WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth metals produced

  1. Formation of an integrated holding company to produce rare-earth metal articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, S. V.; Grishaev, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    The possibility of formation of a Russian holding company for the production of rare-earth metal articles under conditions of its increasing demand on the world market is considered. It is reasonable to ensure stable business operation on the market under conditions of state-private partnership after the fraction of soled products is determined and supported by the competitive advantages of Russian products.

  2. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  3. Earth's Most Important Producers: Meet the Phytoplankton!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Meghan E.; Stevens, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The ocean is home to some of Earth's most important producers. Single-celled organisms in the ocean are responsible for more than half of Earth's productivity, as well as most of its oxygen. Phytoplankton are single-celled, plantlike organisms. That is, they have chloroplasts and perform photosynthesis, but are not true plants, which are typically…

  4. Rare Earth Metals: Resourcefulness and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shijie

    2013-10-01

    When we appreciate the digital revolution carried over from the twentieth century with mobile communication and the Internet, and when we enjoy our high-tech lifestyle filled with iDevices, hybrid cars, wind turbines, and solar cells in this new century, we should also appreciate that all of these advanced products depend on rare earth metals to function. Although there are only 136,000 tons of annual worldwide demand, (Cho, Rare Earth Metals, Will We Have Enough?)1 rare earth metals are becoming such hot commodities on international markets, due to not only to their increasing uses, including in most critical military hardware, but also to Chinese growth, which accounts for 95% of global rare earth metal production. Hence, the 2013 technical calendar topic, planned by the TMS/Hydrometallurgy and Electrometallurgy Committee, is particularly relevant, with four articles (including this commentary) contributed to the JOM October Issue discussing rare earth metals' resourcefulness and recovery.

  5. Recovering heavy rare earth metals from magnet scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Ryan T.; McCallum, Ralph W.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    2017-08-08

    A method of treating rare earth metal-bearing permanent magnet scrap, waste or other material in a manner to recover the heavy rare earth metal content separately from the light rare earth metal content. The heavy rare earth metal content can be recovered either as a heavy rare earth metal-enriched iron based alloy or as a heavy rare earth metal based alloy.

  6. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  7. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Santa Fe, NM; Mendoza, Daniel [Santa Fe, NM; Chen, Chun-Ku [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  8. Effects of Rare Earth Metals on Steel Microstructures

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Kuo, Chia-Liang; Su, Yen-Hao; Chen, Shin-Hau; Lin, Kuan-Ju; Hsieh, Ping-Hung; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth metals are used in semiconductors, solar cells and catalysts. This review focuses on the background of oxide metallurgy technologies, the chemical and physical properties of rare earth (RE) metals, the background of oxide metallurgy, the functions of RE metals in steelmaking, and the influences of RE metals on steel microstructures. Future prospects for RE metal applications in steelmaking are also presented.

  9. Effects of Rare Earth Metals on Steel Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Pan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rare earth metals are used in semiconductors, solar cells and catalysts. This review focuses on the background of oxide metallurgy technologies, the chemical and physical properties of rare earth (RE metals, the background of oxide metallurgy, the functions of RE metals in steelmaking, and the influences of RE metals on steel microstructures. Future prospects for RE metal applications in steelmaking are also presented.

  10. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  11. Process for Producing Metal Compounds From Graphite Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be fiber processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon. metal carbonate. and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  12. Electronic Structure of Rare-Earth Metals. II. Positron Annihilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, R. W.; Mackintosh, Allan

    1968-01-01

    The angular correlation of the photons emitted when positrons annihilate with electrons has been studied in single crystals of the rare-earth metals Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Er, and in a single crystal of an equiatomic alloy of Ho and Er. A comparison of the results for Y with the calculations...... of Loucks shows that the independent-particle model gives a good first approximation to the angular distribution, although correlation effects probably smear out some of the structure. The angular distributions from the heavy rare-earth metals are very similar to that from Y and can be understood...... surface normal to the c axis. The same aspects of the Fermi surface are believed to be important in determining the stability of the periodic magnetic structures formed in some of the metals, and there is a strong correlation between the structure in the angular distribution and the magnetic properties...

  13. Cationic rare-earth metal SALEN complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiancai; Meermann, Christian; Görlitzer, Hans W; Runte, Oliver; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Sirsch, Peter; Törnroos, Karl W; Anwander, Reiner

    2008-11-28

    Complexes (Salpren(tBu,tBu))Y[N(SiHMe2)2](thf) and (SALEN(tBu,tBu))La[N(SiHMe2)2](thf) (SALEN(tBu,tBu) = Salcyc(tBu,tBu) and Salpren(tBu,tBu)) were prepared from Ln[N(SiHMe2)2]3(thf)2 and H2SALEN(tBu,tBu). The yttrium complex was characterized by X-ray crystallography revealing intrinsic solid-state structural features: the metal centre is displaced by 1.05 angstroms from the [N2O2] least squares plane of a highly bent Salpren(tBu,tBu) ligand (angle(Ph,Ph) dihedral angle of 80.4(1) degrees ) and is coordinated asymmetrically by the silylamide ligand exhibiting one significant Y---(HSi) beta-agostic interaction (Y-N1-Si1, 106.90(9) degrees; Y---Si1, 3.2317(6) angstroms). Complexes (SALEN(tBu,tBu))Ln[N(SiHMe2)2](thf)n (n = 1, Sc; n = 2, Y, La) react with ammonium tetraphenylborate to form the ion pairs [(SALEN(tBu,tBu))Ln(thf)n][BPh4]. The cationisation was proven by X-ray crystal structure analyses of [(Salpren(tBu,tBu))Sc(thf)2][B(C6H5)4].2(thf) and [(Salpren(tBu,tBu))Ln(thf)3][B(C6H5)4].4(thf) (Ln = Y, La), showing an octahedral and pentagonal-bipyramidal coordination geometry, respectively.

  14. System and method for producing metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-07-29

    A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

  15. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  16. Systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Li, Anyin; Luo, Qingjie

    2017-08-01

    The invention generally relates to systems and methods for producing metal clusters; functionalized surfaces; and droplets including solvated metal ions. In certain aspects, the invention provides methods that involve providing a metal and a solvent. The methods additionally involve applying voltage to the solvated metal to thereby produce solvent droplets including ions of the metal containing compound, and directing the solvent droplets including the metal ions to a target. In certain embodiments, once at the target, the metal ions can react directly or catalyze reactions.

  17. Growth of oriented rare-earth-transition-metal thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullerton, E.E.; Sowers, C.H.; Bader, S.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wu, X.Z. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Rare-earth-transition-metal thin films are successfully grown by magnetron sputtering onto single-crystal MgO substrates with epitaxial W buffer layers. The use of epitaxial W buffer layers allows oriented single-phase films to be grown. Sm-Co films grown onto W(100), have strong in-plane anisotropy and coercivities exceeding 5 T at 5 K whereas Fe-Sm films have strong perpendicular anisotropy and are magnetically soft.

  18. Metallic Light Absorbers Produced by Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Y. Vorobyev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses for surface structuring, technologically important metallic light absorbers (dark Au, W, and Ti alloy with absorption of about 85–95% over a broad wavelength range from ultraviolet to infrared were produced. It was found that the enhanced absorption of the dark metals is caused by a rich variety of nano-/microscale surface structures. The dark metals produced in this study may find a variety of applications in the fields of renewable energy and energy efficiency, such as thermophotovoltaics, solar energy absorbers, thermal radiation sources, and radiative heat transfer devices.

  19. Thermodynamic Investigation of the Reduction-Distillation Process for Rare Earth Metals Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, W. D.; Azimi, G.

    2017-10-01

    Owing to their high vapor pressure, the four rare earth metals samarium, europium, thulium, and ytterbium are produced by reduction-distillation whereby their oxides are reduced with metallic lanthanum in vacuo, and the produced metal is subsequently vaporized off. Here, we performed a thorough thermodynamic investigation to establish a fundamental understanding of the reduction-distillation process. Thermodynamic functions including vapor pressures, Gibbs free energies, and enthalpies of reaction were calculated and compared with available experimental data. Furthermore, the kinetics of the process was explored and theoretical evaporation rates were calculated from thermodynamic data. The thermodynamic model developed in this work can help optimize processing conditions to maximize the yield and improve the overall process.

  20. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  1. Electrons and Spin Waves in Heavy Rare Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackintosh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Although the main principles governing the magnetic interactions and magnetic ordering in rare earth metals have been qualitatively understood for some time, it is only relatively recently that a sufficiently detailed study has been made of their electronic and magnetic excitations to place...... this understanding on a more quantitative basis. The experimental evidence on the electronic structure of the rare earths is still rather meager but, so far as it goes, is in accord with the detailed description provided by band structure calculations. On the other hand, the experimental study of the magnon...... dispersion relations by inelastic neutron scattering has provided a wealth of information about the interactions between the local moments, associated with the incompletely filled 4f subshell, and the rest of the crystal. The main emphasis in these notes will be on the interrelation between the electronic...

  2. Using thermoforming capacity of metallic glasses to produce multimaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragani, J., E-mail: jennifer.ragani@simap.grenoble-inp.f [Grenoble University/CNRS, Grenoble-INP/UJF, SIMAP Laboratory, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France); Volland, A., E-mail: antoine.volland@simap.grenoble-inp.f [Grenoble University/CNRS, Grenoble-INP/UJF, SIMAP Laboratory, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France); Valque, S.; Liu, Y. [Grenoble University/CNRS, Grenoble-INP/UJF, SIMAP Laboratory, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France); Gravier, S., E-mail: sebastien.gravier@simap.grenoble-inp.f [Grenoble University/CNRS, Grenoble-INP/UJF, SIMAP Laboratory, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France); Blandin, J.J., E-mail: jean-jacques.blandin@simap.grenoble-inp.f [Grenoble University/CNRS, Grenoble-INP/UJF, SIMAP Laboratory, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France); Suery, M., E-mail: michel.suery@simap.grenoble-inp.f [Grenoble University/CNRS, Grenoble-INP/UJF, SIMAP Laboratory, 38402 Saint-Martin d' Heres (France)

    2010-08-15

    In addition to casting, thermoforming is a particularly interesting way to produce components in bulk metallic glasses since large strains can be achieved when the BMGs are deformed in their supercooled liquid region. The experimental window (temperature, time) in which high temperature forming can be carried out is directly related to the crystallization resistance of the glass. Such forming windows have been identified for zirconium based bulk metallic glasses thanks to thermal analysis and compression tests in the supercooled liquid region. Based on this identification, the thermoforming capacity of the studied glasses was used to produce multimaterials associating metallic glasses with conventional metallic alloys. Two processes have been preferentially investigated (co-extrusion and co-pressing) and the interface quality of the elaborated multi materials was studied.

  3. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals. PMID:27574182

  4. 40 CFR 421.270 - Applicability: Description of the primary rare earth metals subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... primary rare earth metals subcategory. 421.270 Section 421.270 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS NONFERROUS METALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Primary Rare Earth Metals Subcategory § 421.270 Applicability: Description of the primary rare...

  5. Heavy metal accumulation by carrageenan and agar producing algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, K.S. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Faculty of Biology; Bird, K.T. [North Carolina Univ., Wilmington, NC (United States). Center for Marine Science Research

    1994-09-01

    The accumulation of six heavy metals Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn, Mn and Pb was measured in living and lzophilized algal thalli. The agar producing algae were Gracilaria tikvahiae and Gelidium pusillum. The carrageenan producing macroalgae were Agardhiella subulata and the gametophyte and tetrasporophyte phases of Chondrus crispus. These produce primarily iota, kappa and lambda carrageenans, respectively. At heavy metal concentrations of 0.5 mg L{sup -1}, living thalli of Gracilaria tikvahiae generally showed the greatest amount of accumulation of the 6 heavy metals tested. The accumulation of Pb was greater in the living thalli of all four species than in the lyophilized thalli. Except for Agardhiella subulata, lyophilized thalli showed greater accumulation of Ni, Cu and Zn. There was no difference in heavy metal accumulation between living and lyophilized thalli in the accumulation of Cd. Manganese showed no accumulation at the tested concentration. There did not appear to be a relationship between algal hydrocolloid characteristics and the amounts of heavy metals accumulated. (orig.)

  6. Evaluating the Heavy Metal Constituents of Pre-Treated Produced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ERAKHRUMEN

    proportions. Produced water undergoes changes in its physical chemistry including precipitation of heavy metals after being discharged and mixed with ambient seawater (Azetsu-Scott et al.,. 2007). It has been noted by some workers that with effective dilution, acute toxic effects of this and other types of effluent water are ...

  7. Concentrations of heavy metals in untreated produced water from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    product, residue or waste. One of such is an effluent from the mining of crude oil and gas, known as produced water, which contains varying quantities of hydrocarbons and heavy metals, thereby making it to require proper treatment in order to ...

  8. Study on decay of rare earth nuclei produced by fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawade, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Michihiro; Asai, Masato [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Tsukada, Kazuaki; Osa, Akihiko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Iimura, Hideki

    1996-01-01

    JAERI-ISOL utilizes charge particle induced fission by proton and heavy proton produced by the tandem type accelerator (JAERI). To study the decay mechanism and nuclei structure of neutron and excess nuclei produced by actinoid fission, JAERI-ISOL was improved by developing the multilayer target tank. So that, the intensity of mass separated ion beam increased enough to use. New 76.6 KeV {gamma}-ray with about 10s of half life was found in the preliminary experiment. (S.Y.)

  9. Metal sulfide and rare-earth phosphate nanostructures and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Zhang, Fen

    2014-05-13

    The present invention provides a method of producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure. The metal is a transitional metal or a Group IV metal. In the method, a porous membrane is placed between a metal precursor solution and a sulfur precursor solution. The metal cations of the metal precursor solution and sulfur ions of the sulfur precursor solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal sulfide nanostructure.

  10. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C.; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart, E-mail: s.t.wagland@cranfield.ac.uk

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Samples from multiple core drills were obtained from 4× landfill sites in the UK. • Each sample analysed for rare earth elements, critical metals and valuable metals. • Two stage microwave digestion method ensuring high yield. • High quantities of copper and aluminium were observed in the soil layers of landfill. • Across 4× landfills aluminium and copper present has a value of around $400 million. - Abstract: Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58 ± 6 mg kg{sup −1} for REEs comprising 44 ± 8 mg kg{sup −1} for light REEs, 11 ± 2 mg kg{sup −1} for heavy REEs and 3 ± 1 mg kg{sup −1} for Scandium (Sc) and 3 ± 1.0 mg kg{sup −1} of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are

  11. Rare earth elements and critical metal content of extracted landfilled material and potential recovery opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Silvia C; Coulon, Frédéric; Jiang, Ying; Wagland, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs), Platinum group metals (PGMs) and other critical metals currently attract significant interest due to the high risks of supply shortage and substantial impact on the economy. Their uses in many applications have made them present in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in commercial and industrial waste (C&I), since several industrial processes produce by-products with high content of these metals. With over 4000 landfills in the UK alone, the aim of this study was to assess the existence of these critical metals within landfills. Samples collected from four closed landfills in UK were subjected to a two-step acid digestion to extract 27 metals of interest. Concentrations across the four landfill sites were 58±6mgkg(-1) for REEs comprising 44±8mgkg(-1) for light REEs, 11±2mgkg(-1) for heavy REEs and 3±1mgkg(-1) for Scandium (Sc) and 3±1.0mgkg(-1) of PGMs. Compared to the typical concentration in ores, these concentrations are too low to achieve a commercially viable extraction. However, content of other highly valuable metals (Al and Cu) was found in concentrations equating to a combined value across the four landfills of around $400 million, which increases the economic viability of landfill mining. Presence of critical metals will mainly depend on the type of waste that was buried but the recovery of these metals through landfill mining is possible and is economically feasible only if additional materials (plastics, paper, metallic items and other) are also recovered for reprocessing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Syntheses and structures of new rare-earth metal tetracyanidoborates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Fanni; Hackbarth, Liisa; Koeckerling, Martin [Anorganische Festkoerperchemie, Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Str. 3a, 18059, Rostock (Germany); Herkert, Lorena; Mueller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Finze, Maik [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Institut fuer nachhaltige Chemie and Katalyse mit Bor (ICB), Julius-Maximilians-Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, 97074, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2017-05-04

    Six new rare-earth metal tetracyanidoborates were prepared and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystals of these salts contain co-crystallized solvent molecules, such as water, acetone, ethanol, or diethyl ether. In [La(EtOH){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}{B(CN)_4}{sub 3}] (1), [La(EtOH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{B(CN)_4}{sub 3}].Et{sub 2}O (2), and [Y(EtOH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}{B(CN)_4}{sub 3}].EtOH (6) the tetracyanidoborate anions are all or in part bonded to the RE{sup 3+} ions, whereas in [Pr(H{sub 2}O){sub 9}][B(CN){sub 4}]{sub 3}.(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO (3), [Er(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}][B(CN){sub 4}]{sub 3}.(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO (4), and [Lu(EtOH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}][B(CN){sub 4}]{sub 3}.EtOH.0.5H{sub 2}O (5) the [B(CN){sub 4}]{sup -} anions are not coordinated to the central metal atoms. Only in 1, one of the three crystallographically independent [B(CN){sub 4}]{sup -} anions acts as a bridging ligand. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Kiesel, Richard F.; Englund, David J; Hendrickson, Dave

    2012-12-18

    A method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets may include providing multiple layers of agglomerates, such as briquettes, balls and extrusions, of a reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and of a reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) on a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material) and providing a coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material over at least some of the agglomerates. Heating the agglomerates of reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  14. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Lindgren, Andrew J.; Kiesel, Richard F.

    2013-06-25

    Method and system for producing metallic nuggets includes providing reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) that may be arranged in discrete portions, such as mounds or briquettes, on at least a portion of a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material). A coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material may be provided over at least some of the discrete portions. Heating the reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  15. Synthesis, structure and reactivity of rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianshu; Kaercher, Sabrina; Roesky, Peter W

    2014-01-07

    A comprehensive review of structurally characterized rare-earth metal complexes containing anionic phosphorus ligands is presented. Since rare-earth elements form hard ions and phosphorus is considered as a soft ligand, the rare-earth metal phosphorus coordination is regarded as a less favorite combination. Three classes of phosphorus ligands, (1) the monoanionic organophosphide ligands (PR2(-)) bearing one negative charge on the phosphorus atom; (2) the dianionic phosphinidene (PR(2-)) and P(3-) ligands; and (3) the pure inorganic polyphosphide ligands (Pn(x-)), are included here. Particular attention has been paid to the synthesis, structure, and reactivity of the rare-earth metal phosphides.

  16. Release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during biomass pyrolysis and steam gasification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jiang; Song, Hu; Jun, Xiang; Sheng, Su; Lun-Shi, Sun; Kai, Xu; Yao, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Investigating the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) is of potential interest because of AAEM's possible useful service as catalysts in biomass thermal conversion. In this study, three kinds of typical Chinese biomass were selected to pyrolyse and their chars were subsequently steam gasified in a designed quartz fixed-bed reactor to investigate the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs). The results indicate that 53-76% of alkali metal and 27-40% of alkaline earth metal release in pyrolysis process, as well as 12-34% of alkali metal and 12-16% of alkaline earth metal evaporate in char gasification process, and temperature is not the only factor to impact AAEMs emission. The releasing characteristics of AAEMs during pyrolysis and char gasification process of three kinds of biomass were discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Naphthenic acid removal from HVGO by alkaline earth metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, L.; Rahimi, P.; Hawkins, R.; Bhatt, S.; Shi, Y. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada); Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CanmetENERGY

    2009-07-01

    This poster highlighted a study that investigated naphthenic acid removal from bitumen-derived heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) by thermal cracking and catalytic decarboxylation over alkaline earth-metal oxides and ZnO catalysts in a batch reactor and a continuous fixed-bed reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}-TPD), and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the fresh and spent catalysts. With MgO and ZnO, naphthenic acid removal proceeded via catalytic decarboxylation. No crystalline phase changes were observed after reaction. With CaO, multiple pathways such as catalytic decarboxylation, neutralization, and thermal cracking were responsible for naphthenic acid conversion. The spent catalysts contained Ca(OH){sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. With BaO, naphthenic acid conversion occurred through neutralization. All BaO was converted to Ba(OH){sub 2} during the reaction. tabs., figs.

  18. Toxicity of Nine (Doped) Rare Earth Metal Oxides and Respective Individual Metals to Aquatic Microorganisms Vibrio fischeri and Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvet, Imbi; Juganson, Katre; Vija, Heiki; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Syvertsen-Wiig, Guttorm; Kahru, Anne

    2017-07-05

    Despite the increasing use of rare earth elements (REEs) and oxides (REOs) in various technologies, the information on their ecotoxicological hazard is scarce. Here, the effects of La(3+), Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+), CeO₂, and eight doped REOs to marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and freshwater protozoa Tetrahymena thermophila were studied in parallel with REO dopant metals (Co(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Sr(2+)). The highest concentrations of REOs tested were 100 mg/L with protozoa in deionized water and 500 mg/L with bacteria in 2% NaCl. Although (i) most REOs produced reactive oxygen species; (ii) all studied soluble REEs were toxic to bacteria (half-effective concentration, EC50 3.5-21 mg metal/L; minimal bactericidal concentration, MBC 6.3-63 mg/L) and to protozoa (EC50 28-42 mg/L); and (iii) also some dopant metals (Ni(2+), Fe(3+)) proved toxic (EC50 ≤ 3 mg/L), no toxicity of REOs to protozoa (EC50 > 100 mg/L) and bacteria (EC50 > 500 mg/L; MBC > 500 mg/L) was observed except for La₂NiO₄ (MBC 25 mg/L). According to kinetics of V. fischeri bioluminescence, the toxicity of REEs was triggered by disturbing cellular membrane integrity. Fortunately, as REEs and REOs are currently produced in moderate amounts and form in the environment insoluble salts and/or oxides, they apparently present no harm to aquatic bacteria and protozoa.

  19. Concentration of heavy metals in ash produced from Lithuanian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrenaite, Edita; Pereira, Paulo; Butkus, Donatas; Úbeda, Xavier

    2010-05-01

    Wood ash contains important amounts of heavy metals. This quantity depends on burned specie, temperature of exposition and heat duration time. Due the high mineralization imposed by the temperatures, ash is used as lime product in agriculture and forests. Also, after a forest fire large quantities of ash are produced and distributed in soil surface. This mineralized organic matter can induce important environmental problems, including soil toxicity provoked by heavy metals leachates from ash. There is an extensive literature about heavy metals contents on ash in different species. However, it recently highlighted that the same species placed in different environments can respond diversely to same temperatures. This question is of major importance because temperature effects on severity can be a function of the plant communities instead of specie characteristics. These findings add a higher degree of complexity in the understanding of temperature effects on ash composition and consequent availability of heavy metals. The aim of this study is to compare the ash chemical heavy metal composition, Cobalt (Co), Chromium (Cr), Cooper (Cu), Silver (Ag), Lead (Pb), Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Zinc (Zn), from Pinus sylvestris and Betula pendula, collected in key and representative areas of Lithuanian forests, located in southern, coastal and central part. Samples were collected from alive trees, taken to laboratory and air dried. Subsequently were crushed and submitted to muffle furnace at temperature of 550°C during two hours. The ash samples were digested and in a HNO3-HCl solution and then analysed with AAS. Comparisons between species and sites were performed with a Non-parametric one-way ANOVA‘s on rank transformed data followed by Tukey‘s HSD, significant at a pcommunication.

  20. SM and ND Substitutions in YBCO Films Produced through Metal Organic Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, B. C.; Fang, H.; Carpenter, J.; Klenk, P.; Varanasi, C. V.; Barnes, P. N.

    2006-03-01

    Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-X (YBCO) films were produced on non-buffered (100) single crystal LaAlO3 using the metal organic deposition (MOD) method with fluorinated metal acetates. In an effort to enhance the in-field performance of the films, Sm and Nd acetates were fractionally substituted for Y acetate in a series of precursor solutions to incorporate an array of nanoscale flux pinning centers in the post-annealed films. From measurements taken in the non-optimized films a 50%-150% improvement in critical current density at 77K in fields up to 1T were found for films with a 1/3 substitution of the Rare Earth elements, with further improvements at 40K. Furthermore, a study of the microstructure of the films by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals the presence of nanoparticles on the surfaces of the films.

  1. Digital Archive Issues from the Perspective of an Earth Science Data Producer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: Introduction. A Producer Perspective on Earth Science Data. Data Producers as Members of a Scientific Community. Some Unique Characteristics of Scientific Data. Spatial and Temporal Sampling for Earth (or Space) Science Data. The Influence of the Data Production System Architecture. The Spatial and Temporal Structures Underlying Earth Science Data. Earth Science Data File (or Relation) Schemas. Data Producer Configuration Management Complexities. The Topology of Earth Science Data Inventories. Some Thoughts on the User Perspective. Science Data User Communities. Spatial and Temporal Structure Needs of Different Users. User Spatial Objects. Data Search Services. Inventory Search. Parameter (Keyword) Search. Metadata Searches. Documentation Search. Secondary Index Search. Print Technology and Hypertext. Inter-Data Collection Configuration Management Issues. An Archive View. Producer Data Ingest and Production. User Data Searching and Distribution. Subsetting and Supersetting. Semantic Requirements for Data Interchange. Tentative Conclusions. An Object Oriented View of Archive Information Evolution. Scientific Data Archival Issues. A Perspective on the Future of Digital Archives for Scientific Data. References Index for this paper.

  2. Segmented metallic nanostructures, homogeneous metallic nanostructures and methods for producing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Stanislaus; Koenigsmann, Christopher

    2017-04-18

    The present invention includes a method of producing a segmented 1D nanostructure. The method includes providing a vessel containing a template wherein on one side of the template is a first metal reagent solution and on the other side of the template is a reducing agent solution, wherein the template comprises at least one pore; allowing a first segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow within a pore of the template until a desired length is reached; replacing the first metal reagent solution with a second metal reagent solution; allowing a second segment of a 1D nanostructure to grow from the first segment until a desired length is reached, wherein a segmented 1D nanostructure is produced.

  3. The recent development of efficient Earth-abundant transition-metal nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Astruc, Didier

    2017-02-06

    Whereas noble metal compounds have long been central in catalysis, Earth-abundant metal-based catalysts have in the same time remained undeveloped. Yet the efficacy of Earth-abundant metal catalysts was already shown at the very beginning of the 20th century with the Fe-catalyzed Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis and later in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Nanoscience has revolutionized the world of catalysis since it was observed that very small Au nanoparticles (NPs) and other noble metal NPs are extraordinarily efficient. Therefore the development of Earth-abundant metals NPs is more recent, but it has appeared necessary due to their "greenness". This review highlights catalysis by NPs of Earth-abundant transition metals that include Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, early transition metals (Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb and W) and their nanocomposites with emphasis on basic principles and literature reported during the last 5 years. A very large spectrum of catalytic reactions has been successfully disclosed, and catalysis has been examined for each metal starting with zero-valent metal NPs followed by oxides and other nanocomposites. The last section highlights the catalytic activities of bi- and trimetallic NPs. Indeed this later family is very promising and simultaneously benefits from increased stability, efficiency and selectivity, compared to monometallic NPs, due to synergistic substrate activation.

  4. Multiplet effects in the electronic structure of light rare-earth metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebegue, S.; Svane, A.; Katsnelson, M.I.; Lichtenstein, A.I.; Eriksson, O.

    2006-01-01

    The excited-state properties of the light rare-earth elemental metals praseodymium, neodymium, and samarium are studied within the Hubbard-I formalism. This method describes the multiplets of the rare-earth f shell by an exact diagonalization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian. Subsequently,

  5. Method of producing microporous joints in metal bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    Tungsten is placed in contact with either molybdenum, tantalum, niobium, vanadium, rhenium, or other metal of atoms having a different diffusion coefficient than tungsten. The metals are heated so that the atoms having the higher diffusion coefficient migrate to the metal having the lower diffusion rate, leaving voids in the higher diffusion coefficient metal. Heating is continued until the voids are interconnected.

  6. Influence of selected rare earth metals on structural characteristics of 42CrMo4 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Drápala

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of rare earth metals (REM addition on solidification structure of the low-carbon 42CrMo4 steel was investigated. Alloys were prepared by means of a centrifugal casting. The addition of cerium, praseodymium or mischmetal in the steel produced greatly improved solidification structure with a suppressed columnar grain zone, finer grain size in the equiaxed grain zone. The additions occurred in the steel bath in the form of REM oxide and/or oxide-sulphide inclusions and as dissolved REM segregated along with other elements at prior grain boundaries and interdendritic spaces. Microstructure (light microscope, SEM/EDX chemical microanalysis, and TOF-SIMS analysis – mapping of elements in the structure of alloys were obtained.

  7. Research on determination of the rare-earth content in metal phases of steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keming, Fang; Ruiming, Ni

    1986-02-01

    The behavior of the rare-earth dissolved in a-Fe, of the iron-cerium intermetallic compounds and of the rare-earth inclusions in electrolytic separation process has been studied by means of counting measurements of radioactivity, the electron probe, and X-ray analysis. The experimental results show that the rare-earth sulfide and the rare-earth oxide are stable completely in the electrolytic separation process, when the composition of the electrolytic solution is 1 pct 4-methyl ammonium chloride, 5 pct triethanolamine, 5 pct glycerin, and 89 pct methyl alcohol, and the controlling anode current density is ≤100 mA/cm2. But Fe-Ce intermetallic compounds and the rare-earth dissolved in a-Fe enter into electrolytic solution as ions. When the cerium ion concentration in electrolytic solution is >7.87 X 10-5 mol/liter electrolyte, precipitates of cerium hydroxide will be formed. When the inclusions are separated quantitatively, the electrolytic solution must be filtered by using a funnel with filter paper pulp thick up to 6 mm, and not be filtered directly with single filter paper. Samples without rare-earth were remelted and a radioactive isotope141Ce was added to the steel. Inclusions were separated by the electrolytic method in the nonaqueous solution. The counting of 14lCe in the electrolytic solution was measured. Thus the rare-earth content in the metal phases can be calculated. Experimental results show that the rare-earth content in the metal phases increases with the total rare-earth content in steel. The rare-earth content in the metal phases of the steel was also found to increase as the aluminum content in steel was increased. This method for determining the rare-earth content in the metal phases of steel is very sensitive. The sensitivity is 10-6 pct.

  8. Crystal Fields in Dilute Rare-Earth Metals Obtained from Magnetization Measurements on Dilute Rare-Earth Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Høg, J.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal field parameters of Tb, Dy, and Er in Sc, Y, and Lu are summarized. These parameters are obtained from magnetization measurements on dilute single crystals, and successfully checked by a number of different methods. The crystal field parameters vary unpredictably with the rare-earth solute....... B40, B60, and B66 are similar in Y and Lu. Crystal field parameters for the pure metals Tb, Dy, and Er are estimated from the crystal fields in Y and Lu....

  9. Local magnetism in rare-earth metals encapsulated in fullerenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Nadai, C; Mirone, A; Dhesi, SS; Bencok, P; Brookes, NB; Marenne, [No Value; Rudolf, P; Tagmatarchis, N; Shinohara, H; Dennis, TJS; Marenne, I.; Nadaï, C. De

    Local magnetic properties of rare-earth (RE) atoms encapsulated in fullerenes have been characterized using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The orbital and spin contributions of the magnetic moment have been determined through sum rules and theoretical

  10. Method of microbially producing metal gallate spinel nano-objects, and compositions produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, Chad E.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald E.; Love, Lonnie J.; Moon, Ji Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Kim, Jongsu; Park, Jehong; Lauf, Robert

    2018-01-16

    A method of forming a metal gallate spinel structure that includes mixing a divalent metal-containing salt and a gallium-containing salt in solution with fermentative or thermophilic bacteria. In the process, the bacteria nucleate metal gallate spinel nano-objects from the divalent metal-containing salt and the gallium-containing salt without requiring reduction of a metal in the solution. The metal gallate spinel structures, as well as light-emitting structures in which they are incorporated, are also described.

  11. An Animal Model Using Metallic Ions to Produce Autoimmune Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Ramírez-Sandoval

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune nephritis triggered by metallic ions was assessed in a Long-Evans rat model. The parameters evaluated included antinuclear autoantibody production, kidney damage mediated by immune complexes detected by immunofluorescence, and renal function tested by retention of nitrogen waste products and proteinuria. To accomplish our goal, the animals were treated with the following ionic metals: HgCl2, CuSO4, AgNO3, and Pb(NO32. A group without ionic metals was used as the control. The results of the present investigation demonstrated that metallic ions triggered antinuclear antibody production in 60% of animals, some of them with anti-DNA specificity. Furthermore, all animals treated with heavy metals developed toxic glomerulonephritis with immune complex deposition along the mesangium and membranes. These phenomena were accompanied by proteinuria and increased concentrations of urea. Based on these results, we conclude that metallic ions may induce experimental autoimmune nephritis.

  12. Semi-solid high pressure die casting of metal matrix composites produced by liquid state processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ivanchev, L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There are two main technologies for manufacturing of particulate reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC), solid state and liquid state processing. The great challenge of producing cast metal matrix composites is to prevent agglomeration...

  13. Maternal exposure to alkali, alkali earth, transition and other metals: Concentrations and predictors of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinwood, A L; Stasinska, A; Callan, A C; Heyworth, J; Ramalingam, M; Boyce, M; McCafferty, P; Odland, J Ø

    2015-09-01

    Most studies of metals exposure focus on the heavy metals. There are many other metals (the transition, alkali and alkaline earth metals in particular) in common use in electronics, defense industries, emitted via combustion and which are naturally present in the environment, that have received limited attention in terms of human exposure. We analysed samples of whole blood (172), urine (173) and drinking water (172) for antimony, beryllium, bismuth, cesium, gallium, rubidium, silver, strontium, thallium, thorium and vanadium using ICPMS. In general most metals concentrations were low and below the analytical limit of detection with some high concentrations observed. Few factors examined in regression models were shown to influence biological metals concentrations and explained little of the variation. Further study is required to establish the source of metals exposures at the high end of the ranges of concentrations measured and the potential for any adverse health impacts in children. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Environmental Defects And Economic Impact On Global Market Of Rare Earth Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampides, G.; Vatalis, K.; Karayannis, V.; Baklavaridis, A.

    2016-11-01

    Rare earth elements include the 14 lanthanides as well as lanthanium and often yttrium. Actually, most of them are not very rare and occur widely dispersed in a variety of rocks. Rare earth metals are vital to some of the world's faster growing industries: catalysts, Nd-magnets, ceramics, glass, metallurgy, battery alloys, electronics and phosphors. Worldwide, the main countries for distribution of rare earths deposits include China, USA, Russia, Brasil, India, Australia, Greenland and Malaysia. The mining and processing of rare earth metals usually result in significant environmental defects. Many deposits are associated with high concentrations of radioactive elements such as uranium and thorium, which requires separate treatment and disposal. The accumulation of rare earth elements in soils has occurred due to pollution caused by the exploitation of rare earth resources and the wide use of rare earths as fertilizers in agriculture. This accumulation has a toxic effect on the soil microfauna community. However, there are large differences in market prices due to the degree of purity determined by the specifications in the applications. The main focus of this article is to overview Rare Earth Metals’ overall impact on global economy and their environmental defects on soils during processing techniques and as they are used as fertilizers.

  15. Occurrence of metal ions in rice produced in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Rivero

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations General Assembly declared the year 2004 the International Year of Rice under the concept "Rice is Life". The largest nutritional problems occurring globally are protein-energy malnutrition, Ca, Fe, I, Zn and vitamin A deficiencies. Being rice the staple food more consumed worldwide, outstanding care is taken on its composition levels.Uruguay has emerged as medium-size rice producer and Latin America's major rice exporter, and is now amongst the world's top ten. Thus, the knowledge of toxic as well as micronutrient elements is very important. Here is reported the determination in forty nine samples of rice (Oryza sativa L. of As, Cd, Cr, and Pb by ET AAS in samples digested by dry ashing, and Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mo, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn by FAAS and Hg by CV AAS using microwave-assisted decomposition.The amount of all the metal ions studied in this work fall within the range typical of rice around the world. All the rice samples tested showed lower levels of As, Cd, Hg and Pb than the maximum limit permitted by governmental and international organizations.Potassium was the most abundant mineral followed by Mg and Ca and amongst microelements the presence of Cu, Fe, Mo, Mn, Na and Zn was outstanding.The milling process highly affects the contents of K, Mg, Mn, Na and Zn while little influence has on Ca, Co, Cu and Fe concentrations.Unexpected loss of Ca, Fe and Mn during parboiling process was detected. 

  16. High-Field Magnetization of Light Rare-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEwen, K.A.; Cock, G.J.; Roeland, L.W.

    1973-01-01

    The magnetization of single crystals of Eu, Sm, Nd, Pr, and Pr-Nd alloys has been measured in fields up to 37 T (370 kG). The results give new information on the magnetic properties of these metals. Of particular interest is a first-order transition from a nonmagnetic to a metamagnetic phase...

  17. Electron-phonon coupling in the rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Mertig, I.

    1990-01-01

    We have estimated the strength of the mass enhancement of the conduction electrons due to electron-phonon interaction in the rare metals Sc, Y, and La–Lu. The underlying self-consistent energy bands were obtained by means of the scalar relativistic linear-muffin-tin-orbital method, and the electron...

  18. Synthesis and infrared spectra of alkaline earth metal carbonates ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The metal carbonate, MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr and Ba), was synthesized by a novel method of reacting aqueous solution of each of Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ salts with urea at high temperature, ∼ 80°C. The reaction products were characterized through elemental analysis and infrared spectra. The infrared spectra of the products are ...

  19. Voltage Control of Rare-Earth Magnetic Moments at the Magnetic-Insulator-Metal Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Alejandro O.; Cahaya, Adam B.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2018-01-01

    The large spin-orbit interaction in the lanthanides implies a strong coupling between their internal charge and spin degrees of freedom. We formulate the coupling between the voltage and the local magnetic moments of rare-earth atoms with a partially filled 4 f shell at the interface between an insulator and a metal. The rare-earth-mediated torques allow the power-efficient control of spintronic devices by electric-field-induced ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization switching.

  20. Biodiesel production using alkali earth metal oxides catalysts synthesized by sol-gel method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Mohadesi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel fuel is considered as an alternative to diesel fuel. This fuel is produced through transesterification reactions of vegetable oils or animal fat by alcohols in the presence of different catalysts. Recent studies on this process have shown that, basic heterogeneous catalysts have a higher performance than other catalysts. In this study different alkali earth metal oxides (CaO, MgO and BaO doped SiO2 were used as catalyst for the biodiesel production process. These catalysts were synthesis by using the sol-gel method. A transesterification reaction was studied after 8h by mixing corn oil, methanol (methanol to oil molar ratio of 16:1, and 6 wt. % catalyst (based on oil at 60oC and 600rpm. Catalyst loading was studied for different catalysts ranging in amounts from 40, 60 to 80%. The purity and yield of the produced biodiesel for 60% CaO/SiO2 was higher than other catalysts and at 97.3% and 82.1%, respectively.

  1. On the single-ion Magnetic Anisotropy of the Rare-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmakova, N.P.; Tishin, A.M.; Bohr, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the single-ion magnetic anisotropy constants for Tb and Dy metals are calculated in terms of the multipole moments of the rare-earth ions utilizing the available crystal-field parameters. The results are compared with the existing experimental data.......The temperature dependences of the single-ion magnetic anisotropy constants for Tb and Dy metals are calculated in terms of the multipole moments of the rare-earth ions utilizing the available crystal-field parameters. The results are compared with the existing experimental data....

  2. New technology of extracting the amount of rare earth metals from the red mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martoyan, G. A.; Karamyan, G. G.; Vardan, G. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper outlined the environmental and economic problems associated with red mud - the waste generated in processing of bauxite ore for aluminum production. The chemical analysis of red mud has identified a number of useful elements including rare earth metals. The electromembrane technology of red mud processing with extraction of valuable elements is described. A possible scheme of separation of these metals through electrolysis is also given.

  3. Search for supernova produced {sup 60}Fe in Earth's microfossil record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Peter; Bishop, Shawn; Chernenko, Valentyna; Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Gomez, Jose; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Egli, Ramon [Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The detection of supernova debris on Earth can be achieved by use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to search for radionuclides like {sup 60}Fe. This long-lived isotope (T{sub 1/2}=2.6 Myr) is produced in massive stars and is expected to be present in the debris of type II supernovae. The discovery of {sup 60}Fe in a ferromanganese crust from the Pacific ocean (Knie et al., 2004) was interpreted as the input of a supernova explosion about 2.2 Myr ago. Currently, several projects are aiming for the confirmation of the signature of {sup 60}Fe in terrestrial and lunar samples. In this talk, the search for this {sup 60}Fe signature in Earth's microfossil record is presented. The sample material for this study is marine sediment from the eastern equatorial Pacific. A specific kind of secondary (formed in situ) magnetite mineral contained in the sample material are magnetofossils, which are the remains of magnetotactic bacteria, which are the target for extraction. The chemical extraction technique used to produce AMS samples has been characterized using newly developed magnetic analysis methods and has been shown to be extremely selective towards secondary magnetite. The AMS samples produced in this way are uniquely suited for the search for supernova {sup 60}Fe. Preliminary AMS results are presented.

  4. Efficient separation of transition metals from rare earths by an undiluted phosphonium thiocyanate ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-06-21

    The ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium thiocyanate has been used for the extraction of the transition metal ions Co(ii), Ni(ii), Zn(ii), and the rare-earth ions La(iii), Sm(iii) and Eu(iii) from aqueous solutions containing nitrate or chloride salts. The transition metal ions showed a high affinity for the ionic liquid phase and were efficiently extracted, while the extraction efficiency of the rare-earth ions was low. This difference in extraction behavior enabled separation of the pairs Co(ii)/Sm(iii), Ni(ii)/La(iii) and Zn(ii)/Eu(iii). These separations are relevant for the recycling of rare earths and transition metals from samarium cobalt permanent magnets, nickel metal hydride batteries and lamp phosphors, respectively. The extraction of metal ions from a chloride or nitrate solution with a thiocyanate ionic liquid is an example of "split-anion extraction", where different anions are present in the aqueous and ionic liquid phase. Close to 100% loading was possible for Co(ii) and Zn(ii) up to a concentration of 40 g L(-1) of the transition metal salt in the initial aqueous feed solution, whereas the extraction efficiency for Ni(ii) gradually decreased with increase in the initial feed concentration. Stripping of Co(ii), Zn(ii) and Ni(ii) from the loaded ionic liquid phase was possible by a 15 wt% NH3 solution. The ionic liquid could reused after extraction and stripping.

  5. Adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on stanene: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadioglu, Yelda; Ersan, Fatih [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Gökoğlu, Gökhan [Department of Physics, Karabük University, 78050 Karabük (Turkey); Aktürk, Olcay Üzengi [Department of Electrical & Electronics Engineering, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Aktürk, Ethem, E-mail: ethem.akturk@adu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey); Nanotechnology Application and Research Center, Adnan Menderes University, 09100 Aydın (Turkey)

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a study on the adsorption of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms on single-layer stanene with different levels of coverage using first-principles plane wave calculations within spin-polarized density functional theory. The most favorable adsorption site for alkali atoms (Li, Na, K) were found to be the hollow site similar to other group IV single-layers, but the case of alkaline-earths on stanene is different from silicene and germanene. Whereas Mg and Ca are bound to stanene at hollow site, the bridge site is found to be energetically favorable for Be adatom. All adsorbed atoms are positively charged due to the charge transfer from adatom to stanene single-layer. The semimetallic bare stanene become metallic except for Be adsorption. The Beryllium adsorption give rise to non-magnetic semiconducting ground state. Our results illustrate that stanene has a reactive and functionalizable surface similar to graphene or silicene. - Highlights: • Alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms form stronger bonds with stanene compared to other group IV monolayers. • Semi-metallic stanene becomes nonmagnetic metal for Li, Na, K, Mg, and Ca atoms adsorption. • Semi-metallic stanene becomes nonmagnetic semiconductor with 94 meV band gap for Be atom adsorption.

  6. Adsorption of alkali, alkaline-earth, and 3d transition metal atoms on silicene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption characteristics of alkali, alkaline-earth, and transition metal adatoms on silicene, a graphene-like monolayer structure of silicon are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. In contrast to graphene, interaction between the metal atoms and the silicene surface is quite strong due to its highly reactive buckled hexagonal structure. In addition to structural properties, we also calculate the electronic band dispersion, net magnetic moment, charge transfer, work function, and dipole moment of the metal adsorbed silicene sheets. Alkali metals, Li, Na, and K, adsorb to hollow sites without any lattice distortion. As a consequence of the significant charge transfer from alkalis to silicene, metalization of silicene takes place. Trends directly related to atomic size, adsorption height, work function, and dipole moment of the silicene/alkali adatom system are also revealed. We found that the adsorption of alkaline-earth metals on silicene is entirely different from their adsorption on graphene. The adsorption of Be, Mg, and Ca turns silicene into a narrow gap semiconductor. Adsorption characteristics of eight transition metals Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Mo, and W are also investigated. As a result of their partially occupied d orbital, transition metals show diverse structural, electronic, and magnetic properties. Upon the adsorption of transition metals, depending on the adatom type and atomic radius, the system can exhibit metal, half-metal, and semiconducting behavior. For all metal adsorbates, the direction of the charge transfer is from adsorbate to silicene, because of its high surface reactivity. Our results indicate that the reactive crystal structure of silicene provides a rich playground for functionalization at nanoscale.

  7. Rare Earth Luminescence in Phosphogypsum Waste Produced From Phosphate Ore Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Hammas Nasri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence properties of rare earth elements (Eu3+, Sm3+ and Ce3+ were investigated in phosphogypsum waste produced from the phosphoric acid manufacture. The presence of these elements was already confirmed after analysis of the phosphogypsum sample by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, which showed total rare earths content about 350 ppm. The principal aim of this work is to use the photoluminescence technique for identifying 4f ions by the mutual relationship between excitation and emission spectra.  The obtained spectra may be used then as reliable references for monitoring rare earth elements during their extraction from phosphogypsum, any time that the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is inapplicable.To find the most convenient conditions for observing Eu3+ emissions, a powder of calcium sulfate doped with europium (CaSO4: Eu (1% was synthesized. After comparison with the emission and excitation spectra of the synthetic gypsum, it was pointed out that excitation of the phosphogypsum selectively at 466 nm is the most suitable for observing Eu3+ emissions. These latter were obtained at around 556 nm and 603 nm.  Based on literature data, Sm3+ and Ce3+ emissions in the phosphogypsum were identified. Sm3+ lines were obtained at 567 nm and 602 nm after a selective excitation at the 4G5/2-6H7/2 transition (404 nm. Whereas cerium luminescence was only observed after calcination of the phosphogypsum sample at 900°C. Ce3+ emissions were obtained at around 305 nm and 326 nm after excitation of the calcined phosphogypsum at 254 nm. The effect of phosphogypsum impurities on the lifetime of rare earths emissions was also discussed.

  8. Theory of Temperature Dependence of the Magnetization in Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures for Gdl-xTx (T = Co, Ni, and Fe) and Y1-xCox can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition-metal pseudo-...

  9. Molecular dynamics of liquid alkaline-earth metals near the melting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 75; Issue 4. Molecular dynamics of liquid alkaline-earth metals near the melting point ... Department of Physics, V.P. & R.P.T.P. Science College, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India; Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120, India ...

  10. No Giant Two-Ion Anisotropy in the Heavy-Rare-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1976-01-01

    A new Bose-operator expansion of tensor operators is applied to the heavy-rare-earth metals. The Er data for the cone phase have been analyzed successfully with single-ion anisotropy and isotropic exchange interaction. The Tb data can be understood on the same basis. The previously found large two...

  11. Calculated Structural Phase-Transitions in the Alkaline-Earth Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1982-01-01

    The local-density approximation and the linear muffin-tin orbital method have been used within the atomic-sphere approximation to calculate structural energy differences for all the alkaline earth metals at zero temperature. At ordinary pressure the calculations predict the crystal structure...

  12. Effect of Rare Earth Metals on the Microstructure of Al-Si Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Alkahtani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed on A356 alloy [Al-7 wt %Si 0.0.35 wt %Mg]. To that La and Ce were added individually or combined up to 1.5 wt % each. The results show that these rare earth elements affect only the alloy melting temperature with no marked change in the temperature of Al-Si eutectic precipitation. Additionally, rare earth metals have no modification effect up to 1.5 wt %. In addition, La and Ce tend to react with Sr leading to modification degradation. In order to achieve noticeable modification of eutectic Si particles, the concentration of rare earth metals should exceed 1.5 wt %, which simultaneously results in the precipitation of a fairly large volume fraction of insoluble intermetallics. The precipitation of these complex intermetallics is expected to have a negative effect on the alloy performance.

  13. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kamiya, Noriho [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Goto, Masahiro, E-mail: m-goto@mail.cstm.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Center for Future Chemistry, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Recycling of rare earth metals from fluorescent lamps was conducted by ionic liquid-mediated extraction. • Acid leaching from a waste phosphor powder was carried out using sulfuric and nitric acids. • An ionic liquid was used as extracting solvent for the rare earth metals. • Selective extraction of rare earth metals from leach solutions was attained. •The extracting ionic liquid phase was recyclable in the recovery process. -- Abstract: The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid–liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system.

  14. Selected heavy metals in some vegetables produced through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study revealed that the concentrations of all metals in the vegetables, except Co, were found to be above the safe limits set by different international organizations for consumption, posing a serious health hazard to humans. Therefore, regular monitoring of effluents, soils, and vegetables are essential to prevent ...

  15. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2004-07-13

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  16. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Rare-Earth Metals Doped ZnO Monolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changlong Tan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of rare-earth metals doped ZnO monolayer have been investigated using the first-principles calculations. The induced spin polarization is confirmed for Ce, Eu, Gd, and Dy dopings while the induced spin polarization is negligible for Y doping. The localized f states of rare-earth atoms respond to the introduction of a magnetic moment. ZnO monolayer undergoes transition from semiconductor to metal in the presence of Y, Ce, Gd, and Dy doping. More interestingly, Eu doped ZnO monolayer exhibits half-metallic behavior. Our result demonstrates that the RE-doping is an efficient route to modify the magnetic and electronic properties in ZnO monolayer.

  17. Effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Song; Jiang, Long; Wang, Yi; Su, Sheng; Sun, Lushi; Xu, Boyang; He, Limo; Xiang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to investigate effects of inherent alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) on biomass pyrolysis at different temperatures. The yield of CO, H2 and C2H4 was increased and that of CO2 was suppressed with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature could also promote depolymerization and aromatization reactions of active tars, forming heavier polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, leading to decrease of tar yields and species diversity. Diverse performance of inherent AAEMs at different temperatures significantly affected the distribution of pyrolysis products. The presence of inherent AAEMs promoted water-gas shift reaction, and enhanced the yield of H2 and CO2. Additionally, inherent AAEMs not only promoted breakage and decarboxylation/decarbonylation reaction of thermally labile hetero atoms of the tar but also enhanced thermal decomposing of heavier aromatics. Inherent AAEMs could also significantly enhance the decomposition of levoglucosan, and alkaline earth metals showed greater effect than alkali metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of rare earth metal on the spin-orbit torque in magnetic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Kohei; Pai, Chi-Feng; Tan, Aik Jun; Mann, Maxwell; Beach, Geoffrey S. D., E-mail: gbeach@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-06-06

    We report the effect of the rare earth metal Gd on current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Pt/Co/Gd heterostructures, characterized using harmonic measurements and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). By varying the Gd metal layer thickness from 0 nm to 8 nm, harmonic measurements reveal a significant enhancement of the effective fields generated from the Slonczewski-like and field-like torques. ST-FMR measurements confirm an enhanced effective spin Hall angle and show a corresponding increase in the magnetic damping constant with increasing Gd thickness. These results suggest that Gd plays an active role in generating SOTs in these heterostructures. Our finding may lead to spin-orbitronics device application such as non-volatile magnetic random access memory, based on rare earth metals.

  19. METAL-CERAMIC INTERFACES PRODUCED BY LASER MELT INJECTION PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHOSSON, JTM; VANDENBURG, M; Burg, M. van den

    1995-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. It is concluded that a firmly bonded coating of Cr2O3 on steel could be produced by high power laser processing. The actual interface strength of a

  20. Valence and metal/silicate partitioning of Mo: Implications for conditions of Earth accretion and core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Pando, K. M.; Shofner, G. A.; Sutton, S. R.; Newville, M.; Lee, C.-T.

    2016-03-01

    To better understand and predict the partition coefficient of Mo at the conditions of the deep interior of Earth and other terrestrial planets or bodies, we have undertaken new measurements of the valence and partitioning of Mo. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) K-edge spectra for Mo have been measured in a series of Fe-bearing glasses produced at 1 bar and higher PT conditions. High pressure experiments have been carried out up to 19 GPa in order to better understand the effect of pressure on Mo partitioning. And, finally, a series of experiments at very low fO2 conditions and high Si content metallic liquids has been carried out to constrain the effect of Si on the partitioning of Mo between metallic liquids and silicate melt. The valence measurements demonstrate that Mo undergoes a transition from 4+ to 6+ near IW-1, in general agreement with previous 1 bar studies on FeO-free silicate melts. High pressure experiments demonstrate a modest pressure dependence of D (Mo) metal/silicate and, combined with previous results, show a significant decrease with pressure that must be quantified in any predictive expression. Finally, the effect of dissolved Si in Fe-rich metallic liquid is to decrease D (Mo) significantly, as suggested by previous work in metallurgical systems. The effect of pressure, temperature, oxygen fugacity, metallic liquid composition, and silicate melt composition can be quantified by using multiple linear regression of available experimental data for Mo. Our XANES results show that Mo will be 4+ at conditions of core formation, so only experiments carried out at fO2 of IW-1 and lower were used in the regressions. Application of predictive expressions to Earth accretion shows that D (Mo) decreases to values consistent with an equilibrium scenario for early Earth core-mantle. The Mo content of the primitive upper mantle (PUM) can be attained by metal-silicate equilibrium involving S-, C-, and Si-bearing metallic liquid, and peridotite

  1. Selective extraction and recovery of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps using an ionic liquid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-06-15

    The recycling of rare earth metals from phosphor powders in waste fluorescent lamps by solvent extraction using ionic liquids was studied. Acid leaching of rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powder was examined first. Yttrium (Y) and europium (Eu) dissolved readily in the acid solution; however, the leaching of other rare earth metals required substantial energy input. Ionization of target rare earth metals from the waste phosphor powders into the leach solution was critical for their successful recovery. As a high temperature was required for the complete leaching of all rare earth metals, ionic liquids, for which vapor pressure is negligible, were used as an alternative extracting phase to the conventional organic diluent. An extractant, N, N-dioctyldiglycol amic acid (DODGAA), which was recently developed, showed a high affinity for rare earth metal ions in liquid-liquid extraction although a conventional commercial phosphonic extractant did not. An effective recovery of the rare earth metals, Y, Eu, La and Ce, from the metal impurities, Fe, Al and Zn, was achieved from the acidic leach solution of phosphor powders using an ionic liquid containing DODGAA as novel extractant system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rare and Rare-Earth Metals in Coal Processing Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkasova Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An urgent issue for power plants operating on solid fuels (coal is the issue of utilization or use of accumulated production waste - ash and slag materials - in the related production. Ash-slag materials are classified as “waste”, usually grade 5; tens of millions of tons of them being pro-duced annually in the Kemerovo region, which threatens the ecology of the region. At the same time, ash and slag is a very promising raw material. The use of this material as a base for the final product allows us to signifi-cantly expand the possibilities of using coal. The most widespread is the system of ash and slag involving in construction or as a replacement for sand in road construction, or as an additive to building mixtures. However, there are both industrially valuable and environmentally dangerous ele-ments in ash-slag materials. Ash-slag materials can be considered as inde-pendent ore deposits located on the surface and requiring the costs of their extraction.

  3. Rare and Rare-Earth Metals in Coal Processing Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkasova, Tatiana; Cherkasova, Elizaveta; Tikhomirova, Anastasia; Bobrovni-kova, Alyona; Goryunova, Irina

    2017-11-01

    An urgent issue for power plants operating on solid fuels (coal) is the issue of utilization or use of accumulated production waste - ash and slag materials - in the related production. Ash-slag materials are classified as "waste", usually grade 5; tens of millions of tons of them being pro-duced annually in the Kemerovo region, which threatens the ecology of the region. At the same time, ash and slag is a very promising raw material. The use of this material as a base for the final product allows us to signifi-cantly expand the possibilities of using coal. The most widespread is the system of ash and slag involving in construction or as a replacement for sand in road construction, or as an additive to building mixtures. However, there are both industrially valuable and environmentally dangerous ele-ments in ash-slag materials. Ash-slag materials can be considered as inde-pendent ore deposits located on the surface and requiring the costs of their extraction.

  4. [Electric current around dental metals as a factor producing allergenic metal ions in the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, N

    1989-11-01

    Allergy to dental metal alloys has been reported to occasionally cause dermatitis, stomatitis, lichen planus and pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. According to Faraday's law of electrolysis, when electric current flows into an anode, cationic metal ions dissolve in parallel with the amount of the electric current. Therefore, when patients hypersensitive to metals have suffered from the above mentioned persistent dermatoses, measurement of voltages and electric currents around the dental alloys of the patient's oral cavities was deemed necessary, in order to investigate whether or not such dental metals have been supplied causative metal ions to the patients. For the investigation of electrochemical dissolution of metal ions; firstly, voltages and electric currents between the mucous membrane and standard dental alloy tips placed in the oral cavities of each 15 healthy volunteers and patients were measured. Secondly, the same study was performed with the mucous membrane and actually installed dental metals with 158 patients who showed positive reactions to dental metal series patch test allergens composed of 19 reagents. The results were as follows: 1) Voltages between the mucous membranes and standard metal plates placed in the oral cavities varied depending on the composition of the dental metal. 2) The above-mentioned voltages changed when various food were present in the oral cavity. 3) With the dental metals actually present in the metal-hypersensitive patient's oral cavities, the voltages between the adjacent mucous membrane and dental metals varied greatly, depending on the individual patient rather than on the types of metal. Certain alloys acted as cathodes with some patients, but as anodes with others. 4) Amalgam and silver alloys showed higher voltages and more electric current with the smaller ranges of variation than other kinds of alloys. Both of these alloys tended to act as anodes, therefore, the electrochemical dissolution of metal ions was expected

  5. Molecular structures of alkaline-earth-metal metallocenes: Electron diffraction and ab initio investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blom, R.; Faegri, K. Jr.; Volden, H.V. (Univ. of Oslo (Norway))

    1990-02-01

    The thermal average molecular structures of Sr(C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2} and Ba(C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2} have been determined by gas electron diffraction. For both compounds the experimental data are consistent with molecular models where the C{sub 5}Me{sub 5} rings are approximately {eta}{sup 5}-bonded to the metals and with ring centroid-metal-ring centroid angles close to 150{degree}. The metal-carbon bond distances are r{sub a}(Sr-C) = 275.0 (8) pm and r{sub a}(Ba-C) = 289.8 (10) pm (mean values). The experimental results are compared to calculations on the model compounds Mg(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2} and Ca(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}){sub 2} in a discussion of the bonding and structure of alkaline-earth-metal metallocenes.

