WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth hysteresis experiment

  1. Thermodynamic Analysis of Snowball Earth Hysteresis Experiment: Efficiency, Entropy Production, and Irreversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarini, Valerio; Fraedrich, Klaus; Lunkeit, Frank

    2010-05-01

    We present an extensive thermodynamic analysis of a hysteresis experiment performed on a simplified yet Earth-like climate model. We slowly vary the solar constant by 20% around the present value and detect that for a large range of values of the solar constant the realization of snowball or of regular climate conditions depends on the history of the system. Using recent results on the global climate thermodynamics, we show that the two regimes feature radically different properties. The efficiency of the climate machine monotonically increases with decreasing solar constant in present climate conditions, whereas the opposite takes place in snowball conditions. Instead, entropy production is monotonically increasing with the solar constant in both branches of climate conditions, and its value is about four times larger in the warm branch than in the corresponding cold state. Finally, the degree of irreversibility of the system, measured as the fraction of excess entropy production due to irreversible heat transport processes, is much higher in the warm climate conditions, with an explosive growth in the upper range of the considered values of solar constants. Whereas in the cold climate regime a dominating role is played by changes in the meridional albedo contrast, in the warm climate regime changes in the intensity of latent heat fluxes are crucial for determining the observed properties. This substantiates the importance of addressing correctly the variations of the hydrological cycle in a changing climate. An interpretation of the climate transitions at the tipping points based upon macro-scale thermodynamic properties is also proposed. Our results support the adoption of a new generation of diagnostic tools based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics for auditing climate model and outline a set of parameterizations to be used in conceptual and intermediate complexity models or for the reconstruction of the past climate conditions

  2. Hysteresis

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Setterfield

    2010-01-01

    Three competing conceptualizations of hysteresis in economics are identified: the unit/zero root approach, “true” hysteresis, and hysteresis conceived as a product of historical time. The properties of these conceptualizations are discussed and their pros and cons considered.

  3. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  4. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, indicates that there are more-than-two stable points in a given condition, and it has been considered to one of the most important topics in fundamental physics. Recently, the hysteresis of plasma has become a focus of research because stable plasma operation is very important for fusion reactors, bio-medical plasmas, and industrial plasmas for nano-device fabrication process. Interestingly, the bi-stability characteristics of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop have been observed in inductive discharge plasmas Because hysteresis study in such plasmas can provide a universal understanding of plasma physics, many researchers have attempted experimental and theoretical studies. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. This research was partially supported by Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science.

  5. A suite of user-friendly global climate models: Hysteresis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraedrich, K.

    2012-05-01

    A hierarchy of global spectral circulation models is introduced ranging from the shallow-water system via the primitive-equation dynamical core of the atmosphere to the Planet Simulator as a Global Climate Model (GCM) of Intermediate Complexity (MIC) which can be used to run climate and paleo-climate simulations for time scales up to ten thousand years or more in an acceptable real time. The priorities in development are set to speed, easy handling and portability with a modular structure suitable for problem-dependent configuration. Adaptions exist for the planetary atmospheres of Mars and of Saturn's moon Titan and are being extended. Common coupling interfaces enable the addition of ocean, ice, vegetation models and more. An interactive mode with a Model Starter and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) is available to select a configuration from the available model suite, to set its parameters and inspect atmospheric fields while changing the models' parameters on the fly. This is especially useful for teaching, debugging and tuning of parameterizations. An updated overview of the model suite's features is presented based on the Earth-like climate model Planet Simulator with mixed-layer ocean introducing static and memory hysteresis in terms of a parameter sweep of the solar constant and CO2 concentrations. The static hysteresis experiment demonstrates that the solar constant varying by 20% reveals warm and snowball Earth climate regimes depending on the history of the system. This hysteresis subjected to a thermodynamic analysis shows the following features: i) Both climate regimes are characterized by global mean surface temperature and entropy growing with increasing solar constant. ii) The climate system's efficiency decreases (increases) with increasing solar constant in present-day warm (snowball) climate conditions. iii) Climate transitions near bifurcation points are characterized by high efficiency associated with the system's large distance from the stable

  6. Saturation and hysteresis effects in ionospheric modification experiments observed by the CUTLASS and EISCAT radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Wright

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of high latitude ionospheric modification experiments utilising the EISCAT heating facility at Tromsø are presented. As a result of the interaction between the high power pump waves and upper hybrid waves in the ionosphere, field-aligned electron density irregularities are artificially excited. Observations of these structures with the CUTLASS coherent HF radars and the EISCAT incoherent UHF radar exhibit hysteresis effects as the heater output power is varied. These are explained in terms of the two-stage mechanism which leads to the growth of the irregularities. Experiments which involve preconditioning of the ionosphere also indicate that hysteresis could be exploited to maximise the intensity of the field-aligned irregularities, especially where the available heater power is limited.

    In addition, the saturation of the irregularity amplitude is considered. Although, the rate of irregularity growth becomes less rapid at high heater powers it does not seem to fully saturate, indicating that the amplification would continue beyond the capabilities of the Tromsø heater - currently the most powerful of its kind. It is shown that the CUTLASS radars are sensitive to irregularities produced by very low heater powers (effective radiated powers <4 MW. This fact is discussed from the perspective of a new heating facility, SPEAR, located on Spitzbergen and capable of transmitting high frequency radio waves with an effective radiated power ~10% of that of the Tromsø heater (28MW.

  7. Saturation and hysteresis effects in ionospheric modification experiments observed by the CUTLASS and EISCAT radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. M.; Davies, J. A.; Yeoman, T. K.; Robinson, T. R.; Shergill, H.

    2006-03-01

    The results of high latitude ionospheric modification experiments utilising the EISCAT heating facility at Tromsø are presented. As a result of the interaction between the high power pump waves and upper hybrid waves in the ionosphere, field-aligned electron density irregularities are artificially excited. Observations of these structures with the CUTLASS coherent HF radars and the EISCAT incoherent UHF radar exhibit hysteresis effects as the heater output power is varied. These are explained in terms of the two-stage mechanism which leads to the growth of the irregularities. Experiments which involve preconditioning of the ionosphere also indicate that hysteresis could be exploited to maximise the intensity of the field-aligned irregularities, especially where the available heater power is limited. In addition, the saturation of the irregularity amplitude is considered. Although, the rate of irregularity growth becomes less rapid at high heater powers it does not seem to fully saturate, indicating that the amplification would continue beyond the capabilities of the Tromsø heater - currently the most powerful of its kind. It is shown that the CUTLASS radars are sensitive to irregularities produced by very low heater powers (effective radiated powers <4 MW). This fact is discussed from the perspective of a new heating facility, SPEAR, located on Spitzbergen and capable of transmitting high frequency radio waves with an effective radiated power ~10% of that of the Tromsø heater (28MW).

  8. ``An Earth-Shaking Experience''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach, Joel

    2005-03-01

    Last month's annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco drew an estimated 11,000 scientists, teachers, journalists and geophysics groupies. The schedule of talks could be found in a bound volume as thick as a phone book. You never see a geophysicist in ordinary life, but apparently the world is crawling with them. They came to talk about everything from the ozone layer to the big wad of iron at the center of the Earth. Also about other planets. And magnetic fields. Solar wind. Water on Mars. To be at this convention was to be immersed to the eyebrows in scientific knowledge. It is intellectually fashionable to fetishize the unknown, but at AGU, a person will get the opposite feeling-that science is a voracious, relentless and tireless enterprise, and that soon there may not remain on this Earth an unturned stone.

  9. Earth Observations: Experiences from Various Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja Bye, Bente

    2015-04-01

    With Earth observations and the Group of Earth Observations as the common thread, a variety of communication strategies have been applied showcasing the use of Earth observations in geosciences such as climate change, natural hazards, hydrology and more. Based on the experiences from these communication strategies, using communication channels ranging from popular articles in established media, video production, event-based material and social media, lessons have been learned both with respect to the need of capacity, skills, networks, and resources. In general it is not difficult to mobilize geoscientists willing to spend some time on outreach activities. Time for preparing and training is however scarce among scientists. In addition, resources to cover the various aspects of professional science outreach is far from abundant. Among the challenges is the connection between the scientific networks and media channels. Social media competence and capacity are also issues that needs to be addressed more explicitly and efficiently. An overview of the experiences from several types of outreach activities will be given along with some input on possible steps towards improved communication strategies. Steady development of science communication strategies continuously integrating trainging of scientists in use of new outreach tools such as web technology and social innovations for more efficient use of limited resources will remain an issue for the scientific community.

  10. The Earth's velocity for direct detection experiments

    CERN Document Server

    McCabe, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The Earth's velocity relative to the Sun in galactic coordinates is required in the rate calculation for direct detection experiments. We provide a rigorous derivation of this quantity to first order in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit. We also discuss the effect of the precession of the equinoxes, which has previously been ignored. Comparing with other expressions in the literature, we confirm that the expression of Lee, Lisanti and Safdi is correct, while the expression of Lewin and Smith, the de facto standard expression, contains an error. For calculations of the absolute event rate, the leading order expression is sufficient while for modulation searches, an expression with the eccentricity is required for accurate predictions of the modulation phase.

  11. Parity Violation Experiments with Rare Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry

    1997-10-01

    Since the first suggestions (V. A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and I. B. Khriplovich, Z. Phys. D1, 243 (1986).), (A. Gongora and P. G. H. Sandars, J. Phys. B 19, L291 (1986).) to search for parity violation in the rare earth atoms, experiments have been carried out by groups in Novosibirsk, Oxford, Hiroshima and Berkeley with Sm, Yb and Dy. The status of these experiments will be reviewed, with some details given on recent Berkeley Dy results ( A.-T. Nguyen, D. Budker, D. DeMille, and M. Zolotorev, Submitted to Phys. Rev. A.). Progress of the Berkeley Yb experiment ( D. DeMille, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4165 (1995).), ( C.J. Bowers, D. Budker, E.D. Commins, D. DeMille, S.J. Freedman, A.-T. Nguyen, S.-Q. Shang, and M. Zolotorev, Phys. Rev. A 53, 3103-9(1996). ) will be described elsewhere at this meeting by C. J. Bowers et al.

  12. Virtual synchrotron experiments for deep Earth studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. M.; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, J.; Alatas, A.; Sturhahn, W.

    2011-12-01

    National facilities offer one-of-a-kind opportunities to apply state-of-the-art experimental techniques to the pressing scientific problems of today. Yet, few students are able to experience research projects at national facilities due to limited accessibility caused in part by limited involvement in the local academic institution, constrained working areas at the experimental stations, and/or travel costs. We present a virtual and remote beam-line for deep Earth mineral physics studies using nuclear resonant and inelastic x-ray scattering methods at Sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Off-site students have the capability of controlling their measurements via secure internet connections and webcams. Students can access a 'view only mode' for ease of interaction and safety-control. More experienced users have exclusive control of the experiment and can remotely change variables within the experimental setup.

  13. Mathematical models of hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The ongoing research has largely been focused on the development of mathematical models of hysteretic nonlinearities with nonlocal memories. The distinct feature of these nonlinearities is that their current states depend on past histories of input variations. It turns out that memories of hysteretic nonlinearities are quite selective. Indeed, experiments show that only some past input extrema (not the entire input variations) leave their marks upon future states of hysteretic nonlinearities. Thus special mathematical tools are needed in order to describe nonlocal selective memories of hysteretic nonlinearities. The origin of such tools can be traced back to the landmark paper of Preisach. Their research has been primarily concerned with Preisach-type models of hysteresis. All these models have a common generic feature; they are constructed as superpositions of simplest hysteretic nonlinearities-rectangular loops. During the past four years, the study has been by and large centered around the following topics: (1) further development of Scalar and vector Preisach-type models of hysteresis; (2) experimental testing of Preisach-type models of hysteresis; (3) development of new models for viscosity (aftereffect) in hysteretic systems; (4) development of mathematical models for superconducting hysteresis in the case of gradual resistive transitions; (5) software implementation of Preisach-type models of hysteresis; and (6) development of new ideas which have emerged in the course of the research work. The author briefly describes the main scientific results obtained in the areas outlined above.

  14. Cosmic Hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Sayantan

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological hysteresis, has interesting and vivid implications in the scenario of a cyclic bouncy universe. This, purely thermodynamical in nature, is caused by the asymmetry in the equation of state parameter during expansion and contraction phase of the universe, due to the presence of a single scalar field. When applied to variants of modified gravity models this phenomenon leads to the increase in amplitude of the consecutive cycles of the universe, provided we have physical mechanisms to make the universe bounce and turnaround. This also shows that the conditions which creates a universe with an ever increasing expansion, depend on the signature of $\\oint pdV$ and on model parameters.

  15. Developing Authentic Research Experiences Using EarthScope Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Wallace, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    EarthScope, a decade-long experiment to understand the formation, structure, and evolution of the North American continent, will carry-out active investigations in nearly every county in the US. The excitement of a huge science experiment in one's own backyard piques interest, but teachers need resources and professional development experiences to capitalize upon this excitement and create opportunities for their students' learning. The EarthScope Education and Outreach Network will provide the interface to make EarthScope science, and the advanced technology and modern approaches used to understand Earth, relevant and beneficial to K-16 educators vested in advancing Earth science education. Three obstacles must be overcome for success in carrying out authentic EarthScope research in the classroom. First, scientists and teachers must work together to identify relevant and developmentally appropriate research questions for the target audience. Second, teachers will need professional development experiences that engage them in authentic research and that provide support for introducing a similar research experience in their own classroom. Third, the outcome of the research experience must have value to the scientist, teacher and student to motivate sustained participation by all. The dense array of seismometers being deployed in the USArray component of EarthScope will permit students and the public to see first-hand Earth's dynamic response to both human and natural events in their hometown and around the country. Targeted local experiments will make EarthScope's scientific investigations and discoveries relevant for educational efforts on a region-by-region basis. Combining the real-time seismic data streams from USArray with data and instrumentation from the growing US Educational Seismic Network (USESN) opens up endless possibilities for student-centered research. In this paper, I will discuss the lessons learned from eight years of leading a high school

  16. The magnetization process: Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamel, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The magnetization process, hysteresis (the difference in the path of magnetization for an increasing and decreasing magnetic field), hysteresis loops, and hard magnetic materials are discussed. The fabrication of classroom projects for demonstrating hysteresis and the hysteresis of common magnetic materials is described in detail.

  17. Earth Sciences Requirements for the Information Sciences Experiment System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, David E. (Editor); Katzberg, Steve J. (Editor); Wilson, R. Gale (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to further explore and define the earth sciences requirements for the Information Sciences Experiment System (ISES), a proposed onboard data processor with real-time communications capability intended to support the Earth Observing System (Eos). A review of representative Eos instrument types is given and a preliminary set of real-time data needs has been established. An executive summary is included.

  18. Modeling of hysteresis in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J; Qin, K R; Xiang, C; Lee, T H

    2012-08-01

    Hysteresis, observed in many gene regulatory networks, has a pivotal impact on biological systems, which enhances the robustness of cell functions. In this paper, a general model is proposed to describe the hysteretic gene regulatory network by combining the hysteresis component and the transient dynamics. The Bouc-Wen hysteresis model is modified to describe the hysteresis component in the mammalian gene regulatory networks. Rigorous mathematical analysis on the dynamical properties of the model is presented to ensure the bounded-input-bounded-output (BIBO) stability and demonstrates that the original Bouc-Wen model can only generate a clockwise hysteresis loop while the modified model can describe both clockwise and counter clockwise hysteresis loops. Simulation studies have shown that the hysteresis loops from our model are consistent with the experimental observations in three mammalian gene regulatory networks and two E.coli gene regulatory networks, which demonstrate the ability and accuracy of the mathematical model to emulate natural gene expression behavior with hysteresis. A comparison study has also been conducted to show that this model fits the experiment data significantly better than previous ones in the literature. The successful modeling of the hysteresis in all the five hysteretic gene regulatory networks suggests that the new model has the potential to be a unified framework for modeling hysteresis in gene regulatory networks and provide better understanding of the general mechanism that drives the hysteretic function.

  19. An experience of science theatre: Earth Science for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Gemma; Lanza, Tiziana; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    The present paper describes an experience of science theatre addressed to children of primary and secondary school, with the main purpose of explaining the Earth interior while raising awareness about natural hazard. We conducted the experience with the help of a theatrical company specialized in shows for children. Several performances have been reiterated in different context, giving us the opportunity of conducting a preliminary survey with public of different ages, even if the show was conceived for children. Results suggest that science theatre while relying on creativity and emotional learning in transmitting knowledge about the Earth and its hazard has the potential to induce in children a positive attitude towards the risks

  20. The Earth Is Flat when Personally Significant Experiences with the Sphericity of the Earth Are Absent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Participants with personal and without personal experiences with the Earth as a sphere estimated large-scale distances between six cities located on different continents. Cognitive distances were submitted to a specific multidimensional scaling algorithm in the 3D Euclidean space with the constraint that all cities had to lie on the same sphere. A…

  1. The Earth Is Flat when Personally Significant Experiences with the Sphericity of the Earth Are Absent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2010-01-01

    Participants with personal and without personal experiences with the Earth as a sphere estimated large-scale distances between six cities located on different continents. Cognitive distances were submitted to a specific multidimensional scaling algorithm in the 3D Euclidean space with the constraint that all cities had to lie on the same sphere. A…

  2. Hysteresis in the phase transition of chocolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ruilong; Lu, Qunfeng; Lin, Sihua; Dong, Xiaoyan; Fu, Hao; Wu, Shaoyi; Wu, Minghe; Teng, Baohua

    2016-01-01

    We designed an experiment to reproduce the hysteresis phenomenon of chocolate appearing in the heating and cooling process, and then established a model to relate the solidification degree to the order parameter. Based on the Landau-Devonshire theory, our model gave a description of the hysteresis phenomenon in chocolate, which lays the foundations for the study of the phase transition behavior of chocolate.

  3. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  4. A NEW HYSTERESIS COMPENSATION METHOD FOR LOAD CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuZijian; ChenRenwen

    2002-01-01

    A new hysteresis compensation method is presented.After analyzing the characteristics of strain-gage based load cells under loading & unloading conditions, mathe-matical models are established.A solution to compensate the hysteresis of the load cell by the experiments.It is shown that the method is reliable and can effectively re-duce the hysteresis.

  5. Contact angle hysteresis explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-07-04

    A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

  6. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  7. Large magnetocaloric effect and near-zero thermal hysteresis in the rare earth intermetallic Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuyang; Tian, Fanghua; Chang, Tieyan; Chen, Kaiyun; Yang, Sen; Cao, Kaiyan; Zhou, Chao; Song, Xiaoping

    2017-02-01

    We report the magnetocaloric effect in a Tb1-x Dy x Co2 compound which exhibits a wide working temperature window around the Curie temperature (T C) and delivers a large refrigerant capacity (RC) with near-zero thermal hysteresis. Specifically, the wide full width at half maxima ({δ\\text{WFHM}} ) can reach up to 62 K and the RC value changes from 216.5 to 274.3 J Kg-1 when the external magnetic field increases to 5 T. Such magnetocaloric effects are attributed to a magnetic and structural transition from a paramagnetic and cubic phase to a ferromagnetic (M S along [1 1 1] direction) and rhombohedral phase or ferromagnetic (M S along [0 0 1] direction) and tetragonal phase.

  8. Hysteresis in a quantized superfluid 'atomtronic' circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Stephen; Lee, Jeffrey G; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Murray, Noel; Clark, Charles W; Lobb, Christopher J; Phillips, William D; Edwards, Mark; Campbell, Gretchen K

    2014-02-13

    Atomtronics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that seeks to develop new functional methods by creating devices and circuits where ultracold atoms, often superfluids, have a role analogous to that of electrons in electronics. Hysteresis is widely used in electronic circuits-it is routinely observed in superconducting circuits and is essential in radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices. Furthermore, it is as fundamental to superfluidity (and superconductivity) as quantized persistent currents, critical velocity and Josephson effects. Nevertheless, despite multiple theoretical predictions, hysteresis has not been previously observed in any superfluid, atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. Here we directly detect hysteresis between quantized circulation states in an atomtronic circuit formed from a ring of superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate obstructed by a rotating weak link (a region of low atomic density). This contrasts with previous experiments on superfluid liquid helium where hysteresis was observed directly in systems in which the quantization of flow could not be observed, and indirectly in systems that showed quantized flow. Our techniques allow us to tune the size of the hysteresis loop and to consider the fundamental excitations that accompany hysteresis. The results suggest that the relevant excitations involved in hysteresis are vortices, and indicate that dissipation has an important role in the dynamics. Controlled hysteresis in atomtronic circuits may prove to be a crucial feature for the development of practical devices, just as it has in electronic circuits such as memories, digital noise filters (for example Schmitt triggers) and magnetometers (for example superconducting quantum interference devices).

  9. Does Unemployment Hysteresis Equal Employment Hysteresis?

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavsson, Magnus; Österholm, Pär

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates if conclusions regarding labour market hysteresis differ depending on whether employment or unemployment rates are studied. Applying a range of unit-root tests to monthly data from Australia, Austria, Canada, Finland, Sweden, the U.K. and the U.S., we find results for employment rates that contrast those based on unemployment rates. In particular, rather than the mixed evidence for hysteresis found using unemployment rates, employment rates result in unequivocal eviden...

  10. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  11. Little Earth Experiment: an instrument to model planetary cores

    CERN Document Server

    Aujogue, Kelig; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  12. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  13. The Earth's velocity for direct detection experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.mccabe@durham.ac.uk [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    The Earth's velocity relative to the Sun in galactic coordinates is required in the rate calculation for direct detection experiments. We provide a rigorous derivation of this quantity to first order in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit. We also discuss the effect of the precession of the equinoxes, which has hitherto received little explicit discussion. Comparing with other expressions in the literature, we confirm that the expression of Lee, Lisanti and Safdi is correct, while the expression of Lewin and Smith, the de facto standard expression, contains an error. For calculations of the absolute event rate, the leading order expression is sufficient while for modulation searches, an expression with the eccentricity is required for accurate predictions of the modulation phase.

  14. Dual-domain mass-transfer parameters from electrical hysteresis: theory and analytical approach applied to laboratory, synthetic streambed, and groundwater experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Ong, John B.; Harvey, Judson W.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Models of dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) are used to explain anomalous aquifer transport behavior such as the slow release of contamination and solute tracer tailing. Traditional tracer experiments to characterize DDMT are performed at the flow path scale (meters), which inherently incorporates heterogeneous exchange processes; hence, estimated “effective” parameters are sensitive to experimental design (i.e., duration and injection velocity). Recently, electrical geophysical methods have been used to aid in the inference of DDMT parameters because, unlike traditional fluid sampling, electrical methods can directly sense less-mobile solute dynamics and can target specific points along subsurface flow paths. Here we propose an analytical framework for graphical parameter inference based on a simple petrophysical model explaining the hysteretic relation between measurements of bulk and fluid conductivity arising in the presence of DDMT at the local scale. Analysis is graphical and involves visual inspection of hysteresis patterns to (1) determine the size of paired mobile and less-mobile porosities and (2) identify the exchange rate coefficient through simple curve fitting. We demonstrate the approach using laboratory column experimental data, synthetic streambed experimental data, and field tracer-test data. Results from the analytical approach compare favorably with results from calibration of numerical models and also independent measurements of mobile and less-mobile porosity. We show that localized electrical hysteresis patterns resulting from diffusive exchange are independent of injection velocity, indicating that repeatable parameters can be extracted under varied experimental designs, and these parameters represent the true intrinsic properties of specific volumes of porous media of aquifers and hyporheic zones.

  15. Delivery of extraterrestrial amino acids to the primitive Earth. Exposure experiments in Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, B; Bertrand, M; Boillot, F; Chabin, A; Chaput, D; Henin, O; Brack, A

    1998-06-01

    A large collection of micrometeorites has been recently extracted from Antarctic old blue ice. In the 50 to 100 micrometers size range, the carbonaceous micrometeorites represent 80% of the samples and contain 2% of carbon. They might have brought more carbon to the surface of the primitive Earth than that involved in the present surficial biomass. Amino acids such as "-amino isobutyric acid have been identified in these Antarctic micrometeorites. Enantiomeric excesses of L-amino acids have been detected in the Murchison meteorite. A large fraction of homochiral amino acids might have been delivered to the primitive Earth via meteorites and micrometeorites. Space technology in Earth orbit offers a unique opportunity to study the behaviour of amino acids required for the development of primitive life when they are exposed to space conditions, either free or associated with tiny mineral grains mimicking the micrometeorites. Our objectives are to demonstrate that porous mineral material protects amino acids in space from photolysis and racemization (the conversion of L-amino acids into a mixture of L- and D-molecules) and to test whether photosensitive amino acids derivatives can polymerize in mineral grains under space conditions. The results obtained in BIOPAN-1 and BIOPAN-2 exposure experiments on board unmanned satellite FOTON are presented.

  16. Results of the Compensated Earth-Moon-Earth Retroreflector Laser Link (CEMERLL) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K. E.; Leatherman, P. R.; Cleis, R.; Spinhirne, J.; Fugate, R. Q.

    1997-07-01

    Adaptive optics techniques can be used to realize a robust low bit-error-rate link by mitigating the atmosphere-induced signal fades in optical communications links between ground-based transmitters and deep-space probes. Phase I of the Compensated Earth-Moon-Earth Retroreflector Laser Link (CEMERLL) experiment demonstrated the first propagation of an atmosphere-compensated laser beam to the lunar retroreflectors. A 1.06-μ_m Nd:YAG laser beam was propagated through the full aperture of the 1.5-m telescope at the Starfire Optical Range (SOR), Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, to the Apollo 15 retroreflector array at Hadley Rille. Laser guide-star adaptive optics were used to compensate turbulence-induced aberrations across the transmitter's 1.5-m aperture. A 3.5-m telescope, also located at the SOR, was used as a receiver for detecting the return signals. JPL-supplied Chebyshev polynomials of the retroreflector locations were used to develop tracking algorithms for the telescopes. At times we observed in excess of 100 photons returned from a single pulse when the outgoing beam from the 1.5-m telescope was corrected by the adaptive optics system. No returns were detected when the outgoing beam was uncompensated. The experiment was conducted from March through September 1994, during the first or last quarter of the Moon.

  17. Preisach modeling of magnetostrictive hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adly, A.A.; Mayergoyz, I.D. (Electrical Engineering Department and Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (USA)); Bergqvist, A. (Electric Power Research Centre, The Royal Institute of Technology, 10044 Stockholm, (Sweden))

    1991-04-15

    Preisach-type models are suggested for the description of strain hysteresis of magnetostrictive materials. It is pointed out that the strain hysteresis has some peculiar properties in comparison with magnetic hysteresis. These peculiarities of strain hysteresis are discussed in detail along with the identification problem for these models.

  18. Experiences & Tools from Modeling Instruction Applied to Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenec, J.; Landis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Framework for K-12 Science Education calls for stronger curricular connections within the sciences, greater depth in understanding, and tasks higher on Bloom's Taxonomy. Understanding atmospheric sciences draws on core knowledge traditionally taught in physics, chemistry, and in some cases, biology. If this core knowledge is not conceptually sound, well retained, and transferable to new settings, understanding the causes and consequences of climate changes become a task in memorizing seemingly disparate facts to a student. Fortunately, experiences and conceptual tools have been developed and refined in the nationwide network of Physics Modeling and Chemistry Modeling teachers to build necessary understanding of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, particulate nature of matter, kinetic molecular theory, and particle model of light. Context-rich experiences are first introduced for students to construct an understanding of these principles and then conceptual tools are deployed for students to resolve misconceptions and deepen their understanding. Using these experiences and conceptual tools takes an investment of instructional time, teacher training, and in some cases, re-envisioning the format of a science classroom. There are few financial barriers to implementation and students gain a greater understanding of the nature of science by going through successive cycles of investigation and refinement of their thinking. This presentation shows how these experiences and tools could be used in an Earth Science course to support students developing conceptually rich understanding of the atmosphere and connections happening within.

  19. Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Alberto; Schimmele, Lothar; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-01-19

    Wetting of actual surfaces involves diverse hysteretic phenomena stemming from ever-present imperfections. Here, we clarify the origin of wetting hysteresis for a liquid front advancing or receding across an isolated defect of nanometric size. Various kinds of chemical and topographical nanodefects, which represent salient features of actual heterogeneous surfaces, are investigated. The most probable wetting path across surface heterogeneities is identified by combining, within an innovative approach, microscopic classical density functional theory and the string method devised for the study of rare events. The computed rugged free-energy landscape demonstrates that hysteresis emerges as a consequence of metastable pinning of the liquid front at the defects; the barriers for thermally activated defect crossing, the pinning force, and hysteresis are quantified and related to the geometry and chemistry of the defects allowing for the occurrence of nanoscopic effects. The main result of our calculations is that even weak nanoscale defects, which are difficult to characterize in generic microfluidic experiments, can be the source of a plethora of hysteretical phenomena, including the pinning of nanobubbles.

  20. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  1. Load-Dependent Friction Hysteresis on Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Egberts, Philip; Han, Gang Hee; Johnson, A T Charlie; Carpick, Robert W; Martini, Ashlie

    2016-05-24

    Nanoscale friction often exhibits hysteresis when load is increased (loading) and then decreased (unloading) and is manifested as larger friction measured during unloading compared to loading for a given load. In this work, the origins of load-dependent friction hysteresis were explored through atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments of a silicon tip sliding on chemical vapor deposited graphene in air, and molecular dynamics simulations of a model AFM tip on graphene, mimicking both vacuum and humid air environmental conditions. It was found that only simulations with water at the tip-graphene contact reproduced the experimentally observed hysteresis. The mechanisms underlying this friction hysteresis were then investigated in the simulations by varying the graphene-water interaction strength. The size of the water-graphene interface exhibited hysteresis trends consistent with the friction, while measures of other previously proposed mechanisms, such as out-of-plane deformation of the graphene film and irreversible reorganization of the water molecules at the shearing interface, were less correlated to the friction hysteresis. The relationship between the size of the sliding interface and friction observed in the simulations was explained in terms of the varying contact angles in front of and behind the sliding tip, which were larger during loading than unloading.

  2. The Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobowitz, H.; Soule, H. V.; Kyle, H. L.; House, F. B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of ERB observational systems is traced from its beginnings in the late 1950's through to the current ERB on the Nimbus 7 satellite. The instruments comprising the current 22-channel ERB experiment are described in some detail. Noteworthy are the inclusion in one solar channel, of a self-calibrating cavity to measure the solar constant and the use of biaxial scanning telescopes to determine the angular reflection and emission model required for processing the narrow-angle radiometric data. A fairly detailed description of the prelaunch and in-flight calibrations is given along with an analysis of the radiometric performance of the instruments. The data processing system is traced with the aid of a schematic flow diagram showing the steps required to produce the many tape and microfilm products archived. Future plans for improving the quality and accuracy of the data products are discussed. Finally, the upcoming Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is briefly mentioned. It will be capable of simultaneously measuring the radiation budget from three satellites, each having a different equator crossing time and angle.

  3. The earth radiation budget experiment: Early validation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. Louis; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consists of radiometers on a dedicated spacecraft in a 57° inclination orbit, which has a precessional period of 2 months, and on two NOAA operational meteorological spacecraft in near polar orbits. The radiometers include scanning narrow field-of-view (FOV) and nadir-looking wide and medium FOV radiometers covering the ranges 0.2 to 5 μm and 5 to 50 μm and a solar monitoring channel. This paper describes the validation procedures and preliminary results. Each of the radiometer channels underwent extensive ground calibration, and the instrument packages include in-flight calibration facilities which, to date, show negligible changes of the instruments in orbit, except for gradual degradation of the suprasil dome of the shortwave wide FOV (about 4% per year). Measurements of the solar constant by the solar monitors, wide FOV, and medium FOV radiometers of two spacecraft agree to a fraction of a percent. Intercomparisons of the wide and medium FOV radiometers with the scanning radiometers show agreement of 1 to 4%. The multiple ERBE satellites are acquiring the first global measurements of regional scale diurnal variations in the Earth's radiation budget. These diurnal variations are verified by comparison with high temporal resolution geostationary satellite data. Other principal investigators of the ERBE Science Team are: R. Cess, SUNY, Stoneybrook; J. Coakley, NCAR; C. Duncan, M. King and A Mecherikunnel, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA; A. Gruber and A.J. Miller, NOAA; D. Hartmann, U. Washington; F.B. House, Drexel U.; F.O. Huck, Langley Research Center, NASA; G. Hunt, Imperial College, London U.; R. Kandel and A. Berroir, Laboratory of Dynamic Meteorology, Ecole Polytechique; V. Ramanathan, U. Chicago; E. Raschke, U. of Cologne; W.L. Smith, U. of Wisconsin and T.H. Vonder Haar, Colorado State U.

  4. Understanding Unemployment Hysteresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels Framroze

    What explains the persistence of unemployment? The literature on hysteresis, which is based on unit root testing in autoregressive models, consists of a vast number of univariate studies, i.e. that analyze unemployment series in isolation, but few multivariate analyses that focus on the sources...... of hysteresis. As a result, this question remains largely unanswered. This paper presents a multivariate econometric framework for analyzing hysteresis, which allows one to test different hypotheses about non-stationarity of unemployment against one another. For example, whether this is due to a persistently...... to UK quarterly data on prices, wages, output, unemployment and crude oil prices, suggests that, for the period 1988 up to the onset of the …financial crisis, the non-stationarity of UK unemployment cannot be explained as a result of slow adjustment, including sluggish wage formation as emphasized...

  5. Addressing Earth Science Data Access Challenges through User Experience Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, S. N.; Banks, B.; Kendall, J.; Lee, C. M.; Irwin, D.; Toll, D. L.; Searby, N. D.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Capacity Building Program (Earth Science Division, Applied Sciences Program) works to enhance end-user capabilities to employ Earth observation and Earth science (EO/ES) data in decision-making. Open data access and user-tailored data delivery strategies are critical elements towards this end. User Experience (UX) and User Interface (UI) research methods can offer important contributions towards addressing data access challenges, particularly at the interface of science application/product development and product transition to end-users. This presentation focuses on developing nation contexts and describes methods, results, and lessons learned from two recent UX/UI efforts conducted in collaboration with NASA: the SERVIRglobal.net redesign project and the U.S. Water Partnership (USWP) Portal development effort. SERVIR, a collaborative venture among NASA, USAID, and global partners, seeks to improve environmental management and climate change response by helping governments and other stakeholders integrate EO and geospatial technologies into decision-making. The USWP, a collaboration among U.S. public and private sectors, harnesses U.S.-based resources and expertise to address water challenges in developing nations. SERVIR's study, conducted from 2010-2012, assessed and tested user needs, preferences, and online experiences to generate a more user-friendly online data portal at SERVIRglobal.net. The portal provides a central access interface to data and products from SERVIR's network of hubs in East Africa, the Hindu Kush Himalayas, and Mesoamerica. The second study, conducted by the USWP Secretariat and funded by the U.S. Department of State, seeks to match U.S.-based water information resources with developing nation stakeholder needs. The USWP study utilizes a multi-pronged approach to identify key design requirements and to understand the existing water data portal landscape. Adopting UX methods allows data distributors to design customized UIs that

  6. Reversible hysteresis loop tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A.; Binek, Ch.; Margulies, D. T.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2006-02-01

    We utilize antiferromagnetically coupled bilayer structures to magnetically tune hysteresis loop properties. Key element of this approach is the non-overlapping switching field distribution of the two magnetic layers that make up the system: a hard magnetic CoPtCrB layer (HL) and a soft magnetic CoCr layer (SL). Both layers are coupled antiferromagnetically through an only 0.6-nm-thick Ru interlayer. The non-overlapping switching field distribution allows the measurement of magnetization reversal in the SL at low fields while keeping the magnetization state of the HL unperturbed. Applying an appropriate high field or high field sequence changes the magnetic state of the HL, which then influences the SL magnetization reversal due to the interlayer coupling. In this way, the position and shape of the SL hysteresis loop can be changed or tuned in a fully reversible and highly effective manner. Here, we study specifically how the SL hysteresis loop characteristics change as we move the HL through an entire high field hysteresis loop sequence.

  7. Hysteresis of transient populations in absorbing-state systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitanchuk, Oleksiy L.; Marchenko, Oleksij M.; Teslenko, Victor I.

    2016-06-01

    A nonequilibrium density matrix theory is used in order to explicitly describe the hysteresis interrelation between populations of nonstationary states in an absorbing multi-stage chain system in the one-particle approximation. As an illustrative example, we restrict ourselves to consideration of the 3-stage absorbing case for which we identify three types of the hysteresis; that is, the causal time dependent hysteresis with leaf-like and triangle-like closed loops, the hidden hysteresis with broken-line loops and the true hysteresis with open loops. Furthermore, we observe a common critical threshold for the hysteresis types and ascertain a reciprocal correspondence of this threshold as between the types as well with the experiment.

  8. Hysteresis in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Banerjee, Shreya

    2016-07-01

    Hysteresis is a phenomenon occurring naturally in several magnetic and electric materials in condensed matter physics. When applied to cosmology, aka cosmological hysteresis, has interesting and vivid implications in the scenario of a cyclic bouncy universe. Most importantly, this physical prescription can be treated as an alternative proposal to inflationary paradigm. Cosmological hysteresis is caused by the asymmetry in the equation of state parameter during expansion and contraction phase of the universe, due to the presence of a single scalar field. This process is purely thermodynamical in nature, results in a non-vanishing hysteresis loop integral (∮pdV) in cosmology. When applied to variants of modified gravity models 1) Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati (DGP) brane world gravity, 2) Cosmological constant dominated Einstein gravity, 3) Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG), 4) Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet brane world gravity and 5) Randall Sundrum single brane world gravity (RSII), under certain circumstances, this phenomenon leads to the increase in amplitude of the consecutive cycles and to a universe with older and larger successive cycles, provided we have physical mechanisms to make the universe bounce and turnaround. This inculcates an arrow of time in a dissipationless cosmology. Remarkably, this phenomenon appears to be widespread in several cosmological potentials in variants of modified gravity background, which we explicitly study for i) Hilltop, ii) Natural and iii) Coleman-Weinberg potentials, in this paper. Semi-analytical analysis of these models, for different potentials with minimum/minima, show that the conditions which creates a universe with an ever increasing expansion, depend on the signature of the hysteresis loop integral (∮pdV) as well as on the variants of model parameters.

  9. A Study of the Influence of Solid Particles on Boiling Hysteresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.H.Shi; J.Ma

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the effects on boiling hysteresis of locally fluidized particles contained in a liquid that serves as coolant for electronic equipment.The results show that Iocally fluidized particles can diminish boiling hysteresis.

  10. Rare-earth loaded liquid scintillator (for LENS experiment)

    CERN Document Server

    Barabanov, I R; Kornoukhov, V N; Yanovich, E A; Zatsepin, G T; Danilov, N A; Korpusov, G V; Kostukova, G V; Krylov, Y S; Yakshin, V V

    1999-01-01

    Rare-earth (Yb/Gd) complexes with neutral organophosphorus ligands are briefly discussed for their application in liquid scintillation technique. To evaluate the principal feasibility of rare-earth loaded scintillator, the ytterbium chloride complexes with tri-isoamylphosphine oxides were synthesized. Relative scintillation efficiency (RSE) for two Yb concentrations (78 and 88 g/L) was measured by means of the internal conversion exitation from Cs-137. The results obtained were 50 and 40% respectively.

  11. Hysteresis in structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyi, A., E-mail: aivanyi@morpheus.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); Ivanyi, P., E-mail: peteri@morpheus.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); Ivanyi, M.M., E-mail: ivanyi@uvaterv.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary); UVATERV Ltd, Budapest, 1117, Dombovari ut 17, Budapest (Hungary); Ivanyi, M., E-mail: drivanyi@pmmk.pte.hu [Pollack Mihaly Faculty of Engineering, University of Pecs, Boszorkany u. 2, H-7624 Pecs (Hungary)

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the Preisach hysteresis model is applied to determine the dynamic behavior of a steel column with mass on the top and loaded by an impulse force. The column is considered as a rigid element, while the fixed end of the column is modeled with a rotational spring of hysterestic characteristic. In the solution of the non-linear dynamical equation of motion the fix-point technique is inserted to the time marching iteration. In the investigation the non-linearity of the rotation spring is modeled with the Preisach hysteresis model. The variation of amplitude and the action time interval of force are changing. The results are plotted in figures.

  12. Stereo Hysteresis Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Tyler

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most fascinating phenomena in stereopsis is the profound hysteresis effect reported by Fender and Julesz (1967, in which the depth percept persisted with increasing disparity long past the point at which depth was recovered with decreasing disparity. To control retinal disparity without vergence eye movements, they stabilized the stimuli on the retinas with an eye tracker. I now report that stereo hysteresis can be observed directly in printed stereograms simply by rotating the image. As the stereo image rotates, the horizontal disparities rotate to become vertical, then horizontal with inverted sign, and then vertical again before returning to the original orientation. The depth shows an interesting popout effect, almost as though the depth was turning on and off rapidly, despite the inherently sinusoidal change in the horizontal disparity vector. This stimulus was generated electronically in a circular format so that the random-dot field could be dynamically replaced, eliminating any cue to cyclorotation. Noise density was scaled with eccentricity to fade out the stimulus near fixation. For both the invariant and the dynamic noise, profound hysteresis of several seconds delay was found in six observers. This was far longer than the reaction time to respond to changes in disparity, which was less than a second. Purely horizontal modulation of disparity to match the horizontal vector component of the disparity rotation did not show the popout effect, which thus seems to be a function of the interaction between horizontal and vertical disparities and may be attributable to depth interpolation processes.

  13. A magnetic hysteresis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatley, Thomas W.; Henretty, Debra A.

    1995-01-01

    The Passive Aerodynamically Stabilized Magnetically Damped Satellite (PAMS) will be deployed from the Space Shuttle and used as a target for a Shuttle-mounted laser. It will be a cylindrical satellite with several corner cube reflectors on the ends. The center of mass of the cylinder will be near one end, and aerodynamic torques will tend to align the axis of the cylinder with the spacecraft velocity vector. Magnetic hysteresis rods will be used to provide passive despin and oscillation-damping torques on the cylinder. The behavior of the hysteresis rods depends critically on the 'B/H' curves for the combination of materials and rod length-to-diameter ratio ('l-over-d'). These curves are qualitatively described in most Physics textbooks in terms of major and minor 'hysteresis loops'. Mathematical modeling of the functional relationship between B and H is very difficult. In this paper, the physics involved is not addressed, but an algorithm is developed which provides a close approximation to empirically determined data with a few simple equations suitable for use in computer simulations.

  14. INTRODUCTION All earth dams in their natural state experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Earth Dam constructed within the Precambrian Basement Complex terrain of Southwestern Nigeria. The study was aimed at ... The 2-D resistivity structure revealed that the core of the dam embankment is .... within the rain forest region of Nigeria. The ..... (citrus Sinensis Osbeck) Stored at Ambient Tropical Condition. 251.

  15. Bringing Ad-Hoc Analytics to Big Earth Data: the EarthServer Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    From the commonly accepted Vs defining the Big Data challenge - volume, velocity, variety - we more and more learn that the sheer volume is not the only, and often not even the decisive factor inhibiting access and analytics. In particular variety of data is a frequent core issue, posing manifold issues. Based on this observation we claim that a key aspect to analytics is the freedom to ask any questions, simple or complex, anytime and combining any choice of data structures, whatever diverging they may be. Actually, techniques for such "ad-hoc queries" we can learn from classical databases. Their concept of high-level query languages brings along several benefits: a uniform semantic, allowing machine-to-machine communication, including automatic generation of queries; massive server-side optimization and parallelization; and building attractive client interfaces hiding the query syntax from casual users while allowing power users to utilize it. However, these benefits used to be available only on tabular and set oriented data, text, and - more recently - graph data. With the advent of Array Databases, they become available on large multidimensional raster data assets as well, getting one step closer to the Holy Grail of itnegrated, uniform retrieval for users. ErthServer is a transatlantic initiative setting up operationa linfrastructures based on this paradigm. In our talk, we present core EarthServer technology concepts as well as a spectrum of Earth Science applications utilizing the EarthServer platform for versatile, visualisation supported analytics services. Further, we discuss the substantial impact EarthServer is having on Big Geo Data standardization in OGC and ISO. Time and Internet connection permitting a live demo can be presented.

