations and is expected to lead to a PhD degree. The 14 topics are grouped in 5 research themes: Forest monitoring Land cover and change Coastal zone and freshwater monitoring Geohazards and emergency response Climate adaptation and emergency response The methods developed and used in GIONET are as diverse as its research topics. GIONET has already held two summer schools; one at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany), on 'New operational radar satellite applications: Introduction to SAR, Interferometry and Polarimetry for Land Surface Mapping'. The 2nd summer school took place last September at the University of Leicester (UK )on 'Remote sensing of land cover and forest in GMES'. The next Summer School in September 2013

  16. A comparative study of spherical and flat-Earth geopotential modeling at satellite elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, M. H.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Flat-Earth and spherical-Earth geopotential modeling of crustal anomaly sources at satellite elevations are compared by computing gravity and scalar magnetic anomalies perpendicular to the strike of variably dimensioned rectangular prisms at altitudes of 150, 300, and 450 km. Results indicate that the error caused by the flat-Earth approximation is less than 10% in most geometric conditions. Generally, error increase with larger and wider anomaly sources at higher altitudes. For most crustal source modeling applications at conventional satellite altitudes, flat-Earth modeling can be justified and is numerically efficient.

  17. Realtime Data to Enable Earth-Observing Sensor Web Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade NASA's Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) has invested in new technologies for information systems to enhance the Earth-observing capabilities of satellites, aircraft, and ground-based in situ observations. One focus area has been to create a common infrastructure for coordinated measurements from multiple vantage points which could be commanded either manually or through autonomous means, such as from a numerical model. This paradigm became known as the sensor web, formally defined to be "a coherent set of heterogeneous, loosely-coupled, distributed observing nodes interconnected by a communications fabric that can collectively behave as a single dynamically adaptive and reconfigurable observing system". This would allow for adaptive targeting of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable meteorological features to improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict their evolution. It would also enable measurements earmarked at critical regions of the atmosphere that are highly sensitive to data analysis errors, thus offering the potential for significant improvements in the predictive skill of numerical weather forecasts. ESTO's investment strategy was twofold. Recognizing that implementation of an operational sensor web would not only involve technical cost and risk but also would require changes to the culture of how flight missions were designed and operated, ESTO funded the development of a mission-planning simulator that would quantitatively assess the added value of coordinated observations. The simulator was designed to provide the capability to perform low-cost engineering and design trade studies using synthetic data generated by observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs). The second part of the investment strategy was to invest in prototype applications that implemented key features of a sensor web, with the dual goals of developing a sensor web reference architecture as well as supporting useful science activities that

  18. Multifunctional astronomical self-organizing system of autonomous navigation and orientation for artificial Earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, V. I.; Danilova, T. V.

    2017-03-01

    We describe the methods and algorithms of a multifunctional astronomical system of the autonomous navigation and orientation for artificial Earth satellites based on the automatization of the system approach to the design and programming problems of the subject area.

  19. Satellite Data for All? Review of Google Earth Engine for Archaeological Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Alcover Firpi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A review of Google Earth Engine for archaeological remote sensing using satellite data. GEE is a freely accessible software option for processing remotely sensed data, part of the larger Google suite of products.

  20. Jupiter and Planet Earth. [planetary and biological evolution and natural satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The evolution of Jupiter and Earth are discussed along with their atmospheres, the radiation belts around both planets, natural satellites, the evolution of life, and the Pioneer 10. Educational study projects are also included.

  1. 78 FR 14952 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 2 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit Space Stations AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule....

  2. Earth observations in the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the achievements of earth observations from past space missions are described. Also discussed are the achievements to be anticipated from currently approved and planned earth observation missions. In looking forward to what the objectives of earth observations from space are expected to be in the future, together with what technology is expected to enable, what the earth observing program will look like during the first part of the twenty-first century is discussed. It is concluded that a key part of this program will be long-term observations holistically viewing the earth system.

  3. Future missions for observing Earth's changing gravity field: a closed-loop simulation tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P. N.

    2008-12-01

    The GRACE mission has successfully demonstrated the observation from space of the changing Earth's gravity field at length and time scales of typically 1000 km and 10-30 days, respectively. Many scientific communities strongly advertise the need for continuity of observing Earth's gravity field from space. Moreover, a strong interest is being expressed to have gravity missions that allow a more detailed sampling of the Earth's gravity field both in time and in space. Designing a gravity field mission for the future is a complicated process that involves making many trade-offs, such as trade-offs between spatial, temporal resolution and financial budget. Moreover, it involves the optimization of many parameters, such as orbital parameters (height, inclination), distinction between which gravity sources to observe or correct for (for example are gravity changes due to ocean currents a nuisance or a signal to be retrieved?), observation techniques (low-low satellite-to-satellite tracking, satellite gravity gradiometry, accelerometers), and satellite control systems (drag-free?). A comprehensive tool has been developed and implemented that allows the closed-loop simulation of gravity field retrievals for different satellite mission scenarios. This paper provides a description of this tool. Moreover, its capabilities are demonstrated by a few case studies. Acknowledgments. The research that is being done with the closed-loop simulation tool is partially funded by the European Space Agency (ESA). An important component of the tool is the GEODYN software, kindly provided by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

  4. Preliminary Analysis of a Novel SAR Based Emergency System for Earth Orbit Satellites using Galileo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.K.A.; Helderweirt, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary analysis of a novel Search and Rescue (SAR) based emergency system for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites using the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It starts with a description of the space user SAR system including a concept description, mission ar

  5. Shallow-earth rheology from glacial isostasy and satellite gravity: a sensitivity analysis for GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotman, H.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, satellite gravity missions have been launched that probe the earth's long- to mediumwavelength (1000 - 500 km) gravity field. The upcoming ESA satellite gravity mission GOCE is predicted to measure the gravity field with an accuracy of a few centimeters at spatial scales of 100 km.

  6. The EMC impact of SPS operations on low Earth orbit satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, W. B.; Morrison, E. L., Jr.; Davis, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    The susceptibility of various operational and planned low Earth orbit satellites to solar power satellite (SPS) operations was examined. Functional degradation for the electronic systems on LANDSAT, the global positioning system, and the space telescope is described in relation to the amplitude of the SPS illumination components. Analyses include the modes of coupling to devices and subsystems, and performance effects in relation to satellite mission.

  7. The study of gravity gradient effect on attitude of low earth orbit satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Nor Hazadura; Yaacob, Sazali; Muthusamy, Hariharan; Hamzah, Norhizam; Ghazali, Najah

    2013-04-01

    Simulations and mathematical models are increasingly used to assist the process of decision making in engineering design. The objective of this paper is to simulate the linear attitude dynamics of small satellites under gravity gradient torque which is inherent in low earth orbit. The equations were first derived in their nonlinear form, and then manipulated and simulated in their linear form. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of choosing the appropriate values of satellite's moment of inertia in designing phase of a satellite.

  8. Observations of iodine monoxide columns from satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schönhardt

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Iodine species in the troposphere are linked to ozone depletion and new particle formation. In this study, a full year of iodine monoxide (IO columns retrieved from measurements of the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument is presented, coupled with a discussion of their uncertainties and the detection limits. The largest amounts of IO are found near springtime in the Antarctic. A seasonal variation of iodine monoxide in Antarctica is revealed with high values in springtime, slightly less IO in the summer period and again larger amounts in autumn. In winter, no elevated IO levels are found in the areas accessible to satellite measurements. This seasonal cycle is in good agreement with recent ground-based measurements in Antarctica. In the Arctic region, no elevated IO levels were found in the period analysed. This implies that different conditions with respect to iodine release exist in the two Polar Regions. To investigate possible release mechanisms, comparisons of IO columns with those of tropospheric BrO, and ice coverage are described and discussed. Some parallels and interesting differences between IO and BrO temporal and spatial distributions are identified. Overall, the large spatial coverage of satellite retrieved IO data and the availability of a long-term dataset provide new insight about the abundances and distributions of iodine compounds in the troposphere.

  9. Remote Observation of Volcanos by Small Satellite Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Klaus; Zakšek, Klemen

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic eruptions, severe storms, or desert dust can seriously jeopardize the safety of the air traffic. To prevent encounters of airplanes with such clouds it is necessary to accurately monitor the cloud top heights, which is impossible using currently operational satellites. The most commonly used method for satellite cloud height estimation compares brightness temperature of the cloud with the atmospheric temperature profile. Because of its many uncertainties we propose to exploit the formation of four satellites providing images for photogrammetric analysis. Simultaneous observations from multiple satellites is necessary, because clouds can move with velocities over several m/s. With the proposed mission, we propose a formation of nano-satellites that simultaneously observe the clouds from different positions and orientations. The proposed formation of four satellites will fly in the same orbit with a distance between each satellite of 100 km on the height of 600 km. There are autonomous reaction capabilities realized to focus all satellites on the same surface point for joint observations, enabling by postprocessing 3D surface images. Each satellite will carry a camera operating in visible spectrum providing data with 35 m spatial resolution. Such data will make possible to monitor multilayer clouds with a vertical accuracy of 200 m.

  10. Uncertainty information in climate data records from Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Christopher J.; Paul, Frank; Popp, Thomas; Ablain, Michael; Bontemps, Sophie; Defourny, Pierre; Hollmann, Rainer; Lavergne, Thomas; Laeng, Alexandra; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Mittaz, Jonathan; Poulsen, Caroline; Povey, Adam C.; Reuter, Max; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Sandven, Stein; Sofieva, Viktoria F.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-07-01

    The question of how to derive and present uncertainty information in climate data records (CDRs) has received sustained attention within the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (CCI), a programme to generate CDRs addressing a range of essential climate variables (ECVs) from satellite data. Here, we review the nature, mathematics, practicalities, and communication of uncertainty information in CDRs from Earth observations. This review paper argues that CDRs derived from satellite-based Earth observation (EO) should include rigorous uncertainty information to support the application of the data in contexts such as policy, climate modelling, and numerical weather prediction reanalysis. Uncertainty, error, and quality are distinct concepts, and the case is made that CDR products should follow international metrological norms for presenting quantified uncertainty. As a baseline for good practice, total standard uncertainty should be quantified per datum in a CDR, meaning that uncertainty estimates should clearly discriminate more and less certain data. In this case, flags for data quality should not duplicate uncertainty information, but instead describe complementary information (such as the confidence in the uncertainty estimate provided or indicators of conditions violating the retrieval assumptions). The paper discusses the many sources of error in CDRs, noting that different errors may be correlated across a wide range of timescales and space scales. Error effects that contribute negligibly to the total uncertainty in a single-satellite measurement can be the dominant sources of uncertainty in a CDR on the large space scales and long timescales that are highly relevant for some climate applications. For this reason, identifying and characterizing the relevant sources of uncertainty for CDRs is particularly challenging. The characterization of uncertainty caused by a given error effect involves assessing the magnitude of the effect, the shape of the

  11. An autonomous navigation algorithm for high orbit satellite using star sensor and ultraviolet earth sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baohua, Li; Wenjie, Lai; Yun, Chen; Zongming, Liu

    2013-01-01

    An autonomous navigation algorithm using the sensor that integrated the star sensor (FOV1) and ultraviolet earth sensor (FOV2) is presented. The star images are sampled by FOV1, and the ultraviolet earth images are sampled by the FOV2. The star identification algorithm and star tracking algorithm are executed at FOV1. Then, the optical axis direction of FOV1 at J2000.0 coordinate system is calculated. The ultraviolet image of earth is sampled by FOV2. The center vector of earth at FOV2 coordinate system is calculated with the coordinates of ultraviolet earth. The autonomous navigation data of satellite are calculated by integrated sensor with the optical axis direction of FOV1 and the center vector of earth from FOV2. The position accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 1000 meters to 300 meters. And the velocity accuracy of the autonomous navigation for satellite is improved from 100 m/s to 20 m/s. At the same time, the period sine errors of the autonomous navigation for satellite are eliminated. The autonomous navigation for satellite with a sensor that integrated ultraviolet earth sensor and star sensor is well robust.

  12. Conference on Earth Observation and Information Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Morley, Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    The NATO Science Committee and its subsidiary Programme Panels provide support for Advanced Research Institutes (ARI) in various fields. The idea is to bring together scientists of a chosen field with the hope that they will achieve a consensus on research direc­ tions for the future, and make recommendations for the benefit of a wider scientific community. Attendance is therefore limited to those whose experience and expertise make the conclusions significant and acceptable to the wider community. Participants are selected on the basis of substantial track records in research or in the synthesis of research results to serve mankind. The proposal for a one-week ARIon Earth Observation and In­ formation Systems was initiated by the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science (SPPOSS). In approving the ARI, the senior NATO Science Committee identified the subject as one of universal impor­ tance, requiring a broad perspective on the development of opera­ tional systems based on successful experimental s...

  13. Observing and understanding the Earth system variations from space geodesy

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Shuanggen; van Dam, Tonie; Wdowinski, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    The interaction and coupling of the Earth system components that include the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, and other fluids in Earth's interior, influence the Earth's shape, gravity field and its rotation (the three pillars of geodesy). The effects of global climate change, such as sea level rise, glacier melting, and geoharzards, also affect these observables. However, observations and models of Earth's system change have large uncertainties due to the lack of direct high...

  14. Insights on How NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Monitors Our World Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a space-based observing system comprised of a series of satellite sensors by which scientists can monitor the Earth, a Data and Information System (EOSDIS) enabling researchers worldwide to access the satellite data, and an interdisciplinary science research program to interpret the satellite data. During this year, four EOS science missions were launched, representing observations of (1) total solar irradiance, (2) Earth radiation budget, (3) land cover and land use change, (4) ocean processes (vector wind, sea surface temperature, and ocean color), (5) atmospheric processes (aerosol and cloud properties, water vapor, and temperature and moisture profiles), and (6) tropospheric chemistry. In succeeding years many more satellites will be launched that will contribute immeasurably to our understanding of the Earth's environment. In this presentation I will describe how scientists are using EOS data to examine land use and natural hazards, environmental air quality, including dust storms over the world's deserts, cloud and radiation properties, sea surface temperature, and winds over the ocean.

  15. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model. Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio [Universita del Salento, Dipartimento Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Lecce (Italy); Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Paolozzi, Antonio; Paris, Claudio [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Museo della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Rome (Italy); Pavlis, Erricos C. [University of Maryland, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), Baltimore County (United States); Koenig, Rolf [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Ries, John [University of Texas at Austin, Center for Space Research, Austin (United States); Gurzadyan, Vahe; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Matzner, Richard [University of Texas at Austin, Theory Center, Austin (United States); Penrose, Roger [University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom); Sindoni, Giampiero [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure μ = (0.994 ± 0.002) ± 0.05, where μ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity. (orig.)

  16. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model: Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  17. Earth's thermal radiation sensors for attitude determination systems of small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertat, I.; Linhart, R.; Masopust, J.; Vobornik, A.; Dudacek, L.

    2017-07-01

    Satellite attitude determination is a complex process with expensive hardware and software and it could consume the most of resources (volume, mass, electric power), especially of small satellites as CubeSats. Thermal radiation infrared detectors could be one of useful sensors for attitude determination systems in such small satellites. Nowadays, these sensors are widely used in contact-less thermometers and thermo-cameras resulting in a low-cost technology. On low Earth orbits the infrared thermal sensors can be utilized for coarse attitude determination against a relative warm and close Earth's globe.

  18. Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Visualization Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) Plot Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Julia A.

    1995-01-01

    The first Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument will be launched in 1997 to collect data on the Earth's radiation budget. The data retrieved from the satellite will be processed through twelve subsystems. The Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) plot generator software was written to assist scientists in the early stages of CERES data analysis, producing two-dimensional plots of the footprint radiation and cloud data generated by one of the subsystems. Until the satellite is launched, however, software developers need verification tools to check their code. This plot generator will aid programmers by geolocating algorithm result on a global map.

  19. Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's Earth as Art Image Gallery 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center manages the Earth as Art Three exhibit, which provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of...

  20. Transforming Science Data for GIS: How to Find and Use NASA Earth Observation Data Without Being a Rocket Scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, Ross; Peters, Byron; Berrick, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    NASAs Earth Observing System Data Information System (EOSDIS) manages Earth Observation satellites and the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs), where the data is stored and processed. The challenge is that Earth Observation data is complicated. There is plenty of data available, however, the science teams have had a top-down approach: define what it is you are trying to study -select a set of satellite(s) and sensor(s), and drill down for the data.Our alternative is to take a bottom-up approach using eight environmental fields of interest as defined by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) called Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs): Disaster Resilience (DR) Public Health Surveillance (PHS) Energy and Mineral Resource Management (EMRM) Water Resources Management (WRM) Infrastructure and Transport Management (ITM) Sustainable Urban Development (SUD) Food Security and Sustainable Agriculture (FSSA) Biodiversity and Ecosystems Sustainability (BES).

  1. Learning to Improve Earth Observation Flight Planning

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes a method and system for integrating machine learning with planning and data visualization for the management of mobile sensors for Earth science...

  2. EKOSAT/DIAMANT - The Earth Observation Programme at OHB- System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penne, B.; Tobehn, C.; Kassebom, M.; Luebberstedt

    This paper covers the EKOSAT / DIAMANT programme heading for superspectral geo-information products. The EKOSAT / DIAMANT programme is based on a commercial strategy just before the realization of the first step - the EKOSAT launch in 2004. Further, we give an overview on OHB-System earth observation prime activities especially for infrared and radar. The EKOSAT/ DIAMANT is based on the MSRS sensor featuring 12 user dedicated spectral bands in the VIS/NIR with 5m spatial resolution and 26 km swath at an orbit of 670 km. The operational demonstrator mission EKOSAT is a Korean-Israelean-German-Russian initiative that aims in utilizing the existing proto-flight model of the KOMPSAT-1 spacecraft for the MSRS sensor, which development is finished. The EKOSAT pointing capability will allow a revisit time of 3 days. DIAMANT stands for the future full operational system based on dedicated small satellites. The basic constellation relying on 2-3 satellites with about one day revisit is extendend on market demand. EKOSAT/ DIAMANT is designed to fill the gap between modern high spatial resolution multispectral (MS) systems and hyperspectral systems with moderate spatial resolution. On European level, there is currently no remote sensing system operational with comparable features and capabilities concerning applications especially in the field of environmental issues, vegetation, agriculture and water bodies. The Space Segment has been designed to satisfy the user requirements based on a balance between commercial aspects and scientific approaches. For example eight spectral bands have been identified to cover almost the entire product range for the current market. Additional four bands have been implemented to be prepared for future applications as for example the improved red edge detection, which give better results regarding environmental conditions. The spacecraft design and its subsystems are still reasonable small in order to keep the mass below 200 kg. This is an

  3. CEOS Contributions to Informing Energy Management and Policy Decision Making Using Space-Based Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Earth observations are playing an increasingly significant role in informing decision making in the energy sector. In renewable energy applications, space-based observations now routinely augment sparse ground-based observations used as input for renewable energy resource assessment applications. As one of the nine Group on Earth Observations (GEO) societal benefit areas, the enhancement of management and policy decision making in the energy sector is receiving attention in activities conducted by the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). CEOS has become the "space arm" for the implementation of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) vision. It is directly supporting the space-based, near-term tasks articulated in the GEO three-year work plan. This paper describes a coordinated program of demonstration projects conducted by CEOS member agencies and partners to utilize Earth observations to enhance energy management end-user decision support systems. I discuss the importance of engagement with stakeholders and understanding their decision support needs in successfully increasing the uptake of Earth observation products for societal benefit. Several case studies are presented, demonstrating the importance of providing data sets in formats and units familiar and immediately usable by decision makers. These projects show the utility of Earth observations to enhance renewable energy resource assessment in the developing world, forecast space-weather impacts on the power grid, and improve energy efficiency in the built environment.

  4. Connecting Earth observation to high-throughput biodiversity data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bush, Alex; Sollmann, Rahel; Wilting, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Understandably, given the fast pace of biodiversity loss, there is much interest in using Earth observation technology to track biodiversity, ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. However, because most biodiversity is invisible to Earth observation, indicators based on Earth observation could...... observation data. This approach is achievable now, offering efficient and near-real-time monitoring of management impacts on biodiversity and its functions and services....

  5. LCROSS (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite) Observation Campaign: Strategies, Implementation, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Colaprete, Anthony; Wooden, Diane H.; Ackermann, Robert F.; Acton, David D.; Backus, Peter R.; Bailey, Vanessa; Ball, Jesse G.; Barott, William C.; Blair, Samantha K.; Buie, Marc W.; Callahan, Shawn; Chanover, Nancy J.; Choi, Young-Jun; Conrad, Al; Coulson, Dolores M.; Crawford, Kirk B.; DeHart, Russell; de Pater, Imke; Disanti, Michael; Forster, James R.; Furusho, Reiko; Fuse, Tetsuharu; Geballe, Tom; Gibson, J. Duane; Goldstein, David; Gregory, Stephen A.; Gutierrez, David J.; Hamilton, Ryan T.; Hamura, Taiga; Harker, David E.; Harp, Gerry R.; Haruyama, Junichi; Hastie, Morag; Hayano, Yutaka; Hinz, Phillip; Hong, Peng K.; James, Steven P.; Kadono, Toshihiko; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kelley, Michael S.; Kim, Daryl L.; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Lee, Duk-Hang; Long, Michael; Lucey, Paul G.; Marach, Keith; Matulonis, Anthony C.; McDermid, Richard M.; McMillan, Russet; Miller, Charles; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Noda, Hirotomo; Okamura, Natsuko; Ong, Lawrence; Porter, Dallan; Puschell, Jeffery J.; Rayner, John T.; Rembold, J. Jedadiah; Roth, Katherine C.; Rudy, Richard J.; Russell, Ray W.; Ryan, Eileen V.; Ryan, William H.; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Sekine, Yasuhito; Skinner, Mark A.; Sôma, Mitsuru; Stephens, Andrew W.; Storrs, Alex; Suggs, Robert M.; Sugita, Seiji; Sung, Eon-Chang; Takatoh, Naruhisa; Tarter, Jill C.; Taylor, Scott M.; Terada, Hiroshi; Trujillo, Chadwick J.; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Vilas, Faith; Walls, Brian D.; Watanabe, Jun-ihi; Welch, William J.; Woodward, Charles E.; Yim, Hong-Suh; Young, Eliot F.

    2012-05-01

    NASA's LCROSS (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite) mission was designed to explore the nature of previously detected enhanced levels of hydrogen near the lunar poles. The LCROSS mission impacted the spent upper stage of the launch vehicle into a permanently shadowed region of the lunar surface to create an ejecta plume. The resultant impact crater and plume were then observed by the LCROSS Shepherding Spacecraft as well as a cadre of telescopes on the Earth and in space to determine the nature of the materials contained within the permanently shadowed region. The Shepherding Spacecraft then became a second impactor which was also observed by multiple assets. The LCROSS Observation Campaign was a key component of the LCROSS mission. The goal of the Observation Campaign was to realize the scientific benefits of extending the LCROSS observations to multiple ground and space-based assets. This paper describes the LCROSS Observation Campaign and provides an overview of the Campaign coordination and logistics as well as a summary of the observation techniques utilized at a multitude of observatories. Lessons learned from the LCROSS Observation Campaign are also discussed to assist with the planning of future unique observing events.

  6. Observations and Effects of Dipolarization Fronts Observed in Earth's Magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Dipolarization fronts in Earth's magnetotail are characterized by sharp jumps in magnetic field, a drop in density, and often follow earthward fast plasma flow. They are commonly detected near the equatorial plane of Earth s tail plasma sheet. Sometimes, but not always, dipolarization fronts are associated with global substorms and auroral brightenings. Both Cluster, THEMIS, and other spacecraft have detected dipolarization fronts in a variety of locations in the magnetotail. Using multi-spacecraft analyses together with simulations, we have investigated the propagation and evolution of some dipolarization events. We have also investigated the acceleration of electrons and ions that results from such magnetic-field changes. In some situations, the velocities of fast earthward flows are comparable to the Alfven speed, indicating that the flow bursts might have been generated by bursty reconnection that occurred tailward of the spacecraft. Based on multi-spacecraft timing analysis, dipolarization fronts are found to propagate mainly earthward at 160-335 km/s and have thicknesses of 900-1500 km, which corresponds to the ion inertial length or gyroradius scale. Following the passage of dipolarization fronts, significant fluctuations are observed in the x and y components of the magnetic field. These peaks in the magnetic field come approximately 1-2 minutes after passage of the dipolarization front. These Bx and By fluctuations propagate primarily dawnward and earthward. Field-aligned electron beams are observed coincident with those magnetic field fluctuations. Non-Maxwellian electron and ion distributions are observed that are associated with the dipolarization that may be unstable to a range of electrostatic and/or whistler instabilities. Enhanced electrostatic broadband noise at frequencies below and near the lower-hybrid frequency is also observed at or very close to these fronts. This broadband noise is thought to play a role in further energizing the particles

  7. 78 FR 39200 - Federal Earth Stations-Non-Federal Fixed Satellite Service Space Stations; Spectrum for Non...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ...-11341; FCC 13-65] Federal Earth Stations--Non-Federal Fixed Satellite Service Space Stations; Spectrum... interference protection for Fixed-Satellite Service (FSS) and Mobile- Satellite Service (MSS) earth stations... and the important role it will play in our nation's economy and technological innovation now and in...