  6. A physical mechanism producing suprathermal populations and initiating substorms in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a candidate physical mechanism, combining there dimensional structure and temporal development, which is potentially able to produce suprathermal populations and cross-tail current disruptions in the Earth's plasma sheet. At the core of the proposed process is the "akis" structure; in a thin current sheet (TCS the stretched (tail-like magnetic field lines locally terminate into a sharp tip around the tail midplane. At this sharp tip of the TCS, ions become non-adiabatic, while a percentage of electrons are accumulated and trapped: The strong and transient electrostatic electric fields established along the magnetic field lines produce suprathermal populations. In parallel, the tip structure is associated with field aligned and mutually attracted parallel filamentary currents which progressively become more intense and inevitably the structure collapses, and so does the local TCS. The mechanism is observationally based on elementary, almost autonomous and spatiotemporal entities that correspond each to a local thinning/dipolarization pair having duration of ~1 min. Energetic proton and electron populations do not occur simultaneously, and we infer that they are separately accelerated at local thinnings and dipolarizations, respectively. In one example energetic particles are accelerated without any dB/dt variation and before the substorm expansion phase onset. A particular effort is undertaken demonstrating that the proposed acceleration mechanism may explain the plasma sheet ratio Ti/Te≈7. All our inferences are checked by the highest resolution datasets obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC instrument. The energetic particles are used as the best diagnostics for the accelerating source. Near Earth (X≈10 RE selected events support our basic concept. The proposed mechanism seems to reveal a fundamental building block of the substorm

  7. A physical mechanism producing suprathermal populations and initiating substorms in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Sarafopoulos

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We suggest a candidate physical mechanism, combining there dimensional structure and temporal development, which is potentially able to produce suprathermal populations and cross-tail current disruptions in the Earth's plasma sheet. At the core of the proposed process is the "akis" structure; in a thin current sheet (TCS the stretched (tail-like magnetic field lines locally terminate into a sharp tip around the tail midplane. At this sharp tip of the TCS, ions become non-adiabatic, while a percentage of electrons are accumulated and trapped: The strong and transient electrostatic electric fields established along the magnetic field lines produce suprathermal populations. In parallel, the tip structure is associated with field aligned and mutually attracted parallel filamentary currents which progressively become more intense and inevitably the structure collapses, and so does the local TCS. The mechanism is observationally based on elementary, almost autonomous and spatiotemporal entities that correspond each to a local thinning/dipolarization pair having duration of ~1 min. Energetic proton and electron populations do not occur simultaneously, and we infer that they are separately accelerated at local thinnings and dipolarizations, respectively. In one example energetic particles are accelerated without any dB/dt variation and before the substorm expansion phase onset. A particular effort is undertaken demonstrating that the proposed acceleration mechanism may explain the plasma sheet ratio Ti/Te≈7. All our inferences are checked by the highest resolution datasets obtained by the Geotail Energetic Particles and Ion Composition (EPIC instrument. The energetic particles are used as the best diagnostics for the accelerating source. Near Earth (X≈10 RE selected events support our basic concept. The proposed mechanism seems to reveal a fundamental building block of the substorm phenomenon and may be the basic process/structure, which is now

  8. Bridging the Gap Between Earth Science Open Data Producers and Consumers Using a Standards based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E.; Sivaraman, C.

    2016-12-01

    The Web brought together science communities creating collaborative opportunities that were previously unimaginable. This was due to the novel ways technology enabled users to share information that would otherwise not be available. This means that data and software that previously could not be discovered without direct contact with data or software creators can now be downloaded with the click of a mouse button, and the same products can now outlive the lifespan of their research projects. While in many ways these technological advancements provide benefit to collaborating scientists, a critical producer-consumer knowledge gap is created when collaborating scientists rely solely on web sites, web browsers, or similar technology to exchange services, software, and data. Without some best practices and common approaches from Web publishers, collaborating scientific consumers have no inherent way to trust the results or other products being shared, producers have no way to convey their scientific credibility, and publishers risk obscurity where data is hidden in the deep Web. By leveraging recommendations from the W3C Data Activity, scientific communities can adopt best practices for data publication enabling consumers to explore, reuse, reproduce, and contribute their knowledge about the data. This talk will discuss the application of W3C Data on the Web Best Practices in support of published earth science data and feature the Data Usage Vocabulary.

  9. Electrolysis of lunar soil to produce oxygen and metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Russell O.; Haskin, Larry A.; Keller, R.

    1991-01-01

    The discussion of melt electrolysis consists of three sections. The implications of the chemistry and physics of fluxed and raw melts on melt electrolysis are discussed first. This includes discussion of the factor that influence melt resistivity, melt viscosity, oxygen production efficiency, and the theoretical energy required to produce oxygen. Second, the implications of phase equilibria and solubilities in silicate melts on the selection of materials for container and electrodes are discussed. The implications of proposed container and electrode materials on melt composition and how this effects expected resistivities, viscosities, as outlined in the first section are discussed. Finally, a general discussion of the basic features of both the fluxed and unfluxed melt electrolysis is given, including their advantages and disadvantages and how they compare with alternative processes.

  10. Modification of Non-Metallic Inclusions by Rare-Earth Elements in Microalloyed Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Opiela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The modification of the chemical composition of non-metallic inclusions by rare-earth elements in the new-developed microalloyed steels was discussed in the paper. The investigated steels are assigned to production of forged elements by thermo- mechanical treatment. The steels were melted in a vaccum induction furnace and modification of non-metallic inclusions was carried out by the michmetal in the amount of 2.0 g per 1 kg of steel. It was found that using material charge of high purity and a realization of metallurgical process in vacuous conditions result in a low concentration of sulfur (0.004%, phosphorus (from 0.006 to 0.008% and oxygen (6 ppm. The high metallurgical purity is confirmed by a small fraction of non-metallic inclusions averaging 0.075%. A large majority of non-metallic inclusions are fine, globular oxide-sulfide or sulfide particles with a mean size 17m2. The chemical composition and morphology of non-metallic inclusions was modified by Ce, La and Nd, what results a small deformability of non- metallic inclusions during hot-working.

  11. Effects of alkaline earth metal ion complexation on amino acid zwitterion stability: Results from infrared action spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, M. F.; Oomens, J.; Saykally, R. J.; Williams, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The structures of isolated alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and theory. These results indicate that arginine, glutamine, proline, serine, and valine all adopt zwitterionic structures when complexed with

  12. Electrochemical Extraction of Rare Earth Metals in Molten Fluorides : Conversion of Rare Earth Oxides into Rare Earth Fluorides Using Fluoride Additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasalizadeh, A.; Malfliet, Annelies; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Sietsma, J.; Yang, Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the present research on rare earth extraction from rare earth oxides (REOs), conversion of rare earth oxides into rare earth fluorides with fluoride fluxes is investigated in order to overcome the problem of low solubility of the rare earth oxides in molten fluoride salts as well as the formation

  13. Search for supernova-produced {sup 60}Fe in the Earth's fossil record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Shawn; Ludwig, Peter; Chernenko, Valentyna; Faestermann, Thomas; Famulok, Nicolai; Fimiani, Leticia; Gomez, Jose; Hain, Karin; Korschinek, Gunther [TU Muenchen, Physik Department (Germany); Egli, Ramon [ZAMG, Wien (Austria); Frederichs, Thomas [Universitaet Bremen, Geowissenschaften (Germany); Hazlik, Marianne [TU Muenchen, Fakultaet fuer Chemie (Germany); Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg [HZDR, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Approximately 1.8 to 2.8 Myr before the present our planet was subjected to the debris of a supernova explosion. The terrestrial proxy for this event was the discovery of live atoms of {sup 60}Fe in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust [Knie et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2004)]. The signature for this supernova event should also reside in magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) magnetofossils produced by magnetotactic bacteria extant at the time of the Earth-supernova interaction; these bacteria were and are ubiquitous in all ocean sediments. We have conducted accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements, searching for live {sup 60}Fe in the magnetofossil component of a Pacific Ocean sediment core (ODP Core 848); additional AMS measurements are now ongoing with a second sediment core (ODP Core 851) in which we expect to find a higher {sup 60}Fe signal. This talk presents the current preliminary status of our {sup 60}Fe search results for both sediment cores.

  14. Process for producing metal oxide superconductor-polymer composites and composites thereby formed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, J.C.W.

    1990-06-05

    This patent describes a process for producing copper based metal oxide superconductors having continuous foam-like morphology. It comprises: co-dissolving solutions other than metal oxides containing metal ions with a polymer or copolymer in an organic solvent in which the solutions and polymer or copolymer are soluble and of a polar organic solvent type selected from the group consisting of dimethyl formamide, dimethacetamide N-methyl pyrolidone and sulfolan, the the polymer or copolymer being selected from the group consisting of (poly)acrylic acid, (poly)methacrylic acid (poly)styrene sulfonic acid, and copolymers of malonic acid, citraconic acid, acrylonitriles, E-caprolactam, cyclic ethers and cyclic acetals having metal complexing or chelating functional pendant substituents, and a copolymer of vinyl acetate and acrylic acid, and the metals being of the type susceptible of forming high transition temperature metal oxide superconductors with at least some selected from the group consisting of Y, Ba, La and Sr.

  15. Hydrometallurgical separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from spent nickel-metal-hydride batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luiz Eduardo Oliveira Carmo; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    The separation of rare earth elements, cobalt and nickel from NiMH battery residues is evaluated in this paper. Analysis of the internal content of the NiMH batteries shows that nickel is the main metal present in the residue (around 50% in weight), as well as potassium (2.2-10.9%), cobalt (5.1-5.5%), rare earth elements (15.3-29.0%) and cadmium (2.8%). The presence of cadmium reveals that some Ni-Cd batteries are possibly labeled as NiMH ones. The leaching of nickel and cobalt from the NiMH battery powder with sulfuric acid is efficient; operating variables temperature and concentration of H 2O 2 has no significant effect for the conditions studied. A mixture of rare earth elements is separated by precipitation with NaOH. Finally, solvent extraction with D2EHPA (di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid) followed by Cyanex 272 (bis-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid) can separate cadmium, cobalt and nickel from the leach liquor. The effect of the main operating variables of both leaching and solvent extraction steps are discussed aiming to maximize metal separation for recycling purposes.

  16. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, M. K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x)81

  17. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mi-Kyung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn13-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3.6Zn13-xAl7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x

  18. Polyoxometalate electrocatalysts based on earth-abundant metals for efficient water oxidation in acidic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Ahicart, Marta; Soriano-López, Joaquín; Carbó, Jorge J.; Poblet, Josep M.; Galan-Mascaros, J. R.

    2018-01-01

    Water splitting is a promising approach to the efficient and cost-effective production of renewable fuels, but water oxidation remains a bottleneck in its technological development because it largely relies on noble-metal catalysts. Although inexpensive transition-metal oxides are competitive water oxidation catalysts in alkaline media, they cannot compete with noble metals in acidic media, in which hydrogen production is easier and faster. Here, we report a water oxidation catalyst based on earth-abundant metals that performs well in acidic conditions. Specifically, we report the enhanced catalytic activity of insoluble salts of polyoxometalates with caesium or barium counter-cations for oxygen evolution. In particular, the barium salt of a cobalt-phosphotungstate polyanion outperforms the state-of-the-art IrO2 catalyst even at pH < 1, with an overpotential of 189 mV at 1 mA cm-2. In addition, we find that a carbon-paste conducting support with a hydrocarbon binder can improve the stability of metal-oxide catalysts in acidic media by providing a hydrophobic environment.

  19. Effects of Rare Earth Metal Addition on Wear Resistance of Chromium-Molybdenum Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasinska J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses changes in the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel modified with rare earth metals (REM. The changes were assessed using scanning microscopy. The wear response was determined in the Miller test to ASTM G75. Abrasion tests were supplemented with the surface profile measurements of non-modified and modified cast steel using a Talysurf CCI optical profilometer. It was demonstrated that the modification substantially affected the microstructure of the alloy, leading to grain size reduction and changed morphology of non-metallic inclusions. The observed changes in the microstructure resulted in a three times higher impact strength (from 33 to 99 kJ/cm2 and more than two times higher resistance to cracking (from 116 to 250 MPa. The following surface parameters were computed: Sa: Arithmetic mean deviation of the surface, Sq: Root-mean-square deviation of the surface, Sp: Maximum height of the peak Sv: Maximum depth of the valley, Sz: Ten Point Average, Ssk: Asymmetry of the surface, Sku: Kurtosis of the surface. The findings also indicated that the addition of rare earth metals had a positive effect on the abrasion behaviour of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel.

  20. Nano porous alkaline earth metal silicates as free fatty acid adsorbents from Crude Palm Oil (CPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masmur, Indra; Sembiring, Seri Bima; Bangun, Nimpan; Kaban, Jamaran; Putri, Nabila Karina

    2017-01-01

    Free fatty acids(FFA) from Crude Palm Oil (CPO) have been adsorbed by alkaline earth metal silicate (M-silicate : M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) adsorbents in ethanol using batch method. The adsorbents were prepared from the chloride salts of alkaline metals and Na2SiO3. The resulting white solid of the alkaline earth metal silicates were then heated at 800°C for 3 hours to enlarge their porosities. All adsorbents were characterized by SEM-EDX, XRD and BET. The EDX spectrum of SEM-EDX showed the appearance of all elements in the adsorbents, and the XRD spectrum of all adsorbents showed that they have crystobalite structure. The porosity of the adsorbents calculated by BET method showed that the porosities of the adsorbents range from 2.0884 - 2.0969 nm. All the adsorbents were used to adsorb the FFA from CPO containing 4.79%, 7.3%, 10.37% and 13.34% of FFA. The ratio of adsorbent to CPO to be used in adsorption of FFA from CPO were made 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, with adsorption time of 1 hour. We found that the maximum adsorption of FFA from CPO was given by Ca-Silicate adsorbent which was between 69.86 - 94.78%, while the lowest adsorption was shown by Mg-silicate adsorbent which was 49.32 -74.53%.

  1. Structurally triggered metal-insulator transition in rare-earth nickelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercy, Alain; Bieder, Jordan; Íñiguez, Jorge; Ghosez, Philippe

    2017-11-22

    Rare-earth nickelates form an intriguing series of correlated perovskite oxides. Apart from LaNiO3, they exhibit on cooling a sharp metal-insulator electronic phase transition, a concurrent structural phase transition, and a magnetic phase transition toward an unusual antiferromagnetic spin order. Appealing for various applications, full exploitation of these compounds is still hampered by the lack of global understanding of the interplay between their electronic, structural, and magnetic properties. Here we show from first-principles calculations that the metal-insulator transition of nickelates arises from the softening of an oxygen-breathing distortion, structurally triggered by oxygen-octahedra rotation motions. The origin of such a rare triggered mechanism is traced back in their electronic and magnetic properties, providing a united picture. We further develop a Landau model accounting for the metal-insulator transition evolution in terms of the rare-earth cations and rationalizing how to tune this transition by acting on oxygen rotation motions.

  2. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  3. Reduction of earth alkaline metal salts in THF solution studied by picosecond pulse radiolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Archirel, Pierre; Schmidhammer, Uli; Teuler, Jean-Marie; Pernot, Pascal; Mostafavi, Mehran

    2013-12-27

    Picosecond pulse radiolysis of tetrahydrofuran (THF) solutions containing earth alkaline metal salt, M(II)(ClO4)2, at different concentrations are performed using two different supercontinua as probe pulse, one covering the visible and another the near-infrared (NIR) down to the visible. Two types of line scan detectors are used to record the absorption spectra in the range from 400 to 1500 nm. Because of the strong overlap between the spectra of the absorbing species in the present wavelength range, global matrices were built for each M(II) system, by delay-wise binding the matrix for pure THF with the available matrices for this cation. The number of absorbers was assessed by Singular Value Decomposition of the global matrix, and a MCR-ALS analysis with the corresponding number of species was performed. The analysis of the results show clearly that solvated electron reacts with the earth alkaline metal molecule and the product has an optical absorption band very different than that of solvated electron in pure THF. So, contrarily to the case of solution containing free Na(+), in the presence of Mg(II), Ca(II) and Sr(II) the observed absorption band is not only blueshifted, but its shape is also drastically changed. In fact with Na(+) solvated electron forms a tight-contact pair but with earth alkaline metal cation solvated electron is scavenged by the undissociated molecule M(II)(ClO4)2. In order to determine the structure of the absorbing species observed after the electron pulse, Monte Carlo/DFT simulations were performed in the case of Mg(II), based on a classical Monte Carlo code and DFT/PCM calculation of the solute. The UV-visible spectrum of the solute is calculated with the help of the TDDFT method. The calculated spectrum is close to the experimental one. It is due to two species, a contact pair and an anion.

  4. Kinetics of the mechanochemical synthesis of alkaline-earth metal amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garroni, Sebastiano; Takacs, Laszlo; Leng, Haiyan; Delogu, Francesco

    2014-07-01

    A phenomenological framework is developed to model the kinetics of the formation of alkaline-earth metal amides by the ball milling induced reaction of their hydrides with gaseous ammonia. It is shown that the exponential character of the kinetic curves is modulated by the increase of the total volume of the powder inside the reactor due to the substantially larger molar volume of the products compared to the reactants. It is claimed that the volume of powder effectively processed during each collision connects the transformation rate to the physical and chemical processes underlying the mechanochemical transformations.

  5. Investigation of possibility of recovery nonferrous metals and producing building materials from copper-nickel smelterslag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlov A.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pelletized slag of copper-nickel smelter ("Pechenganikel" combine, "Kola MMC" JSC has been investigated as a potential technogenic deposit. It has been shown that nonferrous metals can be re-extracted from slag using flotation. The work presents the results of laboratory simulation of heap leaching of non-ferrous metals. Ceramic building materials from slag-based feed have been produced and their main properties have been studied

  6. First-principles study of the alkali earth metal atoms adsorption on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minglei; Tang, Wencheng; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; JinYu; Du, Yanhui; Zhang, Yajun

    2015-11-01

    Geometries, electronic structures, and magnetic properties for alkali earth metal atoms absorbed graphene have been studied by first-principle calculations. For Be and Mg atoms, the interactions between the adatom and graphene are weak van der Waals interactions. In comparison, Ca, Sr and Ba atoms adsorption on graphene exhibits strong ionic bonding with graphene. We found that these atoms bond to graphene at the hollow site with a significant binding energy and large electron transfer. It is intriguing that these adatoms may induce important changes in both the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene. Semimetal graphene becomes metallic and magnetic due to n-type doping. Detailed analysis shows that the s orbitals of these adatoms should be responsible for the arising of the magnetic moment. We believe that our results are suitable for experimental exploration and useful for graphene-based nanoelectronic and data storage.

  7. Anomalous positive flatband voltage shifts in metal gate stacks containing rare-earth oxide capping layers

    KAUST Repository

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.

    2012-03-09

    It is shown that the well-known negative flatband voltage (VFB) shift, induced by rare-earth oxide capping in metal gate stacks, can be completely reversed in the absence of the silicon overlayer. Using TaN metal gates and Gd2O3-doped dielectric, we measure a ∼350 mV negative shift with the Si overlayer present and a ∼110 mV positive shift with the Si overlayer removed. This effect is correlated to a positive change in the average electrostatic potential at the TaN/dielectric interface which originates from an interfacial dipole. The dipole is created by the replacement of interfacial oxygen atoms in the HfO2 lattice with nitrogen atoms from TaN.

  8. A genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus that can produce gold nanoparticles from a metal salt precursor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Love

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV, and demonstrate that unlike wild type (WT TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10-40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials.

  9. Computational Studies of Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Metal Oxides in Li-Ion Batteries and Earth's Lower Mantle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenzhen

    Metal oxide materials are ubiquitous in nature and in our daily lives. For example, the Earth's mantle layer that makes up about 80% of our Earth's volume is composed of metal oxide materials, the cathode materials in the lithium-ion batteries that provide power for most of our mobile electronic devices are composed of metal oxides, the chemical components of the passivation layers on many kinds of metal materials that protect the metal from further corrosion are metal oxides. This thesis is composed of two major topics about the metal oxide materials in nature. The first topic is about our computational study of the iron chemistry in the Earth's lower mantle metal oxide materials, i.e. the bridgmanite (Fe-bearing MgSiO3 where iron is the substitution impurity element) and the ferropericlase (Fe-bearing MgO where iron is the substitution impurity element). The second topic is about our multiscale modeling works for understanding the nanoscale kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the metal oxide cathode interfaces in Li-ion batteries, including the intrinsic cathode interfaces (intergrowth of multiple types of cathode materials, compositional gradient cathode materials, etc.), the cathode/coating interface systems and the cathode/electrolyte interface systems. This thesis uses models based on density functional theory quantum mechanical calculations to explore the underlying physics behind several types of metal oxide materials existing in the interior of the Earth or used in the applications of lithium-ion batteries. The exploration of this physics can help us better understand the geochemical and seismic properties of our Earth and inspire us to engineer the next generation of electrochemical technologies.

  10. New high-pressure and high-temperature metal/silicate partitioning of U and Pb: Implications for the cores of the Earth and Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malavergne, V. [Lunar and Planetary Inst, Houston, TX (United States); Malavergne, V.; Tarrida, M.; Combes, R. [Univ Marne La Vallee, Lab Geomat, F-77454 Marne La Vallee, (France); Bureau, H. [CEA Saclay, LPS, CEA-CNRS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Jones, J. [NASA, Lyndon B Johnson Space Ctr, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Schwandt, C. [Jacobs Sverdrup, ESCG, Houston, TX (United States)

    2007-07-01

    In order to quantify possible fractionation of U and Pb into a metallic core, we have performed piston cylinder and multi-anvil press experiments at high pressure (up to 20 GPa) and high temperature (up to 2400 degrees C) and obtained the distribution coefficient D(metal-silicate) and the exchange partition coefficient K(metal-silicate) for these elements between metal and silicates (mineral or liquid). D{sup Pb}(metal-silicate) and D{sup U}(metal-silicate) depend strongly on the S content of the metallic phase, and also on the oxygen fugacity, in agreement with an effective valence state of 4 for U in silicates and 2 for Pb in silicates. Kd{sup Pb}( metal-silicate) and Kd{sup U}(metal-silicate) show no discernable pressure and temperature trend. U remains lithophile even at high pressure and high temperature but its lithophile nature decreases at very low oxygen fugacity. From our experimental data, it was possible to calculate the U and Pb contents of the cores of Mars and Earth under core-mantle equilibrium conditions at high pressure and high temperature. From the D(metal-silicate) of the present study, we obtained that: 0.008 ppm {<=} Pb (in the core) {<=} 4.4 ppm, and 0.0003 ppb {<=} U (in the core) {<=} 0.63 ppb, depending on whether the metal is S-free or S-saturated respectively, and if the mantle was molten or solid during the segregation process of the Earth's core around {delta}IW-2. For Mars, based on a core segregation process around {delta}IW-1, we obtained that: 0.005 ppm {<=} Pb (in the core) {<=} 3 ppm, and 0.00002 ppb {<=} U (in the core) < 0.05 ppb, depending on the metallic composition: S-free or S-saturated respectively. Our results suggest that the low concentration of Pb in the terrestrial mantle could not be explained by an early Pb sequestration in the Earth's core even if S is the dominant light element of the core. If we assume a magma ocean scenario, U might produced a maximum value of 1.5% of the total heat budget of the core

  11. Rare earth metals in North America; Zeldzame aardmetalen in Noord-Amerika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louzada, K.

    2012-11-15

    The uncertain supply of rare earth metals (Rare Earth Elements) from China for the high tech industry in the U.S. is a barrier for innovation and the high-tech manufacturing industry. Many rare earths are applied in permanent magnets for sustainable energy generation and for energy storage systems in for example electric cars. Also other sectors feel the pressure of shortages. The federal government in the USA and US companies use the opportunity to encourage research into recycling, reducing the use and finding alternatives for rare earths. Canada sees in the uncertain supply and dwindling reserves in the USA and elsewhere an economic opportunity. Canada can start the development of hitherto unprofitable reserves of valuable materials. Both in the USA and Canada, the number of exploration projects in the mining industry has grown significantly [Dutch] De onzekere aanvoer van zeldzame aardmetalen (Rare Earth Elements) uit China voor de hightechindustrie vormt in de VS een hindernis voor innovatie en voor de hightech maakindustrie. Met name in permanente magneten voor duurzame energieopwekking en energieopslagsystemen voor bijvoorbeeld elektrische auto's worden veel zeldzame aardmetalen verwerkt. Ook andere sectoren staan onder druk. De federale overheid en bedrijven in de VS maken van de gelegenheid gebruik om onderzoek naar de recycling, vermindering van het gebruik en alternatieven voor zeldzame aardmetalen te stimuleren. Canada ziet de onzekere aanvoer en slinkende reserves in de VS en elders als een economische kans. Het land kan tot nu toe onrendabele voorkomens van de waardevolle materialen gaan ontwikkelen. Zowel in de VS als in Canada is het aantal exploratieprojecten in de mijnbouw aanzienlijk gegroeid.

  12. Steam Gasification of Sawdust Biochar Influenced by Chemical Speciation of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metallic Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Feng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chemical speciation (H2O/NH4Ac/HCl-soluble and insoluble of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species on the steam gasification of sawdust biochar was investigated in a lab-scale, fixed-bed reactor, with the method of chemical fractionation analysis. The changes in biochar structures and the evolution of biochar reactivity are discussed, with a focus on the contributions of the chemical speciation of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs on the steam gasification of biochar. The results indicate that H2O/NH4Ac/HCl-soluble AAEMs have a significant effect on biochar gasification rates. The release of K occurs mainly in the form of inorganic salts and hydrated ions, while that of Ca occurs mainly as organic ones. The sp3-rich or sp2-sp3 structures and different chemical-speciation AAEMs function together as the preferred active sites during steam gasification. H2O/HCl-soluble AAEMs could promote the transformation of biochar surface functional groups, from ether/alkene C-O-C to carboxylate COO− in biochar, while they may both be improved by NH4Ac-soluble AAEMs. H2O-soluble AAEMs play a crucial catalytic role in biochar reactivity. The effect of NH4Ac-soluble AAEMs is mainly concentrated in the high-conversion stage (biochar conversion >30%, while that of HCl-soluble AAEMs is reflected in the whole activity-testing stage.

  13. Selective Uptake of Alkaline Earth Metals by Cyanobacteria Forming Intracellular Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Nithavong; Benzerara, Karim; Georgelin, Thomas; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Poinsot, Mélanie; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Cordier, Laure

    2016-11-01

    The uptakes of calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) by two cyanobacterial strains, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 and Gloeomargarita lithophora, both forming intracellular carbonates, were investigated in laboratory cultures. In the culture medium BG-11 amended with 250 μM Ca and 50 or 250 μM Sr and Ba, G. lithophora accumulated first Ba, then Sr, and finally Ca. Sr and Ba were completely accumulated by G. lithophora cells at rates between 0.02 and 0.10 fmol h-1 cell-1 and down to extracellular concentrations below the detection limits of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Accumulation of Sr and Ba did not affect the growth rate of the strain. This sequential accumulation occurred mostly intracellularly within polyphosphate and carbonate granules and resulted in the formation of core-shell structures in carbonates. In contrast, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 showed neither a preferential accumulation of heavier alkaline earth metals nor core-shell structures in the carbonates. This indicated that fractionation between alkaline earth metals was not inherent to intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria but was likely a genetically based trait of G. lithophora. Overall, the capability of G. lithophora to sequester preferentially Sr and Ba at high rates may be of considerable interest for designing new remediation strategies and better understanding the geochemical cycles of these elements.

  14. Earthshine observations at high spectral resolution: exploring and detecting metal lines in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Merino, B.; Pallé, E.; Motalebi, F.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Kissler-Patig, M.

    2013-11-01

    Observations of the Earth as a planet using the earthshine technique (i.e. looking at the light reflected from the dark side of the Moon) have been used for climate and astrobiology studies. They provide information about the planetary albedo, a fundamental parameter of the Earth's energy balance. Here we present, for the first time, observations of the earthshine taken at high spectral resolution. The high spectral resolution was chosen in order to investigate the possibility of detecting metallic layers in the Earth's atmosphere of geological or meteoritic origin. The Spettrografo Alta Risoluzione Galileo echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in La Palma was used to acquire the earthshine data. Observations were carried out on several nights in 2011 February, with the spectral resolution set at 29 000, covering a spectral range from the near-ultraviolet (360 nm) to near-infrared (1011.9 nm). While we find evidence for the detection of a Na layer in the earthshine, other atomic species are not detected, perhaps due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of the observations and the difficult telluric corrections. The Na layer is found to vary between observation dates, which we speculate is due to physical variations in mesospheric Na concentrations.

  15. Thermal and Physical Properties of Plutonium Dioxide Produced from the Oxidation of Metal: a Data Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-13

    The ARIES Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory removes plutonium metal from decommissioned nuclear weapons, and converts it to plutonium dioxide in a specially-designed Direct Metal Oxidation furnace. The plutonium dioxide is analyzed for specific surface area, particle size distribution, and moisture content. The purpose of these analyses is to certify that the plutonium dioxide powder meets or exceeds the specifications of the end-user, and the specifications for the packaging and transport of nuclear materials. Analytical results from plutonium dioxide from ARIES development activities, from ARIES production activities, from muffle furnace oxidation of metal, and from metal that was oxidized over a lengthy time interval in air at room temperature, are presented. The processes studied produce plutonium dioxide powder with distinct differences in measured properties, indicating the significant influence of oxidation conditions on physical properties.

  16. Tailoring dislocation structures and mechanical properties of nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a dislocation structure associated with low-angle dislocation boundaries and interior dislocations is a common and characteristic feature in nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation, and plays an important role in determining both the strength and ductility of the nan...

  17. Alkali and alkaline earth metal salts of tetrazolone: structurally interesting and excellently thermostable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Piao; Wu, Le; Wu, Jin-Ting; Yin, Xin; Gozin, Michael; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-07-04

    Tetrazolone (5-oxotetrazole) was synthesized by a moderate strategy through three steps (addition, cyclization and catalytic hydrogenation) avoiding the unstable intermediate diazonium, as reported during the previous preparation. Alkali and alkaline earth metal salts with lithium (1), sodium (2), potassium (3), rubidium (4) caesium (5), magnesium (6), calcium (7), strontium (8) and barium (9) were prepared and fully characterized using elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy, DSC and TG analysis. All metal salts were characterized via single-crystal X-ray diffraction. They crystallize in common space groups with high densities ranging from 1.479 (1) to 3.060 g cm-3 (5). Furthermore, the crystal structures of 7, 8 and 9 reveal interesting porous energetic coordination polymers with strong hydrogen bond interactions. All new salts have good thermal stabilities with decomposition temperature between 215.0 °C (4) and 328.2 °C (7), significantly higher than that of the reported nitrogen-rich salt neutral tetrazolone. The sensitivities towards impact and friction were tested using standard methods, and all the tetrazolone-based compounds investigated can be classified into insensitive. The flame test of these metal salts supports their potential use as perchlorate-free pyrotechnics or eco-friendly insensitive energetic materials.

  18. Influence of Rare Earth Metals on Microstructure and Inclusions Morphology G17CrMo5-5 Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasińska J.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents influence of rare earth metals (REM on the microstructure and morphology of non-metallic inclusions of G17CrMo5-5 cast carbon steel The research has been performed on successive industrial melts. Each time about 2000 kg of liquid metal was modified. The REM was in the form of mishmetal of the composition 49, 8% Ce, 21, 8% La, 17, 1% Nd, 5, 5% Pr and 5, 35% the rest of REM. Therareearth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace.

  19. Observation of vapor pressure enhancement of rare-earth metal-halide salts in the temperature range relevant to metal-halide lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, J. J.; Estupiñán, E. G.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Henins, A.; Shastri, S. D.; Hardis, J. E.

    2012-02-01

    Total vapor-phase densities of Dy in equilibrium with a DyI3/InI condensate and Tm in equilibrium with a TmI3/TlI condensate have been measured for temperatures between 900 K and 1400 K. The measurements show strong enhancements in rare-earth vapor densities compared to vapors in equilibrium with the pure rare-earth metal-halides. The measurements were made with x-ray induced fluorescence on the sector 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. The temperature range and salt mixtures are relevant to the operation of metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  20. Technique for recovering rare-earth metals from spent sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets without external heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Sasai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To selectively recover rare-earth metals with higher purity from spent sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets without external heating, we investigated the mechano-chemical treatment of spent sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet powder with a reaction solution of HCl and (COOH2 at room temperature. The results of various experiments showed that the mechano-chemical treatment with HCl and (COOH2 is very effective for recovering the rare-earth metals contained in spent sintered Nd-Fe-B magnet powder; the recovery rate and purity of the rare-earth metals were 95.3 and 95.0 mass%, respectively, under optimal conditions ([HCl] = 0.2 mol/dm3 and [(COOH2] = 0.25 mol/dm3.

  1. First-principles study on interlayer state in alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Tomoaki; Saito, Riichiro

    2017-11-01

    Energetics and electronic structures of alkali metal (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) and alkaline earth metal (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) atoms intercalated bilayer graphene are systematically investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Formation of alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms intercalated bilayer graphene is exothermic except for Be and Mg. The interlayer state between two graphene layers is occupied for K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, and Ba. We find that the energetic position of the interlayer states between bilayer graphene monotonically shifts downward with increasing of interlayer distance. The interlayer distances of more than 4.5 Å and 4.0 Å, respectively, are necessary for the occupation of the interlayer state in bilayer graphene for alkali and alkaline earth metal atoms, which is almost independent of the intercalant metal species. We discuss the relevance to occurrence of superconductivity for the metal intercalated bilayer graphene in terms of the occupation of the interlayer state and the phonon frequency of metal ions.

  2. Heavy Metals in Seafood and Farm Produce from Uyo, Nigeria; Levels and health implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orish E. Orisakwe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to obtain representative data on the levels of heavy metals in seafood and farm produce consumed by the general population in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria, a region known for the exploration and exploitation of crude oil. Methods: In May 2012, 25 food items, including common types of seafood, cereals, root crops and vegetables, were purchased in Uyo or collected from farmland in the region. Dried samples were ground, digested and centrifuged. Levels of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, nickel, cobalt and chromium were analysed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Average daily intake and target hazard quotients (THQ were estimated. Results: Eight food items (millet, maize, periwinkle, crayfish, stock fish, sabina fish, bonga fish and pumpkin leaf had THQ values over 1.0 for cadmium, indicating a potential health risk in their consumption. All other heavy metals had THQ values below 1.0, indicating insignificant health risks. The total THQ for the heavy metals ranged from 0.389 to 2.986. There were 14 items with total THQ values greater than 1.0, indicating potential health risks in their consumption. Conclusion: The regular consumption of certain types of farm produce and seafood available in Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria, is likely adding to the body burden of heavy metals among those living in this region.

  3. Metal oxide targets produced by the polymer-assisted deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Mitch A., E-mail: mitch@berkeley.ed [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ali, Mazhar N.; Chang, Noel N.; Parsons-Moss, T. [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ashby, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gates, Jacklyn M. [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stavsetra, Liv [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Nitsche, Heino [Department of Chemistry, Room 446 Latimer Hall, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-02-11

    The polymer-assisted deposition (PAD) method was used to create crack-free homogenous metal oxide films for use as targets in nuclear science applications. Metal oxide films of europium, thulium, and hafnium were prepared as models for actinide oxides. Films produced by a single application of PAD were homogenous and uniform and ranged in thickness from 30 to 320 nm. Reapplication of the PAD method (six times) with a 10% by weight hafnium(IV) solution resulted in an equally homogeneous and uniform film with a total thickness of 600 nm.

  4. Ground state oxygen holes and the metal-insulator transition in rare earth nickelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Thorsten; Bisogni, Valentina; Huang, Yaobo; Strocov, Vladimir [Research Department Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Catalano, Sara; Gibert, Marta; Scherwitzl, Raoul; Zubko, Pavlo; Triscone, Jean-Marc [Departement de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Green, Robert J.; Balandeh, Shadi; Sawatzky, George [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Perovskite rare-earth (Re) nickelates ReNiO{sub 3} continue to attract a lot of interest owing to their intriguing properties like a sharp metal to insulator transition (MIT), unusual magnetic order and expected superconductivity in specifically tuned super-lattices. Full understanding of these materials, however, is hampered by the difficulties in describing their electronic ground state (GS). From X-ray absorption (XAS) at the Ni 2p{sub 3/2} edge of thin films of NdNiO{sub 3} and corresponding RIXS maps vs. incident and transferred photon energies we reveal that the electronic GS configuration of NdNiO{sub 3} is composed of delocalized and localized components. Our study conveys that a Ni 3d{sup 8}-like configuration with holes at oxygen takes on the leading role in the GS and the MIT of ReNiO{sub 3} as proposed by recent model theories.

  5. Thermodynamics analysis of the rare earth metals and their alloys with indium in solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassiliev, V.P., E-mail: valeryvassiliev@yahoo.fr [Chemical Department, Lomonossov University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Benaissa, Ablazeze [Département des Matériaux, Faculté des Sciences de l’Ingénieur, Université M’hamed Bougara, Boumerdes 35000 (Algeria); Taldrik, A.F. [Institute of Superconductivity and Solid State Physics, Academician Kurchatov 1, Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-25

    Graphical abstract: Gibbs energies of formation vs. RE atomic numbers in REIn{sub 3}. Highlights: •Set of experimental values was collected for REIn{sub 3} phases. •Thermodynamic functions of formation were calculated at 298 K and 775 K. •Experimental and calculated values were compared. -- Abstract: Nonlinear correlative analyses between thermodynamic and some physico-chemical properties of rare-earth metals (RE) and their alloys with indium are performed for the isostructural phases RE and REIn{sub 3}. The thermodynamics values (Gibbs energies of formation, enthalpies of formation, and entropies of formation at 298 K and 775 K and standard entropies) of LnIn{sub 3} phases are calculated on the basis of calorimetry and potentiometry results. The proposed correlation between physico-chemical and thermodynamic properties agrees for all the isostructural phases REX (X are others elements of the periodic table). The resulting thermodynamic data are recommended for metallurgical handbook.

  6. Magnetic Phase Transition in Rare Earth Metal Holmium at Low Temperatures and High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sarah; Uhoya, Walter; Wenger, Lowell; Vohra, Yogesh

    2012-02-01

    The heavy rare earth metal Holmium has been studied under high pressures and low temperatures using a designer diamond anvil cell and neutron diffraction using a Paris-Edinburgh Cell at the Spallation Neutrons and Pressure (SNAP) Diffractometer. The electrical resistance measurement using designer diamond shows a change in slope at the Neel temperature as the temperature is lowered at high pressures. At atmospheric pressure TN=120 K and decreases with a slope of -4.7 K/GPa as pressure is increased, until reaching 9 GPa, at which pressure the magnetic ordering is lost. This correlates to the pressure at which there is a structural change from an hcp phase to an α-Sm structure. Neutron diffraction measurements made above and below the Neel temperature at increasing pressures show the reversibility of the change between the paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic states. The parameters of the low temperature incommensurate magnetic phase will be reported at various pressures.

  7. Coordination Polymerization of Renewable 3-Methylenecyclopentene with Rare-Earth-Metal Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Shihui; Wang, Meiyan; Cui, Dongmei

    2017-04-10

    Coordination polymerization of renewable 3-methylenecyclopentene has been investigated for the first time using rare-earth metal-based precursors bearing various bulky ligands. All the prepared complexes catalyze controllable polymerization of 3-methylenecyclopentene into high molecular weight polymers, of which the NPN- and NSN-tridentate non-Cp ligated lutetium-based catalytic systems exhibited extremely high activities up to 11 520 kg/(molLu ⋅h) in a dilute toluene solution (3.2 g/100 mL) at room temperature. The resultant polymers have pure 1,4-regioregularity (>99 %) and tailorable number average molecular weights (1-20×104 ) with narrow molecular weight distributions (polydispersity index (PDI)=1.45-1.79). DFT simulations were employed to study the polymerization mechanism and stereoregularity control. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effect of metals on a siderophore producing bacterial isolate and its implications on microbial assisted bioremediation of metal contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Teja; Bhosle, Saroj

    2013-11-01

    A bacterial isolate producing siderophore under iron limiting conditions, was isolated from mangroves of Goa. Based on morphological, biochemical, chemotaxonomical and 16S rDNA studies, the isolate was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NAR38.1. Preliminary characterization of the siderophore indicated it to be catecholate type with dihydroxy benzoate as the core component. Optimum siderophore production was observed at pH 7 in mineral salts medium (MSM) without any added iron with glucose as the carbon source. Addition of NaCl in the growth medium showed considerable decrease in siderophore production above 2% NaCl. Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) below 2 μM and 40 μM concentrations respectively, induced siderophore production, above which the production was repressed. Binding studies of the siderophore with Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) indicated its high affinity towards Fe(+3). The siderophore concentration in the extracellular medium was enhanced when MSM was amended with essential metals Zn, Co, Mo and Mn, however, decreased with Cu, while the concentration was reduced with abiotic metals As, Pb, Al and Cd. Significant increase in extracellular siderophore production was observed with Pb and Al at concentrations of 50 μM and above. The effect of metals on siderophore production was completely mitigated in presence of Fe. The results implicate effect of metals on the efficiency of siderophore production by bacteria for potential application in bioremediation of metal contaminated iron deficient soils especially in the microbial assisted phytoremediation processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Low-Pressure Cold Plasma for Disinfection of ISS Grown Produce and Metallic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Franco, Carolina; Hummerick, Mary E.; Maloney, Phil R.; Spencer, Lashelle E.

    2017-01-01

    Cold plasma (CP) cleaning is a dry, non-thermal process, which can provide broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity yet reportedly causes little to no damage to the object being sanitized. Since cold plasma uses no liquids, it has the distinct advantage when used in microgravity of not having to separate liquids from the item being cleaned. This paper will present results on an effort to use low pressure CP to disinfect or sterilize materials for in space applications. Exposure times from 0 to 60 minutes and pressures ranging from 0.10 to 1.0 mbar were used to optimize plasma parameters. Tests were done on produce and metal coupons to simulate medical equipment. Escherichia coli was used as the challenge organism on produce and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-32 was used on metal surfaces. Produce testing was not successful, with unacceptable kill rates and the produce being negatively impacted by exposure to the plasma. The plasma caused a 5 log reduction in the number of viable bacteria on metal coupon tests, which placed the number of viable bacteria below the detection limit. This is a very promising result showing that sterilization of medical equipment with cold plasma is feasible. Scanning Electron Microscope images were taken before and after exposure. The images after plasma exposure show that the bacteria spores have been physically affected, as their size has gotten smaller and their appearance has changed.

  10. Metal-chelating compounds produced by ectomycorrhizal fungi collected from pine plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machuca, A; Pereira, G; Aguiar, A; Milagres, A M F

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro production of metal-chelating compounds by ectomycorrhizal fungi collected from pine plantations in southern Chile. Scleroderma verrucosum, Suillus luteus and two isolates of Rhizopogon luteolus were grown in solid and liquid modified Melin-Norkans (MMN) media with and without iron addition and the production of iron-chelating compounds was determined by Chrome Azurol S (CAS) assay. The presence of hydroxamate and catecholate-type compounds and organic acids was also investigated in liquid medium. All isolates produced iron-chelating compounds as detected by CAS assay, and catecholates, hydroxamates as well as oxalic, citric and succinic acids were also detected in all fungal cultures. Scleroderma verrucosum produced the greatest amounts of catecholates and hydroxamates whereas the highest amounts of organic acids were detected in S. luteus. Nevertheless, the highest catecholate, hydroxamate and organic acid concentrations did not correlate with the highest CAS reaction which was observed in R. luteolus (Yum isolate). Ectomycorrhizal fungi produced a variety of metal-chelating compounds when grown in liquid MMN medium. However, the addition of iron to all fungi cultures reduced the CAS reaction, hydroxamate and organic acid concentrations. Catecholate production was affected differently by iron, depending on the fungal isolate. The ectomycorrhizal fungi described in this study have never been reported to produce metal-chelating compound production. Moreover, apart from some wood-rotting fungi, this is the first evidence of the presence of catecholates in R. luteolus, S. luteus and S. verrucosum cultures.

  11. Exploration of earth-abundant transition metals (Fe, Co, and Ni) as catalysts in unreactive chemical bond activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo; Cao, Zhi-Chao; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2015-03-17

    Activation of inert chemical bonds, such as C-H, C-O, C-C, and so on, is a very important area, to which has been drawn much attention by chemists for a long time and which is viewed as one of the most ideal ways to produce valuable chemicals. Under modern chemical bond activation logic, many conventionally viewed "inert" chemical bonds that were intact under traditional conditions can be reconsidered as novel functionalities, which not only avoids the tedious synthetic procedures for prefunctionalizations and the emission of undesirable wastes but also inspires chemists to create novel synthetic strategies in completely different manners. Although activation of "inert" chemical bonds using stoichiometric amounts of transition metals has been reported in the past, much more attractive and challenging catalytic transformations began to blossom decades ago. Compared with the broad application of late and noble transition metals in this field, the earth-abundant first-row transition-metals, such as Fe, Co, and Ni, have become much more attractive, due to their obvious advantages, including high abundance on earth, low price, low or no toxicity, and unique catalytic characteristics. In this Account, we summarize our recent efforts toward Fe, Co, and Ni catalyzed "inert" chemical bond activation. Our research first unveiled the unique catalytic ability of iron catalysts in C-O bond activation of both carboxylates and benzyl alcohols in the presence of Grignard reagents. The benzylic C-H functionalization was also developed via Fe catalysis with different nucleophiles, including both electron-rich arenes and 1-aryl-vinyl acetates. Cobalt catalysts also showed their uniqueness in both aromatic C-H activation and C-O activation in the presence of Grignard reagents. We reported the first cobalt-catalyzed sp(2) C-H activation/arylation and alkylation of benzo[h]quinoline and phenylpyridine, in which a new catalytic pathway via an oxidative addition process was demonstrated

  12. Nitridomanganates of alkaline-earth metals. Synthesis, structure, and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, Alexander

    2016-12-02

    The main goal of the present work was the synthesis of alkaline-earth nitridomanganates (AE{sub x}Mn{sub y}N{sub z}) with extended anionic structures and the characterization of their electronic and magnetic properties. Up to now, only compounds with isolated nitridomanganate anions have been reported in the discussed ternary systems. A systematic exploratory synthesis, employing high-temperature treatment of AE nitrides and Mn under controlled N2 pressure, yielded more than ten new nitridomanganates. Their crystal structures contain anionic building blocks of different dimensionalities, ranging from isolated species to three-dimensional frameworks. In general, the formation of Mn-rich compositions was found to be driven by the emergence of Mn-Mn interactions, which creates a link between nitridometalates and transition-metal-rich binary nitrides. The obtained nitridomanganates display a plethora of interesting phenomena, such as large spin-orbit coupling, magnetic frustration, quenching of magnetism due to Mn-Mn interactions, and metal-insulator transition.

  13. The Importance of Rare-Earth Additions in Zr-Based AB2 Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of substitutions of rare earth (RE elements (Y, La, Ce, and Nd to the Zr-based AB2 multi-phase metal hydride (MH alloys on the structure, gaseous phase hydrogen storage (H-storage, and electrochemical properties were studied and compared. Solubilities of the RE atoms in the main Laves phases (C14 and C15 are very low, and therefore the main contributions of the RE additives are through the formation of the RENi phase and change in TiNi phase abundance. Both the RENi and TiNi phases are found to facilitate the bulk diffusion of hydrogen but impede the surface reaction. The former is very effective in improving the activation behaviors. −40 °C performances of the Ce-doped alloys are slightly better than the Nd-doped alloys but not as good as those of the La-doped alloys, which gained the improvement through a different mechanism. While the improvement in ultra-low-temperature performance of the Ce-containing alloys can be associated with a larger amount of metallic Ni-clusters embedded in the surface oxide, the improvement in the La-containing alloys originates from the clean alloy/oxide interface as shown in an earlier transmission electron microscopy study. Overall, the substitution of 1 at% Ce to partially replace Zr gives the best electrochemical performances (capacity, rate, and activation and is recommended for all the AB2 MH alloys for electrochemical applications.

  14. Laser-produced plasma (LPP) x-ray source with BaF2 and rare-earth targets for application in dual-energy subtraction angiography (DESA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Andrzej; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Jiang, Zhiming; Yu, Jianfan; Chamberlain, Charles C.; Bassano, Daniel A.; Gallant, Pascal

    1999-05-01

    A laser produced plasma (LPP) x-ray source utilizing ultra- fast laser was investigated in the context of its utility for dual energy subtraction angiography. Experiments were performed with a Table Top Terawatt (TTT) laser using BaF2 and rare-earth metal targets including La, Ce, Nd and Gd. The laser was operated in a single-pulse or in a dual pulse mode with surface power density in the 1018 - 1019 Wcm-2 range with pulse duration of 150 or 450 fs. Infrared and/or green beams were utilized. Hot electrons' temperature was in the 35 - 50 keV range. The obtained LPP x- ray spectra were comprised of a continuous bremsstrahlung component as well as discrete characteristic lines. The bremsstrahlung extended to high energies with no evident cutoff energy below 100 keV. Its shape was best described by exp(-E/kTe), where Te is the hot electron temperature. The overall efficiency was equal to approximately 9 X 10-4 for 450 fs pulse and approximately 6 X 10-4 for 150 fs pulses. The x-ray focal spot size was in the range 13 to 50 microns. We have found that the LPP x- ray source with BaF2 and rare-earth targets provide x-ray spectra that might be suitable for DESA.

  15. Unambiguously identifying spin states of transition-metal ions in the Earth (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H.

    2010-12-01

    The spin state of a transition-metal ion in crystalline solids, defined by the number of unpaired electrons in the ion’s incomplete 3d shell, may vary with many factors, such as temperature, pressure, strain, and the local atomic configuration, to name a few. Such a phenomenon, known as spin-state crossover, plays a crucial role in spintronic materials. Recently, the pressure-induced spin-state crossover in iron-bearing minerals has been recognized to affect the minerals’ structural and elastic properties. However, the detailed mechanism of such crossover in iron-bearing magnesium silicate perovskite, the most abundant mineral in the Earth, remains unclear. A significant part of this confusion arises from the difficulty in reliably extracting the spin state from experiments. For the same reason, the thermally-induced spin-state crossover in lanthanum cobaltite (LaCoO3) has been controversial for more than four decades. In this talk, I will discuss how first-principle calculations can help clarifying these long-standing controversies. In addition to the total energy, equation of state, and elastic properties of each spin state, first-principle calculations also predict the electric field gradient (EFG) at the nucleus of each transition-metal ion. Our calculations showed that the nuclear EFG, a quantity that can be measured via Mössbauer or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, depends primarily on the spin state, irrespective of the concentration or configuration of transition-metal ions. Such robustness makes EFG a unique fingerprint to identify the spin state. The combination of first-principle calculations and Mössbauer/NMR spectroscopy can therefore be a reliable and efficient approach in tackling spin-state crossover problems in the Earth. This work was primarily supported by the MRSEC Program of NSF under Awards Number DMR-0212302 and DMR-0819885, and partially supported by NSF under ATM-0428774 (V-Lab), EAR-1019853, and EAR-0810272. The

  16. Silylation of C-H bonds in aromatic heterocycles by an Earth-abundant metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutov, Anton A.; Liu, Wen-Bo; Betz, Kerry N.; Fedorov, Alexey; Stoltz, Brian M.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2015-02-01

    Heteroaromatic compounds containing carbon-silicon (C-Si) bonds are of great interest in the fields of organic electronics and photonics, drug discovery, nuclear medicine and complex molecule synthesis, because these compounds have very useful physicochemical properties. Many of the methods now used to construct heteroaromatic C-Si bonds involve stoichiometric reactions between heteroaryl organometallic species and silicon electrophiles or direct, transition-metal-catalysed intermolecular carbon-hydrogen (C-H) silylation using rhodium or iridium complexes in the presence of excess hydrogen acceptors. Both approaches are useful, but their limitations include functional group incompatibility, narrow scope of application, high cost and low availability of the catalysts, and unproven scalability. For this reason, a new and general catalytic approach to heteroaromatic C-Si bond construction that avoids such limitations is highly desirable. Here we report an example of cross-dehydrogenative heteroaromatic C-H functionalization catalysed by an Earth-abundant alkali metal species. We found that readily available and inexpensive potassium tert-butoxide catalyses the direct silylation of aromatic heterocycles with hydrosilanes, furnishing heteroarylsilanes in a single step. The silylation proceeds under mild conditions, in the absence of hydrogen acceptors, ligands or additives, and is scalable to greater than 100 grams under optionally solvent-free conditions. Substrate classes that are difficult to activate with precious metal catalysts are silylated in good yield and with excellent regioselectivity. The derived heteroarylsilane products readily engage in versatile transformations enabling new synthetic strategies for heteroaromatic elaboration, and are useful in their own right in pharmaceutical and materials science applications.

  17. Thermoelectric properties of semiconductor-metal composites produced by particle blending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the quest for more efficient thermoelectric material able to convert thermal to electrical energy and vice versa, composites that combine a semiconductor host having a large Seebeck coefficient with metal nanodomains that provide phonon scattering and free charge carriers are particularly appealing. Here, we present our experimental results on the thermal and electrical transport properties of PbS-metal composites produced by a versatile particle blending procedure, and where the metal work function allows injecting electrons to the intrinsic PbS host. We compare the thermoelectric performance of composites with microcrystalline or nanocrystalline structures. The electrical conductivity of the microcrystalline host can be increased several orders of magnitude with the metal inclusion, while relatively high Seebeck coefficient can be simultaneously conserved. On the other hand, in nanostructured materials, the host crystallites are not able to sustain a band bending at its interface with the metal, becoming flooded with electrons. This translates into even higher electrical conductivities than the microcrystalline material, but at the expense of lower Seebeck coefficient values.

  18. Crystal fields in Sc, Y, and the heavy-rare-earth metals Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.

    1977-01-01

    -field parameters for all these 15 alloy systems deduced. The consistency of the parameters was confirmed by a variety of magnetic measurements, including neutron spectroscopy. Crystal-field parameters have also been derived for the ions in pure magnetic rare-earth metals and their alloys using the results......—with the inaccuracies somewhat increased—are expected to be representative also for the magnetic rare-earth metals. For rare-earth ions in the Sc host the values B40 / β=9.9±1.9 K, B60 / γ=19.8±1.5 K, and B66 / γ=(9.4±0.9)β60 / γ were deduced. B20 / α is a host-sensitive parameter which has the average values of -102.......7, -53.4, and 29.5 K for rare-earth ions in Y, Lu, and Sc, respectively. There is also evidence that this parameter varies with the solute. B20 / α for ions in the pure magnetic rare-earth metals and their alloys shows a linear variation with c / a ratio characteristic of each ion. The results indicate...

  19. Selective oxidation of methanol to hydrogen over gold catalysts promoted by alkaline-earth-metal and lanthanum oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314131116; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2009-01-01

    A series of alumina-supported gold catalysts was investigated for the CO-free production of hydrogen by partial oxidation of methanol. The addition of alkaline-earth metal oxide promoters resulted in a significant improvement of the catalytic performance. The methanol conversion was ca. 85 % with

  20. A rare earth-based metal-organic framework for moisture removal and control in confined spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2017-04-13

    A method for preparing a metal-organic framework (MOF) comprising contacting one or more of a rare earth metal ion component with one or more of a tetratopic ligand component, sufficient to form a rare earth-based MOF for controlling moisture in an environment. A method of moisture control in an environment comprising adsorbing and/or desorbing water vapor in an environment using a MOF, the MOF including one or more of a rare earth metal ion component and one or more of a tetratopic ligand component. A method of controlling moisture in an environment comprising sensing the relative humidity in the environment comprising a MOF; and adsorbing water vapor on the MOF if the relative humidity is above a first level, sufficient to control moisture in an environment. The examples relate to a MOF created from 1,2,4,5-Tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl )benzene (BTEB) as tetratopic ligand, 2-fluorobenzoic acid and Y(NO3)3, Tb(NO3)3 and Yb(NO3)3 as rare earth metals.

  1. Diffuse electron of alkali metals (Li, Na, K) or diffuse electron pair of alkaline earth metals (Be, Mg, Ca) which predict larger second hyperpolarizability? A comprehensive study of M⋯NH3 model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatua, Kaushik; Mondal, Avijit; Banerjee, Paramita; Nandi, Prasanta K.

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, model M⋯NH3 complexes of alkali and alkaline earth metals are considered to calculate second hyperpolarizability using HF, MP2, CCSD and DFT methods. The diffuse electrons of alkali metals are more efficient than diffuse electron pair of alkaline earth metals in enhancing the magnitude of second hyperpolarizability. The radiation frequency has a dramatic effect on γav. Although MP2 γzzzz is overestimated by a smaller margin the corresponding γav fairly agrees with the CCSD result. The large second hyperpolarizability of alkali metal (versus alkaline earth metal) complexes arises from the lower energy intense transition.