  16. Understanding Unemployment Hysteresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels Framroze

    to UK quarterly data on prices, wages, output, unemployment and crude oil prices, suggests that, for the period 1988 up to the onset of the …financial crisis, the non-stationarity of UK unemployment cannot be explained as a result of slow adjustment, including sluggish wage formation as emphasized...... by the hysteresis theories. Instead, it is the equilibrium that has evolved persistently as a consequence of exogenous oil prices shifting the price setting relation (in the unemployment-real wage space) in a non-stationary manner....

  17. Modeling of Hysteresis in Piezoelectric Actuator Based on Segment Similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xiong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To successfully exploit the full potential of piezoelectric actuators in micro/nano positioning systems, it is essential to model their hysteresis behavior accurately. A novel hysteresis model for piezoelectric actuator is proposed in this paper. Firstly, segment-similarity, which describes the similarity relationship between hysteresis curve segments with different turning points, is proposed. Time-scale similarity, which describes the similarity relationship between hysteresis curves with different rates, is used to solve the problem of dynamic effect. The proposed model is formulated using these similarities. Finally, the experiments are performed with respect to a micro/nano-meter movement platform system. The effectiveness of the proposed model is verified as compared with the Preisach model. The experimental results show that the proposed model is able to precisely predict the hysteresis trajectories of piezoelectric actuators and performs better than the Preisach model.

  18. Wetting hysteresis of nanodrops on nanorough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-10-01

    Nanodrops on smooth or patterned rough surfaces are explored by many-body dissipative particle dynamics to demonstrate the influence of surface roughness on droplet wetting. On a smooth surface, nanodrops exhibit the random motion and contact angle hysteresis is absent. The diffusivity decays as the intrinsic contact angle (θY) decreases. On a rough surface, the contact line is pinned and the most stable contact angle (θY') is acquired. The extent of contact angle hysteresis (Δ θ ) is determined by two approaches, which resemble the inflation-deflation method and inclined plane method for experiments. The hysteresis loop is acquired and both approaches yield consistent results. The influences of wettability and surface roughness on θY' and Δ θ are examined. θY' deviates from that estimated by the Wenzel or Cassie-Baxter models. This consequence can be explained by the extent of impregnation, which varies with the groove position and wettability. Moreover, contact angle hysteresis depends more on the groove width than the depth.

  19. Wetting hysteresis of nanodrops on nanorough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-10-01

    Nanodrops on smooth or patterned rough surfaces are explored by many-body dissipative particle dynamics to demonstrate the influence of surface roughness on droplet wetting. On a smooth surface, nanodrops exhibit the random motion and contact angle hysteresis is absent. The diffusivity decays as the intrinsic contact angle (θ_{Y}) decreases. On a rough surface, the contact line is pinned and the most stable contact angle (θ_{Y}^{'}) is acquired. The extent of contact angle hysteresis (Δθ) is determined by two approaches, which resemble the inflation-deflation method and inclined plane method for experiments. The hysteresis loop is acquired and both approaches yield consistent results. The influences of wettability and surface roughness on θ_{Y}^{'} and Δθ are examined. θ_{Y}^{'} deviates from that estimated by the Wenzel or Cassie-Baxter models. This consequence can be explained by the extent of impregnation, which varies with the groove position and wettability. Moreover, contact angle hysteresis depends more on the groove width than the depth.

  20. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-03

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials.

  1. Big Earth Data: the Film, the Experience, and some Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, P.

    2016-12-01

    Scientists have to get out of the ivory tower and tell society, which ultimately finances them, about their work, their results, and implications, be they good or bad. This is commonly accepted ethics. But how would you "tell society" at large what you are doing? Scientific work typically is difficult to confer to lay people, and finding suitable simplifications and paraphrasings requires considerable effort. Estimating societal implications is dangerous as swimming with sharks, some of which are your own colleagues. Media tend to be not always interested - unless results are particularly spectacular, well, in a press sense. Again, sharks are luring. All this makes informing the public a tedious, time-consuming task which tends to receive not much appreciation in tenure negotiations where indexed publications are the first and foremost measure.As part of the EU funded EarthServer initiative we tried it. Having promised a "video about the project" we found it boring to do another 10 minute repetition from the grant contract and started aiming at a full TV documentary explaining "Big Earth Data" to the interested citizens. It took more than one year to convince a TV producing company and TV stations that this is not another feature about the beauty of nature or catastrophies, but a bout human insight from computer-supported sifting through all those observations and simulations available. After they got the gist they were fully on board and supported financially with a substantial amount. The final 53 minutes "Big Earth Data" movie was broadcast in February 2015 in German and French (English version available from ). Several smaller spin-off features originated around it, such as an uptake of the theme (and material) in a popular German science TV series.Of course, this is but one contribution and cannot be made a continuous activity. In the talk we want to present and discuss the "making of" from a scientist's perspective, highlighting the ups and downs in the

  2. Design for Vibrator Field Experiment Based- on Vibrator- earth System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zubin; Lin Jun; Liang Tiecheng; Zhang Linhang

    2000-01-01

    Source- generated energy in seismic vibrator records high frequency harmonic behavior. Conventional vibratorearth coupling model was set up on the linear system. Some assumptions in the application of linear theory to the vibrator problem play an insignificant role in the overall coupling structure. Obviously, non- linear behaviors can be modeled using a "hard - spring" form of the Duffing equation. Model dedicates that a qualitatively similar harmonic component is present for a broad range of possible mathematical descriptions. After some qualitative analysis about the non- linear system, some conclusion can be drawn. Firstly, The design of the vibrator weight should be abided by two points as followed: In order to avoid decoupling for the vibrator to the earth, the weight should be greater than the peak of the driving force amplitude as to keep the resultant force pointing to the earth's core. On the other hand, for the limited energy output, the vibrator overweight may damage the system high - frequency ability. Secondly, as the driving force frequency approaching to the ground hard- spring inherent frequency, the energy transmission was found to climb its peak from the system energy absorbed curve. At last, due to the non- linear coupling model system, its load curve would come into unstable frequency range,which might limit the application of the Vibroseis conventional sweeping pattern - linear sweep. A new sweeping pattern was listed: the driving signal was the pseudo- random sequence modulated by a fixed frequency cosine signal satisfying with the exploration precision and absorbing efficiency. The synthesized signal was ready to be realized by the electromagnetic driven system. Even the side- lobes noise of its auto- correlation function was restrained well. The theory coming from the Vibrator- earth coupling model was applied to the design of the Portable High- frequency Vibrator System (PHVS), and the good result was obtained. By the analysis of the

  3. Big Earth Data: the Film, the Experience, and some Thoughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, P.; Hoenig, H.

    2015-12-01

    Scientists have to get out of the ivory tower and tell society, which ultimately finances them, about their work, their results, and implications, be they good or bad. This is commonly accepted ethics. But how would you "tell society" at large what you are doing? Scientific work typically is difficult to confer to lay people, and finding suitable simplifications and paraphrasings requires considerable effort. Estimating societal implications is dangerous as swimming with sharks, some of which are your own colleagues. Media tend to be not always interested - unless results are particularly spectacular, well, in a press sense. Again, sharks are luring. All this makes informing the public a tedious, time-consuming task which tends to receive not much appreciation in tenure negotiations where indexed publications are the first and foremost measure.As part of the EU funded EarthServer initiative we tried it. Having promised a "video about the project" we found it boring to do another 10 minute repetition from the grant contract and started aiming at a full TV documentary explaining "Big Earth Data" to the interested citizens. It took more than one year to convince a TV producing company and TV stations that this is not another feature about the beauty of nature or catastrophies, but about human insight from computer-supported sifting through all those observations and simulations available. After they got the gist they were fully on board and supported financially with a substantial amount. The final 53 minutes "Big Earth Data" movie was broadcast in February 2015 in German and French (English version available from ). Several smaller spin-off features originated around it, such as an uptake of the theme (and material) in a popular German science TV series.Of course, this is but one contribution and cannot be made a continuous activity. In the talk we want to present and discuss the "making of" from a scientist's perspective, highlighting the ups and downs in the

  4. Hysteresis in Magnetocaloric Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Moos, Lars

    , obtained at the initial low and final high field. However, in first order materials thermal entropy hysteresis loops are obtained through characterization, corresponding to measurements done in an increasing and a decreasing temperature mode. Indirectly determining the MCE through the use of the Maxwell...... characterization of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) in these materials is done through conventional indirect magnetometric and calorimetric methods, as well as newly developed direct methods. The determination of the MCE due to a magnetic field change is in principle given by the isofield material entropy curves...... relation or calorimetric measurements done only in a heating or cooling mode, estimate the MCE as the reversible difference between the set isofield heating-heating or cooling-cooling entropy curves. Here it is shown that direct measurements suggest that the real MCE is given by the difference between...

  5. Vortex flow hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to quantify the hysteresis associated with various vortex flow transition points and to determine the effect of planform geometry. The transition points observed consisted of the appearance (or disappearance) of trailing edge vortex burst and the transition to (or from) flat plate or totally separated flows. Flow visualization with smoke injected into the vortices was used to identify the transitions on a series of semi-span models tested in a low speed tunnel. The planforms tested included simple deltas (55 deg to 80 deg sweep), cranked wings with varying tip panel sweep and dihedral, and a straked wing. High speed movies at 1000 frames per second were made of the vortex flow visualization in order to better understand the dynamics of vortex flow, burst and transition.

  6. Characterization of Corneal Indentation Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Match W L; Dongming Wei; Leung, Christopher K S

    2015-01-01

    Corneal indentation is adapted for the design and development of a characterization method for corneal hysteresis behavior - Corneal Indentation Hysteresis (CIH). Fourteen porcine eyes were tested using the corneal indentation method. The CIH measured in enucleated porcine eyes showed indentation rate and intraocular pressure (IOP) dependences. The CIH increased with indentation rate at lower IOP ( 25 mmHg). The CIH was linear proportional to the IOP within an individual eye. The CIH was positively correlated with the IOP, corneal in-plane tensile stress and corneal tangent modulus (E). A new method based on corneal indentation for the measurement of Corneal Indentation Hysteresis in vivo is developed. To our knowledge, this is the first study to introduce the corneal indentation hysteresis and correlate the corneal indentation hysteresis and corneal tangent modulus.

  7. Hysteresis model of magnetostrictive actuators and its numerical realization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-feng; LV Fu-zai; XIANG Zhan-qin

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents two numerical realization of Preisach model by Density Function Method (DFM) and F Function Method (FFM) for a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA). Experiment and simulation showed that FFM is better than DFM for predicting precision of hysteresis loops. Lagrange bilinear interpolation algorithm is used in Preisach numerical realization to enhance prediction performance. A set of hysteresis loops and higher order reversal curves are predicted and experimentally verified. The good agreement between the measured and predicted curves shows that the classical Preisach model is effective for modelling the quasi-static hysteresis of the GMA.

  8. Manifestations of the rotation and gravity of the Earth in high-energy physics experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Obukhov, Yuri N; Teryaev, Oleg V

    2016-01-01

    The inertial (due to rotation) and gravitational fields of the Earth affect the motion of an elementary particle and its spin dynamics. This influence is not negligible and should be taken into account in high-energy physics experiments. Earth's influence is manifest in perturbations in the particle motion, in an additional precession of the spin, and in a change of the constitutive tensor of the Maxwell electrodynamics. Bigger corrections are oscillatory, and their contributions average to zero. Other corrections due to the inhomogeneity of the inertial field are not oscillatory but they are very small and may be important only for the storage ring electric dipole moment experiments. Earth's gravity causes the Newton-like force, the reaction force provided by a focusing system, and additional torques acting on the spin. However, there are no observable indications of the electromagnetic effects due to Earth's gravity.

  9. Wetting Hysteresis at the Molecular Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wei; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1996-01-01

    The motion of a fluid-fluid-solid contact line on a rough surface is well known to display hysteresis in the contact angle vs. velocity relationship. In order to understand the phenomenon at a fundamental microscopic level, we have conducted molecular dynamics computer simulations of a Wilhelmy plate experiment in which a solid surface is dipped into a liquid bath, and the force-velocity characteristics are measured. We directly observe a systematic variation of force and contact angle with velocity, which is single-valued for the case of an atomically smooth solid surface. In the microscopically rough case, however, we find (as intuitively expected) an open hysteresis loop. Further characterization of the interface dynamics is in progress.

  10. Modeling and Control for Magnetostrictive Hysteresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Jian-qin; MA Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    To deal with the rate-dependent hysteresis presented in a magnetostrictive actuator, a new method of modeling and control is proposed. The relationship between inputs and outputs of the actuator is approximately described by a dynamic differential equation with two rate-dependent coefficients, each expressed as a polynomial of frequency. For a given frequency, the coefficients will be able to be estimated by approximating the experimental data of the outputs of the magnetostrictive actuator. Based on this model, a quasi-PID controller is designed. In the space of the coefficients and frequency, the stable domain of closed loop system with hysteresis is analyzed. The numerical simulation and experiments have born witness to the feasibility of the proposed new method.

  11. Revealing the Earth's mantle from the tallest mountains using the Jinping Neutrino Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šrámek, Ondřej; Roskovec, Bedřich; Wipperfurth, Scott A; Xi, Yufei; McDonough, William F

    2016-09-09

    The Earth's engine is driven by unknown proportions of primordial energy and heat produced in radioactive decay. Unfortunately, competing models of Earth's composition reveal an order of magnitude uncertainty in the amount of radiogenic power driving mantle dynamics. Recent measurements of the Earth's flux of geoneutrinos, electron antineutrinos from terrestrial natural radioactivity, reveal the amount of uranium and thorium in the Earth and set limits on the residual proportion of primordial energy. Comparison of the flux measured at large underground neutrino experiments with geologically informed predictions of geoneutrino emission from the crust provide the critical test needed to define the mantle's radiogenic power. Measurement at an oceanic location, distant from nuclear reactors and continental crust, would best reveal the mantle flux, however, no such experiment is anticipated. We predict the geoneutrino flux at the site of the Jinping Neutrino Experiment (Sichuan, China). Within 8 years, the combination of existing data and measurements from soon to come experiments, including Jinping, will exclude end-member models at the 1σ level, define the mantle's radiogenic contribution to the surface heat loss, set limits on the composition of the silicate Earth, and provide significant parameter bounds for models defining the mode of mantle convection.

  12. Discretization of Preisach hysteresis model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安凯; 蔡国平

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the partial derivative errors in Preisach hysteresis model caused by inaccurate experimental data, the concept and correlative method of discretization of Preisach hysteresis model are proposed, the essential of which is to centralize the distribution density of Preisach hysteresis model in local region as an integral, which is defined as the weight of a certain point in that region. For the input composed of an ascending segment and a descending segment, a method to determine the initial weights together with an additional method to determine present weights is given according to the number of input ascending segments. If the number of input ascending segments increases, the weights of the corresponding points in updating rectangle are updated by adding the initial weights of corresponding points. A prominent advantage of discrete Preisach hysteresis model is its memory efficiency. Another advantage of discrete Preisach hysteresis model is that there is no function in the model, and thus, it can be expediently operated using a computer. By generalizing the above updating rectangle method to the continuous Preisach hysteresis model, identification method of distribution density can be given as well.

  13. Mastering hysteresis in magnetocaloric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfleisch, O; Gottschall, T; Fries, M; Benke, D; Radulov, I; Skokov, K P; Wende, H; Gruner, M; Acet, M; Entel, P; Farle, M

    2016-08-13

    Hysteresis is more than just an interesting oddity that occurs in materials with a first-order transition. It is a real obstacle on the path from existing laboratory-scale prototypes of magnetic refrigerators towards commercialization of this potentially disruptive cooling technology. Indeed, the reversibility of the magnetocaloric effect, being essential for magnetic heat pumps, strongly depends on the width of the thermal hysteresis and, therefore, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms causing hysteresis and to find solutions to minimize losses associated with thermal hysteresis in order to maximize the efficiency of magnetic cooling devices. In this work, we discuss the fundamental aspects that can contribute to thermal hysteresis and the strategies that we are developing to at least partially overcome the hysteresis problem in some selected classes of magnetocaloric materials with large application potential. In doing so, we refer to the most relevant classes of magnetic refrigerants La-Fe-Si-, Heusler- and Fe2P-type compounds.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'.

  14. Perovskite-fullerene hybrid materials suppress hysteresis in planar diodes.

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jixian

    2015-05-08

    Solution-processed planar perovskite devices are highly desirable in a wide variety of optoelectronic applications; however, they are prone to hysteresis and current instabilities. Here we report the first perovskite-PCBM hybrid solid with significantly reduced hysteresis and recombination loss achieved in a single step. This new material displays an efficient electrically coupled microstructure: PCBM is homogeneously distributed throughout the film at perovskite grain boundaries. The PCBM passivates the key PbI3(-) antisite defects during the perovskite self-assembly, as revealed by theory and experiment. Photoluminescence transient spectroscopy proves that the PCBM phase promotes electron extraction. We showcase this mixed material in planar solar cells that feature low hysteresis and enhanced photovoltage. Using conductive AFM studies, we reveal the memristive properties of perovskite films. We close by positing that PCBM, by tying up both halide-rich antisites and unincorporated halides, reduces electric field-induced anion migration that may give rise to hysteresis and unstable diode behaviour.

  15. Thermal and orbital analysis of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, Brian D.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamentals of an Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous orbit are presented. A Sun-synchronous Orbit Analysis Program (SOAP) was developed to calculate orbital parameters for an entire year. The output from this program provides the required input data for the TRASYS thermal radiation computer code, which in turn computes the infrared, solar and Earth albedo heat fluxes incident on a space experiment. Direct incident heat fluxes can be used as input to a generalized thermal analyzer program to size radiators and predict instrument operating temperatures. The SOAP computer code and its application to the thermal analysis methodology presented, should prove useful to the thermal engineer during the design phases of Earth monitoring Sun-synchronous space experiments.

  16. Experiments of Applying the Rare-Earth Modifying Agents in New Dental Materials Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiaohu; Wang Hua; Wang Qin; Li Xiaodi; Ma Rui

    2007-01-01

    Harmless rare-earth modifying agents were prepared by orthogonal experiments. A new resin material was synthesized with the qualities such as rigidity, rubbing abrasion, aging, luster and plasticity better than the dental resin materials in common used. It could be used as the substitutes for the applied resin teeth materials.

  17. An Experience of Science Theatre to Introduce Earth Interior and Natural Hazards to Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Gemma; Lanza, Tiziana; D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    The present paper describes an experience of science theatre addressed to children of primary and secondary school, with the main purpose of making them acquainted with a topic, the interior of the Earth, largely underestimated in compulsory school curricula worldwide. A not less important task was to encourage a positive attitude towards natural…

  18. Radiation Information for Designing and Interpreting Biological Experiments Onboard Missions Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, T.; Slaba, T.; Bhattacharya, S.; Braby, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in flying biological experiments beyond low-Earth orbit (LEO) to measure biological responses potentially relevant to those expected during a human mission to Mars. Such experiments could be payloads onboard precursor missions, including unmanned private-public partnerships, as well as small low-cost spacecraft (satellites) designed specifically for biosentinel type missions. Designing such experiments requires knowledge of the radiation environment and its interactions with both the spacecraft and the experimental payload. Information is provided here that is useful for designing such experiments.

  19. From Earth to Heaven: Using `Newton's Cannon' Thought Experiment for Teaching Satellite Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velentzas, Athanasios; Halkia, Krystallia

    2013-10-01

    Thought Experiments are powerful tools in both scientific thinking and in the teaching of science. In this study, the historical Thought Experiment (TE) `Newton's Cannon' was used as a tool to teach concepts relating to the motion of satellites to students at upper secondary level. The research instruments were: (a) a teaching-interview designed and implemented according to the Teaching Experiment methodology and (b) an open-ended questionnaire administered to students 2 weeks after the teaching-interview. The sample consisted of forty students divided into eleven groups. The teaching and learning processes which occurred during the teaching-interview were recorded and analyzed. The findings of the present study show that the use of the TE helped students to mentally construct a physical system which has nothing to do with their everyday experience (i.e. they had to imagine themselves as observers in a context in which the whole Earth was visible) and to draw conclusions about phenomena within this system. Specifically, students managed (1) to conclude that if an object is appropriately launched, it may be placed in an orbit around the Earth and to support this conclusion by giving necessary arguments, and (2) to realize that the same laws of physics describe, on the one hand, the motion of the Moon around the Earth (and the motion of other celestial bodies as well) and, on the other hand, the motion of `terrestrial' objects (i.e. objects on the Earth, such as a tennis ball). The main difficulties students met were caused by their idea that there is no gravity in the vacuum (i.e. the area outside of the Earth's atmosphere) and also by their everyday experience, according to which it is impossible for a projectile to move continuously parallel to the ground.

  20. Effect of Earth's rotation on the trajectories of free-fall bodies in Equivalence Principle Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, C. G.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Luo, J.; Liu, Z Z

    2002-01-01

    Owing to Earth's rotation a free-fall body would move in an elliptical orbit rather than along a straight line forward to the center of the Earth. In this paper on the basis of the theory for spin-spin coupling between macroscopic rotating bodies we study violation of the equivalence principle from long-distance free-fall experiments by means of a rotating ball and a non-rotating sell. For the free-fall time of 40 seconds, the difference between the orbits of the two free-fall bodies is of th...

  1. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.; Alexander, K.;

    2013-01-01

    and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20......Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE...

  2. Hysteresis zone or locus - Aerodynamic of bulbous based bodies at low speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data are presented which seem to suggest that a well-defined hysteresis locus on bulbous based bodies at low speeds does not exist. Instead, if the experiment is repeated several times, the entire hysteresis region seems to fill with data rather than trace out a specific hysteresis locus. Data obtained on an oscillating model even at low reduced frequencies may be well defined but when applied to arbitrary motion lead to less accurate results than desired.

  3. The NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Wide Field-of-View Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Kathryn A.; Smith, G. Louis; Young, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consisted of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometers and scanning radiometers for measuring outgoing longwave radiation and solar radiation reflected from the Earth. These instruments were carried by the dedicated Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and by the NOAA-9 and -10 operational spacecraft. The WFOV radiometers provided data from which instantaneous fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are computed by use of a numerical filter algorithm. Monthly mean fluxes over a 5-degree equal angle grid are computed from the instantaneous TOA fluxes. The WFOV radiometers aboard the NOAA-9 spacecraft operated from February 1985 through December 1992, at which time a failure of the shortwave radiometer ended the usable data after nearly 8 years. This paper examines the monthly mean products from that data set.

  4. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1...

  5. Foucault pendulum at the South Pole: Proposal for an experiment to detect the Earth's general relativistic gravitomagnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.; Polnarev, Aleksander G.; Thorne, Kip S.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment is proposed for measuring the earth's gravitomagnetic field by monitoring its effect on the plane of swing of a Foucault pendulum at the south pole ("dragging of inertial frames by earth's rotation"). With great effort a 10% experiment in a measurement time of several months might be achieved.

  6. Galactic Cosmic Rays - Clouds Effect and Bifurcation Model of the Earth Global Climate. Part 2. Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rusov, V; Vaschenko, V; Mihalys, O; Kosenko, S; Mavrodiev, S; Vachev, B

    2008-01-01

    The solution of the energy-balance model of the Earth's global climate proposed in Ref. [1] is compared with well-known experimental data on the palaeotemperature evolution of Earth's surface over past 420 kyr and 740 kyr obtained in the framework of Antarctic projects the EPICA Dome C and Vostok. The Solar-Earth mechanism of anomalous temperature jumps observed in the EPICA Dome C and Vostok experiments and its relation with the "order-chaos" transitions in convection evolution in the liquid Earth core responsible to the mechanism of the Earth magnetic field inversions was discussed. The stabilizing role of the slow nuclear burning on the boundary of the liquid and solid phases of the Earth's core (georeactor with power of 30 TW) for convection evolution in the liquid Earth's core and hence in the Earth's magnetic field evolution is pointed out.

  7. Nonlinear diffusion and superconducting hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayergoyz, I.D. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Nonlinear diffusion of electromagnetic fields in superconductors with ideal and gradual resistive transitions is studied. Analytical results obtained for linear and nonlinear polarizations of electromagnetic fields are reported. These results lead to various extensions of the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis.

  8. Corporatising School Leadership through Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    This article builds on the established notion that schools are hierarchised through policy, accruing different amounts and types of symbolic capital, by examining how this is reflected in the habitus of the leaders of new, privileged school types. The article uses Bourdieu's concept of hysteresis, or a dislocation between the habitus which…

  9. Core Formation in the Earth and Moon: New Constraints From V, Cr, and Mn Partitioning Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, N. L.; Agee, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    The mantles of the Earth and Moon are similarly depleted in V, Cr, and Mn relative to the concentrations of these elements in chondritic meteorites [1,2]. The similar depletions have been suggested to be due to a common genesis of the Earth and Moon, with the Moon inheriting its mantle, complete with V, Cr, and Mn depletions, from the Earth during the impact-induced formation of the Moon. We have conducted multi-anvil experiments that systematically examined the effects of pressure, temperature, and silicate and metallic compositions on liquid metal-liquid silicate partitioning of V, Cr, and Mn. Increasing temperature is found to significantly increase the metal-silicate partition coefficients for all three elements. Increasing the S or C content of the metallic liquid also causes the partition coefficients to increase. Silicate composition has an effect consistent with Cr and Mn being divalent and V being trivalent. Over our experimental range of 3-14 GPa, the partitioning behavior of V, Cr, and Mn did not vary with pressure. With the effects of oxygen fugacity, metallic and silicate compositions, temperature and pressure understood, the partition coefficient for each element was expressed as a function of these thermodynamic variables and applied to different core formation scenarios. Our new metal-silicate experimental partitioning data can explain the mantle depletions of V, Cr, and Mn by core formation in a high temperature magma ocean under oxygen fugacity conditions two log units below the iron-wuestite buffer, conditions similar to those proposed by [3] from their metal-magnesiowuestite study. In contrast, more oxidizing conditions proposed in recent core formation models [4] cannot account for the V, Cr, and Mn depletions. Additionally, because we observe little or no pressure effect on V, Cr, and Mn partitioning in our experiments, we conclude that the mantle depletions of these elements during core formation are not dependent on planet size. Accordingly

  10. QUANTITATIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF STRESS-STRAIN HYSTERESIS LOOPS OF Cu-Zn-Al SHAPE MEMORY ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.F. Guo; Y.Z. Huo; G.T. Zeng; X.T. Zu

    2001-01-01

    A six-parameter mathematical model was introduced to simulate the stress-strain hysteresis and the inner hysteresis of polycrystalline shape memory alloys (SMAs). By comparing with experiments of Cu-Zn-Al SMA, it was shown that the model could be used to calculate the stress-strain relations with rather good accuracy. Moreover,it was found that the six parameters introduced in this paper represented the characteristics of the stress-strain hysteresis of polycrystalline SMA and can be used to characterize the hysteresis quantitatively.

  11. Earth at Rest - Aesthetic Experience and Students' Grounding in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2017-07-01

    Focus of this article is the current situation characterized by students' de-rootedness and possible measures to improve the situation within the frame of education for sustainable development. My main line of argument is that science teachers can practice teaching in such a way that students are brought in deeper contact to the environment. I discuss efforts to promote aesthetic experience in science class and in science teacher education. Within a wide range of definitions, my main understanding of aesthetic experience is that of pre-conceptual experience, relational to the environment and incorporated in students' embodied knowledge. I ground the idea of Earth at rest in Husserl's phenomenological philosophy and Heidegger's notion of science' deprivation of the world. A critique of the ontological reversal leads to an ontological re-reversal that implies giving lifeworld experience back its value and rooting scientific concepts in students' everyday lives. Six aspects of facilitating grounding in sustainability-oriented science teaching and teacher education are highlighted and discussed: students' everyday knowledge and experience, aesthetic experience and grounding, fostering aesthetic sensibility, cross-curricular integration with art, ontological and epistemological aspects, and belongingness and (re-)connection to Earth. I conclude that both science students and student-teachers need to practice their sense of caring and belonging, as well as refining their sensibility towards the world. With an intension of educating for a sustainable development, there is an urgent need for a critical discussion in science education when it comes to engaging learners for a sustainable future.

  12. In Search of the Invisible Roots: Immigrant Experiences in Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogobete Daniela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts an analysis of the metaphorical strategies Jhumpa Lahiri uses in her 2008 collection of short stories Unaccustomed Earth in order to explore and comment on the intricate relations and the complex web of feelings and resentments, longing and attachment that make up the essence of family life as shaped by the diasporic experience. In this volume, Lahiri particularly focuses on the conflicting emotions engendered by migration, on the articulation of displacement and reintegration, and on the capacity to fully assume the diasporic experience and turn it into a meaningful assertion of one’s identity.

  13. Earth's core-mantle boundary - Results of experiments at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (above 2.4 x 10 to the 10th Pa) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite, the most abundant mineral of earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO2 stishovite and MgSiO3 perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10 to the 10th Pa. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 km of earth's mantle, the D-double-prime layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  14. Analysis of Static Experiment of Measuring Hysteresis Loops and Interpretation of Microcosmic Mechanism%静态法磁滞回线测量实验分析及微观机理解释

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟祥鹏; 张建强; 徐静; 刘超卓

    2012-01-01

    For the static method to measure magnetic hysteresis loops, more attention was paid to the mechanical operation and apparent description of the curves, while the underlying physical mechanism was ignored. It is necessary to survey the microscopic mechanism of the measurement of the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials in more details. By analyzing the principle of the experimental apparatus, examining the air-gap, shape, and nonuniformity of test materials, it is believed that the presence of air-gap influences the precision of the measurement, and the demagnetization induced by the nonuniformity of the material can weaken magnetization. According to repeated experimental experience, a method that can realize fast demagnetization was developed. Increasing the reverse magnetizing current can accelerate demagnetization, because demagnetization has no accumulative effect. The reverse demagnetizing current ranges from 160 to 180 mA. The process of magnetization, the magnetization curve and magnetic hysteresis loops are closely related to the magnetic domain structure. The process can be divided into two basic stages: the displacement of domain wall and rotation of the magnetization vector. By referring to the experimental results, the process of magnetization and reverse magnetization was theoretically discussed.%通过分析FD-BH-I实验仪器的工作原理,考察了待测材料的非闭合性、形状和不均匀度等仪器的细节因素,得出空气隙的存在会影响磁场的测量精度,不均匀和形状不规则的材料产生的退磁场会减弱磁化.根据反复退磁的实验经验,总结出了可以快速退磁的方法,因为退磁没有叠加效应,可以通过增大反向磁化电流实现快速退磁,反向退磁电流大都分布在160~180 mA.磁化过程以及它所决定的磁化曲线和磁滞回线与磁畴结构密切相关,可以分为畴壁位移和磁化矢量的转动两个基本的运动阶段.结合实验测量的结果,

  15. Low Field Magnetic and Thermal Hysteresis in Antiferromagnetic Dysprosium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliia Liubimova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic and thermal hysteresis (difference in magnetic properties on cooling and heating have been studied in polycrystalline Dy (dysprosium between 80 and 250 K using measurements of the reversible Villari effect and alternating current (AC susceptibility. We argue that measurement of the reversible Villari effect in the antiferromagnetic phase is a more sensitive method to detect magnetic hysteresis than the registration of conventional B(H loops. We found that the Villari point, recently reported in the antiferromagnetic phase of Dy at 166 K, controls the essential features of magnetic hysteresis and AC susceptibility on heating from the ferromagnetic state: (i thermal hysteresis in AC susceptibility and in the reversible Villari effect disappears abruptly at the temperature of the Villari point; (ii the imaginary part of AC susceptibility is strongly frequency dependent, but only up to the temperature of the Villari point; (iii the imaginary part of the susceptibility drops sharply also at the Villari point. We attribute these effects observed at the Villari point to the disappearance of the residual ferromagnetic phase. The strong influence of the Villari point on several magnetic properties allows this temperature to be ranked almost as important as the Curie and Néel temperatures in Dy and likely also for other rare earth elements and their alloys.

  16. Ocean and atmosphere feedbacks affecting AMOC hysteresis in a GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L. C.; Smith, R. S.; Wood, R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Theories suggest that the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) can exhibit a hysteresis where, for a given input of fresh water into the north Atlantic, there are two possible states: one with a strong overturning in the north Atlantic (on) and the other with a reverse Atlantic cell (off). A previous study showed hysteresis of the AMOC for the first time in a coupled general circulation model (Hawkins et al. in Geophys Res Lett. doi: 10.1029/2011GL047208, 2011). In this study we show that the hysteresis found by Hawkins et al. (2011) is sensitive to the method with which the fresh water input is compensated. If this compensation is applied throughout the volume of the global ocean, rather than at the surface, the region of hysteresis is narrower and the off states are very different: when the compensation is applied at the surface, a strong Pacific overturning cell and a strong Atlantic reverse cell develops; when the compensation is applied throughout the volume there is little change in the Pacific and only a weak Atlantic reverse cell develops. We investigate the mechanisms behind the transitions between the on and off states in the two experiments, and find that the difference in hysteresis is due to the different off states. We find that the development of the Pacific overturning cell results in greater atmospheric moisture transport into the North Atlantic, and also is likely responsible for a stronger Atlantic reverse cell. These both act to stabilize the off state of the Atlantic overturning.

  17. Hysteresis of boiling for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastuszko Robert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of boiling hysteresis on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil is proposed. Hysteresis is an adverse phenomenon, preventing high heat flux systems from thermal stabilization, characterized by a boiling curve variation at an increase and decrease of heat flux density. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS, narrow tunnel structures (NTS and mini-fins covered with the copper wire net (NTS-L. The experiments were carried out with water, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. A detailed analysis of the measurement results identified several cases of type I, II and III for TS, NTS and NTS-L surfaces.

  18. Conditions necessary for capillary hysteresis in porous media: Tests of grain size and surface tension influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Olson, Keith R.; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-05-01

    Hysteresis in the relation between water saturation and matric potential is generally regarded as a basic aspect of unsaturated porous media. However, the nature of an upper length scale limit for saturation hysteresis has not been previously addressed. Since hysteresis depends on whether or not capillary rise occurs at the grain scale, this criterion was used to predict required combinations of grain size, surface tension, fluid-fluid density differences, and acceleration in monodisperse systems. The Haines number (Ha), composed of the aforementioned variables, is proposed as a dimensionless number useful for separating hysteretic (Ha 15) behavior. Vanishing of hysteresis was predicted to occur for grain sizes greater than 10.4 ± 0.5 mm, for water-air systems under the acceleration of ordinary gravity, based on Miller-Miller scaling and Haines' original model for hysteresis. Disappearance of hysteresis was tested through measurements of drainage and wetting curves of sands and gravels and occurs between grain sizes of 10 and 14 mm (standard conditions). The influence of surface tension was tested through measurements of moisture retention in 7 mm gravel, without and with a surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS)). The ordinary water system (Ha = 7) exhibited hysteresis, while the SDBS system (Ha = 18) did not. The experiments completed in this study indicate that hysteresis in moisture retention relations has an upper limit at Ha = 16 ± 2 and show that hysteresis is not a fundamental feature of unsaturated porous media.

  19. The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget Experiment on MSG-1 and its Potential Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, J.; Crommelynck, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (GERB) is in development for launch on the first Meteosat Second Generation Satellite (MSG1) and is described here with its main characteristics. GERB is designed to determine top of the atmosphere reflected Solar and Earth emitted fluxes, sampled every five minutes with a nadir foot print of about 50×50 km2. The measured radiances will be translated into fluxes with improved spatial resolution based on the information extracted from the SEVIRIrefid="fn1">1 instrument also flying on MSG. The applications of GERB data will be multiple. They will provide the behaviour of the real diurnal cycle radiation fields, and thus enable quantification of the cloud diurnal cycle. Together with the SEVIRI information, GERB will allow unique new insight for atmospheric energy budget research.1Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager, the prime instrument on MSG

  20. Effect of Earth's rotation on the trajectories of free-fall bodies in Equivalence Principle Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, C G; Luo, J; Liu, Z Z

    2002-01-01

    Owing to Earth's rotation a free-fall body would move in an elliptical orbit rather than along a straight line forward to the center of the Earth. In this paper on the basis of the theory for spin-spin coupling between macroscopic rotating bodies we study violation of the equivalence principle from long-distance free-fall experiments by means of a rotating ball and a non-rotating sell. For the free-fall time of 40 seconds, the difference between the orbits of the two free-fall bodies is of the order of 10^{-9}cm which could be detected by a SQUID magnetometer owing to such a magnetometer can be used to measure displacements as small as 10^{-13} centimeters.

  1. Challenges and Opportunities for Developing Capacity in Earth Observations for Agricultural Monitoring: The GEOGLAM Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcraft, A. K.; Di Bella, C. M.; Becker Reshef, I.; Deshayes, M.; Justice, C. O.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2011, the Group on Earth Observations Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) Initiative has been working to strengthen the international community's capacity to use Earth observation (EO) data to derive timely, accurate, and transparent information on agriculture, with the goals of reducing market volatility and promoting food security. GEOGLAM aims to develop capacity for EO-based agricultural monitoring at multiple scales, from national to regional to global. This is accomplished through training workshops, developing and transferring of best-practices, establishing networks of broad and sustainable institutional support, and designing or adapting tools and methodologies to fit localized contexts. Over the past four years, capacity development activities in the context of GEOGLAM have spanned all agriculture-containing continents, with much more work to be done, particularly in the domains of promoting access to large, computationally-costly datasets. This talk will detail GEOGLAM's experiences, challenges, and opportunities surrounding building international collaboration, ensuring institutional buy-in, and developing sustainable programs.

  2. Effect of Earth's Rotation on the Trajectories of Free-Fall Bodies in Equivalence Principle Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Cheng-Gang; ZHANG Yuan-Zhong; LUAN En-Jie; LUO Jun; LIU Zhong-Zhu

    2003-01-01

    Owing to Earth's rotation a free-fall body would move in an elliptical orbit rather than along a straight line forward to the center of the Earth. In this paper on the basis of the theory for spin-spin coupling between macroscopic rotating bodies we study violation of the equivalence principle from long-distance free-fall experiments by means of a rotating ball and a non-rotating shell. For the free-fall time of 40 s, the difference between the orbits of the two free-fall bodies is of the order of 10-9 cm which could be detected by an SQUID magnetometer because such a magnetometer can be used to measure displacements as small as 10-13 cm.

  3. Efficient Computational Model of Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Joel

    2005-01-01

    A recently developed mathematical model of the output (displacement) versus the input (applied voltage) of a piezoelectric transducer accounts for hysteresis. For the sake of computational speed, the model is kept simple by neglecting the dynamic behavior of the transducer. Hence, the model applies to static and quasistatic displacements only. A piezoelectric transducer of the type to which the model applies is used as an actuator in a computer-based control system to effect fine position adjustments. Because the response time of the rest of such a system is usually much greater than that of a piezoelectric transducer, the model remains an acceptably close approximation for the purpose of control computations, even though the dynamics are neglected. The model (see Figure 1) represents an electrically parallel, mechanically series combination of backlash elements, each having a unique deadband width and output gain. The zeroth element in the parallel combination has zero deadband width and, hence, represents a linear component of the input/output relationship. The other elements, which have nonzero deadband widths, are used to model the nonlinear components of the hysteresis loop. The deadband widths and output gains of the elements are computed from experimental displacement-versus-voltage data. The hysteresis curve calculated by use of this model is piecewise linear beyond deadband limits.

  4. Determining Appropriate Coupling between User Experiences and Earth Science Data Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Pilone, D.; Newman, D. J.; Mitchell, A. E.; Goff, T. D.; Baynes, K.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System ClearingHOuse (ECHO) is a format agnostic metadata repository supporting over 3000 collections and 100M granules. ECHO exposes FTP and RESTful Data Ingest APIs in addition to both SOAP and RESTful search and order capabilities. Built on top of ECHO is a human facing search and order web application named Reverb. Reverb exposes ECHO's capabilities through an interactive, Web 2.0 application designed around searching for Earth Science data and downloading or ordering data of interest. ECHO and Reverb have supported the concept of Earth Science data services for several years but only for discovery. Invocation of these services was not a primary capability of the user experience. As more and more Earth Science data moves online and away from the concept of data ordering, progress has been made in making on demand services available for directly accessed data. These concepts have existed through access mechanisms such as OPeNDAP but are proliferating to accommodate a wider variety of services and service providers. Recently, the EOSDIS Service Interface (ESI) was defined and integrated into the ECS system. The ESI allows data providers to expose a wide variety of service capabilities including reprojection, reformatting, spatial and band subsetting, and resampling. ECHO and Reverb were tasked with making these services available to end-users in a meaningful and usable way that integrated into its existing search and ordering workflow. This presentation discusses the challenges associated with exposing disparate service capabilities while presenting a meaningful and cohesive user experience. Specifically, we'll discuss: - Benefits and challenges of tightly coupling the user interface with underlying services - Approaches to generic service descriptions - Approaches to dynamic user interfaces that better describe service capabilities while minimizing application coupling - Challenges associated with traditional WSDL / UDDI style service

  5. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  6. Statistical analysis of Contact Angle Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, Nachiketa; Panchagnula, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a new statistical approach to determining Contact Angle Hysteresis (CAH) by studying the nature of the triple line. A statistical distribution of local contact angles on a random three-dimensional drop is used as the basis for this approach. Drops with randomly shaped triple lines but of fixed volumes were deposited on a substrate and their triple line shapes were extracted by imaging. Using a solution developed by Prabhala et al. (Langmuir, 2010), the complete three dimensional shape of the sessile drop was generated. A distribution of the local contact angles for several such drops but of the same liquid-substrate pairs is generated. This distribution is a result of several microscopic advancing and receding processes along the triple line. This distribution is used to yield an approximation of the CAH associated with the substrate. This is then compared with measurements of CAH by means of a liquid infusion-withdrawal experiment. Static measurements are shown to be sufficient to measure quasistatic contact angle hysteresis of a substrate. The approach also points towards the relationship between microscopic triple line contortions and CAH.

  7. CP violation and matter effect for a variable earth density in very long baseline experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahmachari, Biswajoy; Choubey, Sandhya E-mail: sandhya@he.sissa.it; Roy, Probir

    2003-11-03

    The perturbative treatment of subdominant oscillation and matter effect in neutrino beams/superbeams, propagating over long baselines and being used to look for CP violation, is studied here for a general matter density function varying with distance. New lowest order analytic expressions are given for different flavour transition and survival probabilities in a general neutrino mixing basis and a variable earth matter density profile. It is demonstrated that the matter effect in the muon neutrino (antineutrino) flavour survival probability vanishes to this order, provided the depletion, observed for atmospheric muon neutrinos and antineutrinos at super-Kamiokande, is strictly maximal. This result is independent of the earth density profile and the distance L between the source and the detector. In the general variable density case we show that one cannot separate the matter induced asymmetry from a genuine CP effect by keeping two detectors at distances L{sub 1} and L{sub 2} from the source while maintaining a fixed ratio L{sub 1}/E{sub 1}=L{sub 2}/E{sub 2}. This needs to be done numerically and we estimate the asymmetry generated by the earth matter effect with particular density profiles and some chosen parameters for very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments.