  8. A model of Earth's magnetic field derived from 2 years of Swarm satellite constellation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Christopher C.; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    More than 2 years of magnetic field data taken by the three-satellite constellation mission Swarm are used to derive a model of Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. This model is called SIFMplus. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites, explicit advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of Swarm by including East-West magnetic intensity and vector field gradient information from the lower satellite pair. Along-track differences of the magnetic intensity as well as of the vector components provide further information concerning the North-South gradient. The SIFMplus model provides a description of the static lithospheric field that is very similar to models determined from CHAMP data, up to at least spherical harmonic degree n=75. Also the core field part of SIFMplus, with a quadratic time dependence for n ≤ 6 and a linear time dependence for n=7-15, demonstrates the possibility to determine high-quality field models from only 2 years of Swarm data, thanks to the unique constellation aspect of Swarm. To account for the magnetic signature caused by ionospheric electric currents at polar latitudes we co-estimate, together with the model of the core, lithospheric and large-scale magnetospheric fields, a magnetic potential that depends on quasi-dipole latitude and magnetic local time.

  9. Earth observation mission operation of COMS during in-orbit test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Min

    2011-11-01

    Communication Ocean Meteorological Satellite (COMS) for the hybrid mission of meteorological observation, ocean monitoring, and telecommunication service was launched onto Geostationary Earth Orbit on June 27, 2010 and it is currently under normal operation service after the In-Orbit Test (IOT) phase. The COMS is located on 128.2° East of the geostationary orbit. In order to perform the three missions, the COMS has 3 separate payloads, the meteorological imager (MI), the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), and the Ka-band antenna. Each payload is dedicated to one of the three missions, respectively. The MI and GOCI perform the Earth observation mission of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively. During the IOT phase the functionality and the performance of many aspects of the COMS satellite and ground station have been checked through the Earth observation mission operation for the observation of the meteorological phenomenon over several areas of the Earth and the monitoring of marine environments around the Korean peninsula. The Earth observation mission operation of COMS during the IOT phase is introduced in terms of mission operation characteristics, mission planning, and mission operation results for the missions of meteorological observation and ocean monitoring, respectively.

  10. Mesoscale climate hydrology: Earth Observation System - definition phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, M.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of airborne and space observations to map surface heat fluxes and soil water content at heterogeneous land surfaces was studied. Algorithms to estimate evaporation fluxes with satellite observations were evaluated against measurements. Spatialcorrelation lengths were studied with estimated

  11. Mesoscale climate hydrology: Earth Observation System - definition phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, M.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The use of airborne and space observations to map surface heat fluxes and soil water content at heterogeneous land surfaces was studied. Algorithms to estimate evaporation fluxes with satellite observations were evaluated against measurements. Spatialcorrelation lengths were studied with estimated

  12. Microspacecraft and Earth observation: Electrical Field (ELF) measurement project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    There is a need for an inexpensive, extensive, long-lasting global electric field measurement system (ELF). The primary performance driver of this mission is the need to measure the attitude of each spacecraft in the Earth's electric field very accurately. In addition, it is necessary to know the electric charge generated by the satellite as it crosses the magnetic field lines (E equals V times B). In order to achieve the desired global coverage, a constellation of about 50 satellites in at least 18 different orbits will be used. To reduce the cost of each satellite, off-the-shelf, proven technology will be used whenever possible. Researchers have set a limit of $500,000 per satellite. Researchers expect the program cost, including the deployment of the entire constellation, to be less than $100 million. The minimum projected mission life is five years.

  13. Terra - the Earth Observing System flagship observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thome, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Terra platform enters its teenage years with an array of accomplishments but also with the potential to do much more. Efforts continue to extend the Terra data record to build upon its array of accomplishments and make its data more valuable by creating a record length that allows examination of inter annual variability, observe trends on the decadal scale, and gather statistics relevant to the define climate metrics. Continued data from Terra's complementary instruments will play a key role in creating the data record needed for scientists to develop an understanding of our climate system. Terra's suite of instruments: ASTER (contributed by the Japanese Ministry of Economy and Trade and Industry with a JPL-led US Science Team), CERES (NASA LaRC - PI), MISR (JPL - PI), MODIS (NASA GSFC), and MOPITT (sponsored by Canadian Space Agency with NCAR-led Science Team) are providing an unprecedented 81 core data products. The annual demand for Terra data remains with >120 million files distributed in 2011 and >157 million in 2012. More than 1,100 peer-reviewed publications appeared in 2012 using Terra data bringing the lifetime total >7,600. Citation numbers of 21,000 for 2012 and over 100,000 for the mission's lifetime. The broad range of products enable the community to provide answers to the overarching question, 'How is the Earth changing and what are the consequences for life on Earth?' Terra continues to provide data that: (1) Extend the baseline of morning-orbit collections; (2) Enable comparison of measurements acquired from past high-impact events; (3) Add value to recently-launched and soon-to-be launched missions, and upcoming field programs. Terra data continue to support monitoring and relief efforts for natural and man-made disasters that involve U.S. interests. Terra also contributes to Applications Focus Areas supporting the U.S. National Objectives for agriculture, air quality, climate, disaster management, ecological forecasting, public health, water

  14. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes that influence POC sources and sinks. Using field observations and satellite ocean color products, we developed a nw multiple regression algorithm to estimate POC on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) from satellite observations. The algorithm had reliable performance with mean relative error (MRE) of ?40% and root mean square error (RMSE) of ?50% for MODIS and SeaWiFS images for POC ranging between ?80 and ?1200 mg m23, and showed similar performance for a large estuary (Mobile Bay). Substantial spatiotemporal variability in the satellite-derived POC was observed on the LCS, with high POC found on the inner shelf (satellite data with carefully developed algorithms can greatly increase

  15. Validation strategy for satellite observations of tropospheric reactive gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Richter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last twodecades, satellite observations of tropospheric composition have becomepossible using nadir viewing spectrometers operating in the UV, visible, nearinfrared, and thermal infrared spectral range. [...

  16. Forecasting ultrafine particle concentrations from satellite and in situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, P.; Castruccio, S.; Pryor, S. C.

    2017-02-01

    Recent innovations in remote sensing technologies and retrievals offer the potential for predicting ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations from space. However, the use of satellite observations to provide predictions of near-surface UFP concentrations is limited by the high frequency of incomplete predictor values (due to missing observations), the lack of models that account for the temporal dependence of UFP concentrations, and the large uncertainty in satellite retrievals. Herein we present a novel statistical approach designed to address the first two limitations. We estimate UFP concentrations by using lagged estimates of UFP and concurrent satellite-based observations of aerosol optical properties, ultraviolet solar radiation flux, and trace gas concentrations, wherein an expectation maximization algorithm is used to impute missing values in the satellite observations. The resulting model of UFP (derived by using an autoregressive moving average model with exogenous inputs) explains 51 and 28% of the day-to-day variability in concentrations at two sites in eastern North America.

  17. Satellite observations of the northeast monsoon coastal current

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Gouveia, A.D.; Shetye, S.R.; Rao, L.V.G.

    Satellite Infrared observations, from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), during November 1987-February 1988 and hydrographic data from the eastern Arabian Sea are used to describe the poleward flowing coastal current in the eastern...

  18. Project Copernicus: An Earth observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Hunsaker Aerospace Corporation is presenting this proposal for Project Copernicus to fulfill the need for space-based remote sensing of Earth. Concentration is on data acquisition. Copernicus is designed to be a flexible system of spacecraft in a low near-polar orbit. The goal is to acquire data so that the scientists may begin to understand many Earth processes and interactions. The mission objective of Copernicus is to provide a space-based, remote-sensing measurement data acquisition and transfer system for 15 years. A description of the design project is presented.

  19. From Earth to Heaven: Using `Newton's Cannon' Thought Experiment for Teaching Satellite Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velentzas, Athanasios; Halkia, Krystallia

    2013-10-01

    Thought Experiments are powerful tools in both scientific thinking and in the teaching of science. In this study, the historical Thought Experiment (TE) `Newton's Cannon' was used as a tool to teach concepts relating to the motion of satellites to students at upper secondary level. The research instruments were: (a) a teaching-interview designed and implemented according to the Teaching Experiment methodology and (b) an open-ended questionnaire administered to students 2 weeks after the teaching-interview. The sample consisted of forty students divided into eleven groups. The teaching and learning processes which occurred during the teaching-interview were recorded and analyzed. The findings of the present study show that the use of the TE helped students to mentally construct a physical system which has nothing to do with their everyday experience (i.e. they had to imagine themselves as observers in a context in which the whole Earth was visible) and to draw conclusions about phenomena within this system. Specifically, students managed (1) to conclude that if an object is appropriately launched, it may be placed in an orbit around the Earth and to support this conclusion by giving necessary arguments, and (2) to realize that the same laws of physics describe, on the one hand, the motion of the Moon around the Earth (and the motion of other celestial bodies as well) and, on the other hand, the motion of `terrestrial' objects (i.e. objects on the Earth, such as a tennis ball). The main difficulties students met were caused by their idea that there is no gravity in the vacuum (i.e. the area outside of the Earth's atmosphere) and also by their everyday experience, according to which it is impossible for a projectile to move continuously parallel to the ground.

  20. Waste Management with Earth Observation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarit, Gerard; Tabasco, A.

    2010-05-01

    The range of applications where Earth Observation (EO) can be useful has been notably increased due to the maturity reached in the adopted technology and techniques. In most of the cases, EO provides a manner to remotely monitor particular variables and parameters with a more efficient usage of the available resources. Typical examples are environmental (forest, marine, resources…) monitoring, precision farming, security and surveillance (land, maritime…) and risk / disaster management (subsidence, volcanoes…). In this context, this paper presents a methodology to monitor waste disposal sites with EO. In particular, the explored technology is Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), which applies the interferometric concept to SAR images. SAR is an advanced radar concept able to acquire 2D coherent microwave reflectivity images for large scenes (tens of thousands kilometres) with fine resolution (Digital Elevation Models (DEM) that provide key information about the tri-dimensional configuration of a scene, that is, a height map of the scene. In practice, this represents an alternative way to obtain the same information than in-situ altimetry can provide. In the case of waste management, InSAR has been used to evaluate the potentiality of EO to monitor the disposed volume along a specific range of time. This activity has been developed in collaboration with the Agència de Resídus de Catalunya (ARC) (The Waste Agency of Catalonia), Spain, in the framework of a pilot project. The motivation comes from the new law promoted by the regional Government that taxes the volume of disposed waste. This law put ARC in duty to control that the real volume matches the numbers provided by the waste processing firms so that they can not commit illegal actions. Right now, this task is performed with in-situ altimetry. But despite of the accurate results, this option is completely inefficient and limits the numbers of polls that can be generated and the number of

  1. Towards disruptions in Earth observation? New Earth Observation systems and markets evolution: Possible scenarios and impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Gil; Claverie, Alain; Pasco, Xavier; Darnis, Jean-Pierre; de Maupeou, Benoît; Lafaye, Murielle; Morel, Eric

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews the trends in Earth observation (EO) and the possible impacts on markets of the new initiatives, launched either by existing providers of EO data or by new players, privately funded. After a presentation of the existing models, the paper discusses the new approaches, addressing both commercial and institutional markets. New concepts for the very high resolution markets, in Europe and in the US, are the main focus of this analysis. Two complementary perspectives are summarised: on the one hand, the type of system and its operational performance and, on the other, the related business models, concepts of operation and ownership schemes.

  2. ECC Ozonesonde Calibration and Observations: Satellite Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Francis J.; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The reliability of the Electrochemical Concentration Cell (ECC) ozonesonde depends on the care exercised in preparing the instrument for use. Although the ECC can be quickly prepared and flown, generally within less then one day if necessary, it is best to prepare the instrument at least one week prior to use, and as our tests have confirmed even 2-3 weeks prior to use may actually be better. There are a number of factors that must be considered when preparing an ECC. These basically are the pump efficiency, volumetric flow rate, temperature of the air entering the pump, and the background current. Also of importance is the concentration of the potassium iodide solution. Tests conducted at Wallops Island (38 N) has enabled us to identify potential problem areas and ways to avoid them. The calibration and pre-flight preparation methods will be discussed. The method of calibrating the ECC also is used at Ascension Island (8 S) and Natal, Brazil (5 S). Comparisons between vertical profiles of the ECC instrument and satellites will be reviewed as well as comparison with ground based instruments, such as, the Dobson Spectrophotometer and hand held Microtops photometers.

  3. Near-Earth asteroids orbit propagation with Gaia observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bancelin, D; Thuillot, W

    2016-01-01

    Gaia is an astrometric mission that will be launched in 2013 and set on L2 point of Lagrange. It will observe a large number of Solar System Objets (SSO) down to magnitude 20. The Solar System Science goal is to map thousand of Main Belt asteroids (MBAs), Near Earth Objects (NEOs) (including comets) and also planetary satellites with the principal purpuse of orbital determination (better than 5 mas astrometric precision), determination of asteroid mass, spin properties and taxonomy. Besides, Gaia will be able to discover a few objects, in particular NEOs in the region down to the solar elongation 45{\\deg} which are harder to detect with current ground-based surveys. But Gaia is not a follow-up mission and newly discovered objects can be lost if no ground-based recovery is processed. The purpose of this study is to quantify the impact of Gaia data for the known NEAs population and to show how to handle the problem of these discoveries when faint number of observations and thus very short arc is provided.

  4. Investigating the Role of Earth's Quasi-Satellite Resonance in the Accretion of Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, S.

    2012-12-01

    We studied the orbital evolution of low inclination asteroidal interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) decaying towards 1 AU under the influence of radiation pressure, PR drag, and solar wind drag. We used a series of β values (the ratio of radiation pressure to central gravity) ranging from 0.0025 up to 0.02. Assuming a composition consistent with astronomical silicate and a particle density of 2.5 g cm-3 these β values correspond to diameters ranging from 200 down to 25 microns, respectively. Simulations with the larger IDPs (>50 microns) typically showed that 100% of the dust particles became temporarily trapped in mean-motion resonances outside Earth's orbit. When trapped in these outer resonances a dust particle's orbital eccentricity significantly increases (sometimes to e > 0.2) while its decay in semi-major axis is halted. Most dust particles eventually slip out of these outer resonances and their orbits continue decaying inwards toward 1 AU. We found that a significant fraction of the initial populations subsequently became trapped in 1:1 co-orbital resonance with Earth. In addition to traditional horseshoe type co-orbitals, IDPs also became trapped as so-called quasi-satellites. About 1% of the smallest IDPs (25 microns) and 10% of the largest (200 microns) became trapped in the quasi-satellite resonance for some length of time. Quasi-satellite IDPs always remain relatively near to Earth, within about 0.2-0.3 AU, and undergo two close-encounters with Earth each year. While resonant perturbations from Earth halt the decay in semi-major axis of quasi-satellite IDPs their eccentricities continue to decrease, forcing the IDPs onto more Earth-like orbits and causing them to spiral closer and closer to Earth. This has dramatic consequences for the relative velocity and distance of closest approach between Earth and the IDPs. After about 104 years in the quasi-satellite resonance IDPs are typically less than 0.1 AU from Earth and consistently coming within about

  5. Formation Flight of Earth Satellites on KAM Tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    analysis in 320km, 30◦ orbit, δϕ = 0.0001◦ 119 E8 . Cluster distance from chief satellite for tight formation analysis in 320km, 30◦ orbit, δϕ0 = 0.0001...become all the more apparent with the relatively recent focus on development and implementation of small satellite or microsatellite formations – groups ...of math - ematics. However, one can obtain a very basic idea of system behavior by investigating higher-dimensional tori using a method loosely

  6. Communications via the radio artificial earth satellite: Design of the tracking diagram and features for conducting QSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrozhanskiy, V.; Rybkin, V.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed examination is made of the operation of a transmitting artifical Earth satellite. A tracking diagram for the satellite is constructed. The zone of radio visibility can be determined based on the techniques proposed.

  7. A Test of General Relativity Using the LARES and LAGEOS Satellites and a GRACE Earth's Gravity Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of General Relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth's gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure $\\mu = (0.994 \\pm 0.002) \\pm 0.05$, where $\\mu$ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its General Relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is the estimated systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth's gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of General Relativity.

  8. Precision of natural satellite ephemerides from observations of different types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, N. V.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, various types of observations of natural planetary satellites are used to refine their ephemerides. A new type of measurement - determining the instants of apparent satellite encounters - has recently been proposed by Morgado and co-workers. The problem that arises is which type of measurement to choose in order to obtain an ephemeris precision that is as high as possible. The answer can be obtained only by modelling the entire process: observations, obtaining the measured values, refining the satellite motion parameters, and generating the ephemeris. The explicit dependence of the ephemeris precision on observational accuracy as well as on the type of observations is unknown. In this paper, such a dependence is investigated using the Monte Carlo statistical method. The relationship between the ephemeris precision for different types of observations is then assessed. The possibility of using the instants of apparent satellite encounters to obtain an ephemeris is investigated. A method is proposed that can be used to fit the satellite orbital parameters to this type of measurement. It is shown that, in the absence of systematic scale errors in the CCD frame, the use of the instants of apparent encounters leads to less precise ephemerides. However, in the presence of significant scale errors, which is often the case, this type of measurement becomes effective because the instants of apparent satellite encounters do not depend on scale errors.

  9. Assessing Satellite Column Observation of Formaldehyde over Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour Biazar, A.; White, A.; Khan, M. N.; McNider, R. T.

    2016-12-01

    The advent of satellite observation of trace gases has provided valuable information for better understanding of chemical atmosphere. One of these products, satellite observation of column formaldehyde, can be especially valuable in air quality studies. Since photochemical production of formaldehyde constitutes a large portion of summertime atmospheric concentration, satellite observations can be used to constraint the uncertainties in primary aldehyde emissions. In particular, isoprene as the major precursor of formaldehyde in most areas during summer, contributes 20-60% of total production. However, the magnitude of this contribution is spatially variable. Therefore, in comparing model column formaldehyde to that of the satellite, environmental factors affecting this variation must agree with observations. In this study, first we correct the radiation field used in the model for estimating emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC). Then by performing photochemical simulations for the summer of 2013, model formaldehyde field will be compared to that of satellite observed. WRF/SMOKE/CMAQ modeling system is being used for these simulations. The model simulations use satellite-based estimates of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in BVOC emission estimates produced by the latest version of biogenic emission inventory system (BEIS). The results for the period of August-September 2013 (NASA's Discover-AQ field campaign) will be presented.

  10. Observations of Electrostatic and Electromagnetic Waves in the Earth's Magnetosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbert, Paul Charles

    Using data from the University of Minnesota Plasma Wave Experiment aboard the IMP-6 (Explorer 43) satellite, three topics are addressed. The first concerns the wave lengths of certain electrostatic waves in the earth's magnetosphere. Using the fact that the X and Y dipole antennas on IMP-6 are of unequal length, the antenna response to electrostatic waves is calculated as a function of wavelength. This result is used to experimentally determine the wavelengths of Bernstein mode waves observed just beyond the plasmapause. These wavelengths are then used in conjunction with present theoretical models to determine the energy of the electrons driving these waves and a range of energies between (TURN) several tens to (TURN) several hundreds of electron volts is found. This procedure is also applied to Langmuir waves observed upstream of the earth's bow shock and the results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Second it is demonstrated that enhanced levels of the so-called continuum radiation are correlated with AE enhancements. In addition, a source region of continuum radiation is directly observed and movement of the source region is seen which is consistent with a cloud of electrons having been injected into the night side magnetosphere and undergoing gradient drifts in an eastward direction towards local dawn. This drift movement is then used to estimate the energy of the electrons which produce the observed continuum enhancement and a range between 10 kev to 50 kev is found. Spectral properties of the directly observed source are also presented, and indicate a high frequency spectral index of (TURN)f('-5.5). A new type of continuum radiation which correlates with TKR on a time scale of (TURN)1 minute is also observed and is found to have a source region distinct from that mentioned above. Third, a correlation between TKR and VLF auroral hiss has been observed for several high latitude passes of IMP-6 through the midnight auroral zone. This

  11. Gravitational mechanism of active life of the Earth, planets and satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yury

    2010-05-01

    From positions of geodynamic model of the forced gravitational swing, wobble and displacements of shells of a planet are studied and fundamental problems of geodynamics, geology, geophysics, planetary sciences are solved etc.: 1) The mechanism of cyclic variations of activity of natural processes in various time scales. 2) The power of endogenous activity of planetary natural processes on planets and satellites. 3) The phenomenon of polar inversion of natural processes on planets and satellites. 4) Spasmodic and catastrophic changes of activity of natural processes. 5) The phenomenon of twisting of hemispheres (latitude zones or belts) of celestial bodies. 6) Formation of the pear-shaped form of celestial bodies and the mechanism of its change. 7) The ordered planetary structures of geological formations. 8) The phenomena of bipolarity of celestial bodies and antipodality of geology formations. Mechanism. The fundamental feature of a structure of celestial bodies is their shell structure. The most investigated is the internal structure of the Earth. For the Moon and wide set of other bodies of solar system models of an internal structure have been constructed on the basis of the data of observations obtained at studying of their gravitational fields as a result of realization of the appropriate space missions. The basic components for the majority of celestial bodies are the core, the mantle and the crust. To other shells we concern atmospheres (for example, at Venus, Mars, the Titan etc.) and oceanic shells (the Titan, the Earth, Enceladus etc.). Shells are the complex (composite) formations. Planets and satellites are not spherical celestial bodies. The centers of mass of shells of the given planet (or the satellite) and their appropriate principal axes of inertia do not coincide. Accordingly, all their shells are characterized by the certain dynamic oblatenesses. Differences of dynamical oblatenesses results in various forced influences of external celestial

  12. Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's Earth as Art Image Gallery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center manages this collection of Landsat 7 scenes created for aesthetic purposes rather than scientific...

  13. Observations of land-atmosphere interactions using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julia; Gentine, Pierre; Konings, Alexandra; Alemohammad, Hamed; Kolassa, Jana

    2016-04-01

    Observations of land-atmosphere interactions using satellite data Julia Green (1), Pierre Gentine (1), Alexandra Konings (1,2), Seyed Hamed Alemohammad (3), Jana Kolassa (4) (1) Columbia University, Earth and Environmental Engineering, NY, NY, USA, (2) Stanford University, Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford, CA, USA, (3) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Cambridge, MA, USA, (4) National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA. Previous studies of global land-atmosphere hotspots have often relied solely on data from global models with the consequence that they are sensitive to model error. On the other hand, by only analyzing observations, it can be difficult to distinguish causality from mere correlation. In this study, we present a general framework for investigating land-atmosphere interactions using Granger Causality analysis applied to remote sensing data. Based on the near linear relationship between chlorophyll sun induced fluorescence (SIF) and photosynthesis (and thus its relationship with transpiration), we use the GOME-2 fluorescence direct measurements to quantify the surface fluxes between the land and atmosphere. By using SIF data to represent the flux, we bypass the need to use soil moisture data from FLUXNET (limited spatially and temporally) or remote sensing (limited by spatial resolution, canopy interference, measurement depth, and radio frequency interference) thus eliminating additional uncertainty. The Granger Causality analysis allows for the determination of the strength of the two-way causal relationship between SIF and several climatic variables: precipitation, radiation and temperature. We determine that warm regions transitioning from water to energy limitation exhibit strong feedbacks between the land surface and atmosphere due to their high sensitivity to climate and weather variability. Tropical rainforest regions show low magnitudes of

  14. Microwave maps of the polar ice of the earth. [from Nimbus-5 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Chang, T. C.; Nordberg, W.; Campbell, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    Synoptic views of the entire polar regions of earth were obtained free of the usual persistent cloud cover using a scanning microwave radiometer operating at a wavelength of 1.55 cm on board the Nimbus-5 satellite. Three different views at each pole are presented utilizing data obtained at approximately one-month intervals during the winter of 1972-1973. The major discoveries resulting from an analysis of these data are as follows: (1) Large discrepancies exist between the climatic norm ice cover depicted in various atlases and the actual extent of the canopies. (2) The distribution of multiyear ice in the north polar region is markedly different from that predicted by existing ice dynamics models. (3) Irregularities in the edge of the Antarctic sea ice pack occur that have neither been observed previously nor anticipated. (4) The brightness temperatures of the Greenland and Antarctica glaciers show interesting contours probably related to the ice and snow morphologic structure.

  15. Design description report for a photovoltaic power system for a remote satellite earth terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N. A.; Naff, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    A photovoltaic (PV) power system has been installed as an adjunct to an agricultural school at Wawatobi on the large northern island of the Republic of Indonesia. Its purpose is to provide power for a satellite earth station and a classroom. The renewable energy developed supports the video and audio teleconferencing systems as well as the facility at large. The ground station may later be used to provide telephone service. The installation was made in support of the Agency for International Development's Rural Satellite Program, whose purpose is to demonstrate the use of satellite communications for rural development assistance applications. The objective of this particular PV power system is to demonstrate the suitability of a hybrid PV engine-generator configuration for remote satellite earth stations.

  16. Bridging the Gap Between NASA Earth Observations and Decision Makers Through the NASA Develop National Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillard, C. M.; Madden, M.; Favors, J.; Childs-Gleason, L.; Ross, K. W.; Rogers, L.; Ruiz, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    The NASA DEVELOP National Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth Science and society by building capacity in both participants and partner organizations that collaborate to conduct projects. These rapid feasibility projects highlight the capabilities of satellite and aerial Earth observations. Immersion of decision and policy makers in these feasibility projects increases awareness of the capabilities of Earth observations and contributes to the tools and resources available to support enhanced decision making. This paper will present the DEVELOP model, best practices, and two case studies, the Colombia Ecological Forecasting project and the Miami-Dade County Ecological Forecasting project, that showcase the successful adoption of tools and methods for decision making. Through over 90 projects each year, DEVELOP is always striving for the innovative, practical, and beneficial use of NASA Earth science data.