  2. A Novel Exopolysaccharide with Metal Adsorption Capacity Produced by a Marine Bacterium Alteromonas sp. JL2810

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zilian; Cai, Ruanhong; Zhang, Wenhui; Fu, Yingnan; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2017-01-01

    Most marine bacteria can produce exopolysaccharides (EPS). However, very few structures of EPS produced by marine bacteria have been determined. The characterization of EPS structure is important for the elucidation of their biological functions and ecological roles. In this study, the structure of EPS produced by a marine bacterium, Alteromonas sp. JL2810, was characterized, and the biosorption of the EPS for heavy metals Cu2+, Ni2+, and Cr6+ was also investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicated that the JL2810 EPS have a novel structure consisting of the repeating unit of [-3)-α-Rhap-(1→3)-α-Manp-(1→4)-α-3OAc-GalAp-(1→]. The biosorption of the EPS for heavy metals was affected by a medium pH; the maximum biosorption capacities for Cu2+ and Ni2+ were 140.8 ± 8.2 mg/g and 226.3 ± 3.3 mg/g at pH 5.0; however, for Cr6+ it was 215.2 ± 5.1 mg/g at pH 5.5. Infrared spectrometry analysis demonstrated that the groups of O-H, C=O, and C-O-C were the main function groups for the adsorption of JL2810 EPS with the heavy metals. The adsorption equilibrium of JL2810 EPS for Ni2+ was further analyzed, and the equilibrium data could be better represented by the Langmuir isotherm model. The novel EPS could be potentially used in industrial applications as a novel bio-resource for the removal of heavy metals. PMID:28604644

  3. Identification of new neutron-rich rare-earth nuclei produced in /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, R C; Gehrke, R J; Meikrantz, D H

    1981-01-01

    A program of systematic study of the decay properties of neutron-rich rare-earth nuclei with 30 sproduced in /sup 252/Cf spontaneous fission, is currently underway using the Idaho ESOL (Elemental Separation On Line) Facility. The chemistry system used for the rare-earth elemental separations consists of two high-performance chromatography columns connected in series and coupled to the /sup 252 /Cf fission source via a helium gas-jet transport arrangement. The time delay for separation and initiation of gamma -ray counting with results which have been obtained to date with this system include the identification of a number of new neutron-rich rare-earth isotopes including /sup 155/Pm (t/sub 1/2/=48+or-4 s) and /sup 163/Gd (t/sub 1 /2/=68+or-3 s), in addition to 5.51 min /sup 158/Sm which was identified in an earlier series of experiments. (11 refs).

  4. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Foreshock Disturbances Observed Upstream of Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Sibeck, D. G.; Turner, D. L.; Osmane, A.; Caprioli, D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles can be reflected and accelerated by strong (i.e., high Mach number) astrophysical collisionless shock waves, streaming away to form a foreshock region in communication with the shock. Foreshocks are primarily populated by suprathermal ions that can generate foreshock disturbances-largescale (i.e., tens to thousands of thermal ion Larmor radii), transient (approximately 5-10 per day) structures. They have recently been found to accelerate ions to energies of several keV. Although electrons in Saturn's high Mach number (M > 40) bow shock can be accelerated to relativistic energies (nearly 1000 keV), it has hitherto been thought impossible to accelerate electrons beyond a few tens of keV at Earth's low Mach number (1 =M shock. Here we report observations of electrons energized by foreshock disturbances to energies up to at least approximately 300 keV. Although such energetic electrons have been previously observed, their presence has been attributed to escaping magnetospheric particles or solar events. These relativistic electrons are not associated with any solar or magnetospheric activity. Further, due to their relatively small Larmor radii (compared to magnetic gradient scale lengths) and large thermal speeds (compared to shock speeds), no known shock acceleration mechanism can energize thermal electrons up to relativistic energies. The discovery of relativistic electrons associated with foreshock structures commonly generated in astrophysical shocks could provide a new paradigm for electron injections and acceleration in collisionless plasmas.

  5. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Foreshock Disturbances Observed Upstream of Earth's Bow Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Sibeck, D. G.; Turner, D. L.; Osmane, A.; Caprioli, D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles can be reflected and accelerated by strong (i.e., high Mach number) astrophysical collisionless shock waves, streaming away to form a foreshock region in communication with the shock. Foreshocks are primarily populated by suprathermal ions that can generate foreshock disturbances-largescale (i.e., tens to thousands of thermal ion Larmor radii), transient (approximately 5-10 per day) structures. They have recently been found to accelerate ions to energies of several keV. Although electrons in Saturn's high Mach number (M > 40) bow shock can be accelerated to relativistic energies (nearly 1000 keV), it has hitherto been thought impossible to accelerate electrons beyond a few tens of keV at Earth's low Mach number (1 =M electrons energized by foreshock disturbances to energies up to at least approximately 300 keV. Although such energetic electrons have been previously observed, their presence has been attributed to escaping magnetospheric particles or solar events. These relativistic electrons are not associated with any solar or magnetospheric activity. Further, due to their relatively small Larmor radii (compared to magnetic gradient scale lengths) and large thermal speeds (compared to shock speeds), no known shock acceleration mechanism can energize thermal electrons up to relativistic energies. The discovery of relativistic electrons associated with foreshock structures commonly generated in astrophysical shocks could provide a new paradigm for electron injections and acceleration in collisionless plasmas.

  6. Synthesis and structural diversity of trivalent rare-earth metal diisopropylamide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Tatiana; Heß, Oliver; Meermann-Zimmermann, Melanie; Meermann, Christian; Klimpel, Michael G; Estler, Frank; Schneider, David; Scherer, Wolfgang; Tafipolsky, Maxim; Törnroos, Karl W; Maichle-Mössmer, Cäcilia; Sirsch, Peter; Anwander, Reiner

    2016-09-21

    A series of rare-earth metal diisopropylamide complexes has been obtained via salt metathesis employing LnCl3(THF)x and lithium (LDA) or sodium diisopropylamide (NDA) in n-hexane. Reactions with AM : Ln ratios ≥3 gave ate complexes (AM)Ln(NiPr2)4(THF)n (n = 1, 2; Ln = Sc, Y, La, Lu; AM = Li, Na) in good yields. For smaller rare-earth metal centres such as scandium and lutetium, a Li : Ln ratio = 2.5 accomplished ate-free tris(amido) complexes Ln(NiPr2)3(THF). The chloro-bridged dimeric derivatives [Ln(NiPr2)2(μ-Cl)(THF)]2 (Ln = Sc, Y, La, Lu) could be obtained in high yields for Li : Ln = 1.6-2. The product resulting from the Li : La = 1 : 1.6 reaction revealed a crystal structure containing two different molecules in the crystal lattice, [La(NiPr2)2(THF)(μ-Cl)]2·La(NiPr2)3(THF)2. Recrystallization of the chloro-bridged dimers led to the formation of the monomeric species Ln(NiPr2)2Cl(THF)2 (Ln = Sc, Lu) and La(NiPr2)3(THF)2. The reaction of YCl3 and LDA with Li : Y = 2 in the absence of THF gave a bimetallic ate complex LiY(NiPr2)4 with a chain-like structure. For scandium, the equimolar reactions with LDA or NDA yielded crystals of tetrametallic mono(amido) species, {[Sc(NiPr2)Cl2(THF)]2(LiCl)}2 and [Sc(NiPr2)Cl2(THF)]4, respectively. Depending on the Ln(iii) size, AM, and presence of a donor solvent, ate complexes (AM)Ln(NiPr2)4(THF)n show distinct dynamic behaviour as revealed by variable temperature NMR spectroscopy. The presence of weak LnCH(iPr) β-agostic interactions, as indicated by Ln-N-C angles <105°, is corroborated by DFT calculations and NBO analysis.

  7. Behavior and Distribution of Heavy Metals Including Rare Earth Elements, Thorium, and Uranium in Sludge from Industry Water Treatment Plant and Recovery Method of Metals by Biosurfactants Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lidi; Kano, Naoki; Sato, Yuichi; Li, Chong; Zhang, Shuang; Imaizumi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the behavior, distribution, and characteristics of heavy metals including rare earth elements (REEs), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) in sludge, the total and fractional concentrations of these elements in sludge collected from an industry water treatment plant were determined and compared with those in natural soil. In addition, the removal/recovery process of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, and Ni) from the polluted sludge was studied with biosurfactant (saponin and sophorolipid) elution by batch and column experiments to evaluate the efficiency of biosurfactant for the removal of heavy metals. Consequently, the following matters have been largely clarified. (1) Heavy metallic elements in sludge have generally larger concentrations and exist as more unstable fraction than those in natural soil. (2) Nonionic saponin including carboxyl group is more efficient than sophorolipid for the removal of heavy metals in polluted sludge. Saponin has selectivity for the mobilization of heavy metals and mainly reacts with heavy metals in F3 (the fraction bound to carbonates) and F5 (the fraction bound to Fe-Mn oxides). (3) The recovery efficiency of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, and Cr) reached about 90–100% using a precipitation method with alkaline solution. PMID:22693485

  8. The effects of rare earth elements on an anaerobic hydrogen producing microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Y.; St Jeor, J. D.; Reed, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid growth of new energy technologies and consumer electronics is leading to increased fluxes of rare earth elements (REE), during the phases of resource extraction, product usage, recycling, and disposal. However, little is known about the impacts of these increased REE fluxes on environmental ecosystems, whether natural or engineered (e.g., biological waste treatment systems). We have been evaluating the effects of europium and yttrium on hydrogen production by an anaerobic fermenting microorganism, Sporacetigenium mesophilum, originally isolated from an anaerobic digester at a wastewater treatment plant.1 Europium and yttrium are important components of phosphors used in fluorescent lighting, and are expected to be recycled in larger quantities in the future. Also tested was the compound tributyl phosphate (TBP), a widely used complexing agent in lanthanide and actinide separations. TBP and related compounds may be used in recycling processes for REE. S. mesophilumcultures were amended with Eu at 100 ppb, 1 ppm and 10 ppm and hydrogen production was measured. While the lowest Eu concentration had minimal effect on hydrogen production compared to the no Eu control, the two higher Eu amendment levels appeared to enhance hydrogen production. TBP at 0.1 g/L completely inhibited hydrogen production. Measurements of aqueous Eu concentrations indicated that >85% of the added Eu remained soluble at all three of the Eu addition levels tested. Experiments to ascertain whether enhancement (or inhibition) occurs at even higher Eu concentrations are underway, as are corresponding experiments with yttrium. This work contributes to the assessment of the potential impacts of increased REE recycling and processing on ecosystems, and supports decision making with respect to disposal of wastewaters generated during these industrial practices. 1Chen, S., Song, L. and X. Dong. Int J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 56, 721-725, doi: 10.1099/ijs.0.63686-0 (2006).

  9. Dynamics of the plume produced by nanosecond ultraviolet laser ablation of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Schou, Jørgen; Lunney, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the ablation plume of a partially ionized plasma produced by a nanosecond UV laser with different irradiation spot geometries has been explored. We have used an ensemble of quartz crystal microbalances to make the first systematic and quantitative study of how the shape of the plume...... varies as the aspect ratio (b/a) of the elliptical laser spot is varied by about a factor of ten. The flip-over effect can be described by the adiabatic expansion model of Anisimov using a value of the adiabatic constant of about gamma = 1.4. We have also studied the forward peaking of the ablation plume...... for a large number of metals at the same laser fluence. Contrary to earlier reports, we find that the more refractory metals have the broader angular distributions....

  10. Structural characterization of biomedical Co–Cr–Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barucca, G., E-mail: g.barucca@univpm.it [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Santecchia, E.; Majni, G. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Girardin, E. [DISCO, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Bassoli, E.; Denti, L.; Gatto, A. [DIMeC, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Vignolese 905/B, Modena 41125 (Italy); Iuliano, L. [DISPEA, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Moskalewicz, T. [Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Mengucci, P. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111}{sub γ} planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. - Highlights: • Samples of a Co–Cr–Mo biomedical alloy were produced by direct metal laser sintering. • Hardness values unexpectedly high were attributed to a peculiar microstructure. • Fine lamellae of the ε-phase alternated to the γ-phase were observed for the first time. • A nucleation and growth model for the observed microstructure is proposed.

  11. Evaluation of Low-Pressure Cold Plasma for Disinfection for ISS Grown Produce and Metallic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Franco, Carolina; Hummerick, Mary E.; Maloney, Phillip R.; Spencer, Lashelle E.

    2017-01-01

    Cold plasma (CP) cleaning is a dry, non-thermal process, which can provide broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity yet reportedly causes little to no damage to the object being sanitized. Since cold plasma uses no liquids, it has the distinct advantage when used in microgravity of not having to separate liquids from the item being cleaned. This paper will present results on an effort to use low pressure CP to disinfect or sterilize materials for in space applications. Exposure times from 0 to 60 minutes and pressures ranging from 10 to 100 Pa were used to optimize plasma parameters to achieve acceptable kill rates for 3 bacteria, Bacillus cereus, E. coli and Bacillus pumulis SAFR-32 and one fungi, Aspergillus niger. These tests were done on produce and metal coupons to simulate medical equipment. Produce testing was not successful, with unacceptable kill rates and the produce being negatively impacted by exposure to the plasma. The plasma caused a 5 log reduction in the number of viable bacteria on metal coupon tests, which placed the number of viable bacteria below the detection limit. This is a very promising result showing that sterilization of medical equipment with cold plasma is feasible. Scanning Electron Microscope images were taken before and after exposure. The images after plasma exposure shows that the bacteria spores have been physically affected, as their size has gotten smaller and the appearance has changed.

  12. Typical aqueous rare earth element behavior in co-produced Brines, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, Charles; Quillinan, Scott [UNIVERSIty of Wyoming; McLing, Travis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Neupane, Ghanashyam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-10-24

    Normalization of Rare Earth Elements (REEs) is important to remove the distracting effects of the Oddo–Harkins rule and provide a meaningful baseline. Normalizations for rocks are well developed and include chondritic meteorites, UCC, PM, PAAS, and NASC. However normalizations for aqueous REEs are limited to oceanic regions such as the North Pacific Deep Water or North Atlantic Surface Water. This leaves water in contact with continental lithologies without a suitable normalization. We present a preliminary continental aqueous REE normalization derived from 38 deep basin hydrocarbon brines in Wyoming. The REEs in these waters are seven orders of magnitude more dilute than NASC but with significant europium enrichment. Gromet 1984 reports NASC Eu/Eu* is 0.2179, whereas in the normalization offered here, Eu/Eu* is 3.868. These waters also are free from the distracting reduction-oxidation cerium behavior found in ocean normalizations. Because these samples exhibit both the uniform behavior of NASC and the absolute concentration of seawater, a normalization based upon them offers a unique combination of the advantages of both. We used single-peak gaussian analysis to quantify the mean values for each REE and estimate the distribution variability. Additional sample collection during the last year revealed that the Powder River Basin (PRB) is atypical relative to the other sampled basins of Wyoming. Those other basins are the Wind River Basin (WRB) Green River Basin (GRB) and Wamsutter Area (WA). A pre-normalization gadolinium anomaly (Gd/Gd*) of between 4 and 23 with a mean of 11.5, defines the PRB samples. Other basins in this study range from 1 to 7 with a mean of 2.8. Finally, we present a preliminary model for ligand-based behavior of REEs in these samples. This model identifies bicarbonate, bromide, and chloride as forming significant complexes with REEs contributing to REE solubility. The ligand model explains observed REEs in the sampled Cretaceous and

  13. Trace metal contents of selected seeds and vegetables from oil producing areas of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegwu, Matthew O; Omeodu, Stephen I

    2010-07-01

    The concentrations of accumulated trace metals in selected seeds and vegetables collected in the oil producing Rivers State of Nigeria were investigated. The values were compared with those of seeds and vegetables cultivated in Owerri, a less industrialized area in Nigeria. The lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) contents of the seeds obtained from Rivers State ranged between 0.10 and 0.23 microg/g dry weight, while those of the seeds cultivated in Owerri fell below the detection limit of 0.01 microg/g dry weight. The highest manganese (Mn) level (902 microg/g dry weight) was found in Irvingia garbonesis seeds cultivated in Rivers State. Similarly, the highest nickel (Ni) value (199 microg/g dry weight) was also obtained in I. garbonesis, however, in the seeds sampled in Owerri. The highest copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and iron (Fe) levels (16.8, 5.27, and 26.2 microg/g dry weight, resp.) were detected in seeds collected in Rivers State. With the exception of Talinum triangulae, Ocinum gratissimum, and Piper guineese, with Pb levels of 0.09, 0.10, and 0.11 microg/g dry weight, respectively, the Pb and Cd levels in the vegetables grown in Owerri fell below the detection limit of 0.01 microg/g dry weight. The trace metal with the highest levels in all the vegetables studied was Mn, followed by Fe. The highest concentrations of Ni and Cu occurred in vegetables collected from Rivers State, while the highest level of Zn was observed in Piper guineese collected in Owerri, with a value of 21.4 microg/g dry weight. Although the trace metal concentrations of the seeds and vegetables collected in Rivers State tended to be higher than those of the seeds and vegetables grown in Owerri, the average levels of trace metals obtained in this study fell far below the WHO specifications for metals in foods.

  14. Filament wound metal lined propellant tanks for future Earth-to-orbit transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macconochie, Ian O.; Davis, Robert B.; Freeman, William T., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    For future Earth-to-orbit transport vehicles, reusability and lighter weights are sought for the main propellant tanks. To achieve this, a filament wound tank with a metal liner and an intermediate layer of foam-filled honeycomb is proposed. A hydrogen tank is used as an example. To accommodate mismatches in the expansion of liner and overwrap a design is proposed wherin the liner is configured so that the extension of the liner under pressure matches the expected contraction of the same liner due to the presence of a cryogen. In operation, the liner is pressurized at a rate such that the pressure strain matches the contraction due to decrease in temperature. As an alternate approach, compressive pre-stress is placed in the liner such that it will not separate from the overwrap. A finite element program is used to show stresses in the liner and overwrap for various tank pressures for the pre-stressed liner concept. A fracture mechanics analysis is made of the liners to determine tank life. The tank concept shown has a similar weight to the Shuttle external hydrogen tank, but the filament wound tank is expected to be reusable. Integration of the propellant tanks into a future transport vehicle is discussed.

  15. Sol-gel-derived hybrid materials multi-doped with rare-earth metal ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazowska, E.; Rysiakiewicz-Pasek, E.; Borczuch-Laczka, M.; Cholewa-Kowalska, K.

    2012-06-01

    Four different hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on TiO2-SiO2 matrices with organic additives and doped with rare-earth metal ions (III) from the group of europium, cerium, terbium, neodymium, dysprosium and samarium, were synthesized by sol-gel method. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, titanium (IV) isopropoxide and organic compounds, such as butyl acrylate, butyl methacrylate, ethyl acetoacetate, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, ethyl acetate, propylene carbonate, organic solvents and certain inorganic salts were used in the synthesis. The inorganic part of the sols, which were used in the synthesis of all the hybrid materials, was prepared separately and then the organic parts were added. The materials obtained were aged for three weeks at room temperature and then heated in an electric oven for three hours at temperatures of 80 °C-150 °C. Scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX); X-ray diffraction (XRD); Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (KBr technique); 29Si magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance; and fluorescence spectroscopy were used for the examination of morphology, microstructure and luminescence properties, respectively. Photoluminescence properties with relatively intense narrow emission lines of Tb, Eu, Dy, Nd, Sm respectively to the RE-ions doping, were observed for all the hybrid materials.

  16. Facile fabrication of graphene-based aerogel with rare earth metal oxide for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Liupeng; Liu, Shunli; Oderinde, Olayinka; Li, Kewen; Yao, Fang; Fu, Guodong

    2018-01-01

    We report a one-step facile fabrication of macroscopic multifunctional graphene-based aerogel with three-dimensional interconnected networks under the synergistic effects of the reduction of graphene oxide sheets by L-ascorbic acid and in situ simultaneous deposition of nanoparticles on graphene sheets. The functional components, Nd2O3 nanoparticles, can be easily incorporated with graphene sheets to assemble bulk macroscopic graphene materials under mild conditions. The reduced graphene oxide/neodymium oxide (rGO/Nd2O3) aerogel showed remarkable adsorption capacity towards different types of dyes, especially for anionic dyes, with the adsorption capacity for indigo disulphonate (ID) being more than 220 mg g-1 within one hour while the adsorption capacity at equilibrium is as high as 397 mg g-1. The method proposed is proven to be universal to induce macroscopic assembly of reduced graphene sheets with rare earth metal oxides and thus facilitates to accessing various graphene-based multifunctional nanocomposites in the form of macroscopic aerogels.

  17. Noble-metal nanoparticles produced with colloidal lithography: fabrication, optical properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocchio, Noelia Laura

    2008-08-15

    In this work, metal nanoparticles produced by nanosphere lithography were studied in terms of their optical properties (in connection to their plasmon resonances), their potential application in sensing platforms - for thin layer sensing and bio-recognition events -, and for a particular case (the nanocrescents), for enhanced spectroscopy studies. The general preparation procedures introduced early in 2005 by Shumaker-Parry et al. to produce metallic nanocrescents were extended to give rise to more complex (isolated) structures, and also, by combining colloidal monolayer fabrication and plasma etching techniques, to arrays of them. The fabrication methods presented in this work were extended not only to new shapes or arrangements of particles, but included also a targeted surface tailoring of the substrates and the structures, using different thiol and silane compounds as linkers for further attachment of, i.e. polyelectrolyte layers, which allow for a controlled tailoring of their nanoenvironment. The optical properties of the nanocrescents were studied with conventional transmission spectroscopy; a simple multipole model was adapted to explain their behaviour qualitatively. In terms of applications, the results on thin film sensing using these particles show that the crescents present an interesting mode-dependent sensitivity and spatial extension. Parallel to this, the penetrations depths were modeled with two simplified schemes, obtaining good agreement with theory. The multiple modes of the particles with their characteristic decay lengths and sensitivities represent a major improvement for particle-sensing platforms compared to previous single resonance systems. The nanocrescents were also used to alter the emission properties of fluorophores placed close to them. In this work, green emitting dyes were placed at controlled distances from the structures and excited using a pulsed laser emitting in the near infrared. The fluorescence signal obtained in this

  18. Synthesis and characterization of metal carbides nanoparticles produced by electrical explosion of wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Alexander P; Nazarenko, Olga B; Tikhonov, Dmitriy V

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten, titanium, tantalum, aluminum carbides nanoparticles were produced by electrical explosion of wires. The explosions were carried out in gaseous mixtures of argon and acetylene at different ratios, argon and propane, and in liquids such as benzene, toluene, decane. The effects of the synthesis conditions on the size and phase composition of metal carbide nanoparticles were investigated. The thermal activity of the prepared powders was studied by the method of differential thermal analysis at the heating in air. Thermodynamic analysis of carbides formation during the process of electrical explosion has been made. The output of the chemical compounds depends on their thermal stability: the more thermally stable they are, the higher their output.

  19. Metal nitride cluster as a template to tune the electronic and magnetic properties of rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang

    2013-10-16

    Rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes have attracted much attention due to the feasibility of encaging metal atom, atoms or cluster inside of carbon cages. By switching the metal atom or cluster entrapped inside of the carbon cage the physical and chemical properties of the fullerene compounds can be tuned. The understanding of magnetic and electrochemical properties of endohedral fullerenes plays an essential role in fundamental scientific researches and potential applications in materials science. In this thesis, synthesizing novel rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerene structures, studying the properties of these isolated endohedral fullerenes and the strategies of tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of endohedral fullerenes were introduced. The DC-arc discharging synthesis of different lanthanide metal-based (Ho, Ce and Pr) mixed metal nitride clusterfullerenes was achieved. Those rare-earth metal containing endohedral fullerenes were isolated by multi-step HPLC. The isolated samples were characterized by spectroscopic techniques included UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, Raman, LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, NMR and electrochemistry. The Ho-based mixed metal nitride clusterfullerenes Ho{sub x}M{sub 3-x}N rate at C{sub 80} (M= Sc, Lu, Y; x=1, 2) were synthesized by ''reactive gas atmosphere'' method or ''selective organic solid'' route. The isolated samples were characterized by LDI-TOF mass spectrometry, UV-vis-NIR, FTIR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. The {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic studies demonstrated exceptional NMR behaviors that resulted from switching the second metal inside of the mixed metal nitride cluster Ho{sub x}M{sub 3-x}N from Sc to Lu and further to Y. The LnSc{sub 2}N rate at C{sub 80} (Ln= Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Lu) MMNCFs were characterized by {sup 13}C and {sup 45}Sc NMR study respectively. According to Bleaney's theory and Reilley method, the separation of δ{sup PC} and δ{sup con

  20. Improving the fatigue performance of porous metallic biomaterials produced by Selective Laser Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Apers, Yanni; Lietaert, Karel; Kruth, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the fatigue properties of porous metallic biomaterials produced by additive manufacturing. Cylindrical porous samples with diamond unit cells were produced from Ti6Al4V powder using Selective Laser Melting (SLM). After measuring all morphological and quasi-static properties, compression-compression fatigue tests were performed to determine fatigue strength and to identify important fatigue influencing factors. In a next step, post-SLM treatments were used to improve the fatigue life of these biomaterials by changing the microstructure and by reducing stress concentrators and surface roughness. In particular, the influence of stress relieving, hot isostatic pressing and chemical etching was studied. Analytical and numerical techniques were developed to calculate the maximum local tensile stress in the struts as function of the strut diameter and load. With this method, the variability in the relative density between all samples was taken into account. The local stress in the struts was then used to quantify the exact influence of the applied post-SLM treatments on the fatigue life. A significant improvement of the fatigue life was achieved. Also, the post-SLM treatments, procedures and calculation methods can be applied to different types of porous metallic structures and hence this paper provides useful tools for improving fatigue performance of metallic biomaterials. Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM) are increasingly being used for producing customized porous metallic biomaterials. These biomaterials are regularly used for biomedical implants and hence a long lifetime is required. In this paper, a set of post-built surface and heat treatments is presented that can be used to significantly improve the fatigue life of porous SLM-Ti6Al4V samples. In addition, a novel and efficient analytical local stress method was developed to accurately quantify the influence of the post

  1. A Liquid Chromatography Detector for Transition and Rare-Earth Metal Ions Based on a Cupric Ion-Selective Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    selective Electrode A Transition Metal CuI) Rare Earth Potentiometry Lanthanide Flow-through Electrode 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side if necessary...Flow Potentiometry with Ion-selective Electrodes ..... . 19 i. Introduction - Ideal Ion-selective Electrodes . ... 19 2. Interferences...detector is less than I pL, creating much less peak broadening than the earlier polarographic detectors (9,10). C. Flow Potentiometry with Ion-Selective

  2. Super earth interiors and validity of Birch's Law for ultra-high pressure metals and ionic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Lucas Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Super Earths, recently detected by the Kepler Mission, expand the ensemble of known terrestrial planets beyond our Solar System's limited group. Birch's Law and velocity-density systematics have been crucial in constraining our knowledge of the composition of Earth's mantle and core. Recently published static diamond anvil cell experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron, a key deep element in most super Earth models, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several metallic elements, including iron, and ionic solids shocked with a two-stage light gas gun into the ultra-high pressure, temperature fluid state and make comparisons to the recent static data.

  3. Byproduct metals and rare-earth elements used in the production of light-emitting diodes—Overview of principal sources of supply and material requirements for selected markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilburn, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is expanding because of environmental issues and the efficiency and cost savings achieved compared with use of traditional incandescent lighting. The longer life and reduced power consumption of some LEDs have led to annual energy savings, reduced maintenance costs, and lower emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides from powerplants because of the resulting decrease in energy consumption required for lighting applications when LEDs are used to replace less-energy-efficient sources. Metals such as arsenic, gallium, indium, and the rare-earth elements (REEs) cerium, europium, gadolinium, lanthanum, terbium, and yttrium are important mineral materials used in LED semiconductor technology. Most of the world's supply of these materials is produced as byproducts from the production of aluminum, copper, lead, and zinc. Most of the rare earths required for LED production in 2011 came from China, and most LED production facilities were located in Asia. The LED manufacturing process is complex and is undergoing much change with the growth of the industry and the changes in demand patterns of associated commodities. In many respects, the continued growth of the LED industry, particularly in the general lighting sector, is tied to its ability to increase LED efficiency and color uniformity while decreasing the costs of producing, purchasing, and operating LEDs. Research is supported by governments of China, the European Union, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the United States. Because of the volume of ongoing research in this sector, it is likely that the material requirements of future LEDs may be quite different than LEDs currently (2011) in use as industry attempts to cut costs by reducing material requirements of expensive heavy rare-earth phosphors and increasing the sizes of wafers for economies of scale. Improved LED performance will allow customers to reduce the number of LEDs in automotive, electronic

  4. Materials flow analysis of neodymium, status of rare earth metal in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Basudev; Kang, Leeseung; Mishra, Chinmayee; Ahn, JoongWoo; Hong, Hyun Seon

    2015-11-01

    Materials flow analysis of neodymium, status of rare earth elements (REEs) in the Republic of Korea has been investigated. Information from various resources like the Korean Ministry of Environment, Korea international trade association, United Nations Commodity Trade Statistics Database and from individual industry were collected and analyzed for materials flow analysis of neodymium. Demand of neodymium in the Republic of Korea for the year 2010 was 409.5 tons out of which the majority of neodymium, i.e., 68.41% was consumed by domestic electronics industry followed by medical appliances manufacturing (13.36%). The Republic Korea is one of the biggest consumer and leading exporter of these industrial products, absolutely depends on import of neodymium, as the country is lacking natural resources. The Republic of Korea has imported 325.9 tons of neodymium permanent magnet and 79.5 tons of neodymium containing equipment parts mainly for electronics, medical appliances, and heavy/light vehicles manufacturing industry. Out of which 95.4 tons of neodymium permanent magnet get exported as an intermediate product and 140.6 tons of neodymium in the form of consumable products get exported. Worldwide the neodymium is at the high end of supply chain critical metal because of increasing demand, scarcity and irreplaceable for technological application. To bring back the neodymium to supply stream the recycling of end of life neodymium-bearing waste can be a feasible option. Out of total domestic consumption, only 21.9 tons of neodymium have been collected and subsequently recycled. From material flow analysis, the requirement for an efficient recycling system and element-wise material flow management for these REEs in the Republic of Korea were realized and recommended. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Microstructure and composition of rare earth-transition metal-aluminium-magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Maria Carlotti Zarpelon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the microstructure and chemical composition of La0.7-xPr xMg0.3Al 0.3Mn0.4Co0.5 Ni3.8 (0 < x < 0.7 metal hydride alloys has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X ray analysis (EDX and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The substitution of La with Pr changed the grain structure from equiaxial to columnar. The relative atomic ratio of rare earth to (Al, Mn, Co, Ni in the matrix phase was 1:5 (LaNi5-type structure. Magnesium was detected only in two other phases present. A grey phase revealed 11 at.% Mg and the concentration ratios of other elements indicated the composition to be close to PrMgNi4. A dark phase was very heterogeneous in composition, attributed to the as-cast state of these alloys. The phases identified by XRD analysis in the La0.7Mg0.3Al0.3Mn0.4Co 0.5Ni3.8 alloy were: La(Ni,Co5, LaAl(Ni,Co4, La2(Ni,Co7 and AlMn(Ni,Co2. Praseodymium favors the formation of a phase with a PuNi3-type structure. Cobalt substituted Ni in the structures and yielded phases of the type: Pr(Ni,Co5 and Pr(Ni,Co3.

  6. Levels of rare earth elements, heavy metals and uranium in a population living in Baiyun Obo, Inner Mongolia, China: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhe; Li, Yonghua; Li, Hairong; Wei, Binggan; Liao, Xiaoyong; Liang, Tao; Yu, Jiangping

    2015-06-01

    The Baiyun Obo deposit is the world's largest rare earth elements (REE) deposit. We aimed to investigate levels of REE, heavy metals (HMs) and uranium (U) based on morning urine samples in a population in Baiyun Obo and to assess the possible influence of rare earth mining processes on human exposure. In the mining area, elevated levels were found for the sum of the concentrations of light REE (LREE) and heavy REE (HREE) with mean values at 3.453 and 1.151 μg g(-1) creatinine, which were significantly higher than those in the control area. Concentrations of HMs and U in the population increased concomitantly with increasing REE levels. The results revealed that besides REE, HMs and U were produced with REE exploitation. Gender, age, educational level, alcohol and smoking habit were major factors contributing to inter-individual variation. Males were more exposed to these metals than females. Concentrations in people in the senior age group and those with only primary education were low. Drinking and smoking were associated with the levels of LREE, Cr, Cu, Cd and Pb in morning urine. Hence this study provides basic and useful information when addressing public and environmental health challenges in the areas where REE are mined and processed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Developments in the use of rare earth metal complexes as efficient catalysts for ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters used in biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, Iuliana

    2017-04-01

    Biodegradable polymers represent a class of particularly useful materials for many biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Among these types of polyesters, poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and polylactides are considered very promising for controlled drug delivery devices. These polymers are mainly produced by ring-opening polymerization of their respective cyclic esters, since this method allows a strict control of the molecular parameters (molecular weight and distribution) of the obtained polymers. The most widely used catalysts for ring-opening polymerization of cyclic esters are tin- and aluminium-based organometallic complexes; however since the contamination of the aliphatic polyesters by potentially toxic metallic residues is particularly of concern for biomedical applications, the possibility of replacing organometallic initiators by novel less toxic or more efficient organometallic complexes has been intensively studied. Thus, in the recent years, the use of highly reactive rare earth initiators/catalysts leading to lower polymer contamination has been developed. The use of rare earth complexes is considered a valuable strategy to decrease the polyester contamination by metallic residues and represents an attractive alternative to traditional organometallic complexes.

  8. Effect of Rare Earth Elements (Er, Ho) on Semi-Metallic Materials (ScN) in an Applied Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Yeonjoon; King, Glen C.; Lee, Kunik; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-01-01

    The development of materials and fabrication technology for field-controlled spectrally active optics is essential for applications such as membrane optics, filters for LIDARs, windows for sensors, telescopes, spectroscopes, cameras and flat-panel displays. The dopants of rare earth elements, in a host of optical systems, create a number of absorption and emission band structures and can easily be incorporated into many high quality crystalline and amorphous hosts. In wide band-gap semiconductors like ScN, the existing deep levels can capture or emit the mobile charges, and can be ionized with the loss or capture of the carriers which are the fundamental basis of concept for smart optic materials. The band gap shrinkage or splitting with dopants supports the possibility of this concept. In the present work, a semi-metallic material (ScN) was doped with rare earth elements (Er, Ho) and tested under an applied electric field to characterize spectral and refractive index shifts by either Stark or Zeeman Effect. These effects can be verified using the UV-Vis spectroscopy, the Hall Effect measurement and the ellipsometric spectroscopy. The optical band gaps of ScN doped with Er and doped with Ho were experimentally estimated as 2.33eV and 2.24eV ( 0.2eV) respectively. This is less than that of undoped ScN (2.5 0.2eV). The red-shifted absorption onset is a direct evidence for the decrease of band gap energy (Eg), and the broadening of valence band states is attributable to the doping cases. A decrease in refractive index with an applied field was observed as a small shift in absorption coefficient using a variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometer. In the presence of an electric field, mobile carriers are redistributed within the space charge region (SCR) to produce this electro-refractive effect. The shift in refractive index is also affected by the density and location of deep potential wells within the SCR. In addition, the microstructure change was observed by a TEM

  9. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF DIATOMACEOUS EARTH – 4,4-DIAMINODIPHENYLETHER-O-HYDROXYBENZALDEHYDE AS AN ADSORBENT OF Ag(I METAL ION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fatoni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis, characterization and application of Diatomaceous Earth-4,4-Diamino diphenylether-O-Hydroxybenzaldehyde (diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb as an adsorbent of Ag(I metal ion has been done. The aim of the purification of natural diatomaceous earth with KMnO4, H2SO4 and HCl were to obtain pure diatomaceous earth, remove the other compounds and de-alumination, respectively. The adsorbent of diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb was synthesized by reacting pure diatomaceous earth with 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane, 4,4-diaminodiphenylether (DDE and O-hydroxybenzaldehyde (O-Hb. The FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify Schiff base group in diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb adsorbent. The diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb was applied as adsorbent in the adsorption of Ag(I metal ion. Parameters influencing the interaction such as time, pH and concentration were optimized. The result showed that diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb adsorbent have Schiff base group. The interaction time of 90 min showed that 70.79% of Ag(I metal ions at the concentration of 100 ppm can be adsorbed by diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb adsorbent. At the pH solution between 2 to 7, the concentration of 100 ppm of Ag(I metal ion that can adsorbed by diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb adsorbent was up to 98% and at the concentration of 25 ppm Ag(I metal ion, the adsorption of Ag(I by diatomaceous earth-DDE-O-Hb adsorbent was near 91%.

  10. Concentrations of some heavy metals in underground water samples from a Nigerian crude oil producing community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejike, Chukwunonso E C C; Eferibe, Chinedu O; Okonkwo, Francis O

    2017-03-01

    Pollution due to oil exploration activities in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria and government under-investments in potable water infrastructure has led to the dependence of the population on personal boreholes. Yet, there are little quality or surveillance reports on such waters. The concentrations of heavy metals in underground water samples from an oil producing area, Umuebulu, in the Niger Delta were therefore investigated. Water samples were collected from three test points, each approximately 300 m from (1) wellhead area (WHA), (2) flare area (FA) and (3) effluent discharge area (EDA), and one control point located 10 km away from any oil-related activity. The concentrations of lead, arsenic and cadmium were determined in the samples using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All three heavy metals were present in the test, and control water samples at concentrations significantly (P water samples showed that their consumption constituted significant health risks in the order EDA > FA > WHA > Control. Appropriate water treatment and surveillance is warranted and therefore recommended for underground water resources of the studied community.

  11. Corrosion of Ti6Al4V pins produced by direct metal laser sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Damborenea, J. J.; Arenas, M. A.; Larosa, Maria Aparecida; Jardini, André Luiz; de Carvalho Zavaglia, Cecília Amélia; Conde, A.

    2017-01-01

    Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique allows the manufacturing a wide variety of medical devices for any type of prosthetic surgery (HIP, dental, cranial, maxillofacial) as well as for internal fixation devices (K-Wires or Steinmann Pins). There are a large number of research studies on DMLS, including microstructural characterization, mechanical properties and those based on production quality assurance but the influence of porosity in the corrosion behavior of these materials not been sufficiently considered. In the present paper, surgical pins of Ti6Al4V have been produced by DMLS. After testing in a phosphate buffered saline solution, the surface of the titanium alloy appeared locally covered by a voluminous white oxide. This unexpected behavior was presumably due to the existence of internal defects in the pins as result of the manufacturing process. The importance of these defects-that might act as crevice nucleation sites- has been revealed by electrochemical techniques and confirmed by computed tomography.

  12. Technology of Producing the Contact Connections of Superconductor Metal-Sheathed Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Andrzej

    2017-06-01

    The technology of producing the current contact connections on the superconductor cable edges is presented. This lead cable is used as one of the major elements of the magnetic system in thermonuclear reactor construction, actuality for modern world energy. The technology is realized by the radial draft of metal thin-walled tube on the conductor's package. The filling of various profiles by round section wire is optimized. Geometrical characteristics of the dangerous crosssection (as a broken ring) of thin-walled tube injured by the sector cut-out are accounted. The comparative strength calculation of the solid and injured tubes at a longitudinal compression and lateral bending is acted. The radial draft mechanism of cylindrical thin-walled sheath with the wire packing is designed. The necessity to use the nonlinear theory for the sheaths calculate is set. The resilient co-operation of wires as the parallel located cylinders with the contact stripes of rectangular form is considered.

  13. Investigation of femtosecond laser-produced plasma from various metallic targets using the Langmuir probe characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, P.; Gurlui, S.; Osiac, M.; Agop, M.; Ziskind, M.; Focsa, C.

    2017-10-01

    The Langmuir probe is used to characterize the plasma produced by fs-laser ablation from pure metallic targets. Time dependence of the probe current and the total collected charge is discussed in terms of a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution function, and from probe characteristics the plasma temperature and average charge state are calculated. Target materials of various physical properties (atomic mass, thermal constants) are used to find possible correlations with resulting plasma parameters. By positively biasing the probe, the collected charge -probe voltage characteristic is in general vertically shifted, and for low negative probe potentials an effect consisting in an abnormal decrease of the ion current is observed. Periodic falls of the total collected charge vs. probe voltage are experimentally recorded, the effect being more significant at high background pressure. They are tentatively attributed to secondary ionization.

  14. Syntheses, structure and properties of Alkaline-earth metal salts of 4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ions, resulting in the formation of extended structures. This was well demonstrated for alkaline-earths by link- ... reactions of alkaline-earth carbonates with 4-npaH to structurally characterize the products. The results are ... few days were collected by filtration in ∼60% yield. The use of calcium carbonate, strontium carbonate.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of rare-earth oxide transition-metal arsenides and selenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peschke, Simon Friedrich

    2017-04-06

    The present thesis includes two different quaternary systems that have been studied extensively. On the one hand, several samples of the REFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} family of iron-based superconductors were prepared using a novel solid state metathesis reaction, which also provided a possibility to prepare late rare-earth compounds of this family at ambient pressure. Comparison of structural and physical properties of those samples with samples from conventional solid state and high pressure syntheses revealed both, commonalities as well as striking differences. The observations gave reason to the conclusion that superconducting properties strongly depend, beside electronic infl uence, on the structural parameters. On the other hand, the quaternary system RE-T-Se-O with T = Ti-Mn was investigated using a NaI/KI flux mediated synthesis route. It has been shown that oC -La{sub 2}O{sub 2}MnSe{sub 2} is exclusively accessible in su fficient purity by the use of a fl ux material. Therefore, further syntheses in this quaternary system were performed by a flux mediated synthesis route leading to a large amount of new materials. Among them, a new polymorph mC-La{sub 2}O{sub 2}MnSe{sub 2} which forms, together with La{sub 4}MnSe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and La{sub 6}MnSe{sub 4}O{sub 6}, the series La{sub 2n+2}MnSe{sub n+2}O{sub 2n+2}. In addition, the alternative preparation method also enabled a large scale synthesis of the first examples of rare-earth chromium oxyselenides with chromium in the oxidation state +II, namely RE{sub 2}CrSe{sub 2}O{sub 2} (RE = La-Nd), which opened the door to study their magnetism in detail by powder neutron diffraction and muon spin rotation techniques. Research into the La-V-Se-O system revealed the first fi ve quaternary compounds of this family with interesting magnetic properties including ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, metamagnetism and more complex behaviour. In addition, the crystal structure of two new quaternary titanium containing

  16. [Application potential of siderophore-producing rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soils: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Li; Lin, Qing-Qi; Li, Yu; Yang, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Shi-Zhong; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Siderophore-producing rhizobacteria (SPR) are a group of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, being able to play an important role in assisting the phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soils. Based on the comprehensive analysis of related researches at home and abroad, this paper elaborated the functions of SPR in alleviating the heavy metals stress and toxicity to plants and the mechanisms of SPR in improving the heavy metals bioavailability in soil, and indicated that SPR had good application potential in promoting the plant growth in heavy metals-contaminated soils and reinforcing the heavy metals accumulation in plants. The contradictory phenomena of SPR in increasing or decreasing heavy metals accumulation in plants, which existed in current researches, were also analyzed. Aiming at the deficiencies in current researches, it was suggested that in the future researches, the mechanisms of the interactions between SPR and plants, especially hyperaccumulators, should be further studied, the key factors affecting the heavy metals complexation and mobilization in soil by siderophores should also be further clarified, the effects of siderophores on the heavy metals bioavailability and its subsequent influence on the heavy metals uptake by plants should be comprehensively considered, and the measures for improving the colonization of SPR in heavy metals-contaminated soil should be explored.

  17. Synthesis by coprecipitation technique and spectroscopic properties of some phosphates. [Yttrium or rare earth and potassium and alkaline earth metal phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbus, A.; Duranceau, C.; Zambon, D.; Cousseins, J.C. (Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (FR))

    1991-01-01

    The coprecipitation process has been used for the synthesis of some KBLn(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} compounds where B is an alkaline earth metal and Ln a lanthanide or yttrium. After the gel stage, an amorphous powder is obtained by drying, the thermal evolution of which is studied by X-ray diffraction. The temperature of calcination for the different powders is included in the 500-700{sup 0}C range, lower than that of the classical solid state synthesis, 800-1000{sup 0}C. The final phosphates crystallize with monoclinic or tetragonal symmetry. The spectroscopic properties of some Eu{sup 3+}-doped compounds prepared by coprecipitation technique are reported.

  18. Environmentally Friendly Economical Sequestration of Rare Earth Metals from Geothermal Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stull, Dean P. [Tusaar Corp., Lafayette, CO (United States)

    2016-05-26

    The purpose of this work was to complete a proof of concept study to apply and validate a novel method developed by Tusaar for the capture and recovery of rare earth elements (known as REEs) and other critical and valuable elements from geothermal waters produced from deep within the earth. Geothermal water provides heat for power production at many geothermal power plants in the western United States. The target elements, the REEs, are vital to modern day electronics, batteries, motors, automobiles and many other consumer favorites and necessities. Currently there are no domestic sources of REEs while domestic and international demand for the products they are used in continues to rise. Many of the REEs are considered “strategically” important. A secure supply of REEs in the USA would benefit consumers and the country at large. A new method to recover these REEs from geothermal waters used at existing geothermal power plants around the country is a high priority and would benefit consumers and the USA. The result of this project was the successful development and demonstration of an integrated process for removal and recovery of the REEs from synthetic geothermal brines on a small laboratory scale. The work included preparation of model geothermal brines to test, selection of the most effective proprietary sorbent media to capture the REEs and testing of the media under a variety of potential operating conditions. Geothermal brines are generally very high in salt content and contain a wide range of elements and anions associated with the rock layers from which they are produced. Processing the geothermal water is difficult because it is corrosive and the dissolved minerals in the water precipitate easily once the temperature and pressure change. No commercial technologies have been shown to be effective or robust enough under these geothermal brine conditions to be commercially viable for removal of REEs. Technologies including ion exchange, traditional

  19. Corrosion of Ti6Al4V pins produced by direct metal laser sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damborenea, J.J. de, E-mail: jdambo@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avenida Gregorio del Amo, 8, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Arenas, M.A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avenida Gregorio del Amo, 8, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Larosa, Maria Aparecida; Jardini, André Luiz [National Institute of Biofabrication (INCT-BIOFABRIS), State of University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil); School of Chemical Engineering, State of University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil); Carvalho Zavaglia, Cecília Amélia de [National Institute of Biofabrication (INCT-BIOFABRIS), State of University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil); Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, State of University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil); Conde, A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avenida Gregorio del Amo, 8, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Pins of Ti6Al4V have been produced by DMLS technique. • Corrosion behavior of pins is similar to Ti6Al4V commercial Kirschner wires. • Formation of voluminous white oxide can appear at potentials higher than 2.4 V. • Defects originated during processing may cause this unusual behavior. - Abstract: Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) technique allows the manufacturing a wide variety of medical devices for any type of prosthetic surgery (HIP, dental, cranial, maxillofacial) as well as for internal fixation devices (K-Wires or Steinmann Pins). There are a large number of research studies on DMLS, including microstructural characterization, mechanical properties and those based on production quality assurance but the influence of porosity in the corrosion behavior of these materials not been sufficiently considered. In the present paper, surgical pins of Ti6Al4V have been produced by DMLS. After testing in a phosphate buffered saline solution, the surface of the titanium alloy appeared locally covered by a voluminous white oxide. This unexpected behavior was presumably due to the existence of internal defects in the pins as result of the manufacturing process. The importance of these defects—that might act as crevice nucleation sites- has been revealed by electrochemical techniques and confirmed by computed tomography.

  20. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali-metal and alkaline-earth-metal ions and inert-gas atoms with a graphene layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B. K.

    2015-09-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients C3 of the alkali-metal ions Li+,Na+,K+, and Rb+, the alkaline-earth-metal ions Ca+,Sr+,Ba+, and Ra+, and the inert-gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, and Kr with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of the Dirac model. For these calculations, we evaluate the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at room temperature.

  1. Hyporheic Microbial Biofilms as Indicators of Heavy and Rare Earth Metals in the Clark Fork Basin, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, E. P.; Hornberger, M.; Hwang, C.; Dror, I.; Bouskill, N.; Short, T.; Cain, D.; Fields, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to effectively monitor the impact of hard rock mining activities on rivers and streams is a growing concern given the large number of active and abandoned mines in the western United States. One such example, the Clark Fork Basin (CFB), western Montana, was extensively mined for copper in the early 20th century: it is now one of largest U.S. EPA superfund sites. Microbial biofilms are at the base of the lotic food chain and may provide a useful biomonitoring tool for the assessment of metal toxicity due to their environmental ubiquity, rapidity of response to environmental perturbation, and importance in determining metal mobility. Hyporheic microbial biofilms from the CFB were sampled in 2014, concurrent with the USGS National Research Programs (NRP) long-term site monitoring of metals in bed sediment and aquatic benthic insects. Integration of the DNA sequencing results from the hyporheic biofilms with the sediment and insect metal concentrations correlated several bacterial phyla with metal contamination. For example, the genus Lysobacter was strongly associated with copper (Cu) bioaccumulation in the aquatic insect Hydropsyche. These results support previous studies identifying Lysobacter as a bacterial genus that is resistant to Cu ions. Our analysis is the first to indicate that specific microorganisms can act as biomarkers of Cu contamination in rivers. Moreover, our work demonstrates that changes at the microbial community level in the hyporheic zone can be coupled to observed perturbations across higher trophic levels. In 2015, extensive remediation occurred at several of the sites sampled in 2014, providing an excellent opportunity to revisit the sites and examine the temporal variability of identified biomarkers and the short-term effectiveness of remediation. In addition, samples were analyzed for rare earth metals, of which little is known, and could provide additional insight into other metals that change the microbial community structure.

  2. Mechanistic studies on initiation and propagation of rare earth metal-mediated group transfer polymerization of vinylphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzinger, Stephan; Soller, Benedikt S; Plikhta, Andriy; Seemann, Uwe B; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Rieger, Bernhard

    2013-09-04

    Initiation of rare earth metal-mediated vinylphosphonate polymerization with unbridged rare earth metallocenes (Cp2LnX) follows a complex reaction pathway. Depending on the nature of X, initiation can proceed either via abstraction of the acidic α-CH of the vinylphosphonate (e.g., for X = Me, CH2TMS), via nucleophilic transfer of X to a coordinated monomer (e.g., for X = Cp, SR) or via a monomer (i.e., donor)-induced ligand-exchange reaction forming Cp3Ln in equilibrium (e.g., for X = Cl, OR), which serves as the active initiating species. As determined by mass spectrometric end group analysis, different initiations may also occur simultaneously (e.g., for X = N(SiMe2H)2). A general differential approach for the kinetic analysis of living polymerizations with fast propagation and comparatively slow initiation is presented. Time-resolved analysis of monomer conversion and molecular weights of the formed polymers allow the determination of the initiator efficiency throughout the whole reaction. Using this normalization method, rare earth metal-mediated vinylphosphonate GTP is shown to follow a Yasuda-type monometallic propagation mechanism, with an SN2-type associative displacement of the polymer phosphonate ester by a monomer as the rate-determining step. The propagation rate of vinylphosphonate GTP is mainly determined by the activation entropy, i.e. the change of rotational and vibrational restrictions within the eight-membered metallacycle in the rate-determining step as a function of the steric demand of the metallacycle side chains and the steric crowding at the metal center.

  3. Study of the rare-earth metals magnetic powders filling influence on the basic properties of elastomeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhansakova, K. S.; Mitryaeva, N. S.; Russkikh, G. S.

    2017-08-01

    The work deals with the studying of technological, vulcanization and physical-mechanical properties of magnetic elastomeric compositions. Powders of rare-earth metals with different morphology of particles and different magnetic characteristics were used as fillers. Based on the results of the work performed, it was revealed that the applied technology of manufacturing magnetic elastomeric compositions based on synthetic rubber is optimal. The rationale for this is the balanced technological and physical-mechanical properties of vulcanizates. Morphology and magnetic characteristics of fillers also do not significantly change the vulcanization properties.

  4. Determination of uranium and rare-earth metals separation coefficients in LiCl-KCl melt by electrochemical transient techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, S.A. [Institute of Chemistry, Kola Science Centre, RAS, 184200 Apatity, Murmansk Region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: kuznet@chemy.kolasc.net.ru; Hayashi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Minato, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Gaune-Escard, M. [Ecole Polytechnique, IUSTI-CNRS UMR 6595, Technopole de Chateau Gombert, F-13453 Marseille cedex 13 (France)

    2005-09-01

    The main step in the pyrometallurgical process of spent nuclear fuel recycling is a molten salt electrorefining. The knowledge of separation coefficients of actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) and rare-earth metals (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) is very important for this step. Usually the separation coefficients are evaluated from the formal standard potentials of metals in melts containing their own ions, values obtained by potentiometric method. Electrochemical experiments were carried out at 723-823 K in order to estimate separation coefficients in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing uranium and lanthanum trichlorides. It was shown that for the calculation of uranium and lanthanum separation coefficients it is necessary to determine the voltammetric peak potentials of U(III) and La(III), their concentration in the melt and the kinetic parameters relating to U(III) discharge such as transfer and diffusion coefficients, and standard rate constants of charge transfer.

  5. Siderophile elements in the upper mantle of the Earth: New clues from metal-silicate partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzheid, A.; Borisov, A.; Palme, H.

    1993-03-01

    New, precise data on the solubilities of Ni, Co, and Mo in silicate melts at 1400 C and fO2 from IW to IW-2 are presented. The results suggest NiO, CoO as stable species in the melt. No evidence for metallic Ni or Co was found. Equilibrium was ensured by reversals with initially high Ni and Co in the glass. Mo appears to change oxidation state at IW-1, from MoO3 to MoO2. Metal-silicate partition coefficients calculated from these data and recent data on Pd indicate similar partition coefficients for Pd and Mo at the conditions of core formation. This unexpected result constrains models of core formation in the Earth.

  6. Metallurgical characterization of orthodontic brackets produced by Metal Injection Molding (MIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinelis, Spiros; Annousaki, Olga; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bonding base surface morphology, alloy type, microstructure, and hardness of four types of orthodontic brackets produced by Metal Injection Molding technology (Discovery, Extremo, Freedom, and Topic). The bonding base morphology of the brackets was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Brackets from each manufacturer were embedded in epoxy resin, and after metallographic grinding, polishing and coating were analyzed by x-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) microanalysis to assess their elemental composition. Then, the brackets were subjected to metallographic etching to reveal their metallurgical structure. The same specimen surfaces were repolished and used for Vickers microhardness measurements. The results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The findings of SEM observations showed a great variability in the base morphology design among the brackets tested. The x-ray EDS analysis demonstrated that each bracket was manufactured from different ferrous or Co-based alloys. Metallographic analysis showed the presence of a large grain size for the Discovery, Freedom, and Topic brackets and a much finer grain size for the Extremo bracket. Vickers hardness showed great variations among the brackets (Topic: 287 +/- 16, Freedom: 248 +/- 13, Discovery: 214 +/- 12, and Extremo: 154 +/- 9). The results of this study showed that there are significant differences in the base morphology, composition, microstructure, and microhardness among the brackets tested, which may anticipate significant clinical implications.

  7. Effect of Rare Earth Metals, Sr, and Ti Addition on the Microstructural Characterization of A413.1 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was performed on A413.1 alloy containing 0.2–1.5 wt% rare earth metals (lanthanum or cerium, 0.05–0.15% Ti, and 0–0.02 wt% Sr. These elements were either added individually or combined. Thermal analysis, image analysis, and electron probe microanalysis were the main techniques employed in the present study. The results show that the use of the depression in the eutectic temperature as a function of alloy modification cannot be applied in the case when the alloy is treated with rare earth metals. Increasing the concentration of RE increases the solidification zone especially in Sr-modified alloys leading to poor feeding ability. This observation is more prominent in the case of Ce addition. Depending upon the amount of added Ti, two RE based intermetallics can be formed: (i a white phase, mainly platelet-like (approximately 2.5 μm thick, that is rich in RE, Si, Cu, and Al and (ii a second phase made up of mainly grey sludge particles (star-like branching in different directions. The grey phase is rich in Ti with some RE (almost 20% of that in the white phase with traces of Si and Cu. There is a strong interaction between RE and Sr leading to a reduction in the efficiency of Sr as a eutectic Si modifier causing particle demodification.

  8. Review of magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect in the intermetallic compounds of rare earth with low boiling point metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling-Wei, Li

    2016-03-01

    The magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in many rare earth (RE) based intermetallic compounds has been extensively investigated during the last two decades, not only due to their potential applications for magnetic refrigeration but also for better understanding of the fundamental problems of the materials. This paper reviews our recent progress on studying the magnetic properties and MCE in some binary or ternary intermetallic compounds of RE with low boiling point metal(s) (Zn, Mg, and Cd). Some of them exhibit promising MCE properties, which make them attractive for low temperature magnetic refrigeration. Characteristics of the magnetic transition, origin of large MCE, as well as the potential application of these compounds are thoroughly discussed. Additionally, a brief review of the magnetic and magnetocaloric properties in the quaternary rare earth nickel boroncarbides RENi2B2C superconductors is also presented. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374081 and 11004044), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. N150905001, L1509006, and N140901001), the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Postdoctoral Fellowships for Foreign Researchers (Grant No. P10060), and the Alexander von Humboldt (AvH) Foundation (Research stipend to L. Li).

  9. Rare earth metals appliance for magnetic admixtures recovery from mineral premixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shevtsov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the material composition metallomagnetic admixtures of mineral premix. It is shown that the dressed metallomagnetic impurity includes low-magnetic particles with low magnetic susceptibility. Removing these particles from the product stream in process of magnetic separation using high-energy rare earth magnets is a challenging task.

  10. Method of producing metallized chloroplasts and use thereof in the photochemical production of hydrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1987-01-01

    The invention is primarily a metallized chloroplast composition for use in a photosynthetic reaction. A catalytic metal is precipitated on a chloroplast membrane at the location where a catalyzed reduction reaction occurs. This metallized chloroplast is stabilized by depositing it on a support medium such as fiber so that it can be easily handled. A possible application of this invention is the splitting of water to form hydrogen and oxygen that can be used as a renewable energy source.