  8. VIIRS day-night band (DNB) electronic hysteresis: characterization and correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) offers measurements over a dynamic range from full daylight to the dimmest nighttime. This makes radiometric calibration difficult because effects that are otherwise negligible become significant for the DNB. One of these effects is electronic hysteresis and this paper evaluates this effect and its impact on calibration. It also considers possible correction algorithms. The cause of this hysteresis is uncertain, but since the DNB uses a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector array, it is likely the result of residual charge or charge depletion. The effects of hysteresis are evident in DNB imagery. Steaks are visible in the cross-track direction around very bright objects such as gas flares. Dark streaks are also visible after lightning flashes. Each VIIRS scan is a sequence of 4 sectors: space view (SV); Earth-view (EV); blackbody (BB) view; and solar diffuser (SD) view. There are differences among these sectors in offset that can only be explained as being the result of hysteresis from one sector to the next. The most dramatic hysteresis effect is when the sun illuminates the SD and hysteresis is then observed in the SV and EV. Previously this was hypothesized to be due to stray light leaking from the SD chamber, but more careful evaluation shows that this can only be the result of hysteresis. There is a stray light correction algorithm that treats this as stray light, but there are problems with this that could be remedied by instead using the characterization presented here.

  9. Refurbishment of the cryogenic coolers for the Skylab earth resources experiment package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, J. C.; Luksa, N. C.

    1975-01-01

    Skylab Earth Resources Experiment Package (EREP) experiments, S191 and S192, required a cold temperature reference for operation of a spectrometer. This cold temperature reference was provided by a subminiature Stirling cycle cooler. However, the failure of the cooler to pass the qualification test made it necessary for additional cooler development, refurbishment, and qualification. A description of the failures and the cause of these failures for each of the coolers is presented. The solutions to the various failure modes are discussed along with problems which arose during the refurbishment program. The rationale and results of various tests are presented. The successful completion of the cryogenic cooler refurbishment program resulted in four of these coolers being flown on Skylab. The system operation during the flight is presented.

  10. Improved charge amplifier using hybrid hysteresis compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Shahidi, Darya; Trumper, David L.

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel charge amplifier, with a robust feedback circuit and a method for compensating piezoelectric actuator's hysteresis at low frequencies. The amplifier uses a modified feedback circuit which improves robustness to the addition of series load impedance such as in cabling. We also describe a hybrid hysteresis compensation method for enabling the charge amplifier to reduce hysteresis at low frequencies. Experimental results demonstrate the utility of the new amplifier design.

  11. Contact angle hysteresis on fluoropolymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, H; Jehnichen, D; Grundke, K; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2007-10-31

    Contact angle hysteresis of liquids with different molecular and geometrical properties on high quality films of four fluoropolymers was studied. A number of different causes are identified for hysteresis. With n-alkanes as probe liquids, contact angle hysteresis is found to be strongly related to the configuration of polymer chains. The largest hysteresis is obtained with amorphous polymers whereas the smallest hysteresis occurs for polymers with ordered molecular chains. This is explained in terms of sorption of liquid by the solid and penetration of liquid into the polymer film. Correlation of contact angle hysteresis with the size of n-alkane molecules supports this conclusion. On the films of two amorphous fluoropolymers with different molecular configurations, contact angle hysteresis of one and the same liquid with "bulky" molecules is shown to be quite different. On the surfaces of Teflon AF 1600, with stiff molecular chains, the receding angles of the probe liquids are independent of contact time between solid and liquid and similar hysteresis is obtained for all the liquids. Retention of liquid molecules on the solid surface is proposed as the most likely cause of hysteresis in these systems. On the other hand, with EGC-1700 films that consist of flexible chains, the receding angles are strongly time-dependent and the hysteresis is large. Contact angle hysteresis increases even further when liquids with strong dipolar intermolecular forces are used. In this case, major reorganization of EGC-1700 chains due to contact with the test liquids is suggested as the cause. The effect of rate of motion of the three-phase line on the advancing and receding contact angles, and therefore contact angle hysteresis, is investigated. For low viscous liquids, contact angles are independent of the drop front velocity up to approximately 10 mm/min. This agrees with the results of an earlier study that showed that the rate-dependence of the contact angles is an issue only

  12. High-speed tracking control of piezoelectric actuators using an ellipse-based hysteresis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guoying; Zhu, Limin

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, an ellipse-based mathematic model is developed to characterize the rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the proposed model, an expanded input space is constructed to describe the multivalued hysteresis function H[u](t) by a multiple input single output (MISO) mapping Gamma:R(2)-->R. Subsequently, the inverse MISO mapping Gamma(-1)(H[u](t),H[u](t);u(t)) is proposed for real-time hysteresis compensation. In controller design, a hybrid control strategy combining a model-based feedforward controller and a proportional integral differential (PID) feedback loop is used for high-accuracy and high-speed tracking control of piezoelectric actuators. The real-time feedforward controller is developed to cancel the rate-dependent hysteresis based on the inverse hysteresis model, while the PID controller is used to compensate for the creep, modeling errors, and parameter uncertainties. Finally, experiments with and without hysteresis compensation are conducted and the experimental results are compared. The experimental results show that the hysteresis compensation in the feedforward path can reduce the hysteresis-caused error by up to 88% and the tracking performance of the hybrid controller is greatly improved in high-speed tracking control applications, e.g., the root-mean-square tracking error is reduced to only 0.34% of the displacement range under the input frequency of 100 Hz.

  13. Molecular mechanism of adsorption/desorption hysteresis: dynamics of shale gas in nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, FengChao; Liu, He; Wu, HengAn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the adsorption and desorption behavior of methane has received considerable attention since it is one of the crucial aspects of the exploitation of shale gas. Unexpectedly, obvious hysteresis is observed from the ideally reversible physical sorption of methane in some experiments. However, the underlying mechanism still remains an open problem. In this study, Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to explore the molecular mechanisms of adsorption/desorption hysteresis. First, a detailed analysis about the capillary condensation of methane in micropores is presented. The influence of pore width, surface strength, and temperature on the hysteresis loop is further investigated. It is found that a disappearance of hysteresis occurs above a temperature threshold. Combined with the phase diagram of methane, we explicitly point out that capillary condensation is inapplicable for the hysteresis of shale gas under normal temperature conditions. Second, a new mechanism, variation of pore throat size, is proposed and studied. For methane to pass through the throat, a certain energy is required due to the repulsive interaction. The required energy increases with shrinkage of the throat, such that the originally adsorbed methane cannot escape through the narrowed throat. These trapped methane molecules account for the hysteresis. Furthermore, the hysteresis loop is found to increase with the increasing pressure and decreasing temperature. We suggest that the variation of pore throat size can explain the adsorption/desorption hysteresis of shale gas. Our conclusions and findings are of great significance for guiding the efficient exploitation of shale gas.

  14. Characteristics of the Nordic Seas overflows in a set of Norwegian Earth System Model experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuncheng; Ilicak, Mehmet; Bentsen, Mats; Fer, Ilker

    2016-08-01

    Global ocean models with an isopycnic vertical coordinate are advantageous in representing overflows, as they do not suffer from topography-induced spurious numerical mixing commonly seen in geopotential coordinate models. In this paper, we present a quantitative diagnosis of the Nordic Seas overflows in four configurations of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) family that features an isopycnic ocean model. For intercomparison, two coupled ocean-sea ice and two fully coupled (atmosphere-land-ocean-sea ice) experiments are considered. Each pair consists of a (non-eddying) 1° and a (eddy-permitting) 1/4° horizontal resolution ocean model. In all experiments, overflow waters remain dense and descend to the deep basins, entraining ambient water en route. Results from the 1/4° pair show similar behavior in the overflows, whereas the 1° pair show distinct differences, including temperature/salinity properties, volume transport (Q), and large scale features such as the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The volume transport of the overflows and degree of entrainment are underestimated in the 1° experiments, whereas in the 1/4° experiments, there is a two-fold downstream increase in Q, which matches observations well. In contrast to the 1/4° experiments, the coarse 1° experiments do not capture the inclined isopycnals of the overflows or the western boundary current off the Flemish Cap. In all experiments, the pathway of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water is misrepresented: a major fraction of the overflow proceeds southward into the West European Basin, instead of turning westward into the Irminger Sea. This discrepancy is attributed to excessive production of Labrador Sea Water in the model. The mean state and variability of the Nordic Seas overflows have significant consequences on the response of the AMOC, hence their correct representations are of vital importance in global ocean and climate modelling.

  15. Benchmark Shock Tube Experiments for Radiative Heating Relevant to Earth Re-Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, A. M.; Cruden, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Detailed spectrally and spatially resolved radiance has been measured in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility for conditions relevant to high speed entry into a variety of atmospheres, including Earth, Venus, Titan, Mars and the Outer Planets. The tests that measured radiation relevant for Earth re-entry are the focus of this work and are taken from campaigns 47, 50, 52 and 57. These tests covered conditions from 8 km/s to 15.5 km/s at initial pressures ranging from 0.05 Torr to 1 Torr, of which shots at 0.1 and 0.2 Torr are analyzed in this paper. These conditions cover a range of points of interest for potential fight missions, including return from Low Earth Orbit, the Moon and Mars. The large volume of testing available from EAST is useful for statistical analysis of radiation data, but is problematic for identifying representative experiments for performing detailed analysis. Therefore, the intent of this paper is to select a subset of benchmark test data that can be considered for further detailed study. These benchmark shots are intended to provide more accessible data sets for future code validation studies and facility-to-facility comparisons. The shots that have been selected as benchmark data are the ones in closest agreement to a line of best fit through all of the EAST results, whilst also showing the best experimental characteristics, such as test time and convergence to equilibrium. The EAST data are presented in different formats for analysis. These data include the spectral radiance at equilibrium, the spatial dependence of radiance over defined wavelength ranges and the mean non-equilibrium spectral radiance (so-called 'spectral non-equilibrium metric'). All the information needed to simulate each experimental trace, including free-stream conditions, shock time of arrival (i.e. x-t) relation, and the spectral and spatial resolution functions, are provided.

  16. Advanced Concepts, Technologies and Flight Experiments for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Barry D.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has established a tradition of excellence in scientific research and leading-edge system developments, which have contributed to improved scientific understanding of our Earth system. Specifically, LaRC advances knowledge of atmospheric processes to enable proactive climate prediction and, in that role, develops first-of-a-kind atmospheric sensing capabilities that permit a variety of new measurements to be made within a constrained enterprise budget. These advances are enabled by the timely development and infusion of new, state-of-the-art (SOA), active and passive instrument and sensor technologies. In addition, LaRC's center-of-excellence in structures and materials is being applied to the technological challenges of reducing measurement system size, mass, and cost through the development and use of space-durable materials; lightweight, multi-functional structures; and large deployable/inflatable structures. NASA Langley is engaged in advancing these technologies across the full range of readiness levels from concept, to components, to prototypes, to flight experiments, and on to actual science mission infusion. The purpose of this paper is to describe current activities and capabilities, recent achievements, and future plans of the integrated science, engineering, and technology team at Langley Research Center who are working to enable the future of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise.

  17. Partitioning experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell: volatile content in the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jephcoat, Andrew P; Bouhifd, M Ali; Porcelli, Don

    2008-11-28

    The present state of the Earth evolved from energetic events that were determined early in the history of the Solar System. A key process in reconciling this state and the observable mantle composition with models of the original formation relies on understanding the planetary processing that has taken place over the past 4.5Ga. Planetary size plays a key role and ultimately determines the pressure and temperature conditions at which the materials of the early solar nebular segregated. We summarize recent developments with the laser-heated diamond anvil cell that have made possible extension of the conventional pressure limit for partitioning experiments as well as the study of volatile trace elements. In particular, we discuss liquid-liquid, metal-silicate (M-Sil) partitioning results for several elements in a synthetic chondritic mixture, spanning a wide range of atomic number-helium to iodine. We examine the role of the core as a possible host of both siderophile and trace elements and the implications that early segregation processes at deep magma ocean conditions have for current mantle signatures, both compositional and isotopic. The results provide some of the first experimental evidence that the core is the obvious replacement for the long-sought, deep mantle reservoir. If so, they also indicate the need to understand the detailed nature and scale of core-mantle exchange processes, from atomic to macroscopic, throughout the age of the Earth to the present day.

  18. Dynamic hysteresis in the rheology of complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisto, Antti; Mohtaschemi, Mikael; Alava, Mikko J; Illa, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Recently, rheological hysteresis has been studied systematically in a wide range of complex fluids combining global rheology and time-resolved velocimetry. In this paper we present an analysis of the roles of the three most fundamental mechanisms in simple-yield-stress fluids: structure dynamics, viscoelastic response, and spatial flow heterogeneities, i.e., time-dependent shear bands. Dynamical hysteresis simulations are done analogously to rheological ramp-up and -down experiments on a coupled model which incorporates viscoelasticity and time-dependent structure evolution. Based on experimental data, a coupling between hysteresis measured from the local velocity profiles and that measured from the global flow curve has been suggested. According to the present model, even if transient shear banding appears during the shear ramps, in typical narrow-gap devices, only a small part of the hysteretic response can be attributed to heterogeneous flow. This results in decoupling of the hysteresis measured from the local velocity profiles and the global flow curve, demonstrating that for an arbitrary time-dependent rheological response this proposed coupling can be very weak.

  19. Position control of a single pneumatic artificial muscle with hysteresis compensation based on modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xizhe; Liu, Yixiang; Heng, Shuai; Lin, Zhenkun; Zhao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    High-performance position control of pneumatic artificial muscles is limited by their inherent nonlinearity and hysteresis. This study aims to model the length/pressure hysteresis of a single pneumatic artificial muscle and to realize its accurate position tracking control with forward hysteresis compensation. The classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is widely used in hysteresis modelling and compensation. But it is only effective for symmetric hysteresis. Therefore, a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model is built to characterize the asymmetric length/pressure hysteresis of a single pneumatic artificial muscle, by replacing the classical play operators with two more flexible elementary operators to independently describe the ascending branch and descending branch of hysteresis loops. On the basis, a position tracking controller, which is composed of cascade forward hysteresis compensation and simple proportional pressure controller, is designed for the pneumatic artificial muscle. Experiment results show that the MPI model can reproduce the length/pressure hysteresis of the pneumatic artificial muscle, and the proposed controller for the pneumatic artificial muscle can track the reference position signals with high accuracy. By modelling the length/pressure hysteresis with the modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model and using its inversion for compensation, precise position control of a single pneumatic artificial muscle is achieved.

  20. Earth resources programs at the Langley Research Center. Part 1: Advanced Applications Flight Experiments (AAFE) and microwave remote sensing program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    The earth resources activity is comprised of two basic programs as follows: advanced applications flight experiments, and microwave remote sensing. The two programs are in various stages of implementation, extending from experimental investigations within both the AAFE program and the microwave remote sensing program, to multidisciplinary studies and planning. The purpose of this paper is simply to identify the main thrust of the Langley Research Center activity in earth resources.

  1. Hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández-Lemus

    Full Text Available In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue.

  2. Nonlinearity and hysteresis of resonant strain gauges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gui, Chengqun; Legtenberg, Rob; Tilmans, Harrie A.C.; Fluitman, Jan H.J; Elwenspoek, Miko

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinearity and hysteresis effects of electrostatically activated, voltage driven resonant microbridges have been studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown, that, in order to avoid vibration instability and hysteresis to occur, the choices of the ax. and d.c. driving voltages and of the

  3. Nonlinearity and hysteresis of resonant strain gauges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gui, Chengqun; Legtenberg, Rob; Tilmans, Harrie A.C.; Fluitman, Jan H.J; Elwenspoek, Miko

    1998-01-01

    The nonlinearity and hysteresis effects of the electrostatically activated voltage-driven resonant microbridges have been studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that in order to avoid vibration instability and hysteresis to occur, the choices of the ac and dc driving voltages and of t

  4. Recording experiments on rare-earth transition-metal thin films studied with Lorentz microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greidanus, F.J.A.M.; Jacobs, B.A.J.; Spruit, J.H.M. (Philips Research Labs., Eindhoven (Netherlands)); Klahn, S. (Philips GmbH Forschungslaboratorium Hamburg, D-2000 Hamburg (DE))

    1989-09-01

    Domains written thermomagnetically under recording conditions in rare-earth transition-metal thin films are studied with Lorentz microscopy. New technique in which the magneto-optical layer is deposited on specially prepared silicon wafer disks, provided with Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ windows is described. This technique allows direct observation of the written domain patterns in the electron microscope. It is demonstrated that the nucleation process plays a crucial role when writing in TbFeCo. Different compositions, having different temperature dependencies of the magnetic properties, lead to remarkably different domain-formation behaviour. With the detailed insight into the shape and structure of domains obtained by Lorentz microscopy, carrier and noise levels obtained from recording experiments can be understood. This is demonstrated with data on GdTbFe. It is shown that magnetic-field modulation, apart from the advantage of direct overwrite, offers the possibility of very high density recording.

  5. Science Results from Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE): Energetic Particle Distribution in Near Earth Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlin

    2013-04-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the National Science Foundation, launched into a low-Earth, polar orbit on 13 September 2012 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. The science objectives of CSSWE are to investigate the relationship of the location, magnitude, and frequency of solar flares to the timing, duration, and energy spectrum of solar energetic particles reaching Earth, and to determine the precipitation loss and the evolution of the energy spectrum of trapped radiation belt electrons. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a miniaturization of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics for NASA/Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft, launched 30 August 2012, that traverse the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination orbit. CSSWE's REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 10 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3.3 MeV. The commissioning phase was completed and REPTile was activated on 4 October 2012. The data are very clean, far exceeding expectations! A number of engineering challenges had to be overcome to achieve such clean measurements under the mass and power limits of a CubeSat. The CSSWE is also an ideal class project, providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project.

  6. Stabilization and Control Models of Systems With Hysteresis Nonlinearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail E. Semenov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical and economic systems with hysteresis nonlinearities are studied in article. Dissipativity condition of inverted pendulum under the hysteresis control is obtained. The solution of the optimal production strategy problem was found where price has hysteresis behaviour.

  7. Hysteresis in the dynamic perception of scenes and objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltoratski, Sonia; Tong, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Scenes and objects are effortlessly processed and integrated by the human visual system. Given the distinct neural and behavioral substrates of scene and object processing, it is likely that individuals sometimes preferentially rely on one process or the other when viewing canonical "scene" or "object" stimuli. This would allow the visual system to maximize the specific benefits of these 2 types of processing. It is less obvious which of these modes of perception would be invoked during naturalistic visual transition between a focused view of a single object and an expansive view of an entire scene, particularly at intermediate views that may not be assigned readily to either stimulus category. In the current study, we asked observers to report their online perception of such dynamic image sequences, which zoomed and panned between a canonical view of a single object and an entire scene. We found a large and consistent effect of prior perception, or hysteresis, on the classification of the sequence: observers classified the sequence as an object for several seconds longer if the trial started at the object view and zoomed out, whereas scenes were perceived for longer on trials beginning with a scene view. This hysteresis effect resisted several manipulations of the movie stimulus and of the task performed, but hinged on the perceptual history built by unidirectional progression through the image sequence. Multiple experiments confirmed that this hysteresis effect was not purely decisional and was more prominent for transitions between corresponding objects and scenes than between other high-level stimulus classes. This finding suggests that the competitive mechanisms underlying hysteresis may be especially prominent in the perception of objects and scenes. We propose that hysteresis aids in disambiguating perception during naturalistic visual transitions, which may facilitate a dynamic balance between scene and object processing to enhance processing efficiency.

  8. Leakage behavior and distortion of the hysteresis loop in ferroelectric thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑立荣; 林成鲁; 许华平; 邹世昌; Masanori Okuyama

    1997-01-01

    Leakage behavior and distortion of the polarization hysteresis loop in ferroelectric thin films are analyzed by applying a totally depleted asymmetric back-to-back Schottky model, with the Pt/Pb(Zr, Ti)O3/Pt ( Pt/ PZT/Pt) sandwich structural thin film capacitor as an example. Some interesting phenomena resulting from the asymmetric interfaces, such as the leakage current level, the flat-band voltage, the disclosure of the hysteresis loop, and the change in the remanent polarization and coercive field, as well as the vertical drift of the polarization hysteresis loop, are discussed in detail. The calculated results are also verified with experiments.

  9. Pairing Essential Climate Science with Sustainable Energy Information: the "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuginow, E.; Alley, R. B.; Haines-Stiles, G.

    2010-12-01

    considerable challenge of supplying clean energy to a growing population. Additional scenes have been filmed in Brazil, Spain, China, Morocco, Scotland, and across America, including at the National Renewable Energy Lab. in Denver, CO, and New Orleans. Program 3 (presently untitled and targeted for 2012) will feature American communities seeking to increase energy efficiency and minimize carbon emissions. The Fall 2010 AGU presentation will include video clips from the series, initial findings from focus groups (coordinated by project evaluator, Rockman Et Al) as to what information has been found most compelling to potential audiences, and a description of plans being developed by the project's science center partners in San Diego CA, Portland OR, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Fort Worth TX and Raleigh NC. "EARTH-The Operators' Manual" is an experiment to determine the effectiveness of these activities to reach audiences who, according to surveys, have actually become less convinced of anthropogenic climate change, while remaining supportive of investments in advancing clean energy opportunities.

  10. How to Communicate Near Earth Objects with the Public - Klet Observatory Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticha, Jana; Tichy, Milos; Kocer, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Near-Earth Object (NEO) research is counted among the most popular parts of communicating astronomy with the public. Increasing research results in the field of Near-Earth Objects as well as impact hazard investigations cause growing interest among general public and media. Furthermore NEO related issues have outstanding educational value. So thus communicating NEO detection, NEO characterization, possible impact effects, space missions to NEOs, ways of mitigation and impact warnings with the public and media belong to the most important tasks of scientists and research institutions.Our institution represents an unique liaison of the small professional research institution devoted especially to NEO studies (the Klet Observatory, Czech Republic) and the educational and public outreach branch (the Observatory and Planetarium Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic). This all has been giving us an excellent opportunity for bringing NEO information to wider audience. We have been obtaining a wide experience in communicating NEOs with the public more than twenty years.There is a wide spectrum of public outreach tools aimed to NEO research and hazard. As the most useful ones we consider two special on-line magazines (e-zins) devoted to asteroids (www.planetky.cz) and comets (www.komety.cz) in Czech language, educational multimedia presentations for schools at different levels in planetarium, summer excursions for wide public just at the Klet Observatory on the top of the Klet mountain, public lectures, meetings and exhibitions. It seems to be very contributing and favoured by public to have opportunities for more or less informal meetings just with NEO researchers from time to time. Very important part of NEO public outreach consists of continuous contact with journalists and media including press releases, interviews, news, periodical programs. An increasing role of social media is taken into account through Facebook and Twitter profiles.The essential goal of all mentioned NEO

  11. Evaluation of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) shortwave channel's stability using in-flight calibration sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Michael A.; Lee, Robert B., III; Thomas, Susan

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) radiometers were designed to make absolute measurements of the incoming solar, earth-reflected solar, and earth-emitted fluxes for investigations of the earth's climate system. Thermistor bolometers were the sensors used for the ERBE scanning radiometric package. Each thermistor bolometer package consisted of three narrow field of view broadband radiometric channels measuring shortwave, longwave, and total (0.2 micron to 50 microns) radiation. The in-flight calibration facilities include Mirror Attenuator Mosaics, shortwave internal calibration source, and internal blackbody sources to monitor the long-term responsivity of the radiometers. This paper describes the in-flight calibration facilities, the calibration data reduction techniques, and the results from the in-flight shortwave channel calibrations. The results indicate that the ERBE shortwave detectors were stable to within +/- 1 percent for up to five years of flight operation.

  12. Motion of liquid drops on surfaces induced by asymmetric vibration: role of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2011-08-16

    Hysteresis of wetting, like the Coulombic friction at solid/solid interface, impedes the motion of a liquid drop on a surface when subjected to an external field. Here, we present a counterintuitive example, where some amount of hysteresis enables a drop to move on a surface when it is subjected to a periodic but asymmetric vibration. Experiments show that a surface either with a negligible or high hysteresis is not conducive to any drop motion. Some finite hysteresis of contact angle is needed to break the periodic symmetry of the forcing function for the drift to occur. These experimental results are consistent with simulations, in which a drop is approximated as a linear harmonic oscillator. The experiment also sheds light on the effect of the drop size on flow reversal, where drops of different sizes move in opposite directions due to the difference in the phase of the oscillation of their center of mass.

  13. Research on the Dynamic Hysteresis Loop Model of the Residence Times Difference (RTD-Fluxgate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxia Wan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the core hysteresis features, the RTD-fluxgate core, while working, is repeatedly saturated with excitation field. When the fluxgate simulates, the accurate characteristic model of the core may provide a precise simulation result. As the shape of the ideal hysteresis loop model is fixed, it cannot accurately reflect the actual dynamic changing rules of the hysteresis loop. In order to improve the fluxgate simulation accuracy, a dynamic hysteresis loop model containing the parameters which have actual physical meanings is proposed based on the changing rule of the permeability parameter when the fluxgate is working. Compared with the ideal hysteresis loop model, this model has considered the dynamic features of the hysteresis loop, which makes the simulation results closer to the actual output. In addition, other hysteresis loops of different magnetic materials can be explained utilizing the described model for an example of amorphous magnetic material in this manuscript. The model has been validated by the output response comparison between experiment results and fitting results using the model.

  14. Research on the dynamic hysteresis loop model of the residence times difference (RTD)-fluxgate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhang; Wu, Shujun; Zhou, Zhijian; Cheng, Defu; Pang, Na; Wan, Yunxia

    2013-09-02

    Based on the core hysteresis features, the RTD-fluxgate core, while working, is repeatedly saturated with excitation field. When the fluxgate simulates, the accurate characteristic model of the core may provide a precise simulation result. As the shape of the ideal hysteresis loop model is fixed, it cannot accurately reflect the actual dynamic changing rules of the hysteresis loop. In order to improve the fluxgate simulation accuracy, a dynamic hysteresis loop model containing the parameters which have actual physical meanings is proposed based on the changing rule of the permeability parameter when the fluxgate is working. Compared with the ideal hysteresis loop model, this model has considered the dynamic features of the hysteresis loop, which makes the simulation results closer to the actual output. In addition, other hysteresis loops of different magnetic materials can be explained utilizing the described model for an example of amorphous magnetic material in this manuscript. The model has been validated by the output response comparison between experiment results and fitting results using the model.

  15. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eby

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20th century trends in surface air temperature and carbon uptake are reasonably well simulated when compared to observed trends. Land carbon fluxes show much more variation between models than ocean carbon fluxes, and recent land fluxes appear to be slightly underestimated. It is possible that recent modelled climate trends or climate–carbon feedbacks are overestimated resulting in too much land carbon loss or that carbon uptake due to CO2 and/or nitrogen fertilization is underestimated. Several one thousand year long, idealized, 2 × and 4 × CO2 experiments are used to quantify standard model characteristics, including transient and equilibrium climate sensitivities, and climate–carbon feedbacks. The values from EMICs generally fall within the range given by general circulation models. Seven additional historical simulations, each including a single specified forcing, are used to assess the contributions of different climate forcings to the overall climate and carbon cycle response. The response of surface air temperature is the linear sum of the individual forcings, while the carbon cycle response shows a non-linear interaction between land-use change and CO2 forcings for some models. Finally, the preindustrial portions of the last millennium simulations are used to assess historical model carbon-climate feedbacks. Given the specified forcing, there

  16. Hysteresis phenomenon of the field emission from carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, S. V.; Popov, E. O.; Kolosko, A. G.; Romanov, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Using the high voltage scanning method and the technique of multichannel recording and processing of field emission (FE) characteristics in real time mode we found out some subtle effects on current voltage characteristics (IVC) of the multi-tip field emitters. We observed the direct and reverse hysteresis simultaneously in the same field emission experiment. Dependence of the form of IVC hysteresis on time of high voltage scanning was observed.

  17. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  18. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  19. Dynamic optical hysteresis in the quantum regime

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, S R K; Storme, F; Sagnes, I; Gratiet, L Le; Galopin, E; Lemaitre, A; Amo, A; Ciuti, C; Bloch, J

    2016-01-01

    For more than 40 years, optical bistability --- the existence of two stable states with different photon numbers for the same driving conditions --- has been experimentally reported. Surprisingly, the quantum theory of a single-mode nonlinear cavity always predicts a unique steady state, i.e. no bistability. To reconcile this apparent contradiction, a tunneling time for bistability has been introduced. This is a timescale over which quantum fluctuations trigger transitions between classically stable states, and which can be astronomically longer than the measurement. While quantum fluctuations ultimately forbid the static hysteresis associated with bistability, it was recently predicted that optical hysteresis should emerge dynamically for finite sweep rates of the driving intensity. This dynamic hysteresis is expected to exhibit a double power-law behavior defining a classical-to-quantum crossover. Here, by measuring the dynamic optical hysteresis of a semiconductor microcavity for various sweep rates of the...

  20. Understanding rheological hysteresis in soft glassy materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Rangarajan; Divoux, Thibaut; Manneville, Sébastien; Fielding, Suzanne M

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by recent experimental studies of rheological hysteresis in soft glassy materials, we study numerically strain rate sweeps in simple yield stress fluids and viscosity bifurcating yield stress fluids. Our simulations of downward followed by upward strain rate sweeps, performed within fluidity models and the soft glassy rheology model, successfully capture the experimentally observed monotonic decrease of the area of the rheological hysteresis loop with sweep time in simple yield stress fluids, and the bell shaped dependence of hysteresis loop area on sweep time in viscosity bifurcating fluids. We provide arguments explaining these two different functional forms in terms of differing tendencies of simple and viscosity bifurcating fluids to form shear bands during the sweeps, and show that the banding behaviour captured by our simulations indeed agrees with that reported experimentally. We also discuss the difference in hysteresis behaviour between inelastic and viscoelastic fluids. Our simulations qualitatively agree with the experimental data discussed here for four different soft glassy materials.

  1. Adhesion hysteresis of silane coated microcantilevers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE BOER,MAARTEN P.; KNAPP,JAMES A.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.; SRINIVASAN,U.; MABOUDIAN,R.

    2000-04-17

    The authors have developed a new experimental approach for measuring hysteresis in the adhesion between micromachined surfaces. By accurately modeling the deformations in cantilever beams that are subject to combined interfacial adhesion and applied electrostatic forces, they determine adhesion energies for advancing and receding contacts. They draw on this new method to examine adhesion hysteresis for silane coated micromachined structures and found significant hysteresis for surfaces that were exposed to high relative humidity (RH) conditions. Atomic force microscopy studies of these surfaces showed spontaneous formation of agglomerates that they interpreted as silages that have irreversibly transformed from uniform surface layers at low RH to isolated vesicles at high RH. They used contact deformation models to show that the compliance of these vesicles could reasonably account for the adhesion hysteresis that develops at high RH as the surfaces are forced into contact by an externally applied load.

  2. Inversion of hysteresis and creep operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejčí, Pavel; Al Janaideh, Mohammad; Deasy, Fergal

    2012-05-01

    The explicit inversion formula for rate dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii operators is extended to cases without the threshold dilation condition. This solves a problem in hysteresis and creep modeling of magnetostrictive behavior.

  3. Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis models for complex time dependent hysteresis nonlinearities

    OpenAIRE

    Al Janaideh, M.; Krejčí, P

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new class of time dependent hysteresis models by combining the time dependent Prandtl–Ishlinskii model with functional nonlinearities. This combination improves the capability of the time dependent Prandtl–Ishlinskii model to characterize a class of complex time dependent hysteresis nonlinearities in smart actuators. The analytical inversion for the proposed time dependent hysteresis model is also presented in order to extend the inversion algorithm of the inverse time dependen...

  4. Evaluation of the Earth Systems Research Laboratory's global Observing System Simulation Experiment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki C. Privé

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE system has been implemented at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Earth Systems Research Laboratory in the US as part of an international Joint OSSE effort. The setup of the OSSE consists of a Nature Run from a 13-month free run of the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts operational model, synthetic observations developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Modelling and Assimilation Office, and an operational version of the NCEP Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation data assimilation and Global Forecast System numerical weather prediction model. Synthetic observations included both conventional observations and the following radiance observations: AIRS, AMSU-A, AMSU-B, HIRS2, HIRS3, MSU, GOES radiance and OSBUV. Calibration was performed by modifying the error added to the conventional synthetic observations to achieve a match between data denial impacts on the analysis state in the OSSE system and in the real data system. Following calibration, the performance of the OSSE system was evaluated in terms of forecast skill scores and impact of observations on forecast fields.

  5. Hysteresis of Electronic Transport in Graphene Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haomin; Wu, Yihong; Cong, Chunxiao; Shang, Jingzhi; Yu, Ting

    2010-01-01

    Graphene field effect transistors commonly comprise graphene flakes lying on SiO2 surfaces. The gate-voltage dependent conductance shows hysteresis depending on the gate sweeping rate/range. It is shown here that the transistors exhibit two different kinds of hysteresis in their electrical characteristics. Charge transfer causes a positive shift in the gate voltage of the minimum conductance, while capacitive gating can cause the negative shift of conductance with respect to gate voltage. The...

  6. Contact angle hysteresis at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Mathieu; Monthioux, Marc; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2011-04-01

    Using atomic force microscopy with nonconventional carbon tips, the pinning of a liquid contact line on individual nanometric defects was studied. This mechanism is responsible for the occurrence of the contact angle hysteresis. The presence of weak defects which do not contribute to the hysteresis is evidenced for the first time. The dissipated energy associated with strong defects is also measured down to values in the range of kT, which correspond to defect sizes in the order of 1 nm.

  7. Temperature dependent extension of a hysteresis model

    OpenAIRE

    Sixdenier, Fabien; MESSAL, Oualid; Hilal, Alaa; Martin, Christian; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Some soft magnetic materials (like ferrites but not only) are strongly dependent of the temperature. In order to predict their behaviour in electrical devices, engineers need hysteresis models able to take into account the temperature. This paper is an attempt to take into account the temperature in an existing model of hysteresis through its parameters. Variations of some parameters are issued from Weiss’s works and others have to be fitted numerically. Simulation res...

  8. Earth Sciences as a Vehicle for Gifted Education--The Hong Kong Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Phillip J.; Chan, Lung Sang; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The development and delivery of an Earth-science-focused short course designed to prepare Hong Kong students for university level study is described. Earth sciences provide an inspirational and challenging context for learning and teaching in Hong Kong's increasingly skills-based curriculum. (Contains 3 figures and 4 online resources.)

  9. Earth Sciences as a Vehicle for Gifted Education--The Hong Kong Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Phillip J.; Chan, Lung Sang; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The development and delivery of an Earth-science-focused short course designed to prepare Hong Kong students for university level study is described. Earth sciences provide an inspirational and challenging context for learning and teaching in Hong Kong's increasingly skills-based curriculum. (Contains 3 figures and 4 online resources.)

  10. Cosmological Hysteresis and the Cyclic Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Varun

    2012-01-01

    A Universe filled with a homogeneous scalar field exhibits `Cosmological hysteresis'. Cosmological hysteresis is caused by the asymmetry in the equation of state during expansion and contraction. This asymmetry results in the formation of a hysteresis loop: $\\oint pdV$, whose value can be non-vanishing during each oscillatory cycle. For flat potentials, a negative value of the hysteresis loop leads to the increase in amplitude of consecutive cycles and to a universe with older and larger successive cycles. Such a universe appears to possess an arrow of time even though entropy production is absent and all of the equations respect time-reversal symmetry ! Cosmological hysteresis appears to be widespread and exists for a large class of scalar field potentials and mechanisms for making the universe bounce. For steep potentials, the value of the hysteresis loop can be positive as well as negative. The expansion factor in this case displays quasi-periodic behaviour in which successive cycles can be both larger as ...

  11. ESA takes part in Earth observation and space science experiments on board the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The ATLAS-2 mission is focusing on Earth observation and space science; three out of the seven instruments have been developed by scientific institutes in Belgium, France and Germany, with support from ESA. Four experiments have been provided by NASA and US scientists. The three European instruments have already shown an excellent performance during the first Atlas mission in March 1992, when they were tended by payload specialist Dirk Frimout, a Belgian astronaut and ESA staff member. Although the main scientific objective of the series of Atlas missions is to achieve continuity of annual measurements over a period as long as a decade, the first scientific results from Atlas can already be considered as a contribution to critical research topics, in particular the environment. The data from ATLAS-2 will add to this achievement. Two European instruments, Solcon and Solspec, are measuring to a very high degree of precision the total irradiation the Earth receives from the Sun - the "solar constant" -and the spectral distribution of this radiation over a wide range of wavelengths. Knowledge of the solar constant and the solar radiation spectrum matters not only for a better understanding of the Sun, but also for improving numerical models of climate and climate change. SOLCON was developed under the responsibility of Dr. Dominique Crommelynck of the Royal Meteorological Institute of Brussels, Belgium. SOLSPEC was instead developed under the responsibility of Dr. Gerard Thuillier of the CNRS, Verrieres le Buisson, France. One of these instruments will be fully remote-controlled by scientists from a laboratory in Belgium, via telecommunications links to the Shuttle, and the data of another will be transmitted to Belgium in real time to follow the results obtained. This approach is known as telescience: using telescience, a scientist can monitor his experiment in real-time, repeat it with different settings, consult his team, process data and adapt his measurements when

  12. PanEurasian Experiment (PEEX): Modelling Platform for Earth System Observations and Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, Alexander; Mahura, Alexander; Penenko, Vladimir; Zilitinkevich, Sergej; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    models, analysing scenarios, inverse modelling, modelling based on measurement needs and processes; • Model validation by remote sensing data and assimilation of satellite observations to constrain models to better understand processes, e.g., emissions and fluxes with top-down modelling; • Geophysical/ chemical model validation with experiments at various spatial and temporal scales. Added value of the comprehensive multi-platform observations and modeling; network of monitoring stations with the capacity to quantify those interactions between neighboring areas ranging from the Arctic and the Mediterranean to the Chinese industrial areas and the Asian steppes is needed. For example, apart from development of Russian stations in the PEEX area a strong co-operation with surrounding research infrastructures in the model of ACTRIS network needs to be established in order to obtain a global perspective of the emissions transport, transformation and ageing of pollutants incoming and exiting the PEEX area. The PEEX-MP aims to simulate and predict the physical aspects of the Earth system and to improve understanding of the bio-geochemical cycles in the PEEX domain, and beyond. The environmental change in this region implies that, from the point-of-view of atmospheric flow, the lower boundary conditions are changing. This is important for applications with immediate relevance for society, such as numerical weather prediction. The PEEX infrastructure will provide a unique view to the physical properties of the Earth surface, which can be used to improve assessment and prediction models. This will directly benefit citizens of the North in terms of better early warning of hazardous events, for instance. On longer time-scales, models of the bio-geochemical cycles in the PEEX domain absolutely need support from the new monitoring infra-structure to better measure and quantify soil and vegetation properties. In the most basic setup, the atmospheric and oceanic Global Circulation

  13. The World's Largest Experiment Manipulating Solar Energy Input To Earth Resumed In 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Small amounts of solar-ultraviolet-energy absorbing gases such as ozone, SO2, and NO2 play an unusually large role warming the atmosphere. A mere 3 to 8 ppmv ozone at elevations of 15 to 50 km and associated exothermic chemical reactions warm the atmosphere >50oC, forming the stratosphere. All three molecules have an asymmetric top shape that, unlike linear molecules of CO2, forms a permanent electromagnetic dipole enhancing interaction with electromagnetic radiation. Planck’s postulate (Energy = a constant times frequency) implies that solar ultraviolet energy strongly absorbed by SO2 is 43 times greater than infrared energy radiated by earth and strongly absorbed by CO2. Solar energy in the blue visible spectrum and ultraviolet causes electronic transitions and an absorption spectrum that is a continuum, absorbing far more energy per unit gas than spectral line absorption of infrared energy caused by rotational and vibrational transitions. Absorption of electromagnetic energy by atmospheric gases increases rapidly with increasing frequency, an observation not accounted for by the use of specific heat in atmospheric models to link energy flux with temperature. While SO2 in the stratosphere is oxidized to a sulfuric acid aerosol that reflects sunlight, cooling the earth, SO2 in the troposphere is oxidized much more slowly than commonly assumed. Well-documented concentrations of tens of ppbv SO2 emitted by humans burning fossil fuels, especially coal, in northern mid-latitudes are contemporaneous, with suitable time delays for warming the ocean, with increased global warming during the 20th century, greatest by nearly a factor of two in the northern hemisphere. A decrease by 18% of anthropogenic SO2 emissions between 1979 and 2000 aimed at reducing acid rain had the unintended effect of reducing the global mean rate of temperature increase to zero by 1998. By 2003, global SO2 emissions began to rise sharply due to the rapid increase in number of new coal

  14. Measuring the Value of Earth Observation Information with the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernknopf, R.; Kuwayama, Y.; Brookshire, D.; Macauley, M.; Zaitchik, B.; Pesko, S.; Vail, P.

    2014-12-01

    Determining how much to invest in earth observation technology depends in part on the value of information (VOI) that can be derived from the observations. We design a framework and then evaluate the value-in-use of the NASA Gravity Research and Climate Experiment (GRACE) for regional water use and reliability in the presence of drought. As a technology that allows measurement of water storage, the GRACE Data Assimilation System (DAS) provides information that is qualitatively different from that generated by other water data sources. It provides a global, reproducible grid of changes in surface and subsurface water resources on a frequent and regular basis. Major damages from recent events such as the 2012 Midwest drought and the ongoing drought in California motivate the need to understand the VOI from remotely sensed data such as that derived from GRACE DAS. Our conceptual framework models a dynamic risk management problem in agriculture. We base the framework on information from stakeholders and subject experts. The economic case for GRACE DAS involves providing better water availability information. In the model, individuals have a "willingness to pay" (wtp) for GRACE DAS - essentially, wtp is an expression of savings in reduced agricultural input costs and for costs that are influenced by regional policy decisions. Our hypothesis is that improvements in decision making can be achieved with GRACE DAS measurements of water storage relative to data collected from groundwater monitoring wells and soil moisture monitors that would be relied on in the absence of GRACE DAS. The VOI is estimated as a comparison of outcomes. The California wine grape industry has features that allow it to be a good case study and a basis for extrapolation to other economic sectors. We model water use in this sector as a sequential decision highlighting the attributes of GRACE DAS input as information for within-season production decisions as well as for longer-term water reliability.

  15. Rare Earth Element Partition Coefficients from Enstatite/Melt Synthesis Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Craig S.; McKay, Gordon A.

    1997-01-01

    Enstatite (En(80)Fs(19)Wo(01)) was synthesized from a hypersthene normative basaltic melt doped at the same time with La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Er, Yb and Lu. The rare earth element concentrations were measured in both the basaltic glass and the enstatite. Rare earth element concentrations in the glass were determined by electron microprobe analysis with uncertainties less than two percent relative. Rare earth element concentrations in enstatite were determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry with uncertainties less than five percent relative. The resulting rare earth element partition signature for enstatite is similar to previous calculated and composite low-Ca pigeonite signatures, but is better defined and differs in several details. The partition coefficients are consistent with crystal structural constraints.