  17. Web Map Apps using NASA's Earth Observing Fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, R.; Baynes, K.; Pressley, N.; Thompson, C.; Cechini, M.; Schmaltz, J.; Alarcon, C.; De Cesare, C.; Gunnoe, T.; Wong, M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Through the miracle of open web mapping services for satellite imagery, a garden of new applications has sprouted to monitor the planet across a variety of domains. The Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) provide free and open access to full resolution imagery captured by NASAs Earth observing fleet. Spanning 15+ years and running through as recently as a few hours ago, GIBS aims to provide a general-purpose window into NASA's vast archive of the planet. While the vast nature of this archive can be daunting, many domain-specific applications have been built to meet the needs of their respective communities. This presentation will demonstrate a diverse set of these new applications which can take planetarium visitors into (virtual) orbit, guide fire resource managers to hotspots, help anglers find their next catch, illustrate global air quality patterns to local regulators, and even spur a friendly competition to find clouds which are shaped the most like cats. We hope this garden will continue to grow and will illustrate upcoming upgrades to GIBS which may open new pathways for development. data visualization, web services, open access

  18. Web Map Apps using NASA's Earth Observing Fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, R. A.; Baynes, K.; Pressley, N. N.; Thompson, C. K.; Cechini, M. F.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Alarcon, C.; De Cesare, C.; Gunnoe, T.; Wong, M. M.; King, B. A.; Roberts, J. T.; Rodriguez, J.; De Luca, A. P.; King, J.

    2016-12-01

    Through the miracle of open web mapping services for satellite imagery, a garden of new applications has sprouted to monitor the planet across a variety of domains. The Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) provide free and open access to full resolution imagery captured by NASA's Earth observing fleet. Spanning 15+ years and running through as recently as "a few hours ago", GIBS aims to provide a general-purpose window into NASA's vast archive of the planet. While the vast nature of this archive can be daunting, many domain-specific applications have been built to meet the needs of their respective communities. This presentation will demonstrate a diverse set of these new applications which can take planetarium visitors into (virtual) orbit, guide fire resource managers to hotspots, help anglers find their next catch, illustrate global air quality patterns to local regulators, and even spur a friendly competition to find clouds which are shaped the most like cats. We hope this garden will continue to grow and will illustrate upcoming upgrades to GIBS which may open new pathways for development.

  19. Communication Systems through Artificial Earth Satellites (Selected Pages)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-05

    POX Fs (8.2.11) is 0(F) dF If on input of weighing circuit fluctuation noise with uniform spectrum acts, spectral power density in numerator and...Possibly also realization MV with asynchronous operation of terrestrial stations, that we will designate through MVA . In the case MVA each terrestrial...according to the frequcrncy. With MVA through receiving-transmitting equipment of satellite into some tiMe intervals simultaneous possible passage of signals

  20. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  1. The U.S. National Plan for Civil Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryker, T.; Clavin, C.; Gallo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, the United Sates Government is one of the largest providers of environmental and Earth-system data. As the nation's Earth observation capacity has grown, so have the complexity and challenges associated with managing Earth observation systems and related data holdings. In July 2014, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy released the first-ever National Plan for Civil Earth Observations to address these challenges. The Plan provides a portfolio management-based framework for maximizing the value of Federal Earth observations. The Plan identifies Federal priorities for Earth observations and improved management of their data. Through routine assessments, expanding data management efforts, interagency planning, and international collaboration, OSTP and its partner agencies will seek ensure the continued provision of and access to key Earth observation data, which support a broad range of public services and research programs. The presenters will provide a detailed review of the components of the National Plan, its impacts across the Federal agencies involved in Earth observations, and associated efforts to enable interagency coordination.

  2. On identifying the specular reflection of sunlight in earth-monitoring satellite data.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelsen, James M., Jr.; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Jackson, Dale Clayton; Longenbaugh, Randolph S.

    2009-03-01

    Among the background signals commonly seen by Earth-monitoring satellites is the specular reflection of sunlight off of Earth's surface, commonly referred to as a glint. This phenomenon, involving liquid or ice surfaces, can result in the brief, intense illumination of satellite sensors appearing from the satellite perspective to be of terrestrial origin. These glints are important background signals to be able to identify with confidence, particularly in the context of analyzing data from satellites monitoring for transient surface or atmospheric events. Here we describe methods for identifying glints based on the physical processes involved in their production, including spectral fitting and polarization measurements. We then describe a tool that, using the WGS84 spheroidal Earth model, finds the latitude and longitude on Earth where a reflection of this type could be produced, given input Sun and satellite coordinates. This tool enables the user to determine if the surface at the solution latitude and longitude is in fact reflective, thus identifying the sensor response as a true glint or an event requiring further analysis.

  3. The Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy: A 30 year adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-12-01

    The history of research in the Earth's gravity field from satellite geodesy is described and limitations of existing geopotential models are indicated. Although current solutions have made outstanding achievements, their limited accuracy restricts their use for some oceanographic applications. An example is discussed where there appears to be an incompatibility of the long wavelength geoid undulation obtained through satellite analysis with independent estimates that have become available. The future Aristoteles mission is seen as providing a significant leap in Earth gravity field knowledge improvement.

  4. Mini-satellite exploration of very near earth space fuel objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-09-19

    A prospecting plan is presented to assay near Earth objects (NEO) for their potential to yield rocket fuel. The plan calls out small satellites as the near-term means to achieve low cost surveys and deep subsurface sampling of NEO composition. The water bearing classes of NEO to be considered are limited to those accessible in short time and with small thrusters. These include the water bearing clay objects (phylosilicates) at nearly trivial distances from Earth, and the recently identified water ice objects such as comet ({number_sign}4015) 1979 VA. These objects are evaluated as small satellite prospecting and assay vehicle targets.

  5. Mini-satellite exploration of very near earth space fuel objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuppero, A.C.; Jacox, M.G.

    1992-09-19

    A prospecting plan is presented to assay near Earth objects (NEO) for their potential to yield rocket fuel. The plan calls out small satellites as the near-term means to achieve low cost surveys and deep subsurface sampling of NEO composition. The water bearing classes of NEO to be considered are limited to those accessible in short time and with small thrusters. These include the water bearing clay objects (phylosilicates) at nearly trivial distances from Earth, and the recently identified water ice objects such as comet ([number sign]4015) 1979 VA. These objects are evaluated as small satellite prospecting and assay vehicle targets.

  6. A Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite Model Using Easy Java Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Loo Kang; Goh, Giam Hwee

    2013-01-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize geostationary orbits near Earth, modelled using a Java 3D implementation of the EJS 3D library. The simplified physics model is described and simulated using a simple constant angular velocity equation. We discuss four computer model design ideas: (1) a simple and realistic…

  7. A Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite Model Using Easy Java Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Loo Kang; Goh, Giam Hwee

    2013-01-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize geostationary orbits near Earth, modelled using a Java 3D implementation of the EJS 3D library. The simplified physics model is described and simulated using a simple constant angular velocity equation. We discuss four computer model design ideas: (1) a simple and realistic…

  8. Changing inclination of earth satellites using the gravity of the moon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla de Souza Torres

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the problem of the orbital control of an Earth's satellite using the gravity of the Moon. The main objective is to study a technique to decrease the fuel consumption of a plane change maneuver to be performed in a satellite that is in orbit around the Earth. The main idea of this approach is to send the satellite to the Moon using a single-impulsive maneuver, use the gravity field of the Moon to make the desired plane change of the trajectory, and then return the satellite to its nominal semimajor axis and eccentricity using a bi-impulsive Hohmann-type maneuver. The satellite is assumed to start in a Keplerian orbit in the plane of the lunar orbit around the Earth and the goal is to put it in a similar orbit that differs from the initial orbit only by the inclination. A description of the close-approach maneuver is made in the three-dimensional space. Analytical equations based on the patched conics approach are used to calculate the variation in velocity, angular momentum, energy, and inclination of the satellite. Then, several simulations are made to evaluate the savings involved. The time required by those transfers is also calculated and shown.

  9. Using NASA's Giovanni Web Portal to Access and Visualize Satellite-Based Earth Science Data in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, S. A.; Acker, J. G.; Prados, A. I.; Leptoukh, G. G.

    2008-12-01

    One of the biggest obstacles for the average Earth science student today is locating and obtaining satellite- based remote sensing datasets in a format that is accessible and optimal for their data analysis needs. At the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES-DISC) alone, on the order of hundreds of Terabytes of data are available for distribution to scientists, students and the general public. The single biggest and time-consuming hurdle for most students when they begin their study of the various datasets is how to slog through this mountain of data to arrive at a properly sub-setted and manageable dataset to answer their science question(s). The GES DISC provides a number of tools for data access and visualization, including the Google-like Mirador search engine and the powerful GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (Giovanni) web interface. Giovanni provides a simple way to visualize, analyze and access vast amounts of satellite-based Earth science data. Giovanni's features and practical examples of its use will be demonstrated, with an emphasis on how satellite remote sensing can help students understand recent events in the atmosphere and biosphere. Giovanni is actually a series of sixteen similar web-based data interfaces, each of which covers a single satellite dataset (such as TRMM, TOMS, OMI, AIRS, MLS, HALOE, etc.) or a group of related datasets (such as MODIS and MISR for aerosols, SeaWIFS and MODIS for ocean color, and the suite of A-Train observations co-located along the CloudSat orbital path). Recently, ground-based datasets have been included in Giovanni, including the Northern Eurasian Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), and EPA fine particulate matter (PM2.5) for air quality. Model data such as the Goddard GOCART model and MERRA meteorological reanalyses (in process) are being increasingly incorporated into Giovanni to facilitate model- data intercomparison. A full suite of data

  10. Satellite laser ranging measurements in South Africa: Contributions to earth system sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Botai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This contribution reassesses progress in the development of satellite laser ranging (SLR technology and its scientific and societal applications in South Africa. We first highlight the current global SLR tracking stations within the framework of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS and the artificial satellites currently being tracked by these stations. In particular, the present work focuses on analysing SLR measurements at Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO, South Africa, based on the MOBLAS-6 SLR configuration. Generally, there is a weak geometry of ILRS stations in the southern hemisphere and the SLR tracking station at HartRAO is the only active ILRS station operating on the African continent. The SLR-derived products such as station positions and velocities, satellite orbits, components of earth's gravity field and their temporal variations, earth orientation parameters are collected, merged, achieved and distributed by the ILRS under the Crustal Dynamic Data Information System. These products are used in various research fields such as detection and monitoring of tectonic plate motion, crustal deformation, earth rotation, polar motion, and the establishment and monitoring of International Terrestrial Reference Frames, as well as modelling of the spatio-temporal variations of the earth's gravity field. The MOBLAS-6 tracking station is collocated with other geodetic techniques such as very long baseline interferometry and Global Navigation Satellite Systems, thus making this observatory a fiducial geodetic location. Some applications of the SLR data products are described within the context of earth system science.

  11. Optimization and Feasibility Analysis of Satellite Earth Station Power System Using Homer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen T. Dorrah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite earth stations which located in remote areas are one of many applications powered by the renewable energy sources. Ground system consists of ground station and control centers working together to support the spacecraft and the data user. Earth station consists of major subsystems, transmitter, receiver, antenna, tracking equipment, terrestrial interface equipment and power supply. Power subsystem is an important part that required for supplying the earth station with electrical power to continue communicating with its remote sensing satellite. This paper deals with simulation and optimal sizing of earth station power system using HOMER software. A combination of two energy sources (solar, and wind to provide a continuous electric power production is used to determine the optimum system operation. Three system configurations are compared with respect to the total net present cost (NPC and levelized cost of energy (COE. Also, economical study will be analyzed for energy demand and sensitivity analysis will be performed.

  12. Optimization and Feasibility Analysis of Satellite Earth Station Power System Using Homer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen T. Dorrah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Satellite earth stations which located in remote areas are one of many applications powered by the renewable energy sources. Ground system consists of ground station and control centers working together to support the spacecraft and the data user. Earth station consists of major subsystems, transmitter, receiver, antenna, tracking equipment, terrestrial interface equipment and power supply. Power subsystem is an important part that required for supplying the earth station with electrical power to continue communicating with its remote sensing satellite. This paper deals with simulation and optimal sizing of earth station power system using HOMER software. A combination of two energy sources (solar, and wind to provide a continuous electric power production is used to determine the optimum system operation. Three system configurations are compared with respect to the total net present cost (NPC and levelized cost of energy (COE. Also, economical study will be analyzed for energy demand and sensitivity analysis will be performed.

  13. Bit Error Rate Due to Misalignment of Earth Station Antenna Pointing to Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Pamungkas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available One problem causing reduction of energy in satellite communications system is the misalignment of earth station antenna pointing to satellite. Error in pointing would affect the quality of information signal to energy bit in earth station. In this research, error in pointing angle occurred only at receiver (Rx antenna, while the transmitter (Tx antennas precisely point to satellite. The research was conducted towards two satellites, namely TELKOM-1 and TELKOM-2. At first, measurement was made by directing Tx antenna precisely to satellite, resulting in an antenna pattern shown by spectrum analyzer. The output from spectrum analyzers is drawn with the right scale to describe swift of azimuth and elevation pointing angle towards satellite. Due to drifting from the precise pointing, it influenced the received link budget indicated by pattern antenna. This antenna pattern shows reduction of power level received as a result of pointing misalignment. As a conclusion, the increasing misalignment of pointing to satellite would affect in the reduction of received signal parameters link budget of down-link traffic.

  14. Value of Earth Observations: NASA Activities with Socioeconomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, L.

    2016-12-01

    There is greater emphasis internationally on the social and economic benefits that organizations can derive from applications of Earth observations. A growing set of qualitative, anecdotal examples on the uses of Earth observations across a range of sectors can be complemented by the quantitative substantiation of the socioeconomic benefits. In turn, the expanding breadth of environmental data available and the awareness of their beneficial applications to inform decisions can support new products and services. To support these efforts, there are needs to develop impact assessments, populate the literature, and develop familiarity in the Earth science community with the terms, concepts and methods to assess impacts. Within NASA, the Earth Science Division's Applied Sciences Program has initiated and supported numerous activities in recent years to quantify the socioeconomic benefits from Earth observations applications and to build familiarity within the Earth science community. This paper will present an overview of measuring socioeconomic impacts of Earth observations and how the measures can be translated into a value of Earth observation information. It will address key terms, techniques, principles and applications of socioeconomic impact analyses. It will also discuss activities to support analytic techniques, expand the literature, and promote broader skills and capabilities.

  15. Validation of GOCE Satellite Gravity Gradient Observations by Orbital Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, P.

    The upcoming European Space Agency ESA Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circular Explorer GOCE mission foreseen to be launched in 2007 will carry a highly sensitive gradiometer consisting of 3 orthogonal pairs of ultra-sensitive accelerometers A challenging calibration procedure has been developed to calibrate the gradiometer not only before launch by a series of on-ground tests but also after launch by making use of on-board cold-gas thrusters to provoke a long series of gradiometer shaking events which will provide observations for its calibration This calibration can be checked by a combined analysis of GPS Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking SST and Satellite Gravity Gradient SGG observations An assessment has been made of how well SGG calibration parameters can be estimated in a combined orbit and gravity field estimation from these observations

  16. Carbon Observations from Geostationary Earth Orbit as Part of an Integrated Observing System for Atmospheric Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation describes proposed satellite carbon measurements from the CHRONOS mission. The primary goal of this experiment is to measure the atmospheric pollutants carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) from geostationary orbit, with hourly observations of North America at high spatial resolution. CHRONOS observations would provide measurements not currently available or planned as part of a surface, suborbital and satellite integrated observing system for atmospheric composition over North America. Carbon monoxide is produced by combustion processes such as urban activity and wildfires, and serves as a proxy for other combustion pollutants that are not easily measured. Methane has diverse anthropogenic sources ranging from fossil fuel production, animal husbandry, agriculture and waste management. The impact of gas exploration in the Western States of the USA and oil extraction from the Canadian tar sands will be particular foci of the mission, as will the poorly-quantified natural CH4 emissions from wetlands and thawing permafrost. In addition to characterizing pollutant sources, improved understanding of the domestic CH4 budget is a priority for policy decisions related to short-lived climate forcers. A primary motivation for targeting CO is its value as a tracer of atmospheric pollution, and CHRONOS measurements will provide insight into local and long-range transport across the North American continent, as well as the processes governing the entrainment and venting of pollution in and out of the planetary boundary layer. As a result of significantly improved characterization of diurnal changes in atmospheric composition, CHRONOS observations will find direct societal applications for air quality regulation and forecasting. We present a quantification of this expected improvement in the prediction of near-surface concentrations when CHRONOS measurements are used in Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). If CHRONOS and the planned NASA Earth

  17. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-09-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  18. Earth's gravity field modelling based on satellite accelerations derived from onboard GPS phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X.; Ditmar, P.; Zhao, Q.; Klees, R.; Farahani, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    GPS data collected by satellite gravity missions can be used for extracting the long-wavelength part of the Earth's gravity field. We propose a new data processing method which makes use of the `average acceleration' approach to gravity field modelling. In this method, satellite accelerations are directly derived from GPS carrier phase measurements with an epoch-differenced scheme. As a result, no ambiguity solutions are needed and the systematic errors that do not change much from epoch to epoch are largely eliminated. The GPS data collected by the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission are used to demonstrate the added value of the proposed method. An analysis of the residual accelerations shows that accelerations derived in this way are more precise, with noise being reduced by about 20 and 5% at the cross-track component and the other two components, respectively, as compared to those based on kinematic orbits. The accelerations obtained in this way allow the recovery of the gravity field to a slightly higher maximum degree compared to the solution based on kinematic orbits. Furthermore, the gravity field solution has an overall better performance. Errors in spherical harmonic coefficients are smaller, especially at low degrees. The cumulative geoid height error is reduced by about 15 and 5% up to degree 50 and 150, respectively. An analysis in the spatial domain shows that large errors along the geomagnetic equator, which are caused by a high electron density coupled with large short-term variations, are substantially reduced. Finally, the new method allows for a better observation of mass transport signals. In particular, sufficiently realistic signatures of regional mass anomalies in North America and south-west Africa are obtained.

  19. Refractive aiming corrections for satellite observation of stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Schmidt, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    Standard references describe how apparent zenith angles differ from true zenith angles for observers on the Earth. In fact, correction formulae are available for aiming Earth-based sensors at stars; some corrections give variations as a function of observer altitude. Such corrections have not been available for observers in space. This report develops formulae appropriate for proper aiming from space-based sensors toward the relatively few stars that are near the Earth`s limb at any given time. These formulae correct for refractive effects and may be critical for steerable space-borne sensors with fields of view less than one degree, tasked to observe starlight passing near the Earth`s surface. Ray tracing in the U.S. Standard Atmosphere, 1976 including H{sub 2}O effects, is used to determine relations between the refracted tangent height, the apparent tangent height resulting from observation at the sensor, and the angle through which the detected rays have deviated. Analytic fits of the ray deviation as a function of apparent tangent height allows quick determination of corrections needed for a space-borne sensor. Using those results that apply in the plane of incidence and using the necessary coordinate rotations, alterations in the star`s apparent right ascension and declination are evaluated to improve the aim. Examples illustrate that alterations can be larger than one degree, with effects lasting up to a few minutes.

  20. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... for modeling Sun sensor output by incorporating the Earth albedo model is presented. This model utilizes the directional information of in the Earth albedo model, which is achieved by Earth surface partitioning. This allows accurate simulation of the Sun sensor output and the results are consistent with Ørsted...... and useful for space environment simulations, and may be utilized to improve attitude estimation algorithms applying Sun sensor vector observations....

  1. USGEO National Earth Observation Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Relative Contributions of Earth Observing Systems to Societal Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, J.; Stryker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The second National Civil Earth Observation Assessment identifies the inputs and relative contributions of the portfolio of observing systems currently relied upon by Federal agencies to meet key Earth observing objectives. The Assessment employs a hierarchical value-tree framework that traces the pathways through which Earth observing systems contribute value across 13 societal benefit areas, utilizing multiple levels to provide logical traceability. This presentation describes the methods used to construct societal benefit area value-trees that include key objectives and the information products, services, and research derived from Earth observations that help satisfy them. It describes the methods for weighting nodes at multiple levels of each value-tree and the expert elicitation process for assessing the relative contributions of Earth observing systems to the development of information products, services, and research. The methodology employed in the Assessment is especially useful at assessing the interdependence and relative contributions of multiple Earth observing systems on the development of blended information products and tracing information pathways from direct observations through intermediate products, such as models, to end-products used to improve decision-making. This presentation will highlight case study examples from the 13 societal benefit areas (agriculture and forestry, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy and mineral resources, human health, ocean and costal resources, space weather, transportation, water resources weather, and reference measurements) to demonstrate tractability from Earth observing systems, through information products and research that satisfy key objectives, to societal benefit.

  2. Applying sensor web strategies to big data earth observations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, TL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Earth observation data and meta-data are a central concern of the earth sciences. These data are generated by a myriad of both in-situ and remote sensors. Other sources of data include computational simulations, various ex-situ sources...

  3. An Autonomous Orbit Determination System for Earth Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    these points is warranted. For example, low-Earth orbits ( LEO ) can be expected to approach e - 0 with time, so it is particularly useful to examine how...0.77887 e + 0.52875 e x y z 7 Canis Major A A A Cairs) M-0.18485 e + 0.93984 e - 0.28728 e (Sirus) -xyz A A A 8 a Leo -0.86275 e + 0.46061 e...Filters for Orbit Determination and Estimation, PhD Dissertation. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign IL, 1986 (AD-A170680). 12. Brouwer , Dirk

  4. Monitoring water quality in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala using Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Cordova, A. I.; Christopher, S. A.; Griffin, R.; Limaye, A. S.; Irwin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Frequent and spatially continuous water quality monitoring is either unattainable or challenging for developing nations if only standard methods are used. Such standard methods rely on in situ water sampling, which is expensive, time-consuming and point specific. Through the Regional Visualization and Monitoring System (SERVIR), Lake Atitlan's water quality was first monitored in 2009 using Earth observation satellites. Lake Atitlan is a source of drinking water for the towns located nearby and a major touristic attraction for the country. Several multispectral sensors were used to monitor the largest algal bloom known to date for the lake, which covered 40% of the lake's 137 square kilometer surface. Red and Near-Infrared bands were used to isolate superficial algae from clean water. Local authorities, media, universities and local communities, broadly used the information provided by SERVIR for this event. It allowed estimating the real extent of the algal bloom and prompted immediate response for the government to address the event. However, algal blooms have been very rare in this lake. The lake is considered oligotrophic given its relatively high transparency levels that can reach 15 m in the dry season. To continue the support provided by SERVIR in the algal bloom event, an algorithm to monitor chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration under normal conditions was developed with the support of local institutions. Hyperspectral data from Hyperion on board EO-1 and in situ water quality observations were used to develop a semi-empirical algorithm for the lake. A blue to green band ratio successfully modeled Chl a concentration in Lake Atitlan with a relative error of 33%. This presentation will explain the process involved from providing an emergency response to developing a tailored tool for monitoring water quality in Lake Atitlan, Guatemala.

  5. Asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3, the smallest and closest Earth quasi-satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2016-01-01

    A number of Earth co-orbital asteroids experience repeated transitions between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe dynamical states. Asteroids 2001 GO2, 2002 AA29, 2003 YN107 and 2015 SO2 are well-documented cases of such a dynamical behaviour. These transitions depend on the gravitational influence of other planets, owing to the overlapping of a multiplicity of secular resonances. Here, we show that the recently discovered asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3 is a quasi-satellite of our planet -the fifth one, joining the ranks of (164207) 2004 GU9, (277810) 2006 FV35, 2013 LX28 and 2014 OL339. This new Earth co-orbital also switches repeatedly between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe configurations. Its current quasi-satellite episode started nearly 100 yr ago and it will end in about 300 yr from now. The orbital solution currently available for this object is very robust and our full N-body calculations show that it may be a long-term companion (timescale of Myr) to our planet. Among the known Earth quasi-satellites, ...

  6. A novel emergency system for low earth orbit satellites using Galileo GNSS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.K.A.; Helderweirt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites have a limited direct contact time with the stations of their ground segment. This fundamentally constraints a timeliness reaction of the mission control center in case of emergency situations onboard the LEO spacecraft. To enable such a rapid reaction to emergency s

  7. Study on networking issues of medium earth orbit satellite communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Noriyuki; Shinonaga, Hideyuki; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1993-01-01

    Two networking issues of communications systems with medium earth orbit (MEO) satellites, namely network architectures and location determination and registration methods for hand-held terminals, are investigated in this paper. For network architecture, five candidate architectures are considered and evaluated in terms of signaling traffic. For location determination and registration, two methods are discussed and evaluated.

  8. 78 FR 19172 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 2 and 25 Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating with Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit Space Stations AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule;...

  9. The impact of earth resources exploration from space. [technology assessment/LANDSAT satellites -technological forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, W.