  11. Cleanup of industrial effluents containing heavy metals: a new opportunity of valorising the biomass produced by brewing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Eduardo V; Soares, Helena M V M

    2013-08-01

    Heavy metal pollution is a matter of concern in industrialised countries. Contrary to organic pollutants, heavy metals are not metabolically degraded. This fact has two main consequences: its bioremediation requires another strategy and heavy metals can be indefinitely recycled. Yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are produced at high amounts as a by-product of brewing industry constituting a cheap raw material. In the present work, the possibility of valorising this type of biomass in the bioremediation of real industrial effluents containing heavy metals is reviewed. Given the auto-aggregation capacity (flocculation) of brewing yeast cells, a fast and off-cost yeast separation is achieved after the treatment of metal-laden effluent, which reduces the costs associated with the process. This is a critical issue when we are looking for an effective, eco-friendly, and low-cost technology. The possibility of the bioremediation of industrial effluents linked with the selective recovery of metals, in a strategy of simultaneous minimisation of environmental hazard of industrial wastes with financial benefits from reselling or recycling the metals, is discussed.

  12. A Pyoverdin Siderophore Produced By Pseudomonas aeruginosa CHL-004 Binds Lead And Other Heavy Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy metal pollution in soils, sediments and wastewater poses a significant environmental and public health threat due to toxicity and the potential for bioaccumulation in both plant and animal tissues. Remediation of heavy metals in soils and sediments using solely physical or...

  13. A Pyoverdin Siderophore Produced By Pseudomonas aeruginosa CHL-004 Binds Lead And Other Heavy Metals - (Poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy metal pollution in soils, sediments and wastewater poses a significant environmental and public health threat due to toxicity and the potential for bioaccumulation in both plant and animal tissues. Remediation of heavy metals in soils and sediments using solely physical or...

  14. LOCALIZED STARBURSTS IN DWARF GALAXIES PRODUCED BY THE IMPACT OF LOW-METALLICITY COSMIC GAS CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Filho, M. E. [Instituto Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Elmegreen, B. G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Pérez-Montero, E.; Vílchez, J. M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Granada (Spain); Amorín, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Ascasibar, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Papaderos, P., E-mail: jos@iac.es [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal)

    2015-09-10

    Models of galaxy formation predict that gas accretion from the cosmic web is a primary driver of star formation over cosmic history. Except in very dense environments where galaxy mergers are also important, model galaxies feed from cold streams of gas from the web that penetrate their dark matter halos. Although these predictions are unambiguous, the observational support has been indirect so far. Here, we report spectroscopic evidence for this process in extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) of the local universe, taking the form of localized starbursts associated with gas having low metallicity. Detailed abundance analyses based on Gran Telescopio Canarias optical spectra of 10 XMPs show that the galaxy hosts have metallicities around 60% solar, on average, while the large star-forming regions that dominate their integrated light have low metallicities of some 6% solar. Because gas mixes azimuthally in a rotation timescale (a few hundred Myr), the observed metallicity inhomogeneities are only possible if the metal-poor gas fell onto the disk recently. We analyze several possibilities for the origin of the metal-poor gas, favoring the metal-poor gas infall predicted by numerical models. If this interpretation is correct, XMPs trace the cosmic web gas in their surroundings, making them probes to examine its properties.

  15. THE DISTRIBUTION OF COMMERCIAL CROWN ETHER DC18C6 AND THE EXTRACTION STUDY OF ALKALI AND EARTH ALKALI METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Rusdiarso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of A and B isomers of crown-ether DC18C6 on their organic and water phases (chloride, nitrate and sulphocyanide salts and extraction of alkali and earth alkali metals has been studied. In LiCl 0.1 M environment, lithium extraction could be ignored. The presence of extracted potassium metal may affect the crown ether DC18C6 distribution albeit only a little. In KNO3 0.1 M environment, the distribution coefficient values (d were 6.1 and 10.3 for A and B isomers, respectively ; while in KCl  0.1 M environment the values were 4.9 and 11.8, respectively. In KSCN 0.1 M, d values for A and B isomers were 40.4 and 36.6, respectively, which were higher than the value obtained from both KNO3 and KCl  0.1 M environments. Caesium metal extraction using DC18C6 occurred weakly, up to only 5%. Strontium extraction using DC18C6 achieved better yield than the caesium extraction. The percentage of extraction increased under organic solvent according to the following: toluene (4% < chloroform (28% < TBP (35%.   Keywords: distribution, crown-ether DC18C6, extraction.

  16. Surface shift of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels of the rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldén, Magnus; Johansson, Börje; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1995-01-01

    The surface energy shifts of the occupied and unoccupied 4f levels for the lanthanide metals have been calculated from first principles by means of a Green’s-function technique within the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbitals method. We use the concept of complete screening to identify the occ...

  17. Electric dipole moments, cluster metallicity, and the magnetism of rare earth clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlan, John

    One of the fundamental properties of bulk metals is the cancellation of electric fields. The free charges inside of a metal will move until they find an arrangement where the internal electric field is zero. This implies that the electric dipole moment of a metal particle should be exactly zero, because an electric dipole moment requires a net separation of charge and thus a nonzero internal electric field. This thesis is an experimental study to see if this property continues to hold for tiny subnanometer metal particles called clusters (2--200 atom, R beam electric deflection technique. We find that the observed dipole moments vary a great deal across the periodic table. Alkali metals have zero dipole moments, while transition metals and lanthanides all have dipole moments which are highly size dependent. In most cases, the measured dipole moments are independent of temperature (T = 20--50 K), and when there is a strong temperature dependence this suggests that there is a new state of matter present. Our interpretation of these results are that those clusters which have a nonzero dipole moment are non-metallic, in the sense that their electrons must be localized and prevented from moving to screen the internal field associated with a permanent dipole moment. This interpretation gives insight to several related phenomena and applications. We briefly discuss an example cluster system RhN where the measured electric dipole moments appear to be correlated with a the N2O reactivity. Finally, we discuss a series of magnetic deflection experiments on lanthanide clusters (Pr, Ho, Tb, and Tm). The magnetic response of these clusters is very complex and highly sensitive to size and temperature. We find that PrN (which is non-magnetic in the bulk) becomes magnetic in clusters and Tm N clusters have magnetic moments lower than the atomic value as well as the bulk saturation value implying that the magnetic order in the cluster involves non-collinear or antiferromagnetic

  18. Vibronic transitions in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb) - alkaline-earth-metal (Ca, Sr) series: A systematic analysis of de-excitation mechanisms based on the graphical mapping of Frank-Condon integrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pototschnig, Johann V.; Meyer, Ralf; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2017-02-01

    Research on ultracold molecules has seen a growing interest recently in the context of high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum computation. After forming weakly bound molecules from atoms in cold collisions, the preparation of molecules in low vibrational levels of the ground state is experimentally challenging, and typically achieved by population transfer using excited electronic states. Accurate potential energy surfaces are needed for a correct description of processes such as the coherent de-excitation from the highest and therefore weakly bound vibrational levels in the electronic ground state via couplings to electronically excited states. This paper is dedicated to the vibrational analysis of potentially relevant electronically excited states in the alkali-metal (Li, Na, K, Rb)- alkaline-earth metal (Ca,Sr) diatomic series. Graphical maps of Frank-Condon overlap integrals are presented for all molecules of the group. By comparison to overlap graphics produced for idealized potential surfaces, we judge the usability of the selected states for future experiments on laser-enhanced molecular formation from mixtures of quantum degenerate gases.

  19. An expert system for process planning of sheet metal parts produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , error-prone and experiencebased. This paper ... The proposed system can be implemented on a PC having VB and AutoCAD software, therefore its low cost of implementation makes it affordable even for small scale sheet metal industries.

  20. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 94. Rare Earth Metal Iodides and Bromides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Bromides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary; Zeng, Dewen; Voigt, Heidelore

    2013-03-01

    This work presents solubility data for rare earth metal bromides in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal bromide with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were almost never studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple bromides (no complexes) are treated as the input substances in this work. The literature has been covered through the end of 2011.

  1. An expert system for process planning of sheet metal parts produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sachin Salunkhe

    Expert system; process planning; sheet metal parts; compound die; stamping industries; ... metal industries are also facing problems due to scarcity of .... Sheet thickness in mm [1.6; and Sheet thickness in mm B 4.5. Set die-angle = 0.5 degree; and Die- land = 4.0 mm. 3. Sheet thickness in mm [4.5. Set die-angle = 0.75 ...

  2. Characterization of metal-binding bioflocculants produced by the cyanobacterial component of mixed microbial mats.

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, J; Rodriguez-Eaton, S; Ekanemesang, U M; Phillips, P

    1994-01-01

    Mixed-species microbial mats that were dominated by the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. and contained heterotrophic and purple autotrophic bacteria were constructed for specific bioremediation applications. When the mats were challenged with metals, production and secretion of metal-binding extracellular polysaccharide bioflocculants were observed. The concentration of these negatively charged polysaccharides was correlated with the removal of manganese from the water column beneath a surface...

  3. Antimony film sensor for sensitive rare earth metal analysis in environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makombe, Martin; van der Horst, Charlton; Silwana, Bongiwe; Iwuoha, Emmanuel; Somerset, Vernon

    2016-07-02

    A sensor for the adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of rare earth elements has been developed. The electrochemical procedure is based on the oxidation of the rare earth elements complexed with alizarin complexone at a glassy carbon electrode that was in situ modified with an antimony film, during an anodic scan from -0.2 V to 1.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and deposition potential of -0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The factors influencing the adsorptive stripping capability were optimised, including the complexing agent concentration, plating concentration of antimony and deposition time. The detection of rare earth elements (La, Ce and Pr) were realised in 0.08 M sodium acetate (pH = 5.8) solution as supporting electrolyte, with 2 × 10(-6) M alizarin complexone and 1.0 mg L(-1) antimony solution. Under the optimised conditions, a deposition time of 360 s was obtained and a linear response was observed between 1 and 25 µg L(-1). The reproducibility of the voltammetric measurements was found to be within 5.0% RSD for 12 replicate measurements of cerium(III) concentration of 5 µg L(-1) using the same electrode surface. The detection limits obtained using stripping analysis was 0.06, 0.42 and 0.71 μg L(-1) for Ce(III), La(III) and Pr(III), respectively. The developed sensor has been successfully applied for the determination of cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium in municipal tap water samples.

  4. Optical probes for the detection of protons, and alkali and alkaline earth metal cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Graham R C; Sahoo, Suban K; Kamila, Sukanta; Singh, Narinder; Kaur, Navneet; Hyland, Barry W; Callan, John F

    2015-07-07

    Luminescent sensors and switches continue to play a key role in shaping our understanding of key biochemical processes, assist in the diagnosis of disease and contribute to the design of new drugs and therapies. Similarly, their contribution to the environment cannot be understated as they offer a portable means to undertake field testing for hazardous chemicals and pollutants such as heavy metals. From a physiological perspective, the Group I and II metal ions are among the most important in the periodic table with blood plasma levels of H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) being indicators of several possible disease states. In this review, we examine the progress that has been made in the development of luminescent probes for Group I and Group II ions as well as protons. The potential applications of these probes and the mechanism involved in controlling their luminescent response upon analyte binding will also be discussed.

  5. Microwave-Assisted Adsorptive Desulfurization of Model Diesel Fuel Using Synthesized Microporous Rare Earth Metal-Doped Zeolite Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Salahudeen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The microwave-assisted adsorptive desulfurization of model fuel (thiophene in n-heptane was investigated using a synthesized rare earth metal-doped zeolite Y (RE Y. Crystallinity of the synthesized zeolite was 89.5%, the silicon/aluminium (Si/Al molar ratio was 5.2, the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET surface area was 980.9 m2/g, and the pore volume and diameter was 0.3494 cm3/g and 1.425 nm, respectively. The results showed that the microwave reactor could be used to enhance the adsorptive desulfurization process with best efficiency of 75% at reaction conditions of 100 °C and 15 minutes. The high desulfurization effect was likely due to the higher efficiency impact of microwave energy in the interaction between sulfur in thiophene and HO-La(OSiAl.

  6. Effects of Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metals on N-Containing Species Release during Rice Straw Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Gao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of inherent and external alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs, i.e., K, Ca and Mg on the behavior of N-containing species release during rice straw (RS pyrolysis, different pretreatments were applied in numerous experiments. Results indicate that ammonia (NH3 and hydrogen cyanide (HCN are the major N-containing species and that the yields of isocyanic acid (HNCO and nitric oxide (NO are relatively low. The removal of inhert AAEMs shifts N-containing species release to a high-temperature zone according to volatile release behavior because of the increase in activation energy. The formation selectivity of NH3, HNCO, and NO increases by demineralized pretreatment, whereas HCN selectivity decreases. The formation of HNCO is mainly affected by alkaline earth metal. N-containing species release occurs in low temperatures with the addition of external AAEMs. The activation energy of samples impregnated with CaCl2 and MgCl2 sharply decreases compared to the original RS. The total yields of N-containing species are reduced significantly in the presence of KCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2 as additives. The inhibition ability of AAEMs follows the sequence MgCl2 > CaCl2 > KCl. The inhibition effect of MgCl2 can be improved by solution immersion compared with solid powder mixing. The clean biomass pyrolysis and gasification technology with low N-containing species content may be developed according to the results.

  7. Determination of Heavy Metals in Raw Milk Produced in Tangshan City, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Aijun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the content of heavy metals (Arsenic, Lead, Chromium and Mercury in raw milk of Tangshan. Samples were obtained directly from dairy farms in Tangshan City. A total of 55 raw milk samples were collected in 2012, a total of 150 raw milk samples and 150 in 2013 and 2014 respectively. All the samples were analyzed by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry method-based on China National Standard. In general, heavy metals (Arsenic, Lead, Chromium and Mercury of raw milk in Tangshan were relatively safe for people’s health because none of those heavy metals (Arsenic, Lead, Chromium and Mercury contents exceeded the Maximum Limit set by China.

  8. Electrochemical transient techniques for determination of uranium and rare-earth metal separation coefficients in molten salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, S.A. [Institute of Chemistry, Kola Science Centre, RAS, Apatity, Murmansk Region 184200, Russia (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: kuznet@chemy.kolasc.net.ru; Hayashi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Minato, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Gaune-Escard, M. [Ecole Polytechnique, IUSTI-CNRS UMR 6595, University of Provence, F-13453 Marseille, Cedex 13 (France)

    2006-02-25

    The main step in the pyrometallurgical recycling process of spent nuclear fuel is a molten salt electrorefining. The knowledge of separation coefficients of actinides (U, Np, Pu and Am) and rare-earth metals (Y, La, Ce, Nd and Gd) is very important for this step. Usually the separation coefficients are evaluated from the formal standard potentials of metals in melts containing their own ions, i.e. values obtained by potentiometric method. Electrochemical experiments were carried out at 723-823 K in order to estimate separation coefficients in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing uranium and lanthanum trichlorides. The electrochemical behaviour of UCl{sub 3} in LiCl-KCl melt was studied by different electrochemical methods. The diffusion coefficients of U(III) were determined by linear sweep voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamperometry. The standard rate constants of charge transfer for electroreduction of uranium, U(III) + 3e{sup -} {sup {yields}} U, were calculated by the impedance spectroscopy method. The values of constants testify that electroreduction of U(III) to U is mainly controlled by the rate of charge transfer. La(III) discharge on uranium electrode was also investigated. It was shown that for the calculation of uranium and lanthanum separation coefficients it is necessary to determine the voltammetric peak potentials of U(III) and La(III), their concentration in the melt and the kinetic parameters relating to U(III) discharge such as transfer and diffusion coefficients, and standard rate constants of charge transfer.

  9. Exchange Processes in Shibasaki's Rare Earth Alkali Metal BINOLate Frameworks and Their Relevance in Multifunctional Asymmetric Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jerome R; Gu, Jun; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J; Walsh, Patrick J

    2015-06-10

    Shibasaki's rare earth alkali metal BINOLate (REMB) catalysts (REMB; RE = Sc, Y, La - Lu; M = Li, Na, K; B = 1,1-bi-2-naphtholate; RE/M/B = 1/3/3) are among the most successful enantioselective catalysts and have been employed in a broad range of mechanistically diverse reactions. Despite the phenomenal success of these catalysts, several fundamental questions central to their reactivity remain unresolved. Combined reactivity and spectroscopic studies were undertaken to probe the identity of the active catalyst(s) in Lewis-acid (LA) and Lewis-acid/Brønsted-base (LA/BB) catalyzed reactions. Exchange spectroscopy provided a method to obtain rates of ligand and alkali metal self-exchange in the RE/Li frameworks, demonstrating the utility of this technique for probing solution dynamics of REMB catalysts. Isolation of the first crystallographically characterized REMB complex with substrate bound enabled stoichiometric and catalytic reactivity studies, wherein we observed that substrate deprotonation by the catalyst framework was necessary to achieve selectivity. Our spectroscopic observations in LA/BB catalysis are inconsistent with previous mechanistic proposals, which considered only tris(BINOLate) species as active catalysts. These findings significantly expand our understanding of the catalyst structure in these privileged multifunctional frameworks and identify new directions for development of new catalysts.

  10. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  11. Application of FMEA in the Quality Estimation of Metal Matrix Composite Castings Produced by Squeeze Infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawdzińska K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composites (MMCs are still scarcely described due to various combinations of used materials and a wide array of technologies. Applying the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA method to describe the quality of metal composite castings may contribute to eliminating specific (characteristic only to these materials defects. This part of the analysis determines the criticality numbers, meaning the frequency of a given failure, detectability level and significance of a given failure to the group of specific composite casting failures. It contributes to establishing the priority number (P, which is a measure used to assess risk, a notion essential in discussing quality in a composite casting.

  12. On the Role of Processing Parameters in Producing Recycled Aluminum AA6061 Based Metal Matrix Composite (MMC-AlR) Prepared Using Hot Press Forging (HPF) Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azlan; Lajis, Mohd Amri; Yusuf, Nur Kamilah

    2017-09-19

    Solid-state recycling, which involves the direct recycling of scrap metal into bulk material using severe plastic deformation, has emerged as a potential alternative to the conventional remelting and recycling techniques. Hot press forging has been identified as a sustainable direct recycling technique that has fewer steps and maintains excellent material performance. An experimental investigation was conducted to explore the hardness and density of a recycled aluminum-based metal matrix composite by varying operating temperature and holding time. A mixture of recycled aluminum, AA6061, and aluminum oxide were simultaneously heated to 430, 480, and 530 °C and forged for 60, 90, and 120 min. We found a positive increase in microhardness and density for all composites. The hardness increased approximately 33.85%, while density improved by about 15.25% whenever the temperature or the holding time were increased. Based on qualitative analysis, the composite endures substantial plastic deformation due to the presence of hardness properties due to the aluminum oxide embedded in the aluminum matrix. These increases were significantly affected by the operating temperature; the holding time also had a subordinate role in enhancing the metal matrix composite properties. Furthermore, in an effort to curb the shortage of primary resources, this study reviewed the promising performance of secondary resources produced by using recycled aluminum and aluminum oxide as the base matrix and reinforcement constituent, respectively. This study is an outline for machining practitioners and the manufacturing industry to help increase industry sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our community in the future.

  13. Sabang Submarine Volcano Aceh, Indonesia: Review of Some Trace and Rare Earth Elements Abundances Produced by Seafloor Fumarole Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananto kurnio

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.3.173-182Geochemical analyses of selected coastal and seafloor samples from Sabang Area revealed abundances of trace and rare earth elements. The selected samples of element abundances were mostly taken from seafloor in the vicinities of active fumaroles either by grab sampler operated from survey boat above fumarole point or by diver directly took the samples on the seafloor especially at Serui - Sabang Bay. Results show that samples closed to seafloor fumaroles demonstrate plenty of trace and rare earth elements. The trace and rare earth elements mean values (n=10 are: Nb (4.33 ppm, La (16.52 ppm, Ce (38.82 ppm, Nd (19.15 ppm, Ce (38.82 ppm, Pr (4.907 ppm, Nd (19.15 ppm, Sm (4.04 ppm, Gd (3.95 ppm, Dy (3.38 ppm, Th (6.432 ppm, and U (4.335 ppm. Negatively, statistical correlations between Fe, Zn, and Ni as the main sulphide elements with sulphur is interpreted that sulphide minerals do not form in the Sabang Sea. Sea water influence in the mineralization process was shown by the good correlations between Fe, Zn, Pb, Ni, and Ba.

  14. Metal-silicate partitioning of potassium at high pressure and temperature conditions and implications for thermal history of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, R.; Hirose, K.

    2011-12-01

    The possible presence of potassium in the Earth's core as a radioactive heat source can have a significant influence on the thermal evolution of the Earth (Buffett, 2002 GRL; Labrosse, 2003 PEPI). Core-mantle equilibration at high P-T (e.g. ~30 GPa, ~3450 K [Righter, 2011 EPSL]) was suggested from the mantle contents of siderophile elements. Basal magma ocean (Labrosse et al., 2007 Nature) also should be equilibrated with molten iron at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) (~135 GPa) due to its gravitational stability (Nomura et al., 2011 Nature). Previous experimental studies on potassium partitioning between liquid metal and silicate melt showed contradictory results on the concentration of potassium in the Earth's core because of experimental artifacts (K loss in metal phase), different (simplified) chemical compositions for study and large extrapolations to high P-T which suits for core-mantle equilibration at the base of the magma ocean. Recently, Corgne et al. (2007 EPSL) performed the partitioning experiments up to 7.7 GPa and 2200°C with chemical compositions of CI chondrite doped with moderate amount of S and K and revealed a significant effect of O contents in molten alloy on K partition coefficient while with negligible effect of P-T and S and C contents. The change in electronic structure of potassium from 4s- to 3d-like was predicted by theory (Bukowinski, 1976 GRL) and potassium alloying with nickel and iron was reported by experiments using diamond anvil cell at ~30 GPa and 2200 K (Parker et al., 1997 Science; Lee and Jeanloz, 2003 GRL). So, it is important to investigate the effect of pressure on K partition coefficient at the pressure conditions above ~30 GPa up to 135 GPa. Hirao et al. (2006 GRL) performed melting experiment at 135 GPa and 3500 K using laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) and showed the value of partition coefficient Dk is 0.15, but their results lack the elemental mass balances between run products and starting materials. Our

  15. OSPAR-OIC Intercalibration Study on metals in produced water samples: a QUASIMEME Laboratory performance Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velzeboer, I.; Crum, S.J.H.; Karman, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Offshore Industry Committee (OIC) of OSPAR discussed in its 2008 meeting the reporting of inputs of metals from offshore installations. INPUT is currently compiling data and information on discharges and emissions to the OSPAR maritime area to be used in the Quality Status Report (QSR). This

  16. Characterisation of a metal matrix composite produced with laser particle injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, AB; De Hosson, JTM; Sudarshan, TS; Jeandin, M; Khor, KA

    1998-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the laser particle injection process. TiC, TiN end SiC particles were injected into Ti-6Al-4V, which resulted in the formation of a metal matrix composite with modest dissolution of the added particles. The laser tracks with SIC exhibited a diversity of microstructures

  17. 77 FR 43474 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Specialty Metals-Definition of “Produce...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... in Canada (which is a qualifying country and part of the national technology and industrial base). Do... current technologies for production of specialty metals other than titanium and analyzed the impact any...'' of armor steel plate, and to expand the application of the other listed technologies, currently...

  18. Hardfacing of aluminium alloys by means of metal matrix composites produced by laser surface alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix composite layers were formed on an aluminium substrate by means of laser surface alloying method. Aluminium 1200 was used as a host material and TiC particles were used as the reinforcement. The microstructure of the modified layer...

  19. On the formability, geometrical accuracy, and surface quality of sheet metal parts produced by SPIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. L.; Silva, M. B.; Alves, L. M.; Martins, P. A. F.

    2008-11-01

    Conventional sheet metal forming processes are not suitable for flexible small-batch production and, therefore, are not appropriate for the growing agile manufacturing trends requiring very short life-cycles, development and production lead times. In fact, the present need for flexible sheet metal forming techniques requires the development of innovative technological solutions that are capable of reducing the fixed and capital costs of sheet metal forming to a level where small-batch production becomes economically feasible. Single point incremental forming (SPIF) is a new sheet metal forming process with a high potential economic payoff for rapid prototyping applications and for small quantity production. In general terms a typical SPIF set-up makes use of a small number of low cost active tools components; (i) a blankholder, (ii) a backing plate and (iii) a single point forming tool. The tool path is generated in a CNC machining center and during the process there is no backup die supporting the back surface of the sheet. Despite the contributions of many researchers on the development of industrial applications and better characterization of the forming limits of the process, several key topics related to the mechanics of deformation, likely mode of failure, geometric accuracy and surface quality of the formed parts remain little understood and scarcely systematized. This paper attempts to provide new contributions about the abovementioned issues by means of a comprehensive experimental investigation performed under laboratory controlled conditions.

  20. Nickel/metal hydride batteries using rate-earth hydrogen storage alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1994-07-01

    Fine particles of a hydrogen storage alloy (LaNi3.8Co0.5Mn0.4Al0.3) were microencapsulated with a thin film of nickel of about 0.6 micron thickness. The microencapsulated alloy powders were used as an anode material in a sealed nickel/metal hydride battery. The battery characteristics were compared with those of a battery with a bare (uncoated) alloy anode. The battery using the bare alloy was less stable compared to the coated alloy due to the role of the coated nickel as an oxygen barrier for protecting the alloy surface from oxidation. In addition, charge- discharge characteristics were improved greatly by the nickel coating, especially at high rates and at low temperatures due to the role of nickel as a microcurrent collector. So the microencapsulation of the alloy powders improves the performances of the alloy electrode.

  1. Hydrologic impacts of past shifts of Earth's thermal equator offer insight into those to be produced by fossil fuel CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker, Wallace S; Putnam, Aaron E

    2013-10-15

    Major changes in global rainfall patterns accompanied a northward shift of Earth's thermal equator at the onset of an abrupt climate change 14.6 kya. This northward pull of Earth's wind and rain belts stemmed from disintegration of North Atlantic winter sea ice cover, which steepened the interhemispheric meridional temperature gradient. A southward migration of Earth's thermal equator may have accompanied the more recent Medieval Warm to Little Ice Age climate transition in the Northern Hemisphere. As fossil fuel CO2 warms the planet, the continents of the Northern Hemisphere are expected to warm faster than the Southern Hemisphere oceans. Therefore, we predict that a northward shift of Earth's thermal equator, initiated by an increased interhemispheric temperature contrast, may well produce hydrologic changes similar to those that occurred during past Northern Hemisphere warm periods. If so, the American West, the Middle East, and southern Amazonia will become drier, and monsoonal Asia, Venezuela, and equatorial Africa will become wetter. Additional paleoclimate data should be acquired and model simulations should be conducted to evaluate the reliability of this analog.

  2. Effect of metallic nanoparticle fillers on the thermal conductivity of diatomaceous earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, Mouhamad S. [Department of Liberal Arts, Des Moines Area Community College, Des Moines, IA 50314 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Srinivasan, Srilok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chang, Boyce [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ghosh, Suvojit [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S4L8 (Canada); Balasubramanian, Ganesh, E-mail: bganesh@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2016-10-23

    Thermal conductivity of solid nanoparticles (aluminum) in a nanoporous solid matrix (diatomaceous earth) is examined to understand the effect of conductive fillers on the thermal properties of a porous material. We find that thermal conductivity is strongly dependent on load applied to prepare the mixture compacts, while porosity is influenced by the composition of the mixture. The addition of nanoparticles contributes to limited increases in thermal conductivity of the mixture by (1) increasing contact area between the mixture constituents and (2) reduction of porosity that leads to enhanced solid–gas coupling contribution. Thermal conductivity increases exponentially with external gas pressures due to the coupling effect between the solid particles and the entrapped air. - Highlights: • Thermal conductivity k of DE/AlNP mixture is more dependent on compaction than on Al concentration. • Nanoparticles affect k of DE by increase in solid contact area rather than by its effect on porosity. • When air content in mixture rises, k increases with gas pressures due to solid–gas coupling effect.

  3. Metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in rare-earth matrix for low temperature thermal imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauwel, E.; Galeckas, A.; Rauwel, P.; Hansen, P.-A.; Wragg, D.; Nilsen, O.; Fjellvåg, H.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the synthesis and characterization of nanocomposites comprising of oxide nanoparticles (NPs) (ZnO, CaHfO3 and SrHfO3) embedded in rare-earth oxide (Eu2O3, Nd2O3) matrices by using atomic layer deposition. The different oxide surroundings allowed highlighting the role of interface defects in the recombination processes of charge carriers in the NPs. We provide a comparative analysis of optical absorption and emission properties of the constituents: thin films, free-standing and embedded NPs, and discuss the intrinsic and extrinsic nature of the luminescent sites in different nanocomposites. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanocomposites are clearly distinguishable from those of free-standing NPs in terms of overall quantum efficiency as well as intensity ratios of the characteristic blue and green emission bands associated with radiative transitions involving excitons and intrinsic defects, respectively. In contrast to PL enhancement due to surface-passivating effect of the surrounding media in the case of ZnO nanocomposites, the embedment of hafnia perovskites into oxide matrices generally leads to suppressed luminescence in the visible range, thus confirming its extrinsic, surface-defect related nature.

  4. A geological reconnaissance of electrical and electronic waste as a source for rare earth metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sandra R; Wäger, Patrick A; Widmer, Rolf; Williams, Ian D

    2015-11-01

    The mining of material resources requires knowledge about geogenic and anthropogenic deposits, in particular on the location of the deposits with the comparatively highest concentration of raw materials. In this study, we develop a framework that allows the establishment of analogies between geological and anthropogenic processes. These analogies were applied to three selected products containing rare earth elements (REE) in order to identify the most concentrated deposits in the anthropogenic cycle. The three identified anthropogenic deposits were characterised according to criteria such as "host rock", "REE mineralisation" and "age of mineralisation", i.e. regarding their "geological" setting. The results of this characterisation demonstrated that anthropogenic deposits have both a higher concentration of REE and a longer mine life than the evaluated geogenic deposit (Mount Weld, Australia). The results were further evaluated by comparison with the geological knowledge category of the United Nations Framework Classification for Fossil Energy and Mineral Reserves and Resources 2009 (UNFC-2009) to determine the confidence level in the deposit quantities. The application of our approach to the three selected cases shows a potential for recovery of REE in anthropogenic deposits; however, further exploration of both potential and limitations is required. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Inverse metal-assisted chemical etching produces smooth high aspect ratio InP nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Mohseni, Parsian K; Song, Yi; Ishihara, Tatsumi; Li, Xiuling

    2015-01-14

    Creating high aspect ratio (AR) nanostructures by top-down fabrication without surface damage remains challenging for III-V semiconductors. Here, we demonstrate uniform, array-based InP nanostructures with lateral dimensions as small as sub-20 nm and AR > 35 using inverse metal-assisted chemical etching (I-MacEtch) in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4), a purely solution-based yet anisotropic etching method. The mechanism of I-MacEtch, in contrast to regular MacEtch, is explored through surface characterization. Unique to I-MacEtch, the sidewall etching profile is remarkably smooth, independent of metal pattern edge roughness. The capability of this simple method to create various InP nanostructures, including high AR fins, can potentially enable the aggressive scaling of InP based transistors and optoelectronic devices with better performance and at lower cost than conventional etching methods.

  6. The spatial thickness distribution of metal films produced by large area pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Schou, Jørgen; Linderoth, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of metals have been deposited in the large-area Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) Facility at Riso National Laboratory. Thin films of Ag and Ni were deposited with laser pulses from an excimer laser at 248 nm with a rectangular beam spot at a fluence of 10 J/cm(2) on glass substrates of 127...... mm diameter positioned 80 turn from the target in vacuum. We have explored the distribution of deposited material on a stationary substrate from a fixed point of impact on the target relative to the substrate. In all cases the angular distribution of the deposited metal layers shows a distinct "flip...... utilized in an algorithm for production of films over large areas. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Effect of anatomical region on the formation of metal artefacts produced by dental implants in cone beam computed tomographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alessiana Helena; Fardim, Karolina Aparecida Castilho; de Souza, Camila Furtado; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Devito, Karina Lopes

    2018-01-10

    To quantitatively compare metal artefacts produced by implants in different maxillomandibular regions on cone beam CT (CBCT) images. A total of 200 implants selected from CBCT examinations were divided into four groups: Group 1 (n = 50)-implants located in the anterior maxilla; Group 2 (n = 50)-implants located in the posterior maxilla; Group 3 (n = 50)-implants located in the anterior mandible and Group 4 (n = 50)-implants located in the posterior mandible. The implants were further classified as isolated or adjacent to other implants. Three axial reconstructions were selected for each sampled implant (apical, middle and cervical). On each slice, the artefacts produced by the implants were counted. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the variables between groups. The Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were used to compare the axial reconstructions. The mandible showed a greater number of artefacts than the maxilla (apical image: p = 0.0024; middle image: p < 0.0001). The anterior region produced more artefacts than the posterior region (apical image: p = 0.0105; middle image: p < 0.0316). There was no significant difference in the number of artefacts between isolated and adjacent implants, and the cervical image was most affected by artefacts. Dental implants always produce metal artefacts in CBCT images, and these artefacts are affected by the anatomical location in the dental arch.

  8. Characterization of metal-binding bioflocculants produced by the cyanobacterial component of mixed microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, J; Rodriguez-Eaton, S; Ekanemesang, U M; Phillips, P

    1994-07-01

    Mixed-species microbial mats that were dominated by the cyanobacterium Oscillatoria sp. and contained heterotrophic and purple autotrophic bacteria were constructed for specific bioremediation applications. When the mats were challenged with metals, production and secretion of metal-binding extracellular polysaccharide bioflocculants were observed. The concentration of these negatively charged polysaccharides was correlated with the removal of manganese from the water column beneath a surface microbial mat. Bioflocculants from an Oscillatoria sp. that was isolated from the mat were collected and concentrated for characterization. A chromatographic analysis revealed a heterogeneous population of polysaccharides with respect to charge density and molecular size. The subpopulation of polysaccharides which exhibited the highest level of flocculating activity was polyanionic and had a molecular weight of more than 200,000. A glycosyl analysis of the bioflocculants revealed the presence of galacturonic acid (2.2%) and glucuronic acid (1.86%). The presence of these components, which were negatively charged at the pH levels generated by the mats during photosynthesis (pH > 7.5), may account for the metal-binding properties of the mats.

  9. Levels of heavy metals in canned bonito, sardines, and mackerel produced in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Suhendan

    2011-11-01

    Concentrations of selected metals were determined using ICP-MS in canned bonito, sardines and mackerel commercialized in Turkey. Thirty samples and two different brands were sampled for each fish species. The minimum and maximum concentrations of trace metals in canned bonito, sardines and mackerel were found as 0.000-34.742, 0.000-89.015, 0.000-28.725 mg/kg for iron, 2.388-26.620, 10.930-41.340, 4.778-29.270 mg/kg for zinc, 0.331-1.548, 0.599-2.242, 0.336-2.884 mg/kg for copper, 0.000-0.065, 0.000-0.113, 0.000-0.115 mg/kg for cadmium, 0.000-0.190, 0.000-0.158, 0.000-0.385 mg/kg for tin, 0.000-0.111, 0.000-0.223, 0.000-0.208 mg/kg for mercury and 0.000-3.046, 0.000-2.875, 0.000-3.529 mg/kg for lead, respectively. These levels are similar those found in other studies. Although the samples have concentrations within permissible limits for Zn, Cu, Sn and Hg, some of them contained Fe, Cd and Pb above these limits. Periodical controls of metals in canned fish are essential both to protect human health and to provide data on this subject.

  10. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 1. Scandium Group (Sc, Y, La)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, 03195 Warsaw (Poland); Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, 410083 Changsha (China)

    2014-03-15

    This work presents an assessment of solubility data for rare earth metal fluorides (generally of trivalent metals and of CeF{sub 4}) in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were seldom studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or binary salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. The literature has been covered through the end of 2013.

  11. Alkali and Alkaline Earth Metal Complexes Ligated by an Ethynyl Substituted Cyclopentadienyl Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Seifert

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sodium, potassium, and calcium compounds of trimethyl((2,3,4,5-tetramethylcyclopentadien-1-ylethynylsilane (CpMe4(C≡CSiMe3 were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction and standard analytical methods. The sodium derivative was obtained by deprotonation of CpMe4(C≡CSiMe3H with Na{N(SiMe32} to give a monomeric complex [NaCpMe4(C≡CSiMe3(THF3]. In a similar reaction, starting from K{N(SiMe32} the corresponding potassium compound [KCpMe4(C≡CSiMe3(THF2]n, which forms a polymeric super sandwich structure in the solid state, was obtained. Subsequently, salt metathesis reactions were conducted in order to investigate the versatility of the CpMe4(C≡CSiMe3− ligand in alkaline earth chemistry. The reaction of [KCpMe4(C≡CSiMe3(THF2]n with CaI2 afforded the dimeric complex [CaCpMe4(C≡CSiMe3I(THF2]2, in which both CpMe4(C≡CSiMe3Ca units are bridged by iodide in a μ2 fashion. In-depth NMR investigation indicates that [CaCpMe4(C≡CSiMe3I(THF2]2 is in a Schlenk equilibrium with [{CpMe4(C≡CSiMe3}2Ca(THFx] and CaI2(THF2, as is already known for [CaCp*I(THF2].

  12. Hydrogen and syngas production by catalytic gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) using alkali and alkaline-earth metals compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abdol Ghaffar; Hisoriev, Hikmat; Zarnegar, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Hamed

    2018-01-02

    The steam gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) in presence of alkali and alkaline-earth metal compounds catalysts was studied to enhance the yield of syngas and reduce its tar content through cracking and reforming of condensable fractions. The commercial catalysts used include NaOH, KHCO 3 , Na 3 PO 4 and MgO. The gasification runs carried out with a research scale, biomass gasification unit, show that the NaOH has a strong potential for production of hydrogen, along with the added advantages of char converting and tar destruction, allowing enhancement of produced syngas caloric value. When the temperature increased from 700°C to 900°C, the tar content in the gas sharply decreased, while the hydrogen yield increased. Increasing steam/biomass ratio significantly increased hydrogen yield and tar destruction; however, the particle size in the range of 0.5-2.5 mm played a minor role in the process.

  13. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Jeffrey Hawk

    2004-02-01

    In an effort to realize minimum of a 2x increase in wear life of ground engaging components used on mining machines, two potentially cost effective processes were explored for the production of tailored, highly abrasion resistant materials: (1) hybrid pressure casting of steel composites, and (2) arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings. Steel composites comprised of cermet or oxide hard particles were successfully produced using pressure casting processes, although a cost effective process has not yet been identified for oxide particles. Both composites achieved project wear targets in high stress gouging wear, but the cermet composites did not meet the targets in impact wear, due to poor matrix toughness resulting from particle dissolution. Oxide composites had superior toughness and are expected to meet impact wear goals. Arc lamp processing of thermal spray coatings was successfully demonstrated to produce a metallurgical bond at the coating interface. Functionally graded materials were developed and successfully fused to allow for the accommodation of thermal process stresses in an intermediate layer. Ultimately, three functionally graded materials were identified as having high stress, three-body abrasion resistance sufficient to exceed project goals.

  14. Preliminary investigations on picoplankton-related precipitation of alkaline-earth metal carbonates in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Jaquet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a routine water-quality survey in meso-oligotrophic lake Geneva (Switzerland, suspended matter was collected by filtration on 0.2 μm membranes in July and August 2012 at the depth of maximal chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration (2 mg m–3. Examination by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous dark and gelatinous patches occluding the pores of the membranes, containing high numbers of picoplanktonic cells and, in places, clusters of high-reflectance smooth microspheres (1-2 μm in diameter. Their chemical composition, determined by semi-quantitative, energy-dispersive X ray spectroscopy (EDS showed magnesium (Mg, calcium (Ca, strontium (Sr and barium (Ba (alkaline earth metals to be the dominant cations. Among the anions, phosphorus (P and carbon (C were present, but only the latter is considered here (as carbonate. The microspheres were subdivided into four types represented in a Ca-Sr-Ba ternary space. All types are confined within a domain bound by Ca>45, Sr<10 and Ba<50 (in mole %. Type I, the most frequent, displays a broad variability in Ba/Ca, even within a given cluster. Types II and III are devoid of Ba, but may incorporate P. Type IV contains only Ca. The Type I composition resembles that of benstonite, a Group IIA carbonate that was recently found as intracellular granules in a cyanobacterium from alkaline lake Alchichica (Mexico.Lake Geneva microspheres are solid, featureless and embedded in a mucilage-looking substance in the vicinity of, but seemingly not inside, picoplanktonic cells morphologically similar to Chlorella and Synechococcus. In summer 2012, the macroscopic physico-chemical conditions in lake Geneva epilimnion were such as to allow precipitation of Ca but not of Sr and Ba carbonates. Favourable conditions did exist, though, in the micro-environment provided by the combination of active picoplankton and a mucilaginous envelope. Further studies are ongoing to investigate the

  15. Anomalies in Trace Metal and Rare-Earth Loads below a Waste-Water Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antweiler, R.; Writer, J. H.; Murphy, S.

    2013-12-01

    The changes in chemical loads were examined for 54 inorganic elements and compounds in a 5.4-km reach of Boulder Creek, Colorado downstream of a waste water treatment plant (WWTP) outfall. Elements were partitioned into three categories: those showing a decrease in loading downstream, those showing an increase, and those which were conservative, at least over the length of the study reach. Dissolved loads which declined - generally indicative of in-stream loss via precipitation or sorption - were typically rapid (occurring largely before the first sampling site, 2.3 km downstream); elements showing this behavior were Bi, Cr, Cs, Ga, Ge, Hg, Se and Sn. These results were as expected before the experiment was performed. However, a large group (28 elements, including all the rare-earth elements, REE, except Gd) exhibited dissolved load increases indicating in-stream gains. These gains may be due to particulate matter dissolving or disaggregating, or that desorption is occurring below the WWTP. As with the in-stream loss group, the processes tended to be rapid, typically occurring before the first sampling site. Whole-water samples collected concurrently also had a large group of elements which showed an increase in load downstream of the WWTP. Among these were most of the group which had increases in the dissolved load, including all the REE (except Gd). Because whole-water samples include both dissolved and suspended particulates within them, increases in loads cannot be accounted for by invoking desorption or disaggregation mechanisms; thus, the only source for these increases is from the bed load of the stream. Further, the difference between the whole-water and dissolved loads is a measure of the particulate load, and calculations show that not only did the dissolved and whole-water loads increase, but so did the particulate loads. This implies that at the time of sampling the bed sediment was supplying a significant contribution to the suspended load. In general

  16. Phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of oxide systems on the basis of rare earth, alkaline earth and 3d-transition (Mn, Fe, Co metals. A short overview of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Cherepanov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review is dedicated studies of phase equilibria in the systems based on rare earth elements and 3d transition metals. It’s highlighted several structural families of these compounds and is shown that many were found interesting properties for practical application, such as high conductivity up to the superconducting state, magnetic properties, catalytic activity of the processes of afterburning of exhaust gases, the high mobility in the oxygen sublattice and more.

  17. Stress modulation in desiccating crack networks for producing effective templates for patterning metal network based transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ankush; Pujar, Rajashekhar; Gupta, Nikita; Tarafdar, Sujata; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2017-07-01

    A drying layer of a colloidal dispersion tends to produce cracks, often in a network, due to internal stress arising from the rearrangement of particles while the substrate adhesion resists such movements. The stress can be modulated using experimental agents such as electric field, humidity, and surface structuring. In this work, repeated wet-drying cycles of the cracking layer have been used as stress modulating agents taking an aqueous dispersion of acrylic resin nanoparticles as the colloidal layer, offering cracks with widths in the sub-ten micrometer range. With increasing wet-drying cycles, the colloidal layer is seen to develop higher crack density and connectivity, as well as a well-defined hierarchy of formation. Thus developed crack layers have been used as templates for depositing metals (Cu and Au) to realize fine metal wire meshes. The latter serve as transparent conductors with excellent optoelectronic properties.

  18. Empirical links between trace metal cycling and marine microbial ecology during a large perturbation to Earth's carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jeremy D.; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Rohrssen, Megan; Love, Gordon D.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the global redox state of the oceans and its cause-and-effect relationship with periods of widespread organic-carbon deposition is vital to interpretations of Earth's climatic and biotic feedbacks during periods of expanded oceanic oxygen deficiency. Here, we present a compilation of new and published data from an organic-rich locality within the proto-North Atlantic Ocean during the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event that shows a dramatic drawdown of redox-sensitive trace elements. Iron geochemistry independently suggests euxinic deposition (i.e., anoxic and sulfidic bottom waters) for the entire section, thus confirming its potential as an archive of global marine metal inventories. In particular, depleted molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) concentrations effectively record the global expansion of euxinic and oxygen-deficient but non-sulfidic waters, respectively. The V drawdown precedes the OAE, fingerprinting an expansion of oxygen deficiency prior to an expansion of euxinia. Molybdenum drawdown, in contrast, is delayed with respect to V and coincides with the onset of OAE2. Parallel lipid biomarker analyses provide evidence for significant and progressive reorganization of marine microbial ecology during the OAE in this region of the proto-North Atlantic, with the smallest relative eukaryotic contributions to total primary production occurring during metal-depleted intervals. This relationship may be related to decreasing supplies of enzymatically important trace elements. Similarly, box modeling suggests that oceanic drawdown of Mo may have approached levels capable of affecting marine nitrogen fixation. Predictions of possible nitrogen stress on eukaryotic production, locally and globally, are consistent with the low observed levels of Mo and a rise in 2-methylhopane index values during the peak of the OAE. At the same time, the environmental challenge presented by low dissolved oxygen and euxinia coincides with increased turnover rates of

  19. Effect of water on metal-silicate partitioning and hydrogen incorporation in the core of the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clesi, Vincent; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Manthilake, Geeth; Andrault, Denis; Raepsaet, Caroline; Bureau, Hélène; Khodja, Hicham

    2017-04-01

    The accretion of planets from primordial materials and their subsequent differentiation to form a core and a mantle are fundamental questions in terrestrial and solar system. Many of the questions about the processes are still open and much debated. For example, could the presence of water during the metallic phase segregation affect the planet-accretion models? The existing studies on the elemental metal-silicate partitioning under hydrous conditions are limited to 1 GPa [5,6] well below the likely conditions prevailing during core formation on Earth and Mars. In the present study we use multi-anvil technique aver a range of P, T, fO_2 and water content (5 - 20 GPa, 2000 - 2500 K, from 1 to 5 log units below the iron-wüstite buffer, and for XH2O varying from 500 ppm to 1.5 wt.{%}). The present experimental results show that except for Fe, there is no effect of water on the partitioning of moderately siderophile elements. It allowed us to build consistent models of planetary accretion from reducing to oxidized conditions. Furthermore, for the range of water concentrations studied, there is no evidence of an important hydrogen incorporation into planetary cores, thus making unlikely for hydrogen to be a major light element of the core as previsously assumed [7]. [1] Morbidelli et al. (2000) Meteoritics & Planetary Science 1320, 1309-1320. [2] Marty (2012) EPSL 313-314, 56-66. [3] O'Brien et al. (2014) Icarus 239, 74-84. [4] Sarafian et al. (2014) Science 346, 623-626. [5] Righter and Drake (1999) EPSL 171, 383-399. [6] Jana and Walker (1999) GCA 63, 2299-2310. [7] Okuchi, T. (1997) Science 278, 1781-1784

  20. Separation of technetium and rare earth metals for co-decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine; Martin, Leigh

    2015-05-01

    Poster. In the US there are several technologies under consideration for the separation of the useful components in used nuclear fuel. One such process is the co-decontamination process to separate U, Np and Pu in a single step and produce a Np/ Pu and a U product stream. Although the behavior of the actinide elements is reasonably well defined in this system, the same is not true for the fission products, mainly Zr, Mo, Ru and Tc. As these elements are cationic and anionic they may interact with each other to extract in a manner not predicted by empirical models such as AMUSE. This poster presentation will discuss the initial results of batch contact testing under flowsheet conditions and as a function of varying acidity and flowsheet conditions to optimize recovery of Tc and minimize extraction of Mo, Zr and Ru with the goal of developing a better understanding of the behavior of these elements in the co-decontamination process.

  1. Heavy metal removal from produced water using retorted shale; Remocao de metais pesados em aguas produzidas utilizando xisto retortado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, Patricia M.; Melo, Marcos A.F.; Melo, Dulce M.A.; Silva Junior, Carlos N.; Assuncao, Ary L.C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Anjos, Marcelino J. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2004-07-01

    The Production of oil and gas is usually accompanied by the production of large volume of water that can have significant environmental effects if not properly treated. In this work, the use of retort shale was investigated as adsorbent agent to remove heavy metals in produced water. Batch adsorption studies in synthetic solution were performed for several metal ions. The efficiency removal was controlled by solution pH, adsorbent dosage, and initial ion concentration and agitation times. Two simple kinetic models were used, pseudo-first- and second-order, were tested to investigate the adsorption mechanisms. The equilibrium data fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich models. The produced water samples were treated by retorted shale under optimum adsorption conditions. Synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence was used to analyze the elements present in produced water samples from oil field in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. The removal was found to be approximately 20-50% for Co, Ni, Sr and above 80% for Cr, Ba, Hg and Pb. (author)

  2. Structural and Dynamical Properties of Alkaline Earth Metal Halides in Supercritical Water: Effect of Ion Size and Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Sonanki; Tembe, Bhalachandra Laxmanrao

    2017-10-31

    Constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations have been performed for aqueous alkaline earth metal chloride (M2+ - Cl- [M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba]) solutions over a wide range of concentrations (0.27 molal to 5.55 molal) in supercritical and ambient conditions to investigate their structural and dynamical properties. A strong influence of the salt concentration is found on the ion-ion pair correlation functions in both ambient and supercritical conditions. In supercritical conditions, significant clustering is observed in 0.27 molal solution whereas, the reverse situation is observed at room temperature and this is also supported by the residence times of the clusters. Concentration and ion size (cation size) seem to have opposite effects on the average number of hydrogen bonds. The simulation results show that the self-diffusion coefficient of water, the cations and the chloride ion increase with increasing temperature, whereas they decrease with increasing salt concentration. The cluster size distribution shows strong density dependence in both ambient and supercritical conditions. In supercritical conditions, cluster sizes display a near Gaussian distribution whereas, the distribution decays monotonically in ambient conditions.

  3. Influence of compound deoxidation of steel with Al, Zr, rare earth metals, and Ti on properties of heavy castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Senberger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy steel castings deoxidized with aluminium are sometimes brittle intercrystalline failed during their service along primary grain boundaries what is initiated by aluminium nitrides and so called conchoidal fractures are formed. The tendency to forming the conchoidal fractures depends in particular on cooling rate (the casting modulus, aluminium and nitrogen contents in steel. During deoxidation, when manufacturing heavy castings, the elements with high affinity to nitrogen, zirconium or titanium, are added to steel that would decrease nitrogen activity by the bond on stable nitrides. The formation of stable nitrides should reduce the tendency of steel to the formation of conchoidal fractures. Deoxidation was thermodynamically analyzed at presence of the mentioned elements. For particular conditions a probable course of deoxidation was estimated at test castings. The deoxidation course was checked by microanalysis of deoxidation products (inclusions. For service and experimental castings the anticipated composition of inclusions was compared. It has been proved that in heavy castings with high aluminium contents in steel under studied conditions neither the addition of zirconium nor of titanium nor of rare earth metals will prevent the formation of conchoidal fractures.

  4. Comprehensive study of the chelation and coacervation of alkaline earth metals in the presence of sodium polyphosphate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Arash; Filiaggi, Mark Joseph

    2014-05-13

    The effect of chelation of three alkaline earth metals (Ca, Sr, and Ba) by polyphosphates on the pH and viscosity of the solution is examined and correlated to the phosphate glass properties. Also, the impact of the polyphosphate average degree of polymerization (D(p)) as well as the type and amount of chelated divalent cation on the degradation rate of the chains is studied. Subsequently, the number of divalent cations required for polyphosphate chain agglomeration to form a coacervate, and the resulting composition of these coacervates, was investigated. A decrease in polyphosphate solution pH during chelation was routinely obtained, with a sudden shift in the rate of pH drop occurring around a divalent cation/phosphorus molar ratio of 0.18. Longer chains or cations with a smaller ionic radius accelerated the rate of D(p) reduction. The number of divalent cations required for coacervation depends on different variables such as the polyphosphate concentration, the D(p), and the type of divalent cation. The formed coacervate retains the D(p) of polyphosphate originally used for coacervation, and the resulting Ca/P molar ratio depends largely on the amount of calcium being used during coacervation. Overall, this article helps one to understand the coacervation of polyphosphates in order to exploit their potential as a biomaterial.

  5. CO2 gasification reactivity of biomass char: catalytic influence of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahijani, Pooya; Zainal, Zainal Alimuddin; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Mohammadi, Maedeh

    2013-09-01

    This study investigates the influence of alkali (Na, K), alkaline earth (Ca, Mg) and transition (Fe) metal nitrates on CO2 gasification reactivity of pistachio nut shell (PNS) char. The preliminary gasification experiments were performed in thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and the results showed considerable improvement in carbon conversion; Na-char>Ca-char>Fe-char>K-char>Mg-char>raw char. Based on TGA studies, NaNO3 (with loadings of 3-7 wt%) was selected as the superior catalyst for further gasification studies in bench-scale reactor; the highest reactivity was devoted to 5 wt% Na loaded char. The data acquired for gasification rate of catalyzed char were fitted with several kinetic models, among which, random pore model was adopted as the best model. Based on obtained gasification rate constant and using the Arrhenius plot, activation energy of 5 wt% Na loaded char was calculated as 151.46 kJ/mol which was 53 kJ/mol lower than that of un-catalyzed char. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Distortion and Targeting Errors from Strong Rare Earth Metal Magnetic Dental Implant Requiring Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong-Cheol, Park; Chong Sik, Lee; Seok Min, Kim; Eu Jene, Choi; Do Hee, Lee; Jung Kyo, Lee

    2016-12-22

    Recently, the use of magnetic dental implants has been re-popularized with the introduction of strong rare earth metal, for example, neodymium, magnets. Unrecognized magnetic dental implants can cause critical magnetic resonance image distortions. We report a case involving surgical failure caused by a magnetic dental implant. A 62-year-old man underwent deep brain stimulation for medically insufficiently controlled Parkinson's disease. Stereotactic magnetic resonance imaging performed for the first deep brain stimulation showed that the overdenture was removed. However, a dental implant remained and contained a neodymium magnet, which was unrecognized at the time of imaging; the magnet caused localized non-linear distortions that were the largest around the dental magnets. In the magnetic field, the subthalamic area was distorted by a 4.6 mm right shift and counter clockwise rotation. However, distortions were visually subtle in the operation field and small for distant stereotactic markers, with approximately 1-2 mm distortions. The surgeon considered the distortion to be normal asymmetry or variation. Stereotactic marker distortion was calculated to be in the acceptable range in the surgical planning software. Targeting errors, approximately 5 mm on the right side and 2 mm on the left side, occurred postoperatively. Both leads were revised after the removal of dental magnets. Dental magnets may cause surgical failures and should be checked and removed before stereotactic surgery. Our findings should be considered when reviewing surgical precautions and making distortion-detection algorithm improvements.

  7. Effect of Solidification Rate and Rare Earth Metal Addition on the Microstructural Characteristics and Porosity Formation in A356 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed on A356 alloy with the main aim of investigating the effects of La and Ce additions to 356 alloys (with and without 100 ppm Sr on the microstructure and porosity formation in these alloys. Measured amounts of La, Ce, and Sr were added to the molten alloy. The results showed that, in the absence of Sr, addition of La and Ce leads to an increase in the nucleation temperature of the α-Al dendritic network with a decrease in the temperature of the eutectic Si precipitation, resulting in increasing the freezing range. Addition of 100 ppm Sr results in neutralizing these effects. The presence of La or Ce in the casting has a minor effect on eutectic Si modification, in spite of the observed depression in the eutectic temperature. It should be noted that Ce is more effective than La as an alternate modifying agent. According to the atomic radius ratio, rLa/rSi is 1.604 and rCe/rSi is 1.559, theoretically, which shows that Ce is relatively more effective than La. The present findings confirm that Sr is the most dominating modification agent. Interaction between rare earth (RE metals and Sr would reduce the effectiveness of Sr. Although modification with Sr causes the formation of shrinkage porosity, it also reacts with RE-rich intermetallics, resulting in their fragmentation.

  8. Structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X=Ca, Be, Mg) studied by a genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin [Ames Laboratory; Nguyen, Manh Cuong [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory

    2013-09-17

    The structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X = Ca, Be, Mg) were studied using an adaptive genetic algorithm (GA) for global structure optimization in combination with first-principles calculations. From the adaptive GA search, we obtained an orthorhombic structure for CaO2 with 12 atoms in the unit cell, which is energetically more favorable than the previously proposed structures. Reaction energy of the decomposition CaO2 → CaO + 1/2O2 determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation shows that this orthorhombic calcium peroxide structure is thermodynamically stable. The simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern using our predicted structure is in excellent agreement with experimental data. We also show that crystal phase BeO2 is unlikely to exist under normal conditions. MgO2 has a cubic pyrite structure, but it is not stable against decomposition: MgO2 → MgO + 1/2O2.

  9. Structure-property relationship of ceramic coatings on metals produced by laser processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; van den Burg, M.; Mazumder, J; Conde, O; Villar, R; Steen, W

    1996-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. The thickness of the coating that can be applied by laser coating is limited to about 200 mu m setting a limit to the maximum strain energy release rate

  10. MECHANICAL PERFORMANCE OF METAL-CERAMIC INTERFACES PRODUCED BY LASER PROCESSING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Burg, M.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on Steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. The thickness of the coating that can be applied by laser coating is limited to about 200 mu m setting a limit to the maximum strain energy release rate

  11. On the electrical and optical properties of oxide nanolayers produced by the thermal oxidation of metal tin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabtsev, S. V., E-mail: ryabtsev@phys.vsu.ru; Chuvenkova, O. A.; Kannykin, S. V.; Popov, A. E.; Ryabtseva, N. S.; Voischev, S. S.; Turishchev, S. Yu.; Domashevskaya, E. P. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Thin SnO{sub 2–x} layers, 30 nm in thickness, are produced by the thermal oxidation of metal tin nanolayers at a temperature of 450–750°C. The electrical and optical properties of the layers are studied. During the thermal oxidation of tin nanolayers, an unsteady variation in their conductivity is observed. For the oxide films produced at 450 and 550°C, an absorption band at 340 nm (3.65 eV) is detected in the optical spectra. The conductivity-activation energy is determined for samples oxidized to different degrees. On the basis of experimental data and the data reported in publications, an oxidation mechanism controlling the properties of Sn nanolayers is proposed.