  16. Laboratory experiments on the impact disruption of iron meteorites at temperature of near-Earth space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Takekuni; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Takabe, Ayana; Okamoto, Takaya; Sangen, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Sunao; Liu, Xun; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2014-10-01

    Iron meteorites and some M-class asteroids are generally understood to be fragments that were originally part of cores of differentiated planetesimals or part of local melt pools on primitive bodies. The parent bodies of iron meteorites may have formed in the terrestrial planet region, from which they were then scattered into the main belt (Bottke, W.F., Nesvorný, D., Grimm, R.E., Morbidelli, A., O'Brien, D.P. [2006]. Nature 439, 821-824). Therefore, a wide range of collisional events at different mass scales, temperatures, and impact velocities would have occurred between the time when the iron was segregated and the impact that eventually exposed the iron meteorites to interplanetary space. In this study, we performed impact disruption experiments of iron meteorite specimens as projectiles or targets at room temperature to increase understanding of the disruption process of iron bodies in near-Earth space. Our iron specimens (as projectiles or targets) were almost all smaller in size than their counterparts (as targets or projectiles, respectively). Experiments of impacts of steel specimens were also conducted for comparison. The fragment mass distribution of the iron material was different from that of rocks. In the iron fragmentation, a higher percentage of the mass was concentrated in larger fragments, probably due to the ductile nature of the material at room temperature. The largest fragment mass fraction f was dependent not only on the energy density but also on the size d of the specimen. We assumed a power-law dependence of the largest fragment mass fraction to initial peak pressure P0 normalized by a dynamic strength, Y, which was defined to be dependent on the size of the iron material. A least squares fit to the data of iron meteorite specimens resulted in the following relationship: f∝∝d, indicating a large size dependence of f. Additionally, the deformation of the iron materials in high-velocity shots was found to be most significant when the

  17. Mesoscopic magnetomechanical hysteresis in a magnetorheological elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, A M; Stolbov, O V; Raikher, Yu L

    2015-08-01

    Field-induced magnetostatic interaction in a pair of identical particles made of a magnetically soft ferromagnet is studied. It is shown that due to saturation of the ferromagnet magnetization, this case differs significantly from the (super)paramagnetic one. A numerical solution is given, discussed, and compared with that provided by a simpler model (nonlinear mutual dipoles). We show that for multidomain ferromagnetic particles embedded in an elastomer matrix, as for paramagnetic ones in the same environment, pair clusters may form or break by a hysteresis scenario. However, the magnetization saturation brings in important features to this effect. First, the bistability state and the hysteresis take place only in a limited region of the material parameters of the system. Second, along with the hysteresis jumps occurring under the sole influence of the field, the "latent" hysteresis is possible which realizes only if the action of the field is combined with some additional (nonmagnetic) external factor. The obtained conditions, when used to assess the possibility of clustering in real magnetorheological polymers, infer an important role of mesoscopic magnetomechanical hysteresis for the macroscopic properties of these composites.

  18. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  19. Authentic Research Experiences for Pre- and In-service Teachers: UNH’s Transforming Earth System Science Education (TESSE) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, R. K.; Graham, K.; Bryce, J. G.; Finkel, L.; Froburg, E.; Hale, S.; Johnson, J. E.; von Damm, K.

    2009-12-01

    The University of New Hampshire’s Transforming Earth System Science Education (TESSE) project is designed to enrich the education and professional development of in-service and pre-service teachers who currently teach or plan to teach Earth science curricula. A key TESSE program goal is to foster the development of middle and high school students’ Earth System Science (ESS) literacy by engaging teachers in authentic research experiences. As part of TESSE, pre-service teachers are engaged in a research immersion experience (RIE), during which they work alongside a faculty research mentor for an intensive eight week period. The chief goal of this component of the program is to provide these pre-service teachers with authentic research experiences that will sharpen their research skills by providing guidance in designing projects and in gathering and interpreting data. The RIE also includes weekly discussions on pedagogical approaches to research with students, providing a catalyst for taking these research experiences into the classroom. For in-service teachers we have developed a course: “Research Techniques in the Earth System Sciences for Teachers.” Teachers enroll in an intensive ten-day research experience during which they participate in a research cruise on the Great Bay Estuary and collect gas and water samples, measure parameters in the water column, and collect sediment cores in order to answer questions they have posed about the estuary environment. Onshore, teacher teams analyze the water and core samples for gas and trace metal content, grain size, and other sedimentological characteristics. The research experience culminates with a public poster presentation of each team's results. Throughout the experience, teachers are engaged in a variety of discussions about transferring what they have learned about doing research to their classrooms. The integration of authentic research is a key mechanism that the TESSE program uses to help teachers

  20. The effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Michael A; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2011-11-15

    In this work, droplet coalescence and the subsequent mixing in superhydrophobic surfaces is studied over a range of impact velocities and impact angles. Sanded Teflon surfaces are used as a novel two-dimensional microfluidics platform. These superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit a constant advancing contact angle of θ(A)=150° over a broad range of contact angle hysteresis. As a result, the effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing can be studied. Based on the observed characteristics of coalescence, three different regimes of coalescence are identified as a function of both Weber number and impact angle. These regimes include oscillation dominated, rotation dominated, and mixed dynamics. It is shown that within Weber number ranges achievable in this experiment, hysteresis greatly reduces the deformation of the droplet coalescence process and the subsequent mixing. In head-on collisions, higher hysteresis is found to decrease the frequency at which the resulting dr oscillates. In the case of glancing collisions, where the resulting droplet is found to rotate, higher hysteresis increases the rate of rotation although the overall angular momentum is found to be independent of contact angle hysteresis.

  1. Hysteresis Effects and Strain-Induced Homogeneity Effects in Base Metal Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlasek, P.; Elliott, C. J.; Pearce, J. V.; Duris, S.; Palencar, R.; Koval, M.; Machin, G.

    2015-03-01

    Thermocouples are used in a wide variety of industrial applications in which they play an important role for temperature control and monitoring. Wire inhomogeneity and hysteresis effects are major sources of uncertainty in thermocouple measurements. To efficiently mitigate these effects, it is first necessary to explore the impact of strain-induced inhomogeneities and hysteresis, and their contribution to the uncertainty. This article investigates homogeneity and hysteresis effects in Types N and K mineral-insulated metal-sheathed (MIMS) thermocouples. Homogeneity of thermocouple wires is known to change when mechanical strain is experienced by the thermoelements. To test this influence, bends of increasingly small radii, typical in industrial applications, were made to a number of thermocouples with different sheath diameters. The change in homogeneity was determined through controlled immersion of the thermocouple into an isothermal liquid oil bath at and was found to be very small at for Type K thermocouples, with no measureable change in Type N thermocouples found. An experiment to determine the hysteresis effect in thermocouples was performed on swaged, MIMS Type N and Type K thermocouples, in the temperature range from to . The hysteresis measurements presented simulate the conditions that thermocouples may be exposed to in industrial applications through continuous cycling over 136 h. During this exposure, a characteristic drift from the reference function has been observed but no considerable difference between the heating and cooling measurements was measureable. The measured differences were within the measurement uncertainties; therefore, no hysteresis was observed.

  2. Mercury Porosimetry: Contact Angle Hysteresis of Materials with Controlled Pore Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmas, Constantinos; Androutsopoulos, George

    2001-07-01

    Mercury Porosimetry (MP) hysteresis is a commonly observed phenomenon in which mercury retention disguises further the overall hysteresis picture. This article introduces a new interpretation of the MP hysteresis based on the combined effect of pore structure networking and mercury contact angle variation occurring between the mercury penetration and retraction operations. To distinguish the contribution of each factor the following investigations were carried out. Nitrogen sorption (NP) and MP experiments were performed on samples of an anodic aluminum membrane and the results were interpreted in terms of the Corrugated Pore Structure Model (CPSM), i.e., CPSM-Nitrogen and CPSM-Mercury models, respectively. The simulation of the observed hysteresis data using the CPSM model enabled the evaluation of an identical for the two methods intrinsic pore size distribution (PSD) and cumulative surface area in perfect agreement with the respective BET value. Additionally, the CPSM analysis of data resulted in the evaluation of mercury contact angles, i.e., θ(p)=143 degrees and θ(r)=101.7 degrees for the MP penetration and retraction branches of the hysteresis loop, respectively. Moreover, CPSM-Mercury simulations of literature MP hysteresis data, valid for controlled-pore glasses and nuclepore membranes, led to the evaluation of contact angles, i.e., glasses: θ(p)=143 degrees, θ(r)=100.5-107.5 degrees and nuclepore: θ(p)=143 degrees, θ(r)=118- 121 degrees. The latter values are comparable with relevant literature data and approximate those determined for the anodic aluminum membrane. The CPSM model employed herein proved to be a flexible and reliable model for simulating the pertinent hysteresis loops by combining pore networking and contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  3. Contrasting diel hysteresis between soil autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration in a desert ecosystem under different rainfall scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weimin; Chen, Shiping; Zhou, Yadan; Wu, Bo; Zhu, Yajuan; Lu, Qi; Lin, Guanghui

    2015-11-30

    Diel hysteresis occurs often between soil CO2 efflux (R(S)) and temperature, yet, little is known if diel hysteresis occurs in the two components of R(S), i.e., autotrophic respiration (R(A)) and heterotrophic respiration (R(H)), and how diel hysteresis will respond to future rainfall change. We conducted a field experiment in a desert ecosystem in northern China simulating five different scenarios of future rain regimes. Diel variations of soil CO2 efflux and soil temperature were measured on Day 6 and Day 16 following the rain addition treatments each month during the growing season. We found contrasting responses in the diel hysteresis of R(A) and R(H) to soil temperature, with a clockwise hysteresis loop for R(H) but a counter-clockwise hysteresis loop for R(A). Rain addition significantly increased the magnitude of diel hysteresis for both R(H) and R(A) on Day 6, but had no influence on either on Day 16 when soil moisture was much lower. These findings underline the different roles of biological (i.e. plant and microbial activities) and physical-chemical (e.g. heat transport and inorganic CO2 exchange) processes in regulating the diel hysteresis of R(A) and R(H), which should be considered when estimating soil CO2 efflux in desert regions under future rainfall regime.

  4. Piloting a Global Collaborative Experiment to Determine your Place on the Planet and the Circumference of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solie, D. J.; Paniwozik, R. L.; Wallace, P.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the laboratory component in Bush Physics for the 21st Century, a distance delivered physics course geared toward rural and Indigenous students in Alaska, students determine their village location on earth from simple sun angle measurements at local-noon during the spring equinox. Students measure the length of the sun shadow cast by a rod mounted on a horizontal surface, over short time intervals on or near the spring equinox during mid-day. Local-noon occurs when the sun is the highest and its corresponding shadow the shortest. Local noon, when expressed in Universal Time, can be directly converted to the local longitude in degrees. Local latitude in degrees, is obtained from the local-noon shadow length on the spring equinox and simple trigonometry. As an added bonus, using data from different sites, students can collaborate to approximate the circumference of the earth from their measurements. In the spirit of Eratosthenes, students envision an earth-sized pie wedge cut from a polar great-circle where the curve of the wedge on the earth's surface is the North-South distance between two often road-less sites (determined using Google Earth, a map or a globe), and the angle of the wedge is the difference between the site latitudes. The earth's circumference is calculated from this wedge. In 2012 with the aim of including Indigenous groups from other regions of the planet, we expanded this experiment to include teams from Japan, Puerto Rico, American Samoa, and New Zealand. We present our results from this pilot year.

  5. Hysteresis phenomenon in nuclear reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirayesh, Behnam; Pazirandeh, Ali [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Science and Research Branch; Akbari, Monireh [Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-05-15

    This paper applies a nonlinear analysis method to show that hysteresis phenomenon, due to the Saddle-node bifurcation, may occur in the nuclear reactor. This phenomenon may have significant effects on nuclear reactor dynamics and can even be the beginning of a nuclear reactor accident. A system of four dimensional nonlinear ordinary differential equations was considered to study the hysteresis phenomenon in a typical nuclear reactor. It should be noted that the reactivity was considered as a nonlinear function of state variables. The condition for emerging hysteresis was investigated using Routh-Hurwitz criterion and Sotomayor's theorem for saddle node bifurcation. A numerical analysis is also provided to illustrate the analytical results.

  6. Mechanical Hysteresis of Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Aiguo; LI Haoran

    2011-01-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important structural material with layered microstructure.Because of the plastic anisotropy,this material shows obvious mechanical hysteresis (nonlinear elastic deformation).There are hysteretic loops at the cyclical load-unload stress-strain curves of h-BN.Consequently,two hot-pressed h-BN cylinders with different textures were studied.The mechanical hysteresis is heavily texture-dependent.The area of hysteretic loop is linearly related with the square of loading stresslevel.Two minor loops attached on the hysteretic loops with the same extreme stresses have congruent shapes.It can be concluded that the mechanical hysteresis of h-BN can he explained by a Kink Nonlinear Elastic model developed from the study of a ternary carbide Ti3SiC2.

  7. Magnetomechanical damping and magnetoelastic hysteresis in permalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercuta, A.; Mihalca, I.

    2002-11-01

    The inverse Wiedemann effect (IWE) consisting in longitudinal magnetization reversals was detected with a cylindrical permalloy layer subjected to circular DC magnetic fields while performing low frequency (~1 Hz) free torsion oscillations. Hysteresis occurring in the magnetization vs elastic strain dependence (the `magnetoelastic hysteresis') suggested irreversible processes activated mechanically. Joint vibration and magnetization time records were carried out by means of an experimental set-up including inverted pendulum and conventional integrating fluxmeter, in order to compare the relative energy losses ascribed to the magnetomechanical damping (MMD) and to the magnetoelastic hysteresis, respectively. The experimental results clearly pointed out a close connection between IWE and MMD providing evidence that, when simultaneously examined, both effects reflect the same basic phenomenon: the irreversible magnetization changes induced by the elastic strain.

  8. A thermodynamic model of contact angle hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Lasse

    2017-08-01

    When a three-phase contact line moves along a solid surface, the contact angle no longer corresponds to the static equilibrium angle but is larger when the liquid is advancing and smaller when the liquid is receding. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, i.e., the contact angle hysteresis, is of paramount importance in wetting and capillarity. For example, it determines the magnitude of the external force that is required to make a drop slide on a solid surface. Until now, fundamental origin of the contact angle hysteresis has been controversial. Here, this origin is revealed and a quantitative theory is derived. The theory is corroborated by the available experimental data for a large number of solid-liquid combinations. The theory is applied in modelling the contact angle hysteresis on a textured surface, and these results are also in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Adhesion elastic contact and hysteresis effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zheng; Zhao Ya-Pu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study the relationship between the pull-off force and the transition parameter (or Tabor number)as well as the variation of the pull-off radius with the transition parameter in the adhesion elastic contact. Hysteresis models are presented to describe the contact radius as a function of external loads in loading and unloading processes.Among these models, we verified the hysteresis model from Johnson-Kendall-Roberts theory, based on which the calculated results are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  10. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  11. A Sorption Hysteresis Model For Cellulosic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The equilibrium concentration of adsorbed water in cellulosic materials is dependent on the history of the variations of vapor pressure in the ambient air, i.e. sorption hysteresis. Existing models to describe this phenomenon such as the independent domain theory have numerical drawbacks and....../or imply accounting for the entire history variations of every material point. This paper presents a sorption hysteresis model based on a state formulation and expressed in closed-form solutions, which makes it suitable for implementation into a numerical method....

  12. Hysteresis modeling in graphene field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, M.; Rorsman, N. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 412-96 Göteborg (Sweden); Sveinbjörnsson, E. Ö. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2015-02-21

    Graphene field effect transistors with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric are fabricated on H-intercalated bilayer graphene grown on semi-insulating 4H-SiC by chemical vapour deposition. DC measurements of the gate voltage v{sub g} versus the drain current i{sub d} reveal a severe hysteresis of clockwise orientation. A capacitive model is used to derive the relationship between the applied gate voltage and the Fermi energy. The electron transport equations are then used to calculate the drain current for a given applied gate voltage. The hysteresis in measured data is then modeled via a modified Preisach kernel.

  13. Implementation of a network model of hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruosso, G. [Dipartimento Elettronica e Informazione, Politecnico di Milano, P.za Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Repetto, M. [Dipartimento Ingegneria Elettrica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Turin (Italy)]. E-mail: maurizio.repetto@polito.it

    2006-02-01

    A network model of hysteresis based on elementary cells made up with piece-wise linear resistors and a linear capacitor has been presented in the literature and its theoretical properties have been investigated. This model allows to simulate hysteresis in a circuit solver without requiring any modification to its source code. Despite its appealing features, some cautions must be used for the treatment of the interface between the model and the rest of the circuit and for the handling of nonlinear resistors which can introduce some convergence problems in the network solution. These topics are investigated and some results on a simple test case are presented and discussed.

  14. Application of geometry based hysteresis modelling in compensation of hysteresis of piezo bender actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milecki, Andrzej; Pelic, Marcin

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents results of studies of an application of a new method of piezo bender actuators modelling. A special hysteresis simulation model was developed and is presented. The model is based on a geometrical deformation of main hysteresis loop. The piezoelectric effect is described and the history of the hysteresis modelling is briefly reviewed. Firstly, a simple model for main loop modelling is proposed. Then, a geometrical description of the non-saturated hysteresis is presented and its modelling method is introduced. The modelling makes use of the function describing the geometrical shape of the two hysteresis main curves, which can be defined theoretically or obtained by measurement. These main curves are stored in the memory and transformed geometrically in order to obtain the minor curves. Such model was prepared in the Matlab-Simulink software, but can be easily implemented using any programming language and applied in an on-line controller. In comparison to the other known simulation methods, the one presented in the paper is easy to understand, and uses simple arithmetical equations, allowing to quickly obtain the inversed model of hysteresis. The inversed model was further used for compensation of a non-saturated hysteresis of the piezo bender actuator and results have also been presented in the paper.

  15. GeoBrain for Facilitating Earth Science Education in Higher-Education Institutes--Experience and Lessons-learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, M.; di, L.

    2007-12-01

    Data integration and analysis are the foundation for the scientific investigation in Earth science. In the past several decades, huge amounts of Earth science data have been collected mainly through remote sensing. Those data have become the treasure for Earth science research. Training students how to discover and use the huge volume of Earth science data in research become one of the most important trainings for making a student a qualified scientist. Being developed by a NASA funded project, the GeoBrain system has adopted and implemented the latest Web services and knowledge management technologies for providing innovative methods in publishing, accessing, visualizing, and analyzing geospatial data and in building/sharing geoscience knowledge. It provides a data-rich online learning and research environment enabled by wealthy data and information available at NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Students, faculty members, and researchers from institutes worldwide can easily access, analyze, and model with the huge amount of NASA EOS data just like they possess such vast resources locally at their desktops. Although still in development, the GeoBrain system has been operational since 2005. A number of education materials have been developed for facilitating the use of GeoBrain as a powerful education tool for Earth science education at both undergraduate and graduate levels. Thousands of online higher-education users worldwide have used GeoBrain services. A number of faculty members in multiple universities have been funded as GeoBrain education partners to explore the use of GeoBrain in the classroom teaching and student research. By summarizing and analyzing the feedbacks from the online users and the education partners, this presentation presents the user experiences on using GeoBrain in Earth science teaching and research. The feedbacks on classroom use of GeoBrain have demonstrated that GeoBrain is very useful for

  16. Volcanic tremor and plume height hysteresis from Pavlof Volcano, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, David; Haney, Matthew M; Matoza, Robin S; Eaton, Alexa R; Cervelli, Peter; Schneider, David J; Iezzi, Alexandra M

    2017-01-06

    The March 2016 eruption of Pavlof Volcano, Alaska, produced an ash plume that caused the cancellation of more than 100 flights in North America. The eruption generated strong tremor that was recorded by seismic and remote low-frequency acoustic (infrasound) stations, including the EarthScope Transportable Array. The relationship between the tremor amplitudes and plume height changes considerably between the waxing and waning portions of the eruption. Similar hysteresis has been observed between seismic river noise and discharge during storms, suggesting that flow and erosional processes in both rivers and volcanoes can produce irreversible structural changes that are detectable in geophysical data. We propose that the time-varying relationship at Pavlof arose from changes in the tremor source related to volcanic vent erosion. This relationship may improve estimates of volcanic emissions and characterization of eruption size and intensity.

  17. 8 years of experience in international, interdisciplinary and structured doctoral training in Earth system modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Antje; Stevens, Bjorn; Marotzke, Jochem

    2010-05-01

    The mission of the International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modelling (IMPRS-ESM) is to provide a high quality, modern and structured graduate education to students pursuing a doctoral degree in Earth system modelling. In so doing, the IMPRS-ESM also strives to advance the emerging discipline (or cross-discipline) of Earth system modelling; to provide a framework for attracting the most talented and creative young women and men from around the world to pursue their doctoral education in Germany; to provide advanced as well as specialized academic training and scientific guidance to doctoral students; to encourage academic networking and publication of research results; to better integrate doctoral research at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M) with education and research at the University of Hamburg and other cooperating institutions. Core elements are rigorous selection of doctoral students, effective academic supervision, advanced academic training opportunities and interdisciplinary communication as well as administrative support. IMPRS-ESM graduates have been recognized with a variety of awards. 85% of our alumni continue a career in research. In this presentation we review the challenges for an interdisciplinary PhD program in Earth system sciences and the types of routines we have implemented to surmount them as well as key elements that we believe contribute to the success of our doctoral program.

  18. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on moving liquid film integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F. F.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and breakdown of a water film moving over solid surfaces (teflon, lucite, stainless steel, and copper). The flow rate associated with film formation was found to be higher than the flow rate at which film breakdown occurred. The difference in the flow rates for film formation and film breakdown was attributed to contact angle hysteresis. Analysis and experiment, which are in good agreement, indicated that film formation and film breakdown are functions of the advancing and receding angles, respectively.

  19. On the Control of Plants with Hysteresis: Overview and a Prandtl-Ishlinskii Hysteresis Based Control Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingqing Wang; Chun-Yi Su; Yonghong Tan

    2005-01-01

    The development of control techniques to mitigate the effects of unknown hysteresis preceding with plants has recently re-attracted significant attention. In this paper, we first give a brief review of presently developed hysteresis models and hysteresis compensating control methods.Then, with the use of the Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model, we propose a robust adaptive control scheme. The novelty is that the model of hysteresis nonlinearities is firstly fused with the available control techniques without necessarily constructing a hysteresis inverse. The global stability of the adaptive system and tracking a desired trajectory to a certain precision are achieved. Simulations performed on a nonlinear system illustrate and clarify the approach.

  20. Resting Study of Tracer Experiment on Catalytic Wet Oxidation Reactor under Micro-gravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ji; JIA Jin-ping

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station(ISS) employs catalytic wet oxidation carried out in a Volatile Reactor Assembly (VRA) for water recycling. Previous earth gravity experiments show that the VRA is very effective at removing polar,low molecular weight organics. To compare the reactor performance under micro-gravity and Earth gravity conditions,a tracer study was performed on a space shuttle in 1999 by using 0. 2% potassium carbonate as the chemical tracer.In this paper, the experimental data were analyzed and it is indicated that the reactor can be considered as a plug flow one under both micro-gravity and earth gravity experimental conditions. It has also been proved that dispersion is not important in the VRA reactor under the experimental conditions. Tracer retardation was observed in the experiments and it is most likely caused by catalyst adsorption. It is concluded that the following reasons may also have influence on the retardation of mean residence time: (1) the liquid can be held by appurtenances, which will retard the mean residence time; (2) the pores can hold the tracer, which can also retard the mean residence time.

  1. An investigation on the hysteresis characteristics of an automotive air spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Lee, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    Hysteresis is one of major properties of air spring during its compression and rebounding sequences. This study shows hysteresis property of air spring theoretically and experimentally. At first, the theoretical model of the air spring was developed, considering the factor of heat exchange. And then experiments of force responses with displacement excitation signal of various frequencies were implemented. The simulations by using obtained model were performed to compare with experimental results. The results show that simulation results are close to experiment in low excitation frequency from 1 Hz to 0.1 Hz, but there exits some difference between them in very low excitation frequency (quasistatic process).

  2. Ferromagnetic hysteresis and the effective field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Jiles-Atherton model of the behavior of ferromagnetic materials determines the irreversible magnetization from the effective field by using a differential equation. This paper presents an exact, analytical solution to the equation, one displaying hysteresis. The inclusion of magnetomechanical co

  3. Managing Hysteresis: Three Cornerstones to Fiscal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the Great Recession of 2007-2009 continue to challenge school business officials (SBOs) and other education leaders as they strive to prepare students for the global workforce. Economists have borrowed a word from chemistry to describe this state of affairs: hysteresis--the lingering effects of the past on the present. Today's SBOs…

  4. Hysteresis and transition in swirling nonpremixed flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, M.J.; Hübner, A.W.; Veen, van E.H.; Hanjalic, K.; Meer, van der Th.H.

    2009-01-01

    Strongly swirling nonpremixed flames are known to exhibit a hysteresis when transiting from an attached long, sooty, yellow flame to a short lifted blue flame, and vice versa. The upward transition (by increasing the air and fuel flow rates) corresponds to a vortex breakdown, i.e. an abrupt change f

  5. A Sorption Hysteresis Model For Cellulosic Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The equilibrium concentration of adsorbed water in cellulosic materials is dependent on the history of the variations of vapor pressure in the ambient air, i.e. sorption hysteresis. Existing models to describe this phenomenon such as the independent domain theory have numerical drawbacks and/or i...

  6. INITIAL SLOPE OF THE HYSTERESIS CURVE

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsma, G.J.; Stam, M.T.H.C.W.; Lodder, J. C.; Popma, Th.J.A.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical expression for the initial slope T of the hysteresis curve is derived for a stripe domain structure in a thin magnetic film, giving that T-1 is proportional to t-1/2 (t = film thickness). This is confirmed by measurements on RF sputtered CoCr films with 20 nm ≤ t ≤ 950 nm.

  7. Initial slope of the hysteresis curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsma, G.J.; Stam, M.T.H.C.W.; Lodder, J.C.; Popma, Th.J.A.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical expression for the initial slope T of the hysteresis curve is derived for a stripe domain structure in a thin magnetic film, giving that T-1 is proportional to t-1/2 (t = film thickness). This is confirmed by measurements on RF sputtered CoCr films with 20 nm £ t £ 950 nm.

  8. Managing Hysteresis: Three Cornerstones to Fiscal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the Great Recession of 2007-2009 continue to challenge school business officials (SBOs) and other education leaders as they strive to prepare students for the global workforce. Economists have borrowed a word from chemistry to describe this state of affairs: hysteresis--the lingering effects of the past on the present. Today's SBOs…

  9. Hysteresis in an experimental phytoplankton population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faassen, Els; Veraart, A.J.; Nes, van E.H.; Dakos, V.; Lurling, M.; Scheffer, M.

    2015-01-01

    The road to recovery of a deteriorated system is often different, and fraught with more barriers, than the path to the system's deterioration. This phenomenon is called hysteresis, and is inherent to systems presenting alternative stable states. In such systems, the stability of a given state is the

  10. Soil and crop management experiments in the Laboratory Biosphere: an analogue system for the Mars on Earth(R) facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, S; Nelson, M; Alling, A; Allen, J P

    2005-01-01

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation of "Hoyt" Soy Beans, (experiment #1) USU Apogee Wheat (experiment #2) and TU-82-155 sweet potato (experiment #3) using a 5.37 m2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching, returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment and increasing soil biota by introducing worms, soil bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi. High soil pH of the original soil appeared to be a factor affecting the first two experiments. Hence, between experiments #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. This resulted in lowering the initial pH of 8.0-6.7 at the start of experiment #3. At the end of the experiment, the pH was 7.6. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus has been adequate, but some chlorosis was evident in the first two experiments. Aphid infestation was the only crop pest problem during the three experiments and was handled using an introduction of Hyppodamia convergens. Experimentation showed there were environmental differences even in this 1200 cubic foot ecological system facility, such as temperature and humidity gradients because of ventilation and airflow patterns which resulted in consequent variations in plant growth and yield. Additional humidifiers were added to counteract low humidity and helped optimize conditions for the sweet potato experiment. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth(R) facility (Silverstone et al., Development and research program for a soil

  11. Soil and crop management experiments in the Laboratory Biosphere: An analogue system for the Mars on Earth ® facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstone, S.; Nelson, M.; Alling, A.; Allen, J. P.

    During the years 2002 and 2003, three closed system experiments were carried out in the "Laboratory Biosphere" facility located in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The program involved experimentation of "Hoyt" Soy Beans, (experiment #1) USU Apogee Wheat (experiment #2) and TU-82-155 sweet potato (experiment #3) using a 5.37 m 2 soil planting bed which was 30 cm deep. The soil texture, 40% clay, 31% sand and 28% silt (a clay loam), was collected from an organic farm in New Mexico to avoid chemical residues. Soil management practices involved minimal tillage, mulching, returning crop residues to the soil after each experiment and increasing soil biota by introducing worms, soil bacteria and mycorrhizae fungi. High soil pH of the original soil appeared to be a factor affecting the first two experiments. Hence, between experiments #2 and #3, the top 15 cm of the soil was amended using a mix of peat moss, green sand, humates and pumice to improve soil texture, lower soil pH and increase nutrient availability. This resulted in lowering the initial pH of 8.0-6.7 at the start of experiment #3. At the end of the experiment, the pH was 7.6. Soil nitrogen and phosphorus has been adequate, but some chlorosis was evident in the first two experiments. Aphid infestation was the only crop pest problem during the three experiments and was handled using an introduction of Hyppodamia convergens. Experimentation showed there were environmental differences even in this 1200 cubic foot ecological system facility, such as temperature and humidity gradients because of ventilation and airflow patterns which resulted in consequent variations in plant growth and yield. Additional humidifiers were added to counteract low humidity and helped optimize conditions for the sweet potato experiment. The experience and information gained from these experiments are being applied to the future design of the Mars On Earth ® facility (Silverstone et al., Development and research program for a soil

  12. Non-equilibrium fluctuations on earth and in micro-gravity. The GRADFLEX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vailati, A.; Cerbino, R.; Mazzoni, S.; Giglio, M.; Takacs, C. J.; Cannell, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of measurements of giant nonequilibrium fluctuations in a single component fluid (density fluctuations) and a mixture (concentration fluctuations) driven by applied temperature gradients, both on Earth and in space. Flight data were obtained during the September 2007 FOTON M3 mission. Spatial power spectra obtained using the shadowgraph method, during flight, confirm that the asymptotic behaviour extends to such low wave vector q, as to be limited by the sample thickness. Quantitative comparison with theory is provided, and is generally quite good. Temporal sequences of shadowgraph images for the mixture, both on Earth and during flight will be presented to emphasize the dramatic differences. Fluctuation lifetimes of thousands of seconds were observed during flight. The rugged but sensitive shadowgraph scattering method (phase fluctuations below 10 milliradians measured to within a few percent absolute accuracy) will be described briefly.

  13. Creating the Public Connection: Interactive Experiences with Real-Time Earth and Space Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Patricia H.; Ledley, Tamara S.; Sumners, Carolyn; Wyatt, Ryan

    1995-01-01

    The Houston Museum of Natural Sciences is less than two miles from Rice University, a major hub on the Internet. This project links these two institutions so that NASA real-time data and imagery can flow via Rice to the Museum where it reaches the public in the form of planetarium programs, computer based interactive kiosks, and space and Earth science problem solving simulation. Through this program at least 200,000 visitors annually (including every 4th and 7th grader in the Houston Independent School District) will have direct exposure to the Earth and space research being conducted by NASA and available over the Internet. Each information conduit established between Rice University and the Houston Museum of Natural Science will become a model for public information dissemination that can be replicated nationally in museums, planetariums, Challenger Centers, and schools.

  14. CP violation and matter effect for a variable earth density in very long baseline experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Brahmachari, B; Roy, P; Brahmachari, Biswajoy; Choubey, Sandhya; Roy, Probir

    2003-01-01

    The perturbative treatment of subdominant oscillation and the matter effect in neutrino beams/superbeams, propagating over long baselines and being used to look for CP violation, is studied here for a general matter density function varying with distance. New lowest order analytic expressions are given for different flavour transition and survival probabilities in a general neutrino mixing basis and a variable earth matter density profile. It is demonstrated that the matter effect in the muon neutrino (antineutrino) flavour survival probability vanishes to this order, provided the depletion, observed for atmospheric muon neutrinos and antineutrinos at super-Kamiokande, is strictly maximal. This result is independent of the earth density profile and the distance L between the source and the detector. In the general variable density case we show that one cannot separate the matter induced asymmetry from a genuine CP effect by keeping two detectors at distances $L_1$ and $L_2$ from the source while maintaining a...

  15. Galileo's Double Star: The Experiment That "Proved" the Earth Did Not Move

    CERN Document Server

    Graney, C M

    2006-01-01

    Great opportunities arise for teaching physics, astronomy, and their histories when new discoveries are made that involve concepts accessible to students at every level. Such an opportunity currently exists thanks to the fact that notes written by Galileo indicating that he observed the double star Mizar in the "Big Dipper" have recently come to light. His measurements of this star, given the scientific knowledge at the time, strongly supported the theory that the Earth was fixed in space and not moving. Had Galileo published these results, it is likely that widespread acceptance of the heliocentric theory in scientific circles would have been significantly delayed. In light of these notes, his later reference in his Dialogue to using double stars as a means of proving that the Earth was in motion is puzzling. The physics and mathematics behind Galileo's work is easily within reach of students in introductory physics and astronomy courses, so discussion of Galileo's Mizar work and its interesting implications...

  16. Contact angle hysteresis: a different view and a trivial recipe for low hysteresis hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpfer, Joseph W; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is addressed from two perspectives. The first is an analysis of the events that occur during motion of droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces. Hysteresis is discussed in terms of receding contact line pinning and the tensile failure of capillary bridges. The sign of the curvature of the solid surface is implicated as playing a key role. The second is the report of a new method to prepare smooth low hysteresis surfaces. The thermal treatment of oxygen plasma-cleaned silicon wafers with trimethylsilyl-terminated linear poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS - commercial silicone oils) in disposable glass vessels is described. This treatment renders silicon/silica surfaces that contain covalently attached PDMS chains. The grafted layers of nanometre scale thickness are liquid-like (rotationally dynamic at room temperature), decrease activation barriers for contact line motion and minimize water contact angle hysteresis. This simple method requires neither sophisticated techniques nor substantial laboratory skills to perform.

  17. The screen effect of the earth in the TETG - Theory of a screening experiment of a sample body at the equator, using the earth as a screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuti, I. A.

    1982-04-01

    The acceleration of gravity, g, is calculated at the same point on the earth's surface for the cases of the equator at midday and at midnight. The calculations are for an ellipsoid of revolution of the earth around an axis projected from the plane of the equator. Values of g are calculated in terms of the Newton and electrothermodynamical theories, for the earth, sun, and the centrifugal rotation and revolution of the earth. The results are presented in tabular form for the midday and midnight cases, and calculations are conducted to verify the total differences between the two points, for the two theoretical frameworks, by means of a pendulum and a ballistic gravimeter.

  18. Sufficient conditions for dissipativity on Duhem hysteresis model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayawardhana, B.; Andrieu, V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents sufficient conditions for dissipativity on the Duhem hysteresis model. The result of this paper describes the dissipativity property of several standard hysteresis models, including the backlash and Prandtl operator. It also allows the curve in the hysteresis diagram (the phase p

  19. The PROCESS experiment: an astrochemistry laboratory for solid and gaseous organic samples in low-earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Hervé; Guan, Yuan Yong; Noblet, Audrey; Poch, Olivier; Saiagh, Kafila; Cloix, Mégane; Macari, Frédérique; Jérome, Murielle; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François; Stalport, Fabien; Szopa, Cyril; Bertrand, Marylène; Chabin, Annie; Westall, Frances; Chaput, Didier; Demets, René; Brack, André

    2012-05-01

    The PROCESS (PRebiotic Organic ChEmistry on the Space Station) experiment was part of the EXPOSE-E payload outside the European Columbus module of the International Space Station from February 2008 to August 2009. During this interval, organic samples were exposed to space conditions to simulate their evolution in various astrophysical environments. The samples used represent organic species related to the evolution of organic matter on the small bodies of the Solar System (carbonaceous asteroids and comets), the photolysis of methane in the atmosphere of Titan, and the search for organic matter at the surface of Mars. This paper describes the hardware developed for this experiment as well as the results for the glycine solid-phase samples and the gas-phase samples that were used with regard to the atmosphere of Titan. Lessons learned from this experiment are also presented for future low-Earth orbit astrochemistry investigations.

  20. Hysteresis in myo-inositol utilization by Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinckx, Jessica; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2016-12-27

    Growth of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 14028 with myo-inositol (MI) as the sole carbon and energy source is characterized by a bistable phenotype that manifests in a growth phenotype with an extraordinarily long and length-variable lag phase. However, in the presence of hydrogen carbonate, in the absence of IolR that represses the MI degradation pathway, or if cells are already adapted to minimal medium (MM) with MI, the lag phase is drastically shortened, and the bistable phenotype is abolished. We hypothesized that memory development or hysteresis is a further characteristic of MI degradation by S. Typhimurium; therefore, we investigated the transition from a short to a long lag phase in more detail. Growth experiments demonstrated that memory on the population level is successively lost within approximately 8 hr after cells, which had been adapted to MI utilization, were transferred to lysogeny broth (LB) medium. Flow cytometry (FC) analysis using a chromosomal fusion to PiolE , a promoter controlling the expression of the enzymatic genes iolE and iolG involved in MI degradation, indicated a gradual reversion within a few hours from a population in the "ON" status with respect to iolE transcription to one that is mainly in the "OFF" status. Growth and FC experiments revealed that IolR does not affect hysteresis.

  1. Inelastic compaction, dilation and hysteresis of sandstones under hydrostatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Hamiel, Yariv; Zhu, Wenlu

    2014-05-01

    Sandstones display non-linear and inelastic behaviour such as hysteresis when subjected to cyclic loading. We present three hydrostatic compaction experiments with multiple loading-unloading cycles on Berea and Darley Dale sandstones and explain their hysteretic behaviour using non-linear inelastic compaction and dilation. Each experiment included eight to nine loading-unloading cycles with increasing maximum pressure in each subsequent cycle. Different pressure-volumetric strain relations during loading and unloading were observed. During the first cycles, under relatively low pressures, not all of the volumetric strain is recovered at the end of each cycle whereas at the last cycles, under relatively high pressures, the strain is recovered and the pressure-volumetric strain hysteresis loops are closed. The observed pressure-volumetric strain relations are non-linear and the effective bulk modulus of the sandstones changes between cycles. Observations are modelled with two inelastic deformation processes: irreversible compaction caused by changes in grain packing and recoverable compaction associated with grain contact adhesion, frictional sliding on grains or frictional sliding on cracks. The irreversible compaction is suggested to reflect rearrangement of grains into a more compact mode as the maximum pressure increases. Our model describes the `inelastic compaction envelope' in which sandstone sample will follow during hydrostatic loading. Irreversible compaction occurs when pressure is greater than a threshold value defined by the `inelastic compaction envelope'.

  2. Full Scale Earth Fault Experiments on 10 kV laboratory network with comparative Measurements on Conventional CT's and VT's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Stefan; Nielsen, Hans Ove; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    . The necessity of high bandwidth measurement equipment for earth fault measurements on compensated distribution networks can be undermined, since it will be shown that the transient signal transfer through conventional CT?s and VT?s for further signal analysis is sufficient. Caused the inadequacy three phase...... transformers (CT?s) and voltage transformers (VT?s) by an optical link. Comparison with a similar earlier performed experiment caried out autumn 1998, where current and voltage measurements were measured with high bandwidth Rugowski-coils and high voltage Tektronix probes, gave remarkable results...

  3. Experiment on Nonlinear Properties Coupling Electromagnetism with Mechanics of Giant Rare Earth Magnetostrictive Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Huiqun; Sun Huagang

    2004-01-01

    The electromagnetic and mechanical coupling properties of giant rare earth giant magnetostriction material TbxDy1 -xFe2 -z (0. 27 ≤x ≤ 0.3, 0 ≤ z ≤ 0.1 ) alloys were investigated by means of self-fabricated test apparatus. The effect of coupling mechanical with electromagnetic on magnetostrictive strain coefficient was discussed. The physical model of the coupling system was established. Based on the equivalent circuit of the coupling system, the magnetomechanical coupling coefficient was derived by means of impedance resistance analysis method.

  4. Excited state absorption in glasses activated with rare earth ions: Experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatkowski, Dawid; Mackowski, Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    We present semiempirical approach based on the Judd-Ofelt theory and apply it for modeling the spectral properties of fluoride glasses activated with the rare earth (RE) ions. This method provide a powerful tool for simulating both ground state absorption (GSA) and excited state absorption (ESA) spectra of RE ions, e.g. Nd3+, Ho3+, Er3+ and Tm3+ in the ZBLAN glass matrix. The results of theoretical calculations correspond to the experimentally measured data. We also demonstrate that the spectra obtained using the presented approach are applicable in the analysis of up-conversion excitation schemes in these optoelectronically relevant materials.

  5. Integrating Real-time, Real-world Geoscience Experiences into Classroom Instruction with EarthLabs and the JOIDES Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, A. S.; Lockwood, J.; Ellins, K. K.; Haddad, N.; Cooper, S. K.; Ledley, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Inspiring the next generation of geoscientists and preparing students for the 21st century workforce requires lifting science outside of the classroom and giving learners the opportunity to think critically about real-world geoscience problems. The EarthLabs suite of climate science modules challenges students with a variety of learning experiences including current scientific data analysis, computer visualizations, satellite imagery, and engaging videos. Each module includes a series of hands-on activities to allow students to explore Earth's complex and dynamic climate history, leading to a deeper understanding of present and future changes to our planet. A new EarthLabs module in development 'Climate Detectives: An Expedition on board the JOIDES Resolution," focuses on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 341 to Southern Alaska. The module is structured to allow students to work collaboratively, mimicking scientific research groups on the JOIDES Resolution. As students assume the role of a scientist, learn about data collection methods, and analyze authentic data, they learn about the climate history and tectonic processes of the Southern Alaska continental margin, as well as explore the relationship between climate, sedimentation, and tectonics. The Project Based Learning (PBL) approach used in the module teaches students how to analyze data and solve problems like scientists, strengthening the development of higher order thinking skills and preparing them for college coursework. The 'Climate Detectives' Module also provides students with opportunities to interact with scientists through live video conferencing and pre-recorded video presentations by scientists. In this presentation, Expedition 341 Education Officer, Alison Mote, describes the new module, which takes students on an educational journey as they learn about the scientific objectives, methods, and data collection tools scientists use to conduct research on sediment cores retrieved

  6. NASA Earth Observing System Simulator Suite (NEOS3): A Forward Simulation Framework for Observing System Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamsuwan, N.; Tanelli, S.; Johnson, M. P.; Jacob, J. C.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Oveisgharan, S.; Dao, D.; Simard, M.; Turk, F. J.; Tsang, L.; Liao, T. H.; Chau, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Future Earth observation missions will produce a large volume of interrelated data sets that will help us to cross-calibrate and validate spaceborne sensor measurements. A forward simulator is a crucial tool for examining the quality of individual products as well as resolving discrepancy among related data sets. NASA Earth Observing System Simulator Suite (NEOS3) is a highly customizable forward simulation tool for Earth remote sensing instruments. Its three-stage simulation process converts the 3D geophysical description of the scene being observed to corresponding electromagnetic emission and scattering signatures, and finally to observable parameters as reported by a (passive or active) remote sensing instrument. User-configurable options include selection of models for describing geophysical properties of atmospheric particles and their effects on the signal of interest, selection of wave scattering and propagation models, and activation of simplifying assumptions (trading between computation time and solution accuracy). The next generation of NEOS3, to be released in 2015, will feature additional state-of-the-art electromagnetic scattering models for various types of the Earth's surfaces and ground covers (e.g. layered snowpack, forest, vegetated soil, and sea ice) tailored specifically for missions like GPM and SMAP. To be included in 2015 is dedicated functionalities and interface that facilitate integrating NEOS3 into Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) environments. This new generation of NEOS3 can also utilize high performance computing resources (parallel processing and cloud computing) and can be scaled to handle large or computation intensive problems. This presentation will highlight some notable features of NEOS3. Demonstration of its applications for evaluating new mission concepts, especially in the context of OSSE frameworks will also be presented.

  7. Study of contact angle hysteresis using the Cellular Potts Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Vahid; D'Souza, Roshan M; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2013-02-28

    We use the Cellular Potts Model (CPM) to study the contact angle (CA) hysteresis in multiphase (solid-liquid-vapour) systems. We simulate a droplet over the tilted patterned surface, and a bubble placed under the surface immersed in liquid. The difference between bubbles and droplets was discussed through their CA hysteresis. Dependency of CA hysteresis on the surface structure and other parameters was also investigated. This analysis allows decoupling of the 1D (pinning of the triple line) and 2D (adhesion hysteresis in the contact area) effects and provides new insight into the nature of CA hysteresis.

  8. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    hysteresis and hysteresis was dependent on the degree of interlayer expansion, where kaolinite exhibited little hysteresis and montmorillonite showed significant hysteresis between the sorption isotherms. For soils, clay and OM effects on hysteresis depended on the method used for quantifying hysteresis...