    1975-01-01

    The use of Earth Resources Technology Satellites in solving global problems is examined. Topics discussed are: (1) management of food, water, and fiber resources; (2) exploration and management of energy and mineral resources; (3) protection of the environment; (4) protection of life and property; and (5) improvements in shipping and navigation.

  10. Piracy of Satellite Signals by Domestic Receive-Only Earth Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Steven D.

    Innovations in technology have enabled homeowners to pirate satellite signals intended for cable television operators through the use of home earth-stations. Section 605 of the Communications Act of 1934, which governs reception of signals, is inadequate to regulate this situation because it appears that publication of received programing outside…

  11. Technologies for global change earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Gordon I.; Hudson, Wayne R.

    1990-01-01

    Advances in the areas of space-based observations, data/information analysis, and spacecraft/operations for the studying of global changes are discussed. Research involving systems analysis, observation technologies, information technologies, and spacecraft technologies is examined. Consideration is given to cryogenic coolers, IR arrays, laser and submillimeter sensing, large array CCD, information visualization, design knowledge capture, optical communications, multiinstrument pointing, propulsion, space environmental effects, and platform thermal systems.

  12. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS): Discovering New Earths and Super-Earths in the Solar Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, George R.

    2015-12-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will discover thousands of exoplanets in orbit around the brightest stars in the sky. In its two-year prime survey mission, TESS will monitor more than 200,000 bright stars in the solar neighborhood for temporary drops in brightness caused by planetary transits. This first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants, around a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances.TESS stars will typically be 30-100 times brighter than those surveyed by the Kepler satellite; thus, TESS planets will be far easier to characterize with follow-up observations. For the first time it will be possible to study the masses, sizes, densities, orbits, and atmospheres of a large cohort of small planets, including a sample of rocky worlds in the habitable zones of their host stars.An additional data product from the TESS mission will be full frame images (FFI) with a cadence of 30 minutes or less. These FFI will provide precise photometric information for every object within the 2300 square degree instantaneous field of view of the TESS cameras. These objects will include more than 1 million stars and bright galaxies observed during sessions of several weeks. In total, more than 30 million objects brighter than I=16 will be precisely photometered during the two-year prime mission. In principle, the lunar-resonant TESS orbit could provide opportunities for an extended mission lasting more than a decade, with data rates in excess of 100 Mbits/s.An extended survey by TESS of regions surrounding the North and South Ecliptic Poles will provide prime exoplanet targets for characterization with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other large ground-based and space-based telescopes of the future.TESS will issue data releases every 4 months, inviting immediate community-wide efforts to study the new planets, as well as commensal survey candidates from the FFI. A NASA Guest

  13. Value of Earth Observations: Key principles and techniques of socioeconomic benefits analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, L.; Macauley, M.; Bernknopf, R.

    2013-12-01

    Internationally, multiple organizations are placing greater emphasis on the societal benefits that governments, businesses, and NGOs can derive from applications of Earth-observing satellite observations, research, and models. A growing set of qualitative, anecdotal examples on the uses of Earth observations across a range of sectors can be complemented by the quantitative substantiation of the socioeconomic benefits. In turn, the expanding breadth of environmental data available and the awareness of their beneficial applications to inform decisions can support new products and services by companies, agencies, and civil society. There are, however, significant efforts needed to bridge the Earth sciences and social and economic sciences fields to build capacity, develop case studies, and refine analytic techniques in quantifying socioeconomic benefits from the use of Earth observations. Some government programs, such as the NASA Earth Science Division's Applied Sciences Program have initiated activities in recent years to quantify the socioeconomic benefits from applications of Earth observations research, and to develop multidisciplinary models for organizations' decision-making activities. A community of practice has conducted workshops, developed impact analysis reports, published a book, developed a primer, and pursued other activities to advance analytic methodologies and build capacity. This paper will present an overview of measuring socioeconomic impacts of Earth observations and how the measures can be translated into a value of Earth observation information. It will address key terms, techniques, principles and applications of socioeconomic impact analyses. It will also discuss activities to pursue a research agenda on analytic techniques, develop a body of knowledge, and promote broader skills and capabilities.

  14. Earth Observations from Space: The First 50 Years of Scientific Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minster, B.; Campbell, J. W.; Dozier, J.; Fleming, J. R.; Gille, J. C.; Hartmann, D. L.; Jezek, K.; Kidder, S.; Ramankutty, N.; Thompson, A.; Ustin, S. L.; Yoder, J.; Probst, L.; Mengelt, C.

    2007-12-01

    Observing the Earth from space over the last five decades has fundamentally transformed the way people view our home planet. The image of the "blue marble" is taken for granted now, but it was revolutionary when it was first taken in 1972 by the crew on Apollo 17. Since then, the capability to look at Earth from space has grown increasingly sophisticated and evolved from simple photographs to quantitative measurements of Earth properties such as temperature, atmospheric gases, and exact elevation of land and ocean. Consequently, every new method of imaging the Earth from space has resulted in scientific accomplishments that have enabled new discoveries, transformed the field, refined scientific understanding, opened new avenues of research, or provided important societal benefits by improving the predictability of Earth system processes. This National Research Council (NRC) study highlights selected scientific achievements made possible by the first 50 years of Earth satellite observations by space-faring nations. It follows on a recent report from the NRC entitled "Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond" (NRC 2007), also referred to as the "decadal study."

  15. Satellite observations of aerosol and CO over Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Steven T.; Gille, John C.; Edwards, David P.; Nandi, Sreela

    The development of remote sensing satellite technology potentially will lead to the technical means to monitor air pollution emitted from large cities on a global basis. This paper presents observations by the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) and measurements of pollution in the troposphere (MOPITT) experiments of aerosol optical depths and CO mixing ratios, respectively, in the vicinity of Mexico City to illustrate current satellite capabilities. MOPITT CO mixing ratios over Mexico City, averaged between January-March 2002-2005, are 19% above regional values and the CO plume extends over 10° 2 in the free troposphere at 500 hPa. Time series of Red Automatica de Monitoreo Ambiental (RAMA) PM10, and (Aerosol Robotic Network) AERONET and MODIS aerosol optical depths, and RAMA and MOPITT CO time series are inter-compared to illustrate the different perspectives of ground based and satellite instrumentation. Finally, we demonstrate, by examining MODIS and MOPITT data in April 2003, that satellite data can be used to identify episodes in which pollution form fires influences the time series of ground based and satellite observations of urban pollution.

  16. The Orbit and Future Motion of Earth Quasi-Satellite 2016 HO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodas, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The newly discovered small asteroid 2016 HO3 is not only co-orbital with the Earth, it is currently trapped as a quasi-satellite, and it will remain a constant companion of our planet for centuries to come. Although it orbits the Sun, not the Earth, in a frame rotating with the Earth the asteroid appears to make yearly loops around our planet, and also bobs up and down through the ecliptic due to its 8-degree orbital inclination. What makes this asteroid a quasi-satellite is the fact that the Earth's gravity influences its motion so that it never wanders farther away than about 100 lunar distances. In the rotating frame, the asteroid's yearly cycles librate back and forth along the Earth's orbit, with a period of about 45 years. One other asteroid, 2003 YN107, followed a similar librational pattern from 1997 to 2006, but has since departed our vicinity. 2016 HO3, on the other hand, will continue to librate about our planet for centuries to come, making it the best and most stable example of a quasi-satellite to date.

  17. Properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeffrey G.

    1989-01-01

    Environments and surface properties of the moon, Mars, Martian satellites, and near-earth asteroids are discussed. Topics include gravity, atmospheres, surface properties, surface compositions, seismicity, radiation environment, degradation, use of robotics, and environmental impacts. Gravity fields vary from large fractions of the earth's field such as 1/3 on Mars and 1/6 on the moon to smaller fractions of 0.0004 g on an asteroid 1 km in diameter. Spectral data and the analogy with meteor compositions suggest that near-earth asteroids may contain many resources such as water-rich carbonaceous materials and iron-rich metallic bodies. It is concluded that future mining and materials processing operations from extraterrestrial bodies require an investment now in both (1) missions to the moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, and near-earth asteroids and (2) earth-based laboratory research in materials and processing.

  18. Asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3, the smallest and closest Earth quasi-satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-11-01

    A number of Earth co-orbital asteroids experience repeated transitions between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe dynamical states. Asteroids 2001 GO2, 2002 AA29, 2003 YN107 and 2015 SO2 are well-documented cases of such a dynamical behaviour. These transitions depend on the gravitational influence of other planets, owing to the overlapping of a multiplicity of secular resonances. Here, we show that the recently discovered asteroid (469219) 2016 HO3 is a quasi-satellite of our planet - the fifth one, joining the ranks of (164207) 2004 GU9, (277810) 2006 FV35, 2013 LX28, and 2014 OL339. This new Earth co-orbital also switches repeatedly between the quasi-satellite and horseshoe configurations. Its current quasi-satellite episode started nearly 100 yr ago and it will end in about 300 yr from now. The orbital solution currently available for this object is very robust and our full N-body calculations show that it may be a long-term companion (time-scale of Myr) to our planet. Among the known Earth quasi-satellites, it is the closest to our planet and as such, a potentially accessible target for future in situ study. Due to its presumably lengthy dynamical relationship with the Earth and given the fact that at present and for many decades this transient object remains well positioned with respect to our planet, the results of spectroscopic studies of this small body, 26-115 m, may be particularly useful to improve our understanding of the origins - local or captured - of Earth's co-orbital asteroid population. The non-negligible effect of the uncertainty in the value of the mass of Jupiter on the stability of this type of co-orbitals is also briefly explored.

  19. Geostationary Atmospheric Observation Satellite Plan in Japan (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, H.; Kasai, Y.; Kita, K.; Irie, H.; Sagi, K.; Hayashida, S.

    2009-12-01

    As emissions of air pollutants in Asia have increased in the past decades accompanying with rapid economic growth of developing countries, Asian regional air pollution has attracted concern from the view of inter-continental and intra-continental long-range transport as well as domestic air quality. Particularly in Japan, transboundary transport of ozone is of recent social concern as one of a cause of increasing trend of near surface ozone concentration. In order to elucidate the transport and chemical transformation processes of air pollution in East Asia, and to attain internationally common understanding on this issue, geostationary atmospheric observation satellite has been proposed in Japan. In 2006, the Japan Society of Atmospheric Chemistry (JSAC) formed Commission on the Atmospheric Environmental Observation Satellite to initiate the discussion. In 2009, Committee on Geostationary Atmospheric Observation Satellite has been formed within JAXA to promote the plan. The proposed satellite consists of a UV/VIS sensor for O3, NO2, HCHO and AOT, and a MIR sensor for O3, CO, HNO3, NO2, H2O and temperature. Targeted spatial and temporal resolutions are ca.10 km and 1-2 hrs, respectively, and focused observation area is northeast Asia potentially covering the southeast and south Asia. Sensitivity analysis and simulation have been made for both the UV/VIS and MIR sensors. Overview of user requirement and the sensitivity analysis for each species will be presented in this talk.

  20. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of archive

  1. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of archive

  2. Size and Albedo of Irregular Saturnian Satellites from Spitzer Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Grav, T.; Trilling, D.; Stansberry, J.; Sykes, M.

    2008-01-01

    Using MIPS onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, we observed the thermal emission (24 and, for some targets, 70 um) of eight irregular satellites of Saturn: Albiorix, Siarnaq, Paaliaq, Kiviuq, Ijiraq, Tarvos, Erriapus, and Ymir. We determined the size and albedo of all targets. An analysis of

  3. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  4. Accuracy of surface heat fluxes from observations of operational satellites

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Sugimori, Y.

    with uncertainties for same flux values resulting from climatological ship observations. For net satellite derived heat flux varying from 0 to 300 w/m sup(2) the uncertainties were found to be of the order of 50-90 w/m sup(2). For the same range of flux values...

  5. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes that influence POC sources and sinks. Using field observations and satellite ocean color products, we developed a nw multiple regression algorithm to estimate POC on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) from satellite observations. The algorithm had reliable performance with mean relative error (MRE) of ?40% and root mean square error (RMSE) of ?50% for MODIS and SeaWiFS images for POC ranging between ?80 and ?1200 mg m23, and showed similar performance for a large estuary (Mobile Bay). Substantial spatiotemporal variability in the satellite-derived POC was observed on the LCS, with high POC found on the inner shelf (<10 m depth) and lower POC on the middle (10–50 m depth) and outer shelf (50–200 m depth), and with high POC found in winter (January–March) and lower POC in summer to fall (August–October). Correlation analysis between long-term POC time series and several potential influencing factors indicated that river discharge played a dominant role in POC dynamics on the LCS, while wind and surface currents also affected POC spatial patterns on short time scales. This study adds another example where satellite data with carefully developed algorithms can greatly increase

  6. Earth Observation for Biodiversity Assessment (EO-BA)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cho, Moses A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available in the Dukuduku coastal forest Earth Observation for Biodiversity Assessment (EO-BA) MA CHO, P DEBBA, R MATHIEU, A RAMOELO, L NAIDOO, H VAN DEVENTER, O MALAHLELA AND R MAIN CSIR Natural Resources and the Environment, Pretoria, South Africa PO Box 395..., Pretoria, South Africa, 0001 Email: mcho@csir.co.za ? www.csir.co.za THE ROLE OF EARTH OBSERVATION IN PROVIDING BIODIVERSITY INFORMATION Biodiversity encompasses four levels: genetic, species, ecosystem and functional diversities. By sustaining...

  7. An update on Earth's energy balance in light of the latest global observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Graeme L.; Li, Juilin; Wild, Martin; Clayson, Carol Anne; Loeb, Norman; Kato, Seiji; L'Ecuyer, Tristan; Stackhouse, Paul W.; Lebsock, Matthew; Andrews, Timothy

    2012-10-01

    Climate change is governed by changes to the global energy balance. At the top of the atmosphere, this balance is monitored globally by satellite sensors that provide measurements of energy flowing to and from Earth. By contrast, observations at the surface are limited mostly to land areas. As a result, the global balance of energy fluxes within the atmosphere or at Earth's surface cannot be derived directly from measured fluxes, and is therefore uncertain. This lack of precise knowledge of surface energy fluxes profoundly affects our ability to understand how Earth's climate responds to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. In light of compilations of up-to-date surface and satellite data, the surface energy balance needs to be revised. Specifically, the longwave radiation received at the surface is estimated to be significantly larger, by between 10 and 17 Wm-2, than earlier model-based estimates. Moreover, the latest satellite observations of global precipitation indicate that more precipitation is generated than previously thought. This additional precipitation is sustained by more energy leaving the surface by evaporation -- that is, in the form of latent heat flux -- and thereby offsets much of the increase in longwave flux to the surface.

  8. Mesoscale climate hydrology: Earth Observation System - definition phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, M.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of airborne and space observations to map surface heat fluxes and soil water content at heterogeneous land surfaces was studied. Algorithms to estimate evaporation fluxes with satellite observations were evaluated against measurements. Spatialcorrelation lengths were studied with estimated m

  9. Mesoscale climate hydrology: Earth Observation System - definition phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, M.; Bastiaanssen, W.G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The use of airborne and space observations to map surface heat fluxes and soil water content at heterogeneous land surfaces was studied. Algorithms to estimate evaporation fluxes with satellite observations were evaluated against measurements. Spatialcorrelation lengths were studied with estimated m

  10. Bridging the Gap between NASA Earth Observations and Decision Makers through the NASA DEVELOP National Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favors, J. E.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Rogers, L.; Allsbrook, K. N.; Ruiz, M. L.; Miller, T. N.; Crepps, G.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA DEVELOP National Program bridges the gap between NASA Earth Science and society by building capacity in both participants and partner organizations who collaborate to conduct projects. These rapid feasibility projects highlight the capabilities of satellite and aerial Earth observations to enhance decision making on a local level. DEVELOP partners with a wide variety of organizations, including state and local governments, federal agencies, regional entities, tribal governments, international organizations and governments, NGOs and private companies. Immersion of decision and policy makers in these feasibility projects increases awareness of the capabilities of Earth observations, and contributes to the tools and resources available to support enhanced decision making. This presentation will highlight best practices, feedback from project end-users, and case studies of successful adoption of methods in the decision making process.

  11. In-flight observations of electromagnetic interferences emitted by satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO JinBin; YANG JunYing; YUAN ShiGan; SHEN XuHui; LIU YuanMo; YAN ChunXiao; LI WenZhen; CHEN Tao

    2009-01-01

    Using the data from STAFF/TC-1, this paper for the first time analyzes the electromagnetic interferences of Chinese scientific satellite. The electromagnetic interference of satellite exists mainly below 30 Hz,but can extend to 190 Hz with an obviously decreasing power spectral density. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies below 190 Hz have good correlation with the solar aspect angle. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies between 190 and 830 Hz have also correlation with solar aspect angle. However, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies above 830 Hz have no correlation with the solar aspect angle. The correlation coefficient between solar aspect angel and electromagnetic interferences is around 0.90. The larger the solar aspect angle, the stronger the satellite electromagnetic interference. When the solar aspect angle increases from 90.6° to 93.6°, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies <10 Hz increase by 8 times and those at frequencies 190-830 Hz increase by 60%. This close association of electromagnetic interferences with the solar aspect angle indicates that the solar aspect angle is the main factor to determine the electromagnetic interferences.The electromagnetic interferences of satellite in sunlight are larger than those in eclipse. The electromagnetic interference produced by solar panel occupies about 87% in the low frequency bend (<100 Hz)and 94% in the high frequency band (>100 Hz) of the total electromagnetic interference produced by satellite. These in flight observations of electromagnetic radiation of satellites will be very helpful to the designs of future satellites of space sciences or earthquake sciences.

  12. In-flight observations of electromagnetic interferences emitted by satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using the data from STAFF/TC-1, this paper for the first time analyzes the electromagnetic interferences of Chinese scientific satellite. The electromagnetic interference of satellite exists mainly below 30 Hz, but can extend to 190 Hz with an obviously decreasing power spectral density. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies below 190 Hz have good correlation with the solar aspect angle. The electromagnetic interferences at frequencies between 190 and 830 Hz have also correlation with solar as-pect angle. However, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies above 830 Hz have no correlation with the solar aspect angle. The correlation coefficient between solar aspect angel and electromagnetic interferences is around 0.90. The larger the solar aspect angle, the stronger the satellite electromagnetic interference. When the solar aspect angle increases from 90.6° to 93.6°, the electromagnetic interferences at frequencies <10 Hz increase by 8 times and those at frequencies 190―830 Hz increase by 60%. This close association of electromagnetic interferences with the solar aspect angle indicates that the solar aspect angle is the main factor to determine the electromagnetic interferences. The electromagnetic interferences of satellite in sunlight are larger than those in eclipse. The electro-magnetic interference produced by solar panel occupies about 87% in the low frequency band (<100 Hz) and 94% in the high frequency band (>100 Hz) of the total electromagnetic interference produced by satellite. These in flight observations of electromagnetic radiation of satellites will be very helpful to the designs of future satellites of space sciences or earthquake sciences.

  13. Permanent GNSS Observations at Agh-Ust Satellite Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrys, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    GPS satellite observations at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering AGH-UST are conducted since the early 90s of the last century. In 2001, efforts have been made on getting permanently functioning GPS station. At present, observatory is EPN operational center for two GNSS stations KRAW and KRA1. Moreover, KRA1 station is one of fundamental control points in polish horizontal network. The article gives the history and scope of the research carried out in the satellite observatory AGH-UST during the period 2001 - 2015.

  14. Effects of Plasma Drag on Low Earth Orbiting Satellites due to Heating of Earth's Atmosphere by Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Nwankwo, Victor U J

    2013-01-01

    Solar events, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, heat up the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space environment. Due to this heating and expansion of the outer atmosphere by the energetic ultraviolet, X-ray and particles expelled from the sun, the low Earth-Orbiting satellites (LEOS) become vulnerable to an enhanced drag force by the ions and molecules of the expanded atmosphere. Out of various types of perturbations, Earth directed CMEs play the most significant role. They are more frequent and intense during the active (solar maximum) phase of the sun's approximately 11-year cycle. As we are approaching another solar maximum later in 2013, it may be instructive to analyse the effects of the past solar cycles on the orbiting satellites using the archival data of space environment parameters as indicators. In this paper, we compute the plasma drag on a model LEOS due to the atmospheric heating by CMEs and other solar events as a function of the solar parameters. Using the current forecast ...

  15. Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols Based on PARASOL and OMI Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Torres, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Accurate portrayal of the aerosol characteristics is crucial to determine aerosol contribution to the Earth's radiation budget. We employ novel satellite retrievals to make a new measurement-based estimate of the shortwave direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA), both over land and ocean. Global satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function from PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) are used in synergy with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) SSA. Aerosol information is combined with land-surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function and cloud characteristics from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite products. Eventual gaps in observations are filled with the state-of-the-art global aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM2. It is found that our estimate of DREA is largely insensitive to model choice. Radiative transfer calculations show that DREA at top-of-atmosphere is -4.6 +/- 1.5 W/sq m for cloud-free and -2.1 +/- 0.7 W/sq m for all-sky conditions, during year 2006. These fluxes are consistent with, albeit generally less negative over ocean than, former assessments. Unlike previous studies, our estimate is constrained by retrievals of global coverage SSA, which may justify different DREA values. Remarkable consistency is found in comparison with DREA based on CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and MODIS observations.

  16. Direct radiative effect of aerosols based on PARASOL and OMI satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Torres, Omar

    2017-02-01

    Accurate portrayal of the aerosol characteristics is crucial to determine aerosol contribution to the Earth's radiation budget. We employ novel satellite retrievals to make a new measurement-based estimate of the shortwave direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA), both over land and ocean. Global satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function from PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) are used in synergy with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) SSA. Aerosol information is combined with land-surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function and cloud characteristics from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite products. Eventual gaps in observations are filled with the state-of-the-art global aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM2. It is found that our estimate of DREA is largely insensitive to model choice. Radiative transfer calculations show that DREA at top-of-atmosphere is -4.6 ± 1.5 W/m2 for cloud-free and -2.1 ± 0.7 W/m2 for all-sky conditions, during year 2006. These fluxes are consistent with, albeit generally less negative over ocean than, former assessments. Unlike previous studies, our estimate is constrained by retrievals of global coverage SSA, which may justify different DREA values. Remarkable consistency is found in comparison with DREA based on CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and MODIS observations.

  17. Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols Based on PARASOL and OMI Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Torres, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Accurate portrayal of the aerosol characteristics is crucial to determine aerosol contribution to the Earth's radiation budget. We employ novel satellite retrievals to make a new measurement-based estimate of the shortwave direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA), both over land and ocean. Global satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function from PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) are used in synergy with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) SSA. Aerosol information is combined with land-surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function and cloud characteristics from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite products. Eventual gaps in observations are filled with the state-of-the-art global aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM2. It is found that our estimate of DREA is largely insensitive to model choice. Radiative transfer calculations show that DREA at top-of-atmosphere is -4.6 +/- 1.5 W/sq m for cloud-free and -2.1 +/- 0.7 W/sq m for all-sky conditions, during year 2006. These fluxes are consistent with, albeit generally less negative over ocean than, former assessments. Unlike previous studies, our estimate is constrained by retrievals of global coverage SSA, which may justify different DREA values. Remarkable consistency is found in comparison with DREA based on CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and MODIS observations.

  18. Conceptual Research of Lunar-based Earth Observation for Polar Glacier Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhixing; Liu, Guang; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    The ice flow velocity of glaciers is important for estimating the polar ice sheet mass balance, and it is of great significance for studies into rising sea level under the background of global warming. However so far the long-term and global measurements of these macro-scale motion processes of the polar glaciers have hardly been achieved by Earth Observation (EO) technique from the ground, aircraft or satellites in space. This paper, facing the demand for space technology for large-scale global environmental change observation,especially the changes of polar glaciers, and proposes a new concept involving setting up sensors on the lunar surface and using the Moon as a platform for Earth observation, transmitting the data back to Earth. Lunar-based Earth observation, which enables the Earth's large-scale, continuous, long-term dynamic motions to be measured, is expected to provide a new solution to the problems mentioned above. According to the pattern and characteristics of polar glaciers motion, we will propose a comprehensive investigation of Lunar-based Earth observation with synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Via theoretical modeling and experimental simulation inversion, intensive studies of Lunar-based Earth observation for the glacier motions in the polar regions will be implemented, including the InSAR basics theory, observation modes of InSAR and optimization methods of their key parameters. It will be of a great help to creatively expand the EO technique system from space. In addition, they will contribute to establishing the theoretical foundation for the realization of the global, long-term and continuous observation for the glacier motion phenomena in the Antarctic and the Arctic.

  19. Sensor system for Greenhouse Gas Observing Satellite (GOSAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Takashi; Kuze, Akihiko; Kondo, Kayoko

    2004-11-01

    Global warming has become a very serious issue for human beings. In 1997, the Kyoto Protocol was adopted at the Third Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP3), making it mandatory for developed nations to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by six (6) to eight (8) per cent of their total emissions in 1990, and to meet this goal sometime between 2008 and 2012. The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is design to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) from orbit. GOSAT is a joint project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Ministry of Environment (MOE), and the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). JAXA is responsible for the satellite and instrument development, MOE is involved in the instrument development, and NIES is responsible for the satellite data retrieval. The satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2008. In order to detect the CO2 variation of boundary layers, both the technique to measure the column density and the retrieval algorithm to remove cloud and aerosol contamination are investigated. Main mission sensor of the GOSAT is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with high optical throughput, spectral resolution and wide spectral coverage, and a cloud-aerosol detecting imager attached to the satellite. The paper presents the mission sensor system of the GOSAT together with the results of performance demonstration with proto-type instrument aboard an aircraft.