  12. Metal-free current collectors based on graphene materials for supecapacitors produced by 3D printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskakov, S. A.; Baskakova, Yu. V.; Lyskov, N. V.; Dremova, N. N.; Shul'ga, Yu. M.

    2017-10-01

    Supercapacitor (SC) current collectors with electrodes made of graphite oxide reduced during microwave exfoliation are produced from a commercial filament with a graphene component via layer-by-layer fusing with a 3D printer. The separator is made of a graphene oxide film. The current collectors are investigated by means of IR spectroscopy. Electrochemical tests are performed for the assembled SC that include tests of its cyclic stability up to 1000 cycles.

  13. Plant growth promotion and root colonization by EPS producing Enterobacter sp. RZS5 under heavy metal contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed, R Z; Patel, P R; Shaikh, S S

    2015-02-01

    The heavy metal resistant bacterium isolated from field soil and identified as Enterobacter sp. RZS5 tolerates a high concentration (100-2000 μM) of various heavy metal ions such as Mn2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, CO2+ and Fe2+ when grown in such environment and produces exopolysaccharides (EPS). Here, we have demonstrated EPS production by Enterobacter sp. RZS5 during 60 h of growth in yeast extract mannitol broth (YEMB). The yield increased by two fold after the addition of 60 μM of Ca2+; 50 μM of Fe2+ and 60 μM of Mg2+ ions in YEMB, and the optimization of physico-chemical parameters. EPS was extracted with 30% (v/v) of isopropanol as against the commonly used 50% (v/v) isopropanol method. EPS-rich broth promoted seed germination, shoot height, root length, number of leaves and chlorophyll content of wheat (Triticum aestivum) seed and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) seed. The higher colony-forming unit of Enterobacter sp. in soil inoculated with EPS rich broth of Enterobacter sp. indicated the root colonizing potential and rhizosphere competence of the isolate. The FTIR spectra of the EPS extract confirmed the presence of the functional group characteristics of EPS known to exhibit a high binding affinity towards certain metal ions. This overall growth and vigour in plants along with the effective root colonization, reflected the potential of the isolate as an efficient bio-inoculant in bioremediation.

  14. Quantitative Determination of The Heavy Metals (Lead, Zinc And Manganese) in White Cheese Produced in Ergene Basin by Using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry

    OpenAIRE

    Kurt Cücü, Ayşen; Yavuz, Mustafa; Demircan Demir, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARYIt is well known that heavy metals are harmful for human health appearing only after exceeding the specific concentrations of each metal. This study was carried out to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in cheese that was produced in diaries of Ergene Basin.The dairies near the Ergene River were investigated and suitable ones were selected. Since the sampling process directly affects the sensitivity of the results, particular attention was given to this process. A total of tw...

  15. Enhanced recovery of valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries through optimization of organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaloo-Horeh, Nazanin; Mousavi, Seyyed Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, spent medium bioleaching method was performed using organic acids produced by Aspergillus niger to dissolve Ni, Co, Mn, Li, Cu and Al from spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Response surface methodology was used to investigate the effects and interactions between the effective factors of sucrose concentration, initial pH, and inoculum size to optimize organic acid production. Maximum citric acid, malic acid, and gluconic acid concentrations of 26,478, 1832.53 and 8433.76ppm, respectively, and a minimum oxalic acid concentration of 305.558ppm were obtained under optimal conditions of 116.90 (gl(-1)) sucrose concentration, 3.45% (vv(-1)) inoculum size, and a pH value of 5.44. Biogenically-produced organic acids are used for leaching of spent LIBs at different pulp densities. The highest metal recovery of 100% Cu, 100% Li, 77% Mn, and 75% Al occurred at 2% (wv(-1)) pulp density; 64% Co and 54% Ni recovery occurred at 1% (wv(-1)) pulp density. The bioleaching of metals from spent LIBs can decrease the environmental impact of this waste. The results of this study suggest that the process can be used for large scale industrial purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Empirical modeling of plasma clouds produced by the Metal Oxide Space Clouds experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Todd R.; Caton, Ronald G.; Miller, Daniel; Holmes, Jeffrey M.; Groves, Keith M.; Sutton, Eric

    2017-05-01

    The Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) Long-Range Tracking And Instrumentation Radar (ALTAIR) radar at Kwajalein Atoll was used in incoherent scatter mode to measure plasma densities within two artificial clouds created by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Metal Oxide Space Clouds (MOSC) experiment in May 2013. Optical imager, ionosonde, and ALTAIR measurements were combined to create 3-D empirical descriptions of the plasma clouds as a function of time, which match the radar measurements to within 15%. The plasma clouds closely track the location of the optical clouds, and the best fit plasma cloud widths are generally consistent with isotropic neutral diffusion. Cloud plasma densities decreased as a power of time, with exponents between -0.5 and -1.0, or much more slowly than the -1.5 predicted by diffusion. These exponents and estimates of total ion number from integration through the model volume are consistent with a scenario of slow ionization and a gradually increasing total number of ions with time, reaching a net ionization fraction of 20% after approximately half an hour. These robust representations of the plasma density are being used to study impacts of the artificial clouds on the dynamics of the background ionosphere and on RF propagation.

  17. Mass spectrometric observations of metal oxychlorides produced by oxidation-chlorination reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Mcnallan, M. J.; Lee, Y. Y.

    1989-01-01

    It was recently reported that Cr2O3-forming alloys show less corrosion resistance than Al2O3-forming alloys in Cl2/O2 mixtures, which is attributed to the formation of porous Cr2O3 scales and stable CrO2Cl2 vapor species. This paper reports the results of direct mass spectrometric observations with a high-pressure sampling mass spectrometer of these metal oxychlorides forming on the surfaces of Hastelloy S and Alloy 600 superalloys. Samples were preoxidized for 2 hrs at 900 C before the exposure to a O2/Ar gas mixture containing 1 percent Cl2. Results of X-ray diffraction showed scales containing Cr2O3 and NiCr2O4 on both alloys. After exposure to Cl2, large quantities of Cr2O2Cl2 were demonstrated for both alloys, indicating that this is a route for the breakdown of Cr2O3 scales. The Mo present in the Hastelloy S leads to more rapid attack by Cl2, resulting in the formation of MoO2Cl2.

  18. K2-111 b - a short period super-Earth transiting a metal poor, evolved old star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlund, Malcolm; Gaidos, Eric; Barragán, Oscar; Persson, Carina M.; Gandolfi, Davide; Cabrera, Juan; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Sz.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Endl, Michael; Grziwa, Sascha; Korth, Judith; Pfaff, Jeremias; Bitsch, Bertram; Johansen, Anders; Mustill, Alexander J.; Davies, Melvyn B.; Deeg, Hans J.; Palle, Enric; Cochran, William D.; Eigmüller, Philipp; Erikson, Anders; Guenther, Eike; Hatzes, Artie P.; Kiilerich, Amanda; Kudo, Tomoyuki; MacQueen, Phillip; Narita, Norio; Nespral, David; Pätzold, Martin; Prieto-Arranz, Jorge; Rauer, Heike; Van Eylen, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Context. From a light curve acquired through the K2 space mission, the star K2-111(EPIC 210894022) has been identified as possibly orbited by a transiting planet. Aims: Our aim is to confirm the planetary nature of the object and derive its fundamental parameters. Methods: We analyse the light curve variations during the planetary transit using packages developed specifically for exoplanetary transits. Reconnaissance spectroscopy and radial velocity observations have been obtained using three separate telescope and spectrograph combinations. The spectroscopic synthesis package SME has been used to derive the stellar photospheric parameters that were used as input to various stellar evolutionary tracks in order to derive the parameters of the system. The planetary transit was also validated to occur on the assumed host star through adaptive imaging and statistical analysis. Results: The star is found to be located in the background of the Hyades cluster at a distance at least 4 times further away from Earth than the cluster itself. The spectrum and the space velocities of K2-111 strongly suggest it to be a member of the thick disk population. The co-added high-resolution spectra show that that it is a metal poor ([Fe/H] = - 0.53 ± 0.05 dex) and α-rich somewhat evolved solar-like star of spectral type G3. We find Teff = 5730 ± 50 K, log g⋆ = 4.15 ± 0.1 cgs, and derive a radius of R⋆ = 1.3 ± 0.1 R⊙ and a mass of M⋆ = 0.88 ± 0.02 M⊙. The currently available radial velocity data confirms a super-Earth class planet with a mass of 8.6 ± 3.9 M⊕ and a radius of 1.9 ± 0.2 R⊕. A second more massive object with a period longer than about 120 days is indicated by a long-term radial velocity drift. Conclusions: The radial velocity detection together with the imaging confirms with a high level of significance that the transit signature is caused by a planet orbiting the star K2-111. This planet is also confirmed in the radial velocity data. A second more

  19. Hydrogen peroxide modification enhances the ability of biochar (hydrochar) produced from hydrothermal carbonization of peanut hull to remove aqueous heavy metals: Batch and column tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental and modeling investigations were conducted to examine the effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on hydrothermally produced biochar (hydrochar) from peanut hull to remove aqueous heavy metals. Characterization measurements showed that hydrogen peroxide modification increased the oxygen-c...

  20. Structures and Spectroscopy Studies of Two M(II-Phosphonate Coordination Polymers Based on Alkaline Earth Metals (M = Ba, Mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui-Rong Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The two examples of alkaline-earth M(II-phosphonate coordination polymers, [Ba2(L(H2O9]·3H2O (1 and [Mg1.5(H2O9]·(L-H21.5·6H2O (2 (H4L = H2O3PCH2N(C4H8NCH2PO3H2, N,N′-piperazinebis(methylenephosphonic acid, (L-H2 = O3PH2CHN(C4H8NHCH2PO3 have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, PXRD, TG-DSC, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 possesses a 2D inorganic-organic alternate arrangement layer structure built from 1D inorganic chains through the piperazine bridge, in which the ligand L−4 shows two types of coordination modes reported rarely at the same time. In 1, both crystallographic distinct Ba(1 and Ba(2 ions adopt 8-coordination two caps and 9-coordination three caps triangular prism geometry structures, respectively. Compound 2 possesses a zero-dimensional mononuclear structure with two crystallographic distinct Mg(II ions. Free metal cations   [MgO6]n2+ and uncoordinated anions (L-H2n2- are joined together by static electric force. Results of photoluminescent measurement indicate three main emission bands centered at 300 nm, 378.5 nm, and 433 nm for 1 and 302 nm, 378 nm, and 434.5 nm for 2 (λex=235 nm, respectively. The high energy emissions could be derived from the intraligand π∗-n transition stations of H4L (310 nm and 382 nm, λex=235 nm, while the low energy emission (>400 nm of 1-2 may be due to the coordination effect with metal(II ions.

  1. Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi [Wading River, NY

    2009-03-24

    The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

  2. Quest for highly connected metal-organic framework platforms: rare-earth polynuclear clusters versatility meets net topology needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alezi, Dalal; Peedikakkal, Abdul Malik P; Weseliński, Łukasz J; Guillerm, Vincent; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Cairns, Amy J; Chen, Zhijie; Wojtas, Łukasz; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-04-29

    Gaining control over the assembly of highly porous rare-earth (RE) based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) remains challenging. Here we report the latest discoveries on our continuous quest for highly connected nets. The topological exploration based on the noncompatibility of a 12-connected RE polynuclear carboxylate-based cluster, points of extension matching the 12 vertices of the cuboctahedron (cuo), with 3-connected organic ligands led to the discovery of two fascinating and highly connected minimal edge-transitive nets, pek and aea. The reduced symmetry of the employed triangular tricarboxylate ligand, as compared to the prototype highly symmetrical 1,3,5-benzene(tris)benzoic acid guided the concurrent occurrence of nonanuclear [RE9(μ3-OH)12(μ3-O)2(O2C-)12] and hexanuclear [RE6(OH)8(O2C-)8] carboxylate-based clusters as 12-connected and 8-connected molecular building blocks in the structure of a 3-periodic pek-MOF based on a novel (3,8,12)-c trinodal net. The use of a tricarboxylate ligand with modified angles between carboxylate moieties led to the formation of a second MOF containing solely nonanuclear clusters and exhibiting once more a novel and a highly connected (3,12,12)-c trinodal net with aea topology. Notably, it is the first time that RE-MOFs with double six-membered ring (d6R) secondary building units are isolated, representing therefore a critical step forward toward the design of novel and highly coordinated materials using the supermolecular building layer approach while considering the d6Rs as building pillars. Lastly, the potential of these new MOFs for gas separation/storage was investigated by performing gas adsorption studies of various probe gas molecules over a wide range of pressures. Noticeably, pek-MOF-1 showed excellent volumetric CO2 and CH4 uptakes at high pressures.

  3. Rare earth oxide reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} ceramics for inert coating of metallic parts for petroleum extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadava, Yoggendra Prasad; Rego, Sheila Alves Bezerra da Costa; Ferreira, Ricardo Artur Sanguinetti [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings of largest known pre-salt petroleum reservoir in Brazil have created an intense demand for new materials capable of withstanding direct contact with the crude petroleum as it is a highly corrosive and chemically reactive fluid. Petroleum drilling equipment, storage tanks and transportation systems suffer from constant physical stress caused by chemical attack of crude petroleum on its structure. Ceramics are materials with high chemical stability in hostile environment and therefore can be used as an inert coating material to resolve such problems. To date, ceramics based on alumina are most widely used in practice where there is demand for high mechanical strength and high fracture toughness. However intrinsic fragility of ceramics is still a fatal factor for their use in mechanical structures. To improve these characteristics, usually ceramics are reinforced with one or more ceramic additives. Mechanical properties of alumina based ceramics improve considerably with the addition of TiO{sub 2}, TiN, ZrO{sub 2} etc. ceramic additives. Nucleation and propagation of cracks is a major problem for ceramic coating applications. Initial studies show that addition of small percentages of rare earth oxides can increase the toughness of the alumina based ceramics. In the present work, we have produced rare-earth oxide (CeO{sub 2}) reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} ceramics in proportions of 5-20 wt% TiO{sub 2} and 2%wt% CeO{sub 2} through thermomechanical processing and sintering techniques and studied there microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties. To evaluate the potential of these ceramics as inert coatings for crude petroleum extraction, storage and transportation systems, we have studied the physic-chemical and mechanical stability of these ceramics in crude petroleum environment. Our studies presented satisfactory results in terms of physic-chemical and mechanical stability of these materials for the use of 2wt% of CeO{sub 2

  4. Spectral and temporal characterization of nanosecond and femtosecond laser produced plasma from metallic targets

    CERN Document Server

    Smijesh, N

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization and comparison of the temporal features of plasma produced by ultrafast (100 fs, 800 nm) and short-pulse (7ns, 1064 nm) laser pulses from a high purity nickel and zinc targets, expanding into a nitrogen background, are presented. The experiment is carried out under a wide pressure range of 10^-6 to 10^2 Torr, where the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly when the pressure approaches 1 Torr. Electron temperature (Te) is calculated from OES and is found to be independent of pressure for ultrafast excitation, whereas an enhancement in Te is observed around milliTorr regime for short-pulse excitation.The velocity measurements indicate acceleration of the fast species to a certain distance upon plume expansion, whereas the slow species are found to decelerate, particularly at higher pressures.A comparison of the time of flight dynamics of neutrals and ions in the LPPs generated by intense laser pulses confirms that the fast species observed are due to the recombination of fas...

  5. Enhanced Electroresponse of Alkaline Earth Metal-Doped Silica/Titania Spheres by Synergetic Effect of Dispersion Stability and Dielectric Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Chang-Min; Lee, Seungae; Cheong, Oug Jae; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-09-02

    A series of alkaline earth metal-doped hollow SiO2/TiO2 spheres (EM-HST) are prepared as electrorheological (ER) materials via sonication-mediated etching method with various alkaline earth metal hydroxides as the etchant. The EM-HST spheres are assessed to determine how their hollow interior and metal-doping affects the ER activity. Both the dispersion stability and the dielectric properties of these materials are greatly enhanced by the proposed one-step etching method, which results in significant enhancement of ER activity. These improvements are attributed to increased particle mobility and interfacial polarization originating from the hollow nature of the EM-HST spheres and the effects of EM metal-doping. In particular, Ca-HST-based ER fluid exhibits ER performance which is 7.1-fold and 3.1-fold higher than those of nonhollow core/shell silica/titania (CS/ST) and undoped hollow silica/titania (HST)-based ER fluids, respectively. This study develops a versatile and simple approach to enhancing ER activity through synergetic effects arising from the combination of dispersion stability and the unique dielectric properties of hollow EM-HST spheres. In addition, the multigram scale production described in this experiment can be an excellent advantage for practical and commercial ER application.

  6. Rare earth metals influence on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH and G17CrMo5-5 cast steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gajewski

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of research on modification influence of REM on mechanical properties and crack resistance of GP240GH cast carbon steel and G17CrMo5-5 high-temperature cast steel. The tests have been performed on successive industrial melts. The rare earth metals were put into the ladle during tapping of heat melt from the furnace. Each time ca 2000 kg of liquid metals were modified. Because of this the amount of sulphur in the cast steel was decreased and the non-metallic inclusion morphology was significantly changed. There were tested mechanical properties (Re,Rm, plastic properties (A5,Z and impact strength (KV, and on the basis of the three-point bend test the KJC stress intensity factor was evaluated. It was noticed that the REM modification brings essential increase of impact strength as well as fracture toughness determined by KJC factor.

  7. Identification of New Neutron-Rich Isotopes in the Rare-Earth Region Produced by 345 MeV/nucleon 238U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Naoki; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Kameda, Daisuke; Inabe, Naohito; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yohei; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kusaka, Kensuke; Yanagisawa, Yoshiyuki; Ohtake, Masao; Tanaka, Kanenobu; Yoshida, Koichi; Sato, Hiromi; Baba, Hidetada; Kurokawa, Meiko; Ohnishi, Tetsuya; Iwasa, Naohito; Chiba, Ayuko; Yamada, Taku; Ideguchi, Eiji; Go, Shintaro; Yokoyama, Rin; Fujii, Toshihiko; Nishibata, Hiroki; Ieki, Kazuo; Murai, Daichi; Momota, Sadao; Nishimura, Daiki; Sato, Yoshiteru; Hwang, Jongwon; Kim, Sunji; Tarasov, Oleg B.; Morrissey, David J.; Simpson, Gary

    2018-01-01

    A search for new isotopes in the neutron-rich rare-earth region has been carried out using a 345 MeV/nucleon 238U beam at the RIKEN Nishina Center RI Beam Factory. Fragments produced were analyzed and identified using the BigRIPS in-flight separator. We observed a total of 29 new neutron-rich isotopes: 153Ba, 154,155,156La, 156,157,158Ce, 156,157,158,159,160,161Pr, 162,163Nd, 164,165Pm, 166,167Sm, 169Eu, 171Gd, 173,174Tb, 175,176Dy, 177,178Ho, and 179,180Er.

  8. Promoting alkali and alkaline-earth metals on MgO for enhancing CO2 capture by first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Jeong Woo; Lee, Kwang Soon; Lee, Won Bo

    2014-12-07

    Developing next-generation solid sorbents to improve the economy of pre- and post-combustion carbon capture processes has been challenging for many researchers. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising sorbent because of its moderate sorption-desorption temperature and low heat of sorption. However, its low sorption capacity and thermal instability need to be improved. Various metal-promoted MgO sorbents have been experimentally developed to enhance the CO2 sorption capacities. Nevertheless, rigorous computational studies to screen an optimal metal promoter have been limited to date. We conducted first-principles calculations to select metal promoters of MgO sorbents. Five alkali (Li-, Na-, K-, Rb-, and Cs-) and 4 alkaline earth metals (Be-, Ca-, Sr-, and Ba-) were chosen as a set of promoters. Compared with the CO2 adsorption energy on pure MgO, the adsorption energy on the metal-promoted MgO sorbents is higher, except for the Na-promoter, which indicates that metal promotion on MgO is an efficient approach to enhance the sorption capacities. Based on the stabilized binding of promoters on the MgO surface and the regenerability of sorbents, Li, Ca, and Sr were identified as adequate promoters among the 9 metals on the basis of PW91/GGA augmented with DFT+D2. The adsorption energies of CO2 on metal-promoted MgO sorbents for Li, Ca, and Sr atoms are -1.13, -1.68, and -1.48 eV, respectively.

  9. Ultrafast electron, lattice and spin dynamics on rare earth metal surfaces. Investigated with linear and nonlinear optical techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radu, I.E.

    2006-03-15

    This thesis presents the femtosecond laser-induced electron, lattice and spin dynamics on two representative rare-earth systems: The ferromagnetic gadolinium Gd(0001) and the paramagnetic yttrium Y(0001) metals. The employed investigation tools are the time-resolved linear reflectivity and second-harmonic generation, which provide complementary information about the bulk and surface/interface dynamics, respectively. The femtosecond laser excitation of the exchange-split surface state of Gd(0001) triggers simultaneously the coherent vibrational dynamics of the lattice and spin subsystems in the surface region at a frequency of 3 THz. The coherent optical phonon corresponds to the vibration of the topmost atomic layer against the underlying bulk along the normal direction to the surface. The coupling mechanism between phonons and magnons is attributed to the modulation of the exchange interaction J between neighbour atoms due to the coherent lattice vibration. This leads to an oscillatory motion of the magnetic moments having the same frequency as the lattice vibration. Thus these results reveal a new type of phonon-magnon coupling mediated by the modulation of the exchange interaction and not by the conventional spin-orbit interaction. Moreover, we show that coherent spin dynamics in the THz frequency domain is achievable, which is at least one order of magnitude faster than previously reported. The laser-induced (de)magnetization dynamics of the ferromagnetic Gd(0001) thin films have been studied. Upon photo-excitation, the nonlinear magneto-optics measurements performed in this work show a sudden drop in the spin polarization of the surface state by more than 50% in a <100 fs time interval. Under comparable experimental conditions, the time-resolved photoemission studies reveal a constant exchange splitting of the surface state. The ultrafast decrease of spin polarization can be explained by the quasi-elastic spin-flip scattering of the hot electrons among spin

  10. Laboratory calibration and field testing of the Chemcatcher-Metal for trace levels of rare earth elements in estuarine waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jördis; Pröfrock, Daniel; Paschke, Albrecht; Broekaert, Jose A C; Prange, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Little knowledge is available about water concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in the marine environment. The direct measurement of REEs in coastal waters is a challenging task due to their ultra-low concentrations as well as the high salt content in the water samples. To quantify these elements at environmental concentrations (pg L(-1) to low ng L(-1)) in coastal waters, current analytical techniques are generally expensive and time consuming, and require complex chemical preconcentration procedures. Therefore, an integrative passive sampler was tested as a more economic alternative sampling approach for REE analysis. We used a Chemcatcher-Metal passive sampler consisting of a 3M Empore Chelating Disk as the receiving phase, as well as a cellulose acetate membrane as the diffusion-limiting layer. The effect of water turbulence and temperature on the uptake rates of REEs was analyzed during 14-day calibration experiments by a flow-through exposure tank system. The sampling rates were in the range of 0.42 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 0.25 m s(-1)) to 4.01 mL h(-1) (13 °C; 1 m s(-1)). Similar results were obtained for the different REEs under investigation. The water turbulence was the most important influence on uptake. The uptake rates were appropriate to ascertain time-weighted average concentrations of REEs during a field experiment in the Elbe Estuary near Cuxhaven Harbor (exposure time 4 weeks). REE concentrations were determined to be in the range 0.2 to 13.8 ng L(-1), where the highest concentrations were found for neodymium and samarium. In comparison, most of the spot samples measured along the Chemcatcher samples had REE concentrations below the limit of detection, in particular due to necessary dilution to minimize the analytical problems that arise with the high salt content in marine water samples. This study was among the first efforts to measure REE levels in the field using a passive sampling approach. Our results suggest that passive samplers could be

  11. Internal fit of single crowns produced by CAD-CAM and lost-wax metal casting technique assessed by the triple-scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bjørn Einar; Rønold, Hans Jacob; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-03-01

    Whether single crowns produced by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) have an internal fit comparable to crowns made by lost-wax metal casting technique is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the internal fit of single crowns produced with the lost-wax and metal casting technique with that of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique. The internal fit of 5 groups of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique was compared with that of single crowns produced in cobalt-chromium with the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique. Comparison was performed using the triple-scan protocol; scans of the master model, the crown on the master model, and the intaglio of the crown were superimposed and analyzed with computer software. The 5 groups were milled presintered zirconia, milled hot isostatic pressed zirconia, milled lithium disilicate, milled cobalt-chromium, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium. The cement space in both the mesiodistal and buccopalatal directions was statistically smaller (Pcasting technique compared with that of crowns produced by the CAD-CAM technique. Single crowns made using the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique have better internal fit than crowns produced using the CAD-CAM technique. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of the hardness of different orthodontic wires and brackets produced by metal injection molding and conventional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Shiva; Kachuie, Marzie

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the hardness of orthodontic brackets produced by metal injection molding (MIM) and conventional methods and different orthodontic wires (stainless steel, nickel-titanium [Ni-Ti], and beta-titanium alloys) for better clinical results. A total of 15 specimens from each brand of orthodontic brackets and wires were examined. The brackets (Elite Opti-Mim which is produced by MIM process and Ultratrimm which is produced by conventional brazing method) and the wires (stainless steel, Ni-Ti, and beta-titanium) were embedded in epoxy resin, followed by grinding, polishing, and coating. Then, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis was applied to assess their elemental composition. The same specimen surfaces were repolished and used for Vickers microhardness assessment. Hardness was statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Mann-Whitney test at the 0.05 level of significance. The X-ray EDS analysis revealed different ferrous or co-based alloys in each bracket. The maximum mean hardness values of the wires were achieved for stainless steel (SS) (529.85 Vickers hardness [VHN]) versus the minimum values for beta-titanium (334.65 VHN). Among the brackets, Elite Opti-Mim exhibited significantly higher VHN values (262.66 VHN) compared to Ultratrimm (206.59 VHN). VHN values of wire alloys were significantly higher than those of the brackets. MIM orthodontic brackets exhibited hardness values much lower than those of SS orthodontic archwires and were more compatible with NiTi and beta-titanium archwires. A wide range of microhardness values has been reported for conventional orthodontic brackets and it should be considered that the manufacturing method might be only one of the factors affecting the mechanical properties of orthodontic brackets including hardness.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of binary amorphous aluminum alloys with transition metals and rare earth metals; Strukturelle und elektronische Eigenschaften binaerer amorpher Aluminiumlegierungen mit Uebergangsmetallen und Metallen der Seltenen Erden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiehler, Martin

    2012-02-03

    The influence of the d-states of the transition metals on the structure formation in amorphous alloys has so far only been inadequately understood. The present work aims to elaborate additional contributions to the understanding of binary amorphous aluminum alloys with transition metals. Special emphasis was placed on alloys with a subgroup of the transition metals, the rare earth metals. Within the scope of the present work, layers of Al-Ce in the region of 15at% Ce-80at% Ce were produced by sequential flash evaporation at 4.2K in the high vacuum, and characterized electronically by electrical resistance and Hall effect measurements as well as structurally by transmission electron diffraction. In addition, studies of plasma resonance were carried out by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy. In the range of 25at% Ce-60at% Ce, homogeneous amorphous samples were obtained. Especially the structural investigations were made difficult by oxidation of the material. The influence of the Ce-4f electrons manifests itself mainly in the low-temperature and magnetoresistance, both of which are dominated by the Kondo effect. The Hall effect in Al-Ce is dominated by anomalous components over the entire temperature range (2K-320K), which are attributed to skew-scattering effects, also due to Ce-4f electrons. Down to 2K there was no macroscopic magnetic order. In the region 2K-20K, the existence of clusters of ordered magnetic moments is concluded. For T> 20K, paramagnetic behavior occurs. With regard to the structural and electronic properties, a-Al-Ce can be classified as a group with a-Al- (Sc, Y, La). In the sense of plasma resonance, a-Al-Ce is excellently arranged in a system known from other Al transition metal alloys. Furthermore, by increasing the results of binary amorphous Al transition metal alloys from the literature, it has been found that the structure formation in these systems is closely linked to a known but still unexplained structure-forming effect that

  14. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  15. The influence of organic structure and rare earth metal cation on the corrosion efficiency observed on AS1020 steel compared with La(4OHCin3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Seter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst the corrosion protection of steel in aqueous chloride environments by the rare earth inhibitor lanthanum 4-hydroxycinnamate is well known, the influence of the structural variation of the organic component as well as the nature of the metal centre has not previously been addressed. Herein we show that praseodymium 4-hydroxy cinnamate is comparable to its lanthanum counterpart in aqueous solution. On the other hand, cerium 4-hydroxycinnamate and lanthanum 2-hydroxycinnamate show poor corrosion protection performance while lanthanum 3-hydroxycinnamate provides a level of inhibition between these. These differences are shown to be related to the speciation in solution and are postulated to be linked to steric influences which are likely to affect the bonding environment within the rare earth compound itself, as well as its bonding with the steel substrate.

  16. Dehydrogenation of secondary amines: synthesis, and characterization of rare-earth metal complexes incorporating imino- or amido-functionalized pyrrolyl ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghai; Zhou, Shuangliu; Wang, Shaowu; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhang, Lijun; Feng, Zhijun; Guo, Liping; Wang, Fenhua; Wei, Yun

    2013-02-28

    The dehydrogenation of pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amines initiated by rare-earth metal amides was systematically studied. Reactions of the rare-earth metal amides [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)RE(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amines 2-(t)BuNHCH(2)-5-R-C(4)H(2)NH (R = H (1), R = (t)Bu (2)) led to dehydrogenation of the secondary amines with isolation of imino-functionalized pyrrolyl rare-earth metal complexes [2-(t)BuN=CH-5-R-C(4)H(2)N](2)REN(SiMe(3))(2) (R = H, RE = Y (3a), Dy (3b), Yb (3c), Eu (3d); R = (t)Bu, RE = Y (4a), Dy (4b), Er (4c)). The mixed ligands erbium complex [2-(t)BuNCH(2)-5-(t)Bu-C(4)H(2)N]Er[2-(t)BuN=CH-5-(t)BuC(4)H(2)N](2)ClLi(2)(THF) (4c') was isolated in a short reaction time for the synthesis of complex 4c. Reaction of the deuterated pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amine 2-((t)BuNHCHD)C(4)H(3)NH with yttrium amide [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)Y(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) further proved that pyrrolyl-amino ligands were transferred to pyrrolyl-imino ligands. Treatment of 2-((t)BuNHCH(2))C(4)H(3)NH (1) with excess (Me(3)Si)(2)NLi gave the only pyrrole deprotonated product {[η(5):η(2):η(1)-2-((t)BuNHCH(2))C(4)H(3)N]Li(2)N(SiMe(3))(2)}(2) (5), indicating that LiN(SiMe(3))(2) could not dehydrogenate the secondary amines to imines and rare-earth metal ions had a decisive effect on the dehydrogenation. The reaction of the rare-earth metal amides [(Me(3)Si)(2)N](3)RE(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) with 1 equiv. of more bulky pyrrolyl-functionalized secondary amine 2-[(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))NHCH(2)](C(4)H(3)NH) (6) in toluene afforded the only amine and pyrrole deprotonated dinuclear rare-earth metal amido complexes {(μ-η(5):η(1)):η(1)-2-[(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))NCH(2)]C(4)H(3)N]LnN(SiMe(3))(2)}(2) (RE = Nd (7a), Sm (7b), Er (7c)), no dehydrogenation of secondary amine to imine products were observed. On the basis of experimental results, a plausible mechanism for the dehydrogenation of secondary amines to imines was proposed.

  17. Mechanistic aspects of dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation to produce ammonia in catalysis and organometallic chemistry: relevance of metal hydride bonds and dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-Peng; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra

    2014-01-21

    Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by transition-metal centers to produce ammonia is central in industry and in Nature. After an introductory section on the thermodynamic and kinetic challenges linked to N2 splitting, this tutorial review discusses three major classes of transition-metal systems (homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological) capable of achieving dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen. Molecular complexes, solid-state Haber-Bosch catalytic systems, silica-supported tantalum hydrides and nitrogenase will be discussed. Emphasis is focused on the reaction mechanisms operating in the process of dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen, and in particular on the key role played by metal hydride bonds and by dihydrogen in such reactions.

  18. Cysteine-Functionalized Chitosan Magnetic Nano-Based Particles for the Recovery of Light and Heavy Rare Earth Metals: Uptake Kinetics and Sorption Isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhoum, Ahmed A; Mafhouz, Mohammad G; Abdel-Rehem, Sayed T; Gomaa, Nabawia A; Atia, Asem A; Vincent, Thierry; Guibal, Eric

    2015-02-04

    Cysteine-functionalized chitosan magnetic nano-based particles were synthesized for the sorption of light and heavy rare earth (RE) metal ions (La(III), Nd(III) and Yb(III)). The structural, surface, and magnetic properties of nano-sized sorbent were investigated by elemental analysis, FTIR, XRD, TEM and VSM (vibrating sample magnetometry). Experimental data show that the pseudo second-order rate equation fits the kinetic profiles well, while sorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic constants (ΔG°, ΔH°) demonstrate the spontaneous and endothermic nature of sorption. Yb(III) (heavy RE) was selectively sorbed while light RE metal ions La(III) and Nd(III) were concentrated/enriched in the solution. Cationic species RE(III) in aqueous solution can be adsorbed by the combination of chelating and anion-exchange mechanisms. The sorbent can be efficiently regenerated using acidified thiourea.

  19. Fermi surface investigations of the alkaline-earth-metal subnitride NaBa3N by means of de Haas-van Alphen oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, H.; Vajenine, G. V.; Steinbrenner, U.; Simon, A.; Balthes, E.; Wyder, P.

    2001-03-01

    de Haas-van Alphen oscillations are observed in the alkaline-earth-metal subnitride NaBa3N. They are studied at various sample orientations with respect to the magnetic-field direction. A rich spectrum of quantum oscillation frequencies varying with the field orientation is found. The effective cyclotron masses of the carriers are found to depend on the area enclosed by the corresponding Fermi surface orbit, while the mean free path is constant over the whole Fermi surface. Four of the detected frequencies are attributed to two lens-shaped features of the Fermi surface, as computed with the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. Spin-orbit coupling is shown to play a crucial role in determining the topology of the respective orbits in reciprocal space. The experimental results and the computed electronic structure are discussed with regard to the void metal model for the subnitride.

  20. DFT Studies on cis-1,4-Polymerization of Dienes Catalyzed by a Cationic Rare-Earth Metal Complex Bearing an Ancillary PNP Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingbao Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Dnsity functional theory (DFT calculations have been carried out for the highly selective cis-1,4-polymerization of butadiene catalyzed by a cationic rare-earth metal complex bearing an ancillary PNP ligand. It has been found that the chain initiation and propagation of butadiene polymerization occurs via the favorable cis-1,4-insertion route. The trans-1,4 and 1,2-insertion are unfavorable both kinetically and thermodynamically. The chain growth follows the π-allyl-insertion mechanism. The analyses of energy decomposition of transition states indicate that the likelihood of rival insertion pathways is predominantly controlled by the interaction energy of butadiene with a metal center and the deformation energy of butadiene moiety. The electronic factor of the central metal has a decisive influence on the cis- vs. trans-insertion and the regioselectivity (cis-1,4- vs. cis-1,2-insertion is mainly determined by steric hindrance. Tetrahydrofuran (THF coordination made monomer insertion less favorable compared with THF-free case and had more noticeable impact on the trans-monomer insertion compared with the cis case. During the chain propagation, cis-insertion of monomer facilitates THF de-coordination and the THF molecule could therefore dissociate from the central metal.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal studies of some transition and rare earth metal complexes of N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide

    OpenAIRE

    Chondhekar, T.K.; Munde, A.S.; Shankarwar, S.G.; S. M. Jadhav; Shelke, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    The solid complexes of Cu(II), Co(II), Mn(II), La(III) and Ce(III) were prepared from bidentate Schiff base, N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide. The Schiff base ligand was synthesized from 2-hyhdroxybenzohydrazide and benzaldehyde. These metal complexes were characterized by molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, 1H-NMR, UV-Vis and mass spectroscopy. The analytical data of these metal complexes showed metal:ligand ratio of 1:2. The physico-c...

  2. Distribution of rare earth elements and heavy metals in the surficial sediments of the Himalayan river system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramesh, R; Ramanathan, Al; Ramesh, S; Purvaja, R; Subramanian, V

    2000-01-01

    .... REEs and heavy metals (V, Pb, Cr, Co, Ag, Zn, Cd, Ni) were analyzed from the suspended sediments of Ganges and surficial sediments of Yamuna, Brahmaputra, Jamuna, Padma and Meghna, using VG Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer...

  3. Analysis of trace rare earth elements in misch metal by means of ITP-PIXE (isotachophoresis - Particle Induced X-ray Emission) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian-Ying; Hirokawa, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Kimura, Goji; Kiso, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Kazuaki; Shoto, Eiji [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1993-12-31

    A misch metal, an alloy of light rare earth elements, was analyzed by a new coupled analytical method, ITP-PIXE (isotachophoresis - Particle Induced X-ray Emission): The sample solution containing ca.1 mg misch metal was separated and fractionated by the use of a preparative isotachophoretic analyzer. The dropwise fractions containing nanomole rare earth elements were analyzed off-line by PIXE. The matrix effect in X-ray measurement was reduced by the isotachophoretic removing of the dominant lanthanoids and preconcentration of the trace elements of interest. Consequently the minor elements, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb and Y could be determined accurately. The most trace element found was Yb (4ppm, 4ng in 1mg sample). The good accuracy of ITP-PIXE method was also demonstrated for several model samples of lanthanoids, where La was the dominant element and the thirteen lanthanoids were the minor elements. The ratio was varied from 500:1 to 50000:1. Even in the case of 50000:1, ca.10% accuracy was achieved for each minor element except for Sm(23%), Gd(17%) and Yb(18%). The analytical results by ITP-PIXE were compared with those by means of ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometry). (author).

  4. Indirect ultraviolet detection of alkaline earth metal ions using an imidazolium ionic liquid as an ultraviolet absorption reagent in ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    A convenient and versatile method was developed for the separation and detection of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The chromatographic separation of Mg2+ , Ca2+ , and Sr2+ was performed on a carboxylic acid base cation exchange column using imidazolium ionic liquid/acid as the mobile phase, in which the imidazolium ionic liquid acted as an UV-absorption reagent. The effects of imidazolium ionic liquids, detection wavelength, acids in the mobile phase, and column temperature on the retention of Mg2+ , Ca2+ , and Sr2+ were investigated. The main factors influencing the separation and detection were the background UV absorption reagent and the concentration of hydrogen ion in ion chromatography with indirect UV detection. The successful separation and detection of Mg2+ , Ca2+ , and Sr2+ within 14 min were achieved using the selected chromatographic conditions, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were 0.06, 0.12, and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. A new separation and detection method of alkaline earth metal ions by ion chromatography with indirect UV detection was developed, and the application range of ionic liquids was expanded. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Adsorption of humic acid by bi-functional resin JN-10 and the effect of alkali-earth metal ions on the adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jinnan; Zhou Yang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Research Center of Organic Toxic Substance Control and Resource Reuse of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210038 (China); Li Aimin, E-mail: liaimin99@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Research Center of Organic Toxic Substance Control and Resource Reuse of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210038 (China); Xu Li [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Research Center of Organic Toxic Substance Control and Resource Reuse of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210038 (China)

    2010-04-15

    This study investigated the adsorption of humic acid (HA) by bi-functional resin JN-10, which removed the HA more effectively than the commercial resins D-301, D-201, XAD-7, and globe active carbon F-400. The difference between the FT-IR spectroscopy and {sup 13}C NMR analysis of JN-10 before and after it adsorbing the HA revealed that both hydrophobic interaction and electric attraction were the adsorption force for the HA. The related thermodynamic parameters exhibited that the adsorption of the HA by JN-10 was an endothermic process. The occurring of adsorption was due to the increase of entropy, and the electric attraction was also a main adsorption force. In order to investigate the influence of the molecule weight (MW) of the HA on its removal by JN-10, the HA with the MWs ranging from 2000 to 100,000 Da was divided into six fractions by ultra-filtration. The HA with a medium MW (6000-10,000 Da) was preferentially removed by JN-10 due to the synergistic effect of hydrophilicity, molecular size, and aromaticity of the HA. The adsorption capacity of JN-10 for the HA increased in the presence of low concentration of alkali-earth metal ions Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, which neutralized the negative charges of the HA, but it decreased as the concentration of these ions increased because the hydrates formed by the alkali-earth metal ions occupied the adsorption sites of the resin.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal studies of some transition and rare earth metal complexes of N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.K. Chondhekar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The solid complexes of Cu(II, Co(II, Mn(II, La(III and Ce(III were prepared from bidentate Schiff base, N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide. The Schiff base ligand was synthesized from 2-hyhdroxybenzohydrazide and benzaldehyde. These metal complexes were characterized by molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, 1H-NMR, UV-Vis and mass spectroscopy. The analytical data of these metal complexes showed metal:ligand ratio of 1:2. The physico-chemical study supports the presence of square planar geometry around Cu(II and octahedral geometry around Mn(II, Co(II, La(III and Ce(III ions. The IR spectral data reveal that the ligand behaves as bidentate with ON donor atom sequence towards central metal ion. The molar conductance values of metal complexes suggest their non-electrolyte nature. The X-ray diffraction data suggest monoclinic crystal system for these complexes. Thermal behavior (TG/DTA and kinetic parameters calculated by Coats-Redfern method are suggestive of more ordered activated state in complex formation. The ligand and their metal complexes were screened for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and fungicidal activity against Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma.

  7. Condensing the Moon from a MAD Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, S. J.; Stewart, S. T.; Petaev, M. I.; Leinhardt, Z. M.; Mace, M.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Cuk, M.

    2015-12-01

    The favored theory for lunar origin is the giant impact hypothesis, where a protoplanet collides with the growing Earth and creates an orbiting disk of material that forms the Moon. However, the astonishing isotopic similarity between the Earth and Moon cannot be explained by current giant impact models without appealing to highly specific circumstances. Here, we demonstrate that a condensation model for lunar origin, achieved via a previously unrecognized class of post-impact states, produces the Moon's major characteristics. The required class of post-impact states is defined by (i) a high degree of vaporization and (ii) rapid rotation. When these two criteria are met, the mantle, atmosphere and disk (MAD) form a dynamically and thermodynamically continuous structure that quickly mixes, thereby diluting initial compositional heterogeneities. Then, partial condensation from the pressure-supported mass beyond the Roche limit produces a Moon that is isotopically similar to the bulk silicate Earth and depleted in volatile and moderately volatile elements. Initially, the condensed liquid is composed of silicates. As the structure cools, metal exsolves in the accreting Moon and moonlets. We calculate ~2wt% metal is exsolved from a bulk silicate Earth composition, which is consistent with estimates of the mass of the lunar core. Thus, similar tungsten isotopes are established in the Earth and Moon as metal is exsolved in both bodies after mixing. In our model, the criterion for lunar origin shifts, away from specific impact parameters that inject terrestrial material into orbit, to any collision that transforms the Earth into a rapidly rotating and substantially vaporized MAD planet. Impacts that can transform the Earth are common during the end stages of planet formation. Therefore, the characteristics of our Moon are a natural consequence of forming the Earth.

  8. Profiling the third-body wear damage produced in CoCr surfaces by bone cement, CoCr, and Ti6Al4V debris: a 10-cycle metal-on-metal simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Thomas; Burgett, Michelle; Donaldson, Thomas K; Savisaar, Christina; Bowsher, John; Clarke, Ian C

    2014-07-01

    Particles of bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate), CoCr and Ti6Al4V were compared for their abrasion potential against CoCr substrates. This appears to be the first study utilizing CoCr and Ti6Al4V particulates to abrade CoCr bearings and the first study profiling the morphology of third-body abrasive wear scratches in a hip simulator. The 5 mg debris allotments (median size range 140-300 µm) were added to cups mounted both inverted and anatomically with metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings in a 10-cycle, hip simulator test. Surface abrasion was characterized by roughness indices and scratch profiles. Compared to third-body abrasion with metal debris, polymethyl methacrylate debris had minimal effect on the CoCr surfaces. In all, 10 cycles of abrasion with metal debris demonstrated that roughness indices (Ra, PV) increased approximately 20-fold from the unworn condition. The scratch profiles ranged 20-108 µm wide and 0.5-2.8 µm deep. The scratch aspect ratio (W/PV) averaged 0.03, and this very low ratio indicated that the 140 µm CoCr beads had plastically deformed to create wide but shallow scratches. There was no evidence of transfer of CoCr beads to CoCr bearings. The Ti64 particles produced similar scratch morphology with the same aspect ratio as the CoCr particulates. However, the titanium particulates also showed a unique ability to flatten and adhere to the CoCr, forming smears and islands of contaminating metal on the CoCr bearings. The morphology of scratches and metal transfer produced by these large metal particulates in the simulator appeared identical to those reported on retrieved metal-on-metal bearings. © IMechE 2014.

  9. Metal-Matrix Composite Parts With Metal Inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkowski, T.; Kashalikar, U.

    1995-01-01

    Developmental fabrication process produces metal-matrix composite (MMC) parts with integral metal inserts. With inserts, MMC parts readily joined to similar parts by use of brazing, welding, or mechanical fasteners. Process conceived to make strong, lightweight components of structures erected in outer space. Also useful on Earth, in such automotive parts as rocker arms, cylinder liners, and pistons. Potential industrial applications include parts subjected to high stresses at high temperatures, as in power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment.

  10. Cloud formation in metal-rich atmospheres of hot super-Earths like 55 Cnc e and CoRoT7b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, G.; Helling, Ch.; Miguel, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Clouds form in the atmospheres of planets where they can determine the observable spectra, the albedo and phase curves. Cloud properties are determined by the local thermodynamical and chemical conditions of an atmospheric gas. A retrieval of gas abundances requires a comprehension of the cloud formation mechanisms under varying chemical conditions. With the aim of studying cloud formation in metal-rich atmospheres, we explore the possibility of clouds in evaporating exoplanets like CoRoT-7b and 55 Cancri e (55 Cnc e) in comparison to a generic set of solar abundances and the metal-rich gas giant HD 149026b. We assess the impact of metal-rich, non-solar element abundances on the gas-phase chemistry, and apply our kinetic, non-equilibrium cloud formation model to study cloud structures and their details. We provide an overview of global cloud properties in terms of material compositions, maximum particle formation rates and average cloud particle sizes for various sets of rocky element abundances. Our results suggest that the conditions on 55 Cnc e and HD 149026b should allow the formation of mineral clouds in their atmosphere. The high temperatures on some hot rocky super-Earths (e.g. the day side of CoRoT-7b) result in an ionized atmospheric gas, and they prevent gas condensation, making cloud formation unlikely on its day side.

  11. Mechanochemical synthesis, structure, and properties of solid solutions of alkaline earth metal fluorides: Ma1-xMbxF2 (M: Ca, Sr, Ba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, M.; Scholz, G.; Düvel, A.; Heitjans, P.; Kemnitz, E.

    2016-10-01

    The capability of mechanochemical synthesis for the formation of solid solutions of alkaline earth metal fluorides Ma1-xMbxF2 (M: Ca, Sr, Ba) was tested by fluorination of metal acetates and metal hydroxides with ammonium fluoride directly at milling. Evidence was found for a mutual substitution of cations on their lattice positions in Ca1-xSrxF2 and Ba1-xSrxF2 samples. For the Ba/Ca-system this synthesis route is only partially successful. X-ray diffraction and 19F MAS NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize all samples concerning their crystal structure and local fluorine coordination. Calculations of 19F chemical shifts with the superposition model along with probability calculations for the intensity of the individual 19F lines, performed in dependence on the molar composition of the samples, perfectly agree with the experimental findings. The fluoride ion conductivity of as-prepared samples, determined by temperature dependent DC conductivity measurements, is significantly higher than those of crystalline binary fluorides. Moreover, a higher F- ion conductivity is observed for samples with higher mixing grade in the Ca/Sr-and the Ba/Sr-systems.

  12. Optimization of a Molten Salt Electrolytic Bath Geometry for Rare Earth Metal Recovery using a Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Hiroo; Akatsuka, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Haruaki

    2013-02-01

    For a recycling procedure for rare earths from spent hydrogen absorbing alloys by rare earths electrodeposition in a molten salt, the electrolytic bath and the cathode accessories have been optimized by evaluating the appropriate secondary current distribution using finite element method (FEM) computer simulation. The desirable cathode dish as an accessory was designed to prevent drops of less adherent electrodeposits, which improved the current density distribution compared with an a priori determined one. In the bath optimization, a reciprocal proportionality of the difference between the maximum and minimum current densities vs. the ratio of volume to surface area (or electrolyte volume) was found. It was found by FEM that if a resistive floating mass is assumed on the electrolyte surface, the observed necking in the electrodeposit near the electrolyte surface can be analyzed.

  13. AN INDEXING APPROACH FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF HEAVY METALS IN DRINKING WATER PRODUCED BY MAURITANIAN WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    OpenAIRE

    Brahim Baba Aloueimine*; Mohamed Ould Kankou; Driss Belghyti

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the assessment of drinking water quality was carried out through a monitoring of heavy metals in the treated and consumed waters in the city of Nouakchott (Mauritania). Monthly sampling was conducted for a period of 24 months between January 2012 and December 2013. Nine parameters were evaluated: pH, T (°C), Turbidity (NTU), Al, Fe, Cu, Mn, Al2(SO4)3 and CaO. Indexing approaches have been applied by calculating the Heavy Metal Pollution Index (HPI) and Metal Index (MI) fo...

  14. Afganistan and rare earths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. Dobrescu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available On our planet, over a quarter of new technologies for the economic production of industrial goods, are using rare earths, which are also called critical minerals and industries that rely on these precious items being worth of an estimated nearly five trillion dollars, or 5 percent of world gross domestic product. In the near future, competition will increase for the control of rare earth minerals embedded in high-tech products. Rare minerals are in the twenty-first century what oil accounted for in the twentieth century and coal in the nineteenth century: the engine of a new industrial revolution. Future energy will be produced increasingly by more sophisticated technological equipment based not just on steel and concrete, but incorporating significant quantities of metals and rare earths. Widespread application of these technologies will result in an exponential increase in demand for such minerals, and what is worrying is that minerals of this type are almost nowhere to be found in Europe and in other industrialized countries in the world, such as U.S. and Japan, but only in some Asian countries, like China and Afghanistan.

  15. Method for producing and controlling the morphology of metal-oxide nanofiber and/or nanotube catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a process for the controlled production of metal-containing nanofibers and/or nanotubes, where the morphology of the nanofibers and/or nanotubes is followed in real time by TEM measurements.......Disclosed herein is a process for the controlled production of metal-containing nanofibers and/or nanotubes, where the morphology of the nanofibers and/or nanotubes is followed in real time by TEM measurements....

  16. Absorption spectroscopy of heavy alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in rare gas matrices--CCSD(T) calculations and atomic site occupancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Barry M; McCaffrey, John G

    2016-01-28

    Isolation of the heavier alkaline earth metals Ba and Sr in the solid rare gases (RGs) Ar, Kr, and Xe is analysed with absorption spectroscopy and interpreted partly with the assistance of ab initio calculations of the diatomic M ⋅ RG ground state interaction potentials. The y(1)P ← a(1)S resonance transitions in the visible spectral region are used to compare the isolation conditions of these two metal atom systems and calcium. Complex absorption bands were recorded in all three metal atom systems even after extensive sample annealing. Coupled cluster calculations conducted on the ground states of the nine M ⋅ RG diatomics (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba; RG = Ar, Kr, and Xe) at the coupled cluster single, double, and non-iterative triple level of theory revealed long bond lengths (>5 Å) and shallow bound regions (atoms in a single substitutional site of the solid rare gas is unlikely, with the possible exception of Ca/Xe. The luminescence of metal dimer bands has been recorded for Ba and Sr revealing very different behaviours. Resonance fluorescence with a lifetime of 15 ns is observed for the lowest energy transition of Sr2 while this transition is quenched in Ba2. This behaviour is consistent with the absence of vibrational structure on the dimer absorption band in Ba2 indicating lifetime broadening arising from efficient relaxation to low-lying molecular states. More extensive 2D excitation-emission data recorded for the complex site structures present on the absorption bands of the atomic Ba and Sr systems will be presented in future publications.

  17. Potency of (doped) rare earth oxide particles and their constituent metals to inhibit algal growth and induce direct toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joonas, Elise; Aruoja, Villem; Olli, Kalle; Syvertsen-Wiig, Guttorm; Vija, Heiki; Kahru, Anne

    2017-09-01

    Use of rare earth elements (REEs) has increased rapidly in recent decades due to technological advances. It has been accompanied by recurring rare earth element anomalies in water bodies. In this work we (i) studied the effects of eight novel doped and one non-doped rare earth oxide (REO) particles (aimed to be used in solid oxide fuel cells and gas separation membranes) on algae, (ii) quantified the individual adverse effects of the elements that constitute the (doped) REO particles and (iii) attempted to find a discernible pattern to relate REO particle physicochemical characteristics to algal growth inhibitory properties. Green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata (formerly Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) were used as a test species in two different formats: a standard OECD201 algal growth inhibition assay and the algal viability assay (a 'spot test') that avoids nutrient removal effects. In the 24h 'spot' test that demonstrated direct toxicity, algae were not viable at REE concentrations above 1mgmetal/L. 72-hour algal growth inhibition EC50 values for four REE salts (Ce, Gd, La, Pr) were between 1.2 and 1.4mg/L, whereas the EC50 for REO particles ranged from 1 to 98mg/L. The growth inhibition of REEs was presumably the result of nutrient sequestration from the algal growth medium. The adverse effects of REO particles were at least in part due to the entrapment of algae within particle agglomerates. Adverse effects due to the dissolution of constituent elements from (doped) REO particles and the size or specific surface area of particles were excluded, except for La2NiO4. However, the structure of the particles and/or the varying effects of oxide composition might have played a role in the observed effects. As the production rates of these REO particles are negligible compared to other forms of REEs, there is presumably no acute risk for aquatic unicellular algae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Preheated ignition and work function studies on alkaline earth metal oxides coated tungsten electrodes of fluorescent lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Reinhard; Dar, Farrukh; Hilscher, Achim; Horn, Siegfried; Tidecks, Reinhard

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes measurements on the alkaline earth (Ba, Sr, Ca) oxide layers utilized as emitting material in fluorescent lamp electrodes. In a first approach we compared the emission capabilities of the different materials (BaO, SrO and CaO coatings on tungsten filaments) by their ability to facilitate the start of a lamp. In a second investigation the work function was measured quantitatively by means of a Kelvin probe. Basically, the results of both measurements coincide. The impact of sample geometry on measurement results of a Kelvin probe applied for work function measurements of lamp electrodes are discussed in detail.

  19. The coordination complex structures and hydrogen bonding in the three-dimensional alkaline earth metal salts (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) of (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2017-01-01

    (4-Aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) is used as an antihelminth in veterinary applications and was earlier used in the monosodium salt dihydrate form as the antisyphilitic drug atoxyl. Examples of complexes with this acid are rare. The structures of the alkaline earth metal (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) complexes with (4-aminophenyl)arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) have been determined, viz. hexaaquamagnesium bis[hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonate] tetrahydrate, [Mg(H2O)6](C6H7AsNO3)·4H2O, (I), catena-poly[[[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O']-[diaquacalcium]-bis[μ2-hydrogen (4-aminophenyl)arsonato-κ(2)O:O

  20. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Light Lanthanides (Ce-Eu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-03-01

    This is the second part of the volume devoted to the evaluation of experimental solubility data for rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water as well as in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. Fluorides of Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, and Eu (so-called light lanthanides), as the main solutes, are covered in the present part, which has thorough coverage of the experimental literature through the end of 2012. The experimentally unknown solubility value for PmF3 in water was predicted by an interpolation of the solubility values for NdF3 and SmF3 at 298 K. General features of the systems, such as the nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  1. Assessment of metal, trace and rare earth element concentrations in a sedimentary profile from Ponte Nova reservoir, Sao Paulo state, Brazil, by NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Flavio R.; Bordon, Isabella C.C.L.; Silva, Paulo S.C.; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: flavio@baquara.com, E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Sharlleny A.; Franklin, Robson L.; Ferreira, Francisco J., E-mail: shasilva@sp.gov.br, E-mail: rfranklin@sp.gov.br [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo (ELAI/CETESB), SP (Brazil). Setor de Quimica Inorganica

    2015-07-01

    Ponte Nova reservoir, located in the upper basin of the Tiete River in the southern region of Sao Paulo State, covers an area of 25.7 km{sup 2} and drains an area of 320 km{sup 2}. It was built in 1972 to control the rivers flow in the Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo (MRSP) and water supply. A 30 cm sediment core was collected in the dam in August 2014, sliced at every 2.5 cm. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was applied to the sediment samples to determine some major (Fe, K and Na), trace (As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hf, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U and Zn) and rare earth (Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb) elements. The enrichment factor (EF) and Igeo were applied to the results by using NASC (North American Shale Composite) as reference values for sediment contamination index assessment. An EF>1.5 was obtained for As, Hf, Rb, Ta, Th, U, and rare earths Ce, Eu, La, Nd and Sm when NASC values were used, but only for Br, when the last layer concentration values were used as reference values. Similar results were obtained for the Igeo index. For semi-metal As and metals Cr and Zn concentration values were compared to oriented values from Environmental Canada (TEL and PEL) only Cr exceeded TEL value in some slices of the profile. These results may indicate that there is no anthropogenic contribution for the elements analyzed in this reservoir. Multivariate statistical analysis was applied to the results. (author)

  2. Metal binding properties of the EPS produced by Halomonas sp. TG39 and its potential in enhancing trace element bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Tony; Biller, Dondra V; Shimmield, Tracy; Green, David H

    2012-12-01

    An emergent property of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by marine bacteria is their net negative charge, predominantly conferred by their high uronic acids content. Here, we investigated the EPS produced by an algal-associated marine bacterium, Halomonas sp. strain TG39, for its capacity to sequester trace metals and mediate their bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton. Metal analysis of the purified EPS revealed that it contained high levels of K, Ca, Mg and several essential trace metals, including Zn, Cu, Fe and the metalloid Si. Desorption experiments with marine sediment showed that the EPS possessed a specific binding capacity for Ca, Si, Fe, Mn, Mg and Al. Depending on the ionic conditions, Fe was the third or fourth most highly-adsorbed metal out of 27 elements analyzed. Experiments employing Fe-limited synthetic ocean seawater showed that growth of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (axenic strain) was enhanced when incubated in the presence of either purified EPS or EPS that had been pre-exposed to marine sediment, compared to non-EPS amended controls. This growth enhancement was attributed to the EPS binding and increasing the bioavailability of key trace metal elements, such as Fe(III). Since the bacterium used in this study was originally isolated from a marine micro-alga, this work highlights the possibility that bacterial associates of eukaryotic algae could be influencing the bioavailability of Fe(III) to phytoplankton via their production of polyanionic EPS. More widely, this work reinforces the potential importance of marine bacterial EPS in trace metal biogeochemical cycling.