  9. Bean grain hysteresis with induced mechanical damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of mechanical damage on the hysteresis of beans with induced mechanical damage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. harvested manually with 35% water content (w.b. were used. Part of this product was subjected to induced mechanical damage by Stein Breakage Tester and controlled drying (damaged and control sample, for sorption processes. The sorption isotherms of water were analyzed for different temperature conditions: 20, 30, 40 and 50 oC; and relative humidity: 0.3; 0.4; 0.5; 0.7 and 0.9 (decimal. Equilibrium moisture content data were correlated with six mathematical models, and the Modified Oswin model was the one that best fitted to the experimental data. According to the above mentioned isotherms, it was possible to observe the phenomenon of hysteresis of damaged and control samples, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in control ones.

  10. Stability Limits of Capillary Bridges: How Contact Angle Hysteresis Affects Morphology Transitions of Liquid Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Riëlle; Semprebon, Ciro; van Gorcum, Mathijs; Duits, Michèl H G; Brinkmann, Martin; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-06-12

    The equilibrium shape of a drop in contact with solid surfaces can undergo continuous or discontinuous transitions upon changes in either drop volume or surface energies. In many instances, such transitions involve the motion of the three-phase contact line and are thus sensitive to contact angle hysteresis. Using a combination of electrowetting-based experiments and numerical calculations, we demonstrate for a generic sphere-plate confinement geometry how contact angle hysteresis affects the mechanical stability of competing axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric drop conformations and qualitatively changes the character of transitions between them.

  11. Breaking antidunes: Cyclic behavior due to hysteresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deigaard, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic behavior of breaking antidunes (growth, breaking of surface wave, obliteration) is investigated by use of a numerical model. The model includes the transition between supercritical and transcritical flow. As the antidune grows the flow becomes transcritical and a hydraulic jump is form...... upstream of the antidune crest. The relation between growth of the antidune and supercritical flow and between decay and transcritical flow is shown, and the significance of hysteresis in the flow conditions is investigated....

  12. Modeling and Control for Giant Magnetostrictive Actuators with Rate-Dependent Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate-dependent hysteresis in giant magnetostrictive materials is a major impediment to the application of such material in actuators. In this paper, a relevance vector machine (RVM model is proposed for describing the hysteresis nonlinearity under varying input current. It is possible to construct a unique dynamic model in a given rate range for a rate-dependent hysteresis system using the sinusoidal scanning signals as the training set input signal. Subsequently, a proportional integral derivative (PID control scheme combined with a feedforward compensation is implemented on a giant magnetostrictive actuator (GMA for real-time precise trajectory tracking. Simulations and experiments both verify the effectiveness and the practicality of the proposed modeling and control methods.

  13. The effect of randomly earthed ground wires on PLC transmission; A simulation experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao Faria, J.A.; Borges da Silva, J.F. (Centro de Electrotecnia da Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, 1096 Lisboa Codex (PT))

    1990-10-01

    Power line ground wires are discretely bonded to earth along the line at each tower. When the spacing between towers is constant and approaches a multiple of one half wavelength at the operating frequency, abrupt variations in the propagation parameters occur, that would affect carrier transmission performance at the vicinity of certain critical frequencies. In practice the spacing between towers is not exactly constant and one may wish to know the result of taking this circumstance into account. The analysis and numerical results presented in this paper show that even slight random perturbations of line periodicity are sufficient to render unnoticeable any sharp variations in attenuation, velocity and surge impedance, one might be led to expect from the analysis of the strictly periodic case.

  14. A Gravity of Earth Measurement with a qBOUNCE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cronenberg, G; Thalhammer, M; Jenke, T; Abele, H; Geltenbort, P

    2015-01-01

    We report a measurement of the local acceleration $g$ with ultracold neutrons based on quantum states in the gravity potential of the Earth. The new method uses resonant transitions between the states $|1> -> |3>$ and for the first time between $|1> -> |4>$. The measurements demonstrate that Newton's Inverse Square Law of Gravity is understood at micron distances at an energy level of $10^{-14}$ eV with $\\frac{\\Delta g}{g}=4\\times10^{-3}$. The results provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction at a micrometer interaction range. In particular, a dark energy candidate, the chameleon field is restricted to $\\beta<6.9\\times10^{6}$ for $n=2$ (95\\% C.L.).

  15. Soil Water Hysteresis at Low Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. PRUNTY; J. BELL

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the soil water characteristic curve is fundamental for understanding unsaturated soils. The objective of this work was to find scanning hysteresis loops of two fine textured soils at water potentials below wilting point. This was done by equilibration over NaCl solutions with water potentials of -6.6 to -18.8 MPa at 25 °C. When cycled repeatedly through a series of potentials in the range noted previously both soils exhibited a hysteresis effect. The experimental differences in water content between the drying and wetting soils at the same water potential were much too large to be accounted for by failure to allow sufficient time to attain equilibrium as predicted by the exponential decay model. The wetting versus drying differences were relatively small, however, at only 4 mg g-1 or less in absolute terms and about 3% of the mean of wetting and drying, in relative terms. Hysteresis should be a consideration when modeling biological and physical soil processes at water contents below the wilting point, where small differences in water content result in large potential energy changes.

  16. Constitutive modeling of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantam, Srikanth; Panchagnula, Mahesh V

    2008-05-15

    We introduce a phase field model of wetting of surfaces by sessile drops. The theory uses a two-dimensional non-conserved phase field variable to parametrize the Gibbs free energy of the three-dimensional system. Contact line tension and contact angle hysteresis arise from the gradient term in the free energy and the kinetic coefficient respectively. A significant advantage of this approach is in the constitutive specification of hysteresis. The advancing and receding angles of a surface, the liquid-vapor interfacial energy and three-phase line tension are the only required constitutive inputs to the model. We first simulate hysteresis on a smooth chemically homogeneous surface using this theory. Next we show that it is possible to study heterogeneous surfaces whose component surfaces are themselves hysteretic. We use this theory to examine the wetting of a surface containing a circular heterogeneous island. The contact angle for this case is found to be determined solely by the material properties at the contact line in accord with recent experimental data.

  17. A Unique Learning Experience Utilizing NASA's Space Photography of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, Fred

    2002-01-01

    During the last decade, a highly specialized team with backgrounds in education and geography disciplines, including earth and environmental sciences, has developed a unique one-week workshop that trains classroom teachers (grade level five through undergraduate college) in the effective use of earth viewing photography for a variety of classroom situations and courses. The central focus of the workshop is to provide the teachers with the proper materials, skills, and expertise that will result in confident use of the selected course materials in their own classroom environment. Teachers attending the workshop receive a basic introduction to slide/photograph interpretation, as well as more detailed information for each of the images that are part of the workshop package. While the actual number of images/photographs may vary somewhat, the targeted number for the course is 75. That number can include regional images of the local area where the workshop is being conducted. The workshop is separated into three distinct but interrelated sections: content lectures; slide/photo interpretation sessions; and hands-on class demonstrations that include lesson plans and focus groups. For example, creative focus activities and teacher lessons are demonstrated for participants to show how the images/prints/overheads can be used in a classroom. Each teacher who attends the workshop receives two notebooks to take with them upon the completion of the course. Volume 1, the Image Notebook, contains slides, photographs, and accompanying captions. Volume 2, the Activity Notebook, consists of basic information (such as a glossary of photo interpretation terms), copies of content lecture notes and overhead transparencies, and all focus group activities and lessons. Teachers attending the workshop are also introduced to NASA websites to learn how to best use these dynamic and highly motivational tools to stimulate their students either through individual or group assignments.

  18. The PROCESS experiment: amino and carboxylic acids under Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions in low-earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, Audrey; Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Poch, Olivier; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Cloix, Mégane; Macari, Frédérique; Raulin, Francois; Chaput, Didier; Cottin, Hervé

    2012-05-01

    The search for organic molecules at the surface of Mars is a top priority of the next Mars exploration space missions: Mars Science Laboratory (NASA) and ExoMars (ESA). The detection of organic matter could provide information about the presence of a prebiotic chemistry or even biological activity on this planet. Therefore, a key step in interpretation of future data collected by these missions is to understand the preservation of organic matter in the martian environment. Several laboratory experiments have been devoted to quantifying and qualifying the evolution of organic molecules under simulated environmental conditions of Mars. However, these laboratory simulations are limited, and one major constraint is the reproduction of the UV spectrum that reaches the surface of Mars. As part of the PROCESS experiment of the European EXPOSE-E mission on board the International Space Station, a study was performed on the photodegradation of organics under filtered extraterrestrial solar electromagnetic radiation that mimics Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions. Glycine, serine, phthalic acid, phthalic acid in the presence of a mineral phase, and mellitic acid were exposed to these conditions for 1.5 years, and their evolution was determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after their retrieval. The results were compared with data from laboratory experiments. A 1.5-year exposure to Mars-like surface UV radiation conditions in space resulted in complete degradation of the organic compounds. Half-lives between 50 and 150 h for martian surface conditions were calculated from both laboratory and low-Earth orbit experiments. The results highlight that none of those organics are stable under low-Earth orbit solar UV radiation conditions.

  19. A combined Preisach–Hyperbolic Tangent model for magnetic hysteresis of Terfenol-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talebian, Soheil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hojjat, Yousef, E-mail: yhojjat@modares.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghodsi, Mojtaba [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman); Karafi, Mohammad Reza [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzamohammadi, Shahed [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This study presents a new model using the combination of Preisach and Hyperbolic Tangent models, to predict the magnetic hysteresis of Terfenol-D at different frequencies. Initially, a proper experimental setup was fabricated and used to obtain different magnetic hysteresis curves of Terfenol-D; such as major, minor and reversal loops. Then, it was shown that the Hyperbolic Tangent model is precisely capable of modeling the magnetic hysteresis of the Terfenol-D for both rate-independent and rate-dependent cases. Empirical equations were proposed with respect to magnetic field frequency which can calculate the non-dimensional coefficients needed by the model. These empirical equations were validated at new frequencies of 100 Hz and 300 Hz. Finally, the new model was developed through the combination of Preisach and Hyperbolic Tangent models. In the combined model, analytical relations of the Hyperbolic Tangent model for the first order reversal loops determined the weighting function of the Preisach model. This model reduces the required experiments and errors due to numerical differentiations generally needed for characterization of the Preisach function. In addition, it can predict the rate-dependent hysteresis as well as rate-independent hysteresis. - Highlights: • Different hysteresis curves of Terfenol-D are experimentally obtained at 0–200 Hz. • A new model is presented using combination of Preisach and Hyperbolic Tangent models. • The model predicts both rate-independent and rate-dependent hystereses of Terfenol-D. • The analytical model reduces the numerical errors and number of required experiments.

  20. Magneto-transport hysteresis loop of a single nanostructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodary, Guillemin; Wedekind, Sebastian; Sander, Dirk; Kirschner, Juergen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120, Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    We have studied morphological, electronic and magnetic properties of a single cobalt nano-island by means of spin-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) at 7 K and under a high magnetic field (7 T). Two monolayer high triangular Co islands are grown on Cu(111) surface at room temperature and are then imaged by STM at low temperature. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy reveals spin polarized states of the nano-islands. In contrast to previous studies using the field variation of images contrast to obtain a magnetic hysteresis loop, we directly record the apparent topology change with magnetic field variation at a single point. This method allows to understand the magnetic properties of a single nano-object, as the coercitive field or the switching behavior. The magneto-transport hysteresis curve obtained is explained from a tunnel magnetoresistance standpoint. We discuss the precise method to obtain such measurement with a STM in comparison to solid state spin electronic experiments, specially artifacts that have been isolated.

  1. Deformation Hysteresis of Electrohydrodynamic Patterning on a Thin Polymer Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingzhen; Li, Ben Q; Tian, Hongmiao; Li, Xiangming; Shao, Jinyou; Chen, Xiaoliang; Xu, Feng

    2016-07-13

    Electrohydrodynamic patterning is a technique that enables micro/nanostructures via imposing an external voltage on thin polymer films. In this investigation, we studied the electrohydrodynamic patterning theoretically and experimentally, with special interest focused on the equilibrium state. It is found that the equilibrium structure height increases with the voltage. In addition, we have observed, and believe it to be the first time, a hysteresis phenomenon exists in the relationship between the voltage and structure height. With an increase in the voltage, a critical value (the first critical voltage) is noticed, above which the polymer film would increase dramatically until it comes into contact with the template. However, with a decrease in the voltage, a smaller voltage (the second critical voltage) is needed to detach the polymer from the template. The mismatch of the first and second critical voltages distorts the voltage-structure height curve into an "S" shape. Such a phenomenon is verified for three representative templates and also by experiments. Furthermore, the effects of some parameters (e.g., polymer film thickness and dielectric constant) on this hysteresis phenomenon are also discussed.

  2. Spectral evaluation of Earth geopotential models and an experiment on its regional improvement for geoid modeling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Erol

    2012-06-01

    As the number of Earth geopotential models (EGM) grows with the increasing number of data collected by dedicated satellite gravity missions, CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE, measuring the differences among the models and monitoring the improvements in gravity field recovery are required. This study assesses the performance of recent EGMs derived from CHAMP, GRACE, and other data in comparison to the earlier two models in Turkish territory. Also the improvement capacities of these EGMs using local terrestrial data are inspected with two different approaches. In the first approach, the spherical harmonic coefficients of EGMs are modified depending on the local gravity data. In the second part, the original EGMs with their maximum harmonic expansions are employed in Remove Compute Restore algorithm for high resolution local geoid modelling. The assessment results with the local terrestrial data exhibited large disagreements among the models in Turkey. The outputs from regional improvements of EGMs using the gravity observations clarified the important role of the ground truth data contribution in geopotential models. The validations of the computed high resolution geoids rely on the EGMs at the GNSS/levelling networks, having 451 and 309 benchmarks, provided an absolute accuracy by means of standard deviations of the geoid height differences around 20 cm. These results from the final stage of the case study provide a comparison among the EGMs by means of their fit to the local gravity field.

  3. Untangling perceptual memory: hysteresis and adaptation map into separate cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiedrzik, Caspar M; Ruff, Christian C; Lazar, Andreea; Leitner, Frauke C; Singer, Wolf; Melloni, Lucia

    2014-05-01

    Perception is an active inferential process in which prior knowledge is combined with sensory input, the result of which determines the contents of awareness. Accordingly, previous experience is known to help the brain "decide" what to perceive. However, a critical aspect that has not been addressed is that previous experience can exert 2 opposing effects on perception: An attractive effect, sensitizing the brain to perceive the same again (hysteresis), or a repulsive effect, making it more likely to perceive something else (adaptation). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and modeling to elucidate how the brain entertains these 2 opposing processes, and what determines the direction of such experience-dependent perceptual effects. We found that although affecting our perception concurrently, hysteresis and adaptation map into distinct cortical networks: a widespread network of higher-order visual and fronto-parietal areas was involved in perceptual stabilization, while adaptation was confined to early visual areas. This areal and hierarchical segregation may explain how the brain maintains the balance between exploiting redundancies and staying sensitive to new information. We provide a Bayesian model that accounts for the coexistence of hysteresis and adaptation by separating their causes into 2 distinct terms: Hysteresis alters the prior, whereas adaptation changes the sensory evidence (the likelihood function).

  4. Free Space Laser Communication Experiments from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in Lunar Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Skillman, David R.; Hoffman, Evan D.; Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F.; Zellar, Ronald S.; Fong, Wai H; Krainak, Michael A.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Smith, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Laser communication and ranging experiments were successfully conducted from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit. The experiments used 4096-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) for the laser pulses during one-way LRO Laser Ranging (LR) operations. Reed-Solomon forward error correction codes were used to correct the PPM symbol errors due to atmosphere turbulence and pointing jitter. The signal fading was measured and the results were compared to the model.

  5. Free space laser communication experiments from Earth to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in lunar orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Skillman, David R; Hoffman, Evan D; Mao, Dandan; McGarry, Jan F; McIntire, Leva; Zellar, Ronald S; Davidson, Frederic M; Fong, Wai H; Krainak, Michael A; Neumann, Gregory A; Zuber, Maria T; Smith, David E

    2013-01-28

    Laser communication and ranging experiments were successfully conducted from the satellite laser ranging (SLR) station at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in lunar orbit. The experiments used 4096-ary pulse position modulation (PPM) for the laser pulses during one-way LRO Laser Ranging (LR) operations. Reed-Solomon forward error correction codes were used to correct the PPM symbol errors due to atmosphere turbulence and pointing jitter. The signal fading was measured and the results were compared to the model.

  6. Imperial scientists lead the way in preparation for the biggest experiment on earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Reeves, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    "An international team of over 2'000 scientist, led by Professor Tejinder Virdee from Imperial College London's Departement of Physics is stepping up preparations for the world's largest ever physics experiment, starting next year at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland." (1 page)

  7. Apollo-Soyuz Pamphlet No. 5: The Earth from Orbit. Apollo-Soyuz Experiments in Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Lou Williams; Page, Thornton

    This booklet is the fifth in a series of nine that describe the Apollo-Soyuz mission and experiments. This set is designed as a curriculum supplement for high school and college teachers, supervisors, curriculum specialists, textbook writers, and the general public. These booklets provide sources of ideas, examples of the scientific method,…

  8. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kamitakahara, William [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University; Mou, Chung-Yuan [National Taiwan University; Leao, Juscelino B [ORNL; Chang, Sung C [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We inter- pret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved.

  9. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  10. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1994-05-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  11. (Re)engineering Earth System Models to Expose Greater Concurrency for Ultrascale Computing: Practice, Experience, and Musings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    As the high performance computing (HPC) community pushes towards the exascale horizon, the importance and prevalence of fine-grained parallelism in new computer architectures is increasing. This is perhaps most apparent in the proliferation of so-called "accelerators" such as the Intel Xeon Phi or NVIDIA GPGPUs, but the trend also holds for CPUs, where serial performance has grown slowly and effective use of hardware threads and vector units are becoming increasingly important to realizing high performance. This has significant implications for weather, climate, and Earth system modeling codes, many of which display impressive scalability across MPI ranks but take relatively little advantage of threading and vector processing. In addition to increasing parallelism, next generation codes will also need to address increasingly deep hierarchies for data movement: NUMA/cache levels, on node vs. off node, local vs. wide neighborhoods on the interconnect, and even in the I/O system. We will discuss some approaches (grounded in experiences with the Intel Xeon Phi architecture) for restructuring Earth science codes to maximize concurrency across multiple levels (vectors, threads, MPI ranks), and also discuss some novel approaches for minimizing expensive data movement/communication.

  12. Heaven can wait - or down to earth in real time: Near-death experience revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tellingen, C

    2008-10-01

    Near-death experience (NDE) is an intriguing phenomenon that invites more questions than answers. Hitherto emphasis has been laid on apparent similarities in accounts of NDE to prove a supernatural origin while in fact unique differences besides gross similarities support a neurophysiological explanation. A teleological approach is suggested to explain the neuroprotective strategies involved and accordingly a forme fruste of the biological concept of hibernation is put forward as an unifying hypothesis for clarification. (Neth Heart J 2008;16:359-62.).

  13. Down to earth philosophy: an anti-exceptionalist essay on thought experiments and philosophical methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Sgaravatti, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    In the first part of the dissertation, chapters 1 to 3, I criticize several views which tend to set philosophy apart from other cognitive achievements. I argue against the popular views that 1) Intuitions, as a sui generis mental state, are involved crucially in philosophical methodology 2) Philosophy requires engagement in conceptual analysis, understood as the activity of considering thought experiments with the aim to throw light on the nature of our concepts, and 3) Much philosophical ...

  14. The ClearEarth Project: Preliminary Findings from Experiments in Applying the CLEARTK NLP Pipeline and Annotation Tools Developed for Biomedicine to the Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, R.; Thessen, A.; Jenkins, C. J.; Palmer, M.; Myers, S.; Ramdeen, S.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to quickly find, easily use and effortlessly integrate data from a variety of sources is a grand challenge in Earth sciences, one around which entire research programs have been built. A myriad of approaches to tackling components of this challenge have been demonstrated, often with some success. Yet finding, assessing, accessing, using and integrating data remains a major challenge for many researchers. A technology that has shown promise in nearly every aspect of the challenge is semantics. Semantics has been shown to improve data discovery, facilitate assessment of a data set, and through adoption of the W3C's Linked Data Platform to have improved data integration and use at least for data amenable to that paradigm. Yet the creation of semantic resources has been slow. Why? Amongst a plethora of other reasons, it is because semantic expertise is rare in the Earth and Space sciences; the creation of semantic resources for even a single discipline is labor intensive and requires agreement within the discipline; best practices, methods and tools for supporting the creation and maintenance of the resources generated are in flux; and the human and financial capital needed are rarely available in the Earth sciences. However, other fields, such as biomedicine, have made considerable progress in these areas. The NSF-funded ClearEarth project is adapting the methods and tools from these communities for the Earth sciences in the expectation that doing so will enhance progress and the rate at which the needed semantic resources are created. We discuss progress and results to date, lessons learned from this adaptation process, and describe our upcoming efforts to extend this knowledge to the next generation of Earth and data scientists.

  15. An Experiment to Evaluate Skylab Earth Resources Sensors for Detection of the Gulf Stream. [Straits of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, G. A. (Principal Investigator); Gordon, H. R.; Baig, S. R.; Mccaslin, M.; Devivo, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An experiment to evaluate the Skylab earth resources package for observing ocean currents was performed in the Straits of Florida in January 1974. Data from the S190 photographic facility, S191 spectroradiometer and S192 multispectral scanner, were compared with surface observations. The anticyclonic edge of the Gulf Stream could be identified in the Skylab S190A and B photographs, but the cyclonic edge was obscured by clouds. The aircraft photographs were judged not useful for spectral analysis because vignetting caused the blue/green ratios to be dependent on the position in the photograph. The spectral measurement technique could not identify the anticyclonic front, but mass of Florida Bay water which was in the process of flowing into the Straits could be identified and classified. Monte Carlo simulations of the visible spectrum showed that the aerosol concentration could be estimated and a correction technique was devised.

  16. Hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba-Galea, Carlos A

    2016-09-30

    Ion channels constitute a superfamily of membrane proteins found in all living creatures. Their activity allows fast translocation of ions across the plasma membrane down the ion's transmembrane electrochemical gradient, resulting in a difference in electrical potential across the plasma membrane, known as the membrane potential. A group within this superfamily, namely voltage-gated channels, displays activity that is sensitive to the membrane potential. The activity of voltage-gated channels is controlled by the membrane potential, while the membrane potential is changed by these channels' activity. This interplay produces variations in the membrane potential that have evolved into electrical signals in many organisms. These signals are essential for numerous biological processes, including neuronal activity, insulin release, muscle contraction, fertilization and many others. In recent years, the activity of the voltage-gated channels has been observed not to follow a simple relationship with the membrane potential. Instead, it has been shown that the activity of voltage-gated channel displays hysteresis. In fact, a growing number of evidence have demonstrated that the voltage dependence of channel activity is dynamically modulated by activity itself. In spite of the great impact that this property can have on electrical signaling, hysteresis in voltage-gated channels is often overlooked. Addressing this issue, this review provides examples of voltage-gated ion channels displaying hysteretic behavior. Further, this review will discuss how Dynamic Voltage Dependence in voltage-gated channels can have a physiological role in electrical signaling. Furthermore, this review will elaborate on the current thoughts on the mechanism underlying hysteresis in voltage-gated channels.

  17. Scalar and vector hysteresis simulations using HysterSoft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimian, M.; Andrei, P.

    2015-02-01

    Hysteresis modeling has become an important research area with many applications in science and engineering. In this article we present a unified and robust simulation framework designed to perform scalar and vector hysteresis modeling. The framework is based on HysterSoft© which is a simulation platform that can be interfaced with other libraries and simulation programs to model various aspects of hysteresis. We describe the main features of our simulation framework by focusing on scalar and vector hysteresis modeling, direct and inverse modeling, dynamic hysteresis modeling, first-order reversal-curves analysis, identification of the scalar and vector Preisach distribution function using an experimental first- order reversal-curves, noise passage analysis through hysteretic systems, and thermal relaxation in scalar and vector hysteresis. The simulation modules, the user-defined features, and various parameter identification techniques are also presented.

  18. Underlying memory-dominant nature of hysteresis in piezoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashash, Saeid; Jalili, Nader

    2006-07-01

    Although the existence of nonlocal memories in hysteresis behavior of piezoelectric materials has been demonstrated, their detailed and thorough properties have yet to be revealed. Along this line, we disclose and demonstrate the underlying memory-dominant nature of hysteresis, and characterize its important properties that must be considered for the accurate prediction of hysteresis trajectory in piezoelectric materials. More specifically, the concept of recording the turning points, targeting the previously recorded turning points, curve alignment, and wiping-out effects at these points are introduced as the basic intellectual properties of hysteresis nonlinearity. A constitutive memory-based mathematical modeling framework is then developed and trained for the precise prediction of a hysteresis path for arbitrarily assigned input profiles. Utilizing a piezoelectric-driven actuator, it is experimentally demonstrated that if the number of memory units is sufficiently selected, model response in the prediction of a hysteresis track is significantly improved.

  19. Order Parameter Hysteresis on the Complex Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Pei-Jie; WANG Bing-Hong

    2008-01-01

    Collective synchronization is investigated on the small-world network (NW model). The order parameter is introduced to measure the synchronization of phase. It is found that there are differences between the processes of synchronization and desynchronization. The dependence of order parameter on the coupling strength is shown like a hysteresis loop. The size of the 10019 demonstrates the non-monotonicity with the change of adding probability,and is relevant to the construction of the network. The area may be maximum, as the adding probability is equal to 0.4. This phenomenon indicates that the clusters in the network play an important role in the processes of synchronization and desynchronization.

  20. Fingerprint image enhancement by differential hysteresis processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotta, Eduardo; Moler, Emilce

    2004-05-10

    A new method to enhance defective fingerprints images through image digital processing tools is presented in this work. When the fingerprints have been taken without any care, blurred and in some cases mostly illegible, as in the case presented here, their classification and comparison becomes nearly impossible. A combination of spatial domain filters, including a technique called differential hysteresis processing (DHP), is applied to improve these kind of images. This set of filtering methods proved to be satisfactory in a wide range of cases by uncovering hidden details that helped to identify persons. Dactyloscopy experts from Policia Federal Argentina and the EAAF have validated these results.

  1. The AFIS experiment: Detecting low energetic antiprotons in a low earth orbit, using an active target detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poeschl, Thomas; Gaisbauer, Dominic; Greenwald, Daniel; Hahn, Alexander; Hauptmann, Philipp; Konorov, Igor; Meng, Lingxin; Paul, Stephan [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Losekamm, Martin [Physics Department E18, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Institute of Astronautics, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Renker, Dieter [Physics Department E17, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Since the first observation of geomagnetically trapped antiprotons by the PAMELA experiment and the new results on the positron excess by the AMS-02 experiment, the creation and transport of antimatter in the Earth's upper atmosphere attracts more and more attention both at theoretical and experimental side. For this reason the AFIS experiment was initiated to measure the flux of low energetic antiprotons in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). We developed an active target detector made from scintillating fibers connected to silicon photomultipliers which allows to detect antiprotons in the energy interval of about 30 MeV-100 MeV. The stopping curve of incoming antiprotons (Bragg peak) and the signal of outgoing pions created from the annihilation, are used for particle identification as well as triggering. We plan to implement this detector on a 3 unit cubesat satellite in the framework the 'Move2Warp' mission, which is carried out as a student project by the Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  2. Diapirism on Venus and the Early Earth and The thermal effect of fluid flows in AECL's Tunnel Sealing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Catherine M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Flow instabilities occur at all scales in planetary systems. In this thesis we examine three cases of such instabilities, on three very different length scales. In the first part, we test the idea that Archean granite-greenstone belts (GGBs) form by crustal diapirism, or Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. GGBs are characterized by large granitic domes (50-100 km in diameter) embedded in narrow keel-shaped greenstones. They are ubiquitous in Archean (> 2.5 Ga) terrains, but rare thereafter. We performed finite element calculations for a visco-elastic, temperature-dependent, non-Newtonian crust under conditions appropriate for the Archean, which show that dense low-viscosity volcanics overlying a felsic basement will overturn diapirically in as little as 10 Ma, displacing as much as 60 % of the volcanics to the lower crust. This surprisingly fast overturn rate suggests that diapiric overturn dominated crustal tectonics in the hot conditions of the Early Earth, becoming less important as the Earth cooled. Moreover, the deposition of large volumes of wet basaltic volcanics to the lower crust may provide the source for the formation of the distinctly Archean granitic rocks which dominate Earth's oldest continents. The second part examines the origin of Venusian coronae, circular volcanic features unique to Venus. Coronae are thought to result from small instabilities (diapirs) from the core-mantle boundary, which are typical of stagnant-lid convection. However, most young coronae are located in a region surrounded by long-lived hotspots, typical of a more active style of mantle convection. Using analogue experiments in corn syrup heated from below, we show that the co-existence of diapirs and long-lived mantle plumes are a direct consequence of the catastrophic overturn of the cold Venusian lithosphere thought to have occurred ˜ 700 Ma ago. In the last part we analyze the thermal effect of fluid flow through a full-scale experiment testing clay and concrete tunnel seals in

  3. MAGNETIC FIELD ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC VALVE TAKING HYSTERESIS INTO ACCOUNT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shengchang; Zhong Tingxiu; Xu Yangzeng; Shi Guanglin

    2003-01-01

    Predicting and optimizing of the high-speed solenoid on/off valve behavior requires an accurate model of the hysteresis loop of the magnetic material used. A ferromagnetic hysteresis model and a novel algorithm based on fixed-point technique to optimize the electromagnetic model are introduced. By utilizing a modified vector Preisach model of magnetic hysteresis and the global genetic optimization algorithm based on partial mapping cross method, the B-H relation loops are identified accurately.

  4. Method and apparatus for sub-hysteresis discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2015-12-29

    Embodiments of comparator circuits are disclosed. A comparator circuit may include a differential input circuit, an output circuit, a positive feedback circuit operably coupled between the differential input circuit and the output circuit, and a hysteresis control circuit operably coupled with the positive feedback circuit. The hysteresis control circuit includes a switching device and a transistor. The comparator circuit provides sub-hysteresis discrimination and high speed discrimination.

  5. Contact angle hysteresis on randomly rough surfaces: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Robert; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-04-09

    Wetting is important in many applications, and the solid surfaces being wet invariably feature some amount of surface roughness. A free energy-based computational simulation is used to study the effect of roughness on wetting and especially contact angle hysteresis. On randomly rough, self-affine surfaces, it is found that hysteresis depends primarily on the value of the Wenzel roughness parameter r, increasing in proportion with r - 1. Micrometer-level roughness causes hysteresis of a few degrees.

  6. The Mechanism of Aerodynamic Hysteresis for Sinusoidally Oscillating Delta Wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄国创; 王玉明; 曹桂兴

    1994-01-01

    An unsteady model of vortex system is developed to simulate the phenomena of aerodynamic hysteresis of sinusoidally oscillating delta wings.The dynamic behavior of leading-edge separation vortices simulated by the present method is in qualitative agreement with that of flow visualization by Gad-el-Hak and Ho.The calculated lift hysteresis loops are in quantitative agreement with the force measurements in the tunnel.The aerodynamic mechanism of the hysteresis phenomena is further investigated by the present method.

  7. On the rationale for hysteresis in economic decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Luis A.; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Cross, Rod

    2017-02-01

    In the social sciences there are plausible reasons to postulate that hysteresis effects are important. The available evidence, however, is predominantly at the macro level. In this paper we review the evidence regarding hysteresis in the neural processes underlying human behavior. We argue that there is a need for experimental and neuroimaging studies to fill the gap in knowledge about hysteresis processes at the micro level in the social sciences.

  8. Nonlinear model accounting for minor hysteresis of embedded SMA actuators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Kai; GU Chenglin

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative index martensite fraction was used to describe the phase transformation degree of shape memory alloy (SMA).On the basis of the martensite fraction,a nonlinear analysis model for major and minor hysteresis loops was developed.The model adopted two exponential equations to calculate the martensite fractions for cooling and heating,respectively.The martensite fractions were derived as the relative parameters were adjusted timely according to continuous,common initial and common limit constraints.By use of the linear relationship between the curvature of embedded SMA actuator and SMA's martensite fraction,the curvature was determined.The results of the simulations and experiments prove the validity and veracity of the model.

  9. Earth Science Project Office (ESPO) Field Experiences During ORACLES, ATom, KORUS and POSIDON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Vidal; Zavaleta, Jhony

    2017-01-01

    Very often, scientific field campaigns entail years of planning and incur substantial cost, especially if they involve the operation of large research aircraft in remote locations. Deploying and operating these aircrafts even for short periods of time poses challenges that, if not addressed properly, can have significant negative consequences and potentially jeopardize the success of a scientific campaign. Challenges vary from country to country and range from safety, health, and security risks to differences in cultural and social norms. Our presentation will focus on sharing experiences on the ESPO 2016 conducted field campaigns ORACLES, ATom, KORUS and POSIDON. We will focus on the best practices, lessons learned, international relations and coordination aspects of the country-specific experiences. This presentation will be part of the ICARE Conference (2nd International Conference on Airborne Research for the Environment (ICARE 2017) that will focus on "Developing the infrastructure to meet future scientific challenges". This unique conference and gathering of facility support experts will not only allow for dissemination and sharing of knowledge but also promote collaboration and networking among groups that support scientific research using airborne platforms around the globe.

  10. Implementation of sorption hysteresis in multi-Fickian moisture transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    represent this behavior. The multi-Fickian model describes the combined transport of bound water and vapor and their interaction through sorption. The bound-water concentration is also influenced by sorption hysteresis. In the worst case, sorption hysteresis may result in deviations of up to 30......-35% in moisture content. Hence, for a precise moisture content computation, sorption hysteresis must be taken into account. The present paper explains the relation between sorption hysteresis and multi-Fickian moisture transport, and clarifies how models for the two phenomena are coupled. To illustrate...

  11. Implementation of sorption hysteresis in multi-Fickian moisture transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Svensson, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    this behavior. The multi-Fickian model describes the combined transport of bound water and vapor and their interaction through sorption. The bound-water concentration is also influenced by sorption hysteresis. In the worst case, sorption hysteresis may result in deviations of up to 30-35% in moisture content....... Hence, for a precise moisture content computation, sorption hysteresis must be taken into account. The present paper explains the relation between sorption hysteresis and multi-Fickian moisture transport, and clarifies how models for the two phenomena are coupled. To illustrate the effects, a finite...

  12. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  13. On the hysteresis behaviors of the higher spin Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akıncı, Ümit

    2017-10-01

    Hysteresis characteristics of the general Spin-S (S > 1) Blume-Capel model have been studied within the effective field approximation. Particular emphasis has been paid on the large negative valued crystal field region and it has been demonstrated for this region that, Spin-S Blume-Capel model has 2 S windowed hysteresis loop in low temperatures. Some interesting results have been obtained such as nested characteristics of the hysteresis loops of successive spin-S Blume-Capel model. Effect of the rising crystal field and temperature on these hysteresis behaviors have been investigated in detail and physical mechanisms have been given.

  14. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Souad, E-mail: souadhamada@yahoo.fr [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Louai, Fatima Zohra, E-mail: fz_louai@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Nait-Said, Nasreddine, E-mail: n_naitsaid@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Benabou, Abdelkader, E-mail: Abdelkader.Benabou@univ-lille1.fr [L2EP, Université de Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-07-15

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  15. Causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2012-09-01

    Experiments were designed to better understand the causes and implications of colloid and microorganism retention hysteresis with transients in solution ionic strength (IS). Saturated packed column experiments were conducted using two sizes of carboxyl modified latex (CML) microspheres (0.1 and 1.1 μm) and microorganisms (coliphage φX174 and E. coli D21g) under various transient solution chemistry conditions, and 360 μm Ottawa sand that was subject to different levels of cleaning, namely, a salt cleaning procedure that removed clay particles, and a salt + acid cleaning procedure that removed clay and reduced microscopic heterogeneities due to metal oxides and surface roughness. Comparison of results from the salt and salt + acid treated sand indicated that microscopic heterogeneity was a major contributor to colloid retention hysteresis. The influence of this heterogeneity increased with IS and decreasing colloid/microbe size on salt treated sand. These trends were not consistent with calculated mean interaction energies (the secondary minima), but could be explained by the size of the electrostatic zone of influence (ZOI) near microscopic heterogeneities. In particular, the depth of local minima in the interaction energy has been predicted to increase with a decrease in the ZOI when the colloid size and/or the Debye length decreased (IS increased). The adhesive interaction was therefore largely irreversible for smaller sized 0.1 μm CML colloids, whereas it was reversible for larger 1.1 μm CML colloids. Similarly, the larger E. coli D21g exhibited greater reversibility in retention than φX174. However, direct comparison of CML colloids and microbes was not possible due to differences in size, shape, and surface properties. Retention and release behavior of CML colloids on salt + acid treated sand was much more consistent with mean interaction energies due to reduction in microscopic heterogeneities.

  16. EMSCOPE - Electromagnetic Component of EarthScope Backbone and Transportable Array Experiments 2006-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, G.; Evans, R.; Ingate, S.; Livelybrooks, D.; Mickus, K.; Park, S.; Schultz, A.; Unsworth, M.; Wannamaker, P.

    2007-12-01

    USArray (http://www.iris.edu/USArray) in conjunction with EMSOC (Electromagnetic Studies of the Continents) (http://emsoc.ucr.edu/emsoc) is installing magnetotelluric (MT) stations as part of Earthscope. The MT component of Earthscope consists of permanent (Backbone) and transportable long period stations to record naturally occurring, time varying electric and magnetic fields to produce a regional lithospheric/asthensospheric electrical conductivity map of the United States. The recent arrival of 28 long period MT instruments allows for the final installation of the Backbone stations throughout the US and yearly transportable array studies. The Backbone MT survey consists of 7 stations spaced throughout the continental US with preliminary installation at Soap Creek, Oregon; Parkfield, California; Braden, Missouri and Socorro, New Mexico.Siting and permitting are underway or completed at stations in eastern Montana, northern Wisconsin and Virginia. These stations will be recording for at least five years to determine electrical conductivities at depths that extend into the mantle transition zone. The first transportable array experiment was performed in the summer and fall of 2006 in central and eastern Oregon (Oregon Pilot Project) using equipment loaned from EMSOC. Thirty-one long period MT stations were recorded with 14 to 21 day occupations. Preliminary 3D inverse models indicate several lithospheric electrical conductivity anomalies including a linear zone marked by low-high conductivity transition along the Klamath-Blue Mountain Lineament associated with a linear trend of gravity minima. High electrical conductivity values occur in the upper crust under the accreted terrains in the Blue Mountains region. The second transportable array experiment was performed in the summer and fall of 2007 and completes coverage of the Oregon, Washington, and western Idaho, targeting the Cascadia subduction zone, Precambrian boundaries, and sub-basalt lithologies. The 2008

  17. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  18. High-energy cosmic ray fluxes in the Earth atmosphere: calculations vs experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanov, A A; Sinegovsky, S I

    2008-01-01

    A new calculation of the atmospheric fluxes of cosmic-ray hadrons and muons in the energy range 10-10^5 GeV has been performed for the set of hadron production models, EPOS 1.6, QGSJET II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, and others that are of interest to cosmic ray physicists. The fluxes of secondary cosmic rays at several levels in the atmosphere are computed using directly data of the ATIC-2, GAMMA experiments, and the model proposed recently by Zatsepin and Sokolskaya as well as the parameterization of the primary cosmic ray spectrum by Gaisser and Honda. The calculated energy spectra of the hadrons and muon flux as a function of zenith angle are compared with measurements as well as other calculations. The effect of uncertainties both in the primary cosmic ray flux and hadronic model predictions on the spectra of atmospheric hadrons and muons is considered.

  19. Hysteresis compensation of the piezoelectric ceramic actuators-based tip/tilt mirror with a neural network method in adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chongchong; Wang, Yukun; Hu, Lifa; Wang, Shaoxin; Cao, Zhaoliang; Mu, Quanquan; Li, Dayu; Yang, Chengliang; Xuan, Li

    2016-05-01

    The intrinsic hysteresis nonlinearity of the piezo-actuators can severely degrade the positioning accuracy of a tip-tilt mirror (TTM) in an adaptive optics system. This paper focuses on compensating this hysteresis nonlinearity by feed-forward linearization with an inverse hysteresis model. This inverse hysteresis model is based on the classical Presiach model, and the neural network (NN) is used to describe the hysteresis loop. In order to apply it in the real-time adaptive correction, an analytical nonlinear function derived from the NN is introduced to compute the inverse hysteresis model output instead of the time-consuming NN simulation process. Experimental results show that the proposed method effectively linearized the TTM behavior with the static hysteresis nonlinearity of TTM reducing from 15.6% to 1.4%. In addition, the tip-tilt tracking experiments using the integrator with and without hysteresis compensation are conducted. The wavefront tip-tilt aberration rejection ability of the TTM control system is significantly improved with the -3 dB error rejection bandwidth increasing from 46 to 62 Hz.

  20. Residual stresses and vector hysteresis modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ktena, Aphrodite, E-mail: aktena@teiste.gr

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses in magnetic materials, whether the result of processing or intentional loading, leave their footprint on macroscopic data, such hysteresis loops and differential permeability measurements. A Preisach-type vector model is used to reproduce the phenomenology observed based on assumptions deduced from the data: internal stresses lead to smaller and misaligned grains, hence increased domain wall pinning and angular dispersion of local easy axes, favouring rotation as a magnetization reversal mechanism; misaligned grains contribute to magnetostatic fields opposing the direction of the applied field. The model is using a vector operator which accounts for both reversible and irreversible processes; the Preisach concept for interactions for the role of stress related demagnetizing fields; and a characteristic probability density function which is constructed as a weighed sum of constituent functions: the material is modeled as consisting of various subsystems, e.g. reversal mechanisms or areas subject to strong/weak long range interactions and each subsystem is represented by a constituent probability density function. Our assumptions are validated since the model reproduces the hysteresis loops and differential permeability curves observed experimentally and calculations involving rotating inputs at various residual stress levels are consistent and in agreement with experimental evidence.

  1. Residual stresses and vector hysteresis modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktena, Aphrodite

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses in magnetic materials, whether the result of processing or intentional loading, leave their footprint on macroscopic data, such hysteresis loops and differential permeability measurements. A Preisach-type vector model is used to reproduce the phenomenology observed based on assumptions deduced from the data: internal stresses lead to smaller and misaligned grains, hence increased domain wall pinning and angular dispersion of local easy axes, favouring rotation as a magnetization reversal mechanism; misaligned grains contribute to magnetostatic fields opposing the direction of the applied field. The model is using a vector operator which accounts for both reversible and irreversible processes; the Preisach concept for interactions for the role of stress related demagnetizing fields; and a characteristic probability density function which is constructed as a weighed sum of constituent functions: the material is modeled as consisting of various subsystems, e.g. reversal mechanisms or areas subject to strong/weak long range interactions and each subsystem is represented by a constituent probability density function. Our assumptions are validated since the model reproduces the hysteresis loops and differential permeability curves observed experimentally and calculations involving rotating inputs at various residual stress levels are consistent and in agreement with experimental evidence.

  2. HYSTERESIS BETWEEN DISTINCT MODES OF TURBULENT DYNAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kitchatinov, Leonid L., E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 291, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear mean-field models of the solar dynamo show long-term variability, which may be relevant to different states of activity inferred from long-term radiocarbon data. This paper is aimed at probing the dynamo hysteresis predicted by the recent mean-field models of Kitchatinov and Olemskoy with direct numerical simulations. We perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale dynamos in a shearing box with helically forced turbulence. As an initial condition, we either take a weak random magnetic field or we start from a snapshot of an earlier simulation. Two quasi-stable states are found to coexist in a certain range of parameters close to the onset of the large-scale dynamo. The simulations converge to one of these states depending on the initial conditions. When either the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is increased between successive runs above the critical value for onset of the dynamo, the field strength jumps to a finite value. However, when the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is then decreased again, the field strength stays at a similar value (strong field branch) even below the original onset. We also observe intermittent decaying phases away from the strong field branch close to the point where large-scale dynamo action is just possible. The dynamo hysteresis seen previously in mean-field models is thus reproduced by 3D simulations. Its possible relation to distinct modes of solar activity such as grand minima is discussed.