  20. An Information Architect's View of Earth Observations for Disaster Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, K.; Evans, J. D.; Cappelaere, P. G.; Frye, S. W.; Mandl, D.; Dobbs, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations play a significant role in supporting disaster response and risk management, however data complexity is a barrier to broader use especially by the public. In December 2013 the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Working Group on Information Systems and Services documented a high-level reference model for the use of Earth observation satellites and associated products to support disaster risk management within the Global Earth Observation System of Systems context. The enterprise architecture identified the important role of user access to all key functions supporting situational awareness and decision-making. This paper focuses on the need to develop actionable information products from these Earth observations to simplify the discovery, access and use of tailored products. To this end, our team has developed an Open GeoSocial API proof-of-concept for GEOSS. We envision public access to mobile apps available on smart phones using common browsers where users can set up a profile and specify a region of interest for monitoring events such as floods and landslides. Information about susceptibility and weather forecasts about flood risks can be accessed. Users can generate geo-located information and photos of local events, and these can be shared on social media. The information architecture can address usability challenges to transform sensor data into actionable information, based on the terminology of the emergency management community responsible for informing the public. This paper describes the approach to collecting relevant material from the disasters and risk management community to address the end user needs for information. The resulting information architecture addresses the structural design of the shared information in the disasters and risk management enterprise. Key challenges are organizing and labeling information to support both online user communities and machine-to-machine processing for automated product generation.

  1. Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center's Earth as Art Image Gallery 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center manages this collection of forty-five new scenes developed for their aesthetic beauty, rather than for...

  2. Alien Earth: Glint observations of a remote planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Richard K.; Deming, L. Drake

    2011-11-01

    We give a preliminary report on a multi-wavelength study of specular reflections from the oceans and clouds of Earth. We use space-borne observations from a distance sufficient to ensure that light rays reflected from all parts of Earth are closely parallel, as they will be when studying exoplanets. We find that the glint properties of Earth in this far-field vantage point are surprising - in the sense that some of the brightest reflections are not from conventional ocean-glints, but appear to arise from cirrus cloud crystals. The Earth observations discussed here were acquired with the High Resolution Instrument (HRI) - a 0.3 m f/35 telescope on the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft during the Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization (EPOCh) investigation.

  3. DEMETER Satellite Observations of Particle Burst Prior to Chile Earthquake

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhenxia; Shen, Xuhui; Ma, Yuqian; Chen, Huaran; You, Xinzhao; Yuan, Yahong

    2010-01-01

    The lithosphere activity during seismogenic or occurrence of one earthquake may emit electromagnetic wave which propagate to ionosphere and radiation belt, then induce disturbance of electric and magnetic field and the precipitation of high energy charged particles. This paper, based on the data detected by DEMETER satellite, present the high energy charged particle burst(PB) with 4 to 6 times enhancement over the average value observed about ten days days before Chile earthquake. The obvious particle burst was also observed in the northern hemisphere mirror points conjugate of epicenter and no PB events in different years over the same epicenter region was found. The energy spectra of the PBs are different from the one averaged within the first three months in 2010. At the same time, the disturbance of the VLF electric spectrum in ionosphere over the epicenter detected by the DEMETER satellite are also observed in the same two orbits. Those observations from energetic PB and VLF electric spectrum disturbance...

  4. GEOCAB Portal: A gateway for discovering and accessing capacity building resources in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desconnets, Jean-Christophe; Giuliani, Gregory; Guigoz, Yaniss; Lacroix, Pierre; Mlisa, Andiswa; Noort, Mark; Ray, Nicolas; Searby, Nancy D.

    2017-02-01

    The discovery of and access to capacity building resources are often essential to conduct environmental projects based on Earth Observation (EO) resources, whether they are Earth Observation products, methodological tools, techniques, organizations that impart training in these techniques or even projects that have shown practical achievements. Recognizing this opportunity and need, the European Commission through two FP7 projects jointly with the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) teamed up with the Committee on Earth observation Satellites (CEOS). The Global Earth Observation CApacity Building (GEOCAB) portal aims at compiling all current capacity building efforts on the use of EO data for societal benefits into an easily updateable and user-friendly portal. GEOCAB offers a faceted search to improve user discovery experience with a fully interactive world map with all inventoried projects and activities. This paper focuses on the conceptual framework used to implement the underlying platform. An ISO19115 metadata model associated with a terminological repository are the core elements that provide a semantic search application and an interoperable discovery service. The organization and the contribution of different user communities to ensure the management and the update of the content of GEOCAB are addressed.

  5. Applications of a Networked Array of Small Satellites for Planetary Observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunter, B.C.; Maessen, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to explore those applications which can best utilize a network of orbiting satellites working as a distributed computing array. The satellites are presumed to be low-cost mini- or micro-satellites orbiting Earth or some other celestial body (i.e., an asteroid, moon, etc.),

  6. Applications of a Networked Array of Small Satellites for Planetary Observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunter, B.C.; Maessen, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to explore those applications which can best utilize a network of orbiting satellites working as a distributed computing array. The satellites are presumed to be low-cost mini- or micro-satellites orbiting Earth or some other celestial body (i.e., an asteroid, moon, etc.),

  7. Whistler-triggered emissions observed by ISIS satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.; Ondoh, T.

    1989-01-01

    A statistical examination has been conducted of the ducted and nonducted whistler-triggered emissions (WTEs) observed by the ISIS satellites in the 1979-1981 period. Most WTEs are observed with simultaneous lower hybrid resonance in the topside ionosphere. The VLF emissions triggered by ducted whistlers frequently occur at L of 2-3, while those triggered by nonducted whistlers occur in the wider latitudinal regions at L of 2.2-4.3.

  8. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  9. Automated Astrometric Analysis of Satellite Observations using Wide-field Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuljan, J.; Kay, J.

    2016-09-01

    An observational trial was conducted in the South Island of New Zealand from 24 to 28 February 2015, as a collaborative effort between the United Kingdom and New Zealand in the area of space situational awareness. The aim of the trial was to observe a number of satellites in low Earth orbit using wide-field imaging from two separate locations, in order to determine the space trajectory and compare the measurements with the predictions based on the standard two-line elements. This activity was an initial step in building a space situational awareness capability at the Defence Technology Agency of the New Zealand Defence Force. New Zealand has an important strategic position as the last land mass that many satellites selected for deorbiting pass before entering the Earth's atmosphere over the dedicated disposal area in the South Pacific. A preliminary analysis of the trial data has demonstrated that relatively inexpensive equipment can be used to successfully detect satellites at moderate altitudes. A total of 60 satellite passes were observed over the five nights of observation and about 2600 images were collected. A combination of cooled CCD and standard DSLR cameras were used, with a selection of lenses between 17 mm and 50 mm in focal length, covering a relatively wide field of view of 25 to 60 degrees. The CCD cameras were equipped with custom-made GPS modules to record the time of exposure with a high accuracy of one millisecond, or better. Specialised software has been developed for automated astrometric analysis of the trial data. The astrometric solution is obtained as a two-dimensional least-squares polynomial fit to the measured pixel positions of a large number of stars (typically 1000) detected across the image. The star identification is fully automated and works well for all camera-lens combinations used in the trial. A moderate polynomial degree of 3 to 5 is selected to take into account any image distortions introduced by the lens. A typical RMS

  10. Processing Earth Observing images with Ames Stereo Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, R. A.; Moratto, Z. M.; Alexandrov, O.; Fong, T.; Shean, D. E.; Smith, B. E.

    2013-12-01

    ICESat with its GLAS instrument provided valuable elevation measurements of glaciers. The loss of this spacecraft caused a demand for alternative elevation sources. In response to that, we have improved our Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) software (version 2.1+) to ingest satellite imagery from Earth satellite sources in addition to its support of planetary missions. This enables the open source community a free method to generate digital elevation models (DEM) from Digital Globe stereo imagery and alternatively other cameras using RPC camera models. Here we present details of the software. ASP is a collection of utilities written in C++ and Python that implement stereogrammetry. It contains utilities to manipulate DEMs, project imagery, create KML image quad-trees, and perform simplistic 3D rendering. However its primary application is the creation of DEMs. This is achieved by matching every pixel between the images of a stereo observation via a hierarchical coarse-to-fine template matching method. Matched pixels between images represent a single feature that is triangulated using each image's camera model. The collection of triangulated features represents a point cloud that is then grid resampled to create a DEM. In order for ASP to match pixels/features between images, it requires a search range defined in pixel units. Total processing time is proportional to the area of the first image being matched multiplied by the area of the search range. An incorrect search range for ASP causes repeated false positive matches at each level of the image pyramid and causes excessive processing times with no valid DEM output. Therefore our system contains automatic methods for deducing what the correct search range should be. In addition, we provide options for reducing the overall search range by applying affine epipolar rectification, homography transform, or by map projecting against a prior existing low resolution DEM. Depending on the size of the images, parallax, and image

  11. Space Network IP Services (SNIS): An Architecture for Supporting Low Earth Orbiting IP Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, David J.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Space Network (SN) supports a variety of missions using the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), which includes ground stations in White Sands, New Mexico and Guam. A Space Network IP Services (SNIS) architecture is being developed to support future users with requirements for end-to-end Internet Protocol (IP) communications. This architecture will support all IP protocols, including Mobile IP, over TDRSS Single Access, Multiple Access, and Demand Access Radio Frequency (RF) links. This paper will describe this architecture and how it can enable Low Earth Orbiting IP satellite missions.

  12. Heavy precipitation retrieval from combined satellite observations and ground-based lightning measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugnai, A.; Dietrich, S.; Casella, D.; di Paola, F.; Formenton, M.; Sanò, P.

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a series of algorithms for the retrieval of precipitation (especially, heavy precipitation) over the Mediterranean area using satellite observations from the available microwave (MW) radiometers onboard low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and from the visible-infrared (VIS-IR) SEVIRI radiometer onboard the European geosynchronous (GEO) satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG), in conjunction with lightning data from ground-based networks - such as ZEUS and LINET. These are: • A new approach for precipitation retrieval from space (which we call the Cloud Dynamics and Radiation Database approach, CDRD) that incorporates lightning and environmental/dynamical information in addition to the upwelling microwave brightness temperatures (TB’s) so as to reduce the retrieval uncertainty and improve the retrieval performance; • A new combined MW-IR technique for producing frequent precipitation retrievals from space (which we call PM-GCD technique), that uses passive-microwave (PM) retrievals in conjunction with lightning information and the Global Convection Detection (GCD) technique to discriminate deep convective clouds within the GEO observations; • A new morphing approach (which we call the Lightning-based Precipitation Evolving Technique, L-PET) that uses the available lightning measurements for propagating the rainfall estimates from satellite-borne MW radiometers to a much higher time resolution than the MW observations. We will present and discuss our combined MW/IR/lightning precipitation algorithms and analyses with special reference to some case studies over the western Mediterranean.

  13. Mapping Surface Broadband Albedo from Satellite Observations: A Review of Literatures on Algorithms and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo is one of the key controlling geophysical parameters in the surface energy budget studies, and its temporal and spatial variation is closely related to the global climate change and regional weather system due to the albedo feedback mechanism. As an efficient tool for monitoring the surfaces of the Earth, remote sensing is widely used for deriving long-term surface broadband albedo with various geostationary and polar-orbit satellite platforms in recent decades. Moreover, the algorithms for estimating surface broadband albedo from satellite observations, including narrow-to-broadband conversions, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF angular modeling, direct-estimation algorithm and the algorithms for estimating albedo from geostationary satellite data, are developed and improved. In this paper, we present a comprehensive literature review on algorithms and products for mapping surface broadband albedo with satellite observations and provide a discussion of different algorithms and products in a historical perspective based on citation analysis of the published literature. This paper shows that the observation technologies and accuracy requirement of applications are important, and long-term, global fully-covered (including land, ocean, and sea-ice surfaces, gap-free, surface broadband albedo products with higher spatial and temporal resolution are required for climate change, surface energy budget, and hydrological studies.

  14. The Matsu Wheel: A Cloud-Based Framework for Efficient Analysis and Reanalysis of Earth Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Maria T.; Anderson, Nicholas; Bennett, Collin; Bruggemann, Jacob; Grossman, Robert L.; Handy, Matthew; Ly, Vuong; Mandl, Daniel J.; Pederson, Shane; Pivarski, James; hide

    2016-01-01

    Project Matsu is a collaboration between the Open Commons Consortium and NASA focused on developing open source technology for cloud-based processing of Earth satellite imagery with practical applications to aid in natural disaster detection and relief. Project Matsu has developed an open source cloud-based infrastructure to process, analyze, and reanalyze large collections of hyperspectral satellite image data using OpenStack, Hadoop, MapReduce and related technologies. We describe a framework for efficient analysis of large amounts of data called the Matsu "Wheel." The Matsu Wheel is currently used to process incoming hyperspectral satellite data produced daily by NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. The framework allows batches of analytics, scanning for new data, to be applied to data as it flows in. In the Matsu Wheel, the data only need to be accessed and preprocessed once, regardless of the number or types of analytics, which can easily be slotted into the existing framework. The Matsu Wheel system provides a significantly more efficient use of computational resources over alternative methods when the data are large, have high-volume throughput, may require heavy preprocessing, and are typically used for many types of analysis. We also describe our preliminary Wheel analytics, including an anomaly detector for rare spectral signatures or thermal anomalies in hyperspectral data and a land cover classifier that can be used for water and flood detection. Each of these analytics can generate visual reports accessible via the web for the public and interested decision makers. The result products of the analytics are also made accessible through an Open Geospatial Compliant (OGC)-compliant Web Map Service (WMS) for further distribution. The Matsu Wheel allows many shared data services to be performed together to efficiently use resources for processing hyperspectral satellite image data and other, e.g., large environmental datasets that may be analyzed for

  15. Tracking Low Earth Orbit Small Debris with GPS Satellites as Bistatic Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M.; Qaisar, S.; Benson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Space debris is a growing problem and collisions are potentially lethal to satellites. Trajectories for small objects are predicted based on infrequent measurements, and the scale and therefore cost of maneuver required to avoid collisions is a function of trajectory accuracy. Frequent and precise observations will improve trajectory accuracy. In this paper, we extend on aspects of the feasibility of tracking space debris in Low Earth Orbit using emissions from GNSS satellites as bistatic radar illuminators. The wavelengths of GNSS signals are of order 20 cm and our primary focus is to track debris smaller than this, thereby maintaining phase stability of the scattered signals, enabling very long coherent processing intervals. However, the signals scattered by debris will be very weak at a terrestrial receiver, requiring the computationally expensive integration of a large number of signals, over an extended duration and with a large phased array. Detection of such weak signals in the presence of relatively strong direct-arrival signals requires extremely high cross-correlation protection. We show that sufficient cross-correlation protection can be obtained due to the large and varying Doppler shift, and also illustrate a novel processing approach utilizing downshifting of the collected signal to audio frequency. This technique dramatically reduces the cost and complexity of updating debris trajectories. The processing cost of preserving an uncertainty volume of many hundreds of meters around the predicted debris track is very modest, and searching within that uncertainty volume is undertaken at audio sampling rates. Moreover, we explore techniques that further lower the already modest cost of the non-linear search within the preserved uncertainty volume. We conclude with an outline of a system using these techniques that could provide centimetre level tracking of large quantities of small orbital objects at a modest cost.

  16. The ESA Polar Platform: A work-horse for future Earth Observation Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibaldi, G. G.; Cendral, J. L.

    1993-09-01

    In the frame of the European Space Agency (ESA) Long Term Plan, the Earth Observation Missions play a very important role in contributing to a better knowledge and monitoring of the Earth Environment. Within the range of future Earth Observation missions, the low altitude sun synchronous polar orbit is of special interest because it offers a repeated coverage of the complete surface of the Earth. For this type of mission, a large number of instruments having different technology and application objectives have been developed or are under development in Europe. To cope with those needs, ESA has initiated the development of the Polar Platform as part of its infrastructure to become the work-horse of future Earth Observation Missions in the Polar orbits. This spacecraft bus, through its design modularity, can cope with a wide range of payload complements and instrument requirements so that the future development emphasis in Europe can be placed on payload and observations rather than repeated satellite developments. The Polar Platform design makes maximum use of the SPOT and ERS programmes experience and design in order to reduce development risk and minimize costs. The modular design can cope with different payload accommodation, power and mass requirements as well as different orbit altitudes. The development is well advanced and is now well into the detailed design and development programme, with components and long lead hardware procurement already initiated. The development of the payload complement for the first mission has been initiated in parallel via the POEM-1 Programme. The Polar Platform will also make use of the other ESA's future infrastructure, such as the Ariane 5 Launcher as well as the Data Relay Satellite System in order to ensure global coverage of observations. The launch of the first ESA Polar Platform Mission carrying the POEM-1 Mission is planned for mid-1988. The performance requirements, design and status of development of the Polar Platform

  17. Enhancing Earth Observation and Modeling for Tsunami Disaster Response and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimura, Shunichi; Post, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    In the aftermath of catastrophic natural disasters, such as earthquakes and tsunamis, our society has experienced significant difficulties in assessing disaster impact in the limited amount of time. In recent years, the quality of satellite sensors and access to and use of satellite imagery and services has greatly improved. More and more space agencies have embraced data-sharing policies that facilitate access to archived and up-to-date imagery. Tremendous progress has been achieved through the continuous development of powerful algorithms and software packages to manage and process geospatial data and to disseminate imagery and geospatial datasets in near-real time via geo-web-services, which can be used in disaster-risk management and emergency response efforts. Satellite Earth observations now offer consistent coverage and scope to provide a synoptic overview of large areas, repeated regularly. These can be used to compare risk across different countries, day and night, in all weather conditions, and in trans-boundary areas. On the other hand, with use of modern computing power and advanced sensor networks, the great advances of real-time simulation have been achieved. The data and information derived from satellite Earth observations, integrated with in situ information and simulation modeling provides unique value and the necessary complement to socio-economic data. Emphasis also needs to be placed on ensuring space-based data and information are used in existing and planned national and local disaster risk management systems, together with other data and information sources as a way to strengthen the resilience of communities. Through the case studies of the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami disaster, we aim to discuss how earth observations and modeling, in combination with local, in situ data and information sources, can support the decision-making process before, during and after a disaster strikes.

  18. Detection of Ocean Glint and Ozone Absorption Using LCROSS Earth Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D; Meadows, Victoria S; Sparks, William; Bussey, D Ben J; Schwieterman, Edward W; Breiner, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) observed the distant Earth on three occasions in 2009. These data span a range of phase angles, including a rare crescent phase view. For each epoch, the satellite acquired near-infrared and mid-infrared full-disk images, and partial-disk spectra at 0.26-0.65 microns (R~500) and 1.17-2.48 microns (R~50). Spectra show strong absorption features due to water vapor and ozone, which is a biosignature gas. We perform a significant recalibration of the UV-visible spectra and provide the first comparison of high-resolution visible Earth spectra to the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional spectral Earth model. We find good agreement with the observations, reproducing the absolute brightness and dynamic range at all wavelengths for all observation epochs, thus validating the model to within the ~10% data calibration uncertainty. Data-model comparisons reveal a strong ocean glint signature in the crescent phase dataset, ...

  19. Observing Outer Planet Satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science Justification and Observational Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Keszthelyi, Laszlo; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  20. Observing outer planet satellites (except Titan) with JWST: Science justification and observational requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestay, Laszlo P.; Grundy, Will; Stansberry, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Thatte, Deepashri; Gudipati, Murthy; Tsang, Constantine; Greenbaum, Alexandra; McGruder, Chima

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will allow observations with a unique combination of spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for the study of outer planet satellites within our Solar System. We highlight the infrared spectroscopy of icy moons and temporal changes on geologically active satellites as two particularly valuable avenues of scientific inquiry. While some care must be taken to avoid saturation issues, JWST has observation modes that should provide excellent infrared data for such studies.

  1. Periodic components of the atmospheric drag of Earth artificial satellites and their dependence on the state of space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komendant, Volodymyr; Koshkin, Nikolay; Ryabov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Based on the accumulated in the University Observatory extensive database of evolving orbital elements of low-orbit satellites, the behavior of the parameterwas studied, which characterizes their drag in the atmosphere of the Earth. The time spectra structure of drag of 25 artificial satellites is being studied by applying various methods of spectral analysis. Fifteen artificial satellites with circular orbits and ten artificial satellites with elliptical orbits are studied. The processed information includes ten years of observations that covers: declining and minimum phases of 23 ^{rd}(2005-2008) solar cycle; phases of rise and maximum of 24th(2009-2014) solar cycle. Time-frequency analysis of solar and geomagnetic activity indexes has been conducted. These indexes are: W - Wolf numbers; Sp - the total area of sunspot groups of the northern and southern hemispheres of the Sun, F10.7 - the solar radio flux at 10,7 cm; E - electron flux with energies more than 0,6 MeV i 2 MeV; planetary, high latitude and middle latitude geomagnetic index Ap. Periodograms of satellite's drag data, solar and geomagnetic activity indexes were constructed. In the atmospheric drag dynamics of satellites,the following periodswere detected: 6-year, 2.1-year, annual, semi-annual, 27-days, 13- and 11-days. Similar periods are identified in indexes of solar and geomagnetic activity. The ratios of the amplitudes of the spectral power of these periods vary in different phases of the solar cycle. The tables of the main periods in the drag of the artificial satellites and the main periods in the solar and geomagnetic activity indexes were obtained with the help of spectrograms. Their presence in certain phases of the solar cycle was researched. The calculation of multiple correlation' models of the orbital parameter characterizing the drag of satellites on various orbits, depending on the basic parameters of space weather has been done. These results have practical application for models

  2. Analysis of visibility simulation of three polar regions from lunar-based earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hanlin; Liu, Guang; Ren, Yuanzhen; Guo, Huadong; Ding, Yixing

    2016-07-01

    Global environment change has caught the attention of many scientists around the world. The Arctic, Antarctic and Tibet Plateau are known as the three polar regions. They are the world's largest storage of cold and carbon which are the sensitive regions of global environment change. These three regions have significant impacts on the global environment change. It is extremely obvious that the environment change of these three regions is one of the major factors of global environment change. The special geographical positions of these three regions have great influence on the local climate and ecological environment that caused the climate is very bad and few people can get there, so there is very little observation data exists. In addition, these three regions have large scale and long-term observation characteristics. Since the meaning of remote sensing technology came out, we have developed airborne and space-borne Earth observation system. However, when taking three polar regions for researching, we will have to face the problems of temporal coherence and spatial continuity in the global scale, which challenges the Earth observation on the satellite and airborne platform. Moon is the unique natural satellite of the Earth, which always has one side facing it, with the advantages of large coverage, long-life platform, stable geological structure and multi-spheres three-dimensional detecting, turning out to be the ideal platform for observing three polar regions. At present and in the near future, the study of Earth observation data from a lunar observatory would be difficult to carry out, so a simulation is used in this paper to analyze the visibility of three polar regions. At first, we discuss the motion pattern of the Sun-Earth-Moon system. Then we construct a simulation system with simulated optical sensors setting up at different places on the Moon, finding that sunlight has great influence on optical observation. The visible region of a lunar-based optical

  3. Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) International Directory Portal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CEOS IDN is an international effort developed to assist researchers in locating information on available datasets and services. The directory is sponsored as a...

  4. Assessment of radiative feedback in climate models using satellite observations of annual flux variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Yoko; Manabe, Syukuro

    2013-05-07

    In the climate system, two types of radiative feedback are in operation. The feedback of the first kind involves the radiative damping of the vertically uniform temperature perturbation of the troposphere and Earth's surface that approximately follows the Stefan-Boltzmann law of blackbody radiation. The second kind involves the change in the vertical lapse rate of temperature, water vapor, and clouds in the troposphere and albedo of the Earth's surface. Using satellite observations of the annual variation of the outgoing flux of longwave radiation and that of reflected solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere, this study estimates the so-called "gain factor," which characterizes the strength of radiative feedback of the second kind that operates on the annually varying, global-scale perturbation of temperature at the Earth's surface. The gain factor is computed not only for all sky but also for clear sky. The gain factor of so-called "cloud radiative forcing" is then computed as the difference between the two. The gain factors thus obtained are compared with those obtained from 35 models that were used for the fourth and fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment. Here, we show that the gain factors obtained from satellite observations of cloud radiative forcing are effective for identifying systematic biases of the feedback processes that control the sensitivity of simulated climate, providing useful information for validating and improving a climate model.

  5. Sampling Errors of Monthly-mean Radiative Fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, T. Dale; Wong, Takmeng; Smith, G. Louis

    2002-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Experiment (ERBE) consisted of scanning and non-scanning radiometers on the dedicated Earth Radiation Budget Satellite ERBS) and also on the NOAA-9 and -10 operational spacecraft. The non-scanning radiometers included a pair of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometers for measuring outgoing longwave radiation and reflected solar radiation (Luther et al., 1986). The ERBS was placed into an orbit with 57 deg. inclination and 620 km altitude on 16 October 1984. The instruments began collecting data in November 1984 and the non-scanning radiometers provided data until June 2002, providing a 17-year data set.