  3. AN INDEXING APPROACH FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF HEAVY METALS IN DRINKING WATER PRODUCED BY MAURITANIAN WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Baba Aloueimine*

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the assessment of drinking water quality was carried out through a monitoring of heavy metals in the treated and consumed waters in the city of Nouakchott (Mauritania. Monthly sampling was conducted for a period of 24 months between January 2012 and December 2013. Nine parameters were evaluated: pH, T (°C, Turbidity (NTU, Al, Fe, Cu, Mn, Al2(SO43 and CaO. Indexing approaches have been applied by calculating the Heavy Metal Pollution Index (HPI and Metal Index (MI for the assessment of influence of heavy metals on the overall quality of water. The obtained results for heavy metals are in good agreement with World Health Organization (WHO standards. Though the aluminum concentration remains in the limits set by WHO, yet it shows a major contribution in the indices. This has been verified by the statistical analysis which demonstrates fair correlations between aluminum, HPI (r = 0.9 and MI (r = 0.77. Aluminum showed the important influence of seasonal change in the year as well as the doses of reagents injected during the treatment process on the concentration of aluminum is detailed.

  4. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ka King [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    >F5)3 give the expected dicationic M{HB(C6F5)3}2L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF2 or TMEDA) and dicationic mono(silylalkyl) LnC(SiHMe2)3{HB(C6F5)3}2 (Ln = Y, Lu, La), respectively. Salt metathesis reactions of Cp2(NR2)ZrX (X = Cl, I, OTf; R = t-Bu, SiHMe2) and lithium hydrosilazide ultimately afford hydride products Cp2(NR2)ZrH that suggest unusual β-hydrogen elimination processes. A likely intermediate in one of these reactions, Cp2Zr[N(SiHMe2)t-Bu][N(SiHMe2)2], is isolated under controlled synthetic conditions. Addition of alkali metal salts to this zirconium hydrosilazide compound produces the corresponding zirconium hydride. However as conditions are varied, a number of other pathways are also accessible, including C-H/Si-H dehydrocoupling, γ-abstraction of a CH, and β-abstraction of a SiH. Our observations suggest that the conversion of (hydrosilazido)zirconocene to zirconium hydride does not follow the classical four-center β- elimination mechanism.

  5. Tracing metal-silicate segregation and late veneer in the Earth and the ureilite parent body with palladium stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, J. B.; Moynier, F.; Bizzarro, M.

    2017-11-01

    Stable isotope studies of highly siderophile elements (HSE) have the potential to yield valuable insights into a range of geological processes. In particular, the strong partitioning of these elements into metal over silicates may lead to stable isotope fractionation during metal-silicate segregation, making them sensitive tracers of planetary differentiation processes. We present the first techniques for the precise determination of palladium stable isotopes by MC-ICPMS using a 106Pd-110Pd double-spike to correct for instrumental mass fractionation. Results are expressed as the per mil (‰) difference in the 106Pd/105Pd ratio (δ106Pd) relative to an in-house solution standard (Pd_IPGP) in the absence of a certified Pd isotopic standard. Repeated analyses of the Pd isotopic composition of the chondrite Allende demonstrate the external reproducibility of the technique of ±0.032‰ on δ106Pd. Using these techniques, we have analysed Pd stable isotopes from a range of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples. We find that chondrites define a mean δ106Pdchondrite = -0.19 ± 0.05‰. Ureilites reveal a weak trend towards heavier δ106Pd with decreasing Pd content, similar to recent findings based on Pt stable isotopes (Creech et al., 2017), although fractionation of Pd isotopes is significantly less than for Pt, possibly related to its weaker metal-silicate partitioning behaviour and the limited field shift effect. Terrestrial mantle samples have a mean δ106Pdmantle = -0.182 ± 0.130‰, which is consistent with a late-veneer of chondritic material after core formation.

  6. Fractionation mechanisms of rare earth elements (REEs) in hydroponic wheat: an application for metal accumulation by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shiming; Liang, Tao; Zhang, Chaosheng; Huang, Zechun; Xie, Yaning; Chen, Tongbin

    2006-04-15

    Fractionations of rare earth elements (REEs) in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) were observed through application of exogenous mixed REEs under hydroponic conditions. Middle REE (MREE), light REE (LREE), and heavy REE (HREE) enrichments were found in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, accompanied by the tetrad effect (an effect that can cause a split of REE patterns into four consecutive segments) in these organs. Investigations into REE speciation in roots and in the xylem sap with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and nanometer-sized TiO2 adsorption techniques, associated with other controlled experiments, demonstrated that REE fractionations in wheat were caused by the combined effects of chemical precipitation, cell wall absorption, and solution complexation by organic ligands in the xylem vessels. REE fractionations in wheat, which were derived from the small differences of chemical properties across REE series, may reflect a sensitive internal chemical environment that influences plant accumulation for REEs and their analogues actinide radionuclides.

  7. Metallic Hydrogen - Potentially a High Energy Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, John; Silvera, Ike

    2007-01-01

    Pure metallic hydrogen is predicted to have a specific impulse (Isp) of 1700 seconds, but the reaction temperature is too high for current engine materials. Diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen can reduce the reaction temperature to levels compatible with current material limits and still provide an Isp greater than 900 s. Metallic hydrogen has not yet been produced on earth, but experimental techniques exist that may change this situation. This paper will provide a brief description of metallic hydrogen and the status of experiments that may soon produce detectable quantities of this material in the lab. Also provided are some characteristics for diluted metallic hydrogen engines and launch vehicles.

  8. Role of Aspergillus niger in recovery enhancement of valuable metals from produced red mud in Bayer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakilchap, F; Mousavi, S M; Shojaosadati, S A

    2016-10-01

    Annual worldwide growth rate of red mud (RM) as a hazardous waste has caused serious environmental problems for its disposal in the mining and metallurgy industries. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to investigate biological leaching of RM and recovery of metals using organic acids exerted by Aspergillus niger. Experiments using A. niger were conducted in batch cultures with a pulp density of 2% (w/v) RM under one-step, two-step and spent-medium bioleaching. Based on HPLC results, the major lixiviant was the secretion of organic acids (citric, gluconic, oxalic and malic) by A. niger. Leaching efficiency of metals in the one-step process was the highest and the amounts of leached metals were 69.8%, 60% and 25.4% for Al, Ti and Fe, respectively. The fungal leaching technique demonstrated an adequate recovery of metals, with an efficient and cost-effective means and respect to a reuse of RM for economic and environmental purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Corrosion resistant coatings (Al@#2@#O@#3@#) produced by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition using ATSB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; van Corbach, H.D.; Fransen, T.; Gellings, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) of amorphous alumina films on steel was performed in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. This MOCVD process is based on the thermal decomposition of aluminium-tri-sec-butoxide (ATSB). The effect of the deposition temperature (within the range

  10. Reduced Cu–Co–Al Mixed Metal Oxides for the Ring-Opening of Furfuryl Alcohol to Produce Renewable Diols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulmonetti, Taylor P. [School; amp, Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States; Hu, Bo [School; amp, Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States; Lee, Sungsik [Advanced; Agrawal, Pradeep K. [School; amp, Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States; Jones, Christopher W. [School; amp, Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, United States

    2017-08-29

    The ring-opening of furfuryl alcohol to diol products, including 1,2-pentanediol and 1,5- pentanediol, is investigated over reduced Cu-Co-Al mixed metal oxides in a liquid phase batch reactor under H2 pressure. These catalysts are synthesized through the calcination of layered double hydroxides (LDH) to yield well-dispersed, porous mixed metal oxides, which upon reduction displayed activity towards diols, mainly the valuable monomer 1,5-pentanediol. The addition of Cu facilitated the reduction of Co oxide species at lower temperatures, and under optimized conditions a yield towards 1,5-pentanediol of 44% (total diol yield of 62%) was achieved. Various characterization techniques including TPR, XPS, and XAS are employed to elucidate the structure of the catalysts, suggesting the formation of both metallic (Co and Cu) and oxide (CoO) species after reduction and passivation. Ultimately, this study demonstrates the promising characteristics that non-precious multi-metal catalysts have for the conversion of biomass derived platform molecules to plastic precursors

  11. Heating produced by therapeutic ultrasound in the presence of a metal plate in the femur of canine cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Andrades

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the heat generated by a therapeutic ultrasound (TUS in a metal bone plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers. Ten pairs of hind limbs were used, and they were equally distributed between groups that were subjected to 1- and 3-MHz frequencies, with each frequency testing 1- and 2-W/cm² intensities. The right hind limb was defined as the control group (absence of the metal plate, and the left hind limb was the test group (presence of the metal plate. Therefore, the control groups (CG were denominated CGI, using TUS with 1-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; CGII, using 1-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity; CGIII, using 3-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; and CGIV, using 3-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity. For each control group, its respective test group (TG was denominated TGI, TGII, TGIII and TGIV. The TUS was applied to the lateral aspect of the thigh using the continuous mode and a 3.5-cm² transducer in a 6.25-cm² area for 2 minutes. Sensors were coupled to digital thermometers that measured the temperature in different sites before (t0 and after (t1 of the TUS application. The temperatures in t1 were higher in all tested groups. The intramuscular temperature was significantly higher (P<0.05 in the groups used to test the 3-MHz frequency in the presence of the metal plate. The therapeutic ultrasound in the continuous mode using frequencies of 1 and 3 MHz and intensities of 1 and 2 W/cm2 for 2 minutes caused heating of the metal plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers.

  12. Impact of the Static and Radiofrequency Magnetic Fields Produced by a 7T MR Imager on Metallic Dental Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriso, Kenta; Kobayashi, Takuya; Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko; Kihara, Hidemichi; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    We examined safety issues related to the presence of various metallic dental materials in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 7 tesla. A 7T MR imaging scanner was used to examine 18 kinds of materials, including 8 metals used in dental restorations, 6 osseointegrated dental implants, 2 abutments for dental implants, and 2 magnetic attachment keepers. We assessed translational attraction forces between the static magnetic field and materials via deflection angles read on a tailor-made instrument and compared with those at 3T. Heating effects from radiofrequency during image acquisitions using 6 different sequences were examined by measuring associated temperature changes in agarose-gel phantoms with a fiber-optic thermometer. Deflection angles of the metallic dental materials were significantly larger at 7T than 3T. Among full metal crowns (FMCs), deflection angles were 18.0° for cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys, 13.5° for nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloys, and 0° for other materials. Deflection angles of the dental implants and abutments were minimal, ranging from 5.0 to 6.5°, whereas the magnetic attachment keepers were strongly attracted to the field, having deflection angles of 90° or more. Increases in temperature of the FMCs were significant but less than 1°C in every sequence. The dental implant of 50-mm length showed significant but mild temperature increases (up to 1.5°C) when compared with other dental implants and abutments, particularly on sequences with high specific absorption rate values. Although most metallic dental materials showed no apparent translational attraction or heating at 7T, substantial attraction forces on the magnetic attachment keepers suggested potential risks to patients and research participants undergoing MR imaging examinations.

  13. Enhancing Kondo coupling in alkaline-earth-metal atomic gases with confinement-induced resonances in mixed dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanting; Zhang, Ren; Zhang, Peng; Zhai, Hui

    2017-12-01

    The Kondo effect describes the spin-exchange interaction between localized impurities and itinerant fermions. The ultracold alkaline-earth atomic gas provides a natural platform for quantum simulation of the Kondo model, utilizing its long-lived clock state and the nuclear-spin exchange interaction between clock state and ground state. One of the key issue now is whether the Kondo temperature can be high enough to be reached in current experiments, for which we have proposed to use transverse confinement to confine atoms into a one-dimensional tube and to use the confinement-induced resonance to enhance Kondo coupling. In this work, we further consider the (1 +0 ) -dimensional scattering problem when the clock state is further confined by an axial harmonic confinement. We show that this axial confinement for the clock-state atoms not only plays a role for localizing them, but can also act as an additional control knob to reach the confinement-induced resonance. We show that, in the presence of both the transverse and the axial confinements, the confinement-induced resonance can be reached in the practical conditions and the Kondo effect can be attainable in this system.

  14. The properties of metal contacts on TiO2 thin films produced by reactive magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brus V. V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with research on volt-ampere characteristics of metal contacts (Al, Cr, In, Mo, Ti on titanium dioxide thin films and influence of annealing in vacuum on their electric properties. Volt-ampere characteristics measurements were taken by three-probe method. There was established that indium contact on TiO2 thin films possessed sharply defined ohmic properties.

  15. Effect of Firing Temperature and Holding Time on Characterization of Al/SiC Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Pressureless Infiltration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Zulfia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available  The production of Al-SiC metal matrix composite can be carried out by pressureless metal infiltration processs (PRIMEX. The experiment was conducted using aluminium AC2B ingot as a matrix and 50%Vf SiC powder as a reinforcement which is mixed with  10% Mg powder for wetting agent. The variables of this experiment are holding time and firing temperature to investigate the effect of these conditions on mechanical properties of Al-SiC metal matrix composites. Holding time was conducted for 2,5,8,10,12 hours and firing temperatures was 750, 800, 900, 1000, 1100°C respectively.. The composites produced are analysed both mechanical properties and metalography such as densities, porosities, hardness, as well as wear rate. The results showed that the longer holding time and increasing firing temperature will increase mechanical properties of Al-SiC metal matrix composites, and it is found that the optimum mechanical properties at 1000°C for 10 hour.

  16. Metal, trace and rare earth element assessment in a sedimentary profile from Promissao reservoir, Sao Paulo state, Brazil, by INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Sharlleny A.; Franklin, Robson L., E-mail: shasilva@sp.gov.br [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo (ELAI/CETESB), SP (Brazil). Setor de Quimica Inorganica; Luiz-Silva, Wanilson [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (DGRN/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias. Departamento de Geologia e Recursos Naturais; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: defavaro@ipen.gov.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (LAN/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2015-07-01

    In the present study the preliminary results for the Promissao reservoir, situated in the Lower Tiete region covering a little more than 1% of the SP state population, is characterized by intense agropastoral activities. Its operations for generating electrical energy started in 1975. It is located at Tiete River and its hydrographic basin has a drainage area of 530 km{sup 2}. The total extension of the reservoir is 110 km along the Tiete River, with a medium depth of 20 m. A core sampler was used and a 33 cm sediment core was collected from the dam in January 2013, sliced at every 2.5 cm, totaling 13 samples. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to the sediment samples in order to determine some major (Fe, K, and Na), trace (As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hf, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U, and Zn) and rare earth elements (Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb, and Yb). The enrichment factor (EF) was applied to the results obtained by using North American Shale Composite, Upper Continental Crust and the concentration values of the last layer of this profile as reference values for sediment contamination index assessment. When the results for As, Cr, and Zn were compared to threshold effect level (TEL) and probable effect level (PEL) oriented values, sediments from 0-10 cm exceeded the TEL values for As (5.9 mg kg{sup -1}), all samples exceeded the PEL values for Cr (90 mg kg{sup -1}), and all samples had much lower values than TEL values for Zn (123 mg kg{sup -1}). (author)

  17. The RMgSn{sub 2} series of compounds (R = rare earth metal). Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solokha, Pavlo; Minetti, Riccardo; De Negri, Serena; Saccone, Adriana [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita di Genova (Italy); Pereira, Laura Cristina J.; Goncalves, Antonio P. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, EN 10, Universidade de Lisboa, Bobadela (Portugal)

    2017-06-30

    The novel isostructural series of phases RMgSn{sub 2} (R = Y, La-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) is presented. They were prepared by direct synthesis in an induction furnace and subsequently annealed at 500 C. Their crystal structures were determined through single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of the Ce representative [I anti 42m, tI32-LaMgSn{sub 2}, Z = 8, a = 0.82863(3) nm, c = 1.23129(5) nm] and confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction analysis of the other members of the series. Rietveld refinements were also performed on the homologues with R = Pr, Tm, and Y. The title phases show a unique space distribution of atoms, characterized by the presence of a Sn-Sn dumbbell distanced at around 0.29 nm. Their structures are related to those of a few binary AeTt{sub 3} (Ae = alkaline earth; Tt = Si, Ge; I4/mmm, tI32-YbSi{sub 3}) compounds that are stable at high pressure, characterized by a more complex 3D covalently bonded Tt network. Compounds CeMgSn{sub 2} and TbMgSn{sub 2} were magnetically characterized; they show paramagnetic behavior with the presence of ferromagnetic interactions, more pronounced in the case of TbMgSn{sub 2}, as suggested by the Curie-Weiss temperatures, determined in the high-temperature range, of 0.96 and 27.6 K for CeMgSn{sub 2} and TbMgSn{sub 2}, respectively. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Crystal growth, characterization and theoretical studies of alkaline earth metal-doped tetrakis(thiourea)nickel(II) chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agilandeshwari, R.; Muthu, K.; Meenatchi, V.; Meena, K.; Rajasekar, M.; Aditya Prasad, A.; Meenakshisundaram, SP.

    2015-02-01

    The influence of Sr(II)-doping on the properties of tetrakis(thiourea)nickel(II) chloride (TTNC) has been described. The reduction in the intensity observed in powder X-ray diffraction of doped specimen and slight shifts in vibrational frequencies of doped specimens confirm the lattice stress as a result of doping. Surface morphological changes due to doping of the Sr(II) are observed by scanning electron microscopy. The incorporation of metal into the host crystal lattice was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Lattice parameters are determined by single crystal XRD analysis. The thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis studies reveal the purity of the materials and no decomposition is observed up to the melting point. The nonlinear optical properties of the doped and undoped specimens were studied. Theoretical calculations were performed using the Density functional theory (DFT) method with B3LYP/LANL2DZ as the basis set. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of TTNC in the ground state were calculated and the observed structural parameters of TTNC are compared with parameters obtained from single crystal X-ray studies. The atomic charge distributions are obtained by Mulliken charge population analysis. The first-order molecular hyperpolarizability, polarizability and dipole moment were derived.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and quantitative analysis of porous metal microstructures: Application to microporous copper produced by solid state foaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Atwater

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Porous metals can be created through a wide variety of processing techniques, and the pore morphology resulting from these processes is equally diverse. The structural and functional properties of metal foams are directly dependent on the size, shape, interconnectedness and volume fraction of pores, so accurately quantifying the pore characteristics is of great importance. Methods for analyzing porous materials are presented here and applied to a copper-based metallic foam generated through solid state foaming via oxide reduction and expansion. This process results in large voids (10s of microns between sintered particles and small pores (10 microns to less than 50 nm within particles. Optical and electron microscopy were used to image the porosity over this wide range, and the pore characteristics were quantified using image segmentation and statistical analysis. Two-dimensional pore analysis was performed using the Chan-Vese method, and two-point correlation and lineal path functions were used to assess three-dimensional reconstructions from FIB tomography. Two-dimensional analysis reveals distinct size and morphological differences in porosity between particles and within them. Three-dimensional analysis adds further information on the high level interconnectedness of the porosity and irregular shape it takes, forming tortuous pathways rather than spherical cells. Mechanical polishing and optical microscopy allow large areas to be created and analyzed quickly, but methods such as focused ion beam (FIB sectioning can provide additional insight about microstructural features. In particular, after FIB milling is used to create a flat surface, that surface can be analyzed for structural and compositional information.

  20. Third-body Wear Damage Produced in CoCr Surfaces by Hydroxyapatite and Alumina Ceramic Debris: A 10-cycle Metal-on-Metal Simulator Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Halim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic particles are believed to be particularly abrasive due to their extreme hardness. Ceramic debris has been reported in retrieved total hip arthroplasty (THA due to chipping and fracture of alumina components or by flaking of hydroxyapatite from implant coatings. However there appears to be no abrasion ranking of such particle behavior. The hypotheses in this study were, i alumina particles would create large scratches in CoCr surfaces and ii hydroxyapatite would produce very mild scratching comparable to bone-cement particles. Hydroxyapatite beads came in two types of commercial powders while the flakes were scraped from retrieved femoral stems. Alumina beads came in two commercial powders and flakes were retrieved from a fractured ceramic head. Particle morphologies were determined by SEM and CoCr surface damage by interferometry and SEM. Six 38-mm MOM were mounted inverted in a hip simulator and run with ceramic particles inserted for a 10-second test. Surface-roughness ranking after 10-second abrasion test revealed that bone cement and hydroxyapatite produced least damage to CoCr surfaces while alumina produced the most. Alumina increased surface roughness 19-fold greater than either hydroxyapatite or bone-cement particles. The alumina debris produced numerous scratches typically 20-80 µm wide with some up to 140µm wide. Surprisingly the alumina beads and flakes were pulverized within the 10-second test interval and remained adherent to the CoCr surfaces. Additionally, the hydroxyapatite although also a ceramic had no more effect on CoCr than the bone-cement debris. Use of well-characterized and commercially available alumina and hydroxyapatite powders appeared advantageous for abrasion tests. These new data indicated that such ceramic powders have merit.

  1. Ultraviolet laser writing system based on polar scanning strategy to produce subwavelength metal gratings for surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amako, Jun; Fujii, Eiichi

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate the use of ultraviolet (UV) laser lithography in the production of subwavelength metal gratings. A laser writing system with a 413-nm Kr laser is used to write patterns on a resist-coated fused silica substrate mounted on a rotating table with a linear slider. One- and two-dimensional patterns are written in the resist at a selected sampling pitch or grating period, and the substrate is dry etched and coated with Au to obtain metallized gratings. Surface plasmon resonance dips, which appear in the reflectance spectra of the gratings, shift depending on the orientation of the incident polarization, because the gratings lack perfect symmetry owing to a system-induced skew in the writing beam. This dip shift can be considered tolerable when the gratings are used as a signal enhancer in Raman sensing applications. We conclude that UV laser writing based on polar coordinates is a candidate method for surface structuring on submicron scales. Devising a method to attain an unskewed beam will be the subject of future work.

  2. Morphologies, microstructures, and mechanical properties of samples produced using laser metal deposition with 316 L stainless steel wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Mi, Gaoyang; Luo, Yuanqing; Jiang, Ping; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming

    2017-07-01

    Laser metal deposition (LMD) with a filler has been demonstrated to be an effective method for additive manufacturing because of its high material deposition efficiency, improved surface quality, reduced material wastage, and cleaner process environment without metal dust pollution. In this study, single beads and samples with ten layers were successfully deposited on a 316 L stainless steel surface under optimized conditions using a 4000 W continuous wave fibre laser and an arc welding machine. The results showed that satisfactory layered samples with a large deposition height and smooth side surface could be achieved under appropriate parameters. The uniform structures had fine cellular and network austenite grains with good metallurgical bonding between layers, showing an austenite solidification mode. Precipitated ferrite at the grain boundaries showed a subgrain structure with fine uniform grain size. A higher microhardness (205-226 HV) was detected in the middle of the deposition area, while the tensile strength of the 50 layer sample reached 669 MPa. In addition, ductile fracturing was proven by the emergence of obvious dimples at the fracture surface.

  3. The synthesis of higher oxides of alkali and alkaline earth metals in an electric discharge: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, A. T.; Sadhukhan, P.

    1974-01-01

    Potassium hydroxide was subjected to the products of an electrical discharge sustained in oxygen and produced both potassium peroxide and superoxide. The conversion to higher oxides was shown to strongly depend upon the particle size of KOH, the position of KOH in the discharge zone, and the operating conditions of the discharge. Similar experiments were performed with hydroxides of lithium and calcium which do not form superoxides, but are converted to peroxides. The yields of peroxides were shown to strongly depend upon the operating conditions of the discharge. The absence of superoxides and the presence of peroxides of lithium and calcium was explained from the consideration of relative thermodynamic stability of the oxides of lithium and calcium. Thermogravimetric analysis was shown to provide a more accurate means for determining the amount of KO2 than previous methods.

  4. Kinetic study of the aroxyl radical-scavenging reaction of alpha-tocopherol in methanol solution: notable effect of the alkali and alkaline earth metal salts on the reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Abe, Kouichi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2009-10-08

    A kinetic study of the aroxyl (ArO*) radical-scavenging reaction of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TocH) has been performed in the presence of six kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (LiI, LiClO(4), NaI, NaClO(4), KI, and Mg(ClO(4))(2)) in methanol solution, using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The decay rate of the ArO* for the reaction of alpha-TocH with ArO* increased linearly with increasing concentration of metal salts. The second-order rate constants (k(s)) for the reaction of alpha-TocH with ArO* increased in the order of no metal salt concentration of metal salts. For example, the k(s) values in methanol solution including 4.00 x 10(-1) M of LiI and Mg(ClO(4))(2) were 3.04 and 1.30 times larger than that in the absence of metal salts, respectively. The alkali and alkaline earth metal salts having smaller ionic radius of cation and anion and larger charge of cation gave larger rate constants (k(s)). Effects of metal cations on the UV-vis absorption spectra of the alpha-Toc* (and ArO*) radical were negligible in methanol solution, suggesting that the complex formation between the alpha-Toc* (and ArO*) radical molecule and metal cations is hindered by the hydrogen bond between radical and methanol molecules. The results indicate that the hydrogen transfer reaction of alpha-TocH proceeds via an electron transfer intermediate from alpha-TocH to ArO* radicals followed by proton transfer. Both the coordinations of metal cations to the one-electron reduced anions of ArO* (ArO: (-)) and of counteranions to the one-electron oxidized cations of alpha-TocH (alpha-TocH(+)*) may stabilize the intermediate, resulting in the acceleration of electron transfer. On the other hand, the effect of metal salts on the rate of bimolecular self-reaction (2k(d)) of the alpha-Toc* radical was not observed. The result suggests that the hydrogen transfer reaction between two alpha-Toc* radical molecules proceeds via a one-step hydrogen atom transfer mechanism rather than via an

  5. Effects of heat-treatment on the microstructure of TiAl-Nb produced with laser metal deposition technique

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlotleng, Monnamme

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available additive manufacturing approach, and the impact of heat treatment on microstructural evolution and hardness measurements. Ti-33Al-8Nb alloy was produced by melting the elemental powders in a laser melt-pool. The resulting microstructure was characterised...

  6. Diagnostics of Carbon Nanotube Formation in a Laser Produced Plume: An Investigation of the Metal Catalyst by Laser Ablation Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Gary; Scott, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes, elongated molecular tubes with diameters of nanometers and lengths in microns, hold great promise for material science. Hopes for super strong light-weight material to be used in spacecraft design is the driving force behind nanotube work at JSC. The molecular nature of these materials requires the appropriate tools for investigation of their structure, properties, and formation. The mechanism of nanotube formation is of particular interest because it may hold keys to controlling the formation of different types of nanotubes and allow them to be produced in much greater quantities at less cost than is currently available. This summer's work involved the interpretation of data taken last summer and analyzed over the academic year. The work involved diagnostic studies of carbon nanotube formation processes occurring in a laser-produced plume. Laser ablation of metal doped graphite to produce a plasma plume in which carbon nanotubes self assemble is one method of making carbon nanotube. The laser ablation method is amenable to applying the techniques of laser spectroscopy, a powerful tool for probing the energies and dynamics of atomic and molecular species. The experimental work performed last summer involved probing one of the metal catalysts, nickel, by laser induced fluorescence. The nickel atom was studied as a function of oven temperature, probe laser wavelength, time after ablation, and position in the laser produced plume. This data along with previously obtained data on carbon was analyzed over the academic year. Interpretations of the data were developed this summer along with discussions of future work. The temperature of the oven in which the target is ablated greatly influences the amount of material ablated and the propagation of the plume. The ablation conditions and the time scale of atomic and molecular lifetimes suggest that initial ablation of the metal doped carbon target results in atomic and small molecular species. The metal

  7. Soybeans Grown in the Chernobyl Area Produce Fertile Seeds that Have Increased Heavy Metal Resistance and Modified Carbon Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klubicová, Katarína; Danchenko, Maksym; Skultety, Ludovit; Berezhna, Valentyna V.; Uvackova, Lubica; Rashydov, Namik M.; Hajduch, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Plants grow and reproduce in the radioactive Chernobyl area, however there has been no comprehensive characterization of these activities. Herein we report that life in this radioactive environment has led to alteration of the developing soybean seed proteome in a specific way that resulted in the production of fertile seeds with low levels of oil and β-conglycinin seed storage proteins. Soybean seeds were harvested at four, five, and six weeks after flowering, and at maturity from plants grown in either non-radioactive or radioactive plots in the Chernobyl area. The abundance of 211 proteins was determined. The results confirmed previous data indicating that alterations in the proteome include adaptation to heavy metal stress and mobilization of seed storage proteins. The results also suggest that there have been adjustments to carbon metabolism in the cytoplasm and plastids, increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and decreased condensation of malonyl-acyl carrier protein during fatty acid biosynthesis. PMID:23110204

  8. Soybeans grown in the Chernobyl area produce fertile seeds that have increased heavy metal resistance and modified carbon metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Klubicová

    Full Text Available Plants grow and reproduce in the radioactive Chernobyl area, however there has been no comprehensive characterization of these activities. Herein we report that life in this radioactive environment has led to alteration of the developing soybean seed proteome in a specific way that resulted in the production of fertile seeds with low levels of oil and β-conglycinin seed storage proteins. Soybean seeds were harvested at four, five, and six weeks after flowering, and at maturity from plants grown in either non-radioactive or radioactive plots in the Chernobyl area. The abundance of 211 proteins was determined. The results confirmed previous data indicating that alterations in the proteome include adaptation to heavy metal stress and mobilization of seed storage proteins. The results also suggest that there have been adjustments to carbon metabolism in the cytoplasm and plastids, increased activity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and decreased condensation of malonyl-acyl carrier protein during fatty acid biosynthesis.

  9. Development of electrolytic process in molten salt media for light rare-earth metals production. The metallic cerium electrodeposition; Desenvolvimento de processo de eletrolise em meio de sais fundidos para a producao de metais de terras-raras leves. A obtencao do cerio metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restivo, T.A.G.

    1994-12-31

    The development of molten salt process and the respective equipment aiming rare-earth metals recovery was described. In the present case, the liquid cerium metal electrodeposition in a molten electrolytes of cerium chloride and an equimolar mixture of sodium and potassium chlorides in temperatures near 800{sup C} was studied. Due the high chemical reactivity of the rare-earth metals in the liquid state and their molten halides, an electrolytic cell was constructed with controlled atmosphere, graphite crucibles and anodes and a tungsten cathode. The electrolytic process variables and characteristics were evaluated upon the current efficiency and metallic product purity. Based on this evaluations, were suggested some alterations on the electrolytic reactor design and upon the process parameters. (author). 90 refs, 37 figs, 20 tabs.

  10. Magnesium substitutions in rare-earth metal germanides with the Gd5Si4 type. Synthesis, structure determination and magnetic properties of RE5-xMgxGe4 (RE=Gd-Tm, Lu and Y)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrao, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, P H [UNIV. OF DE; Bobev, S [UNIV. OF DE

    2009-01-01

    A series of magnesium-substituted rare-earth metal germanides with a general formula RE{sub 5-x}Mg{sub x}Ge{sub 4} (x {approx} 1.0-2.3; RE =Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) have been synthesized by high-temperature reactions and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These compounds crystallize with the common Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (No. 62; Z =4; Pearson's code oP36) and do not appear to undergo temperature-induced crystallographic phase transitions down to 120 K. Replacing rare-earth metal atoms with Mg, up to nearly 45 % at., reduces the valence electron count and is clearly expressed in the subtle changes of the Ge-Ge and metal-metal bonding. Magnetization measurements as a function of the temperature and the applied field reveal complex magnetic structures at cryogenic temperatures, and Curie-Weiss paramagnetic behavior at higher temperatures. The observed local moment magnetism is consistent with RE+ ground states in all cases. In the magnetically ordered phases, the magnetization cannot reach saturation in fields up to 50 kOe. The structural trends across the series and the variations of hte magnetic properties as a function of the Mg content are also discussed. KEYWORDS: Rare-earth intermetallics, germanides, crystal structure,Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type.

  11. The Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Alkaline-Earth Metals Doped Anatase TiO2: A Comparative Study of Screened Hybrid Functional and Generalized Gradient Approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jin-Gang; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Gong, Ji-Jun; Wu, You-Zhi; Kou, Sheng-Zhong; Yang, Hua; Chen, Yu-Hong; Liu, Zi-Jiang; Chen, Hong-Shan

    2015-08-24

    Alkaline-earth metallic dopant can improve the performance of anatase TiO2 in photocatalysis and solar cells. Aiming to understand doping mechanisms, the dopant formation energies, electronic structures, and optical properties for Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba doped anatase TiO2 are investigated by using density functional theory calculations with the HSE06 and PBE functionals. By combining our results with those of previous studies, the HSE06 functional provides a better description of electronic structures. The calculated formation energies indicate that the substitution of a lattice Ti with an AEM atom is energetically favorable under O-rich growth conditions. The electronic structures suggest that, AEM dopants shift the valence bands (VBs) to higher energy, and the dopant-state energies for the cases of Ca, Sr, and Ba are quite higher than Fermi levels, while the Be and Mg dopants result into the spin polarized gap states near the top of VBs. The components of VBs and dopant-states support that the AEM dopants are active in inter-band transitions with lower energy excitations. As to optical properties, Ca/Sr/Ba are more effective than Be/Mg to enhance absorbance in visible region, but the Be/Mg are superior to Ca/Sr/Ba for the absorbance improvement in near-IR region.

  12. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 3. Heavy Lanthanides (Gd–Lu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, 03195 Warszawa (Poland); Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02093 Warszawa (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-06-15

    This is the third part of the volume devoted to solubility data for the rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water and in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. It covers experimental results of trivalent fluorides of Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu (so-called heavy lanthanides), since no quantitative data on solubilities of TbF{sub 4} and YbF{sub 2} (the most stable compounds at these valencies) are available. The related literature has been covered through the end of 2014. Compilations of all available papers with the solubility data are introduced for each REM fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such assessment contains a collection of all solubility results in aqueous solution, a selection of suggested solubility data, a solubility equation, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or double salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. General features of the systems, such as nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, solution pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and the solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  13. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 3. Heavy Lanthanides (Gd-Lu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioduski, Tomasz; Gumiński, Cezary; Zeng, Dewen

    2015-06-01

    This is the third part of the volume devoted to solubility data for the rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water and in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. It covers experimental results of trivalent fluorides of Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu (so-called heavy lanthanides), since no quantitative data on solubilities of TbF4 and YbF2 (the most stable compounds at these valencies) are available. The related literature has been covered through the end of 2014. Compilations of all available papers with the solubility data are introduced for each REM fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such assessment contains a collection of all solubility results in aqueous solution, a selection of suggested solubility data, a solubility equation, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or double salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. General features of the systems, such as nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, solution pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and the solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  14. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Light Lanthanides (Ce–Eu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw 03195 (Poland); Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Warsaw 02093 (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-03-15

    This is the second part of the volume devoted to the evaluation of experimental solubility data for rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water as well as in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. Fluorides of Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, and Eu (so-called light lanthanides), as the main solutes, are covered in the present part, which has thorough coverage of the experimental literature through the end of 2012. The experimentally unknown solubility value for PmF{sub 3} in water was predicted by an interpolation of the solubility values for NdF{sub 3} and SmF{sub 3} at 298 K. General features of the systems, such as the nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  15. The Electronic Structures and Optical Properties of Alkaline-Earth Metals Doped Anatase TiO2: A Comparative Study of Screened Hybrid Functional and Generalized Gradient Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Gang Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline-earth metallic dopant can improve the performance of anatase TiO2 in photocatalysis and solar cells. Aiming to understand doping mechanisms, the dopant formation energies, electronic structures, and optical properties for Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba doped anatase TiO2 are investigated by using density functional theory calculations with the HSE06 and PBE functionals. By combining our results with those of previous studies, the HSE06 functional provides a better description of electronic structures. The calculated formation energies indicate that the substitution of a lattice Ti with an AEM atom is energetically favorable under O-rich growth conditions. The electronic structures suggest that, AEM dopants shift the valence bands (VBs to higher energy, and the dopant-state energies for the cases of Ca, Sr, and Ba are quite higher than Fermi levels, while the Be and Mg dopants result into the spin polarized gap states near the top of VBs. The components of VBs and dopant-states support that the AEM dopants are active in inter-band transitions with lower energy excitations. As to optical properties, Ca/Sr/Ba are more effective than Be/Mg to enhance absorbance in visible region, but the Be/Mg are superior to Ca/Sr/Ba for the absorbance improvement in near-IR region.

  16. Earth mortars and earth-lime renders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Earth surface coatings play a decorative architectural role, apart from their function as wall protection. In Portuguese vernacular architecture, earth mortars were usually applied on stone masonry, while earth renders and plasters were used on indoors surface coatings. Limestone exists only in certain areas of the country and consequently lime was not easily available everywhere, especially on granite and schist regions where stone masonry was a current building technique. In the central west coast of Portugal, the lime slaking procedure entailed slaking the quicklime mixed with earth (sandy soil, in a pit; the resulting mixture would then be combined in a mortar or plaster. This was also the procedure for manufactured adobes stabilized with lime. Adobe buildings with earth-lime renderings and plasters were also traditional in the same region, using lime putty and lime wash for final coat and decoration. Classic decoration on earth architecture from the 18th-19th century was in many countries a consequence of the François Cointeraux (1740-1830 manuals - Les Cahiers d'Architecture Rurale" (1793 - a French guide for earth architecture and building construction. This manual arrived to Portugal in the beginning of XIX century, but was never translated to Portuguese. References about decoration for earth houses were explained on this manual, as well as procedures about earth-lime renders and ornamentation of earth walls; in fact, these procedures are exactly the same as the ones used in adobe buildings in this Portuguese region. The specific purpose of the present paper is to show some cases of earth mortars, renders and plasters on stone buildings in Portugal and to explain the methods of producing earth-lime renders, and also to show some examples of rendering and coating with earth-lime in Portuguese adobe vernacular architecture.

  17. Kinetic study of the α-tocopherol-regeneration reaction of ubiquinol-10 in methanol and acetonitrile solutions: notable effect of the alkali and alkaline earth metal salts on the reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Kazuo; Oi, Masanori; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2012-03-01

    A kinetic study of regeneration reaction of α-tocopherol (α-TocH) by ubiquinol-10 has been performed in the presence of four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (LiClO(4), NaClO(4), NaI, and Mg(ClO(4))(2)) in methanol and acetonitrile solutions, using double-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The second-order rate constants (k(r)'s) for the reaction of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc•) radical with ubiquinol-10 increased and decreased notably with increasing concentrations of metal salts in methanol and acetonitrile, respectively. The k(r) values increased in the order of no metal salt concentration of metal salts in methanol. On the other hand, in acetonitrile, the k(r) values decreased in the order of no metal salt > NaClO(4) ~ NaI > LiClO(4) > Mg(ClO(4))(2) at the same concentration of metal salts. The metal salts having a smaller ionic radius of cation and a larger charge of cation gave a larger k(r) value in methanol, and a smaller k(r) value in acetonitrile. The effect of anion was almost negligible in both the solvents. Notable effects of metal cations on the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-Toc• radical were observed in aprotic acetonitrile solution, suggesting complex formation between α-Toc• and metal cations. On the other hand, effects of metal cations were negligible in protic methanol, suggesting that the complex formation between α-Toc• and metal cations is hindered by the hydrogen bond between α-Toc• and methanol molecules. The difference between the reaction mechanisms in methanol and acetonitrile solutions was discussed on the basis of the results obtained. High concentrations of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts coexist with α-TocH and ubiquinol-10 in plasma, blood, and many tissues, suggesting the contribution of the metal salts to the above regeneration reaction in biological systems.

  18. Energy losses produced by differential currents in the metallic ducts of electric installations; Perdidas de energia producidas por corrientes diferenciales en la tuberia metalica de instalaciones electricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campero L, Eduardo; Bratu S, Neagu; Marquez M, Luis; Caballero R, Rafael [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Unidad Azcapotzalco, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    In this article it is explained what is known as differential currents and the conditions in which they appear in the electrical installations. A short outline is made on the magnetic induction phenomenon that appears in metallic conduits, due to the circulation of differential currents along the inside of the tube and that in turn produces energy losses in the form of heat, that is dissipated in the tube surrounding environment. The results of the measurements performed in the laboratory are shown in order to quantify the energy losses in the metallic conduit. It was found that for certain conditions these losses are significant. [Espanol] En este articulo se explica lo que se entiende por corrientes diferenciales y se describen las condiciones en las que estas aparecen en las instalaciones electricas. Se plantea brevemente el fenomeno de induccion magnetica que aparece en las tuberias metalicas, debido a la circulacion de corrientes diferenciales por el interior del tubo y que a su vez produce perdidas de energia en forma de calor, que se disipa en el ambiente que rodea al tubo. Se muestran los resultados de las mediciones que se llevaron a cabo en laboratorio para poder cuantificar las perdidas en tuberia metalica conduit. Se encontro que para ciertas condiciones estas perdidas son significativas.

  19. Pickering emulsions stabilized by a metal-organic framework (MOF) and graphene oxide (GO) for producing MOF/GO composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fanyu; Liu, Lifei; Tan, Xiuniang; Sang, Xinxin; Zhang, Jianling; Liu, Chengcheng; Zhang, Bingxing; Han, Buxing; Yang, Guanying

    2017-10-18

    Herein we demonstrate the formation of a novel kind of Pickering emulsion that is stabilized by a Zr-based metal-organic framework (Zr-MOF) and graphene oxide (GO). It was found that the Zr-BDC-NO 2 and GO solids assembling at the oil/water interface can effectively stabilize the oil droplets that are dispersed in the water phase. Such a Pickering emulsion offers a facile route for fabricating Zr-MOF/GO composite materials. After removing water and oil by freeze drying from Pickering emulsions, the Zr-MOF/GO composites were obtained and their morphologies, structures and interaction properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, respectively. The influences of the concentration of GO and Zr-MOF on the emulsion microstructures and the properties of the MOF/GO composites were studied. Based on experimental results, the mechanisms for the emulsion formation by Zr-MOF and GO and the as-synthesized superstructures of the Zr-MOF/GO composite were proposed. It is expected that this facile and tunable route can be applied to the synthesis of different kinds of MOF-based or GO-based composite materials.

  20. Spent metal working fluids produced alterations on photosynthetic parameters and cell-ultrastructure of leaves and roots of maize plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalbo, Lucía; Fernandez-Pascual, Mercedes; García-Seco, Daniel; Gutierrez-Mañero, Francisco Javier; Lucas, Jose Antonio

    2013-09-15

    In this work we assess the capacity of maize (Zea mays) plants to phytoremediate spent metal working fluids (MWFs) and its effects on photosynthesis and ultrastructure of mesophyll and root cells. A corn-esparto fibre system patented by us has been used to phytoremediate MWFs in hydroponic culture. Furthermore, a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) has been used to improve the process. The results show that this system is capable of significantly reducing the chemical oxygen demand, under local legislation limits. However, plant systems are really damaged, mainly its photosynthetic system, as shown by the photosynthetical parameters. Nevertheless, strain inoculated improves these parameters, especially Hill reaction. The ultrastructure of photosynthetic apparatus was also affected. Chloroplast number decreased and becomes degraded in the mesophyll of MWFs treated plants. In some cases even plasmolysis of chloroplast membrane was detected. Early senescence symptoms were detected in root ultrastructural study. Severe cellular damage was observed in the parenchymal root cells of plants grown with MWFs, while vascular bundles cell remained unchanged. It seems that the inoculation minimises the damage originated by the MWFs pollutants, appearing as less degenerative organelles and higher chloroplast number than in non-inoculated ones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Heterometallic Alkaline Earth-Lanthanide Ba(II)-La(III) Microporous Metal-Organic Framework as Bifunctional Luminescent Probes of Al(3+) and MnO4(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bin; Liu, Shi Xin; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Chao; Wu, Xiang Xia; Guo, Jian Hua; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Li, Yan

    2016-05-02

    In this work a rigid asymmetrical tricarboxylate ligand p-terphenyl-3,4″,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3L) has been employed, and a unique heterometallic alkaline earth-lanthanide microporous luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF) {[Ba3La0.5(μ3-L)2.5(H2O)3(DMF)]·(3DMF)}n (1·3DMF) (DMF = dimethylformamide) has been isolated under solvothermal conditions. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis demonstrates that 2D inorganic Ba-O-La connectivity can be observed in 1, which are further bridged via rigid terphenyl backbones of L(3-), forming a unique I(2)O(1)-type microporous luminescent framework. A 1D microporous channel with dimensionality of 9.151(3) Å × 10.098(1) Å can be observed along the crystallographic a axis. PXRD patterns have been investigated indicating pure phases of 1. The luminescence explorations demonstrated that 1 exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for Al(3+) over other cations with high quenching efficiency Ksv value of 1.445 × 10(4) L·mol(-1) and low detection limit (1.11 μM (S/N = 3)). Meanwhile 1 also exhibits highly selective and sensitive sensing for MnO4(-) over other anions with quenching efficiency Ksv = 7.73 × 10(3) L·mol(-1) and low detection limit (0.28 μM (S/N = 3)). It is noted that, when different concentrations of MnO4(-) solutions (0.5 to 100 μM) were dropped into the suspension of 1, the bright blue luminescence of the suspension observed under UV light can gradually change into pink color, indicating visually luminescent sensing, which makes the detection process of MnO4(-) more convenient in practical. The result also reveals that 1 represents the first example of bifunctional heterometallic alkaline earth-lanthanide MOF-based luminescent probes for selectively detecting Al(3+) and MnO4(-) in the water solutions.

  2. Investigating Heavy Metal Pollution in Mining Brownfield and Its Policy Implications: A Case Study of the Bayan Obo Rare Earth Mine, Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuxue; Li, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    The rapid urbanization of China and associated demand for land resources necessitates remediation, redevelopment, and reclamation of contaminated soil. Before these measures are taken, a basic investigation and inventory of heavy metal (HM) pollution levels in contaminated soil is necessary for establishing and implementing the redevelopment plan. In the present study, to identify the policy implications of inventorying and mapping HM pollution of soil in brownfields throughout China, the Bayan Obo giant rare earth element (REE)-Nb-Fe ore deposit of Baotou in Inner Mongolia, China, which is the largest REE mineral deposit in the world, was taken as a case study. Soil samples from 24 sites in Bayan Obo mining area (MA) and 76 sites in mine tailing area (TA) were collected for determining contents of soil HMs (Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn). The results showed that the average concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn in both MA and TA were all higher than their corresponding background values for Inner Mongolia but lower than the Class II criteria of the National Soil Quality Standards of China (GB 15618—1995). Enrichment factor (EF) analysis of the soil samples indicated that the soil in the brownfield sites was highly enriched with Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn compared to the corresponding background values. In MA, the EF for Cd was the highest among the studied elements, while in TA, the EF for Cr (3.45) was the highest, closely followed by the EF for Cd (3.34). The potential ecological risk index (RI) indicated a moderate potential ecological risk from the studied HMs in MA and a low potential ecological risk in TA, and the results of RI also suggested that the soil was most heavily polluted by Cd. According to the spatial distribution maps of HM, contamination hot-spots were primarily located near mining-related high-pollution plants. Based on the results, policy recommendations are proposed related to brownfield management in urban planning.

  3. Blood levels of toxic metals and rare earth elements commonly found in e-waste may exert subtle effects on hemoglobin concentration in sub-Saharan immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Boada, Luis D; Carranza, Cristina; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; González-Antuña, Ana; Camacho, María; Almeida-González, Maira; Zumbado, Manuel; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2017-12-01

    Pollution by heavy metals and more recently by rare earth elements (REE) and other minor elements (ME) has increased due in part to their high use in technological and electronic devices. This contamination can become very relevant in those sites where e-waste is improperly processed, as it is the case in many countries of the African continent. Exposure to some toxic elements has been associated to certain hematological disorders, specifically anemia. In this study, the concentrations of 48 elements (including REE and other ME) were determined by ICP-MS in whole blood samples of sub-Saharan immigrants with anemia (n=63) and without anemia (n=78). We found that the levels of Fe, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, and Se were significantly higher in the control group than in the anemia group, suggesting that anemia was mainly due to nutritional deficiencies. However, since other authors have suggested that in addition to nutritional deficiency, exposure to some elements may influence hemoglobin levels, we wanted to explore the role of a broad panel of toxic and "emerging" elements in hemoglobin deficiency. We found that the levels of Ag, As, Ba, Bi, Ce, Eu, Er, Ga, La, Nb, Nd, Pb, Pr, Sm, Sn, Ta, Th, Tl, U and V were higher in anemic participants than in controls. For most of these elements an inverse correlation with hemoglobin concentration was found. Some of them also correlated inversely with blood iron levels, pointing to the possibility that a higher rate of intestinal uptake of these could exist in relation to a nutritional deficiency of iron. However, the higher levels of Pb, and the group of REE and other ME in anemic participants were independent of iron levels, pointing to the possibility that these elements could play a role in the development of anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Heavy metals in cow's milk and cheese produced in areas irrigated with waste water in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-González, Numa Pompilio; Calderón-Sánchez, Francisco; de Jesús, Jair Castro; Moreno-Rojas, Rafael; Tamariz-Flores, José V; Pérez-Sato, Marcos; Soní-Guillermo, Eutiquio

    2017-11-10

    The aim of this work was to determine Ni, Cr, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As levels in raw milk and Oaxaca and ranchero type cheeses, produced in areas irrigated with waste water from Puebla in Mexico. Milk results showed a mean Pb level of 0.03 mg kg-1, which is above the maximum limit as set by Codex Alimentarius and the European Commission standards. For As a mean value of 0.12 mg kg-1 in milk was obtained. Mean As and Pb levels in milk were below the Mexican standard. Milk whey and ranchero cheese had mean Pb levels of 0.07 and 0.11 mg kg-1, respectively. As was higher in Oaxaca and ranchero cheese at 0.17 and 0.16 mg kg-1, respectively. It was concluded that cheeses made from cow's milk from areas irrigated with waste water are contaminated with Pb and As, which may represent a health risk.

  5. Horizontal and Vertical Distribution of Heavy Metals in Farm Produce and Livestock around Lead-Contaminated Goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Orisakwe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hitherto studies in response to the June 2010 lead poisoning, Zamfara State, Nigeria, have focused on clinical interventions without information on livestock and other metals. Objective. This study has investigated the distribution of heavy metals in farm produce and livestock around lead-contaminated goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Nigeria. Methods. Vegetables, soil, water, blood, and different meat samples were harvested from goat, sheep, cattle, and chicken from Dareta, Abare, and Gusau communities. The samples were digested with 10 mL of a mix of nitric and perchloric acids; the mixture was then heated to dryness. Lead, cadmium, zinc, chromium, copper, magnesium, and nickel were analysed using flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The daily intake, bioaccumulation factor, and target hazard quotient (THQ were calculated. Results. Chicken bone-muscles from Dareta had the highest concentrations of lead, zinc, and nickel (28.2750, 16.1650, and 4.2700 mg/kg, resp., while chicken brain had the highest levels of cadmium, magnesium (0.3800 and 67.5400 mg/kg, and chromium (6.1650 mg/kg, kidney tissue inclusive. Conclusion. In addition to lead, cadmium may also be of concern in the contaminated mining communities of Zamfara State, Nigeria, given the high levels of cadmium in meat and vegetables samples from these areas.

  6. Horizontal and Vertical Distribution of Heavy Metals in Farm Produce and Livestock around Lead-Contaminated Goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Northern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladipo, O. O.; Ajaezi, G. C.; Udowelle, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hitherto studies in response to the June 2010 lead poisoning, Zamfara State, Nigeria, have focused on clinical interventions without information on livestock and other metals. Objective. This study has investigated the distribution of heavy metals in farm produce and livestock around lead-contaminated goldmine in Dareta and Abare, Zamfara State, Nigeria. Methods. Vegetables, soil, water, blood, and different meat samples were harvested from goat, sheep, cattle, and chicken from Dareta, Abare, and Gusau communities. The samples were digested with 10 mL of a mix of nitric and perchloric acids; the mixture was then heated to dryness. Lead, cadmium, zinc, chromium, copper, magnesium, and nickel were analysed using flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The daily intake, bioaccumulation factor, and target hazard quotient (THQ) were calculated. Results. Chicken bone-muscles from Dareta had the highest concentrations of lead, zinc, and nickel (28.2750, 16.1650, and 4.2700 mg/kg, resp.), while chicken brain had the highest levels of cadmium, magnesium (0.3800 and 67.5400 mg/kg), and chromium (6.1650 mg/kg, kidney tissue inclusive). Conclusion. In addition to lead, cadmium may also be of concern in the contaminated mining communities of Zamfara State, Nigeria, given the high levels of cadmium in meat and vegetables samples from these areas. PMID:28539940

  7. Application of Ammoniacal Solutions for Leaching and Electrochemical Dissolution of Metals from Alloys Produced from Low-Grade E-Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Paper reports results of the research on the application of ammoniacal solutions (sulfate, chloride, carbonate for hydrometallurgical treatment of smelted low-grade e-waste. Two Cu-Zn-Sn-Ag-Pb alloys were analyzed in details and discussed. Leaching of copper from the alloys was slow in sulfate solution, but the dissolution rate decreased in chloride and carbonate baths. Anodic alloys dissolution was uniform in sulfate and carbonate electrolytes, but high degradation of the material was observed in chloride bath. Chemical and phase composition of slimes and cathodic deposits produced during electrolysis were characterized. In all cases, separation of copper from other metals was found, but efficiencies of the processes were low.

  8. Magnetic Partitioning Nanofluid for Rare Earth Extraction from Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, Bernard P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thallapally, Praveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Jian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nune, Satish K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-21

    Rare earth metals are critical materials in a wide variety of applications in generating and storing renewable energy and in designing more energy efficient devices. Extracting rare earth metals from geothermal brines is a very challenging problem due to the low concentrations of these elements and engineering challenges with traditional chemical separations methods involving packed sorbent beds or membranes that would impede large volumetric flow rates of geothermal fluids transitioning through the plant. We are demonstrating a simple and highly cost-effective nanofluid-based method for extracting rare earth metals from geothermal brines. Core-shell composite nanoparticles are produced that contain a magnetic iron oxide core surrounded by a shell made of silica or metal-organic framework (MOF) sorbent functionalized with chelating ligands selective for the rare earth elements. By introducing the nanoparticles at low concentration (≈0.05 wt%) into the geothermal brine after it passes through the plant heat exchanger, the brine is exposed to a very high concentration of chelating sites on the nanoparticles without need to pass through a large and costly traditional packed bed or membrane system where pressure drop and parasitic pumping power losses are significant issues. Instead, after a short residence time flowing with the brine, the particles are effectively separated out with an electromagnet and standard extraction methods are then applied to strip the rare earth metals from the nanoparticles, which are then recycled back to the geothermal plant. Recovery efficiency for the rare earths at ppm level has now been measured for both silica and MOF sorbents functionalized with a variety of chelating ligands. A detailed preliminary techno-economic performance analysis of extraction systems using both sorbents showed potential to generate a promising internal rate of return (IRR) up to 20%.

  9. Electron spin resonance study of electron localization and dynamics in metal-molten salt solutions: comparison of M-MX and Ln-LnX sub 3 melts (M alkali metal, Ln = rare earth metal, X = halogen)

    CERN Document Server

    Terakado, O; Freyland, W

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra in liquid K-KCl and M-(NaCl/KCl) sub e sub u sub t mixtures at different concentrations in salt-rich melts approaching the metal-nonmetal transition region. In both systems F-centre-like characteristics are found. Strongly exchange narrowed signals clearly indicate that fast electron exchange occurs on the picosecond timescale. In contrast, the ESR spectra of a (NdCl sub 2)(NdCl sub 3)-(LiCl/KCl) sub e sub u sub t melt are characterized by a large line width of the order of 10 sup 2 mT which decreases with increasing temperature. In this case, the g-factor and correlation time are consistent with the model of intervalence charge transfer, which is supported by recent conductivity and optical measurements. The different transport mechanisms will be discussed.

  10. Magnetic rare earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majkrzak, C.F.; Kwo, J.; Hong, M.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in molecular beam epitaxy deposition techniques have recently made it possible to grow, an atomic plane at a time, single crystalline superlattices composed of alternating layers of a magnetic rare earth, such as Gd, Dy, Ho, or Er, and metallic Y, which has an identical chemical structure...