  3. Modeling Anomalous Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reenen, Stephan; Kemerink, Martijn; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-10-01

    Organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites are distinct from most other semiconductors because they exhibit characteristics of both electronic and ionic motion. Accurate understanding of the optoelectronic impact of such properties is important to fully optimize devices and be aware of any limitations of perovskite solar cells and broader optoelectronic devices. Here we use a numerical drift-diffusion model to describe device operation of perovskite solar cells. To achieve hysteresis in the modeled current-voltage characteristics, we must include both ion migration and electronic charge traps, serving as recombination centers. Trapped electronic charges recombine with oppositely charged free electronic carriers, of which the density depends on the bias-dependent ion distribution in the perovskite. Our results therefore show that reduction of either the density of mobile ionic species or carrier trapping at the perovskite interface will remove the adverse hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. This gives a clear target for ongoing research effort and unifies previously conflicting experimental observations and theories.

  4. Experimental comparison of rate-dependent hysteresis models in characterizing and compensating hysteresis of piezoelectric tube actuators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aljanaideh, Omar, E-mail: omaryanni@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan); Habineza, Didace; Rakotondrabe, Micky [AS2M department, FEMTO-ST Institute, Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Univ. de Franche-Comté/CNRS/ENSMM, 25000 Besançon (France); Al Janaideh, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The Mechatronics and Microsystems Design Laboratory, University of Toronto (Canada); Department of Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2016-04-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to characterize rate-dependent hysteresis of a piezoelectric tube actuator at different excitation frequencies. The experimental measurements were followed by modeling and compensation of the hysteresis nonlinearities of the piezoelectric tube actuator using both the inverse rate-dependent Prandtl–Ishlinskii model (RDPI) and inverse rate-independent Prandtl–Ishlinskii model (RIPI) coupled with a controller. The comparison of hysteresis modeling and compensation of the actuator with both models is presented.

  5. Salt balance: From space experiments to revolutionizing new clinical concepts on earth - A historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzer, Rupert

    2014-11-01

    For a long time, sodium balance appeared to be a “done deal” and was thought to be well understood. However, experiments in preparation of space missions showed that the concept of osmotic sodium storage and close correlations of sodium with water balance are only part of the regulatory mechanisms of body salt. By now it has turned out that the human skin is an important storage place and regulator for sodium, that sodium storage involves macrophages which in turn salt-dependently co-regulate blood pressure, that body sodium also strongly influences bone and protein metabolism, and that immune functions are also strongly influenced by sodium. In addition, the aging process appears to lead to increased body sodium storage, which in turn might influence the aging process of the human body. The current review article summarizes the developments that have led to these revolutionizing new findings and concepts as well as consequences deriving from these findings. Therefore, it is not intended in this article to give a complete literature overview over the whole field but to focus on such key literature and considerations that led to the respective developments.

  6. Contamination Examples and Lessons from Low Earth Orbit Experiments and Operational Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Gary; Finckenor, Miria M.

    2009-01-01

    Flight experiments flown on the Space Shuttle, the International Space Station, Mir, Skylab, and free flyers such as the Long Duration Exposure Facility, the European Retrievable Carrier, and the EFFU, provide multiple opportunities for the investigation of molecular contamination effects. Retrieved hardware from the Solar Maximum Mission satellite, Mir, and the Hubble Space Telescope has also provided the means gaining insight into contamination processes. Images from the above mentioned hardware show contamination effects due to materials processing, hardware storage, pre-flight cleaning, as well as on-orbit events such as outgassing, mechanical failure of hardware in close proximity, impacts from man-made debris, and changes due to natural environment factors.. Contamination effects include significant changes to thermal and electrical properties of thermal control surfaces, optics, and power systems. Data from several flights has been used to develop a rudimentary estimate of asymptotic values for absorptance changes due to long-term solar exposure (4000-6000 Equivalent Sun Hours) of silicone-based molecular contamination deposits of varying thickness. Recommendations and suggestions for processing changes and constraints based on the on-orbit observed results will be presented.

  7. Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Atsushi; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-02-16

    Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis for probe liquids were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of bis((tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2,-tetrahydrooctyl)-dimethylsiloxy)methylsilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(2)O)(2)SiCH(3)H, (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH). Oxidized aluminum surfaces were prepared by photooxidation/cleaning of sputter-coated aluminum on silicon wafers (Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3)))) using oxygen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed that this facile CVD method produces a monolayer with a thickness of 1.1 nm on the Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface without a discernible change in surface morphology. After monolayer deposition, the hydrophilic Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface became both hydrophobic and oleophobic and exhibited essentially no contact angle hysteresis for water and n-hexadecane (advancing/receding contact angles (theta(A)/theta(R)) = 110 degrees/109 degrees and 52 degrees/50 degrees, respectively). Droplets move very easily on this surface and roll off of slightly tilted surfaces, independently of the contact angle (which is a practical definition of ultralyophobic). A conventional fluoroalkylsilane monolayer was also prepared from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(7)CH(2)CH(2)Si(OCH(3))(3), R(F)Si(OMe)(3)) for comparison. The theta(A)/theta(R) values for water and n-hexadecane are 121 degrees/106 degrees and 76 degrees/71 degrees, respectively. The larger hysteresis values indicate the "pinning" of probe liquids, even though advancing contact angles are larger than those of the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers. The (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers have excellent hydrolytic stability in water. We propose that the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers are flexible and liquidlike and that drops in contact with these surfaces experience very low energy barriers between metastable states, leading to the

  8. A stability-based mechanism for hysteresis in the walk-trot transition in quadruped locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Shinya; Katayama, Daiki; Fujiki, Soichiro; Tomita, Nozomi; Funato, Tetsuro; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Senda, Kei; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2013-04-01

    Quadrupeds vary their gaits in accordance with their locomotion speed. Such gait transitions exhibit hysteresis. However, the underlying mechanism for this hysteresis remains largely unclear. It has been suggested that gaits correspond to attractors in their dynamics and that gait transitions are non-equilibrium phase transitions that are accompanied by a loss in stability. In the present study, we used a robotic platform to investigate the dynamic stability of gaits and to clarify the hysteresis mechanism in the walk-trot transition of quadrupeds. Specifically, we used a quadruped robot as the body mechanical model and an oscillator network for the nervous system model to emulate dynamic locomotion of a quadruped. Experiments using this robot revealed that dynamic interactions among the robot mechanical system, the oscillator network, and the environment generate walk and trot gaits depending on the locomotion speed. In addition, a walk-trot transition that exhibited hysteresis was observed when the locomotion speed was changed. We evaluated the gait changes of the robot by measuring the locomotion of dogs. Furthermore, we investigated the stability structure during the gait transition of the robot by constructing a potential function from the return map of the relative phase of the legs and clarified the physical characteristics inherent to the gait transition in terms of the dynamics.

  9. Contact angle hysteresis: a review of fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eral, H.B.; Mannetje, 't D.J.C.M.; Oh, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon. It is omnipresent in nature and also plays a crucial role in various industrial processes. Despite its relevance, there is a lack of consensus on how to incorporate a description of contact angle hysteresis into physical models. To clarif

  10. Hysteresis behavior of the anisotropic quantum Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akıncı, Ümit, E-mail: umit.akinci@deu.edu.tr

    2013-10-15

    The effect of the anisotropy in the exchange interaction on the hysteresis loops within the anisotropic quantum Heisenberg model has been investigated with the effective field theory for two spin cluster. Particular attention has been devoted on the behavior of the hysteresis loop area, coercive field and remanent magnetization with the anisotropy in the exchange interaction for both ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases.

  11. On the controllability of the semilinear heat equation with hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagagiolo, Fabio, E-mail: bagagiol@science.unitn.it [Department of Mathematics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38050-Trento (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    We study the null controllability problem for a semilinear parabolic equation, with hysteresis entering in the semilinearity. Under suitable hypotheses, we prove the controllability result and explicitly treat the cases where the hysteresis relationship is given by a Play or a Preisach operator.

  12. Hysteresis loops of Cosmic Ray intensity decreases versus solar and interplanetary parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kane

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between CR (Cosmic Ray intensity and solar, interplanetary and terrestrial parameters. The hysteresis loops of (CR versus those of several solar parameters showed narrow loops in even cycles 20, 22 and broad loops in odd cycles 19, 21, as also in the recent odd cycle 23. Hysteresis plots for CR versus interplanetary number density N and speed V were erratic and uncertain (broad and narrow, all mixed up. Plots of CR versus Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF B seemed to be narrow for even as well as odd cycles. Hysteresis loops between CR and other interplanetary parameters were not clear-cut. The same was true for terrestrial parameters. During sunspot maximum years 2000–2003 of cycle 23, there is a double peak structure in all parameters. Whereas CR have a peak spacing of ~30 months, sunspots and Tilt angle have a spacing of only ~20 months. The solar open magnetic flux and the Voyager 1 magnetic field have a spacing of ~25 months. The solar polar magnetic field reverses later than the first peak of all parameters and hence, could not be a direct cause (as if effect started before the cause and lasted for several months more after the cause disappeared. It seems that CR modulation is mainly guided by magnetic configurations deep in the heliosphere, which may not have a simple relationship with parameters near Earth or near Sun.

  13. Grain-damage hysteresis and plate tectonic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2016-04-01

    deforms at a given stress can acquire two stable deformation regimes indicative of plate-like flows, i.e., it permits the coexistence of both slowly deforming plate interiors, and rapidly deforming plate boundaries. Earth seems to exist squarely inside the hysteresis loop and thus can have coexisting deformation states, while Venus appears to straddle the end of the loop where only the weakly deforming branch exists.

  14. A Hysteresis Model for Piezoceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ralph C.; Ounaies, Zoubeida

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of nonlinear constitutive relations and hysteresis inherent to piezoceramic materials at moderate to high drive levels. Such models are, necessary to realize the, full potential of the materials in high performance control applications, and a necessary prerequisite is the development of techniques which permit control implementation. The approach employed here is based on the qualification of reversible and irreversible domain wall motion in response to applied electric fields. A comparison with experimental data illustrates that because the resulting ODE model is physics-based, it can be employed for both characterization and prediction of polarization levels throughout the range of actuator operation. Finally, the ODE formulation is amenable to inversion which facilitates the development of an inverse compensator for linear control design.

  15. Tunable contact angle hysteresis on micropatterned surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Debuisson, Damien; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Micropatterned surfaces composed of concentric circular defects having a smooth trench-like profile are formed using a photoresist (SU-8). When an evaporating droplet encounters the micropatterned surface an evaporation phase is observed consisting of distinct discontinuities and steps in the droplet wetting contact angle and base radius respectively. The addition of gaps into the circular defects enables tuning of the contact angle hysteresis; the receding contact angle of fluorocarbon coated SU-8 can be tuned between 34.6{\\deg} and 89.1{\\deg} and that of SU-8 surfaces from 5.6{\\deg} to 43.3{\\deg} depending on the gap length. In addition, a model is developed which accurately predicts the observed behavior.

  16. Coexistence of negative photoconductivity and hysteresis in semiconducting graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Shendong; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Tang, Nujiang; Xu, Xiaoyong; Hu, Jingguo; Chen, Zhuo

    2016-04-01

    Solution-processed graphene quantum dots (GQDs) possess a moderate bandgap, which make them a promising candidate for optoelectronics devices. However, negative photoconductivity (NPC) and hysteresis that happen in the photoelectric conversion process could be harmful to performance of the GQDs-based devices. So far, their origins and relations have remained elusive. Here, we investigate experimentally the origins of the NPC and hysteresis in GQDs. By comparing the hysteresis and photoconductance of GQDs under different relative humidity conditions, we are able to demonstrate that NPC and hysteresis coexist in GQDs and both are attributed to the carrier trapping effect of surface adsorbed moisture. We also demonstrate that GQDs could exhibit positive photoconductivity with three-order-of-magnitude reduction of hysteresis after a drying process and a subsequent encapsulation. Considering the pervasive moisture adsorption, our results may pave the way for a commercialization of semiconducting graphene-based and diverse solution-based optoelectronic devices.

  17. Coexistence of negative photoconductivity and hysteresis in semiconducting graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shendong Zhuang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed graphene quantum dots (GQDs possess a moderate bandgap, which make them a promising candidate for optoelectronics devices. However, negative photoconductivity (NPC and hysteresis that happen in the photoelectric conversion process could be harmful to performance of the GQDs-based devices. So far, their origins and relations have remained elusive. Here, we investigate experimentally the origins of the NPC and hysteresis in GQDs. By comparing the hysteresis and photoconductance of GQDs under different relative humidity conditions, we are able to demonstrate that NPC and hysteresis coexist in GQDs and both are attributed to the carrier trapping effect of surface adsorbed moisture. We also demonstrate that GQDs could exhibit positive photoconductivity with three-order-of-magnitude reduction of hysteresis after a drying process and a subsequent encapsulation. Considering the pervasive moisture adsorption, our results may pave the way for a commercialization of semiconducting graphene-based and diverse solution-based optoelectronic devices.

  18. Positive hysteresis of Ce-doped GAGG scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Koshimizu, Masanori; Watanabe, Kenichi; Sato, Hiroki; Yagi, Hideki; Yanagitani, Takagimi

    2014-10-01

    Positive hysteresis and radiation tolerance to high-dose radiation exposure were investigated for Ce 1% and 3% doped Gd3(Al, Ga)5O12 (Ce:GAGG) crystal scintillator on comparison with other garnet scintillators such Ce:YAG, Ce:LuAG, Pr:LuAG, and ceramic Ce:GAGG. When they were irradiated by several Gy 60Co γ-rays, Ce 1% doped GAGG crystal exhibited ∼20% light yield enhancement (positive hysteresis). This is the first time to observe positive hysteresis in Ce doped GAGG. On the other hand, other garnet materials did not show the positive hysteresis and their light yields were stable after 800 Gy irradiation except Pr:LuAG. The light yield of Pr:LuAG decreased largely. When irradiated Ce:GAGG which showed positive hysteresis was evaluated in Synchrotron facility (UVSOR), new excitation band was created around 60 nm.

  19. Theory of Sorption Hysteresis in Nanoporous Solids: II. Molecular condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Bazant, Martin Z

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the puzzle of sorption hysteresis in Portland cement concrete or cement paste, we develop in Part II of this study a general theory of vapor sorption and desorption from nanoporous solids, which attributes hysteresis to hindered molecular condensation with attractive lateral interactions. The classical mean-field theory of van der Waals is applied to predict the dependence of hysteresis on temperature and pore size, using the regular solution model and gradient energy of Cahn and Hilliard. A simple "hierarchical wetting" model for thin nanopores is developed to describe the case of strong wetting by the first monolayer, followed by condensation of nanodroplets and nanobubbles in the bulk. The model predicts a larger hysteresis critical temperature and enhanced hysteresis for molecular condensation across nanopores at high vapor pressure than within monolayers at low vapor pressure. For heterogeneous pores, the theory predicts sorption/desorption sequences similar to those seen in molecular dynami...

  20. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubov, Alexander L; Mourran, Ahmed; Möller, Martin; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2014-08-21

    We study experimentally and discuss quantitatively the contact angle hysteresis on striped superhydrophobic surfaces as a function of a solid fraction, ϕS. It is shown that the receding regime is determined by a longitudinal sliding motion of the deformed contact line. Despite an anisotropy of the texture the receding contact angle remains isotropic, i.e., is practically the same in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The cosine of the receding angle grows nonlinearly with ϕS. To interpret this we develop a theoretical model, which shows that the value of the receding angle depends both on weak defects at smooth solid areas and on the strong defects due to the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which scales as ϕS(2)lnϕS. The advancing contact angle was found to be anisotropic, except in a dilute regime, and its value is shown to be determined by the rolling motion of the drop. The cosine of the longitudinal advancing angle depends linearly on ϕS, but a satisfactory fit to the data can only be provided if we generalize the Cassie equation to account for weak defects. The cosine of the transverse advancing angle is much smaller and is maximized at ϕS ≃ 0.5. An explanation of its value can be obtained if we invoke an additional energy due to strong defects in this direction, which is shown to be caused by the adhesion of the drop on solid sectors and is proportional to ϕS(2). Finally, the contact angle hysteresis is found to be quite large and generally anisotropic, but it becomes isotropic when ϕS ≤ 0.2.

  1. Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS NL experiment for synthetic muscle returned to Earth: resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Albers, Leila N.; Rodriguez, Simone; Gentile, Charles; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Hitchner, Robert; Taylor, James; Hoffman, Dan; Cylinder, David; Gaza, Ramona; Moy, Leon; Mark, Patrick S.; Prillaman, Daniel L.; Nodarse, Robert; Menegus, Michael J.; Ratto, Jo Ann; Thellen, Christopher T.; Froio, Danielle; Valenza, Logan; Poirier, Catherine; Sinkler, Charles; Corl, Dylan; Hablani, Surbhi; Fuerst, Tyler; Gallucci, Sergio; Blocher, Whitney; Liffland, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    In anticipation of deep space travel, new materials are being explored to assist and relieve humans in dangerous environments, such as high radiation, extreme temperature, and extreme pressure. Ras Labs Synthetic Muscle™ - electroactive polymers (EAPs) that contract and expand at low voltages - which mimic the unique gentle-yet-strong nature of human tissue, is a potential asset to manned space travel through protective gear and human assist robotics and for unmanned space exploration through deep space. Gen 3 Synthetic Muscle™ was proven to be resistant to extreme temperatures, and there were indications that these materials would also be radiation resistant. The purpose of the Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS Experiment was to test the radiation resistivity of the third and fourth generation of these EAPs, as well as to make them even more radiation resistant. On Earth, exposure of the Generation 3 and Generation 4 EAPs to a Cs-137 radiation source for 47.8 hours with a total dose of 305.931 kRad of gamma radiation was performed at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) at Princeton University, followed by pH, peroxide, Shore Hardness durometer, and electroactivity testing to determine the inherent radiation resistivity of these contractile EAPs, and to determine whether the EAPs could be made even more radiation resistant through the application of appropriate additives and coatings. The on Earth preliminary tests determined that selected Ras Labs EAPs were not only inherently radiation resistant, but with the appropriate coatings and additives, could be made even more radiation resistant. G-force testing to over 10 G's was performed at US Army's ARDEC Labs, with excellent results, in preparation for space flight to the International Space Station National Laboratory (ISS-NL). Selected samples of Generation 3 and Generation 4 Synthetic Muscle™, with various additives and coatings, were launched to the ISS-NL on April 14, 2015 on the

  2. An undulation theory for condensation in open end slit pores: critical hysteresis temperature & critical hysteresis pore size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chunyan; Zeng, Yonghong; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2014-06-28

    A new theory of condensation in an open end slit pore, based on the concept of temperature dependent undulation, at the interface separating the adsorbed phase and the gas-like region, is presented. The theory, describes, for the first time, the microscopic origin of the critical hysteresis temperature and the critical hysteresis pore size, properties which are not accessible to any classical theories.

  3. Precession of the Earth as the Cause of Geomagnetism: Experiments lend support to the proposal that precessional torques drive the earth's dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkus, W V

    1968-04-19

    I have proposed that the precessional torques acting on the earth can sustain a turbulent hydromagnetic flow in the molten core. A gross balance of the Coriolis force, the Lorentz force, and the precessional force in the core fluid provided estimates of the fluid velocity and the interior magnetic field characteristic of such flow. Then these numbers and a balance of the processes responsible for the decay and regeneration of the magnetic field provided an estimate of the magnetic field external to the core. This external field is in keeping with the observations, but its value is dependent upon the speculative value for the electrical conductivity of core material. The proposal that turbulent flow due to precession can occur in the core was tested in a study of nonmagnetic laboratory flows induced by the steady precession of fluid-filled rotating spheroids. It was found that these flows exhibit both small wavelike instabilities and violent finite-amplitude instability to turbulent motion above critical values of the precession rate. The observed critical parameters indicate that a laminar flow in the core, due to the earth's precession, would have weak hydrodynamic instabilities at most, but that finite-amplitude hydromagnetic instability could lead to fully turbulent flow.

  4. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Harmon, B A; Fishman, G J; Connaughton, V; Henze, W; Paciesas, W S; Finger, M H; McCollough, M L; Sahi, M; Peterson, B; Shrader, C R; Grindlay, J E; Barret, D

    2004-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1y). Using the Earth Occultation Technique to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE large area detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the world wide web. We then performed a deep-sampling of 179 objects (including the aforementioned 58 objects) combining data from the entire 9.1y BATSE dataset. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects ...

  5. Soil organic matter (de)stabilization - new experiments needed to inform soil biogeochemistry modules in earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Torn, Margaret S.; Riley, William J.

    2017-04-01

    To better predict soil carbon climate feedbacks, the next generation of soil biogeochemistry modules in Earth System Models (ESMs) demand new types of experiments, and a more appropriate use of existing observations. For example, we highlight soil incubations and how they have been misinterpreted when inferring pseudo-first order turnover times and decomposition temperature and moisture sensitivities. Further, for existing pseudo first-order modules, and the new microbial- and mineral-explicit generation of biogeochemistry modules, there is often a mismatch between temporal and spatial observations and how they are used by modelers. Observation periods should be longer, from annual to decadal, and include transitions, e.g., induced by climate or management. Key observations to better structure and parameterize processes that are important for carbon-climate feedbacks include i) mineral surface interactions, ii) microbial dynamics and activity, including effects of soil temperature and moisture, iii) erosion and export, iv) landscape scale process heterogeneity, and v) the effect of land use change, such as clear cut and changes in tillage. Recent insights and knowledge gaps from traditionally disconnected scientific fields (such as geophysical modeling, agricultural soil science, geomorphology, and soil biogeochemistry) will be discussed in the context of informing ESM-scale terrestrial biogeochemistry models.

  6. The South India Precambrian crust and shallow lithospheric mantle: Initial results from the India Deep Earth Imaging Experiment (INDEX)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Rai; Kajaljyoti Borah; Ritima Das; Sandeep Gupta; Shalivahan Srivastava; K S Prakasam; K Sivaram; Sudesh Kumar; Rishikesh Meena

    2013-12-01

    We present here the most comprehensive study of the thickness and composition (/ ratio) of the South India Precambrian crust and the nature of shallower mantle inferred from analysis of teleseismic receiver functions from 70 broad-band seismic stations operated as a part of the India Deep Earth Imaging Experiment (INDEX). South India could be broadly divided into regions with thin crust (32–38 km) and thick crust (38–54 km). Thin crust domains include the East Dharwar Craton (EDC), Cuddapah basin and Madurai/Kerala Khondalite Block. The thicker crust domain includes the Western Dharwar Craton (WDC) and northern part of Southern Granulite Terrain. The WDC shows progressive increase in thickness from 38 km in north to 46–54 km in south, compared to an almost flat Moho beneath the EDC. Compositionally, most of the crustal domains are felsic to intermediate (/ ∼ 1.69–1.75) except the mid Archean block in the southern WDC where it is mafic (/ < 1.81). Considering erosion depth in the WDC, we argue for Himalaya like ∼70 km thick crust beneath it during the Archean. Variation in crustal thickness does not have a first-order influence on regional topography in South India and suggests significant role for the crustal composition. We also present evidence of mid-lithospheric low velocity at ∼85–100 km beneath South India.

  7. Use of rare earth oxides and iron oxides as soil erosion tracers in water erosion experiments at hillslope scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, G.; Cañasveras, J. C.; Barrón, V.; Boulal, H.; Gómez, H.; Conde, E.; Fernández, M.; Gómez, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of the ideal soil erosion have been defined by several authors, for example by Zhang et al. (2001). Despite intensive research on erosion tracers in the last decades there is not a single tracer fulfilling all these characteristics. That is why research on different soil erosion tracers remains as an active field. Two desirable characteristics in erosion tracers are that they should be relatively inexpensive (to purchase and analyze) and that they should be determined with high accuracy in soil or sediment. The availability of multiple tracers is another of the key requirements. In this communication we present our preliminary results on the use of two different sets of erosion tracers. One set are iron oxides with different magnetic and optical properties (Fe3O4, α-Fe2O3 and FeOOH) analyzed by NIRS and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The other set consists of five rare earth oxides (La2O3, Pr6O11, Nd2O3, Sm2O3 and Gd2O3) analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These two groups were studied under controlled and natural conditions, through several water erosion experiments, in field plots with different soil management, crops and scale. In one experiment these tracers were used to determine the source of sediment within sprinkle irrigated fields planted with cotton on shoulders. For this purpose, rainfall simulations were performed under controlled conditions at two scales, one with a portable rainfall simulator at small scale (0.81m2) and with the sprinkler irrigation system in the whole cotton field (2450 m2). Furrows were tagged with both groups of tracers, keeping shoulders untagged (where cotton was planted). Soil samples before and after the rainfall simulations were collected as well as sediment samples. In another experiment four olive orchard plots (330 m2) with different soil managements (cover crop and conventional tillage) were also tagged with the two groups of tracers. Soil samples were taken at

  8. Experiences in Bridging the Gap between Science and Decision Making at NASA's GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Steven; Teng, Bill; Friedl, Lawrence; Lynnes, Chris; Leptoukh, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the significance of NASA remote sensing Earth science data in monitoring and better understanding our planet s natural environment, NASA has implemented the Decision Support Through Earth Science Research Results program (NASA ROSES solicitations). a) This successful program has yielded several monitoring, surveillance, and decision support systems through collaborations with benefiting organizations. b) The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) has participated in this program on two projects (one complete, one ongoing), and has had opportune ad hoc collaborations gaining much experience in the formulation, management, development, and implementation of decision support systems utilizing NASA Earth science data. c) In addition, GES DISC s understanding of Earth science missions and resulting data and information, including data structures, data usability and interpretation, data interoperability, and information management systems, enables the GES DISC to identify challenges that come with bringing science data to decision makers. d) The purpose of this presentation is to share GES DISC decision support system project experiences in regards to system sustainability, required data quality (versus timeliness), data provider understanding of how decisions are made, and the data receivers willingness to use new types of information to make decisions, as well as other topics. In addition, defining metrics that really evaluate success will be exemplified.

  9. Droplet evaporation dynamics on a superhydrophobic surface with negligible hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Susmita; Garimella, Suresh V

    2013-08-27

    We report on experiments of droplet evaporation on a structured superhydrophobic surface that displays very high contact angle (CA ∼ 160 deg), and negligible contact angle hysteresis (contact-angle mode, with contact radius shrinking for almost the entire duration of evaporation. Experiments conducted on Teflon-coated smooth surface (CA ∼ 120 deg) as a baseline also support an evaporation process that is dominated by a constant-contact-angle mode. The experimental results are compared with an isothermal diffusion model for droplet evaporation from the literature. Good agreement is observed for the Teflon-coated smooth surface between the analytical expression and experimental results in terms of the total time for evaporation, transient volume, contact angle, and contact radius. However, for the structured superhydrophobic surface, the experiments indicate that the time taken for complete evaporation of the droplet is greater than the predicted time, across all droplet volumes. This disparity is attributed primarily to the evaporative cooling at the droplet interface due to the high aspect ratio of the droplet and also the lower effective thermal conductivity of the substrate due to the presence of air gaps. This hypothesis is verified by numerically evaluating the temperature distribution along the droplet interface. We propose a generalized relation for predicting the instantaneous volume of droplets with initial CA > 90 deg, irrespective of the mode of evaporation.

  10. Hydride formation thermodynamics and hysteresis in individual Pd nanocrystals with different size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrenova, Svetlana; Wadell, Carl; Nugroho, Ferry A A; Gschneidtner, Tina A; Diaz Fernandez, Yuri A; Nalin, Giammarco; Świtlik, Dominika; Westerlund, Fredrik; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Moth-Poulsen, Kasper; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles may depend on their size and shape and are traditionally assessed in ensemble-level experiments, which accordingly may be plagued by averaging effects. These effects can be eliminated in single-nanoparticle experiments. Using plasmonic nanospectroscopy, we present a comprehensive study of hydride formation thermodynamics in individual Pd nanocrystals of different size and shape, and find corresponding enthalpies and entropies to be nearly size- and shape-independent. The hysteresis observed is significantly wider than in bulk, with details depending on the specifics of individual nanoparticles. Generally, the absorption branch of the hysteresis loop is size-dependent in the sub-30 nm regime, whereas desorption is size- and shape-independent. The former is consistent with a coherent phase transition during hydride formation, influenced kinetically by the specifics of nucleation, whereas the latter implies that hydride decomposition either occurs incoherently or via different kinetic pathways.

  11. Measure the Earth's Radius and the Speed of Light with Simple and Inexpensive Computer-Based Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    With new and inexpensive computer-based methods, measuring the speed of light and the Earth's radius--historically difficult endeavors--can be simple enough to be tackled by high school and college students working in labs that have limited budgets. In this article, the author describes two methods of estimating the Earth's radius using two…

  12. Measure the Earth's Radius and the Speed of Light with Simple and Inexpensive Computer-Based Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    With new and inexpensive computer-based methods, measuring the speed of light and the Earth's radius--historically difficult endeavors--can be simple enough to be tackled by high school and college students working in labs that have limited budgets. In this article, the author describes two methods of estimating the Earth's radius using two…

  13. Seasonal-to-decadal predictions with the ensemble Kalman filter and the Norwegian Earth System Model: a twin experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Counillon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we firstly demonstrate the potential of an advanced flow dependent data assimilation method for performing seasonal-to-decadal prediction and secondly, reassess the use of sea surface temperature (SST for initialisation of these forecasts. We use the Norwegian Climate Prediction Model (NorCPM, which is based on the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM and uses the deterministic ensemble Kalman filter to assimilate observations. NorESM is a fully coupled system based on the Community Earth System Model version 1, which includes an ocean, an atmosphere, a sea ice and a land model. A numerically efficient coarse resolution version of NorESM is used. We employ a twin experiment methodology to provide an upper estimate of predictability in our model framework (i.e. without considering model bias of NorCPM that assimilates synthetic monthly SST data (EnKF-SST. The accuracy of EnKF-SST is compared to an unconstrained ensemble run (FREE and ensemble predictions made with near perfect (i.e. microscopic SST perturbation initial conditions (PERFECT. We perform 10 cycles, each consisting of a 10-yr assimilation phase, followed by a 10-yr prediction. The results indicate that EnKF-SST improves sea level, ice concentration, 2 m atmospheric temperature, precipitation and 3-D hydrography compared to FREE. Improvements for the hydrography are largest near the surface and are retained for longer periods at depth. Benefits in salinity are retained for longer periods compared to temperature. Near-surface improvements are largest in the tropics, while improvements at intermediate depths are found in regions of large-scale currents, regions of deep convection, and at the Mediterranean Sea outflow. However, the benefits are often small compared to PERFECT, in particular, at depth suggesting that more observations should be assimilated in addition to SST. The EnKF-SST system is also tested for standard ocean circulation indices and demonstrates decadal

  14. Experiences in Applying Earth Observing Satellite Technology in SERVIR Regions with an Emphasis on Disasters: Successes, Lessons and Paths Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Earth observing satellites offer a unique perspective of our environment from the vantage point of space. Repeated measurements of the Earths subsystems such as the biosphere, atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and of humans interactions with their environments, allow for a better understanding of Earth system processes, and they can provide input for decision making in areas of environmental management and disaster risk reduction. SERVIR is a joint initiative of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the US Agency for International Development (USAID) that began in 2005 and has been active in applying Earth observations for sustainable development in many regions around the world, recently the Lower Mekong and West Africa regions. This talk will highlight some successes achieved and lessons learned through SERVIR in Central America, Eastern Southern Africa, and the Hindu Kush-Himalaya region, focusing on disasters. We will also present opportunities for enhanced decision making with Earth observations and geospatial technologies in the Lower Mekong region.

  15. Modeling hysteresis observed in the human erythrocyte voltage-dependent cation channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Christophersen, Palle

    2012-01-01

    cycle, including its direction, is reproduced by a model with 2×2 discrete states: the normal open/closed states and two different states of "gate tension". Rates of transitions between the two branches of the hysteresis curve are modeled with single-barrier kinetics by introducing a real......-valued "reaction coordinate" parametrizing the protein's conformational change between the two states of gate tension. The resulting scenario suggests a reanalysis of former experiments with NSVDC channels....

  16. Drop deposition on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis: Liquid-bridge stability and breakup

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J.

    2015-01-01

    We study the stability and breakup of liquid bridges with a free contact line on a surface with contact-angle hysteresis under zero-gravity conditions. Theoretical predictions of the stability limits are validated by experimental measurements. Experiments are conducted in a water-methanol-silicon oil system where the gravity force is offset by buoyancy. We highlight cases where stability is lost during the transition from a pinned-pinned to pinned-free interface when the receding contact angl...

  17. Creating Research-Rich Learning Experiences and Quantitative Skills in a 1st Year Earth Systems Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P. L.; Eggins, S.; Jones, S.

    2014-12-01

    We are creating a 1st year Earth Systems course at the Australian National University that is built around research-rich learning experiences and quantitative skills. The course has top students including ≤20% indigenous/foreign students; nonetheless, students' backgrounds in math and science vary considerably posing challenges for learning. We are addressing this issue and aiming to improve knowledge retention and deep learning by changing our teaching approach. In 2013-2014, we modified the weekly course structure to a 1hr lecture; a 2hr workshop with hands-on activities; a 2hr lab; an assessment piece covering all face-to-face activities; and a 1hr tutorial. Our new approach was aimed at: 1) building student confidence with data analysis and quantitative skills through increasingly difficult tasks in science, math, physics, chemistry, climate science and biology; 2) creating effective learning groups using name tags and a classroom with 8-person tiered tables; 3) requiring students to apply new knowledge to new situations in group activities, two 1-day field trips and assessment items; 4) using pre-lab and pre-workshop exercises to promote prior engagement with key concepts; 5) adding open-ended experiments to foster structured 'scientific play' or enquiry and creativity; and 6) aligning the assessment with the learning outcomes and ensuring that it contains authentic and challenging southern hemisphere problems. Students were asked to design their own ocean current experiment in the lab and we were astounded by their ingenuity: they simulated the ocean currents off Antarctica; varied water density to verify an equation; and examined the effect of wind and seafloor topography on currents. To evaluate changes in student learning, we conducted surveys in 2013 and 2014. In 2014, we found higher levels of student engagement with the course: >~80% attendance rates and >~70% satisfaction (20% neutral). The 2014 cohort felt that they were more competent in writing

  18. Understanding the hysteresis loop conundrum in pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louizos, Christopher; Yáñez, Jaime A; Forrest, M Laird; Davies, Neal M

    2014-01-01

    Hysteresis loops are phenomena that sometimes are encountered in the analysis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships spanning from pre-clinical to clinical studies. When hysteresis occurs it provides insight into the complexity of drug action and disposition that can be encountered. Hysteresis loops suggest that the relationship between drug concentration and the effect being measured is not a simple direct relationship, but may have an inherent time delay and disequilibrium, which may be the result of metabolites, the consequence of changes in pharmacodynamics or the use of a non-specific assay or may involve an indirect relationship. Counter-clockwise hysteresis has been generally defined as the process in which effect can increase with time for a given drug concentration, while in the case of clockwise hysteresis the measured effect decreases with time for a given drug concentration. Hysteresis loops can occur as a consequence of a number of different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms including tolerance, distributional delay, feedback regulation, input and output rate changes, agonistic or antagonistic active metabolites, uptake into active site, slow receptor kinetics, delayed or modified activity, time-dependent protein binding and the use of racemic drugs among other factors. In this review, each of these various causes of hysteresis loops are discussed, with incorporation of relevant examples of drugs demonstrating these relationships for illustrative purposes. Furthermore, the effect that pharmaceutical formulation has on the occurrence and potential change in direction of the hysteresis loop, and the major pharmacokinetic / pharmacodynamic modeling approaches utilized to collapse and model hysteresis are detailed.

  19. Efficient Use of Preisach Hysteresis Model in Computer Aided Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONITA, V.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a practical detailed analysis regarding the use of the classical Preisach hysteresis model, covering all the steps, from measuring the necessary data for the model identification to the implementation in a software code for Computer Aided Design (CAD in Electrical Engineering. An efficient numerical method is proposed and the hysteresis modeling accuracy is tested on magnetic recording materials. The procedure includes the correction of the experimental data, which are used for the hysteresis model identification, taking into account the demagnetizing effect for the sample that is measured in an open-circuit device (a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  20. High Speed, Low Power Current Comparators with Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj K. Chasta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presents a novel idea for analog current comparison which compares input signal current and reference currents with high speed, low power and well controlled hysteresis. Proposed circuit is based on current mirror and voltage latching techniques which produces rail to rail output voltage as a result of current comparison. The same design can be extended to a simple current comparator without hysteresis (or very less hysteresis, where comparator gives high accuracy (less than 50nA and speed at the cost of moderate power consumption. The comparators are designed optimally and studied at 180 nm CMOS process technology for a supply voltage of 3V.

  1. High Speed, Low Power Current Comparators with Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj K. Chasta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper, presents a novel idea for analog current comparison which compares input signal current and reference currents with high speed, low power and well controlled hysteresis. Proposed circuit is based on current mirror and voltage latching techniques which produces rail to rail output voltage as a result of current comparison. The same design can be extended to a simple current comparator without hysteresis (or very less hysteresis, where comparator gives high accuracy (less than 50nA and speed at the cost of moderate power consumption. The comparators are designed optimally and studied at 180nm CMOS process technology for a supply voltage of 3V.

  2. Static measurements of slender delta wing rolling moment hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Levin, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Slender delta wing planforms are susceptible to self-induced roll oscillations due to aerodynamic hysteresis during the limit cycle roll oscillation. Test results are presented which clearly establish that the static rolling moment hysteresis has a damping character; hysteresis tends to be greater when, due to either wing roll or side slip, the vortex burst moves back and forth over the wing trailing edge. These data are an indirect indication of the damping role of the vortex burst during limit cycle roll oscillations.

  3. High Speed, Low Power Current Comparators with Hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Chasta, Neeraj K

    2012-01-01

    This paper, presents a novel idea for analog current comparison which compares input signal current and reference currents with high speed, low power and well controlled hysteresis. Proposed circuit is based on current mirror and voltage latching techniques which produces rail to rail output voltage as a result of current comparison. The same design can be extended to a simple current comparator without hysteresis (or very less hysteresis), where comparator gives high accuracy (less than 50nA) and speed at the cost of moderate power consumption. The comparators are designed optimally and studied at 180nm CMOS process technology for a supply voltage of 3V.

  4. High contact angle hysteresis of superhydrophobic surfaces: Hydrophobic defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Hong, Siang-Jie; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-08-01

    A typical superhydrophobic surface is essentially nonadhesive and exhibits very low water contact angle (CA) hysteresis, so-called Lotus effect. However, leaves of some plants such as scallion and garlic with an advancing angle exceeding 150° show very serious CA hysteresis. Although surface roughness and epicuticular wax can explain the very high advancing CA, our analysis indicates that the unusual hydrophobic defect, diallyl disulfide, is the key element responsible for contact line pinning on allium leaves. After smearing diallyl disulfide on an extended polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film, which is originally absent of CA hysteresis, the surface remains superhydrophobic but becomes highly adhesive.

  5. Hysteresis of nanocylinders with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Rebecca; Beg, Marijan; Albert, Maximilian; Bisotti, Marc-Antonio; Cortés-Ortuño, David; Vousden, Mark; Wang, Weiwei; Hovorka, Ondrej; Fangohr, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The potential for application of magnetic skyrmions in high density storage devices provides a strong drive to investigate and exploit their stability and manipulability. Through a three-dimensional micromagnetic hysteresis study, we investigate the question of existence of skyrmions in cylindrical nanostructures of variable thickness. We quantify the applied field and thickness dependence of skyrmion states and show that these states can be accessed through relevant practical hysteresis loop measurement protocols. As skyrmionic states have yet to be observed experimentally in confined helimagnetic geometries, our work opens prospects for developing viable hysteresis process-based methodologies to access and observe skyrmionic states.

  6. Efficient vector hysteresis modeling using rotationally coupled step functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adly, A.A., E-mail: adlyamr@gmail.com; Abd-El-Hafiz, S.K., E-mail: sabdelhafiz@gmail.com

    2012-05-01

    Vector hysteresis models are usually used as sub-modules of field computation software tools. When dealing with a massive field computation problem, computational efficiency and practicality of such models become crucial. In this paper, generalization of a recently proposed computationally efficient vector hysteresis model based upon interacting step functions is presented. More specifically, the model is generalized to cover vector hysteresis modeling of both isotropic and anisotropic magnetic media. Model configuration details as well as experimental testing and simulation results are given in the paper.

  7. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  8. Restoration and Archiving of Data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this project has been to complete the archiving of energetic (10 eV/epsilon - 18 keV/epsilon) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite, using a particular data format that had previously been approved by NASA and the NSSDC. That same format, a combination of ion velocity moments and differential flux spectra, had been used in 1991 to archive, at the NSSDC, the first 28 months (the "Prime" period of ISEE investigations) of data from the Lockheed instrument under NASA Contract NAS5-33047. With the completion of this project, the almost 4 1/2-year time span of these unique data is now covered by a very compact set, approximately 1 gigabyte in total, of electronic files with physical quantities, all in ASCII. The files are organized by data type and time of data acquisition, in Universal Time, and named according to year and day of year. Each calendar day has five separate files (five types of data), the lengths of which vary from day to day, depending on the instrument mode of operation. The data format and file structure are described in detail in appendices 1 and 2. The physical medium consists of high-density (6250 cpi) 9-track magnetic tapes, complemented by a set of hardcopy line plots of certain plasma parameters. In this case there are five tapes, to be added to the six previous ones from 1991, and 25 booklets of plots, one per month, to be added to the previous 28. The tapes, including an extra standard-density (1600 cpi) tape with electronic versions of the Data User's Guide and self-guiding VAX/VMS command files, and the hardcopy plots are being boxed for shipment to the NSSDC.

  9. Factors Affecting Corneal Hysteresis in Taiwanese Adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Kang Wang; Tzu-Lun Huang; Pei-Yuan Su; Pei-Yao Chang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of various corneal hysteresis (CH) factors in Chinese adults. Methods: From January 2009 to November 2011, the healthy right eyes of a total of 292 adults were recruited into the study. Goldmann-correlated intraocular pressure (IOPG) and CH were measured using an ocular response analyzer (ORA). Central corneal thickness was measured using the ORA’s in-tegrated handheld ultrasonic pachymeter. The IOLMaster was used to obtain the ocular biometric measurements including axial length, anterior chamber depth, and keratometric values. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to test correla-tions between CH and quantitative factors. The chi-square test was used to detect differences in categorical values. Results: Longer axial length (P=0.0001), lower IOPG (P=0.03), older age(P=0.003),and thinner central corneal thick-ness (P=0.0001) were significantly associated with lower CH. The anterior chamber depth (P=0.34), gender (P=0.23), and corneal curvature (P=0.18) had no relationship to CH. Conclusion:Various factors including axial length, intraocular pressure, age, and central corneal thickness can affect measure-ment of corneal biomechanical properties in Chinese adults. But the anterior chamber depth, gender, and corneal curvature were irrelevant to CH.

  10. Engineering magnetic nanostructures with inverse hysteresis loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beatriz Mora; Nastassia Soriano; Carolina Redondo; Alberto Arteche; David Navas; Rafael Morales

    2016-01-01

    Top-down lithography techniques allow the fabrication of nanostructured elements with novel spin configurations,which provide a new route to engineer and manipulate the magnetic response of sensors and electronic devices and understand the role of fundamental interactions in materials science.In this study, shallow nanostructure-pattemed thin films were designed to present inverse magnetization curves,i.e.,an anomalous magnetic mechanism characterized by a negative coercivity and negative remanence.This procedure involved a method for manipulating the spin configuration that yielded a negative coercivity after the patterning of a single material layer.Patterned NiFe thin films with trench depths between 15%-25% of the total film thickness exhibited inverse hysteresis loops for a wide angular range of the applied field and the trench axis.A model based on two exchange-coupled subsystems accounts for the experimental results and thus predicts the conditions for the appearance of this magnetic behavior.The findings of the study not only advance our understanding of patterning effects and confined magnetic systems but also enable the local design and control of the magnetic response of thin materials with potential use in sensor engineering.