  6. EarthObserver: Bringing the world to your fingertips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, W. B.; Goodwillie, A. M.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Ferrini, V.; O'hara, S. H.; Chan, S.; Bonczkowski, J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Morton, J. J.; McLain, K.; Weissel, R.

    2011-12-01

    EarthObserver (http://www.earth-observer.org/), developed by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, brings a wealth of geoscience data to Apple iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch mobile devices. Built around an easy-to-use interface, EarthObserver allows users to explore and visualise a wide range of data sets superimposed upon a detailed base map of land elevations and ocean depths - tapping the screen will instantly return the height or depth at that point. A simple transparency function allows direct comparison of built-in content. Data sets include high-resolution coastal bathymetry of bays, sounds, estuaries, harbors and rivers; geological maps of the US states and world - tapping the screen displays the rock type, and full legends can be viewed; US Topo sheets; and, geophysical content including seafloor crustal age and sediment thickness, earthquake and volcano data, gravity and magnetic anomalies, and plate boundary descriptions. The names of physiographic features are automatically displayed. NASA Visible Earth images along with ocean temperature, salinity and productivity maps and precipitation information expose data sets of interest to the atmospheric, oceanic and biological communities. Natural hazard maps, population information and political boundaries allow users to explore impacts upon society. EarthObserver, so far downloaded by more than 55,000 users, offers myriad ways for educators at all levels to bring research-quality geoscience data into the learning environment, whether for use as an in-class illustration or for extensive exploration of earth sciences data. By using cutting-edge mobile app technology, EarthObserver boosts access to relevant earth science content. The EarthObserver base map is the Global Multi-Resolution Topography digital elevation model (GMRT; http://www.marine-geo.org/portals/gmrt/), also developed at LDEO and updated regularly. It provides land elevations with horizontal resolution as high as 10m for

  7. Solar and lunar observation planning for Earth-observing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Xiong, X.

    2011-11-01

    MODIS on-orbit calibration activities include the use of the on-board solar diffuser (SD), SD stability monitor (SDSM) and regularly scheduled lunar observations for the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) radiometric calibration. Normally, the SD door is closed when there is no SD/SDSM observation to avoid the unnecessary illumination of the sunlight on the SD, which causes the SD degradation. The SD is illuminated over a very short period of time when the spacecraft crosses from the night side to the day side. To implement a SD/SDSM calibration, the SD door needs to be open and the SDSM needs to be turned on during the short period of time when the SD is illuminated. A planning tool is needed to predict the exact times for the opening and closing of SD door and SDSM on/off operations of SDSM for each SD/SDSM calibration. The tool is also needed for MODIS yaw maneuvers implemented for SD bi-direction reflectance factor (BRF) validation and SD screen vignetting function (VF) derivation. MODIS observes the Moon through its space view (SV) port. To increase the opportunity for more lunar observations and to keep the lunar phase angle in a selected narrow range that minimizes the view geometric effect on the observed lunar irradiance, a spacecraft roll maneuver is allowed and implemented for MODIS lunar observations. A lunar observation planning tool is required to predict the time and roll angle needed for each lunar observation in the selected phase angle range. The tool is also needed to determine the phase angle range such that the MODIS can view the Moon in as many months as possible each year with the phase angle in the range. The MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) is responsible for MODIS instrument operation and calibration. We have developed a set of tools to address these needs and have successfully applied them to both Terra and Aqua MODIS. In this paper, we describe the design methodologies and the implementation of the tools. The tools have also been

  8. Satellite microwave observations of a storm complex: A comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The hypothesis that cold events correspond to a particular stage in a class of thunderstorms was tested. That class is a storms class which updrafts are: (1) strong, broad and moist, and (2) extend well above the freezing level. Condition (1) implies strong mesoscale forcing. Condition (2) implies a tall updraft or a relatively low freezing level. Such storms should have big, intense radar echoes and cold, fast-growing anvils. The thunderstorm events were analyzed by radar, rain gauge and GOES infrared observations. Radar was the starting point for detection and definition of the hypothesized thunderstorms. The radar signature is compared to the signature of the storm in rain gauge observations, satellite infrared images and satellite microwave images.

  9. Daily Emission Estimates in China Constrained by Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. We present a new algorithm specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a mesoscopic scale (~25Å~25 km2). The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates of East China, using the CHIMERE model on a 0.25 degree resolution together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments.

  10. Conjunction Risks of Near-Earth Objects to Artificial Satellites: The Case of Asteroid 2015 VY105

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, W.; Ryan, E.

    2016-09-01

    The close approach of near-Earth object 2015 VY105 on November 15, 2015 occurred less than 24 hours after discovery by the Catalina Sky Survey (located in Tucson, AZ). Based on the discovery metric information and follow up data from Magdalena Ridge Observatory (MRO) observations, it was clear that this asteroid would pass through the geostationary satellite belt. In particular, data indicated that although 2015 VY105 would come within approximately 200 km of the DirectTV 11 and 14 satellites, it would not impact either. The details of this analysis as well as characterization results acquired are presented. Further, examples of various other asteroids that have made close approaches within geostationary distances in the past (with both long and short lead times) are included for risk context.

  11. Detection of ocean glint and ozone absorption using LCROSS Earth observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Tyler D. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ennico, Kimberly [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Meadows, Victoria S.; Sparks, William; Schwieterman, Edward W. [NASA Astrobiology Institute' s Virtual Planetary Laboratory, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bussey, D. Ben J. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 17-1, Moffett Field, CA 94089, USA Now the NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute. (United States); Breiner, Jonathan, E-mail: tyler.d.robinson@nasa.gov [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) observed the distant Earth on three occasions in 2009. These data span a range of phase angles, including a rare crescent phase view. For each epoch, the satellite acquired near-infrared and mid-infrared full-disk images, and partial-disk spectra at 0.26-0.65 μm (λ/Δλ ∼ 500) and 1.17-2.48 μm (λ/Δλ ∼ 50). Spectra show strong absorption features due to water vapor and ozone, which is a biosignature gas. We perform a significant recalibration of the UV-visible spectra and provide the first comparison of high-resolution visible Earth spectra to the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional spectral Earth model. We find good agreement with the observations, reproducing the absolute brightness and dynamic range at all wavelengths for all observation epochs, thus validating the model to within the ∼10% data calibration uncertainty. Data-model comparisons reveal a strong ocean glint signature in the crescent phase data set, which is well matched by our model predictions throughout the observed wavelength range. This provides the first observational test of a technique that could be used to determine exoplanet habitability from disk-integrated observations at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, where the glint signal is strongest. We examine the detection of the ozone 255 nm Hartley and 400-700 nm Chappuis bands. While the Hartley band is the strongest ozone feature in Earth's spectrum, false positives for its detection could exist. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for future exoplanet characterization missions.

  12. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report 4: Low cost management approach and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of low cost management approaches for the development of the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) is presented. The factors of the program which tend to increase costs are identified. The NASA/Industry interface is stressed to show how the interface can be improved to produce reduced program costs. Techniques and examples of cost reduction which can be applied to the EOS program are tabulated. Specific recommendations for actions to be taken to reduce costs in prescribed areas are submitted.

  13. Earth Observatory Satellite system definition study. Report no. 4: Management approach recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A management approach for the Earth Observatory Satellite (EOS) which will meet the challenge of a constrained cost environment is presented. Areas of consideration are contracting techniques, test philosophy, reliability and quality assurance requirements, commonality options, and documentation and control requirements. The various functional areas which were examined for cost reduction possibilities are identified. The recommended management approach is developed to show the primary and alternative methods.

  14. Satellite Observed Environmental Changes over the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsin Tseng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We use satellite observed and model atmospheric variables, including land surface temperature, snowfall, snow extent, precipitation, and water vapor contents to study the feasibility of quantifying anthropogenic climate change over high elevation areas such as the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Five types of satellite data and outputs from Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCMs are used to study these climate change indicators: (1 AIRS/AMSU/HSB atmospheric sounding system onboard the Aqua platform, 2003 ~ 2009, (2 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS onboard Terra, 2001 ~ 2009, (3 The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM precipitation measurements, 1999 ~ 2009, (4 the ERA-interim (ECMWF Interim Reanalysis, 1989 ~ 2009, and (5 the Japanese 25-year Reanalysis Project (JRA-25 AGCM data, 1979 ~ 2009. We find that biases exist between temperature observations and model data 0.29 ~ _ AIRS and JRA-25, respectively. The trends for each of the atmospheric variables at best have a qualitative agreement, presumably because the data spans of satellite observations are too short (7 ~ 10 years. The temperature trends for 4000 ~ 5000 m over the Plateau are estimated to be 0.01 ~ _ yr-1, qualitatively agreeing with the published rate of _ decade-1 over the last three decades using in situ data.

  15. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Delivering on the Dream, Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Johnson, Patricia; Case, Warren F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the successful operations of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites over the past 10 years and the plans for the future. Excellent operations performance has been a key factor in the overall success of EOS. The EOS Program was conceived in the 1980s and began to take shape in the early 1990s. EOS consists of a series of satellites that study the Earth as an interrelated system. It began with the launch of Terra in December 1999, followed by Aqua in May 2002, and Aura in July 2004. A key EOS goal is to provide a long-term continuous data set to enable the science community to develop a better understanding of land, ocean, and atmospheric processes and their interactions. EOS has produced unprecedented amounts of data which are used all over the world free of charge. Mission operations have resulted in data recovery for Terra, Aqua, and Aura that have consistently exceeded mission requirements. The paper describes the ground systems and organizations that control the EOS satellites, capture the raw data, and distribute the processed science data sets. The paper further describes how operations have evolved since 1999. Examples of this evolution include (a) the implementation of new mission safety requirements for orbital debris monitoring; (b) technology upgrades to keep facilities at the state of the art; (c) enhancements to meet changing security requirements; and (d) operations management of the 2 international Earth Observing Constellations of 11 satellites known as the "Morning Constellation" and the "A-Train". The paper concludes with a view into the future based on the latest spacecraft status, lifetime projections, and mission plans.

  16. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS): Delivering on the Dream, Today and Tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Angelita C.; Johnson, Patricia; Case, Warren F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the successful operations of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites over the past 10 years and the plans for the future. Excellent operations performance has been a key factor in the overall success of EOS. The EOS Program was conceived in the 1980s and began to take shape in the early 1990s. EOS consists of a series of satellites that study the Earth as an interrelated system. It began with the launch of Terra in December 1999, followed by Aqua in May 2002, and Aura in July 2004. A key EOS goal is to provide a long-term continuous data set to enable the science community to develop a better understanding of land, ocean, and atmospheric processes and their interactions. EOS has produced unprecedented amounts of data which are used all over the world free of charge. Mission operations have resulted in data recovery for Terra, Aqua, and Aura that have consistently exceeded mission requirements. The paper describes the ground systems and organizations that control the EOS satellites, capture the raw data, and distribute the processed science data sets. The paper further describes how operations have evolved since 1999. Examples of this evolution include (a) the implementation of new mission safety requirements for orbital debris monitoring; (b) technology upgrades to keep facilities at the state of the art; (c) enhancements to meet changing security requirements; and (d) operations management of the 2 international Earth Observing Constellations of 11 satellites known as the "Morning Constellation" and the "A-Train". The paper concludes with a view into the future based on the latest spacecraft status, lifetime projections, and mission plans.

  17. Handover aspects for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) CDMA Land Mobile Satellite (LMS) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, P.; Beach, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of handoff in a land mobile satellite (LMS) system between adjacent satellites in a low earth orbit (LEO) constellation. In particular, emphasis is placed on the application of soft handoff in a direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) LMS system. Soft handoff is explained in terms of terrestrial macroscopic diversity, in which signals transmitted via several independent fading paths are combined to enhance the link quality. This concept is then reconsidered in the context of a LEO LMS system. A two-state Markov channel model is used to simulate the effects of shadowing on the communications path from the mobile to each satellite during handoff. The results of the channel simulation form a platform for discussion regarding soft handoff, highlighting the potential merits of the scheme when applied in a LEO LMS environment.

  18. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  19. Human factors dimensions in the evolution of increasingly automated control rooms for near-earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the control and ground support for all of NASA's unmanned near-earth satellites. Traditionally, each satellite had its own dedicated mission operations room. In the mid-seventies, an integration of some of these dedicated facilities was begun with the primary objective to reduce costs. In this connection, the Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) was designed. MSOCC represents currently a labor intensive operation. Recently, Goddard has become increasingly aware of human factors and human-machine interface issues. A summary is provided of some of the attempts to apply human factors considerations in the design of command and control environments. Current and future activities with respect to human factors and systems design are discussed, giving attention to the allocation of tasks between human and computer, and the interface for the human-computer dialogue.

  20. First results of the earth observation water cycle multi-mission observation strategy (WACMOS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhongbo; Fernadez-Prieto, D.; Timmermans, J.; Chen, Xuelong; Hungershoefer, K.; Schröder, M.; Schulz, J.; Stammes, P.; Wang, Peng; Wolters, e.

    2014-01-01

    Observing and monitoring the different components of the global water cycle and their dynamics are essential steps to understand the climate of the Earth, forecast the weather, predict natural disasters like floods and droughts, and improve water resources management. Earth observation technology is

  1. Recent Changes in Earth's Energy Budget As Observed By CERES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, N. G.

    2014-12-01

    A central objective of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is to produce a long-term climate data record of Earth's radiation budget at the top-of-atmosphere, within-atmosphere and surface together with coincident cloud, aerosol and surface properties. CERES relies on a number of data sources, including broadband CERES radiometers on Terra, Aqua, and Suomi-NPP, high-resolution spectral imagers (MODIS and VIIRS), geostationary visible/infrared imagers, meteorological, aerosol and ozone assimilation data, and snow/sea-ice maps based on microwave radiometer data. The many input data sets are integrated and cross-calibrated to provide a consistent climate data record that accurately captures variations in Earth's radiation budget and associated cloud, aerosol and surface properties over a range of time and space scales. The CERES datasets are primarily used for climate model evaluation, process studies and climate monitoring. This presentation will review some of the ways in which the CERES record along with other datasets have been used to improve our understanding Earth's energy budget. At the top-of-atmosphere, we will show how Earth's energy imbalance, a critical indictor of climate change, has varied during the past 15 years relative to what is observed by in-situ observations of ocean heat content by the Argo observing system. We will use these results to place the so-called global warming hiatus into a larger context that takes Earth's energy budget into account. We will also discuss how recent advances in surface radiation budget estimation by the CERES group is reshaping the debate on why the surface energy budget cannot be closed to better than 15 Wm-2 using state-of-the-art observations. Finally, we will highlight the dramatic changes that have been observed by CERES over the Arctic Ocean, and discuss some of the yet unresolved observational challenges that limit our ability document change in this unique part of the planet.

  2. A data transmission scheduling algorithm for rapid-response earth-observing operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the development of rapid-response Earth-observing techniques, the demand for reducing a requirements-tasking-effects cycle from 1 day to hours grows rapidly. For instance, a satellite user always wants to receive requested data in near real-time to support their urgent missions, such as dealing with wildfires, volcanoes, flooding events, etc. In this paper, we try to reduce data transmission time for achieving this goal. The new feature of a responsive satellite is that users can receive signals from it directly. Therefore, the traditional satellite control and operational techniques need to be improved to accommodate these changes in user needs and technical upgrading. With that in mind, a data transmission topological model is constructed. Based on this model, we can deal with the satellite data transmission problem as a multi-constraint and multi-objective path-scheduling problem. However, there are many optional data transmission paths for each target based on this model, and the shortest path is preferred. In addition, satellites represent scarce resources that must be carefully scheduled in order to satisfy as many consumer requests as possible. To efficiently balance response time and resource utilization, a K-shortest path genetic algorithm is proposed for solving the data transmission problem. Simulations and analysis show the feasibility and the adaptability of the proposed approach.

  3. Digital Object Identifiers for NASA's Earth Observing System Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. F.; James, N.

    2012-12-01

    The science community has long recognized the importance of citing data in published literature to encourage replication of experiments and verification of results. Authors that try to cite their data often find that publishers will not accept Internet addresses because they are viewed as transient references, frequently changed by the data provider after the paper is published. Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and the DOI® System were created to avoid this problem by providing a unique and persistent identifier scheme and an online resolution service. DOIs and the Internet service provided by the DOI System have emerged as the most acceptable scheme for publishers. NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project, in cooperation with several Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument teams and data providers, has developed methods for assigning DOIs to EOS products. By assigning DOIs we are enabling authors and publishers to find it easier and more compelling to cite EOS data products. DOIs are unique alphanumeric strings that consist of a prefix and suffix. The prefix is assigned by a registration agency for the DOI System. The suffix must be unique, but is otherwise free to be constructed by the publisher, in this case NASA ESDIS Project. A strategy was needed for constructing DOI suffix names that corresponds to each EOS product. Since the onset of the DOI System, publishers have developed conventions to suit their own purposes. These range from random generation to complex, formally controlled vocabularies. An overarching ESDIS goal has been for the DOI names to be attractive for researchers to use in publication applications. Keeping them short and simple is paramount. When adding meaning to the string, it is also important that the name only refer to the data and not to the publisher, so that the DOI can be accepted as persistent even if the data is moved to a new publisher. Most users download EOS product files to their local facilities when

  4. Synergy of Satellite-Surface Observations for Studying the Properties of Absorbing Aerosols in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2010-01-01

    Through interaction with clouds and alteration of the Earth's radiation budget, atmospheric aerosols significantly influence our weather and climate. Monsoon rainfalls, for example, sustain the livelihood of more than half of the world's population. Thus, understanding the mechanism that drives the water cycle and freshwater distribution is high-lighted as one of the major near-term goals in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise Strategy. Every cloud droplet/ice-crystal that serves as an essential element in portraying water cycle and distributing freshwater contains atmospheric aerosols at its core. In addition, the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric aerosol properties is complex due to their dynamic nature. In fact, the predictability of the tropical climate system is much reduced during the boreal spring, which is associated with the peak season of biomass burning activities and regional/long-range transport of dust aerosols. Therefore, to accurately assess the impact of absorbing aerosols on regional-to-global climate requires not only modeling efforts but also continuous observations from satellites, aircraft, networks of ground-based instruments and dedicated field experiments. Since 1997 NASA has been successfully launching a series of satellites the Earth Observing System - to intensively study, and gain a better understanding of, the Earth as an integrated system. Through participation in many satellite remote-sensing/retrieval and validation projects over the years, we have gradually developed and refined the SMART (Surface-sensing Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) and COMMIT (Chemical, Optical & Microphysical Measurements of In-situ Troposphere) mobile observatories, a suite of surface remote sensing and in-situ instruments that proved to be vital in providing high temporal measurements, which complement the satellite observations. In this talk, we will present SMART-COMMIT which has played key roles, serving as network or supersite

  5. NASA Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Health and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ali H.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that the environment can affect human health in ways that are both complex and global in scope. To address some of these complexities, NASA maintains a diverse constellation of Earth observing research satellites, and sponsors research in developing satellite data applications across a wide spectrum of areas. These include environmental health; infectious disease; air quality standards, policies, and regulations; and the impact of climate change on health and air quality in a number of interrelated efforts. The Health and Air Quality Applications fosters the use of observations, modeling systems, forecast development, application integration, and the research to operations transition process to address environmental health effects. NASA has been a primary partner with Federal operational agencies over the past nine years in these areas. This talk presents the background of the Health and Air Quality Applications program, recent accomplishments, and a plan for the future.

  6. Grid-based platform for training in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petcu, Dana; Zaharie, Daniela; Panica, Silviu; Frincu, Marc; Neagul, Marian; Gorgan, Dorian; Stefanut, Teodor

    2010-05-01

    GiSHEO platform [1] providing on-demand services for training and high education in Earth Observation is developed, in the frame of an ESA funded project through its PECS programme, to respond to the needs of powerful education resources in remote sensing field. It intends to be a Grid-based platform of which potential for experimentation and extensibility are the key benefits compared with a desktop software solution. Near-real time applications requiring simultaneous multiple short-time-response data-intensive tasks, as in the case of a short time training event, are the ones that are proved to be ideal for this platform. The platform is based on Globus Toolkit 4 facilities for security and process management, and on the clusters of four academic institutions involved in the project. The authorization uses a VOMS service. The main public services are the followings: the EO processing services (represented through special WSRF-type services); the workflow service exposing a particular workflow engine; the data indexing and discovery service for accessing the data management mechanisms; the processing services, a collection allowing easy access to the processing platform. The WSRF-type services for basic satellite image processing are reusing free image processing tools, OpenCV and GDAL. New algorithms and workflows were develop to tackle with challenging problems like detecting the underground remains of old fortifications, walls or houses. More details can be found in [2]. Composed services can be specified through workflows and are easy to be deployed. The workflow engine, OSyRIS (Orchestration System using a Rule based Inference Solution), is based on DROOLS, and a new rule-based workflow language, SILK (SImple Language for worKflow), has been built. Workflow creation in SILK can be done with or without a visual designing tools. The basics of SILK are the tasks and relations (rules) between them. It is similar with the SCUFL language, but not relying on XML in

  7. Benchmark Comparison of Cloud Analytics Methods Applied to Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris; Little, Mike; Huang, Thomas; Jacob, Joseph; Yang, Phil; Kuo, Kwo-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing has the potential to bring high performance computing capabilities to the average science researcher. However, in order to take full advantage of cloud capabilities, the science data used in the analysis must often be reorganized. This typically involves sharding the data across multiple nodes to enable relatively fine-grained parallelism. This can be either via cloud-based file systems or cloud-enabled databases such as Cassandra, Rasdaman or SciDB. Since storing an extra copy of data leads to increased cost and data management complexity, NASA is interested in determining the benefits and costs of various cloud analytics methods for real Earth Observation cases. Accordingly, NASA's Earth Science Technology Office and Earth Science Data and Information Systems project have teamed with cloud analytics practitioners to run a benchmark comparison on cloud analytics methods using the same input data and analysis algorithms. We have particularly looked at analysis algorithms that work over long time series, because these are particularly intractable for many Earth Observation datasets which typically store data with one or just a few time steps per file. This post will present side-by-side cost and performance results for several common Earth observation analysis operations.

  8. Benchmark Comparison of Cloud Analytics Methods Applied to Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, C.; Little, M. M.; Huang, T.; Jacob, J. C.; Yang, C. P.; Kuo, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    Cloud computing has the potential to bring high performance computing capabilities to the average science researcher. However, in order to take full advantage of cloud capabilities, the science data used in the analysis must often be reorganized. This typically involves sharding the data across multiple nodes to enable relatively fine-grained parallelism. This can be either via cloud-based filesystems or cloud-enabled databases such as Cassandra, Rasdaman or SciDB. Since storing an extra copy of data leads to increased cost and data management complexity, NASA is interested in determining the benefits and costs of various cloud analytics methods for real Earth Observation cases. Accordingly, NASA's Earth Science Technology Office and Earth Science Data and Information Systems project have teamed with cloud analytics practitioners to run a benchmark comparison on cloud analytics methods using the same input data and analysis algorithms. We have particularly looked at analysis algorithms that work over long time series, because these are particularly intractable for many Earth Observation datasets which typically store data with one or just a few time steps per file. This post will present side-by-side cost and performance results for several common Earth observation analysis operations.

  9. Contrasting trends in light pollution across Europe based on satellite observed night time lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennie, Jonathan; Davies, Thomas W.; Duffy, James P.; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s nighttime satellite images of the Earth from space have provided a striking illustration of the extent of artificial light. Meanwhile, growing awareness of adverse impacts of artificial light at night on scientific astronomy, human health, ecological processes and aesthetic enjoyment of the night sky has led to recognition of light pollution as a significant global environmental issue. Links between economic activity, population growth and artificial light are well documented in rapidly developing regions. Applying a novel method to analysis of satellite images of European nighttime lights over 15 years, we show that while the continental trend is towards increasing brightness, some economically developed regions show more complex patterns with large areas decreasing in observed brightness over this period. This highlights that opportunities exist to constrain and even reduce the environmental impact of artificial light pollution while delivering cost and energy-saving benefits.

  10. Using Islands to Systematically Compare Satellite Observations to Models and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, S. C.; Robinson, F.; Gerstle, D.; Liu, C.; Kirshbaum, D. J.; Hernandez-Deckers, D.; Li, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite observations are our most voluminous, and perhaps most important source of information on atmospheric convective behavior. However testing models is quite difficult, especially with satellites in low Earth orbits, due to several problems including infrequent sampling, the chaotic nature of convection (which means actual storms will always differ from modeled ones even with perfect models), model initialization, and uncertain boundary conditions. This talk presents work using forcing by islands of different sizes as a strategy for overcoming these problems. We examine the systematic dependence of different characteristics of convection with island size, as a target for simple theories of convection and the sea breeze, and for CRMs (cloud resolving models). We find some nonintuitive trends of behavior with size -- some of which we can reproduce with the WRF CRM, and some which we cannot.

  11. Recent La Plata basin drought conditions observed by satellite gravimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, J L; Tapley, B D; Longuevergne, L; Yang, Z L; Scanlon, B R; 10.1029/2010JD014689

    2010-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) provides quantitative measures of terrestrial water storage (TWS) change. GRACE data show a significant decrease in TWS in the lower (southern) La Plata river basin of South America over the period 2002-2009, consistent with recognized drought conditions in the region. GRACE data reveal a detailed picture of temporal and spatial evolution of this severe drought event, which suggests that the drought began in lower La Plata in around austral spring 2008 and then spread to the entire La Plata basin and peaked in austral fall 2009. During the peak, GRACE data show an average TWS deficit of ~12 cm (equivalent water layer thickness) below the 7 year mean, in a broad region in lower La Plata. GRACE measurements are consistent with accumulated precipitation data from satellite remote sensing and with vegetation index changes derived from Terra satellite observations. The Global Land Data Assimilation System model captures the drought event but underestimates its in...