  11. Facile synthesis of highly biocompatible folic acid-functionalised SiO2 nanoparticles encapsulating rare-earth metal complexes, and their application in targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuling; Hu, Fan; Shuai, Qi

    2017-10-30

    Mesoporous silica core-shell nanospheres encapsulating a rare-earth metal complex (RC) were first synthesised through a facile W/O (water in oil) inverse microemulsion method. In order to achieve targeted complex delivery, folic acid (FA) was used as the targeting component due to its high affinity for over-expressed folate receptors (FRs) in cancer cells. The RC2@SiO2-FA nanospheres were characterised via ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis spectroscopy), dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A microwave method was used to synthesise five RC cores based on 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, and their crystal structures were further confirmed using X-ray diffraction. The five RC cores have the following chemical formulae: [Er2(p-CPA)6(H2O)6] RC1, [Ho2(p-CPA)6(H2O)6] RC2, [Sm(p-CPA)3(H2O)] RC3, [Pr(p-CPA)3(H2O)]·3H2O RC4 and [Ce(p-CPA)3(H2O)2]·2H2O RC5. The carboxyl groups showed two kinds of coordination modes, namely μ2-η(1):η(1) and μ2-η(1):η(2), among RC1-RC5. The flexible -OCH2COO- spacer group, which can undergo rotation of its C-O and C-C bonds, offered great potential for structural diversity. In vivo experiments revealed that the nanospheres exhibited no obvious cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells and 293 T cells, even at concentrations of up to 80 μg mL(-1). Nevertheless, all of the RC cores showed a certain degree of anti-tumour efficacy; in particular, RC2 showed the strongest cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity of all of the RC2@SiO2-FA nanospheres was higher than that of lone RC2. These types of FA-targeted mesoporous silica nanocarriers can be used for the delivery of anti-tumour RC, and provide a basis for the further study of affordable non-platinum-based complexes.

  12. Bioavailability of heavy metals, germanium and rare earth elements at Davidschacht dump-field in mine affected area of Freiberg (Saxony)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midula, Pavol; Wiche, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    with the other elements from this group. High amounts of As, Cd, Pb in mould horizons were proved. The surprisingly highest concentrations were determined for As (in average 3328 mg kg-1). The results of the pH measurement indicates acid conditions (in average 4.86, min. 3.89) for whole mine heap. Due to the mobility of Cd and Pb in acid environment, a high mobility of Cd in mobile soil fractions (in average 0.58 mg kg-1) was found, that seems to be responsible for the Cd pollution of Freiberger Mulde river, situated near the dump-field in the East direction from the studied area. The Pb content was in the average 1513 mg kg-1. SE analyses shows, that only the minor amounts of these metals were accounted in fractions I - IV (As: 7.75 %, Pb: 5.48 %, Cd: 26.77 %). The total Ge content in soil samples was 2.7 mg.kg-1in average. The concentrations of Nd and Ce were 17.7 mg kg-1and 38.5 mg kg-1, which is even lower than the average Nd and Ce contents in the Earth crust. However, the concentration of Ge was roughly a factor of two higher, than this average showing a large pool of Ge that could be accessed by phytoextraction. The SE analyses shows, that the average in fractions I - IV is even much lower, than in the case of the above mentioned heavy metals in comparison with Ge (1.75 %), Nd (3.28 %) and Ce (3.12 %). The BCF calculated for plants shows, that the only element, which could be possibly used as the object of phytoaccumulation is Cd (the BCF > 1) in species Populus tremula (3.0, 1.7), Spirea douglasii (1.4, 2.2) and Tanacetum vulgare (3.2, 1.3) at the most sampling places. Since these species represent the natural occurring vegetation of the dump, the use of these species together with soil amendments enhancing the plant availability of elements in soil fractions hold promise for phytoextraction of economically valuable metalloids and consequently an in situ bioremediation of the dump field. This work was realised with the support of Christin Jahns on behalf of the

  13. Earth-Abundant Metal Pyrites (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and Their Alloys) for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution and Polysulfide Reduction Electrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Matthew S; Lukowski, Mark A; Ding, Qi; Kaiser, Nicholas S; Jin, Song

    2014-09-18

    Many materials have been explored as potential hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts to generate clean hydrogen fuel via water electrolysis, but none so far compete with the highly efficient and stable (but cost prohibitive) noble metals. Similarly, noble metals often excel as electrocatalytic counter electrode materials in regenerative liquid-junction photoelectrochemical solar cells, such as quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) that employ the sulfide/polysulfide redox electrolyte as the hole mediator. Here, we systematically investigate thin films of the earth-abundant pyrite-phase transition metal disulfides (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and their alloys) as promising alternative electrocatalysts for both the HER and polysulfide reduction. Their electrocatalytic activity toward the HER is correlated to their composition and morphology. The emergent trends in their performance suggest that cobalt plays an important role in facilitating the HER, with CoS2 exhibiting highest overall performance. Additionally, we demonstrate the high activity of the transition metal pyrites toward polysulfide reduction and highlight the particularly high intrinsic activity of NiS2, which could enable improved QDSSC performance. Furthermore, structural disorder introduced by alloying different transition metal pyrites could increase their areal density of active sites for catalysis, leading to enhanced performance.

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Doped Fluoride Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    DeVol, Timothy A.; Basak Yazgan-Kukouz; Baris Kokuoz; DiMaio, Jeffrey R.; Sprinkle, Kevin B.; Tiffany L. James; Courtney J. Kucera; Luiz G. Jacobsohn; John Ballato

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the synthesis, structure and applications of metal fluoride nanoparticles, with particular focus on rare earth (RE) doped fluoride nanoparticles obtained by our research group. Nanoparticles were produced by precipitation methods using the ligand ammonium di-n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP) that allows the growth of shells around a core particle while simultaneously avoiding particle aggregation. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, and luminesc...

  15. Rare Earth pcu Metal-Organic Framework Platform Based on RE4(μ3-OH)4(COO)62+Clusters: Rational Design, Directed Synthesis, and Deliberate Tuning of Excitation Wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tian-Yi; Liu, Chong; Eliseeva, Svetlana V; Muldoon, Patrick F; Petoud, Stéphane; Rosi, Nathaniel L

    2017-07-12

    The T d point group symmetry of rare earth (RE 3+ ) metal clusters RE 4 (μ 3 -OH) 4 (COO) 6 2+ makes them attractive building blocks for creating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with controllable topologies. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of a series of isoreticular MOFs featuring pcu topology [MOF-1114(RE) and MOF-1115(RE)] with variable rare earth metal ions (RE 3+ = Y 3+ , Sm 3+ , Eu 3+ , Gd 3+ , Tb 3+ , Dy 3+ , Ho 3+ , Er 3+ , Tm 3+ , Yb 3+ ) and linear amino-functionalized dicarboxylate linkers of different lengths. In total, we report 22 MOFs that vary in both composition and structure yet share the same RE 4 (μ 3 -OH) 4 cluster motif. We demonstrate that these pcu MOFs are cationic and that anion exchange can be used to affect the MOF properties. We also investigate the luminescence properties of a representative member of this MOF series [MOF-1114(Yb)] that exhibits near-infrared emission. We show that the excitation energy for Yb 3+ sensitization can be carefully adjusted to lower energy via covalent postsynthetic modification at the amino group sites within the MOF.

  16. Metal TransporterZip14(Slc39a14) Deletion in Mice Increases Manganese Deposition and Produces Neurotoxic Signatures and Diminished Motor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Tolunay Beker; Kim, Min-Hyun; Kim, Jinhee; Colon-Perez, Luis M; Banan, Guita; Mareci, Thomas H; Febo, Marcelo; Cousins, Robert J

    2017-06-21

    Mutations in human ZIP14 have been linked to symptoms of the early onset of Parkinsonism and Dystonia. This phenotype is likely related to excess manganese accumulation in the CNS. The metal transporter ZIP14 (SLC39A14) is viewed primarily as a zinc transporter that is inducible via proinflammatory stimuli. In vitro evidence shows that ZIP14 can also transport manganese. To examine a role for ZIP14 in manganese homeostasis, we used Zip14 knock-out (KO) male and female mice to conduct comparative metabolic, imaging, and functional studies. Manganese accumulation was fourfold to fivefold higher in brains of Zip14 KO mice compared with young adult wild-type mice. There was less accumulation of subcutaneously administered 54 Mn in the liver, gallbladder, and gastrointestinal tract of the KO mice, suggesting that manganese elimination is impaired with Zip14 ablation. Impaired elimination creates the opportunity for atypical manganese accumulation in tissues, including the brain. The intensity of MR images from brains of the Zip14 KO mice is indicative of major manganese accumulation. In agreement with excessive manganese accumulation was the impaired motor function observed in the Zip14 KO mice. These results also demonstrate that ZIP14 is not essential for manganese uptake by the brain. Nevertheless, the upregulation of signatures of brain injury observed in the Zip14 KO mice demonstrates that normal ZIP14 function is an essential factor required to prevent manganese-linked neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Manganese is an essential micronutrient. When acquired in excess, manganese accumulates in tissues of the CNS and is associated with neurodegenerative disease, particularly Parkinson-like syndrome and dystonia. Some members of the ZIP metal transporter family transport manganese. Using mutant mice deficient in the ZIP14 metal transporter, we have discovered that ZIP14 is essential for manganese elimination via the gastrointestinal tract, and a lack of ZIP14

  17. Earth's variable rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond; Dickey, Jean O.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in geodetic data and practical meteorology have advanced research on fluctuations in the earth's rotation. The interpretation of these fluctuations is inextricably linked with studies of the dynamics of the earth-moon system and dynamical processes in the liquid metallic core of the earth (where the geomagnetic field originates), other parts of the earth's interior, and the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Fluctuations in the length of the day occurring on decadal time scales have implications for the topographay of the core-mantle boundary and the electrical, magnetic, ande other properties of the core and lower mantle. Investigations of more rapid fluctuations bear on meteorological studies of interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal variations in the general circulation of the atmosphere and the response of the oceans to such variations.

  18. Mixed ligand complexes of alkaline earth metals: Part XII. Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II complexes with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde or hydroxyaromatic ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITHLESH AGRAWAL

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of alkaline earth metal chlorides with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been carried out in 1 : 1 : 1 mole ratio and the mixed ligand complexes of the type MLL’(H2O2 (where M = Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II, HL = 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and HL’ = salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been isolated. These complexes were characterized by TLC, conductance measurements, IR and 1H-NMR spectra.

  19. Strength of the rare-earth-transition-metal exchange coupling in hard magnetic materials, an experimental approach based on high-field magnetisation measurements: Application to Er sub 2 Fe sub 14 B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoef, R.; Radwanski, R.J.; Franse, J.J.M. (Natuurkundig Lab., Univ. van Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1990-09-01

    A new experimental technique is presented to determine the intersublattice molecular-field coefficient, n{sub RT}, in heavy rare-earth-transition-metal intermetallic compounds. The technique is based on high-field magnetisation measurements on finely powdered polycrystalline material that is free to rotate in the sampleholder. Experimental results are reported for a number of Er{sub 2}Fe{sub 14-x}Mn{sub x}B compounds. The strength of the R-T exchange coupling is not affected by the Mn substitution, and a value of 0.445 Tkg/Am{sup 2} has been deduced for the coefficient n{sub RT}. (orig.).

  20. Earth before life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzban, Caren; Viswanathan, Raju; Yurtsever, Ulvi

    2014-01-09

    A recent study argued, based on data on functional genome size of major phyla, that there is evidence life may have originated significantly prior to the formation of the Earth. Here a more refined regression analysis is performed in which 1) measurement error is systematically taken into account, and 2) interval estimates (e.g., confidence or prediction intervals) are produced. It is shown that such models for which the interval estimate for the time origin of the genome includes the age of the Earth are consistent with observed data. The appearance of life after the formation of the Earth is consistent with the data set under examination.

  1. Solar-Driven Liquid-Metal MHD Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohl, F.; Lee, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Liquid-metal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generator with solar oven as its heat source has potential to produce electric power in space and on Earth at high efficiency. Generator focuses radiation from Sun to heat driving gas that pushes liquid metal past magnetic coil. Power is extracted directly from electric currents set up in conducting liquid. Using solar energy as fuel can save considerable costs and payload weight, compared to previous systems.

  2. High Temperature Equation of State of Metallic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    V.T.Shvets

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures, which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron and proton interaction is applied to determine t...

  3. Rare earth and critical metal recycling using ionic liquid technology:Recyclage van zeldzame aarden en kritieke metalen met ionische vloeistof technologie

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, David

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are of high interest as alternative solvents in solvent extraction applications and metal processing. Their negligible vapor pressure and low flammability make them safer and more convenient to handle than volatile organic solvents. Furthermore, their structure can be modified and functionalized to incorporate metal extracting groups and to tune their physical properties. In this thesis we used smart IL design to provide new innovative solutions to the recycling of critica...

  4. The earth orbiting space debris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The space debris population is similar to the asteroid belt, since it is subject to a process of high-velocity mutual collisions that affects the long-term evolution of its size distribution. Presently, more than 10 000 artificial debris particles with diameters larger than 10 cm (and more than 300 000 with diameters larger than 1 cm are orbiting the Earth, and are monitored and studied by a large network of sensors around the Earth. Many objects of different kind compose the space debris population, produced by different source mechanisms ranging from high energy fragmentation of large spacecraft to slow diffusion of liquid metal. The impact against a space debris is a serious risk that every spacecraft must face now and it can be evaluated with ad-hoc algorithms. The long term evolution of the whole debris population is studied with computer models allowing the simulation of all the known source and sink mechanisms. One of these codes is described in this paper and the evolution of the debris environment over the next 100 years, under different traffic scenarios, is shown, pointing out the possible measures to mitigate the growth of the orbital debris population. .

  5. Luminescence properties of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} scintillating glass doped with rare-earth and transition-metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan, E-mail: sxy5306@126.com [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji’an 343009 (China); Jiang, Da-Guo; Wang, Wen-Feng; Cao, Chun-Yan; Li, Yu-Nong; Zhen, Guo-Tai [Department of Physics, Jinggangshan University, Ji’an 343009 (China); Wang, Hong; Yang, Xin-Xin; Chen, Hao-Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Jun [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhao, Jing-Tai, E-mail: jtzhao@mail.sic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2013-07-11

    Novel B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary scintillating glasses doped with 1 mol% rare-earth and transition-metal activators were synthesized by melt-quenching method. Their transmittance, photoluminescence (PL) and X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) spectra were investigated. The results suggest that a high content of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} is of significance for designing dense glass with density of 6.0 g/cm{sup 3}. And energy transfer from Gd{sup 3+} to the incorporated activators can be realized in the borogermanate glasses. The emission position and decay time can be efficiently tuned by incorporating various kinds of activators. All results imply the developed borogermanate scintillating glass is potential for scintillating fields. -- Highlights: • Glass-forming region of B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} ternary system are determined. • Radioluminescence response from transition-metal doped B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. • Radioluminescence response from rare-earth doped B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–GeO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. • Emission peak position and decay time can be tuneable by incorporating various activators.

  6. Metallization failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  7. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  8. Effects of metal ion chelators on DNA strand breaks and inactivation produced by hydrogen peroxide in Escherichia coli: detection of iron-independent lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Asad, N R; Leitão, A C

    1991-01-01

    In order to study the role of metallic ions in the H2O2 inactivation of Escherichia coli cells, H2O2-sensitive mutants were treated with metal ion chelators and then submitted to H2O2 treatment. o-Phenanthroline, dipyridyl, desferrioxamine, and neocuproine were used as metal chelators. Cell sensitivity to H2O2 treatment was not modified by neocuproine, suggesting that copper has a minor role in OH production in E. coli. On the other hand, prior treatment with iron chelators protected the cell...

  9. Co-spread of metal and antibiotic resistance within ST3-IncHI2 plasmids from E. coli isolates of food-producing animals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fang, Liangxing; Li, Xingping; Li, Liang; Li, Shumin; Liao, Xiaoping; Sun, Jian; Liu, Yahong

    2016-01-01

    Concerns have been raised in recent years regarding co-selection for antibiotic resistance among bacteria exposed to heavy metals, particularly copper and zinc, used as growth promoters for some livestock species...

  10. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  11. Theoretical survey on M@C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba): Behavior of different alkaline earth metal impacting the chemical stability and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jin-Bo; Guo, Yi-Jun; Li, Qiao-Zhi; Zhao, Pei; Zhao, Xiang, E-mail: xzhao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2016-08-02

    Structures of mono-metallofullerenes M@C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) that separated in early experiment are determined owning the C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} cage. The change rule of properties for M@C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba) influenced by different inner metal are discussed. As the trapped metal changes from calcium to barium, performance of thermodynamic stabilities for M@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80}, M@C{sub 2v}(31922)-C{sub 80}, and M@D{sub 5h}(31923)-C{sub 80} are significantly different. Orbital analysis suggests that the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) of Ca@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} and Ca@D{sub 5h}(31923)-C{sub 80} are mostly located on the trapped metal, whereas reduction reactions of Ca@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} and Ca@D{sub 5h}(31923)-C{sub 80} occur on the fullerene cage. Natural electron configuration analyses demonstrates that the decentralized electron back-donation of Ba@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} would take responsible for the instability of itself. Electronic properties such as electron affinities and ionization potentials are significantly affected by encapsulated metal are also found. Computational UV–visible–NIR spectra for M@C{sub 2v}(31920)-C{sub 80} (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) are in perfect accord with the spectra obtained experimentally.

  12. Alaska's rare earth deposits and resource potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, James C.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Alaska’s known mineral endowment includes some of the largest and highest grade deposits of various metals, including gold, copper and zinc. Recently, Alaska has also been active in the worldwide search for sources of rare earth elements (REE) to replace exports now being limitedby China. Driven by limited supply of the rare earths, combined with their increasing use in new ‘green’ energy, lighting, transportation, and many other technological applications, the rare earth metals neodymium, europium and, in particular, the heavy rare earth elements terbium, dysprosium and yttrium are forecast to soon be in critical short supply (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010).

  13. Fractionation of metal stable isotopes by higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Blanckenburg, F.; Von Wiren, N.; Guelke, M.; Weiss, D.J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    Higher plants induce chemical reactions in the rhizosphere, facilitating metal uptake by roots. Fractionation of the isotopes in nutrients such as calcium, iron, magnesium, and zinc produces a stable isotope composition in the plants that generally differs from that of the growth medium. Isotope fractionation also occurs during transport of the metals within most plants, but its extent depends on plant species and on the metal, in particular, on the metal's redox state and what ligand it is bound to. The metal stable isotope variations observed in plants create an isotope signature of life at the Earth's surface, contributing substantially to our understanding of metal cycling processes in the environment and in individual organisms.

  14. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  15. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  16. Structures and heats of formation of simple alkaline earth metal compounds: fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides for Be, Mg, and Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Feller, David; Gole, James L; Dixon, David A

    2010-09-02

    Geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are predicted for the simple alkaline earth (Be, Mg and Ca) fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] level including core-valence correlation with the aug-cc-pwCVnZ basis sets up to n = 5 in some cases. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic effects, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were necessary to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation. The calculated geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are compared with the available experimental data. For a number of these alkaline earth compounds, the experimental geometries and energies are not reliable. MgF(2) and BeF(2) are predicted to be linear and CaF(2) is predicted to be bent. BeOH is predicted to be bent, whereas MgOH and CaOH are linear. The OBeO angle in Be(OH)(2) is not linear, and the molecule has C(2) symmetry. The heat of formation at 298 K for MgO is calculated to be 32.3 kcal/mol, and the bond dissociation energy at 0 K is predicted to be 61.5 kcal/mol.

  17. Use of Cold Gas Dynamic Spraying of bi-metallic powder mixtures as alternative to classic powder metallurgy route for producing intermetallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vit Jan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents cold gas dynamic spraying (or Cold Spray as a novel surface treatment technology capable not only of surface modifications but also being used as bulk creating technology. This is demonstrated on numerous samples where bi-metallic powder feedstock is deposited into bulk, self-standing pieces of material that does not need the support of substrate. Mixtures from the group of Fe, Al, Ti, Ni, Cu were used for the initial bi-metallic mixtures. The deposited samples were then subjected to annealing at temperatures ranging from 300 to 1100°C in protective atmosphere and resulting morphologies and microstructures were analysed. Generally materials with high proportion of intermetallic phase content were obtained. These are discussed as potential scaffolds for metal or polymer matrix composites or as hi temperature resistive supports for catalysts with filter functions.

  18. Review of laser produced multi-keV X-ray sources from metallic foils, cylinders with liner, and low density aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Frédéric [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2016-04-15

    Experimental results obtained within the last fifteen years on multi-keV X-ray sources irradiated with nanosecond scale pulse duration 3ω laser light at TW power levels by CEA and collaborators are discussed in this review paper. Experiments were carried out on OMEGA and GEKKO XII laser facilities where emitting materials in the 5–10 keV multi-keV energy range are intermediate Z value metals from titanium to germanium. Results focused on conversion efficiency improvement by a factor of 2 when an underdense plasma is created using a laser pre-pulse on a metallic foil, which is then heated by a second laser pulse delayed in time. Metal coated inner surface walls of plastic cylindrical tube ablated by laser beam impacts showed that plasma confinement doubles X-ray emission duration as it gives adequate plasma conditions (electron temperature and density) over a long period of time. Low-density aerogels (doped with metal atoms uniformly distributed throughout their volume or metal oxides) contained in a plastic cylinder have been developed and their results are comparable to gas targets. A hybrid target concept consisting of a thin metal foil placed at the end of a cylinder filled with low density aerogel has emerged as it could collect benefits from pre-exploded thin foils, efficient laser absorption in aerogel, and confinement by cylinder walls. All target geometry performances are relatively close together at a given photon energy and mainly depend on laser irradiation condition optimizations. Results are compared with gas target performances from recent NIF experiments allowing high electron temperatures over large dimension low density plasmas, which are the principal parameters for efficient multi-keV X-ray production.

  19. Ab Initio Study of Chemical Reactions of Cold SrF and CaF Molecules with Alkali-Metal and Alkaline-Earth-Metal Atoms: The Implications for Sympathetic Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosicki, Maciej Bartosz; Kędziera, Dariusz; Żuchowski, Piotr Szymon

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the energetics of the atom exchange reaction in the SrF + alkali-metal atom and CaF + alkali-metal atom systems. Such reactions are possible only for collisions of SrF and CaF with the lithium atoms, while they are energetically forbidden for other alkali-metal atoms. Specifically, we focus on SrF interacting with Li, Rb, and Sr atoms and use ab initio methods to demonstrate that the SrF + Li and SrF + Sr reactions are barrierless. We present potential energy surfaces for the interaction of the SrF molecule with the Li, Rb, and Sr atoms in their energetically lowest-lying electronic spin states. The obtained potential energy surfaces are deep and exhibit profound interaction anisotropies. We predict that the collisions of SrF molecules in the rotational or Zeeman excited states most likely have a strong inelastic character. We discuss the prospects for the sympathetic cooling of SrF and CaF molecules using ultracold alkali-metal atoms.

  20. A CONTINUUM OF PLANET FORMATION BETWEEN 1 AND 4 EARTH RADII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaufman, Kevin C., E-mail: kschlauf@mit.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    It has long been known that stars with high metallicity are more likely to host giant planets than stars with low metallicity. Yet the connection between host star metallicity and the properties of small planets is only just beginning to be investigated. It has recently been argued that the metallicity distribution of stars with exoplanet candidates identified by Kepler provides evidence for three distinct clusters of exoplanets, distinguished by planet radius boundaries at 1.7 R{sub ⨁} and 3.9 R{sub ⨁}. This would suggest that there are three distinct planet formation pathways for super-Earths, mini-Neptunes, and giant planets. However, as I show through three independent analyses, there is actually no evidence for the proposed radius boundary at 1.7 R{sub ⨁}. On the other hand, a more rigorous calculation demonstrates that a single, continuous relationship between planet radius and metallicity is a better fit to the data. The planet radius and metallicity data therefore provides no evidence for distinct categories of small planets. This suggests that the planet formation process in a typical protoplanetary disk produces a continuum of planet sizes between 1 R{sub ⨁} and 4 R{sub ⨁}. As a result, the currently available planet radius and metallicity data for solar-metallicity F and G stars give no reason to expect that the amount of solid material in a protoplanetary disk determines whether super-Earths or mini-Neptunes are formed.

  1. Molecular structure, stability and cytotoxicity of natural green colorants produced from Centella asiatica L. leaves treated by steaming and metal complexations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamwonglumlert, Luxsika; Devahastin, Sakamon; Chiewchan, Naphaporn

    2017-10-01

    Stability of extracts from Centella asiatica L. leaves treated by steaming and metal-chlorophylls complexations against combined acid-heat was compared with that from untreated leaves and synthetic colorant. Formation of metal-chlorophylls complexes was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Molecular structure changes during stability test and cytotoxicity of the extracts against Vero cells were evaluated. Utilization of the extracts as colorant was also assessed in selected beverage ingredient and food. Copper-chlorophylls extracts exhibited similar green hue to those from untreated and steamed leaves, while zinc-chlorophylls extracts exhibited yellow-green color. Metal-chlorophylls extracts possessed higher stability against combined acid-heat than those from untreated and steamed leaves. Use of metal-chlorophylls extracts in beverage ingredient led to increased hue value due to their structural rearrangement, which was confirmed by changes in Q band of VIS spectra. Cytotoxicity of zinc- and copper-chlorophylls extracts was slightly different and higher than those of extracts from untreated/steamed leaves and synthetic colorant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mineralogical and geochemical controls on the release of trace elements from slag produced by base- and precious-metal smelting at abandoned mine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, N.M.; Seal, R.R.; Hammarstrom, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Slag collected from smelter sites associated with historic base-metal mines contains elevated concentrations of trace elements such as Cu, Zn and Pb. Weathering of slag piles, many of which were deposited along stream banks, potentially may release these trace elements into the environment. Slags were sampled from the Ely and Elizabeth mines in the Vermont copper belt, from the copper Basin mining district at Ducktown, Tennessee and from the Clayton silver mine in the Bayhorse mining district, Idaho, in the USA. Primary phases in the slags include: olivine-group minerals, glass, spinels, sulfide minerals and native metals for Vermont samples; glass, sulfide minerals and native metals for the Ducktown sample; and olivine-group minerals, clinopyroxenes, spinels, sulfide minerals, native metals and other unidentified metallic compounds for Clayton slag. Olivine-group minerals and pyroxenes are dominantly fayalitic and hedenbergitic in composition, respectively and contain up to 1.25 wt.% ZnO. Spinel minerals range between magnetite and hercynite in composition and contain Zn (up to 2.07 wt.% ZnO), Ti (up to 4.25 wt.% TiO2) and Cr (up to 1.39 wt.% Cr2O3). Cobalt, Ni, Cu, As, Ag, Sb and Pb occur in the glass phase, sulfides, metallic phases and unidentified metallic compounds. Bulk slag trace-element chemistry shows that the metals of the Vermont and Tennessee slags are dominated by Cu (1900-13,500 mg/kg) and Zn (2310-10,200 mg/kg), whereas the Clayton slag is dominated by Pb (63,000 mg/kg), Zn (19,700 mg/kg), Cu (7550 mg/kg), As (555 mg/kg), Sn (363 mg/kg) and Ag (200 mg/kg). Laboratory-based leach tests indicate metals can be released under simulated natural conditions. Leachates from most slags were found to contain elevated concentrations of Cu and Zn (up to 1800 and 470 ??g/l, respectively), well in excess of the acute toxicity guidelines for aquatic life. For the Idaho slag, the concentration of Pb in the leachate (11,000 ??g/l) is also in excess of the acute

  3. High-precision analysis on annual variations of heavy metals, lead isotopes and rare earth elements in mangrove tree rings by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Kefu [South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 164 West Xin-Gang Road, Guangzhou 510301 (China) and Radiogenic Isotope Laboratory, Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (CMM), University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia)]. E-mail: kefuyu@scsio.ac.cn; Kamber, Balz S. [Radiogenic Isotope Laboratory, Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (CMM), University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Department of Earth Sciences, Laurentian University, Sudbury, ONP3E2C6 (Canada); Lawrence, Michael G. [Radiogenic Isotope Laboratory, Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (CMM), University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); Greig, Alan [Radiogenic Isotope Laboratory, Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (CMM), University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia); School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia); Zhao Jianxin [Radiogenic Isotope Laboratory, Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis (CMM), University of Queensland, Qld 4072 (Australia)

    2007-02-15

    Annual variations from 1982 to 1999 of a wide range of trace elements and reconnaissance Pb isotopes ({sup 207}Pb/{sup 206}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 206}Pb) were analyzed by solution ICP-MS on digested ash from mangrove Rhizophora apiculata, obtained from Leizhou Peninsula, along northern coast of South China Sea. The concentrations of the majority of elements show a weak declining trend with growth from 1982 to 1999, punctuated by several high concentration spikes. The declining trends are positively correlated with ring width and negatively correlated with inferred water-use efficiency, suggesting a physiological control over metal-uptake in this species. The episodic metal concentration-peaks cannot be interpreted with lateral movement or growth activities and appear to be related to environmental pollution events. Pb isotope ratios for most samples plot along the 'Chinese Pb line' and clearly document the importance of gasoline Pb as a source of contaminant. Shale-normalised REE + Y patterns are relatively flat and consistent across the growth period, with all patterns showing a positive Ce anomaly and elevated Y/Ho ratio. The positive Ce anomaly is observed regardless of the choice of normaliser, in contrast to previously reported REE patterns for terrestrial and marine plants. This pilot study of trace element, REE + Y and Pb isotope distribution in mangrove tree rings indicates the potential use of mangroves as monitors of historical environmental change.

  4. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  5. Dissolved organic matter degradation by sunlight coagulates organo-mineral colloids and produces low-molecular weight fraction of metals in boreal humic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinikova, Olga V.; Drozdova, Olga Yu.; Lapitskiy, Sergey A.; Demin, Vladimir V.; Bychkov, Andrey Yu.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.

    2017-08-01

    Photochemical degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is recognized as the major driver of CO2 emission to the atmosphere from the inland waters of high latitudes. In contrast to numerous studies of photo-induced DOM transformation, the behavior of trace element (TE) during photodegradation of boreal DOM remains virtually unknown. Towards a better understanding of concentration, size fractionation and speciation change of DOM and TE in boreal waters subjected to solar radiation, we conducted on-site photo-degradation experiments in stream and bog water collected from a pristine zone of the Northern Karelia (Russian subarctic). The removal of Fe and Al occurred only in the bog water (90% and 50% respectively, over 5 days of reaction), whereas no detectable decrease of dissolved (leading to water temperature rise in the boreal zone will intensify the Fe and Al hydroxide coagulation while increasing the production of LMW organic ligands and free metals and metal - organic complexes.

  6. Heavy Metal - Exploring a magnetised metallic asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Andrews, David; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Masters, Adam; Thomas, Nicolas; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Herique, Alain; Retherford, Kurt; Tortora, Paolo; Trigo-Rodriguez, Joseph; Ivchenko, Nickolay; Simon, Sven

    2017-04-01

    We propose a spacecraft mission (Heavy Metal) to orbit and explore (16) Psyche - the largest M-class metallic asteroid in the main belt. Recent estimates of the shape, 279×232×189 km and mass, 2.7×10(19) kg make it one of the largest and densest of asteroids, and together with the high surface radar reflectivity and the spectral data measured from Earth it is consistent with a bulk composition rich in iron-nickel. The M5 mission Heavy Metal will investigate if (16) Psyche is the exposed metallic core of a planetesimal, formed early enough to melt and differentiate. High-resolution mapping of the surface in optical, IR, UV and radar wavebands, along with the determination of the shape and gravity field will be used to address the formation and subsequent evolution of (16) Psyche, determining the origin of metallic asteroids. It is conceivable that a cataclysmic collision with a second body led to the ejection of all or part of the differentiated core of the parent body. Measurements at (16) Psyche therefore provide a possibility to directly examine an iron-rich planetary core, similar to that expected at the center of all the major planets including Earth. A short-lived dynamo producing a magnetic field early in the life of (16) Psyche could have led to a remnant field (of tens of micro Tesla) being preserved in the body today. (16) Psyche is embedded in the variable flow of the solar wind. Whereas planetary magnetospheres and induced magnetospheres are the result of intense dynamo fields and dense conductive ionospheres presenting obstacles to the solar wind, (16) Psyche may show an entirely new 'class' of interaction as a consequence of its lack of a significant atmosphere, the extremely high bulk electrical conductivity of the asteroid, and the possible presence of intense magnetic fields retained in iron-rich material. The small characteristic scale of (16) Psyche ( 200 km) firmly places any solar wind interaction in the "sub-MHD" scale, in which kinetic

  7. Dual function photocatalysis of cyano-bridged heteronuclear metal complexes for water oxidation and two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide as a solar fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aratani, Yusuke; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi; Ohkubo, Kei; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2017-03-25

    The photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from water and dioxygen under visible light irradiation was made possible by using polymeric cyano-bridged heteronuclear metal complexes (M(II)[Ru(II)(CN)4(bpy)]; M(II) = Ni(II), Fe(II) and Mn(II)), where the photocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2 and water oxidation were catalysed by the Ru and M(II) moieties, respectively.

  8. Metal-assisted chemical etching in HF/Na2S2O8 OR HF/KMnO4 produces porous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadjersi, T.; Gabouze, N.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Zinine, A.; Zinine, A.; Ababou, A.; Chergui, W.; Cheraga, H.; Belhousse, S.; Djeghri, A.

    2004-01-01

    A new metal-assisted chemical etching method using Na2S2O8 or KMnO4 as an oxidizing agent was proposed to form a porous silicon layer on a highly resistive p-type silicon. A thin layer of Ag or Pd is deposited on the Si(100) surface prior to immersion in a solution of HF and Na2S2O8 or HF and KMnO4.

  9. Pair natural orbital and canonical coupled cluster reaction enthalpies involving light to heavy alkali and alkaline earth metals: the importance of sub-valence correlation

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2017-03-07

    In this work, we tested canonical and domain based pair natural orbital coupled cluster methods (CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T), respectively) for a set of 32 ligand exchange and association/dissociation reaction enthalpies involving ionic complexes of Li, Be, Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb(ii). Two strategies were investigated: in the former, only valence electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the computationally very efficient FC (frozen core) approach; in the latter, all non-ECP electrons were included in the correlation treatment, giving rise to the AE (all electron) approach. Apart from reactions involving Li and Be, the FC approach resulted in non-homogeneous performance. The FC approach leads to very small errors (<2 kcal mol-1) for some reactions of Na, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb, while for a few reactions of Ca and Ba deviations up to 40 kcal mol-1 have been obtained. Large errors are both due to artificial mixing of the core (sub-valence) orbitals of metals and the valence orbitals of oxygen and halogens in the molecular orbitals treated as core, and due to neglecting core-core and core-valence correlation effects. These large errors are reduced to a few kcal mol-1 if the AE approach is used or the sub-valence orbitals of metals are included in the correlation treatment. On the technical side, the CCSD(T) and DLPNO-CCSD(T) results differ by a fraction of kcal mol-1, indicating the latter method as the perfect choice when the CPU efficiency is essential. For completely black-box applications, as requested in catalysis or thermochemical calculations, we recommend the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method with all electrons that are not covered by effective core potentials included in the correlation treatment and correlation-consistent polarized core valence basis sets of cc-pwCVQZ(-PP) quality.

  10. Strength and electrical conductivity of deformation processed Cu-15**v**/oFe metal matrix composites produced by powder metallurgy/techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerman, G.A.

    1991-05-30

    Copper based deformation processed metal matrix composites have been recently developed which exhibit high strengths with high electrical conductivities. The high strengthening is achieved through the establishment of second phase fibers in a Cu matrix. The most suitable second phase materials are BCC metals such as Nb, Cr, V, Ta, and Fe. The most economically attractive combination is the Cu-Fe system. Previous attempts at processing Cu-Fe composites have been hampered by the presence of Fe dissolved in the Cu matrix. Because of the large detriment dissolved Fe poses to the conductivity of the Cu matrix, cast processing the undeformed composites has led to low overall conductivity. To overcome this obstacle, powder metallurgy techniques have been adopted to consolidate blended elemental Cu and Fe powders. By controlling the time and temperature of the consolidation process, a Cu-15{sup v}/oFe metal matrix composite has been developed which matches the strength and conductivity properties of a similar cast Cu-15{sup v}/oNb alloy. The highest achievable strength was 1462 MPa with an attendant conductivity of 59 %IACS. 49 figs.

  11. Investigation on the influence of metal ion impurities on the complexation behavior of generator produced {sup 90}Y with different bifunctional chelators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Usha; Gamre, Naresh; Chakravarty, Rubel; Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Dash, Ashutosh [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiopharmaceuticals Div.

    2014-07-01

    While the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator is the exclusive source of obtaining 'no carrier added' {sup 90}Y for targeted therapy, the presence of trace metals in the radiolabeling solutions poses a serious challenge owing to their ability to diminish the {sup 90}Y complexation yields with bifunctional chelators (BFCs). p-SCN-Bn-PCTA is a novel ligand having faster complexation kinetics with a number of radiometals. In this work, a systematic investigation was performed to evaluate the chelating ability of p-SCN-Bn-PCTA for {sup 90}Y and the influence of trace metal ions on it's complexation with {sup 90}Y in comparison to p-SCN-Bn-DTPA and p-SCN-Bn-DOTA using {sup 90}YCl{sub 3} obtained from an electrochemical generator. Results from our study indicate that while p-SCN-Bn-PCTA gave very good radiolabeling yields with {sup 90}Y when the reaction was carried out by heating for few minutes, it was most sensitive to the presence of trace metals, especially Fe(III). An independent and useful observation is that p-SCN-Bn-PCTA could be considered as the ligand of choice for assessing the chemical purity of generator derived {sup 90}Y.

  12. Data fusion for food authentication. Combining rare earth elements and trace metals to discriminate "Fava Santorinis" from other yellow split peas using chemometric tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivelos, Spiros A; Higgins, Kevin; Kalivas, John H; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Georgiou, Constantinos A

    2014-12-15

    "Fava Santorinis", is a protected designation of origin (PDO) yellow split pea species growing only in the island of Santorini in Greece. Due to its nutritional quality and taste, it has gained a high monetary value. Thus, it is prone to adulteration with other yellow split peas. In order to discriminate "Fava Santorinis" from other yellow split peas, four classification methods utilising rare earth elements (REEs) measured through inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are studied. The four classification processes are orthogonal projection analysis (OPA), Mahalanobis distance (MD), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and k nearest neighbours (KNN). Since it is known that trace elements are often useful to determine geographical origin of food products, we further quantitated for trace elements using ICP-MS. Presented in this paper are results using the four classification processes based on the fusion of the REEs data with the trace element data. Overall, the OPA method was found to perform best with up to 100% accuracy using the fused data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Trace Metals, Rare Earths, Carbon and Pb Isotopes as Proxies of Environmental Catastrophe at the Permian - Triassic Boundary in Spiti Himalayas, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, N.; Basu, A. R.; Garzione, C. N.; Ghatak, A.; Bhargava, O. N.; Shukla, U. K.; Ahluwalia, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Himalayan sediments from Spiti Valley, India preserve geochemical signatures of the Permian - Triassic (P-Tr) mass extinction in the Neo-Tethys Ocean. We integrate new sedimentological and fossil record with high-resolution geochemical-isotopic data from Spiti that reveals an ecological catastrophe of global proportions. Trace elements of U, Th, Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, the rare earths (REE) and carbon, oxygen and lead isotopes measured across the P-Tr boundary in Spiti are used as proxies for evaluating abrupt changes in this continental shelf environment. δ13Corg excursions of 2.4‰ and 3.1‰ in Atargu and Guling P-Tr sections in Spiti Valley are associated with an abrupt fall of biological productivity while δ13Ccarb and δ18Ocarb record of these sediments shows effects of diagenesis. Here, the P-Tr boundary is compositionally distinct from the underlying Late Permian gray shales, as a partly gypsiferous ferruginous layer that allows additional geochemical-isotopic investigation of sedimentary sources. Conspicuous Ce - Eu anomalies in the light REE-enriched Late Permian shales reflect the source composition of the adjacent Panjal Trap basalts of Kashmir. An abrupt change of this source to continental crust is revealed by Nb - Ta and Zr - Hf anomalies at the P-Tr ferruginous layer and continuing through the overlying Early Triassic carbonate rocks. Pb concentration and isotope ratios of 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb identify changes in the sedimentary element flux, distinguishing the Late Permian shales from the distinct siliciclastic continental crustal signature in the Early Triassic carbonates. These geochemical-isotopic constraints on the sedimentary geochemistry of one of the most critical transitions in geological record establish the utility of multi-proxy datasets for paleoenvironmental reconstructions.

  14. Development and characterization of ceramic composites based on alumina-titania reinforced with rare earth oxide (holmium oxide) for the production of inert coatings in metal tanks of petroleum industry; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao de compositos ceramicos baseados em alumina-titania reforcados com oxido de terra rara (oxido de holmio) para fabricacao de revestimentos inertes em tanques metalicos da industria petrolifera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, N.D.G.; Pontual, J.O.; Ferreira, R.A.S.; Yadava, Y.P., E-mail: nokaa_demery@hotmail.com, E-mail: yadava@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica

    2014-07-01

    Due to the importance of petroleum and its derivatives for modern society, it is necessary to develop technologies that improve processes and transports of petroleum. The crude oil creates hostile environments and in the process of transport and storage of petroleum are used metallic materials, which corrode becoming a critical problem in this industry. One way of solving this problem is the use of ceramics based on alumina as inert coating on hostile environments. In this work was studied a structure, microstructure and mechanical properties of ceramic composite based on Al2O3 - TiO2 reinforced Ho2O3. The composites were produced by a thermomechanical process, sintered at 1350°C, were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness. Analyses were performed before and after immersion in earth and offshore crude petroleum to study stability of the developed composites and concluded that the ceramic composites immersed in petroleum show stable in hostile environments. (author)

  15. Superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; D& #x27; Urso, Brian R [Clinton, TN

    2012-07-10

    A superhydrophobic powder is prepared by coating diatomaceous earth (DE) with a hydrophobic coating on the particle surface such that the coating conforms to the topography of the DE particles. The hydrophobic coating can be a self assembly monolayer of a perfluorinated silane coupling agent. The DE is preferably natural-grade DE where organic impurities have been removed. The superhydrophobic powder can be applied as a suspension in a binder solution to a substrate to produce a superhydrophobic surface on the substrate.

  16. Marginal accuracy of nickel chromium copings fabricated by conventional and accelerated casting procedures, produced with ringless and metal ring investment procedures: A comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Deepa; Shetty, Y Bharath; Miranda, Glynis Anita; Prabhu, M Bharath; Karkera, Reshma

    2015-01-01

    Conventional investing and casting techniques are time-consuming and usually requires 2-4 h for completion. Accelerated nonstandard, casting techniques have been reported to achieve similar quality results in significantly less time, namely, in 30-40 min. During casting, it is essential to achieve compensation for the shrinkage of solidifying alloy by investment expansion. The metal casting ring restricts the thermal expansion of investment because the thermal expansion of the ring is lesser than that of the investment. The use of casting ring was challenged with the introduction of the ringless technique. A total of 40 test samples of nickel chromium (Ni-Cr) cast copings were obtained from the patterns fabricated using inlay casting wax. The 20 wax patterns were invested using metal ring and 20 wax patterns were invested using the ringless investment system. Of both the groups, 10 samples underwent conventional casting, and the other 10 underwent accelerated casting. The patterns were casted using the induction casting technique. All the test samples of cast copings were evaluated for vertical marginal gaps at four points on the die employing a stereo optical microscope. The vertical marginal discrepancy data obtained were tabulated. Mean and standard deviations were obtained. Vertical discrepancies were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significantly different. The data obtained were found to be very highly significant (P cast copings fabricated with the conventional casting using ringless investment system showed significantly better marginal fit than that of cast copings fabricated from conventional and accelerated casting with metal ring investment and accelerated casting using ringless investment since those copings had shown the least vertical marginal discrepancies among the four methods evaluated in this study.

  17. Recycling of Rare Earth Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Tom; Bertau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Any development of an effective process for rare earth (RE) recycling has become more and more challenging, especially in recent years. Since 2011, when commodity prices of REs had met their all-time maximum, prices have dropped rapidly by more than 90 %. An economic process able to offset these fluctuations has to take unconventional methods into account beside well-known strategies like acid/basic leaching or solvent extraction. The solid-state chlorination provides such an unconventional method for mobilizing RE elements from waste streams. Instead of hydrochloric acid this kind of chlorination decomposes NH4Cl thermally to release up to 400 °C hot HCl gas. After cooling the resulting solid metal chlorides may be easily dissolved in pH-adjusted water. Without producing strongly acidic wastes and with NH4Cl as cheap source for hydrogen chloride, solid-state chlorination provides various advantages in terms of costs and disposal. In the course of the SepSELSA project this method was examined, adjusted and optimized for RE recycling from fluorescent lamp scraps as well as Fe14Nd2B magnets. Thereby many surprising influences and trends required various analytic methods to examine the reasons and special mechanisms behind them.

  18. Tribological Behavior of Aluminum Alloy AlSi10Mg-TiB2 Composites Produced by Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, Massimo; Aversa, Alberta; Manfredi, Diego; Calignano, Flaviana; Ambrosio, Elisa Paola; Ugues, Daniele; Pavese, Matteo

    2016-08-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing technique for the production of parts with complex geometry and it is especially appropriate for structural applications in aircraft and automotive industries. Aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMCs) are promising materials for these applications because they are lightweight, ductile, and have a good strength-to-weight ratio This paper presents an investigation of microstructure, hardness, and tribological properties of AlSi10Mg alloy and AlSi10Mg alloy/TiB2 composites prepared by DMLS. MMCs were realized with two different compositions: 10% wt. of microsize TiB2, 1% wt. of nanosize TiB2. Wear tests were performed using a pin-on-disk apparatus on the prepared samples. Performances of AlSi10Mg samples manufactured by DMLS were also compared with the results obtained on AlSi10Mg alloy samples made by casting. It was found that the composites displayed a lower coefficient of friction (COF), but in the case of microsize TiB2 reinforcement the wear rate was higher than with nanosize reinforcements and aluminum alloy without reinforcement. AlSi10Mg obtained by DMLS showed a higher COF than AlSi10Mg obtained by casting, but the wear rate was higher in the latter case.

  19. Pyrolysis of marine biomass to produce bio-oil and its upgrading using a novel multi-metal catalyst prepared from the spent car catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabegh, Mahzad Yaghmaei; Norouzi, Omid; Jafarian, Sajedeh; Khosh, Akram Ghanbari; Tavasoli, Ahmad

    2018-02-01

    In order to reduce the economic and environmental consequences caused by spent car catalyst, we herein report for the first time a novel promising multi-metal catalyst prepared from spent car catalytic converters to upgrade the pyrolysis bio-oils. The physico-chemical properties of prepared catalyst were characterized by XRD, EDS, FESEM, and FT-IR analyses. The thermal stability of the multi-metal catalyst was studied with TGA. To investigate the activity of the catalyst, Conversion of Cladophora glomerata (C. glomerata) into bio-products was carried out via a fixed bed reactor with and without catalyst at the temperature of 500°C. Although the catalyst didn't catalyze the gasification reaction, bio-oil was upgraded over the catalyst. The main effect of the catalyst on the bio-oil components is deoxygenating of nitrogen compounds and promotion the ketonization reaction, which converts acid to ketone and declines the corrosive nature of bio-oil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    appliances, vehicles and buildings, containing iron and aluminium metals, have long lifetimes before they end up in the waste stream. The recycling of production waste and postconsumer metals has a long history in the metal industry. Some metal smelters are today entirely based on scarp metals. This chapter...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  1. Recovery of thorium and rare earths by their peroxides precipitation from a residue produced in the thorium purification facility; Recuperacao de torio e terras raras via peroxido do residuo originado na unidade de purificacao de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Antonio Alves de

    2008-07-01

    As consequence of the operation of a Thorium purification facility, for pure Thorium Nitrate production, the IPEN (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares) has stored away a solid residue called RETOTER (REsiduo de TOrio e TErras Raras). The RETOTER is rich in Rare-Earth Elements and significant amount of Thorium-232 and minor amount of Uranium. Furthermore it contains several radionuclides from the natural decay series. Significant radioactivity contribution is generated by the Thorium descendent, mainly the Radium-228(T{sub 1/2}=5.7y), known as meso thorium and Thorium-228(T{sub 1/2} 1.90y). An important thorium daughter is the Lead-208, a stable isotope present with an expressive quantity. After the enclosure of the operation of the Thorium purification facility, many researches have been developed for the establishment of methodologies for recovery of Thorium, Rare-Earth Elements and Lead-208 from the RETOTER. This work presents a method for RETOTER decontamination, separating and bordering upon some radioactive isotopes. The residue was digested with nitric acid and the Radium-228 was separated by the Barium Sulphate co-precipitation procedure. Finally, the Thorium was separated by the peroxide precipitation and the Rare-Earth Elements were also recovered by the Rare-Earth peroxide precipitation in the filtrate solution.(author)

  2. Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate architecture for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Todd H.

    2015-09-15

    Nano-structured noble metal catalysts based on hexametallate lattices, of a spinel block type, and which are resistant to carbon deposition and metal sulfide formation are provided. The catalysts are designed for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels to synthesis gas. The hexametallate lattices are doped with noble metals (Au, Pt, Rh, Ru) which are atomically dispersed as isolated sites throughout the lattice and take the place of hexametallate metal ions such as Cr, Ga, In, and/or Nb. Mirror cations in the crystal lattice are selected from alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and the lanthanide metals, so as to reduce the acidity of the catalyst crystal lattice and enhance the desorption of carbon deposit forming moieties such as aromatics. The catalysts can be used at temperatures as high as 1000.degree. C. and pressures up to 30 atmospheres. A method for producing these catalysts and applications of their use also is provided.

  3. Electrical and carrier transport properties of the Au/Y2O3/n-GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) diode with rare-earth oxide interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Prasad, C.; Rajagopal Reddy, V.; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2017-04-01

    The electrical and transport properties of rare-earth Y2O3 on n-type GaN with Au electrode have been investigated by current-voltage and capacitance-voltage techniques at room temperature. The Au/Y2O3/n-GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) diode shows a good rectification behavior compared to the Au/n-GaN metal-semiconductor (MS) diode. Statistical analysis showed that a mean barrier height (BH) and ideality factor are 0.78 eV and 1.93, and 0.96 eV and 2.09 for the Au/n-GaN MS and Au/Y2O3/n-GaN MIS diodes, respectively. Results indicate that the high BH is obtained for the MIS diode compared to the MS diode. The BH, ideality factor and series resistance are also estimated by Cheung's function and Norde method. From the forward current-voltage data, the interface state density ( N SS) is estimated for both the MS and MIS Schottky diodes, and found that the estimated N SS is lower for the MIS diode compared to the MS diode. The results reveal that the introduction of Y2O3 interlayer facilitated the reduction of N SS of the Au/n-GaN interface. Experimental results suggest that the Poole-Frenkel emission is a dominant conduction mechanism in the reverse bias region of both Au/n-GaN MS and Au/Y2O3/n-GaN MIS diodes.

  4. Non-rare earth magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, Everett E.; Huba, Zachary J.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Farghaly, Ahmed; Khanna, Shiv N.; Qian, Meichun; Bertino, Massimo

    2017-09-26

    Continuous flow synthetic methods are used to make single phase magnetic metal alloy nanoparticles that do not contain rare earth metals. Soft and hard magnets made from the magnetic nanoparticles are used for a variety of purposes, e.g. in electric motors, communication devices, etc.

  5. Comparison of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of A356/SiC Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Two Different Melting Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prakash Dwivedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A356/SiC metal matrix composites with different weight percent of SiC particles were fabricated by two different techniques such as mechanical stir casting and electromagnetic stir casting. The results of macrostructure, microstructure, and XRD study revealed uniform distribution, grain refinement, and low porosity in electromagnetic stir casing samples. The mechanical results showed that the addition of SiC particles led to the improvement in tensile strength, hardness, toughness, and fatigue life. It indicates that type of fabrication process and percentage of reinforcement are the effective factors influencing the mechanical properties. It is observed that when percentage of reinforcement increases in electromagnetic stir casting, best mechanical properties are obtained.

  6. Gaussian basis sets for use in correlated molecular calculations. XI. Pseudopotential-based and all-electron relativistic basis sets for alkali metal (K-Fr) and alkaline earth (Ca-Ra) elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J Grant; Peterson, Kirk A

    2017-12-28

    New correlation consistent basis sets based on pseudopotential (PP) Hamiltonians have been developed from double- to quintuple-zeta quality for the late alkali (K-Fr) and alkaline earth (Ca-Ra) metals. These are accompanied by new all-electron basis sets of double- to quadruple-zeta quality that have been contracted for use with both Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH) and eXact 2-Component (X2C) scalar relativistic Hamiltonians. Sets for valence correlation (ms), cc-pVnZ-PP and cc-pVnZ-(DK,DK3/X2C), in addition to outer-core correlation [valence + (m-1)sp], cc-p(w)CVnZ-PP and cc-pwCVnZ-(DK,DK3/X2C), are reported. The -PP sets have been developed for use with small-core PPs [I. S. Lim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 104103 (2005) and I. S. Lim et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 034107 (2006)], while the all-electron sets utilized second-order DKH Hamiltonians for 4s and 5s elements and third-order DKH for 6s and 7s. The accuracy of the basis sets is assessed through benchmark calculations at the coupled-cluster level of theory for both atomic and molecular properties. Not surprisingly, it is found that outer-core correlation is vital for accurate calculation of the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of diatomic molecules containing these elements.

  7. Study of Six Green Insensitive High Energetic Coordination Polymers Based on Alkali/Alkali-Earth Metals and 4,5-Bis(tetrazol-5-yl)-2 H-1,2,3-triazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Jing, Dong; Zhang, Qi; Xue, Xianggui; Gou, Shaohua; Li, Hongzhen; Nie, Fude

    2017-09-23

    Constructing insensitive high-performance energetic coordination polymers (ECPs) with alkali/alkali-earth metal ions and a nitrogen-rich organic backbone has been proved to be a feasible strategy in this work. Six diverse dimensional novel ECPs (compounds 1-6) were successfully synthesized from NaI , CsI , CaII , SrII , BaII ions and a nitrogen-rich triheterocyclic 4,5-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)-2 H-1,2,3-triazole (H3 BTT). All compounds show outstanding stability and low sensitivity, the thermal stability of these ECPs are significantly improved as the structural reinforcement increases from 1D to 3D, in which the decomposition temperature of 3D BaII based compound 6 is as high as 397 °C. Long-term storage experiments show that compounds 5 and 6 are stable enough at high temperature. Moreover, the six compounds hold considerable detonation performances, in which CaII based compound 5 possesses the detonation velocity of 9.12 km s-1 , along with the detonation pressure of 34.51 GPa, exceeding those of most energetic coordination polymers. Burn tests further certify that the six compounds can be versatile pyrotechnics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Experimental – Numerical Analysis of Stress State in Front of the Crack Tip of Modified and Unmodified G17CrMo5-5 Cast Steel by Rare Earth Metals in a Brittle-Ductile Transition Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzioba I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presented experimental data and numerical analysis of stress distribution in front of the crack of two melts of low-alloy G17CrMo5-5 cast steel-modified (M by rare earth metals and original, unmodified (UM in the temperature range, according to the brittle-ductile transition region. Experimental tests include determination of the tensile properties and fracture toughness characteristics for the UM and M cast steel. Numerical analysis includes determination of stress distribution in front of the crack at the initial moment of the crack extension. In the numerical computations, experimentally tested specimens SEN(B were modeled. The true stress-strain curves for the UM and M cast steel were used in the calculation. It was shown that the maximum of the opening stresses at the initial moment of the crack extension occurs in the axis of the specimens and reaches similar level of about 3.5σ0 for both UM and M cast steel. However, the length of the critical distance, measured for stress level equal 3σ0, is great for the M in comparison to the UM cast steel. Also was shown that the UM cast steel increased the level of the stress state triaxiality parameters that resulted in a decrease of fracture toughness.

  9. Production of magnesium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  10. Internal fit of three-unit fixed dental prostheses produced by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing and the lost-wax metal casting technique assessed using the triple-scan protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bjørn E; Dahl, Jon E; Rønold, Hans J

    2017-11-24

    Suboptimal adaptation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) can lead to technical and biological complications. It is unclear if the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technique improves adaptation of FDPs compared with FDPs made using the lost-wax and metal casting technique. Three-unit FDPs were manufactured by CAD/CAM based on digital impression of a typodont model. The FDPs were made from one of five materials: pre-sintered zirconium dioxide; hot isostatic pressed zirconium dioxide; lithium disilicate glass-ceramic; milled cobalt-chromium; and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium. The FDPs made using the lost-wax and metal casting technique were used as reference. The fit of the FDPs was analysed using the triple-scan method. The fit was evaluated for both single abutments and three-unit FDPs. The average cement space varied between 50 μm and 300 μm. Insignificant differences in internal fit were observed between the CAD/CAM-manufactured FDPs, and none of the FPDs had cement spaces that were statistically significantly different from those of the reference FDP. For all FDPs, the cement space at a marginal band 0.5-1.0 mm from the preparation margin was less than 100 μm. The milled cobalt-chromium FDP had the closest fit. The cement space of FDPs produced using the CAD/CAM technique was similar to that of FDPs produced using the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Doped Fluoride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. DeVol

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the synthesis, structure and applications of metal fluoride nanoparticles, with particular focus on rare earth (RE doped fluoride nanoparticles obtained by our research group. Nanoparticles were produced by precipitation methods using the ligand ammonium di-n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP that allows the growth of shells around a core particle while simultaneously avoiding particle aggregation. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, and luminescent properties. We discuss the synthesis, properties, and application of heavy metal fluorides; specifically LaF3:RE and PbF2, and group IIA fluorides. Particular attention is given to the synthesis of core/shell nanoparticles, including selectively RE-doped LaF3/LaF3, and CaF2/CaF2 core/(multi-shell nanoparticles, and the CaF2-LaF3 system.