  11. Hysteresis in the Central African Rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Stephan Alexander; Elias Bednar, Johannes; Gautam, Sishir; Petritsch, Richard; Schier, Franziska; Stanzl, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Past climate change caused severe disturbances of the Central African rainforest belt, with forest fragmentation and re-expansion due to drier and wetter climate conditions. Besides climate, human induced forest degradation affected biodiversity, structure and carbon storage of Congo basin rainforests. Information on climatically stable, mature rainforest, unaffected by human induced disturbances, provides means of assessing the impact of forest degradation and may serve as benchmarks of carbon carrying capacity over regions with similar site and climate conditions. BioGeoChemical (BGC) ecosystem models explicitly consider the impacts of site and climate conditions and may assess benchmark levels over regions devoid of undisturbed conditions. We will present a BGC-model validation for the Western Congolian Lowland Rainforest (WCLRF) using field data from a recently confirmed forest refuge, show model - data comparisons for disturbed und undisturbed forests under different site and climate conditions as well as for sites with repeated assessment of biodiversity and standing biomass during recovery from intensive exploitation. We will present climatic thresholds for WCLRF stability, analyse the relationship between resilience, standing C-stocks and change in climate and finally provide evidence of hysteresis.

  12. NASA Perspectives on Earth Observations from Satellite or 50 Years of Meteorological Satellite Experiments-The NASA Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einaudi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    The NASA was established in 1959. From those very eady days to the present NASA has been intimately involved with NOAA and the scientific community in the development and operation of satellite and sensor experiments. The early efforts included experiments on the TIROS and geostationary Applications Technology Satellites (ATS) series. In the latter case the spin-scan cameras conceived by Verner Suomi, along with the TIROS cameras, opened new vistas at what could be done in meteorological studies with the daily, nearly global, synoptic views from space-borne sensors As the years passed and the Nimbus series of satellites came into being in the 1960's, more quantitative observations with longer-lifetime, increasingly capable, better calibrated instruments came into being. NASA, in collaboration with and in support of NOAA, implemented operational systems that we now know as the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) series and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series that provided dependable, continuous, dedicated satellite observations for use by the weather and atmospheric science communities. Through the 1970's, 1980's, and 1990's improved, well-calibrated instruments with more spectral bands extending into the thermal and the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum were provided to obtain accurate soundings of the atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry constituents such as ozone, global sea surface temperature, snow and ice extent, vegetation dynamics, etc. In the 1990's and up to the present the NASA/Earth Observing System (EOS) has been developed, implemented, and operated over many years to provide a very comprehensive suite of observations of the atmosphere, as well as land and ocean parameters. The future looks bright wherein the development of new systems, broadly described by the National Academy of Science Decadal Study, is now underway. NASA, along with collaborations with NOAA, other agencies, and the

  13. Hysteresis in the tearing mode locking/unlocking due to resonant magnetic perturbations in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridström, R.; Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2015-10-01

    The physical mechanisms behind the hysteresis in the tearing mode locking and unlocking to a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) are experimentally studied in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch. The experiments show that the electromagnetic and the viscous torque increase with increasing perturbation amplitude until the mode locks to the wall. At the wall-locking, the plasma velocity reduction profile is peaked at the radius where the RMP is resonant. Thereafter, the viscous torque drops due to the relaxation of the velocity in the central plasma. This is the main reason for the hysteresis in the RMP locking and unlocking amplitude. The increased amplitude of the locked tearing mode produces further deepening of the hysteresis. Both experimental results are in qualitative agreement with the model in Fitzpatrick et al (2001 Phys. Plasmas 8 4489)

  14. An implicit method for the nonlinear modelling and simulation of piezoceramic actuators displaying hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Timothy D.; Zimmerman, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have shown that piezoceramic materials display a nonlinear relationship between the applied electric field and the actuation strain. This relationship also displays a substantial hysteresis upon reversal of the applied field. In this paper, piezoceramic actuator models are incorporated into the structural equations of motion to arrive at a set of nonlinear actively controlled structural equations of motion. A new implicit algorithm for determining the time history of the actively controlled structure is presented. The algorithm employs the trapezoidal rule for stepping the equations forward in time. The algorithm is compared to an explicit algorithm and is shown to provide greater numerical accuracy. In addition, the numerical stability and convergence characteristics are presented via example. The new algorithm displays convergence and stability properties that are comparable to the standard trapezoidal rule used for dynamic systems without hysteresis.

  15. GENERALIZED ASYMMETRIC HYSTERESIS MODEL OF CONTROLLABLE MAGNETORHEOLOGICAL DAMPER FOR VEHICLE SUSPENSION ATTENUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Enrong; Ma Xiaoqing; Su Chunyi; Rakheja Subhash

    2004-01-01

    A generalized model is synthesized to characterize the asymmetric hysteresis force-velocity (F-v) properties of the magneto-rheological (MR) fluids damper.The model is represented as a function of the command current,excitation frequency,and displacement amplitude,based on the symmetric and asymmetric sigmoid functions.The symmetric hysteresis damping properties of the controllable MR-damper and properties of the conventional passive hydraulic damper can also be described by the proposed model.The validity of the model is verified by experiments,which show that the results calculated from the model are consistent with the measured data.In addition,it is shown that the model applies to a wide vibration frequency range.The proposed model has potential application in vehicle suspension design employing the symmetry MR-damper,and also in developing the asymmetry MR-damper especially for the vehicle suspension attenuation.

  16. Tracking control of piezoelectric actuators using a polynomial-based hysteresis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-06-01

    A polynomial-based hysteresis model that describes hysteresis behavior in piezoelectric actuators is presented. The polynomial-based model is validated by comparing with the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Taking the advantages of the proposed model into consideration, inverse control using the polynomial-based model is proposed. To achieve better tracking performance, a hybrid control combining the developed inverse control and a proportional-integral-differential feedback loop is then proposed. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed tracking controls, several comparative experiments of the polynomial-based model and Prandtl-Ishlinskii model are conducted. The experimental results show that inverse control and hybrid control using the polynomial-based model in trajectory-tracking applications are effective and meaningful.

  17. Negative and positive hysteresis in double-cavity optical bistability in three-level atom

    CERN Document Server

    Babu, H Aswath

    2010-01-01

    We present novel hysteretic behaviour of a three-level ladder atomic system exhibiting double-cavity optical bistability in the mean-field limit. The two fields coupling the atomic system experience feedback via two independent, unidirectional, single mode ring cavities and exhibit cooperative phenomena, simultaneously. The system displays a range of rich dynamical features varying from normal switching to self pulsing and a period-doubling route to chaos for both the fields. We focus our attention to a new hump like feature in the bistable curve arising purely due to cavity induced inversion, which eventually leads to negative hysteresis in the bistable response. This is probably the only all-optical bistable system that exhibits positive as well as negative bistable hysteresis in different input field intensity regimes. For both the fields, the switching times, the associated critical slowing down, the self-pulsing characteristics, and the chaotic behaviour can be controlled to a fair degree, moreover, all ...

  18. Intrinsic Low Hysteresis Touch Mode Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fragiacomo, Giulio; Pedersen, Thomas; Hansen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Hysteresis has always been one of the main concerns when fabricating touch mode capacitive pressure sensors (TMCPS). This phenomenon can be fought at two different levels: during fabrication or after fabrication with the aid of a dedicated signal conditioning circuit. We will describe a microfabr......Hysteresis has always been one of the main concerns when fabricating touch mode capacitive pressure sensors (TMCPS). This phenomenon can be fought at two different levels: during fabrication or after fabrication with the aid of a dedicated signal conditioning circuit. We will describe...... a microfabrication step that can be introduced in order to reduce drastically the hysteresis of this type of sensors without compromising their sensitivity. Medium-high range (0 to 10 bar absolute pressure) TMCPS with a capacitive signal span of over 100pF and less than 1 % hysteresis in the entire pressure range...

  19. A nonlinear state-space approach to hysteresis identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, J. P.; Esfahani, A. F.; Kerschen, G.; Schoukens, J.

    2017-02-01

    Most studies tackling hysteresis identification in the technical literature follow white-box approaches, i.e. they rely on the assumption that measured data obey a specific hysteretic model. Such an assumption may be a hard requirement to handle in real applications, since hysteresis is a highly individualistic nonlinear behaviour. The present paper adopts a black-box approach based on nonlinear state-space models to identify hysteresis dynamics. This approach is shown to provide a general framework to hysteresis identification, featuring flexibility and parsimony of representation. Nonlinear model terms are constructed as a multivariate polynomial in the state variables, and parameter estimation is performed by minimising weighted least-squares cost functions. Technical issues, including the selection of the model order and the polynomial degree, are discussed, and model validation is achieved in both broadband and sine conditions. The study is carried out numerically by exploiting synthetic data generated via the Bouc-Wen equations.

  20. Low-Hysteresis Flow-Through Wind-Tunnel Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, N.; Luna, P. M.; Roberts, A. C.; Smith, R. C.; Horne, W. L.; Smith, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    Improved flow-through wind-tunnel balance includes features minimizing both spurious force readings caused by internal pressurized flow and mechanical hysteresis. Symmetrical forces caused by internal flow cancelled.

  1. Could linear hysteresis contribute to shear wave losses in tissues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kevin J

    2015-04-01

    For nearly 100 y in the study of cyclical motion in materials, a particular phenomenon called "linear hysteresis" or "ideal hysteretic damping" has been widely observed. More recently in the field of shear wave elastography, the basic mechanisms underlying shear wave losses in soft tissues are in question. Could linear hysteresis play a role? An underlying theoretical question must be answered: Is there a real and causal physical model that is capable of producing linear hysteresis over a band of shear wave frequencies used in diagnostic imaging schemes? One model that can approximately produce classic linear hysteresis behavior, by examining a generalized Maxwell model with a specific power law relaxation spectrum, is described here. This provides a theoretical plausibility for the phenomenon as a candidate for models of tissue behavior.

  2. Hysteresis loop of nonperiodic outbreaks of recurrent epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hengcong; Zheng, Muhua; Wu, Dayu; Wang, Zhenhua; Liu, Jinming; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-12-01

    Most of the studies on epidemics so far have focused on the growing phase, such as how an epidemic spreads and what are the conditions for an epidemic to break out in a variety of cases. However, we discover from real data that on a large scale, the spread of an epidemic is in fact a recurrent event with distinctive growing and recovering phases, i.e., a hysteresis loop. We show here that the hysteresis loop can be reproduced in epidemic models provided that the infectious rate is adiabatically increased or decreased before the system reaches its stationary state. Two ways to the hysteresis loop are revealed, which is helpful in understanding the mechanics of infections in real evolution. Moreover, a theoretical analysis is presented to explain the mechanism of the hysteresis loop.

  3. Evolution Hemivariational Inequality with Hysteresis Operator in Higher Order Term

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leszek GASINSKI

    2008-01-01

    The authors study evolution hemivariational inequalities of semilinear type containing a hysteresis operator.For such problems we establish an existence result by reducing the order of the equation and then by the use of the time-discretization procedure.

  4. Efficient modeling of vector hysteresis using fuzzy inference systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adly, A.A. [Electrical Power and Machines Department, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza 12211 (Egypt)], E-mail: adlyamr@gmail.com; Abd-El-Hafiz, S.K. [Engineering Mathematics Department, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza 12211 (Egypt)], E-mail: sabdelhafiz@gmail.com

    2008-10-01

    Vector hysteresis models have always been regarded as important tools to determine which multi-dimensional magnetic field-media interactions may be predicted. In the past, considerable efforts have been focused on mathematical modeling methodologies of vector hysteresis. This paper presents an efficient approach based upon fuzzy inference systems for modeling vector hysteresis. Computational efficiency of the proposed approach stems from the fact that the basic non-local memory Preisach-type hysteresis model is approximated by a local memory model. The proposed computational low-cost methodology can be easily integrated in field calculation packages involving massive multi-dimensional discretizations. Details of the modeling methodology and its experimental testing are presented.

  5. Hysteresis Current Control of Switched Reluctance Motor in Aircraft Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged N. F. Nashed

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The switched reluctance motor (SRM drives have been widely used in aircraft applications due to the motor advantages like high speed operation, simple construction, no windings on rotor. But high torque ripples and acoustic noise are main disadvantages. The current hysteresis chopping control is one of the important control methods for SRM drives. These disadvantages can be limited using the hysteresis or chopping current control. This control strategy makes the torque of SRM maintained within a set of hysteresis bands by applying suitable source voltage. This paper introduces two hysteresis control modes; hard chopping and soft chopping mode. The SRM drive system is modeled in Simulink model using MATLAB/SIMULINK software package.

  6. Orientational hysteresis in swarms of active particles in external field

    CERN Document Server

    Romensky, Maksym

    2015-01-01

    Structure and ordering in swarms of active particles have much in common with condensed matter systems like magnets or liquid crystals. A number of important characteristics of such materials can be obtained via dynamic tests such as hysteresis. In this work, we show that dynamic hysteresis can be observed also in swarms of active particles and possesses similar properties to the counterparts in magnetic materials. To study the swarm dynamics, we use computer simulation of the active Brownian particle model with dissipative interactions. The swarm is confined to a narrow linear channel and one-dimensional polar order parameter is measured. In an oscillating external field, the order parameter demonstrates dynamic hysteresis with the shape of the loop and its area varying with the amplitude and frequency of the applied field, swarm density and the noise intensity. We measure the scaling exponents for the hysteresis loop area, which can be associated with the controllability of the swarm. Although the exponents...

  7. Rainfall simulation experiments to study sediment redistribution using rare earth element oxides as tracers under conventional and conservation agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Adrienn; Jakab, Gergely; Sipos, Péter; Karlik, Máté; Madarász, Balázs; Zacháry, Dóra; Szabó, Judit; Szalai, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) have very favourable characteristics for being ideal sediment tracers as they are characterised by strong binding to soil particles, low mobility, low background concentration in soils, environmental benignity, high analytical sensitivity and they can be detected relatively easily and inexpensively in soils. The group of REEs consist of 16 elements with similar chemical properties, but at the same time, they are clearly distinguishable enabling multiple tracking of sediment deriving from different parts of the studied area, as well as mapping redistribution processes by appropriate designing of subareas marked by different REEs. In this study, rainfall simulation experiments were carried out to compare the loss and redistribution of soil sediments in two plots under conventional and conservation agricultural practices. Five different rainfall intensities (up to 80 mm/h) were applied to both plots. Sources and pathways of sediments within the two plots were studied using REE-oxides as tracers. Approximately 1,000 mg/kg of Er2O3, Ho2O3 and Sm2O3 (calculated to the upper 1 cm of the soil) were dispersed to the soil surface with banded distribution; each transversal band covered the third of the surface are of the plots. Concentration of the REE-oxides in the sediment leaving the plots, and that of the surface soil before and after the experiment were analysed by X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry. Significant sediment losses were found for both plots after the experiments, with slightly different characteristics between the conventional and conservation ones. Highest difference in loss of added REEs was found in the upper third of the plots with 81 ± 19% in the conventional and 71 ± 21% in the conservation ones. These values have been equalized downwards with almost complete losses in the lower third of the plots (99 ± 2% and 97 ± 4%, respectively). Only very small part of the removed sediment has been accumulated in the lower parts of the

  8. Pulsed field magnetization in rare-earth kagome systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, M. J. R.; Zhou, H. D.; Mun, E.; Harrison, N.

    2016-02-01

    The rare-earth kagome systems R 3Ga5SiO14 (R  =  Nd or Pr) exhibit cooperative paramagnetism at low temperatures. Evidence for correlated spin clusters in these weakly frustrated systems has previously been obtained from neutron scattering and from ESR and NMR results. The present pulsed field (0-60 T, 25 ms) magnetization measurements made on single crystals of Nd3Ga5SiO14 (NGS) and Pr3Ga5SiO14 (PGS) at temperatures down to 450 mK have revealed striking differences in the magnetic responses of the two materials. For NGS the magnetization shows a low field plateau, saturation in high transient fields, and significant hysteresis while the PGS magnetization does not saturate in transient fields up to 60 T and shows no hysteresis or plateaus. Nd3+ is a Kramers ion while Pr3+ is a non-Kramers ion and the crystal field effects are quite different in the two systems. For the conditions used in the experiments the magnetization behavior is not in agreement with Heisenberg model predictions for kagome systems in which easy-axis anisotropy is much larger than the exchange coupling. The extremely slow spin dynamics found below 4 K in NGS is, however, consistent with the model for Kramers ions and provides a basis for explaining the pulsed field magnetization features.

  9. Pulsed field magnetization in rare-earth kagome systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, M J R; Zhou, H D; Mun, E; Harrison, N

    2016-02-03

    The rare-earth kagome systems R 3Ga5SiO14 (R  =  Nd or Pr) exhibit cooperative paramagnetism at low temperatures. Evidence for correlated spin clusters in these weakly frustrated systems has previously been obtained from neutron scattering and from ESR and NMR results. The present pulsed field (0-60 T, 25 ms) magnetization measurements made on single crystals of Nd3Ga5SiO14 (NGS) and Pr3Ga5SiO14 (PGS) at temperatures down to 450 mK have revealed striking differences in the magnetic responses of the two materials. For NGS the magnetization shows a low field plateau, saturation in high transient fields, and significant hysteresis while the PGS magnetization does not saturate in transient fields up to 60 T and shows no hysteresis or plateaus. Nd(3+) is a Kramers ion while Pr(3+) is a non-Kramers ion and the crystal field effects are quite different in the two systems. For the conditions used in the experiments the magnetization behavior is not in agreement with Heisenberg model predictions for kagome systems in which easy-axis anisotropy is much larger than the exchange coupling. The extremely slow spin dynamics found below 4 K in NGS is, however, consistent with the model for Kramers ions and provides a basis for explaining the pulsed field magnetization features.

  10. Hysteresis as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina D Thiel

    Full Text Available Perceptual decisions not only depend on the incoming information from sensory systems but constitute a combination of current sensory evidence and internally accumulated information from past encounters. Although recent evidence emphasizes the fundamental role of prior knowledge for perceptual decision making, only few studies have quantified the relevance of such priors on perceptual decisions and examined their interplay with other decision-relevant factors, such as the stimulus properties. In the present study we asked whether hysteresis, describing the stability of a percept despite a change in stimulus property and known to occur at perceptual thresholds, also acts as a form of an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making, supporting the stability of a decision across successively presented random stimuli (i.e., decision hysteresis. We applied a variant of the classical 2-point discrimination task and found that hysteresis influenced perceptual decision making: Participants were more likely to decide 'same' rather than 'different' on successively presented pin distances. In a direct comparison between the influence of applied pin distances (explicit stimulus property and hysteresis, we found that on average, stimulus property explained significantly more variance of participants' decisions than hysteresis. However, when focusing on pin distances at threshold, we found a trend for hysteresis to explain more variance. Furthermore, the less variance was explained by the pin distance on a given decision, the more variance was explained by hysteresis, and vice versa. Our findings suggest that hysteresis acts as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making that becomes increasingly important when explicit stimulus properties provide decreasing evidence.

  11. Aileron roll hysteresis effects on entry of space shuttle orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Six-degree-of-freedom simulations of the space shuttle orbiter entry with control hysteresis were conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center interactive simulator known as the automatic reentry flight dynamics simulator. These simulations revealed that the vehicle can tolerate control hysteresis producing a + or - 50 percent change in the nominal aileron roll characteristics and an offset in the nominal characteristics equivalent to a + or - 5 deg aileron deflection with little increase in the reaction control system's fuel consumption.

  12. Hysteresis and Temperature Dependency of Moisture Sorption – New Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that sorption characteristics of building materials exhibit hysteresis in the way the equilibrium curves develop between adsorption and desorption, and that the sorption curves are also somewhat temperature dependent. However, these two facts are most often neglected in models...... measurements of hysteresis and temperature dependency of the moisture sorption characteristics of three different porous building materials: aerated concrete, cement paste and spruce. Scanning curves are measured for all three materials where periods with adsorption and desorption interrupt each other...

  13. Hysteresis as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Sabrina D; Bitzer, Sebastian; Nierhaus, Till; Kalberlah, Christian; Preusser, Sven; Neumann, Jane; Nikulin, Vadim V; van der Meer, Elke; Villringer, Arno; Pleger, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Perceptual decisions not only depend on the incoming information from sensory systems but constitute a combination of current sensory evidence and internally accumulated information from past encounters. Although recent evidence emphasizes the fundamental role of prior knowledge for perceptual decision making, only few studies have quantified the relevance of such priors on perceptual decisions and examined their interplay with other decision-relevant factors, such as the stimulus properties. In the present study we asked whether hysteresis, describing the stability of a percept despite a change in stimulus property and known to occur at perceptual thresholds, also acts as a form of an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making, supporting the stability of a decision across successively presented random stimuli (i.e., decision hysteresis). We applied a variant of the classical 2-point discrimination task and found that hysteresis influenced perceptual decision making: Participants were more likely to decide 'same' rather than 'different' on successively presented pin distances. In a direct comparison between the influence of applied pin distances (explicit stimulus property) and hysteresis, we found that on average, stimulus property explained significantly more variance of participants' decisions than hysteresis. However, when focusing on pin distances at threshold, we found a trend for hysteresis to explain more variance. Furthermore, the less variance was explained by the pin distance on a given decision, the more variance was explained by hysteresis, and vice versa. Our findings suggest that hysteresis acts as an implicit prior in tactile spatial decision making that becomes increasingly important when explicit stimulus properties provide decreasing evidence.

  14. Dynamic Simulation for Hysteresis in Shape Memory Alloy under Tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; ZHAO Jian-Bo; TANG Shao-Qiang

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that the Suliciu model is capable to model the hysteresis phenomenon observed experimentally in NiTi shape memory alloy micro-tubes.This model allows a class of stationary phase interfaces.By a series of fully dynamic numerical simulations that mimic quasi-static loading and unloading,the nominal stress-strain curve exhibits a big hysteresis loop,which quantitatively agrees with the experimental results.

  15. Studying of the Contact Angle Hysteresis on Various Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kirichenko E. O.; Gatapova E. Ya.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to investigation of the contact angle hysteresis on various surfaces. It was carried out by two different methods: measuring the advancing and the receding contact angles and measuring the contact angles at water droplet evaporation under isothermal conditions. Data obtained using two methods have been compared. The influence of the contact angle hysteresis on the mode of the drop evaporation has been shown.

  16. Studying of the Contact Angle Hysteresis on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichenko E. O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to investigation of the contact angle hysteresis on various surfaces. It was carried out by two different methods: measuring the advancing and the receding contact angles and measuring the contact angles at water droplet evaporation under isothermal conditions. Data obtained using two methods have been compared. The influence of the contact angle hysteresis on the mode of the drop evaporation has been shown.

  17. Modeling of Hysteresis Losses in Ferromagnetic Laminations under Mechanical Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Rasilo, Paavo; Singh, Deepak; Aydin, Ugur; Martin, Floran; Kouhia, Reijo; Belahcen, Anouar; Arkkio, Antero

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for predicting magnetic hysteresis loops and losses in ferromagnetic laminations under mechanical stress is presented. The model is based on combining a Helmholtz free energy -based anhysteretic magnetoelastic constitutive law to a vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model. This paper focuses only on unidirectional and parallel magnetic fields and stresses, albeit the model is developed in full 3-D configuration in order to account also for strains perpendicular to the loading d...

  18. DYNAMIC FREE ENERGY HYSTERESIS MODEL IN MAGNETOSTRICTIVE ACTUATORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A dynamic free energy hysteresis model in magnetostrictive actuators is presented. It is the free energy hysteresis model coupled to an ordinary different equation in an unusual way. According to its special structure, numerical implementation method of the dynamic model is provided. The resistor parameter in the dynamic model changes according to different frequency ranges. This makes numerical implementation results reasonable in the discussed operating frequency range. The validity of the dynamic free energy model is illustrated by comparison with experimental data.

  19. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Henze, W.; Paciesas, W. S.; Finger, M. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Sahi, M.; Peterson, B.; Shrader, C. R.; Grindlay, J. E.; Barret, D.

    2004-10-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (~20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1 yr). BATSE monitored the high-energy sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT) for point sources whose emission extended for times on the order of the CGRO orbital period (~92 min) or greater. Using the EOT to extract flux information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE Large Area Detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the all-sky monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic, with intrinsic variability on timescales of hours to years. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) have been placed on the World Wide Web. We then performed a deep-sampling of these 58 objects, plus a selection of 121 more objects, combining data from the entire 9.1 yr BATSE data set. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The sample represents a compilation of sources monitored and/or discovered with BATSE and other high-energy instruments between 1991 and 2000, known sources taken from the HEAO 1 A-4 and Macomb & Gehrels catalogs. The deep sample results include definite detections of 83 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies, and supernova remnants. The average fluxes measured for the fourth class, the X-ray emitting stars, were below the confidence limit for definite detection. Flux data for the deep sample are presented in four energy bands: 20-40, 40-70, 70-160, and 160-430 keV. The limiting average flux level (9.1 yr) for the sample varies from 3.5 to 20

  20. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  1. The significance of observed rotational magnetic hysteresis in lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1974-01-01

    Rotational magnetic hysteresis curves for lunar soils 10084, 12070, and 14259, and rock 14053 have been published. There is no adequate explanation to date for the observed large hysteresis at high fields. Lunar rock magnetism researchers consider fine particle iron to be the primary source of stable magnetic remanence in lunar samples. Iron has cubic anisotropy with added shape anisotropy for extreme particle shapes. The observed high-field hysteresis must have its source in uniaxial or unidirectional anisotropy. This implies the existence of minerals with uniaxial anisotropy or exchange-coupled spin states. Therefore, the source of this observed high-field hysteresis must be identified and understood before serious paleointensity studies are made. It is probable that the exchange-coupled spin states and/or the source of uniaxial anisotropy responsible for the high-field hysteresis might be influenced by the lunar surface diurnal temperature cycling. The possible sources of high-field hysteresis in lunar samples are presented and considered.

  2. Perceptual hysteresis in the judgment of auditory pitch shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Claire; Pressnitzer, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Perceptual hysteresis can be defined as the enduring influence of the recent past on current perception. Here, hysteresis was investigated in a basic auditory task: pitch comparisons between successive tones. On each trial, listeners were presented with pairs of tones and asked to report the direction of subjective pitch shift, as either "up" or "down." All tones were complexes known as Shepard tones (Shepard, 1964), which comprise several frequency components at octave multiples of a base frequency. The results showed that perceptual judgments were determined both by stimulus-related factors (the interval ratio between the base frequencies within a pair) and by recent context (the intervals in the two previous trials). When tones were presented in ordered sequences, for which the frequency interval between tones was varied in a progressive manner, strong hysteresis was found. In particular, ambiguous stimuli that led to equal probabilities of "up" and "down" responses within a randomized context were almost fully determined within an ordered context. Moreover, hysteresis did not act on the direction of the reported pitch shift, but rather on the perceptual representation of each tone. Thus, hysteresis could be observed within sequences in which listeners varied between "up" and "down" responses, enabling us to largely rule out confounds related to response bias. The strength of the perceptual hysteresis observed suggests that the ongoing context may have a substantial influence on fundamental aspects of auditory perception, such as how we perceive the changes in pitch between successive sounds.

  3. Hysteresis phenomenon of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaoliang; Chang, Juntao; Wang, Zhongqi; Yu, Daren

    2016-11-01

    When the hypersonic inlet works at a Mach number higher than the design value, the hypersonic inlet is started with a regular reflection of the external compression shock at the cowl, whereas a Mach reflection will result in the shock propagating forwards to cause a shock detachment at the cowl lip, which is called "local unstart of inlet". As there are two operation modes of hypersonic inlet at high Mach number, the mode transition may occur with the operation condition of hypersonic inlet changing. A cowl-angle-variation-induced hysteresis and a downstream-pressure-variation-induced hysteresis in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition are obtained by viscous numerical simulations in this paper. The interaction of the external compression shock and boundary layer on the cowl plays a key role in the hysteresis phenomenon. Affected by the transition of external compression shock reflection at the cowl and the transition between separated and attached flow on the cowl, a hysteresis exists in the hypersonic inlet start↔local unstart transition. The hysteresis makes the operation of a hypersonic inlet very difficult to control. In order to avoid hysteresis phenomenon and keep the hypersonic inlet operating in a started mode, the control route should never pass through the local unstarted boundary.

  4. Modeling liquid bridge between surfaces with contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Amirfazli, A; Tang, T

    2013-03-12

    This paper presents the behaviors of a liquid bridge when being compressed and stretched in a quasi-static fashion between two solid surfaces that have contact angle hysteresis (CAH). A theoretical model is developed to obtain the profiles of the liquid bridge given a specific separation between the surfaces. Different from previous models, both contact lines in the upper and lower surfaces were allowed to move when the contact angles reach their advancing or receding values. When the contact angles are between their advancing and receding values, the contact lines are pinned while the contact angles adjust to accommodate the changes in separation. Effects of CAH on both asymmetric and symmetric liquid bridges were analyzed. The model was shown to be able to correctly predict the behavior of the liquid bridge during a quasi-static compression/stretching loading cycle in experiments. Because of CAH, the liquid bridge can have two different profiles at the same separation during one loading and unloading cycle, and more profiles can be obtained during multiple cycles. The maximum adhesion force generated by the liquid bridge is found to be influenced by the CAH of surfaces. CAH also leads to energy cost during a loading cycle of the liquid bridge. In addition, the minimum separation between the two solid surfaces is shown to affect how the contact radii and angles change on the two surfaces as the liquid bridge is stretched.

  5. Earth System Modeling and Field Experiments in the Arctic-Boreal Zone - Report from a NASA Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Piers; Rienecker Michele; Randall, David; Frolking, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Early climate modeling studies predicted that the Arctic Ocean and surrounding circumpolar land masses would heat up earlier and faster than other parts of the planet as a result of greenhouse gas-induced climate change, augmented by the sea-ice albedo feedback effect. These predictions have been largely borne out by observations over the last thirty years. However, despite constant improvement, global climate models have greater difficulty in reproducing the current climate in the Arctic than elsewhere and the scatter between projections from different climate models is much larger in the Arctic than for other regions. Biogeochemical cycle (BGC) models indicate that the warming in the Arctic-Boreal Zone (ABZ) could lead to widespread thawing of the permafrost, along with massive releases of CO2 and CH4, and large-scale changes in the vegetation cover in the ABZ. However, the uncertainties associated with these BGC model predictions are even larger than those associated with the physical climate system models used to describe climate change. These deficiencies in climate and BGC models reflect, at least in part, an incomplete understanding of the Arctic climate system and can be related to inadequate observational data or analyses of existing data. A workshop was held at NASA/GSFC, May 22-24 2012, to assess the predictive capability of the models, prioritize the critical science questions; and make recommendations regarding new field experiments needed to improve model subcomponents. This presentation will summarize the findings and recommendations of the workshop, including the need for aircraft and flux tower measurements and extension of existing in-situ measurements to improve process modeling of both the physical climate and biogeochemical cycle systems. Studies should be directly linked to remote sensing investigations with a view to scaling up the improved process models to the Earth System Model scale. Data assimilation and observing system simulation

  6. A GCMC simulation and experimental study of krypton adsorption/desorption hysteresis on a graphite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Luisa; Horikawa, Toshihide; Phadungbut, Poomiwat; Johnathan Tan, Shiliang; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats of krypton on a highly graphitized carbon black, Carbopack F, have been studied with a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and high-resolution experiments at 77K and 87K. Our investigation sheds light on the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed, horizontal hysteresis loop in the first layer, and the vertical hysteresis-loop in the second layer, and is found to be in agreement with our recent Monte Carlo simulation study (Diao et al., 2015). From detailed analysis of the adsorption isotherm, the latter is attributed to the compression of an imperfect solid-like state in the first layer, to form a hexagonally packed, solid-like state, immediately following the first order condensation of the second layer. To ensure that capillary condensation in the confined spaces between microcrystallites of Carbopack F does not interfere with these hysteresis loops, we carried out simulations of krypton adsorption in the confined space of a wedge-shaped pore that mimics the interstices between particles. These simulations show that, up to the third layer, any such interference is negligible.

  7. Thin three-dimensional droplets on an oscillating substrate with contact angle hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J.; Billingham, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments [P. Brunet, J. Eggers, and R. D. Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.144501] have shown that a liquid droplet on an inclined plane can be made to move uphill by sufficiently strong, vertical oscillations. In order to investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon we use a model in which liquid inertia and viscosity are assumed negligible so that the motion of the droplet is dominated by the applied acceleration due to the oscillation of the plate, gravity, and surface tension. We explain how the leading order motion of the droplet can be separated into a spreading mode and a swaying mode. For a linear contact line law, the maximum rise velocity occurs when these modes are in phase. We show that, both with and without contact angle hysteresis, the droplet can climb uphill and also that, for certain contact line laws, the motion of the droplet can produce footprints similar to experimental results. We show that if the two modes are out of phase when there is no contact angle hysteresis, the inclusion of hysteresis can force them into phase. This in turn increases the rise velocity of the droplet and can, in some cases, cause a sliding droplet to climb.

  8. Thin three-dimensional droplets on an oscillating substrate with contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J; Billingham, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments [P. Brunet, J. Eggers, and R. D. Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.144501] have shown that a liquid droplet on an inclined plane can be made to move uphill by sufficiently strong, vertical oscillations. In order to investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon we use a model in which liquid inertia and viscosity are assumed negligible so that the motion of the droplet is dominated by the applied acceleration due to the oscillation of the plate, gravity, and surface tension. We explain how the leading order motion of the droplet can be separated into a spreading mode and a swaying mode. For a linear contact line law, the maximum rise velocity occurs when these modes are in phase. We show that, both with and without contact angle hysteresis, the droplet can climb uphill and also that, for certain contact line laws, the motion of the droplet can produce footprints similar to experimental results. We show that if the two modes are out of phase when there is no contact angle hysteresis, the inclusion of hysteresis can force them into phase. This in turn increases the rise velocity of the droplet and can, in some cases, cause a sliding droplet to climb.

  9. Water Dynamics and Its Role in Structural Hysteresis of Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Pellegrino; Kucerik, Jiri

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of structural dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is of paramount importance for understanding DOM stability and role in the fate of solubilized organic and inorganic compounds (e.g., nutrients and pollutants), either in soils or aquatic systems. In this study, fast field cycling (FFC) (1)H NMR relaxometry was applied to elucidate structural dynamics of terrestrial DOM, represented by two structurally contrasting DOM models such as Suwanee River (SRFA) and Pahokee peat (PPFA) fulvic acids purchased by the International Humic Substance Society. Measurement of NMR relaxation rate of water protons in heating-cooling cycles revealed structural hysteresis in both fulvic acids. In particular, structural hysteresis was related to the delay in re-establishing water network around fulvic molecules as a result of temperature fluctuations. The experiments revealed that the structural temperature dependency and hysteresis were more pronounced in SRFA than in PPFA. This was attributed to the larger content of hydrogel-like structure in SRFA stabilized, at a larger extent, by H-bonds between carboxylic and phenolic groups. Moreover, results supported the view that terrestrial DOM consist of a hydrophobic rigid core surrounded by progressively assembling amphiphilic and polar molecules, which form an elastic structure that can mediate reactivity of the whole DOM.

  10. Hysteresis Modeling of Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaolei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a new type of intelligent material, magnetically shape memory alloy (MSMA has a good performance in its applications in the actuator manufacturing. Compared with traditional actuators, MSMA actuator has the advantages as fast response and large deformation; however, the hysteresis nonlinearity of the MSMA actuator restricts its further improving of control precision. In this paper, an improved Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii (KP model is used to establish the hysteresis model of MSMA actuator. To identify the weighting parameters of the KP operators, an improved gradient correction algorithm and a variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are proposed in this paper. In order to demonstrate the validity of the proposed modeling approach, simulation experiments are performed, simulations with improved gradient correction algorithm and variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are studied, respectively. Simulation results of both identification algorithms demonstrate that the proposed modeling approach in this paper can establish an effective and accurate hysteresis model for MSMA actuator, and it provides a foundation for improving the control precision of MSMA actuator.

  11. Hysteresis modeling of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Miaolei; Wang, Shoubin; Gao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    As a new type of intelligent material, magnetically shape memory alloy (MSMA) has a good performance in its applications in the actuator manufacturing. Compared with traditional actuators, MSMA actuator has the advantages as fast response and large deformation; however, the hysteresis nonlinearity of the MSMA actuator restricts its further improving of control precision. In this paper, an improved Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii (KP) model is used to establish the hysteresis model of MSMA actuator. To identify the weighting parameters of the KP operators, an improved gradient correction algorithm and a variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are proposed in this paper. In order to demonstrate the validity of the proposed modeling approach, simulation experiments are performed, simulations with improved gradient correction algorithm and variable step-size recursive least square estimation algorithm are studied, respectively. Simulation results of both identification algorithms demonstrate that the proposed modeling approach in this paper can establish an effective and accurate hysteresis model for MSMA actuator, and it provides a foundation for improving the control precision of MSMA actuator.

  12. Practicing ESD at School: Integration of Formal and Nonformal Education Methods Based on the Earth Charter (Belarusian Experience)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelava, Sofia; Savelau, Dmitry; Cary, Marina Bakhnova

    2010-01-01

    The Earth Charter represents the philosophy and ethics necessary to create a new period of human civilization. Understanding and adoption of this new vision is the most important mission of education for sustainable development (ESD). This article argues that for successful implementation of ESD principles at school, the school education system…

  13. Elastic hysteresis in human eyes is age dependent value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kotaro; Saito, Kei; Kameda, Toshihiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2012-06-19

    Background:  The elastic hysteresis phenomenon is observed when cyclic loading is applied to a viscoelastic system. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate elastic hysteresis in living human eyes against an external force. Design:  Prospective case series. Participants:  Twenty-four eyes of 24 normal human subjects (mean age: 41.5 ± 10.6 years) were recruited. Methods:  A non-contact tonometry process was recorded with a high-speed camera. Central corneal thickness (CCT), corneal thickness at 4 mm from the center, corneal curvature, and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured. Intraocular pressure (IOP) was also measured using Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT) and dynamic contour tonometer (DCT). Main Outcome Measures:  Energy loss due to elastic hysteresis was calculated and graphed. Results:  The mean CCT was 552.5 ± 36.1 µm, corneal curvature was 7.84 ± 0.26 mm, and ACD was 2.83 ± 0.29 mm. The mean GAT-IOP was 14.2 ± 2.7 mmHg and DCT-IOP was 16.3 ± 3.5 mmHg. The mean energy loss due to elastic hysteresis was 3.90 × 10(-6) ± 2.49 × 10(-6) Nm. Energy loss due to elastic hysteresis correlated significantly with age (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.596, p = 0.0016). There were no significant correlations between energy loss due to elastic hysteresis and other measurements. Conclusion:  Energy loss due to elastic hysteresis in the eyes of subjects was found to positively correlate with age, independent of anterior eye structure or IOP. Therefore, it is believed that the viscosity of the eye increases with age. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2010 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  14. Wetting hysteresis induced by temperature changes: Supercooled water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Golrokh; Sedighi Moghaddam, Maziar; Tuominen, Mikko; Fielden, Matthew; Haapanen, Janne; Mäkelä, Jyrki M; Claesson, Per M

    2016-04-15

    The state and stability of supercooled water on (super)hydrophobic surfaces is crucial for low temperature applications and it will affect anti-icing and de-icing properties. Surface characteristics such as topography and chemistry are expected to affect wetting hysteresis during temperature cycling experiments, and also the freezing delay of supercooled water. We utilized stochastically rough wood surfaces that were further modified to render them hydrophobic or superhydrophobic. Liquid flame spraying (LFS) was utilized to create a multi-scale roughness by depositing titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The coating was subsequently made non-polar by applying a thin plasma polymer layer. As flat reference samples modified silica surfaces with similar chemistries were utilized. With these substrates we test the hypothesis that superhydrophobic surfaces also should retard ice formation. Wetting hysteresis was evaluated using contact angle measurements during a freeze-thaw cycle from room temperature to freezing occurrence at -7°C, and then back to room temperature. Further, the delay in freezing of supercooled water droplets was studied at temperatures of -4°C and -7°C. The hysteresis in contact angle observed during a cooling-heating cycle is found to be small on flat hydrophobic surfaces. However, significant changes in contact angles during a cooling-heating cycle are observed on the rough surfaces, with a higher contact angle observed on cooling compared to during the subsequent heating. Condensation and subsequent frost formation at sub-zero temperatures induce the hysteresis. The freezing delay data show that the flat surface is more efficient in enhancing the freezing delay than the rougher surfaces, which can be rationalized considering heterogeneous nucleation theory. Thus, our data suggests that molecular flat surfaces, rather than rough superhydrophobic surfaces, are beneficial for retarding ice formation under conditions that allow condensation and frost

  15. The mechanism by which fish antifreeze proteins cause thermal hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Erlend; Zachariassen, Karl Erik

    2005-12-01

    Antifreeze proteins are characterised by their ability to prevent ice from growing upon cooling below the bulk melting point. This displacement of the freezing temperature of ice is limited and at a sufficiently low temperature a rapid ice growth takes place. The separation of the melting and freezing temperature is usually referred to as thermal hysteresis, and the temperature of ice growth is referred to as the hysteresis freezing point. The hysteresis is supposed to be the result of an adsorption of antifreeze proteins to the crystal surface. This causes the ice to grow as convex surface regions between adjacent adsorbed antifreeze proteins, thus lowering the temperature at which the crystal can visibly expand. The model requires that the antifreeze proteins are irreversibly adsorbed onto the ice surface within the hysteresis gap. This presupposition is apparently in conflict with several characteristic features of the phenomenon; the absence of superheating of ice in the presence of antifreeze proteins, the dependence of the hysteresis activity on the concentration of antifreeze proteins and the different capacities of different types of antifreeze proteins to cause thermal hysteresis at equimolar concentrations. In addition, there are structural obstacles that apparently would preclude irreversible adsorption of the antifreeze proteins to the ice surface; the bond strength necessary for irreversible adsorption and the absence of a clearly defined surface to which the antifreeze proteins may adsorb. This article deals with these apparent conflicts between the prevailing theory and the empirical observations. We first review the mechanism of thermal hysteresis with some modifications: we explain the hysteresis as a result of vapour pressure equilibrium between the ice surface and the ambient fluid fraction within the hysteresis gap due to a pressure build-up within the convex growth zones, and the ice growth as the result of an ice surface nucleation event at

  16. Alaska's Secondary Science Teachers and Students Receive Earth Systems Science Knowledge, GIS Know How and University Technical Support for Pre- College Research Experiences: The EDGE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, C. L.; Prakash, A.