  12. Observing the Earth as an exoplanet with LOUPE, the Lunar Observatory for Unresolved Polarimetry of Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Karalidi, T; Snik, F; Bagnulo, S; Sparks, W B; Keller, C U

    2012-01-01

    The detections of small, rocky exoplanets have surged in recent years and will likely continue to do so. To know whether a rocky exoplanet is habitable, we have to characterise its atmosphere and surface. A promising characterisation method for rocky exoplanets is direct detection using spectropolarimetry. This method will be based on single pixel signals, because spatially resolving exoplanets is impossible with current and near-future instruments. Well-tested retrieval algorithms are essential to interpret these single pixel signals in terms of atmospheric composition, cloud and surface coverage. Observations of Earth itself provide the obvious benchmark data for testing such algorithms. The observations should provide signals that are integrated over the Earth's disk, that capture day and night variations, and all phase angles. The Moon is a unique platform from where the Earth can be observed as an exoplanet, undisturbed, all of the time. Here, we present LOUPE, the Lunar Observatory for Unresolved Polari...

  13. Cloud Computing Test Bed for NASA Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klene, S. A.; Murphy, K. J.; Fertetta, M.; Law, E.; Wilson, B. D.; Hua, H.; Huang, T.

    2014-12-01

    In order to develop a deeper understanding of utilizing cloud computing technologies for using earth observation data processing a test bed was created to ease access to the technology. Users had expressed concerns about accruing large compute bills by accident while they are learning to use the technology. The test bed is to support NASA efforts such as: Developing a Science Data Service platform to handle big earth data for supporting scalable time and space searches, on-the-fly climatologies, data extraction and data transformation such as data re-gridding. Multi-sensor climate data fusion where users can select, merge and cache variables from multiple sensors to compare data over multiple years. Facilitate rapid prototype efforts to provide an infrastructure so that new development efforts do not need to spend time and effort obtaining a platform. Once successful development is done the application could then scale to very large platform on larger or commercial clouds. Goals of the test bed are: To provide a greater understanding of cloud computing so informed choices can be made on future efforts to handle the over 15 Petabytes of NASA earth science data. Provide an environment where a set of science tools can be developed and reused by multiple earth science disciplines. Develop a Platform as a Service (PaaS) capability for general earth science use. This talk will present the lessons learned from building a community cloud for earth science data.

  14. Observational and Dynamical Wave Climatologies. VOS vs Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorieva, Victoria; Badulin, Sergei; Chernyshova, Anna

    2013-04-01

    The understanding physics of wind-driven waves is crucially important for fundamental science and practical applications. This is why experimental efforts are targeted at both getting reliable information on sea state and elaborating effective tools of the sea wave forecasting. The global Visual Wave Observations and satellite data from the GLOBWAVE project of the European Space Agency are analyzed in the context of these two viewpoints. Within the first "observational" aspect we re-analyze conventional climatologies of all basic wave parameters for the last decades [5]. An alternative "dynamical" climatology is introduced as a tool of prediction of dynamical features of sea waves on global scales. The features of wave dynamics are studied in terms of one-parametric dependencies of wave heights on wave periods following the theoretical concept of self-similar wind-driven seas [3, 1, 4] and recently proposed approach to analysis of Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) data [2]. Traditional "observational" climatologies based on VOS and satellite data collections demonstrate extremely consistent pictures for significant wave heights and dominant periods. On the other hand, collocated satellite and VOS data show significant differences in wave heights, wind speeds and, especially, in wave periods. Uncertainties of visual wave observations can explain these differences only partially. We see the key reason of this inconsistency in the methods of satellite data processing which are based on formal application of data interpolation methods rather than on up-to-date physics of wind-driven waves. The problem is considered within the alternative climatology approach where dynamical criteria of wave height-to-period linkage are used for retrieving wave periods and constructing physically consistent dynamical climatology. The key dynamical parameter - exponent R of one-parametric dependence Hs ~ TR shows dramatically less pronounced latitudinal dependence as compared to observed Hs

  15. Solar irradiance observed on the FY-3 satellites - instrument overview and primary observation results of in-orbit experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Fang, W.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Data of Solar Irradiance (SI) is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, including Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI). SI observations with short term accuracy and long term precision are essential to separate solar forcing from human-induced factors. TSI and SSI have been measured on Chinese FY-3 satellites, including FY-3A, FY-3B and FY-3C. FY-3A satellite launched in May, 2008 is the first satellite. FY-3B satellite launched in November, 2010 is the second satellite and FY-3C satellite launched in September, 2013 is the third satellite. SSI has been measured by SBUS (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Sounder) in the ultraviolet spectrum in the FY-3 mission. When a solar diffuser plate is deployed to reflect the incoming sunlight, SI is measured at 12 discrete, 1.1 nm wide wavelength bands between 250 nm and 340 nm. The SSI measurements are performed using a double monochromator operated in a stepped wavelength scan mode. SBUS collects SSI weekly at 12 discrete wave-lengths near polar area. Moreover, SSI is measured by SBUS every month covering 160-400 nm continuous spectral region. SSI has been recorded in SBUS missions since the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24. Approximately the same variation tendencies of SSI were detected by SBUS in specific spectrum compared with data from SOLSTICE/SORCE. TSI have been recorded by Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) in FY-3 missions. The sun was measured by TSIM/FY-3A and TSIM/FY-3B in a scanning manner. TSI data quality is improved by TSIM/FY-3C which has a pointing system. TSIM/FY-3C measures the sun with nearly zero solar pointing errors. TSI variations detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE. The TSIM experiments have observed the sun for about 7 years. A slowly increasing TSI trend has been detected by TSIMs in the Solar Cycle 24. We present the

  16. Earth Observation for Land-Atmosphere Interaction Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconcini, M.; Fernandez-Prieto, D.; Reissell, A.; Ellis, M.; Blyth, E. M.; Burrows, J. P.; de Leeuw, G.; Gerard, F. F.; Houweling, S.; Kaminski, T.; Krol, M.; Muller, J.-P.; North, P. R. J.; Palmer, P.; Pinty, B.; Plummer, S.; Quegan, S.; Reichstein, M.; Remedios, J. J.; Roberts, G. J.; Shvidenko, A.; Scipal, K.; Sobrino, J. A.; Teuling, A. J.; van der Werf, G. R.

    2011-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA), iLEAPS (Integrated Land Ecosystem-Atmosphere Processes Study, i.e. the land-atmosphere core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme), and the European Geosciences Union (EGU) jointly organized the “Earth Observation for Land-Atmosphere Interaction Science” conference, which took place from 3rd to 5th November 2010 at the Italian premises of ESA in Frascati (Rome). The event represented an attempt to effectively draw together Earth-Observation (EO) and Earth-system scientists investigating land-atmosphere processes in order to better understand the current gaps in science and derive recommendations to advance in the use of EO technology in the context of this important topic. Around 200 people from more than 30 countries world- wide met and discussed for three intensive days. This paper reports key points and the main recommendations of the conference for each of the key themes addressed.

  17. Earth observation archives in digital library and grid infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Fusco

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth Observation Missions provide continuous surveillance of the Earth regardless of atmospheric conditions producing huge amounts of data every year that need to be processed, elaborated, appraised and archived by dedicated systems. Emerging institutional and international environmental initiatives, like the ESA and EC Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES, require access to full historical data collections, including the performed data elaborations, scientific analysis, models and results. The historical ESA Earth Observation archives account for Petabytes data holding, which is augmented, since the launch of Envisat in 2002, by some 500 Terabytes per year. The access and utilisation of these archives is an important measurement for long-term data preservation; improving it is a continuous challenge at programmatic, technological and operational level. This article describes how Digital Library and Grid technology can support the underlying infrastructure for long-term data preservation.

  18. Space-based visible observation strategy for beyond-LEO objects based on an equatorial LEO satellite with multi-sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun-peng; Huang, Jian-yu; Chen, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Many space-based visible observation strategies based on Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites for observing Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) objects were proposed previously. However, there were few studies about other beyond-LEO objects (Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GTO) objects, Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) objects, and Molniya objects). In this paper, a space-based visible observation strategy is proposed for observing GEO objects, GTO objects, MEO objects (especially global navigation satellites), and Molniya objects simultaneously to get more orbital data, using an earth-oriented equatorial LEO satellite with three sensors. This work is focused on the pointing geometry. Brightness of observed objects and sensitivity of sensors are assumed under the relative ideal conditions. First, the distribution characteristics of these beyond-LEO objects are discussed. And in order to observe global navigation satellites efficiently, joint regions formed by the track superposition of two adjacent orbits in a constellation are proposed. To offset the influence of the earth shadow and constraint of sun-target-observer angle, two sensors pointing inside of the equatorial plane are used to observe GEO and GTO objects. The installation angle of the third sensor is optimized to obtain a relative high coverage rate for observing global navigation satellites and Molniya objects based on joint regions. Finally, the coverage rate, the number of observations, and observation duration under different sensors with different field of views (FOVs) are compared and analyzed respectively.

  19. Estimation of residual microaccelerations on board an artificial earth satellite in the monoaxial solar orientation mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatov, A. I.; Sazonov, V. V.

    2013-09-01

    The mode of monoaxial solar orientation of a designed artificial Earth satellite (AES), intended for microgravitational investigations, is studied. In this mode the normal line to the plane of satellite’s solar batteries is permanently directed at the Sun, the absolute angular velocity of a satellite is virtually equal to zero. The mode is implemented by means of an electromechanical system of powered flywheels or gyrodynes. The calculation of the level of microaccelerations arising on board in such a mode, was carried out by mathematical modeling of satellite motion with respect to the center of masses under an effect of gravitational and restoring aerodynamic moments, as well as of the moment produced by the gyrosystem. Two versions of a law for controlling the characteristic angular momentum of a gyrosystem are considered. The first version provides only attenuation of satellite’s perturbed motion in the vicinity of the position of rest with the required velocity. The second version restricts, in addition, the increase in the accumulated angular momentum of a gyrosystem by controlling the angle of rotation of the satellite around the normal to the light-sensitive side of the solar batteries. Both control law versions are shown to maintain the monoaxial orientation mode to a required accuracy and provide a very low level of quasistatic microaccelerations on board the satellite.

  20. Ice surface temperatures: seasonal cycle and daily variability from in-situ and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristine S.; Dybkjær, Gorm; Høyer, Jacob L.; Nielsen-Englyst, Pia; Rasmussen, Till A. S.; Tonboe, Rasmus T.

    2016-04-01

    Surface temperature is an important parameter for understanding the climate system, including the Polar Regions. Yet, in-situ temperature measurements over ice- and snow covered regions are sparse and unevenly distributed, and atmospheric circulation models estimating surface temperature may have large biases. To change this picture, we will analyse the seasonal cycle and daily variability of in-situ and satellite observations, and give an example of how to utilize the data in a sea ice model. We have compiled a data set of in-situ surface and 2 m air temperature observations over land ice, snow, sea ice, and from the marginal ice zone. 2523 time series of varying length from 14 data providers, with a total of more than 13 million observations, have been quality controlled and gathered in a uniform format. An overview of this data set will be presented. In addition, IST satellite observations have been processed from the Metop/AVHRR sensor and a merged analysis product has been constructed based upon the Metop/AVHRR, IASI and Modis IST observations. The satellite and in-situ observations of IST are analysed in parallel, to characterize the IST variability on diurnal and seasonal scales and its spatial patterns. The in-situ data are used to estimate sampling effects within the satellite observations and the good coverage of the satellite observations are used to complete the geographical variability. As an example of the application of satellite IST data, results will be shown from a coupled HYCOM-CICE ocean and sea ice model run, where the IST products have been ingested. The impact of using IST in models will be assessed. This work is a part of the EUSTACE project under Horizon 2020, where the ice surface temperatures form an important piece of the puzzle of creating an observationally based record of surface temperatures for all corners of the Earth, and of the ESA GlobTemperature project which aims at applying surface temperatures in models in order to

  1. The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) through 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara; Cripe, Douglas

    Ministers from the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) Member governments, meeting in Geneva, Switzerland in January 2014, unanimously renewed the mandate of GEO through 2025. Through a Ministerial Declaration, they reconfirmed that GEO’s guiding principles of collaboration in leveraging national, regional and global investments and in developing and coordinating strategies to achieve full and open access to Earth observations data and information in order to support timely and knowledge-based decision-making - are catalysts for improving the quality of life of people around the world, advancing global sustainability, and preserving the planet and its biodiversity. GEO Ministers acknowledged and valued the contributions of GEO Member governments and invited all remaining Member States of the United Nations to consider joining GEO. The Ministers also encouraged all Members to strengthen national GEO arrangements, and - of particular interest to COSPAR - they highlighted the unique contributions of Participating Organizations. In this regard, ten more organizations saw their applications approved by Plenary and joined the ranks along with COSPAR to become a Participating Organization in GEO, bringing the current total to 77. Building on the efforts of a Post-2015 Working Group, in which COSPAR participated, Ministers provided additional guidance for GEO and the evolution of its Global Earth Observation System of System (GEOSS) through 2025. Five key areas of activities for the next decade include the following: 1.) Advocating for the value of Earth observations and the need to continue improving Earth observation worldwide; 2.) Urging the adoption and implementation of data sharing principles globally; 3.) Advancing the development of the GEOSS information system for the benefit of users; 4.) Developing a comprehensive interdisciplinary knowledge base defining and documenting observations needed for all disciplines and facilitate availability and accessibility of

  2. Multi-technique combination of space geodesy observations: Impact of the Jason-2 satellite on the GPS satellite orbits estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoulida, Myriam; Pollet, Arnaud; Coulot, David; Perosanz, Félix; Loyer, Sylvain; Biancale, Richard; Rebischung, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve the Precise Orbit Determination (POD) of the GPS constellation and the Jason-2 Low Earth Orbiter (LEO), we carry out a simultaneous estimation of GPS satellite orbits along with Jason-2 orbits, using GINS software. Along with GPS station observations, we use Jason-2 GPS, SLR and DORIS observations, over a data span of 6 months (28/05/2011-03/12/2011). We use the Geophysical Data Records-D (GDR-D) orbit estimation standards for the Jason-2 satellite. A GPS-only solution is computed as well, where only the GPS station observations are used. It appears that adding the LEO GPS observations results in an increase of about 0.7% of ambiguities fixed, with respect to the GPS-only solution. The resulting GPS orbits from both solutions are of equivalent quality, agreeing with each other at about 7 mm on Root Mean Square (RMS). Comparisons of the resulting GPS orbits to the International GNSS Service (IGS) final orbits show the same level of agreement for both the GPS-only orbits, at 1.38 cm in RMS, and the GPS + Jason2 orbits at 1.33 cm in RMS. We also compare the resulting Jason-2 orbits with the 3-technique Segment Sol multi-missions d'ALTimétrie, d'orbitographie et de localisation précise (SSALTO) POD products. The orbits show good agreement, with 2.02 cm of orbit differences global RMS, and 0.98 cm of orbit differences RMS on the radial component.

  3. Earth Observation Data Interoperability Arrangement with Ontology Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, M.; Ono, M.; Shibasaki, R.

    2012-08-01

    Standardization organizations are working for syntactic and schematic level of interoperability. At the same time, semantic interoperability must be considered as a heterogeneous condition and also very diversified with a large-volume data. The ontology registry has been developed and ontological information such as technical vocabularies for earth observation has been collected for data interoperability arrangement. This is a very challenging method for earth observation data interoperability because collaboration or cooperation with scientists of different disciplines is essential for common understanding. Multiple semantic MediaWikis are applied to register and update technical vocabularies as a part of the ontology registry, which promises to be a useful tool for users. In order to invite contributions from the user community, it is necessary to provide sophisticated and easy-to-use tools and systems, such as table-like editor, reverse dictionary, and graph representation for sustainable development and usage of ontological information. Registered ontologies supply the reference information required for earth observation data retrieval. We proposed data/metadata search with ontology such as technical vocabularies and visualization of relations among dataset to very large scale and various earth observation data.

  4. Quantitative mapping of global land degradation using Earth observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de R.; Bruin, de S.; Schaepman, M.E.; Dent, D.

    2011-01-01

    Land degradation is a global issue on par with climate change and loss of biodiversity, but its extent and severity are only roughly known and there is little detail on the immediate processes – let alone the drivers. Earth-observation methods enable monitoring of land degradation in a consistent, p

  5. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  6. Earth Observation of Vegetation Dynamics in Global Drylands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Feng

    Land degradation in global drylands has been a concern related to both the local livelihoods and the changes in terrestrial biosphere, especially in the context of substantial global environmental changes. Earth Observation (EO) provides a unique way to assess the vegetation dynamics over the past...

  7. Digital preprocessing and classification of multispectral earth observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuta, P. E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of airborne and satellite multispectral image scanning sensors has generated wide-spread interest in application of these sensors to earth resource mapping. These point scanning sensors permit scenes to be imaged in a large number of electromagnetic energy bands between .3 and 15 micrometers. The energy sensed in each band can be used as a feature in a computer based multi-dimensional pattern recognition process to aid in interpreting the nature of elements in the scene. Images from each band can also be interpreted visually. Visual interpretation of five or ten multispectral images simultaneously becomes impractical especially as area studied increases; hence, great emphasis has been placed on machine (computer) techniques for aiding in the interpretation process. This paper describes a computer software system concept called LARSYS for analysis of multivariate image data and presents some examples of its application.

  8. Crew Earth Observations: Twelve Years of Documenting Earth from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cynthia A.; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kimberley; Runco, Susan; Wilkinson, M. Justin; Dawson, Melissa; Trenchard, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload was one of the initial experiments aboard the International Space Station, and has been continuously collecting data about the Earth since Expedition 1. The design of the experiment is simple: using state-of-the-art camera equipment, astronauts collect imagery of the Earth's surface over defined regions of scientific interest and also document dynamic events such as storms systems, floods, wild fires and volcanic eruptions. To date, CEO has provided roughly 600,000 images of Earth, capturing views of features and processes on land, the oceans, and the atmosphere. CEO data are less rigorously constrained than other remote sensing data, but the volume of data, and the unique attributes of the imagery provide a rich and understandable view of the Earth that is difficult to achieve from the classic remote sensing platforms. In addition, the length-of-record of the imagery dataset, especially when combined with astronaut photography from other NASA and Russian missions starting in the early 1960s, provides a valuable record of changes on the surface of the Earth over 50 years. This time period coincides with the rapid growth of human settlements and human infrastructure.

  9. Classification of Clouds and Deep Convection from GEOS-5 Using Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, William; Suarez, Max

    2010-01-01

    With the increased resolution of global atmospheric models and the push toward global cloud resolving models, the resemblance of model output to satellite observations has become strikingly similar. As we progress with our adaptation of the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) as a high resolution cloud system resolving model, evaluation of cloud properties and deep convection require in-depth analysis beyond a visual comparison. Outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) provides a sufficient comparison with infrared (IR) satellite imagery to isolate areas of deep convection. We have adopted a binning technique to generate a series of histograms for OLR which classify the presence and fraction of clear sky versus deep convection in the tropics that can be compared with a similar analyses of IR imagery from composite Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We will present initial results that have been used to evaluate the amount of deep convective parameterization required within the model as we move toward cloud system resolving resolutions of 10- to 1-km globally.

  10. Fast Emission Estimates in China Constrained by Satellite Observations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R.

    2013-12-01

    Emission inventories of air pollutants are crucial information for policy makers and form important input data for air quality models. Unfortunately, bottom-up emission inventories, compiled from large quantities of statistical data, are easily outdated for an emerging economy such as China, where rapid economic growth changes emissions accordingly. Alternatively, top-down emission estimates from satellite observations of air constituents have important advantages of being spatial consistent, having high temporal resolution, and enabling emission updates shortly after the satellite data become available. Constraining emissions from concentration measurements is, however, computationally challenging. Within the GlobEmission project of the European Space Agency (ESA) a new algorithm has been developed, specifically designed for fast daily emission estimates of short-lived atmospheric species on a mesoscopic scale (0.25 × 0.25 degree) from satellite observations of column concentrations. The algorithm needs only one forward model run from a chemical transport model to calculate the sensitivity of concentration to emission, using trajectory analysis to account for transport away from the source. By using a Kalman filter in the inverse step, optimal use of the a priori knowledge and the newly observed data is made. We apply the algorithm for NOx emission estimates in East China, using the CHIMERE model together with tropospheric NO2 column retrievals of the OMI and GOME-2 satellite instruments. The observations are used to construct a monthly emission time series, which reveal important emission trends such as the emission reduction measures during the Beijing Olympic Games, and the impact and recovery from the global economic crisis. The algorithm is also able to detect emerging sources (e.g. new power plants) and improve emission information for areas where proxy data are not or badly known (e.g. shipping emissions). The new emission estimates result in a better

  11. Optical technologies for the observation of low Earth orbit objects

    CERN Document Server

    Hampf, Daniel; Riede, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In order to avoid collisions with space debris, the near Earth orbit must be continuously scanned by either ground- or spaced-based facilities. For the low Earth orbit, radar telescopes are the workhorse for this task, especially due to their continuous availability. However, optical observation methods can deliver complementary information, especially towards high accuracy measurements. Passive-optical observations are inexpensive and can yield very precise information about the apparent position of the object in the sky via comparison with background stars. However, the object's distance from the observer is not readily accessible, which constitutes a major drawback of this approach for the precise calculation of the orbital elements. Two experimental methods have been devised to overcome this problem: Using two observatories a few kilometres apart, strictly simultaneous observations of the same object yield an accurate, instantaneous 3D position determination through measurement of the parallax. If only on...

  12. Observational Aspects of Magnetic Reconnection at the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Vitor M.; Koga, Daiki; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Cardoso, Flavia R.

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic field reconnection has shown to be the dominant process in the solar wind-Earth's magnetosphere interaction. It enables mass, momentum, and energy exchange between different plasma regimes, and it is regarded as an efficient plasma acceleration and heating mechanism. Reconnection has been observed to occur in laboratory plasmas, at planetary magnetospheres in our Solar System, and the Sun. In this work, we focus on analyzing the characteristics of magnetic reconnection at the Earth's magnetosphere according to spaceborne observations in the vicinity of our planet. Firstly, the locations where magnetic field reconnection are expected to occur within the vast magnetospheric region are addressed, and is shown how they are influenced by changes in the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The main magnetic field and plasma signatures of magnetic reconnection are discussed from both theoretical and observational points of view. Spacecraft observations of ion inertial length scale reconnection are also presented.

  13. Assessing The Link Between Urban Changes And Major Sport Events With The Use Of Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimakopoulos, D.; Chrysoulakis, N.; Stathopoulou, M.; Petrakis, M.; Cartalis, C.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper an effort is made to assess the link between urban changes and major sport events with the use of Earth Observation (EO). Particular emphasis is given to a) the simulation of the contribution of urban greening to the microclimate of an area which during the Olympic Games of Athens 2004 hosted a number of sporting facilities and b) to the development of a technique to downscale low resolution satellite images so as to depict the intensity of Surface Urban Heat Island (SUHI).

  14. Taming Big Data Variety in the Earth Observing System Data and Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Christopher; Walter, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Although the volume of the remote sensing data managed by the Earth Observing System Data and Information System is formidable, an oft-overlooked challenge is the variety of data. The diversity in satellite instruments, science disciplines and user communities drives cost as much or more as the data volume. Several strategies are used to tame this variety: data allocation to distinct centers of expertise; a common metadata repository for discovery, data format standards and conventions; and services that further abstract the variations in data.

  15. A novel 120dB hyperspectral platform for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, B.; Caranana, J.; Pinoncely, P. A.; Michelot, J.; Bouvier, C.; Cohet, S.; Jourdain, P.; Monsinjon, P.; Le-Coarer, E.

    2016-10-01

    With the down-size of spacecraft for earth observation in volume, power and budget, there is a pressing need for new, more affordable, easier to integrate, instrumentation sensor. Pyxalis has developed a high dynamic range image sensor dedicated to hyperspectral imaging. This platform can be customized for space or ground-based application, reducing significantly the need for a full-custom detector development for space application. This work describes the development and characterization of such a 120dB High Dynamic Range sensor platform as well as the various possibilities for customization as well as a particular implementation by Grenoble University in the Context of a micro-satellite development.

  16. Observation of anomalous phonons in orthorhombic rare-earth manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, P.; Chen, H. Y.; Tyson, T. A.; Liu, Z. X.; Bai, J. M.; Wang, L. P.; Choi, Y. J.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2010-12-01

    We observe the appearance of a phonon near the lock-in temperature in orthorhombic REMnO3 (RE denotes rare earth) (RE: Lu and Ho) and anomalous phonon hardening in orthorhombic LuMnO3. The anomalous phonon occurs at the onset of spontaneous polarization. No such changes were found in incommensurate orthorhombic DyMnO3. These observations directly reveal different electric polarization mechanisms in the E-type and incommensurate-type orthorhombic REMnO3.