  12. Co-spread of metal and antibiotic resistance within ST3-IncHI2 plasmids from E. coli isolates of food-producing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liangxing; Li, Xingping; Li, Liang; Li, Shumin; Liao, Xiaoping; Sun, Jian; Liu, Yahong

    2016-05-04

    Concerns have been raised in recent years regarding co-selection for antibiotic resistance among bacteria exposed to heavy metals, particularly copper and zinc, used as growth promoters for some livestock species. In this study, 25 IncHI2 plasmids harboring oqxAB (20/25)/blaCTX-M (18/25) were found with sizes ranging from ∼260 to ∼350 kb and 22 belonged to the ST3-IncHI2 group. In addition to blaCTX-M and oqxAB, pcoA-E (5/25) and silE-P (5/25), as well as aac(6')-Ib-cr (18/25), floR (16/25), rmtB (6/25), qnrS1(3/25) and fosA3 (2/25), were also identified on these IncHI2 plasmids. The plasmids carried pco and sil contributed to increasing in the MICs of CuSO4 and AgNO3. The genetic context surrounding the two operons was well conserved except some variations within the pco operon. The ~32 kb region containing the two operons identified in the IncHI2 plasmids was also found in chromosomes of different Enterobacteriaceae species. Further, phylogenetic analysis of this structure showed that Tn7-like transposon might play an important role in cross-genus transfer of the sil and pco operons among Enterobacteriaceae. In conclusion, co-existence of the pco and sil operons, and oqxAB/blaCTX-M as well as other antibiotic resistance genes on IncHI2 plasmids may promote the development of multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  13. Behaviour of Rare Earth Elements during the Earth's core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Pierre; Bouhifd, Mohamed Ali; Boyet, Maud; Hammouda, Tahar; Manthilake, Geeth

    2017-04-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) are classified in the refractory group, which means that they have a high temperature condensation and their volatility-controlled fractionation is limited to high-temperature processes. Anomalies have been measured for Eu, Yb and Sm, which are the REE with the lowest condensation temperatures in CAIs and chondrules (e.g. [1]). REE are particularly abundant in the sulfides of enstatite chondrites, 100 to 1000 times the CI value [e.g. 2,3], proving that these elements are not strictly lithophile under extremely reducing conditions. However by investigating experimentally the impact of Earth's core formation on the behavior of Sm and Nd, we have shown the absence of fractionation between Sm and Nd during the segregation of the metallic phase [4]. Recently, Wohlers and Wood [5] proposed that Nd and Sm could be fractionated in presence of a S-rich alloy phase. However, their results were obtained at pressure and temperature conditions below the plausible conditions of the Earth's core formation. Clearly, large pressure range needs to be covered before well-constrained model can be expected. Furthermore, our preliminary metal-silicate partitioning results show that Ce and Eu have higher metal/silicate partition coefficients than their neighboring elements, and that the presence of sulphur enhances the relative difference between partition coefficients. In this presentation, we will present and discuss new metal-silicate partition coefficients of all REE at a deep magma ocean at pressures ranging from those of the uppermost upper mantle ( 5 GPa) to a maximum pressure expected in the range of 20 GPa, temperatures ranging from 2500 to about 3000 K, and oxygen fugacities within IW-1 to IW-5 (1 to 5 orders of magnitude lower than the iron-wüstite buffer). We will discuss the effect of S, as well as the effect of H2O on the behaviour of REE during the Earth's core formation: recent models suggest that contrary to currently accepted beliefs, the

  14. Design and Calculation of an Earth Electrode

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, J

    2000-01-01

    People using electrical installations have to be protected against electrical shock. For purposes of protection a distinction is made between direct and indirect contact. Direct contact is contact with a live conductor. Protection is provided by the insulation of cables or the screening of live parts. An indirect contact happens when someone touches exposed metal parts which are not intended to carry current but have become live as a result of a fault. In this case metallic parts raise the metal to a dangerous potential (contact voltage). Here protection is provided by connecting the exposed metal part (i.e. the case of the electrical machine) to the earthing point of the installation. A protective device will disconnect the circuit as soon as a fault current flows to earth. The earth fault value will depend on the impedance of the path taken by the fault current, which is known as the earth fault loop. The resistance of the earth electrode plays an important role in the final impedance of the earth fault loo...

  15. CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2}. A new rare-earth metal(III) fluoride oxoselenate(IV) with sections of the ReO{sub 3}-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Stefan; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-09-04

    A new representative of rare-earth metal(III) fluoride oxoselenates(IV) derivatized with alkali metals could be synthesized via solid-state reactions. Colorless single crystals of CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2} were obtained through the reaction of Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ScF{sub 3}, and SeO{sub 2} (molar ratio 1:1:3) with CsBr as reactant and fluxing agent. For this purpose, corundum crucibles embedded as liners into evacuated silica ampoules were applied as containers for these reactions at 700 C for seven days. The new quintenary compound crystallizes in the trigonal space group P3m1 with a = 565.34(4) and c = 1069.87(8) pm (c/a = 1.892) for Z = 1. The crystal structure of CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2} contains two crystallographically different Sc{sup 3+} cations. Each (Sc1){sup 3+} is surrounded by six fluoride anions as octahedron, while the octahedra about (Sc2){sup 3+} are formed by three fluoride anions and three oxygen atoms from three terminal [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} anions. The [(Sc1)F{sub 6}]{sup 3-} octahedra link via common F{sup -} vertices to six fac-[(Sc2)F{sub 3}O{sub 3}]{sup 6-} octahedra forming {sup 2}{sub ∞}{[Sc_3F_6O_6]"9"-} layers parallel to (001). These layers are separated by oxygen-coordinated Cs{sup +} cations (C.N. = 12), arranging for the charge compensation, while Se{sup 4+} cations within the layers surrounded by three oxygen atoms as ψ{sup 1}-tetrahedral [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} units complete the structure. EDX measurements confirmed the composition of the title compound and single-crystal Raman studies showed the typical vibrational modes of isolated [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} anions with ideal C{sub 3v} symmetry. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Comparative analysis of the susceptibility to biocides and heavy metals of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates of human and avian origin, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deus, Daniela; Krischek, Carsten; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Sharifi, Ahmad Reza; Fiegen, Ulrike; Reich, Felix; Klein, Guenter; Kehrenberg, Corinna

    2017-05-01

    A total of 174 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates collected from humans (n=140) and healthy broiler chickens (n = 34) was included in the study. The MIC values of alkyl diaminoethyl glycin hydrochloride, benzethonium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, acriflavine, copper sulfate, silver nitrate and zinc chloride were determined by the broth microdilution method. Significant differences in MIC distributions were found between human and avian isolates and between CTX-M-, SHV- and TEM-type ESBL E. coli for chlorhexidine, silver nitrate, zinc chloride and copper sulfate by statistical analysis. Isolates with reduced susceptibility were investigated for the presence and localization of tolerance-mediating genes by PCR analysis and Southern blotting. The genes emrE, mdfA, sugE(c), cueO, copA, zntA and zitB were commonly present in isolates with elevated MICs, while the genes qacE∆1, qacF, qacH, sugE(p), cusC and pcoA, were less prevalent. In several isolates, a plasmid localization of the genes qacE∆1, qacF, qacH and sugE(p) on large plasmids >20 kb was detected. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hee [Clarendon Hills, IL

    2011-11-29

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  18. Reticular Chemistry and the Discovery of a New Family of Rare Earth (4, 8)-Connected Metal-Organic Frameworks with csq Topology Based on RE4(μ3-O)2(COO)8Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Giasemi K; Sartsidou, Christina; Vlachaki, Styliani; Spanopoulos, Ioannis; Tsangarakis, Constantinos; Kourtellaris, Andreas; Klontzas, Emmanuel; Froudakis, George E; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios; Trikalitis, Pantelis N

    2017-12-27

    In recent years, the design and discovery of new metal-organic framework (MOF) platforms with distinct structural features and tunable chemical composition has remarkably enhanced by applying reticular chemistry rules and the molecular building block (MBB) approach. We targeted the synthesis of new rare earth (RE)-MOF platforms based on a rectangular-shaped 4-c linker, acting as a rigid organic MBB. Accordingly, we designed and synthesized the organic ligand 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)-3,6-dimethyl-benzene (H 4 L), in which the two methyl groups attached to the central phenyl ring lock the four peripheral carboxyphenyl groups to an orthogonal/vertical position. We report here a new family of RE-MOFs featuring the novel inorganic building unit, RE 4 (μ 3 -O) 2 (RE: Y 3+ , Tb 3+ , Dy 3+ , Ho 3+ , Er 3+ , and Yb 3+ ), with planar D 2h symmetry. The rigid 4-c linker, H 4 L, directs the in situ assembly of the unique 8-c RE 4 (μ 3 -O) 2 (COO) 8 cluster, resulting in the formation of the first (4, 8)-c RE-MOFs with csq topology, RE-csq-MOF-1. The structures of the yttrium (Y-csq-MOF-1) and holmium (Ho-csq-MOF-1) analogues were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Y-csq-MOF-1 was successfully activated and tested for Xe/Kr separation. The results show that Y-csq-MOF-1 has high isosteric heat of adsorption for Xe (33.8 kJ mol -1 ), with high Xe/Kr selectivity (IAST 12.1, Henry 12.9) and good Xe uptake (1.94 mmol g -1 at 298 K and 1 bar), placing this MOF among the top-performing adsorbents for Xe/Kr separation.

  19. Ionic liquid technology for recovery and separation of rare earths

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen

    2015-01-01

    End-of-life neodymium-iron-boron and samarium-cobalt permanent magnets, fluorescent lamps and metal hydride batteries are valuable secondary resources of rare earths. These resources are characterised by relatively small volumes, but high concentrations of rare earths [1]. On the other hand, industrial process residues such as bauxite residue (red mud) and phosphogypsum contain low concentrations of rare earths, but are available in huge volumes [2]. Recovery of rare earths from end-of-life c...

  20. Production of magnesium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2012-04-10

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  1. High Temperature Equation of State of Metallic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Shvets, V T

    2016-01-01

    The equation of state of liquid metallic hydrogen is solved numerically. Investigations are carried out at temperatures, which correspond both to the experimental conditions under which metallic hydrogen is produced on earth and the conditions in the cores of giant planets of the solar system such as Jupiter and Saturn. It is assumed that hydrogen is in an atomic state and all its electrons are collectivized. Perturbation theory in the electron and proton interaction is applied to determine the thermodynamic potentials of metallic hydrogen. The electron subsystem is considered in the randomphase approximation with regard to the exchange interaction and the correlation of electrons in the local field approximation. The interproton interaction is taken into account in the hard spheres approximation. The thermodynamic characteristics of metallic hydrogen are calculated with regard to the zero-, second-, and thirdorder perturbation theory terms. The third-order term proves to be rather essential at moderately hig...

  2. Surface electronic structure of rare earth metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blyth, R.I.R.; Dhesi, S.S.; Gravil, P.A.; Newstead, K.; Cosso, R.; Cole, R.J.; Patchett, A.J.; Mitrelias, T. (Surface Science Research Centre, Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)); Prince, N.P.; Barrett, S.D. (Surface Science Research Centre, Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom) Oliver Lodge Lab., Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-25

    Angle-resolved UV photoemission has been used to investigate the electronic structure of the (0001) surfaces of scandium, yttrium, praseodymium and gadolinium. Off-normal emission spectra were recorded with high angular resolution, enabling detailed mapping of the dispersion of valence band features. Yttrium and gadolinium show similar results to published data from Ho(0001), suggesting minimal 4f influence in the lanthanide bandstructures. Differences seen on praseodymium and scandium may be due to 4f-derived states and surface states respectively. (orig.).

  3. Magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1970-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the energy of long- wavelength magnons in Tb-10%Ho has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The results agree with the `frozen-lattice' model, provided that the second-order magnetoelastic effect is taken into account. The planar anisotropy is almost enti...

  4. Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

    1985-11-21

    A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

  5. Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

    2011-04-01

    The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained

  6. Earth Science Multimedia Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, A. F.

    1998-01-01

    The presentation will begin with the latest 1998 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. A compilation of the 10 days of animations of Hurricane Georges which were supplied daily on NASA to Network television will be shown. NASA's visualizations of Hurricane Bonnie which appeared in the Sept 7 1998 issue of TIME magazine. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1 -min GOES images that will appear in the October BAMS. The visualizations are produced by the Goddard Visualization & Analysis Laboratory, and Scientific Visualization Studio, as well as other Goddard and NASA groups using NASA, NOAA, ESA, and NASDA Earth science datasets. Visualizations will be shown from the "Digital-HyperRes-Panorama" Earth Science ETheater'98 recently presented in Tokyo, Paris and Phoenix. The presentation in Paris used a SGI/CRAY Onyx Infinite Reality Super Graphics Workstation at 2560 X 1024 resolution with dual synchronized video Epson 71 00 projectors on a 20ft wide screen. Earth Science Electronic Theater '999 is being prepared for a December 1 st showing at NASA HQ in Washington and January presentation at the AMS meetings in Dallas. The 1999 version of the Etheater will be triple wide with at resolution of 3840 X 1024 on a 60 ft wide screen. Visualizations will also be featured from the new Earth Today Exhibit which was opened by Vice President Gore on July 2, 1998 at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum in Washington, as well as those presented for possible use at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), Disney EPCOT, and other venues. New methods are demonstrated for visualizing, interpreting, comparing, organizing and analyzing immense Hyperimage remote sensing datasets and three dimensional numerical model results. We call the data from many new Earth sensing satellites

  7. Plasma metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, J M

    1997-01-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of s...

  8. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Judith L [Los Alamos, NM; Foltyn, Stephen R [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-06-16

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  9. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Rudolph G.; Martinez, Michael A.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

  10. Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-05-26

    Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

  11. Rare-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seal, Robert R.; Long, Keith R.; Gambogi, Joseph; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    The rare-earth elements (REEs) are 15 elements that range in atomic number from 57 (lanthanum) to 71 (lutetium); they are commonly referred to as the “lanthanides.” Yttrium (atomic number 39) is also commonly regarded as an REE because it shares chemical and physical similarities and has affinities with the lanthanides. Although REEs are not rare in terms of average crustal abundance, the concentrated deposits of REEs are limited in number.Because of their unusual physical and chemical properties, the REEs have diverse defense, energy, industrial, and military technology applications. The glass industry is the leading consumer of REE raw materials, which are used for glass polishing and as additives that provide color and special optical properties to the glass. Lanthanum-based catalysts are used in petroleum refining, and cerium-based catalysts are used in automotive catalytic converters. The use of REEs in magnets is a rapidly increasing application. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets, which are the strongest known type of magnets, are used when space and weight are restrictions. Nickel-metal hydride batteries use anodes made of a lanthanum-based alloys.China, which has led the world production of REEs for decades, accounted for more than 90 percent of global production and supply, on average, during the past decade. Citing a need to retain its limited REE resources to meet domestic requirements as well as concerns about the environmental effects of mining, China began placing restrictions on the supply of REEs in 2010 through the imposition of quotas, licenses, and taxes. As a result, the global rare-earth industry has increased its stockpiling of REEs; explored for deposits outside of China; and promoted new efforts to conserve, recycle, and substitute for REEs. New mine production began at Mount Weld in Western Australia, and numerous other exploration and development projects noted in this chapter are ongoing throughout the world.The REE-bearing minerals are

  12. Ecotoxic heavy metals transformation by bacteria and fungi in aquatic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Amiy Dutt; Pal, Dharm; Penta, Santhosh; Kumar, Awanish

    2015-10-01

    Water is the most important and vital molecule of our planet and covers 75% of earth surface. But it is getting polluted due to high industrial growth. The heavy metals produced by industrial activities are recurrently added to it and considered as dangerous pollutants. Increasing concentration of toxic heavy metals (Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Ni(2+)) in water is a severe threat for human. Heavy metal contaminated water is highly carcinogenic and poisonous at even relatively low concentrations. When they discharged in water bodies, they dissolve in the water and are distributed in the food chain. Bacteria and fungi are efficient microbes that frequently transform heavy metals and remove toxicity. The application of bacteria and fungi may offer cost benefit in water treatment plants for heavy metal transformation and directly related to public health and environmental safety issues. The heavy metals transformation rate in water is also dependent on the enzymatic capability of microorganisms. By transforming toxic heavy metals microbes sustain aquatic and terrestrial life. Therefore the application of microbiological biomass for heavy metal transformation and removal from aquatic ecosystem is highly significant and striking. This paper reviews the microbial transformation of heavy metal, microbe metal interaction and different approaches for microbial heavy metal remediation from water bodies.

  13. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  14. Electrochemical nitridation of metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heli; Turner, John A.

    2015-06-30

    Electrochemical nitridation of metals and the produced metals are disclosed. An exemplary method of electrochemical nitridation of metals comprises providing an electrochemical solution at low temperature. The method also comprises providing a three-electrode potentiostat system. The method also comprises stabilizing the three-electrode potentiostat system at open circuit potential. The method also comprises applying a cathodic potential to a metal.

  15. Bioleaching of metals from WEEE shredding dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Alessandra; Cesaro, Alessandra; Rene, Eldon R; Belgiorno, Vincenzo; Lens, Piet N L

    2018-03-15

    A bioleaching process developed in two separate steps was investigated for the recovery of base metals, precious metals and rare earth elements from dusts generated by Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) shredding. In the first step, base metals were almost completely leached from the dust in 8 days by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans (DSM 9463) that lowered the pH of the leaching solution from 3.5 to 1.0. During this step, cerium, europium and neodymium were mobilized at high percentages (>99%), whereas lanthanum and yttrium reached an extraction yield of 80%. In the second step, the cyanide producing Pseudomonas putida WSC361 mobilized 48% of gold within 3 h from the A. thiooxidans leached shredding dust. This work demonstrated the potential application of biohydrometallurgy for resource recovery from WEEE shredding dust, destined to landfill disposal, and its effectiveness in the extraction of valuable substances, including elements at high supply risk as rare earths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Separation of the rare-earth fission product poisons from spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Jerry D.; Sterbentz, James W.

    2016-08-30

    A method for the separation of the rare-earth fission product poisons comprising providing a spent nuclear fuel. The spent nuclear fuel comprises UO.sub.2 and rare-earth oxides, preferably Sm, Gd, Nd, Eu oxides, with other elements depending on the fuel composition. Preferably, the provided nuclear fuel is a powder, preferably formed by crushing the nuclear fuel or using one or more oxidation-reduction cycles. A compound comprising Th or Zr, preferably metal, is provided. The provided nuclear fuel is mixed with the Th or Zr, thereby creating a mixture. The mixture is then heated to a temperature sufficient to reduce the UO.sub.2 in the nuclear fuel, preferably to at least to 850.degree. C. for Th and up to 600.degree. C. for Zr. Rare-earth metals are then extracted to form the heated mixture thereby producing a treated nuclear fuel. The treated nuclear fuel comprises the provided nuclear fuel having a significant reduction in rare-earths.

  17. A Physicochemical Method for Separating Rare Earths: Addressing an Impending Shortfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelter, Eric [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-03-14

    There are currently zero operating suppliers of critical rare earth elements La–Lu, Sc, Y (REs), in the western hemisphere. REs are critical materials due to their importance in clean energy and defense applications, including permanent magnets in wind turbines and phosphors in energy efficient lighting. It is not economically viable to produce pure REs in the U.S. given current separations technology. REs production is dominated by suppliers in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) because of their capacity in liquid­liquid solvent extraction (SX) used to purify mixtures. Weak environmental regulations in the PRC also contribute to a competitive advantage. SX is a cost, time, solvent and waste intensive process but is highly optimized and scalable. The low efficiency of SX derives from the small thermodynamic differences in solvation enthalpy between the RE3+ cations. To foster stable domestic RE production there is a critical need for fundamentally new REs chemistry that contributes to disruptive technologies in RE separations. The overall goal of this project was to develop new thermodynamic bases, and apply them, for the solution separation of rare earth metals. We have developed the chemistry of rare earth metals: La–Lu, Sc and Y, with redox active ligands. Our hypothesis for the project was that electron­hole coupling in complexes of certain lanthanide metals with redox active ligands can be used to manifest chemical distinctiveness and affect separations. We also developed separations based on unique solution equilibria from tailored ligands.

  18. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    , Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised...

  19. EarthScope: Earth Science Education and Outreach on a Continental Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.; Arrowsmith, R.; Fouch, M. J.; Garnero, E. J.; Taylor, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    EarthScope, funded by the National Science Foundation, enables the exploration of the structure and evolution of the North American continent by scientists accessing a range of seismological, geodetic, in situ fault-zone sampling, geochronology, and high resolution topography resources. Interdisciplinary EarthScope science produces transformative knowledge for studying Earth processes and structures, addressing hazards, and informing resource exploration and environmental management. In addition, these data and technologies offer superb opportunities to enhance formal and informal science education in the solid Earth and Earth system sciences. The EarthScope National Office (ESNO) at Arizona State University serves the broad and diverse community of EarthScope stakeholders, including EarthScope researchers, formal and informal educators in Earth science, and the general public. ESNO supports and promotes education and outreach (E&O) at a level comparable to that of its support for EarthScope science. This is accomplished through effective programs such as the EarthScope E&O website, Speaker Series, Interpretive Workshops for informal educators, newsletters, and the biannual EarthScope National Meeting. ESNO is adding further value to the programmatic E&O portfolio through new initiatives to: rapidly channel EarthScope science through social media; pilot and disseminate exemplary new Earth science content for K-12 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teacher professional development (in partnership with organizations such as American Geological Institute); use regional and local results from EarthScope research in promoting place-based teaching; and deliver continuing education for university researchers and educators. EarthScope E&O, infused with a place-based and educator-centered ethos, coordinates the compilation and presentation of the spectacular findings and scientific legacy of the continental-scale EarthScope program.

  20. Earth's surface heat flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Davies

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a revised estimate of Earth's surface heat flux that is based upon a heat flow data-set with 38 347 measurements, which is 55% more than used in previous estimates. Our methodology, like others, accounts for hydrothermal circulation in young oceanic crust by utilising a half-space cooling approximation. For the rest of Earth's surface, we estimate the average heat flow for different geologic domains as defined by global digital geology maps; and then produce the global estimate by multiplying it by the total global area of that geologic domain. The averaging is done on a polygon set which results from an intersection of a 1 degree equal area grid with the original geology polygons; this minimises the adverse influence of clustering. These operations and estimates are derived accurately using methodologies from Geographical Information Science. We consider the virtually un-sampled Antarctica separately and also make a small correction for hot-spots in young oceanic lithosphere. A range of analyses is presented. These, combined with statistical estimates of the error, provide a measure of robustness. Our final preferred estimate is 47±2 TW, which is greater than previous estimates.

  1. Thermal Stability and Proton Conductivity of Rare Earth Orthophosphate Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2014-01-01

    Hydrated orthophosphate powders of three rare earth metals, lanthanum, neodymium and gadolinium, were prepared and studied as potential proton conducting materials for intermediate temperature electrochemical applications. The phosphates undergo a transformation from the rhabdophane structure...

  2. Primordial Stratification of the Earth's Core (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernlund, J. W.; Rubie, D. C.; Labrosse, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of diverse approaches have been used to assess the formation of Earth's core by silicate-metal equilibration in magma oceans formed by energetic impacts during accretion, all of which invariably yield increasing temperatures and impurity concentrations in the downgoing metal as planetary growth progresses. If one builds the core incrementally with metal equilibrated in magma oceans from the center-up, this gives rise to a gravitationally stratified core with a cool iron-rich central region surrounded by a hot impurity-enriched veneer. The kinetic energy of infalling metal leads to mixing that could moderate such stratification, however, in detail the energetic barriers are difficult to overcome. Regardless of the mechanism of downward metal transport from a magma ocean, the fastest possible descent rate of metal into the core is limited by hard turbulence, for which scaling arguments show that the kinetic energy is much smaller than the expected stabilizing gravitational potential energy. This presents a paradox because the bulk of Earth's present day outer core exhibits density fluctuations of order ppb, apart from stratified regions in the uppermost and lowermost ~100 km. The required degree of mixing seems likely to have been achieved by additional kinetic energy from the direct merging of the cores of large differentiated planetesimal-sized bodies, thus metal transport and merging was not entirely determined by processes such as gravity-driven descent through the mantle from a magma ocean. It is unknown whether the mixing was complete, or whether stratified regions such as the F-layer represent the residue of early stratification. It is possible that Earth's inner core has been growing inside an impurity depleted region of Earth's central core since its birth, which carries implications for the age of the inner core as well as the mechanism of its growth.

  3. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, A. H., E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.com [New Technologies—Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic); Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Huang, Hongwei [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Kamarudin, H. [Center of Excellence Geopolymer and Green Technology, School of Material Engineering, University Malaysia Perlis, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Auluck, S. [Council of Scientific and Industrial Research—National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012, India and Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology - Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-02-28

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δε=−0.076 and the birefringence Δn(0)=0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω). The value of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| spectra with the features of ε{sub 2}(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)|, we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β{sub 111}, the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  4. Teaching through Trade Books: Humans and the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce, Christine Anne

    2016-01-01

    This column includes activities inspired by children's literature. Elementary students are beginning to understand the Earth's natural processes and humans' impact on the Earth. Humans need the natural resources that the Earth produces, use these resources to develop civilizations, and make decisions to offset the damage they cause, as well as…

  5. New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, Richard A.

    2012-06-04

    The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

  6. The Lifeworld Earth and a Modelled Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to study the question of whether a phenomenological view of the Earth could be empirically endorsed. The phenomenological way of thinking considers the Earth as a material entity, but not as an object as viewed in science. In the learning science tradition, tracking the process of the conceptual change of the shape of the…

  7. EarthLabs - Investigating Hurricanes: Earth's Meteorological Monsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2007-12-01

    which students investigate the different interactions involved in hurricane generation, steering, and intensification. Students analyze a variety of visualization resources looking for patterns in occurrence and to develop an understanding of hurricane structure. They download archived data about past hurricanes and produce temporal and spatial plots to discover patterns in hurricane life cycles. They investigate the relationship between hurricane wind speed and factors such as barometric pressure and sea surface temperature by conducting spreadsheet analyses on archived data. They also conduct hands-on laboratory experiments in order to understand the physical processes that underpin energy transfer in convection, condensation, and latent heat. These activities highlight Earth science as a vital, rich, invigorating course, employing state-of-the-art technologies and in-depth labs with high relevance for our daily lives and the future.

  8. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Mukesh Kumar Mahato. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 4 June 2017 pp 49. Metal contamination of agricultural soils in the copper mining areas of Singhbhum shear zone in India · Soma Giri Abhay Kumar Singh Mukesh Kumar Mahato.

  9. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Soma Giri. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 126 Issue 4 June 2017 pp 49. Metal contamination of agricultural soils in the copper mining areas of Singhbhum shear zone in India · Soma Giri Abhay Kumar Singh Mukesh Kumar Mahato.

  10. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing....

  11. EarthKAM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sponsored by NASA, EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to take pictures...

  12. Earth tides, precession-nutation and the secular retardation of earth's rotation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melchor, P; Georis, B

    1968-01-01

    It is shown that both the precessionnutation in space of the axis of inertia and the diurnal nutations inside the Earth of the instantaneous axis of rotation are produced by the horizontal components...

  13. HABEBEE: habitability of eyeball-exo-Earths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angerhausen, Daniel; Sapers, Haley; Citron, Robert; Bergantini, Alexandre; Lutz, Stefanie; Queiroz, Luciano Lopes; da Rosa Alexandre, Marcelo; Araujo, Ana Carolina Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Extrasolar Earth and super-Earth planets orbiting within the habitable zone of M dwarf host stars may play a significant role in the discovery of habitable environments beyond Earth. Spectroscopic characterization of these exoplanets with respect to habitability requires the determination of habitability parameters with respect to remote sensing. The habitable zone of dwarf stars is located in close proximity to the host star, such that exoplanets orbiting within this zone will likely be tidally locked. On terrestrial planets with an icy shell, this may produce a liquid water ocean at the substellar point, one particular "Eyeball Earth" state. In this research proposal, HABEBEE: exploring the HABitability of Eyeball-Exo-Earths, we define the parameters necessary to achieve a stable icy Eyeball Earth capable of supporting life. Astronomical and geochemical research will define parameters needed to simulate potentially habitable environments on an icy Eyeball Earth planet. Biological requirements will be based on detailed studies of microbial communities within Earth analog environments. Using the interdisciplinary results of both the physical and biological teams, we will set up a simulation chamber to expose a cold- and UV-tolerant microbial community to the theoretically derived Eyeball Earth climate states, simulating the composition, atmosphere, physical parameters, and stellar irradiation. Combining the results of both studies will enable us to derive observable parameters as well as target decision guidance and feasibility analysis for upcoming astronomical platforms.

  14. Synthesis of monomeric and polymeric alkali and alkaline earth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    5, September 2014, pp. 1463–1475. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Synthesis of monomeric and polymeric alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes using a phosphinoselenoic amide ligand in metal coordination sphere. JAYEETA BHATTACHARJEE, RAVI K KOTTALANKA, HARINATH ADIMULAM and TARUN K PANDA.

  15. MBE growth and characterisation of light rare-earth superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R.; Bryn-Jacobsen, C.

    1996-01-01

    The molecular beam epitaxy growth techniques which have already successfully produced a range of heavy rare-earth superlattices have now been extended to produce superlattices of two light rare-earth elements, Nd/Pr, as well as superlattices and alloy films of a heavy/light system, Ho/Pr. High...

  16. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  17. Pathways to Metallic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2008-01-01

    The traditional pathway that researchers have used in the goal of producing atomic metallic hydrogen is to compress samples with megabar pressures at low temperature. A number of phases have been observed in solid hydrogen and its isotopes, but all are in the insulating phase. The results of experiment and theory for this pathway are reviewed. In recent years a new pathway has become the focus of this challenge of producing metallic hydrogen, namely a path along the melting line. It has bee...

  18. Magnetic excitations in rare earth systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jens

    1982-10-01

    The observation of magnetic excitations, by means of inelastic neutron scattering, provides valuable information on the magnetic forces acting in rare-earth systems. The RPA (random-phase approximation) theory, developed into its final form in the early seventies, is now a widely used tool for analyzing the excitation spectra in systems with well-defined local moments. These excitations reflect both the dynamics of the single moments and the interactions of these moments with their surroundings. A discussion of the information which has been obtained from studies of the magnetic excitations in the rare-earth metal is presented. The emphasis is laid on Pr-metal which has attracted much interest in recent years. Recent progress in the investigation of rare-earth intermetallic compounds, like the Laves-phase and the CsCl-type-compounds and the rare-earth pnictides, is also condidered. Some aspects of the magnetic properties of the actinides can be understood in terms of a model of localized moments, and we include a discussion of USb, where the spin-wave spectrum contains direct evidence that the spins are ordered in a triple- q structure. The magnetic excitations may be coupled to the phonons and in the metallic systems they interact with the electron- hole excitations of the conduction electrons. Therefore the sound velocities and the effective mass of the conduction electrons can be strongly affected by the spin system. Recent developments within these areas are also reviewed.

  19. High Performance High Temperature Thermoelectric Composites with Metallic Inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, James M. (Inventor); Bux, Sabah K. (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Ravi, Vilupanur A. (Inventor); Firdosy, Samad A. (Inventor); Star, Kurt (Inventor); Kaner, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention provides a composite thermoelectric material. The composite thermoelectric material can include a semiconductor material comprising a rare earth metal. The atomic percent of the rare earth metal in the semiconductor material can be at least about 20%. The composite thermoelectric material can further include a metal forming metallic inclusions distributed throughout the semiconductor material. The present invention also provides a method of forming this composite thermoelectric material.

  20. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  1. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  2. Synthesis, structures, and luminescent properties of sodium rare-earth metal(III) chloride oxotellurates(IV), Na{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 4} (Ln = Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, and Ho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Dorofeev, Sergey G.; Berdonosov, Peter S.; Dolgikh, Valery A. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Zitzer, Sabine; Greiner, Stefan; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Olenev, Andrei V. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Sine Theta Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-17

    Six sodium rare-earth metal(III) chloride oxotellurates(IV), Na{sub 2}Ln{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 4}, isostructural to Na{sub 2}Y{sub 3}Cl{sub 3}[TeO{sub 3}]{sub 4}, were synthesized by flux techniques and characterized by single-crystal XRD. The compounds crystallize in the monoclinic space group C2/c with lattice constants a = 23.967(1), b = 5.6342(3), c = 16.952(1) Aa, β = 134.456(5) for Ln = Sm, a = 23.932(2), b = 5.6044(5), c = 17.134(1) Aa, β = 135.151(6) for Ln = Eu, a = 23.928(1), b = 5.5928(1), c = 17.1133(8) Aa, β = 135.366(3) for Ln = Gd, a = 23.907(1), b = 5.569(3), c = 16.745(1) Aa, β = 134.205(3) for Ln = Tb, a = 23.870(1), b = 5.547(3), c = 16.665(1) Aa, β = 134.102(3) for Ln = Dy, and a = 23.814(1), b = 5.526(3), c = 16.626(1) Aa, β = 134.016(3) for Ln = Ho and Z = 4. Their crystal structure can be considered as a framework built of intergrowing Ln-O and Na-(O,Cl) slabs with channel walls decorated by tellurium atoms of [TeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} groups. The luminescent properties of the new compounds due to the Ln{sup 3+} cations are described and discussed. We also discuss the crystal chemistry of various alkali-metal rare-earth metal(III) halide oxochalcogenates(IV). (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

    1985-04-30

    A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

  4. Heat pumping using the thermal earth gradient to produce air conditioned and hot water with savings of up to 70%; Bombeo de calor utilizando el gradiente termico de la tierra para producir aire acondicionado y agua caliente con ahorros de hasta un 70%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Ramirez, Alejandro [Novaenergia de Mexico S.A. de C.V. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The pumping of heat using the Earth heat as partial energy source bases its principle on which the energy of the ground is constant and the energy efficiency to produce air conditioning and hot water simultaneously is important, obtaining savings up to 70%, comparing itself with the traditional equipment and what these operate of separated way to produce each one of them the cold air and the hot water. The use of this technology presents an opportunity to reduce the energy costs of and the demand of the company. [Spanish] El bombeo de calor utilizando el calor de la tierra como fuente parcial de energia basa su principio en que la energia del suelo es constante y el rendimiento energetico para producir simultaneamente aire acondicionado y agua caliente es importante, obteniendose ahorros hasta de un 70%, comparandose con los equipos tradicionales y que estos operan de manera separada para producir cada uno de ellos el aire frio y el agua caliente. El uso de esta tecnologia presenta una oportunidad para reducir los costos de energia y demanda de la empresa.

  5. Biohydrometallurgical methods for metals recovery from waste materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Willner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article draws attention to recently conducted research of bacterial leaching of metals from various polymetallic waste. These wastes are the carriers of valuable metals: base metals, precious and platinum group metals (e.g. electronic waste, spent catalysts or rare earth elements.

  6. Metal scarcity and sustainability, analyzing the necessity to reduce the extraction of scarce metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M. L C M; Driessen, P. P J; Worrell, E.

    2014-01-01

    There is debate whether or not further growth of metal extraction from the earth's crust will be sustainable in connection with geologic scarcity. Will future generations possibly face a depletion of specific metals? We study whether, for which metals and to what extent the extraction rate would

  7. Ab Initio Studies of Metal Hexaboride Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Kevin M.

    -terminations produce the lowest energies for di-cations of CaB6, SrB6 and BaB6, while tri-valent LaB6 minimizes its surface energy by arranging the metal ions in parallel rows on the surface. Studies involving hydrogen suggest that a single molecule per surface unit-cell is possible, and evidence is given for a dissociative adsorption pathway. Ternary mixtures of metal hexaborides containing two alkaline-earth cations in each crystal are also investigated with electronic structure methods. Multiple geometries are used to understand how spatial arrangements of cations within the mixture can affect properties related to stability. Bond-lengths within the boron framework are found to be heavily dependent upon the local cation environment, and energies taken at absolute zero suggest certain stoichiometries naturally lead to phase splitting.

  8. 19 CFR 19.22 - Withdrawal of metal refined in part from imported crude metal and in part from crude metal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal of metal refined in part from imported crude metal and in part from crude metal produced from imported materials. 19.22 Section 19.22 Customs... § 19.22 Withdrawal of metal refined in part from imported crude metal and in part from crude metal...

  9. Tidal variations of earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Parke, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The periodic variations of the earths' rotation resulting from the tidal deformation of the earth by the sun and moon were rederived including terms with amplitudes of 0.002 millisec and greater. The series applies to the mantle, crust, and oceans which rotate together for characteristic tidal periods; the scaling parameter is the ratio of the fraction of the Love number producing tidal variations in the moment of inertia of the coupled mantle and oceans (k) to the dimensionless polar moment of inertia of the coupled moments (C). The lunar laser ranging data shows that k/C at monthly and fortnightly frequencies equals 0.99 + or - 0.15 and 0.99 + or - 0.20 as compared to the theoretical value of 0.94 + or - 0.04.

  10. Theory of Rare-Earth Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    A mean-field random alloy theory combined with a simple calculation of the exchange interaction J(c,Q) is shown to quantitatively account for the phase diagrams for alloys of rare-earth metals with Y, Lu, Sc, and other rare-earth metals. A concentration-dependent J(c,Q) explains the empirical 2...... to account for all alloys except the Sc based. The exceptional behavior of the Sc alloys is due to a low density of states for Sc. A brief discussion is given of the effect on the mean-field results of changes in volume or c/a ratio and of critical fluctuations. Since the physical mechanisms of these ideal...

  11. Cosmic Dust and the Earth's Atmosphere (Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John M. C.

    2017-04-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s-1), and ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metallic vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke particles (MSPs)". MSPs are too small to sediment downwards and so are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 4 years to reach the surface. Smoke particles play a potentially important role as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere, where they also facilitate freezing of the clouds. There are also potential implications for climate, as the input of bio-available cosmic Fe in the Southern Ocean can increase biological productivity and stimulate CO2 drawdown from the atmosphere. However, current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust mass input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to over 200 tonnes per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there must be serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Furthermore, given this degree of uncertainty, the significance of these potential atmospheric impacts remains speculative. In this lecture I will describe the results of a large study designed to determine the size of the cosmic dust input rate using a self-consistent treatment of cosmic dust from the outer solar system to the Earth's surface. An astronomical model which tracks the evolution of dust from various sources into the inner solar system was combined with a

  12. Sensing Planet Earth - Chalmers' MOOCs on Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobiger, Thomas; Stöhr, Christian; Murtagh, Donal; Forkman, Peter; Galle, Bo; Mellquist, Johan; Soja, Maciej; Berg, Anders; Carvajal, Gisela; Eriksson, Leif; Haas, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    An increasing number of universities around the globe produce and conduct Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). In the beginning of 2016, Chalmers University of Technology ran two MOOCs on the topic of Earth observations on the edX platform. Both four week long courses were at introductory level and covered topics related to solid Earth, atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and cryosphere. It was discussed how one can measure and trace global change and use remote sensing tools for disaster monitoring. Research has attempted to assess the learners' motivations to participate in MOOCs, but there is a need for further case studies about motivations, opportunities and challenges for teachers engaging in MOOC development. In our presentation, we are going to report about the experiences gained from both the MOOC production and the actual course run from the instructors' perspective. After brief introduction to MOOCs in general and at Chalmers in particular, we share experiences and challenges of developing lecture and assessment material, the video production and coordination efforts between and within different actors involved in the production process. Further, we reflect upon the actual run of the course including course statistics and feedback from the learners. We discuss issues such as learner activation and engagement with the material, teacher-learner and student-student interaction as well as the scalability of different learning activities. Finally, we will present our lessons-learned and conclusions on the applicability of MOOCs in the field of Earth science teaching.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and chemical bonding analysis of the lithium alkaline-earth metal gallide nitrides Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Manisha; Bobnar, Matej; Ormeci, Alim; Hoehn, Peter [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Stoiber, Dominik; Niewa, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Ovchinnikov, Alexander [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Large single crystals of Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] up to several mm in size were grown from mixtures of the respective elements and binary alkaline-earth metal nitrides in reactive lithium melts employing a modified high-temperature centrifugation-aided filtration (HTCAF) technique. The main structural features of these isotypic phases are stella quadrangula building units [Ga{sub 4}]Li{sub 4/2} and octahedra (Nae{sub 6/2}), which form two independent interpenetrating networks. The phases crystallize in the η-carbide structure and represent diamagnetic small bandgap semiconductors. Real-space chemical bonding analysis indicates predominantly ionic bonding. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Earth and ocean modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezovich, F. M.

    1976-01-01

    A modular structured system of computer programs is presented utilizing earth and ocean dynamical data keyed to finitely defined parameters. The model is an assemblage of mathematical algorithms with an inherent capability of maturation with progressive improvements in observational data frequencies, accuracies and scopes. The Eom in its present state is a first-order approach to a geophysical model of the earth's dynamics.

  15. Introducing Earth's Orbital Eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Most students know that planetary orbits, including Earth's, are elliptical; that is Kepler's first law, and it is found in many science textbooks. But quite a few are mistaken about the details, thinking that the orbit is very eccentric, or that this effect is somehow responsible for the seasons. In fact, the Earth's orbital eccentricity is…

  16. Thinking the earth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Quentin Meillassoux's call for realism is a call for a new interest in the Earth as un-correlated being in philosophy. Unlike Meillassoux, Martin Heidegger has not been criticized for being a correlationist. To the contrary, his concept of the Earth has to be understood as un-correlated being, as it

  17. Semi-metallic polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubnova, Olga; Khan, Zia Ullah; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Polymers are lightweight, flexible, solution-processable materials that are promising for low-cost printed electronics as well as for mass-produced and large-area applications. Previous studies demonstrated that they can possess insulating, semiconducting or metallic properties; here we report th...... a Fermi glass to a semi-metal. The high Seebeck value, the metallic conductivity at room temperature and the absence of unpaired electron spins makes polymer semi-metals attractive for thermoelectrics and spintronics.......Polymers are lightweight, flexible, solution-processable materials that are promising for low-cost printed electronics as well as for mass-produced and large-area applications. Previous studies demonstrated that they can possess insulating, semiconducting or metallic properties; here we report...... that polymers can also be semi-metallic. Semi-metals, exemplified by bismuth, graphite and telluride alloys, have no energy bandgap and a very low density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, they typically have a higher Seebeck coefficient and lower thermal conductivities compared with metals, thus being...

  18. Transition-Metal Decorated Aluminum Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearer, Dayne F; Leary, Rowan K; Newell, Ryan; Yazdi, Sadegh; Robatjazi, Hossein; Zhang, Yue; Renard, David; Nordlander, Peter; Midgley, Paul A; Halas, Naomi J; Ringe, Emilie

    2017-10-24

    Recently, aluminum has been established as an earth-abundant alternative to gold and silver for plasmonic applications. Particularly, aluminum nanocrystals have shown to be promising plasmonic photocatalysts, especially when coupled with catalytic metals or oxides into "antenna-reactor" heterostructures. Here, a simple polyol synthesis is presented as a flexible route to produce aluminum nanocrystals decorated with eight varieties of size-tunable transition-metal nanoparticle islands, many of which have precedence as heterogeneous catalysts. High-resolution and three-dimensional structural analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography shows that abundant nanoparticle island decoration in the catalytically relevant few-nanometer size range can be achieved, with many islands spaced closely to their neighbors. When coupled with the Al nanocrystal plasmonic antenna, these small decorating islands will experience increased light absorption and strong hot-spot generation. This combination makes transition-metal decorated aluminum nanocrystals a promising material platform to develop plasmonic photocatalysis, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, and quantum plasmonics.

  19. Surface Disturbance Analysis in Rare Earth Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. K.; Yang, L.; Liu, Z. W.

    2017-02-01

    Mining ion-type rare-earth ore made the landscape and ecological environment degraded in mining area, and the tailing produced by rare-earth mining also led large areas land desertification, which resulted in surface temperature variations and significant differences in other types of mining disturbances. In order to analyse surface disturbance of rare-earth mining area, this paper applied the methods based on Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Temperature different Coefficient (TDC) as the ecological disturbance indicator, compared and validated their applicability in Lingbei rare-earth mining area of Southern China. The results illustrated that, compared to NDVI, the TDC which reflected the characteristic of rare-earth mining technology has better discrimination of disturbance, especially for in-situ leach mining area. The places of tailing and the in-situ leach mining plants were the most dramatic mining disturbance. They had the biggest TDC value, followed by orchards and farmlands, reclamation plants, they had relatively small disturbance. And the last was the plant with the smallest TDC value. TDC in rare-earth mining could better correspond to the level of surface ecological disturbance. Therefore, TDC as the indicator of ecological disturbance factor had better performance than NDVI in rare-earth mining area.

  20. Solid Earth: Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, R.

    1991-10-01

    The principles of the solid Earth program are introduced. When considering the study of solid Earth from space, satellites are used as beacons, inertial references, free fall probes and carrying platforms. The phenomenon measured by these satellites and the processes which can be studied as a result of these measurements are tabulated. The NASA solid Earth program focusses on research into surface kinematics, Earth rotation, land, ice, and ocean monitoring. The ESA solid Earth program identifies as its priority the Aristoteles mission for determining the gravity and magnetic field globally, with high spatial resolution and high accuracy. The Aristoteles mission characteristics and goals are listed. The benefits of the improved gravity information that will be provided by this mission are highlighted. This information will help in the following research: geodesy, orbit mechanics, geodynamics, oceanography, climate sea level, and the atmosphere.

  1. Hydrometallurgical method for recycling rare earth metals, cobalt, nickel, iron, and manganese from negative electrodes of spent Ni-MH mobile phone batteries; Metodo hidrometalurgico para reciclagem de metais terras raras, cobalto, niquel, ferro e manganes de eletrodos negativos de baterias exauridas de Ni-MH de telefone celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Vinicius Emmanuel de Oliveira dos; Lelis, Maria de Fatima Fontes; Freitas, Marcos Benedito Jose Geraldo de, E-mail: viniciusemmanuel@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Celante, Vinicius Guilherme [Instituto Federal do Espirito Santo (IFES), Aracruz, ES (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    A hydrometallurgical method for the recovery of rare earth metals, cobalt, nickel, iron, and manganese from the negative electrodes of spent Ni-MH mobile phone batteries was developed. The rare earth compounds were obtained by chemical precipitation at pH 1.5, with sodium cerium sulfate (NaCe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O) and lanthanum sulfate (La{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}.H{sub 2}O) as the major recovered components. Iron was recovered as Fe(OH){sub 3} and FeO. Manganese was obtained as Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}.The recovered Ni(OH){sub 2} and Co(OH){sub 2} were subsequently used to synthesize LiCoO{sub 2}, LiNiO{sub 2} and CoO, for use as cathodes in ion-Li batteries. The anodes and recycled materials were characterized by analytical techniques. (author)

  2. Metallic Hydrogen and Nano-Tube Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, John W.

    2004-01-01

    When hydrogen is subjected to enough pressure the atoms will be pressed into close enough proximity that each electron is no longer bound to a single proton. The research objectives is to find whether metallic hydrogen can be produced and once produced will the metallic hydrogen be metastable and remain in the metallic form when the pressure is released.

  3. Topography of Earth's Inner Core Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, V. F.; Zheng, Y.; Hernlund, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Lateral variations in the structure and crystallization of the inner core will likely be associated with lateral variations in the topography of its boundary. Depending on liquid fraction and the ratio of solid over liquid viscosity, the process of compaction of solids and expulsion of fluids at the solidifying boundary can be dynamically unstable, resulting in small-scale corrugations of the boundary of 0.1 to 5 km height with a horizontal scale on the order of 1 to 10 km. Evidence of such ICB topography has been inferred from waveforms of PKiKP doublets (1). An additional observation consistent ICB topography includes the seismic wave diffracted around the top of the inner core (PKP-Cdiff), whose travel time agrees with that predicted by the AK135 Earth model, but whose amplitude decays more rapidly into the inner core shadow than is predicted by AK135 (2). These observations are modeled by synthesizing seismic body waves with a pseudospectral method (3) having a densified grid in the vicinity of a rough ICB. Validation of the forward modeling includes a comparison of results obtained with a boundary element method. Modeled spectra of ICB topography are used to constrain the parameters and processes that produce the topography. These include compaction length (assuming freezing upward from below), the structure of precipitated piles (assuming metallic snow falling from above), the sedimentary processes due to flow in the overlying F-layer of the outer core, and the relaxation of topography from viscous deformation of the inner core. 1. Cao, A., Y. Masson, and B. Romanowicz, PNAS, 104, 31-35, 2007. 2. Zou, Z., K. Koper, and V.F. Cormier, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. doi: 10.1029/2007JB005316. 3. Furumura T., B.L.N. Kennett, and M. Furumura, Geophys. J. Int., 135, 845--860, 1998.

  4. Earth as art three

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  5. The Astrobiology of the Subsurface: Exploring Cave Habitats on Earth, Mars and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, Penelope Jane

    2016-01-01

    We are using the spectacular underground landscapes of Earth caves as models for the subsurfaces of other planets. Caves have been detected on the Moon and Mars and are strongly suspected for other bodies in the Solar System including some of the ice covered Ocean Worlds that orbit gas giant planets. The caves we explore and study include many extreme conditions of relevance to planetary astrobiology exploration including high and low temperatures, gas atmospheres poisonous to humans but where exotic microbes can flourish, highly acidic or salty fluids, heavy metals, and high background radiation levels. Some cave microorganisms eat their way through bedrock, some live in battery acid conditions, some produce unusual biominerals and rare cave formations, and many produce compounds of potential pharmaceutical and industrial significance. We study these unique lifeforms and the physical and chemical biosignatures that they leave behind. Such traces can be used to provide a "Field Guide to Unknown Organisms" for developing life detection space missions.

  6. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes over 180 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies.The talk will present an overview of current efforts in ESI, the role members of IEEE GRSS play, and discuss

  7. Method of CO and/or CO.sub.2 hydrogenation using doped mixed-metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A.; Haynes, Daniel J.; Abdelsayed, Victor; Smith, Mark W.; Spivey, James J.

    2015-10-06

    A method of hydrogenation utilizing a reactant gas mixture comprising a carbon oxide and a hydrogen agent, and a hydrogenation catalyst comprising a mixed-metal oxide containing metal sites supported and/or incorporated into the lattice. The mixed-metal oxide comprises a perovskite, a pyrochlore, a fluorite, a brownmillerite, or mixtures thereof doped at the A-site or the B-site. The metal site may comprise a deposited metal, where the deposited metal is a transition metal, an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, or mixtures thereof. Contact between the carbon oxide, hydrogen agent, and hydrogenation catalyst under appropriate conditions of temperature, pressure and gas flow rate generate a hydrogenation reaction and produce a hydrogenated product made up of carbon from the carbon oxide and some portion of the hydrogen agent. The carbon oxide may be CO, CO.sub.2, or mixtures thereof and the hydrogen agent may be H.sub.2. In a particular embodiment, the hydrogenated product comprises an alcohol, an olefin, an aldehyde, a ketone, an ester, an oxo-product, or mixtures thereof.

  8. Method of CO and/or CO.sub.2 hydrogenation to higher hydrocarbons using doped mixed-metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A.; Haynes, Daniel J.; Abdelsayed, Victor; Smith, Mark W.; Spivey, James J.

    2017-03-21

    A method of hydrogenation utilizing a reactant gas mixture comprising a carbon oxide and a hydrogen agent, and a hydrogenation catalyst comprising a mixed-metal oxide containing metal sites supported and/or incorporated into the lattice. The mixed-metal oxide comprises a pyrochlore, a brownmillerite, or mixtures thereof doped at the A-site or the B-site. The metal site may comprise a deposited metal, where the deposited metal is a transition metal, an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, or mixtures thereof. Contact between the carbon oxide, hydrogen agent, and hydrogenation catalyst under appropriate conditions of temperature, pressure and gas flow rate generate a hydrogenation reaction and produce a hydrogenated product made up of carbon from the carbon oxide and some portion of the hydrogen agent. The carbon oxide may be CO, CO.sub.2, or mixtures thereof and the hydrogen agent may be H.sub.2. In a particular embodiment, the hydrogenated product comprises olefins, paraffins, or mixtures thereof.

  9. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  10. Project Earth Science

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Project Earth Science: Astronomy, Revised 2nd Edition, involves students in activities that focus on Earth's position in our solar system. How do we measure astronomical distances? How can we look back in time as we gaze across vast distances in space? How would our planet be different without its particular atmosphere and distance to our star? What are the geometries among Earth, the Moon, and the Sun that yield lunar phases and seasons? Students explore these concepts and others in 11 teacher-tested activities.

  11. The Earth's Magnetic Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovsky, Eduard; Harinarayana, T; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    This volume combines review and solicited contributions, related to scientific studies of Division I of IAGA presented recently at its Scientific Assembly in Sopron in 2009. The book is aimed at intermediate to advanced readers dealing with the Earth's magnetic field generation, its historical records in rocks and geological formations - including links to geodynamics and magnetic dating, with magnetic carriers in earth materials, electromagnetic induction and conductivity studies of the Earth interior with environmental applications of rock magnetism and electromagnetism. The aim of the book

  12. Recovery of rare earths from spent NdFeB magnets of wind turbine: Leaching and kinetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Aarti; Sinha, Manish Kumar; Pramanik, Swati; Sahu, Sushanta Kumar

    2018-01-31

    Increasing demands of rare earth (RE) metals for advanced technological applications coupled with the scarcity of primary resources have led to the development of processes to treat secondary resources like scraps or end of life products that are often rich in such metals. Spent NdFeB magnet may serve as a potential source of rare earths containing around ∼30% of neodymium and other rare earths. In the present investigation, a pyro-hydrometallurgical process has been developed to recover rare earth elements (Nd, Pr and Dy) from the spent wind turbine magnet. The spent magnet is demagnetized and roasted at 1123 K to convert rare earths and iron to their respective oxides. Roasting of the magnet not only provides selectivity, but enhances the leaching efficiency also. The leaching of the roasted sample with 0.5 M hydrochloric acid at 368 K, 100 g/L pulp density and 500 rpm for 300 min selectively recovers the rare earth elements almost quantitatively leaving iron oxide in the residue. Leaching of rare earth elements with hydrochloric acid follows the mixed controlled kinetic model with activation energy (E a ) of 30.1 kJ/mol in the temperature range 348-368 K. The leaching mechanism is further established by characterizing the leach residues obtained at different time intervals by scanning electron microscopy- energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Individual rare earth elements from the leach solution containing 16.8 g/L of Nd, 3.8 g/L Pr, 0.28 g/L of Dy and other minor impurity elements could be separated by solvent extraction. However, mixed rare earth oxide of 99% purity was produced by oxalate precipitation followed by roasting. The leach residue comprising of pure hematite has a potential to be used as pigment or can find other applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Monel Metal Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1935-07-17

    foot is adequate. A refractory , open sand should be used. Melting and Casting: The alloys are successfully produced from electro-nickel and copper...desirable if the charge is not chiefly Monel Metal scrap. About 0.1% magnesium should be ;ell stirred into the melt in the ladle before pouring. The addition...such as is used for the more refractory valve trim alloys. Carboloy tools probably can be used to advantage for the high silicon Monel Metal alloys

  14. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  15. 3D Printing of Advanced Biocomposites on Earth and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Gentry, Diana M.; Micks, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Human exploration off planet is severely limited by the cost of launching materials into space and re-supply. Thus materials brought from earth must be light, stable and reliable at destination. Using traditional approaches a lunar or Mars base would require either transporting a hefty store of metals or heavy manufacturing equipment and construction materials for in situ extraction; both would severely limit any other mission objectives. Long-term human space presence requires periodic replenishment, adding a massive cost overhead. Even robotic missions often sacrifice science goals for heavy radiation and thermal protection. Biology has the potential to solve these problems because it can replicate and repair itself, and do a wide variety of chemical reactions including making food, fuel and materials. Synthetic biology can greatly enhance and expand life's evolved repertoire. Using natural and synthetically altered organisms as the feedstock for additive manufacturing could one day make possible the dream of producing bespoke tools, food, smart fabrics and even replacement organs on demand. To this end our lab has produced a proof-of-concept bioprinter with nearly one-cell resolution. Genetically engineering yeast cells to secrete bioproducts subsequent to printing allows the potential to make biomaterials with a fine microstructure. Imagine a production system that, at a few micron scale resolution, can add mollusk shell for compressive strength per unit mass, spider silk or collagen for tensile strength per unit mass, and potentially biologically-deposited wires. Now imagine what new products can be enabled by such a technology, on earth or beyond

  16. Dyeing fabrics with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, Georgia

    2002-06-01

    Traditionally, in textile dyeing, metals have been used as mordants or to improve the color produced by a natural or synthetic dye. In biomedical research and clinical diagnostics gold colloids are used as sensitive signals to detect the presence of pathogens. It has been observed that when metals are finely divided, a distinct color may result that is different from the color of the metal in bulk. For example, when gold is finely divided it may appear black, ruby or purple. This can be seen in biomedical research when gold colloids are reduced to micro-particles. Bright color signals are produced by few nanometer-sized particles. Dr. William Todd, a researcher in the Department of Veterinary Science at the Louisiana State University, developed a method of dyeing fabrics with metals. By using a reagent to bond the metal particles deep into the textile fibers and actually making the metal a part of the chemistry of the fiber. The chemicals of the fabric influence the resulting color. The combination of the element itself, the size of the particle, the chemical nature of the particle and the interaction of the metal with the chemistry of the fabric determine the actual hue. By using different elements, reagents, textiles and solvents a broad range of reproducible colors and tones can be created. Metals can also be combined into alloys, which will produce a variety of colors. The students of the ISCC chapter at the Fashion Institute of Technology dyed fabric using Dr. Todd's method and created a presentation of the results. They also did a demonstration of dyeing fabrics with metals.

  17. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and

  18. Harvesting Near Earth Asteroid Resources Using Solar Sail Technology

    OpenAIRE

    McInnes, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Near Earth asteroids represent a wealth of material resources to support future space ventures. These resources include water from C-type asteroids for crew logistic support; liquid propellants electrolytically cracked from water to fuel crewed vehicles and commercial platforms; and metals from M-type asteroids to support in-situ manufacturing. In this paper the role of solar sail technology will be investigated to support the future harvesting of near Earth asteroid resources. This will incl...

  19. Earliest life on earth

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Suzanne D

    2010-01-01

    This volume integrates the latest findings on earliest life forms, identified and characterized in some of the oldest rocks on Earth. It places emphasis on the integration of analytical methods with observational techniques and experimental simulations.

  20. Earth retaining structures manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-29

    The objectives of this policy are to obtain statewide uniformity, establish standard : procedures and delineate responsibility for the preparation and review of plans, : design and construction control of earth retaining structures. In addition, it i...