  17. Solar neutron observations with ChubuSat-2 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka

    2016-07-01

    Solar neutron observation is a key in understanding of ion accerelation mechanism in the Sun surface since neutrons are hardly affected by magnetic field around the Sun and intersteller mediums unlike charged particles. However, there was only a few tenth detections so far since its discovery in 1982. Actually SEDA-AP Fiber detector (FIB) onboard the International Space Station (ISS) was suffered from a high neutron background produced by the ISS itself. ChubuSat is a series of 50-kg class microsatellite jointly depeloped by universities (Nagoya university and Daido university) and aerospace companies at the Chubu area of central Japan. The ChubuSat-2 is the second ChubuSat following the ChubuSat-1 which was launched by Russian DNEPR rocket on November 6, 2014. It was selected as one of four piggyback payloads of the X-ray astronomy satellite ASTRO-H in 2014 summer, and will be launched by the H-IIA launch vehcles from from JAXA Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) in February 2016. The ChubuSat-2 carries a mission instrument, radiation detector (RD). The main mission of ChubuSat-2 is devoted for monitoring neutrons and gamma-rays which can be background source for ASTRO-H celestrial observations with the RD. The mission also involves a function of solar neutron observations which were originally proposed by graduate students who join the leadership development program for space exploration and research, program for leading graduate schools at Nagoya University. The RD has a similar detection area and efficiency to those of the SEDA-AP FIB, but is expected to have lower backgrounthan the ISS thanks to much smaller mass of the micro-satellite. In this paper, we will describe details of ChubuSat-2 satellite and RD, and in-orbit performance of RD.

  18. Radar observations of near-Earth asteroids from Arecibo Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Rodriguez-Ford, Linda A.; Zambrano Marin, Luisa Fernanda; Virkki, Anne; Aponte Hernandez, Betzaida

    2016-10-01

    The Arecibo S-Band (2.38 GHz, 12.6 cm, 1 MW) planetary radar system at the 305-m William E. Gordon Telescope in Arecibo, Puerto Rico is the most active and most sensitive planetary radar facility in the world. Since October 2015, we have detected 56 near-Earth asteroids, of which 17 are classified as potentially hazardous to Earth and 22 are compliant with the Near-Earth Object Human Space Flight Accessible Target Study (NHATS) as possible future robotic- or human-mission destinations. We will present a sampling of the asteroid zoo observed by the Arecibo radar since the 2015 DPS meeting. This includes press-noted asteroids 2015 TB145, the so-called "Great Pumpkin", and 2003 SD220, the so-called "Christmas Eve asteroid".

  19. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System - EOSDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), a petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research. The Earth Science Data Systems provide end-to-end capabilities to deliver data and information products to users in support of understanding the Earth system. The presentation contains photographs from space of recent events, (i.e., the effects of the tsunami in Japan, and the wildfires in Australia.) It also includes details of the Data Centers that provide the data to EOSDIS and Science Investigator-led Processing Systems. Information about the Land, Atmosphere Near-real-time Capability for EOS (LANCE) and some of the uses that the system has made possible are reviewed. Also included is information about how to access the data, and evolutionary plans for the future of the system.

  20. Space-Based Observations of Satellites From the MOST Microsatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    observations spatiales canadiennes d’un objet en orbite terrestre . Deux satellites de géolocalisation GPS ont été suivis à l’aide du télescope optique monté...the derived orbital metric data with high precision ephemerides yielded root mean square errors of 13 arcseconds. The errors are shown to result...space surveillance from an orbiting platform. Résumé Le 12 octobre 2005, le microsatellite MOST du Canada a acquis les premières images

  1. Global distribution of pauses observed with satellite measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Venkat Ratnam; P Kishore; Isabella Velicogna

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have been carried out on the tropopause, stratopause, and mesopause (collectively termed as ‘pauses’) independently; however, all the pauses have not been studied together. We present global distribution of altitudes and temperatures of these pauses observed with long-term space borne high resolution measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) aboard Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. Here we study the commonality and differences observed in the variability of all the pauses. We also examined how good other datasets will represent these features among (and in between) different satellite measurements, re-analysis, and model data. Hemispheric differences observed in all the pauses are also reported. In addition, we show that asymmetries between northern and southern hemispheres continue up to the mesopause. We analyze inter and intra-seasonal variations and long-term trends of these pauses at different latitudes. Finally, a new reference temperature profile is shown from the ground to 110 km for tropical, mid-latitudes, and polar latitudes for both northern and southern hemispheres.

  2. Eclipses of the inner satellites of Jupiter observed in 2015

    CERN Document Server

    Saquet, E; Colas, F; Arlot, J -E; Robert, V; Christophe, B; Dechambre, O

    2016-01-01

    During the 2014-2015 campaign of mutual events, we recorded ground-based photometric observations of eclipses of Amalthea (JV) and, for the first time, Thebe (JXIV) by the Galilean moons. We focused on estimating whether the positioning accuracy of the inner satellites determined with photometry is sufficient for dynamical studies. We observed two eclipses of Amalthea and one of Thebe with the 1 m telescope at Pic du Midi Observatory using an IR filter and a mask placed over the planetary image to avoid blooming features. A third observation of Amalthea was taken at Saint-Sulpice Observatory with a 60 cm telescope using a methane filter (890 nm) and a deep absorption band to decrease the contrast between the planet and the satellites. After background removal, we computed a differential aperture photometry to obtain the light flux, and followed with an astrometric reduction. We provide astrometric results with an external precision of 53 mas for the eclipse of Thebe, and 20 mas for that of Amalthea. These obs...

  3. Satellite Observations of Desert Dust-induced Himalayan Snow Darkening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritesh; Hsu, N. Christina; Lau, William K.-M.; Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2013-01-01

    The optically thick aerosol layer along the southern edge of the Himalaya has been subject of several recent investigations relating to its radiative impacts on the South Asian summer monsoon and regional climate forcing. Prior to the onset of summer monsoon, mineral dust from southwest Asian deserts is transported over the Himalayan foothills on an annual basis. Episodic dust plumes are also advected over the Himalaya, visible as dust-laden snow surface in satellite imagery, particularly in western Himalaya. We examined spectral surface reflectance retrieved from spaceborne MODIS observations that show characteristic reduction in the visible wavelengths (0.47 nm) over western Himalaya, associated with dust-induced solar absorption. Case studies as well as seasonal variations of reflectance indicate a significant gradient across the visible (0.47 nm) to near-infrared (0.86 nm) spectrum (VIS-NIR), during premonsoon period. Enhanced absorption at shorter visible wavelengths and the resulting VIS-NIR gradient is consistent with model calculations of snow reflectance with dust impurity. While the role of black carbon in snow cannot be ruled out, our satellite-based analysis suggests the observed spectral reflectance gradient dominated by dust-induced solar absorption during premonsoon season. From an observational viewpoint, this study underscores the importance of mineral dust deposition toward darkening of the western Himalayan snow cover, with potential implications to accelerated seasonal snowmelt and regional snow albedo feedbacks.

  4. An automated processing chains for surface temperature monitoring on Earth's most active volcanoes by optical data from multiple satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Malvina; Musacchio, Massimo; Fabrizia Buongiorno, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The Geohazards Exploitation Platform, or GEP is one of six Thematic Exploitation Platforms developed by ESA to serve data user communities. As a new element of the ground segment delivering satellite results to users, these cloud-based platforms provide an online environment to access information, processing tools, computing resources for community collaboration. The aim is to enable the easy extraction of valuable knowledge from vast quantities of satellite-sensed data now being produced by Europe's Copernicus programme and other Earth observation satellites. In this context, the estimation of surface temperature on active volcanoes around the world is considered. E2E processing chains have been developed for different satellite data (ASTER, Landsat8 and Sentinel 3 missions) using thermal infrared (TIR) channels by applying specific algorithms. These chains have been implemented on the GEP platform enabling the use of EO missions and the generation of added value product such as surface temperature map, from not skilled users. This solution will enhance the use of satellite data and improve the dissemination of the results saving valuable time (no manual browsing, downloading or processing is needed) and producing time series data that can be speedily extracted from a single co-registered pixel, to highlight gradual trends within a narrow area. Moreover, thanks to the high-resolution optical imagery of Sentinel 2 (MSI), the detection of lava maps during an eruption can be automatically obtained. The proposed lava detection method is based on a contextual algorithm applied to Sentinel-2 NIR (band 8 - 0.8 micron) and SWIR (band 12 - 2.25 micron) data. Examples derived by last eruptions on active volcanoes are showed.

  5. A comparative study of spherical and flat-Earth geopotential modeling at satellite elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, M. H.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.; Vonfrese, R. R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Flat-Earth modeling is a desirable alternative to the complex spherical-Earth modeling process. These methods were compared using 2 1/2 dimensional flat-earth and spherical modeling to compute gravity and scalar magnetic anomalies along profiles perpendicular to the strike of variably dimensioned rectangular prisms at altitudes of 150, 300, and 450 km. Comparison was achieved with percent error computations (spherical-flat/spherical) at critical anomaly points. At the peak gravity anomaly value, errors are less than + or - 5% for all prisms. At 1/2 and 1/10 of the peak, errors are generally less than 10% and 40% respectively, increasing to these values with longer and wider prisms at higher altitudes. For magnetics, the errors at critical anomaly points are less than -10% for all prisms, attaining these magnitudes with longer and wider prisms at higher altitudes. In general, in both gravity and magnetic modeling, errors increase greatly for prisms wider than 500 km, although gravity modeling is more sensitive than magnetic modeling to spherical-Earth effects. Preliminary modeling of both satellite gravity and magnetic anomalies using flat-Earth assumptions is justified considering the errors caused by uncertainties in isolating anomalies.

  6. Constrained projections of high northern latitudinal photosynthesis increase by satellite observations of vegetation greenness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Alexander J.; Myneni, Ranga; Brovkin, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Satellite observations of the last three decades provide strong evidence that the Earth is greening. Especially in northern high latitudes, a substantial increase of the leaf area index (LAI), an indicator of greening, is observed. For these regions, it is assumed that plant growth benefits from higher temperature (radiative effect) and rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (CO2 fertilization effect). This greening trend, in terms of increasing LAI, is also simulated by various global ecosystem models. We also found a persistent greening trend analyzing historical simulations of Earth system models (ESM) participating in Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). However, a wide spread in magnitude of an associated increase of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) among the ESMs is found, and thus contributes to pronounced uncertainties in projections of future climate change. Here we demonstrate that the tight correlation between enhanced GPP of high northern latitudinal ecosystems and their LAI sensitivity to both key environmental factors, temperature and CO2 concentration, opens up the possibility of an Emergent Constraint on plant photosynthesis. Combining this almost linear relationship across the ensemble of CMIP5 models with the LAI trends in the long-term satellite records, we are able to constrain projections of vegetation growth increase for respective ecosystems.

  7. Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer observations of geosynchronous satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindsley, Robert B; Armstrong, J Thomas; Schmitt, Henrique R; Andrews, Jonathan R; Restaino, Sergio R; Wilcox, Christopher C; Vrba, Frederick J; Benson, James A; DiVittorio, Michael E; Hutter, Donald J; Shankland, Paul D; Gregory, Steven A

    2011-06-10

    Using a 15.9  m baseline at the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI), we have successfully detected interferometric fringes in observations of the geosynchronous satellite (geosat) DirecTV-9S while it glinted on two nights in March 2009. The fringe visibilities can be fitted by a model consisting of two components, one resolved (≳3.7  m) and one unresolved (∼1.1  m). Both the length of the glint and the specular albedos are consistent with the notion that the glinting surfaces are not completely flat and scatter reflected sunlight into an opening angle of roughly 15°. Enhancements to the NPOI that would improve geosat observations include adding an infrared capability, which could extend the glint season, and adding larger, adaptive-optics equipped telescopes. Future work may test the feasibility of observing geosats with aperture-masked large telescopes and of developing an array of six to nine elements.

  8. MONITORING OF ENERGETIC PARTICLE ENVIRONMENT INSIDE THE CHINA-BRAZIL EARTH RESOURCE SATELLITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    On 14 October 1999, the Chinese-Brazil earth resource satellite (CBERS-1) was launched in China. On board of the satellite there was an instrument designed at Peking University to detect the energetic particle radiation inside the satellite so the radiation fluxes of energetic particles in the cabin can be monitored continuously. Inside a satellite cabin, radiation environment consists of ether penetrated energetic particles or secondary radiation from satellite materials due to the interactions with primary cosmic rays.Purpose of the detectors are twofold, to monitor the particle radiation in the cabin and also to study the space radiation environment The data can be used to study the radiation environment and their effects on the electronics inside the satelhte cabin. On the other hand, the data are useful in study of geo-space energetic particle events such as solar proton events, particle precipitation and variations of the radiation belt since there should be some correlation between the radiation situation inside and outside the satellite.The instrument consists of two semi-conductor detectors for protons and electrons respectively. Each detector has two channels of energy ranges. They are 0.5-2MeV and ≥2MeV for electrons and 5-30MeV and 30-60MeV for protons. Counting rate for all channels are up to 104/(cm2@s)and power consumption is about 2.5 W. There are also the additional functions of CMOS TID (total integrated dose) effect and direct SEU monitoring. The data of CBMC was first sent back on Oct. 17 1999 and it's almost three years from then on. The detector has been working normally and the quality of data is good.The preliminary results of data analysis of CBMC not only reveal the effects of polar particle precipitation and radiation belt on radiation environment inside a satellite, but also show some important features of the geo-space energetic particle radiation.As one of the most important parameters of space weather, the energetic charged

  9. Transforming Water Management: an Emerging Promise of Integrated Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    Throughout its history, civilization has relied on technology to facilitate many of its advances. New innovations and technologies have often provided strategic advantages that have led to transformations in institutions, economies and ultimately societies. Observational and information technologies are leading to significant developments in the water sector. After a brief introduction tracing the role of observational technologies in the areas of hydrology and water cycle science, this talk explores the existing and potential contributions of remote sensing data in water resource management around the world. In particular, it outlines the steps being undertaken by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and its Water Task to facilitate capacity building efforts in water management using Earth Observations in Asia, Africa and Latin and Caribbean America. Success stories on the benefits of using Earth Observations and applying GEO principles are provided. While GEO and its capacity building efforts are contributing to the transformation of water management through interoperability, data sharing, and capacity building, the full potential of these contributions has not been fully realized because impediments and challenges still remain.

  10. Experimental evaluation of self-calibrating cavity radiometers for use in earth flux radiation balance measurements from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, J. R.; Karoli, A. R.; Alton, B. M.

    1982-01-01

    A method for evaluating out-of-field response of wide-field, earth-viewing satellite radiometers is described. The equipment which simulates the earth and space consists of a central blackbody surrounded by a cooled ring. The radiometric and orbital considerations are discussed. Some test results for prototype ERBE cavity sensors are included. This presentation is restricted to longwave radiative transfer

  11. Feasibility Analysis on the Utilization of the Iridium Satellite Communications Network for Resident Space Objects in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    equatorial speed. Ideally, the GEO satellite remains directly overhead in the absence of perturbing forces. Of course , perturbing forces exist and cause a...respectively. Assuming a mean Earth radius of 6371 km, the Earth- central angles and can be found from trigonometry using the footprint

  12. Satellite communications provisions on NASA Ames instrumented aircraft platforms for Earth science research/applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameson, L.; Brass, J. A.; Hanratty, J. J.; Roberts, A. C.; Wegener, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    Earth science activities at NASA Ames are research in atmospheric and ecosystem science, development of remote sensing and in situ sampling instruments, and their integration into scientific research platform aircraft. The use of satellite communications can greatly extend the capability of these agency research platform aircraft. Current projects and plans involve satellite links on the Perseus UAV and the ER-2 via TDRSS and a proposed experiment on the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. Provisions for data links on the Perseus research platform, via TDRSS S-band multiple access service, have been developed and are being tested. Test flights at Dryden are planned to demonstrate successful end-to-end data transfer. A Unisys Corp. airborne satcom STARLink system is being integrated into an Ames ER-2 aircraft. This equipment will support multiple data rates up to 43 Mb/s each via the TDRS S Ku-band single access service. The first flight mission for this high-rate link is planned for August 1995. Ames and JPL have proposed an ACTS experiment to use real-time satellite communications to improve wildfire research campaigns. Researchers and fire management teams making use of instrumented aircraft platforms at a prescribed burn site will be able to communicate with experts at Ames, the U.S. Forest Service, and emergency response agencies.

  13. Minimum Number of Observation Points for LEO Satellite Orbit Estimation by OWL Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maru; Jo, Jung Hyun; Cho, Sungki; Choi, Jin; Kim, Chun-Hwey; Park, Jang-Hyun; Yim, Hong-Suh; Choi, Young-Jun; Moon, Hong-Kyu; Bae, Young-Ho; Park, Sun-Youp; Kim, Ji-Hye; Roh, Dong-Goo; Jang, Hyun-Jung; Park, Young-Sik; Jeong, Min-Ji

    2015-12-01

    By using the Optical Wide-field Patrol (OWL) network developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) we generated the right ascension and declination angle data from optical observation of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. We performed an analysis to verify the optimum number of observations needed per arc for successful estimation of orbit. The currently functioning OWL observatories are located in Daejeon (South Korea), Songino (Mongolia), and Oukaïmeden (Morocco). The Daejeon Observatory is functioning as a test bed. In this study, the observed targets were Gravity Probe B, COSMOS 1455, COSMOS 1726, COSMOS 2428, SEASAT 1, ATV-5, and CryoSat-2 (all in LEO). These satellites were observed from the test bed and the Songino Observatory of the OWL network during 21 nights in 2014 and 2015. After we estimated the orbit from systematically selected sets of observation points (20, 50, 100, and 150) for each pass, we compared the difference between the orbit estimates for each case, and the Two Line Element set (TLE) from the Joint Space Operation Center (JSpOC). Then, we determined the average of the difference and selected the optimal observation points by comparing the average values.

  14. Estimates of lightning NOx production from GOME satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. Boersma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric NO2 column retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite spectrometer are used to quantify the source strength and 3-D distribution of lightning produced nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2. A sharp increase of NO2 is observed at convective cloud tops with increasing cloud top height, consistent with a power-law behaviour with power 5±2. Convective production of clouds with the same cloud height are found to produce NO2 with a ratio 1.6/1 for continents compared to oceans. This relation between cloud properties and NO2 is used to construct a 10:30 local time global lightning NO2 production map for 1997. An extensive statistical comparison is conducted to investigate the capability of the TM3 chemistry transport model to reproduce observed patterns of lightning NO2 in time and space. This comparison uses the averaging kernel to relate modelled profiles of NO2 to observed NO2 columns. It exploits a masking scheme to minimise the interference of other NOx sources on the observed total columns. Simulations are performed with two lightning parameterizations, one relating convective preciptation (CP scheme to lightning flash distributions, and the other relating the fifth power of the cloud top height (H5 scheme to lightning distributions. The satellite-retrieved NO2 fields show significant correlations with the simulated lightning contribution to the NO2 concentrations for both parameterizations. Over tropical continents modelled lightning NO2 shows remarkable quantitative agreement with observations. Over the oceans however, the two model lightning parameterizations overestimate the retrieved NO2 attributed to lightning. Possible explanations for these overestimations are discussed. The ratio between satellite-retrieved NO2 and modelled lightning NO2 is used to rescale the original modelled lightning NOx production. Eight estimates of the lightning NOx production in 1997 are obtained from spatial and temporal

  15. Estimates of lightning NOx production from GOME satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Kelder

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric NO2 column retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME satellite spectrometer are used to quantify the source strength and 3D distribution of lightning produced nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO2+NO2. A sharp increase of NO2 is observed at convective cloud tops with increasing cloud top height, consistent with a power-law behaviour with power 5±2. Convective production of clouds with the same cloud height are found to produce NO2 with a ratio 1.6/1 for continents compared to oceans. This relation between cloud properties and NO2 is used to construct a 10:30 local time global lightning NO2 production map for 1997. An extensive statistical comparison is conducted to investigate the capability of the TM3 chemistry transport model to reproduce observed patterns of lightning NO2 in time and space. This comparison uses the averaging kernel to relate modelled profiles of NO2 to observed NO2 columns. It exploits a masking scheme to minimise the interference of other NOx sources on the observed total columns. Simulations are performed with two lightning parametrisations, one relating convective preciptation (CP scheme to lightning flash distributions, and the other relating the fifth power of the cloud top height (H5 scheme to lightning distributions. The satellite-retrieved NO2 fields show significant correlations with the simulated lightning contribution to the NO2 concentrations for both parametrisations. Over tropical continents modelled lightning NO2 shows remarkable quantitative agreement with observations. Over the oceans however, the two model lightning parametrisations overestimate the retrieved NO2 attributed to lightning. Possible explanations for these overestimations are discussed. The ratio between satellite-retrieved NO2 and modelled lightning NO2 is used to rescale the original modelled lightning NOx production. Eight estimates of the lightning NOx production in 1997 are obtained from spatial and temporal correlation

  16. Satellite Observations of Atmospheric SO2 from Volcanic Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, M. F.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    Volcanoes are an important source of various atmospheric trace gases. Volcanic eruptions and their emissions are sporadic and intermittent and often occur in uninhabited regions. Therefore assessing the amount and size of the gaseous and particulate emission from volcanoes is difficult. Satellite remote sensing measurements provide one well suited opportunity to overcome this difficulty. Onboard ERS-2, GOME's moderate spectral resolution enables us to apply the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) algorithm to retrieve SO2 column densities from radiance/irradiance measurements in UV spectral region. Volcanic emissions can cause significant variations of climate on a variety of time scales; just one very large eruption can cause a measurable change in the Earth's climate with a time scale of a few years. Stratospheric aerosols produced by volcanic eruptions can influence stratospheric chemistry both through chemical reactions that take place on the surface of the aerosols and through temperature changes induced by their presence in the stratosphere. In this work we give a comprehensive overview on several volcanoes and the retrieval of SO2 column densities from GOME data for the years 1996 - 2002. The focus is on both eruption and out gassing scenarios from different volcanic eruptions in Italy, Iceland, Congo/ Zaire, Ecuador and Mexico.

  17. A Potpourri of Near-Earth Asteroid Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tholen, David J.; Ramanjooloo, Yudish; Fohring, Dora; Hung, Denise; Micheli, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Ongoing astrometric follow-up of near-Earth asteroids has yielded a variety of interesting results. In the limited space of a DPS abstract, three recently observed objects are worth mentioning.2008 HU4 is among the most accessible asteroids for a human space flight mission. We successfully recovered this object at a second opposition on 2016 April 26 despite the large ephemeris uncertainty. The small size of this asteroid makes it relatively easy to detect the departure from purely gravitational motion caused by solar radiation pressure, which can be used to estimate the density of the object. At the time of this writing, the object remains bright enough for additional observations, so we expect to improve on our five-sigma detection of a relatively low density (roughly similar to water, indicating a high porosity) between now and the DPS meeting.2016 HO3 is a newly-discovered co-orbital with the Earth. Our 2016 May 10-11 observations extended the observational arc by enough to permit backward extrapolation that led to prediscovery observations by Pan-STARRS in 2015, and then annually back to 2011, and ultimately to Sloan DSS observations in 2004. The 12-year arc is sufficient to examine the dynamical behavior of the object, which shows how it will remain in the vicinity of the Earth for decades, if not centuries. Our observations also revealed a rapid rotation (less than a half hour) with large brightness variation (in excess of 1 magnitude), which helps to explain why this object eluded discovery until this year.2011 YV62 is among the top 20 largest near-Earth asteroids with Earth impact solutions (in 2078 and 2080). At the time of this writing, the object is flagged as being "lost", but a re-examination of observations made in 2013 and 2015 finally yielded a successful recovery at a magnitude fainter than 24. We expect the new observations to eliminate the impact possibilities. The story behind this difficult recovery is fascinating.

  18. Evaluating Land-Atmosphere Moisture Feedbacks in Earth System Models With Spaceborne Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, P. A.; Randerson, J. T.; Lawrence, D. M.; Swenson, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a set of metrics for measuring the feedback loop between the land surface moisture state and the atmosphere globally on an interannual time scale. These metrics consider both the forcing of terrestrial water storage (TWS) on subsequent atmospheric conditions as well as the response of TWS to antecedent atmospheric conditions. We designed our metrics to take advantage of more than one decade's worth of satellite observations of TWS from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) along with atmospheric variables from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES). Metrics derived from spaceborne observations were used to evaluate the strength of the feedback loop in the Community Earth System Model (CESM) Large Ensemble (LENS) and in several models that contributed simulations to Phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We found that both forcing and response limbs of the feedback loop were generally stronger in tropical and temperate regions in CMIP5 models and even more so in LENS compared to satellite observations. Our analysis suggests that models may overestimate the strength of the feedbacks between the land surface and the atmosphere, which is consistent with previous studies conducted across different spatial and temporal scales.

  19. A vector method for synthesis of orbits and the structure of satellite constellations for multiswath periodic coverage of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulskiy, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    Single satellites and multisatellite constellations for the periodic coverage of the Earth are considered. The main feature is the use of several cameras with different swath widths. A vector method is proposed which makes it possible to find orbits minimizing the periodicities of coverage of a given area of Earth uniformly for all swaths. Their number is not limited, but the relative dimensions should satisfy the Fibonacci series or some new numerical sequences. The results apply to constellations of any number of satellites. Formulas were derived for calculating their structure, i.e., relative position in the constellation. Examples of orbits and the structure of constellations for the Earth's multiswath coverage are presented.