    2007-12-01

    Alaska's secondary school teachers are increasingly required to provide Earth systems science (ESS) education that integrates student observations of local natural processes related to rapid climate change with geospatial datasets and satellite imagery using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology. Such skills are also valued in various employment sectors of the state where job opportunities requiring Earth science and GIS training are increasing. University of Alaska's EDGE (Experiential Discoveries in Geoscience Education) program has provided training and classroom resources for 3 cohorts of inservice Alaska science and math teachers in GIS and Earth Systems Science (2005-2007). Summer workshops include geologic field experiences, GIS instruction, computer equipment and technical support for groups of Alaska high school (HS) and middle school (MS) science teachers each June and their students in August. Since 2005, EDGE has increased Alaska science and math teachers' Earth science content knowledge and developed their GIS and computer skills. In addition, EDGE has guided teachers using a follow-up, fall online course that provided more extensive ESS knowledge linked with classroom standards and provided course content that was directly transferable into their MS and HS science classrooms. EDGE teachers were mentored by University faculty and technical staff as they guided their own students through semester-scale, science fair style projects using geospatial data that was student- collected. EDGE program assessment indicates that all teachers have improved their ESS knowledge, GIS knowledge, and the use of technology in their classrooms. More than 230 middle school students have learned GIS, from EDGE teachers and 50 EDGE secondary students have conducted original research related to landscape change and its impacts on their own communities. Longer-term EDGE goals include improving student performance on the newly implemented (spring 2008) 10th grade

  17. Contact Angle Hysteresis on Graphene Surfaces and Hysteresis-free Behavior on Oil-infused Graphite Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Woon, Wei-Yen [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Contact angle hysteresis(CAH) on four graphitic surfacesisinvestigated. • The hysteresis loopof water drops on the polished graphite sheetshowsparticularly small receding contact angle. • The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis. • An oil-infused surface of a graphite sheet is produced by imbibition of hexadecane into its porous structure. • The hysteresis-free property for water drops on such a surface is examined and quantitatively explained. - Abstract: Contact angle hysteresis (CAH) on graphitic surfaces, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, reduced electrophoretic deposition (EPD) graphene, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and polished graphite sheet, has been investigated. The hysteresis loops of water drops on the first three samples are similar but the receding contact angle is particularly small for the polished graphite sheet.The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and HOPG associated with atom-scale roughness has to be attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis (surface relaxation), instead of roughness or defects.The difference of the wetting behavior among those four graphitic samples has been further demonstrated by hexadecane drops. On the surface of HOPG or CVD graphene,the contact line expands continuously with time, indicating total wetting for which the contact angle does not exist and contact line pinning disappears. In contrast, on the surface of reduced EPD graphene, spontaneous spreading is halted by spikes on it and partial wetting with small contact angle (θ≈4°) is obtained. On the surface of polished graphite sheet, the superlipophilicity and porous structure are demonstrated by imbibition and capillary rise of hexadecane. Consequently, an oil-infused graphite surface can be fabricated and the ultralow CAH of water (∆θ≈2°) is achieved.

  18. Modulated self-reversed magnetic hysteresis in iron oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2017-02-01

    The steadfast rule of a ferromagnetic hysteresis loop claims its saturation positioned within the first and third quadrants, whereas its saturation positioned in the second and fourth quadrants (named as self-reversed magnetic hysteresis) is usually taken as an experimental artifact and is always intentionally ignored. In this report, a new insight in this unique hysteresis phenomenon and its modulation were discussed in depth. Different iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) with varying dimensions were soaked in FeCl3 aqueous solution and absorbed Fe3+ cations due to their negative enough surface zeta potentials. These iron oxides@Fe3+ core-shell products exhibit well pronounced self-reversed magnetic hysteresis which concurrently have typical diamagnetic characteristics and essential ferromagnetic features. The presence of pre-magnetized Fe3+ shell and its negatively magnetic exchange coupling with post-magnetized iron-oxide core is the root cause for the observed phenomena. More strikingly, this self-reversed magnetic hysteresis can be readily modulated by changing the core size or by simply controlling Fe3+ concentration in aqueous solution. It is anticipated that this work will shed new light on the development of spintronics, magnetic recording and other magnetically-relevant fields.

  19. Conductance hysteresis in the voltage-dependent anion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Shay M; Teijido, Oscar; Hoogerheide, David P; Rostovtseva, Tatiana K; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2015-09-01

    Hysteresis in the conductance of voltage-sensitive ion channels is observed when the transmembrane voltage is periodically varied with time. Although this phenomenon has been used in studies of gating of the voltage-dependent anion channel, VDAC, from the outer mitochondrial membrane for nearly four decades, full hysteresis curves have never been reported, because the focus was solely on the channel opening branches of the hysteresis loops. We studied the hysteretic response of a multichannel VDAC system to a triangular voltage ramp the frequency of which was varied over three orders of magnitude, from 0.5 mHz to 0.2 Hz. We found that in this wide frequency range the area encircled by the hysteresis curves changes by less than a factor of three, suggesting broad distribution of the characteristic times and strongly non-equilibrium behavior. At the same time, quasi-equilibrium two-state behavior is observed for hysteresis branches corresponding to VDAC opening. This enables calculation of the usual equilibrium gating parameters, gating charge and voltage of equipartitioning, which were found to be almost insensitive to the ramp frequency. To rationalize this peculiarity, we hypothesize that during voltage-induced closure and opening the system explores different regions of the complex free energy landscape, and, in the opening branch, follows quasi-equilibrium paths.

  20. Surface free energy of a solid from contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibowski, Emil

    2003-04-25

    Nature of contact angle hysteresis is discussed basing on the literature data (Colloids Surf. A 189 (2001) 265) of dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of n-alkanes and n-alcohols on a very smooth surface of 1,1,2,-trichloro-1,2,2,-trifluoroethane (FC-732) film deposited on a silicon plate. The authors considered the liquid absorption and/or retention (swelling) processes responsible for the observed hysteresis. In this paper hysteresis is considered to be due to the liquid film left behind the drop during retreating of its contact line. Using the contact angle hysteresis an approach is suggested for evaluation of the solid surface free energy. Molecular spacing and the film structure are discussed to explain the difference in n-alkanes and n-alcohols behaviour as well as to explain the difference between dispersion free energy gamma(s)(d) and total surface free energy gamma(s)(tot) of FC-732, as determined from the advancing contact angles and the hysteresis, respectively.

  1. Evaluating litter decomposition in earth system models with long-term litterbag experiments: an example using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Gordon B; Hartman, Melannie D; Parton, William J; Wieder, William R

    2013-03-01

    Decomposition is a large term in the global carbon budget, but models of the earth system that simulate carbon cycle-climate feedbacks are largely untested with respect to litter decomposition. We tested the litter decomposition parameterization of the community land model version 4 (CLM4), the terrestrial component of the community earth system model, with data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET). The LIDET dataset is a 10-year study of litter decomposition at multiple sites across North America and Central America. We performed 10-year litter decomposition simulations comparable with LIDET for 9 litter types and 20 sites in tundra, grassland, and boreal, conifer, deciduous, and tropical forest biomes using the LIDET-provided climatic decomposition index to constrain temperature and moisture effects on decomposition. We performed additional simulations with DAYCENT, a version of the CENTURY model, to ask how well an established ecosystem model matches the observations. The results show large discrepancy between the laboratory microcosm studies used to parameterize the CLM4 litter decomposition and the LIDET field study. Simulated carbon loss is more rapid than the observations across all sites, and nitrogen immobilization is biased high. Closer agreement with the observations requires much lower decomposition rates, obtained with the assumption that soil mineral nitrogen severely limits decomposition. DAYCENT better replicates the observations, for both carbon mass remaining and nitrogen, independent of nitrogen limitation. CLM4 has low soil carbon in global earth system simulations. These results suggest that this bias arises, in part, from too rapid litter decomposition. More broadly, the terrestrial biogeochemistry of earth system models must be critically tested with observations, and the consequences of particular model choices must be documented. Long-term litter decomposition experiments such as LIDET provide a real

  2. Real-time inverse hysteresis compensation of piezoelectric actuators with a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guo-Ying; Yang, Mei-Ju; Zhu, Li-Min

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a novel real-time inverse hysteresis compensation method for piezoelectric actuators exhibiting asymmetric hysteresis effect. The proposed method directly utilizes a modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii hysteresis model to characterize the inverse hysteresis effect of piezoelectric actuators. The hysteresis model is then cascaded in the feedforward path for hysteresis cancellation. It avoids the complex and difficult mathematical procedure for constructing an inversion of the hysteresis model. For the purpose of validation, an experimental platform is established. To identify the model parameters, an adaptive particle swarm optimization algorithm is adopted. Based on the identified model parameters, a real-time feedforward controller is implemented for fast hysteresis compensation. Finally, tests are conducted with various kinds of trajectories. The experimental results show that the tracking errors caused by the hysteresis effect are reduced by about 90%, which clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed inverse compensation method with the modified Prandtl-Ishlinskii model.

  3. Direct recursive identification of the Preisach hysteresis density function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Michael

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a novel direct method of recursive identification of the Preisach hysteresis density function is proposed. Using the discrete dynamic Preisach model, which is a state-space realization of the classical scalar Preisach model, the method is designed based on the output increment error. After giving the general formulation, the identification scheme implemented for a discretized Preisach plane is introduced and evaluated through the use of numerical simulations. Two cases of Gaussian mixtures are considered for mapping the hysteresis system to be identified. The parameter convergence is shown for a low-pass filtered white-noise input. Further, the proposed identification method is applied to a magnetism-related application example, where the flux linkage hysteresis of a proportional solenoid is assumed from the measurements, and then the inverse of a standard demagnetization procedure is utilized as the identification sequence.

  4. Persistent hysteresis in graphene-mica van der Waals heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrmann, Jens; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Danneau, Romain

    2015-01-09

    We report the study of electronic transport in graphene-mica van der Waals heterostructures. We have designed various graphene field-effect devices in which mica is utilized as a substrate and/or gate dielectric. When mica is used as a gate dielectric we observe a very strong positive gate voltage hysteresis of the resistance, which persists in samples that were prepared in a controlled atmosphere down to even millikelvin temperatures. In a double-gated mica-graphene-hBN van der Waals heterostructure, we found that while a strong hysteresis occurred when mica was used as a substrate/gate dielectric, the same graphene sheet on mica substrate no longer showed hysteresis when the charge carrier density was tuned through a second gate with the hBN dielectric. While this hysteretic behavior could be useful for memory devices, our findings confirm that the environment during sample preparation has to be controlled strictly.

  5. Water contact angles and hysteresis of polyamide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W

    2002-04-01

    The wetting behavior of a series of aliphatic polyamides (PAs) has been examined. PAs with varying amide content and polyethylene (PE) were molded against glass to produce surfaces with similar roughness. After cleaning, chemical composition of the surfaces was verified with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Advancing and receding contact angles were measured from small sessile water drops. Contact angles decreased with amide content while hysteresis increased. Hysteresis arose primarily from molecular interactions between the contact liquid and the solid substrates, rather than moisture absorption, variations in crystallinity, surface deformation, roughness, reorientation of amide groups, or surface contamination. Free energies of hysteresis were calculated from contact angles. For PE, which is composed entirely of nonpolar methylene groups, free energies were equivalent to the strength of dispersive van der Waals bonds. For PAs, free energies corresponded to fractional contributions from the dispersive methylene groups and polar amide groups.

  6. Hysteresis Modeling in Magnetostrictive Materials Via Preisach Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    A phenomenological characterization of hysteresis in magnetostrictive materials is presented. Such hysteresis is due to both the driving magnetic fields and stress relations within the material and is significant throughout, most of the drive range of magnetostrictive transducers. An accurate characterization of the hysteresis and material nonlinearities is necessary, to fully utilize the actuator/sensor capabilities of the magnetostrictive materials. Such a characterization is made here in the context of generalized Preisach operators. This yields a framework amenable to proving the well-posedness of structural models that incorporate the magnetostrictive transducers. It also provides a natural setting in which to develop practical approximation techniques. An example illustrating this framework in the context of a Timoshenko beam model is presented.

  7. An Energy-Based Hysteresis Model for Magnetostrictive Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, F. T.; Smith, R. C.; Flatau, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    This paper addresses the modeling of hysteresis in magnetostrictive transducers. This is considered in the context of control applications which require an accurate characterization of the relation between input currents and strains output by the transducer. This relation typically exhibits significant nonlinearities and hysteresis due to inherent properties of magnetostrictive materials. The characterization considered here is based upon the Jiles-Atherton mean field model for ferromagnetic hysteresis in combination with a quadratic moment rotation model for magnetostriction. As demonstrated through comparison with experimental data, the magnetization model very adequately quantifies both major and minor loops under various operating conditions. The combined model can then be used to accurately characterize output strains at moderate drive levels. The advantages to this model lie in the small number (six) of required parameters and the flexibility it exhibits in a variety of operating conditions.

  8. Hysteresis losses in a dense superparamagnetic nanoparticle assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Gudoshnikov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The hysteresis losses of a dense assembly of magnetite nanoparticles with an average diameter D = 25 nm are measured in the frequency range f = 10 – 200 kHz for magnetic field amplitudes up to H0 = 400 Oe. The low frequency hysteresis loops of the assembly are obtained by means of integration of the electro-motive force signal arising in a small pick-up coil wrapped around a sample which contains 1 – 5 mg of a magnetite powder. It is proved experimentally that the specific absorption rate diminishes approximately 4.5 times when the sample aspect ratio decreases from 11.4 to 1. Theoretical estimate shows that experimentally measured hysteresis loops can be approximately described only by taking into account appreciable contributions of magnetic nanoparticles of both very small, D 30 nm, diameters. Thus the wide particle size distribution has to be assumed.

  9. Cosmological hysteresis in cyclic universe from membrane paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, Sayantan

    2016-01-01

    Cosmological hysteresis is a purely thermodynamical phenomenon caused by the gradient in pressure, hence the characteristic equation of state during the expansion and contraction phases of the universe are different, provided that the universe bounces and recollapses. During hysteresis pressure asymmetry is created due to the presence of a single scalar field in the dynamical process. Also such an interesting scenario has vivid implications in cosmology when applied to variants of modified gravity models described within the framework of membrane paradigm. Cyclic universe along with scalar field leads to the increase in the amplitude of the cosmological scale factor at each consecutive cycles of the universe. Detailed analysis shows that the conditions which creates a universe with an ever increasing expansion, depend on the signature of the hysteresis loop integral $\\oint pdV$ and on membrane model parameters.

  10. Modeling contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned and superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaatmaja, H; Yeomans, J M

    2007-05-22

    We investigate contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned and superhydrophobic surfaces, as the drop volume is quasistatically increased and decreased. We consider both two (cylindrical drops) and three (spherical drops) dimensions using analytical and numerical approaches to minimize the free energy of the drop. In two dimensions, we find, in agreement with other authors, a slip, jump, stick motion of the contact line. In three dimensions, this behavior persists, but the position and magnitude of the contact line jumps are sensitive to the details of the surface patterning. In two dimensions, we identify analytically the advancing and receding contact angles on the different surfaces, and we use numerical insights to argue that these provide bounds for the three-dimensional cases. We present explicit simulations to show that a simple average over the disorder is not sufficient to predict the details of the contact angle hysteresis and to support an explanation for the low contact angle hysteresis of suspended drops on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  11. Origin of J-V Hysteresis in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Mengjin; Priya, Shashank; Zhu, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs) based on organometal halide perovskite have emerged in the past five years as excellent devices for harvesting solar energy. Some remaining challenges should be resolved to continue the momentum in their development. The photocurrent density-voltage (J-V) responses of the PSCs demonstrate anomalous dependence on the voltage scan direction/rate/range, voltage conditioning history, and device configuration. The hysteretic J-V behavior presents a challenge for determining the accurate power conversion efficiency of the PSCs. Here, we review the recent progress on the investigation of the origin(s) of J-V hysteresis behavior in PSCs. We discuss the impact of slow transient capacitive current, trapping and detrapping process, ion migrations, and ferroelectric polarization on the hysteresis behavior. The remaining issues and future research required toward the understanding of J-V hysteresis in PSCs will also be discussed.

  12. Application of Mathematic Software to Magnetic Hysteresis Loop in Ferromagnetic Material%Mathematic软件在铁磁材料磁滞回线中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏奶萍; 张相武; 朱君凡

    2014-01-01

    根据铁磁材料磁滞回线的实验原理,利用绘图软件Mathematic绘制出样品的磁化曲线和磁滞回线,对实验数据进行多项式函数拟合,计算出其磁滞损耗。%According to experiment theory of the hysteresis loop of ferromagnetic material,The data measured in the experiment are processed by using drawing software mathematic,magnetization curve and hysteresis loop of the sample are derived,to polynomial function fitting of experiment data,The hysteresis loss of the sample is calculated.

  13. Large-scale separation and hysteresis in cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmayer, A. P.; Smith, F. T.

    1985-01-01

    An approach using a two-dimensional thin aerofoil, allied with the theory of viscous bluff-body separation, is used to study the initial cross-over from massive separation to an attached flow in a single-row unstaggered cascade. Analytic solutions are developed for the limit of small cascade-spacing. From the analytic solutions several interesting features of the cascade are examined, including multiple-solution branches and multiple regions of hysteresis. In addition, numerical results are presented for several selected aerofoils. Some of the aerofoils are found to contain markedly enlarged regions of hysteresis for certain critical cascade spacings.

  14. Hysteresis Phenomena in Sulfur Dioxide Oxidation over Supported Vanadium Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masters, Stephen G.; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    1997-01-01

    Catalyst deactivation and hysteresis behavior in industrial SO2-oxidation catalysts have been studied in the temperature region 350-480 C by combined in situ EPR spectroscopy and catalytic activity measurements. The feed gas composition simulated sulfuric acid synthesis gas and wet/dry de......NOx'ed flue gas. The vanadium (IV) compound K4(VO)3(SO4)5 precipitated during all the investigated conditions hence causing catalyst deactivation. Hysteresis behavior of both the catalytic activity and the V(IV) content was observed during reheating....

  15. Contact angle hysteresis of a drop spreading over metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Geniy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental data on the contact angle hysteresis of the distilled water drop spreading over the surfaces of non-ferrous metals. The measurements of the advancing and receding contact angles were carried out by method of sitting drop on the horizontal surface during increasing and decreasing drop volume with a syringe pump. It was found that the contact line speed has a great influence on the hysteresis of the polished non-elastic substrates. The mechanism of spreading was described using the balance of the forces from the physical point of view.

  16. Magnetic Hysteresis in Er Trimers on Cu(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Aparajita; Donati, Fabio; Wäckerlin, Christian; Baltic, Romana; Dreiser, Jan; Pivetta, Marina; Rusponi, Stefano; Brune, Harald

    2016-06-01

    We report magnetic hysteresis in Er clusters on Cu(111) starting from the size of three atoms. Combining X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, scanning tunneling microscopy, and mean-field nucleation theory, we determine the size-dependent magnetic properties of the Er clusters. Er atoms and dimers are paramagnetic, and their easy magnetization axes are oriented in-plane. In contrast, trimers and bigger clusters exhibit magnetic hysteresis at 2.5 K with a relaxation time of 2 min at 0.1 T and out-of-plane easy axis. This appearance of magnetic stability for trimers coincides with their enhanced structural stability.

  17. J-A Hysteresis Model Parameters Estimation using GA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomir Zidaric

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Jiles and Atherton (J-A hysteresis model parameter estimation for soft magnetic composite (SMC material. The calculation of Jiles and Atherton hysteresis model parameters is based on experimental data and genetic algorithms (GA. Genetic algorithms operate in a given area of possible solutions. Finding the best solution of a problem in wide area of possible solutions is uncertain. A new approach in use of genetic algorithms is proposed to overcome this uncertainty. The basis of this approach is in genetic algorithm built in another genetic algorithm.

  18. Low hysteresis FeMn-based top spin valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, V V; Krinitsina, T P; Milyaev, M A; Naumova, L I; Proglyado, V V

    2012-09-01

    FeMn-based top spin valves Ta/[FeNi/CoFe]/Cu/CoFe/FeMn/Ta with different Cu and FeMn layers thicknesses were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering at room temperature. It was shown that low field hysteresis due to free layer magnetization reversal can be reduced down to (0.1 divided by 0.2) Oe keeping the GMR ratio higher 8% by using both layers thicknesses optimization and non-collinear geometry of magnetoresistance measurements. Dependence of low field hysteresis and GMR ratio on the angle between applied magnetic field and pinning direction are presented.

  19. UVolution, a photochemistry experiment in low earth orbit: Investigation of the photostability of carbonates exposed to martian-like UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, Fabien; Yong Guan, Yuan; Noblet, Audrey; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Macari, Frédérique; Person, Alain; Chaput, Didier; Raulin, François; Cottin, Hervé

    2010-10-01

    The detection and identification of carbonates on Mars are of prime importance to establish the evolution of its atmosphere, correlated to the history of the liquid water, or even to determine the existence of a possible ancient biological activity. Till date, no large deposits of carbonates have been found. In fact, their detection is specific to local areas and in very low amounts. The absence of such deposits is commonly attributed to the harsh environmental conditions at the surface of Mars. Additionally, the presence of UV radiation has been proposed to explain their photodecomposition and hence their absence. However, contradictory results from laboratory experiments mimicking Mars' surface UV radiation did not resolve the behaviour of carbonates in such an environment, which is why we exposed, in low Earth orbit and in laboratory experiments, both abiotic and biotic calcium carbonates to UV radiation of wavelength above 200 nm, the same spectral distribution as the one reaching the surface of Mars. For low Earth orbit (LEO) exposure, this was done for the UVolution experiment on board the BIOPAN ESA module, which was set outside a Russian Foton automated capsule, and exposed to space conditions for 12 days in September 2007. The targeted carbonates are biominerals and abiotic samples. Our laboratory results mainly show that the exposed carbonates appear to be stable to UV radiation if directly exposed to it. The LEO experiment results tend to the same conclusion, but the integrated exposition time to Solar UV during the experiment is not sufficient to be conclusive. However, the stability of the biominerals derived from the laboratory experiment could strengthen the interest to explore deeper their potential as life records at Mars. Hence, they should be considered as primary targets for in situ analyses during future missions.

  20. The large area crop inventory experiment: An experiment to demonstrate how space-age technology can contribute to solving critical problems here on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The large area crop inventory experiment is being developed to predict crop production through satellite photographs. This experiment demonstrates how space age technology can contribute to solving practical problems of agriculture management.

  1. Unifying soil respiration pulses, inhibition, and temperature hysteresis through dynamics of labile soil carbon and O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, P. Y.; Grantz, D. A.; Chatterjee, A.; Eberwein, J. E.; Allsman, L. A.; Jenerette, G. D.

    2014-04-01

    Event-driven and diel dynamics of soil respiration (Rs) strongly influence terrestrial carbon (C) emissions and are difficult to predict. Wetting events may cause a large pulse or strong inhibition of Rs. Complex diel dynamics include hysteresis in the relationship between Rs and soil temperature. The mechanistic basis for these dynamics is not well understood, resulting in large discrepancies between predicted and observed Rs. We present a unifying approach for interpreting these phenomena in a hot arid agricultural environment. We performed a whole ecosystem wetting experiment with continuous measurement of Rs to study pulse responses to wetting in a heterotrophic system. We also investigated Rs during cultivation of Sorghum bicolor to evaluate the role of photosynthetic C in the regulation of diel variation in Rs. Finally, we adapted a Rs model with sensitivity to soil O2 and water content by incorporating two soil C pools differing in lability. We observed a large wetting-induced pulse of Rs from the fallow field and were able to accurately simulate the pulse via release of labile soil C. During the exponential phase of plant growth, Rs was inhibited in response to wetting, which was accurately simulated through depletion of soil O2. Without plants, hysteresis was not observed; however, with growing plants, an increasingly significant counterclockwise hysteresis developed. Hysteresis was simulated via a dynamic photosynthetic C pool and was not likely controlled by physical processes. These results help characterize the complex regulation of Rs and improve understanding of these phenomena under warmer and more variable conditions.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Vacuum Heat Treatment Thermal Hysteresis Time of GH4169 Superalloy Workpiece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMing-wei; ZHANGLi-wen; JIANGGuo-dong; ZHANGFan-yun; LiChen-hui; ZHANGLi-sheng; ZHANGZun-li

    2004-01-01

    A nonlinear finite element model of vacuum heat treatment process was developed. In this model, influence of many factors, such as nonlinear heat radiation, temperature-dependent thermal physical properties of material are considered. The temperature field of GH4169 alloy workpiece during vacuum heat treatment process was calculated using finite element software MSC.Marc, and the thermal hysteresis time of the workpiece was predicted. An experiment of vacuum heat treatment of GH4169 superalloy workpiece was carried out to verify the calculation. The experimental results of temperature profile agree well with the simulated results. This work lays a theoretical foundation for optimizing technical parameter of vacuum heat treatment process.

  3. Assessing temporal variations in connectivity through suspended sediment hysteresis analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; Melland, Alice; Mellander, Per-Erik; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Connectivity provides a valuable concept for understanding catchment-scale sediment dynamics. In intensive agricultural catchments, land management through tillage, high livestock densities and extensive land drainage practices significantly change hydromorphological behaviour and alter sediment supply and downstream delivery. Analysis of suspended sediment-discharge hysteresis has offered insights into sediment dynamics but typically on a limited selection of events. Greater availability of continuous high-resolution discharge and turbidity data and qualitative hysteresis metrics enables assessment of sediment dynamics during more events and over time. This paper assesses the utility of this approach to explore seasonal variations in connectivity. Data were collected from three small (c. 10 km2) intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland with contrasting morphologies, soil types, land use patterns and management practices, and are broadly defined as low-permeability supporting grassland, moderate-permeability supporting arable and high-permeability supporting arable. Suspended sediment concentration (using calibrated turbidity measurements) and discharge data were collected at 10-min resolution from each catchment outlet and precipitation data were collected from a weather station within each catchment. Event databases (67-90 events per catchment) collated information on sediment export metrics, hysteresis category (e.g., clockwise, anti-clockwise, no hysteresis), numeric hysteresis index, and potential hydro-meteorological controls on sediment transport including precipitation amount, duration, intensity, stream flow and antecedent soil moisture and rainfall. Statistical analysis of potential controls on sediment export was undertaken using Pearson's correlation coefficient on separate hysteresis categories in each catchment. Sediment hysteresis fluctuations through time were subsequently assessed using the hysteresis index. Results showed the numeric

  4. On the importance of hysteresis in hydrological modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharari, S.; Razavi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Hysteresis is a widely observed phenomenon in hydrology and beyond at a range of spatio-temporal scales. Despite significant research efforts, hysteretic behaviors and their implications for hydrologic modelling and prediction have remained poorly defined and understood. The current state of the art is that almost all practical models in use do not include any hysteretic component or relationship that directly represents such behaviors. In this study, we review different types of hysteretic behaviors in hydrology and formulate a general definition for hysteresis that might be useful in the context of hydrological modeling. We show how hysteresis can be the result of missing (or ignoring) dimensions/physics that govern a real system. Further, using existing strategies for hysteresis modeling from other disciples, we evaluate to what extent the addition of hysteretic components to a hydrological model (such as soil moisture and soil suction head - soil hydraulic conductivity) change the model performance and associated uncertainties. Our analyses also show that properly designed model structures can largely compensate for the lack of hysteretic components in models and allow mimicking the observed hysteretic behaviors.

  5. Modeling the hysteresis of a scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirscherl, Kai; Garnæs, Jørgen; Nielsen, L.

    2000-01-01

    Most scanning probe microscopes use piezoelectric actuators in open loop configurations. Therefore a major problem related to these instruments is the image distortion due to the hysteresis effect of the piezo. In order to eliminate the distortions, cost effective software control based on a model...

  6. Absolute stability analysis of linear systems with Duhem hysteresis operator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, Ruiyue; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of positive and negative feedback interconnections of a linear system and a Duhem hysteresis operator. We provide sufficient conditions on the linear plant and on the Duhem operator which are based on the counterclockwise (CCW) or clockwise (CW) input–outp

  7. Hysteresis, Stability, and Ion Migration in Lead Halide Perovskite Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, Kenjiro; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Tripathi, Neeti; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-16

    Ion migration has been suspected as the origin of various irreproducible and unstable properties, most notably the hysteresis, of lead halide perovskite photovoltaic (PV) cells since the early stage of the research. Although many evidence of ionic movement have been presented both numerically and experimentally, a coherent and quantitative picture that accounts for the observed irreproducible phenomena is still lacking. At the same time, however, it has been noticed that in certain types of PV cells, the hysteresis is absent or at least within the measurement reproducibility. We have previously shown that the electronic properties of hysteresis-free cells are well represented in terms of the conventional inorganic semiconductors. The reproducibility of these measurements was confirmed typically within tens of minutes under the biasing field of -1 V to +1.5 V. In order to probe the effect of ionic motion in the hysteresis-free cells, we extended the time scale and the biasing rage in the electronic measurements, from which we conclude the following: (1) From various evidence, it appears that ion migration is inevitable. However, it does not cause detrimental effects to the PV operation. (2) We propose, based on the quantitative characterization, that the degradation is more likely due to the chemical change at the interfaces between the carrier selective layers and perovskite rather than the compositional change of the lead iodide perovskite bulk. Together, they give much hope in the use of the lead iodide perovskite in the use of actual application.

  8. Hysteresis Control for a DC Connected Synchronous Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg; Evangelos, Dimarakis

    2009-01-01

    Abstract— for offshore wind farms the distance to the coast increases, therefore DC cables will have to be used. For a variable speed wind turbine a rectifier and a synchronous generator with a boost converter is used. As a new suggestion for control the generator speed hysteresis control...

  9. Preisach model of hysteresis for the Piezoelectric Actuator Drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel; Andersen, Michael A. E.; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    hysteretic nonlinearities. In order to model these nonlinearities, the first-order hysteresis reversal curves of the actuators are measured and a discrete Preisach model is derived. This forms a basis that enables the study of different compensation methods. The results show matching between measured...

  10. Piezoelectric stack actuator parameter extraction with hysteresis compensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zsurzsan, Tiberiu-Gabriel; Mangeot, Charles; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Piezoelectric Actuator Drive (PAD) is a type of rotary motor that transforms the linear motion of piezoelectric stack actuators into a precise rotational motion. The very high stiffness of the actuators employed make this type of motor suited for open-loop control, but the inherent hysteresis...

  11. Hierarchically structured superoleophobic surfaces with ultralow contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Arun K; Li, Yongxin; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2012-11-14

    Hierarchically structured, superoleophobic surfaces are demonstrated that display one of the lowest contact angle hysteresis values ever reported - even with extremely low-surface-tension liquids such as n-heptane. Consequently, these surfaces allow, for the first time, even ≈2 μL n-heptane droplets to bounce and roll-off at tilt angles. ≤ 2°.

  12. Dynamic contact angles and hysteresis under electrowetting-on-dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wyatt C; Sen, Prosenjit; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2011-08-16

    By designing and implementing a new experimental method, we have measured the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles and the resulting hysteresis of droplets under electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). Measurements were obtained over wide ranges of applied EWOD voltages, or electrowetting numbers (0 ≤ Ew ≤ 0.9), and droplet sliding speeds, or capillary numbers (1.4 × 10(-5) ≤ Ca ≤ 6.9 × 10(-3)). If Ew or Ca is low, dynamic contact angle hysteresis is not affected much by the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed; that is, the hysteresis increases by less than 50% with a 2 order-of-magnitude increase in sliding speed when Ca hysteresis increases with either the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed. Stick-slip oscillations were observed at Ew > 0.4. Data are interpreted with simplified hydrodynamic (Cox-Voinov) and molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) models; the Cox-Voinov model captures the trend of the data, but it yields unreasonable fitting parameters. MKT fitting parameters associated with the advancing contact line are reasonable, but a lack of symmetry indicates that a more intricate model is required.

  13. Contact angle hysteresis on regular pillar-like hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Li-Jen; Chang, Jeng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    A series of pillar-like patterned silicon wafers with different pillar sizes and spacing are fabricated by photolithography and further modified by a self-assembled fluorosilanated monolayer. The dynamic contact angles of water on these surfaces are carefully measured and found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions of the Cassie model and the Wenzel model. When a water drop is at the Wenzel state, its contact angle hysteresis increases along with an increase in the surface roughness. While the surface roughness is further raised beyond its transition roughness (from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state), the contact angle hysteresis (or receding contact angle) discontinuously drops (or jumps) to a lower (or higher) value. When a water drop is at the Cassie state, its contact angle hysteresis strongly depends on the solid fraction and has nothing to do with the surface roughness. Even for a superhydrophobic surface, the contact angle hysteresis may still exhibit a value as high as 41 degrees for the solid fraction of 0.563.

  14. Interpreting diel hysteresis between soil respiration and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Phillips; N. Nickerson; D. Risk; B.J. Bond

    2011-01-01

    Increasing use of automated soil respiration chambers in recent years has demonstrated complex diel relationships between soil respiration and temperature that are not apparent from less frequent measurements. Soil surface flux is often lagged from soil temperature by several hours, which results in semielliptical hysteresis loops when surface flux is plotted as a...

  15. A hysteresis model for an orthogonal thin-film magnetometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de René M.; Fluitman, Jan H.

    1990-01-01

    The operation of a ferromagnetic thin-film magnetometer using the anisotropic magnetoresistance effect in a permalloy film is discussed. Measurements showed the presence of a hysteresis effect not predicted by available models. It is shown that the sensitivity of the magnetometer is predicted by app

  16. Hysteresis of the Magnetic Particle in a Dipolar Ising Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yin-Zhong; LI Zhen-Ya

    2002-01-01

    Zero-temperature Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the hysteresis of a magnetic particle ina dipolarIsing model. The magnetic particle is described in a system of permanent dipoles, and the dipoles are locatedin a cubic lattice site. The effects of the shape and the size of the particle on the hysteresis loop at zero temperatureare obtained. For strong exchange interactions, the shapes of magnetic hysteresis loops approach rectangle. For weakexchange interactions, the effects of the size and the shape of the particle on the loops are more remarkable than thoseof strong exchange interactions case. The slope of the hysteresis loop decreases with the increase of the ratio of thesemi major axis to the semi minor axis of the ellipsoidal magnetic particle, and there is an increase of the slope of thehysteresis with the decrease of the size of the magnetic particle. The effects of the shape and size of the particle on thecoercive force at zero temperature are also investigated.

  17. Hysteresis in the solid oxide fuel cell cathode reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Bay, Lasse

    2001-01-01

    The oxygen electrode reaction at the Pt/yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) interface is investigated at 1000degreesC on Pt point electrodes on YSZ and YSZ point contacts on Pt. Linear potential sweeps show a pronounced non-linear current-voltage relation and inductive hysteresis, in particular at l...

  18. Hysteresis loops revisited: An efficient method to analyze ferroic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbellini, Luca; Plathier, Julien; Lacroix, Christian; Harnagea, Catalin; Ménard, David; Pignolet, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis loops characterize a wide variety of behaviors in fields ranging from physics and chemistry to economics and sociology. In particular, they represent the main characteristic of ferroic materials such as ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, which, in recent years, have attracted much interest due to their multifunctional properties. Although measuring such loops may not be experimentally complicated, extracting the intrinsic values of the characteristic parameters of the loop may prove difficult due to the different contributions to the measured hysteresis. In this paper, a simple technique is proposed to analyze hysteresis loops and to extract solely the contribution of the ferromagnetic or ferroelectric material. Such method consists in differentiating the measured loop, deconvoluting the different contributions and selectively integrating only the signals belonging to the ferroic response. A discussion of the limitations of the method is presented. Different measured ferromagnetic and ferroelectric hysteresis loops were also used to validate the technique. Comparison between experimental and reconstructed data demonstrated the precision and reliability of the technique. Moreover, application of such method allowed us to highlight properties of a Bi2FeCrO6 room temperature multiferroic thin film that were not previously observed.

  19. Small hysteresis and high energy storage power of antiferroelectric ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfei; Yang, Tongqing; Chen, Shengchen; Yao, Xi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, modified Pb(Zr,Ti)O3(PZT) antiferroelectric (AFE) ceramics system was investigated by traditional solid state method. It was observed that the effect of different contents of Zr/Sn, Zr/Ti on modified PZT antiferroelectrics. With increasing Zr/Sn content, the EAFE (electric field of AFE phase to ferroelectric (FE) phase) value was enlarged. The phase switch field was reduced from FE to AFE (EFA). The hysteresis loops were changed from "slanted" to "square"-types. With increasing Zr/Ti concentrate, the EAFE value, and also the EFA was enlarged, while the hysteresis switch ΔE was reduced. The hysteresis loops was from "square" to "slanted"-types. The samples with square hysteresis loops are suitable for energy storage capacitor applications, the composition of ceramics was Pb0.97La0.02(Zr0.90Sn0.05Ti0.05)O3, which have the largest energy storage density 4.426J/cm3 at 227 kV/cm, and ΔE was 80 kV/cm, energy efficient η was about 0.612.

  20. A New Approach for Magneto-Static Hysteresis Behavioral Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astorino, Antonio; Swaminathan, Madhavan; Antonini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new behavioral modeling approach for magneto-static hysteresis is presented. Many accurate models are currently available, but none of them seems to be able to correctly reproduce all the possible B-H paths with low computational cost. By contrast, the approach proposed...... achieved when comparing the measured and simulated results....

  1. A simple model of hysteresis behavior using spreadsheet analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, A.; Blachowicz, T.

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis loops occur in many scientific and technical problems, especially as field dependent magnetization of ferromagnetic materials, but also as stress-strain-curves of materials measured by tensile tests including thermal effects, liquid-solid phase transitions, in cell biology or economics. While several mathematical models exist which aim to calculate hysteresis energies and other parameters, here we offer a simple model for a general hysteretic system, showing different hysteresis loops depending on the defined parameters. The calculation which is based on basic spreadsheet analysis plus an easy macro code can be used by students to understand how these systems work and how the parameters influence the reactions of the system on an external field. Importantly, in the step-by-step mode, each change of the system state, compared to the last step, becomes visible. The simple program can be developed further by several changes and additions, enabling the building of a tool which is capable of answering real physical questions in the broad field of magnetism as well as in other scientific areas, in which similar hysteresis loops occur.

  2. A Piecewise Hysteresis Model for a Damper of HIS System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaidong Tian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A damper of the hydraulically interconnected suspension (HIS system, as a quarter HIS, is prototyped and its damping characteristic is tested to characterize the damping property. The force-velocity characteristic of the prototype is analyzed based on a set of testing results and accordingly a piecewise hysteresis model for the damper is proposed. The proposed equivalent parametric model consists of two parts: hysteresis model in low speed region and saturation model in high speed region which are used to describe the hysteresis phenomenon in low speed and nonhysteresis phenomenon in high speed, respectively. The parameters of the model are identified based on genetic algorithm by setting the constraints of parameters according to their physical significances and the corresponding testing results. The advantages of the model are highlighted by comparing to the nonhysteresis model and the permanent hysteresis model. The numerical simulation results are compared with the testing results to validate the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed model. Finally, to further verify the proposed model’s wide applicability under different excitation conditions, its results are compared to the testing results in three-dimensional space. The research in this paper is significant for the dynamic analysis of the HIS vehicle.

  3. Hysteresis and Multi-state Behavior of Counterflow Flame in a Blowing Cylindrical Burner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsing-Sheng Chai

    2009-01-01

    velocity enhances hysteresis and the discrepancy between the two curves. However, as fuel-ejection velocity exceeds a critical value, the intensity of hysteresis almost keeps constant and causes the two curves to be parallel to each other.

  4. A CLASS OF REACTION-DIFFUSION EQUATIONS WITH HYSTERESIS DIFFERENTIAL OPERATOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuLongfeng

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the classical and weak derivatives with respect to spatial variable of a class of hysteresis functional are discussed. Some conclusions about solutions of a class of reaction-diffusion equations with hysteresis differential operator are given.

  5. Expanding earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carey, S.W.

    1976-01-01

    Arguments in favor of an expanding earth are presented. The author believes that the theory of plate tectonics is a classic error in the history of geology. The case for the expanding earth is organized in the following way: introductory review - face of the earth, development of expanding earth concept, necessity for expansion, the subduction myth, and definitions; some principles - scale of tectonic phenomena, non-uniformitarianism, tectonic profile, paleomagnetism, asymmetry of the earth, rotation of the earth, and modes of crustal extension; regional studies - western North America, Central America, South-East Asia, and the rift oceans; tests and cause of expansion. 824 references, 197 figures, 11 tables. (RWR)

  6. Charging of Superconducting Layers and Novel Type of Hysteresis in Coupled Josephson Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Shukrinov, Yu M.; Gaafar, Ma. A.

    2011-01-01

    A manifestation of a novel type of hysteresis related to the parametric resonance in the system of coupled Josephson junctions is demonstrated. Opposite to McCumber and Steward hysteresis, we find that the width of this hysteresis is inversely proportional to the McCumber parameter and depends also on coupling between junctions and the boundary conditions. An investigation of time dependence of the electric charge in superconducting layers allow us to explain the origin of this hysteresis by ...

  7. A control model for hysteresis based on microscopic polarization mechanisms in piezoelectric actuator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RU Chang-hai; SUN Li-ning; RONG Wei-bin

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at the limitation of control accuracy caused by hysteresis and creep for a piezoelectric actuator, the hysteresis phenomenon is explained based on the microscopic polarization mechanism and domain wall theory. Then a control model based on polarization is established, which can reduce the hysteresis and creep remarkablely. The experimental results show that the polarization control method is with more linearity and less hysteresis compared with the voltage control method.

  8. Electrowetting on dielectrics on lubricating fluid based slippery surfaces with negligible hysteresis

    OpenAIRE

    Barman, Jitesh; Nagarajan, Arun Kumar; Khare, Krishnacharya

    2015-01-01

    Low voltage electrowetting on dielectrics on substrates with thin layer of lubricating fluid to reduce contact angle hysteresis is reported here. On smooth and homogeneous solid surfaces, it is extremely difficult to reduce contact angle hysteresis (contact angle difference between advancing and receding drop volume cycle) and the electrowetting hysteresis (contact angle difference between advancing and receding voltage cycle) below 10{\\deg}. On the other hand, electrowetting hysteresis on ro...

  9. Modeling and Scaling of Hysteresis in Magnetic Materials. Frequency, Pick of Induction and Temperature Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Sokalski, Krzysztof Z

    2015-01-01

    Recently introduced model of magnetic hysteresis was extended into set of the following features: frequency, pick of induction and temperature of specimen. Group theoretical classification of hysteresis loops' sets is presented. An effect analogous to the Zeeman splitting has been revealed in the set of the all hysteresis loops.

  10. A Bézier-Spline-based Model for the Simulation of Hysteresis in Variably Saturated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Peche, Aaron; Thiele, Luisa-Bianca; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    Most transient variably saturated flow models neglect hysteresis in the p_c-S-relationship (Beven, 2012). Such models tend to inadequately represent matrix potential and saturation distribution. Thereby, when simulating flow and transport processes, fluid and solute fluxes might be overestimated (Russo et al., 1989). In this study, we present a simple, computationally efficient and easily applicable model that enables to adequately describe hysteresis in the p_c-S-relationship for variably saturated flow. This model can be seen as an extension to the existing play-type model (Beliaev and Hassanizadeh, 2001), where scanning curves are simplified as vertical lines between main imbibition and main drainage curve. In our model, we use continuous linear and Bézier-Spline-based functions. We show the successful validation of the model by numerically reproducing a physical experiment by Gillham, Klute and Heermann (1976) describing primary drainage and imbibition in a vertical soil column. With a deviation of 3%, the simple Bézier-Spline-based model performs significantly better that the play-type approach, which deviates by 30% from the experimental results. Finally, we discuss the realization of physical experiments in order to extend the model to secondary scanning curves and in order to determine scanning curve steepness. {Literature} Beven, K.J. (2012). Rainfall-Runoff-Modelling: The Primer. John Wiley and Sons. Russo, D., Jury, W. A., & Butters, G. L. (1989). Numerical analysis of solute transport during transient irrigation: 1. The effect of hysteresis and profile heterogeneity. Water Resources Research, 25(10), 2109-2118. https://doi.org/10.1029/WR025i010p02109. Beliaev, A.Y. & Hassanizadeh, S.M. (2001). A Theoretical Model of Hysteresis and Dynamic Effects in the Capillary Relation for Two-phase Flow in Porous Media. Transport in Porous Media 43: 487. doi:10.1023/A:1010736108256. Gillham, R., Klute, A., & Heermann, D. (1976). Hydraulic properties of a porous

  11. On-the-fly machine-learning for high-throughput experiments: search for rare-earth-free permanent magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusne, Aaron Gilad; Gao, Tieren; Mehta, Apurva; Ke, Liqin; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Ho, Kai-Ming; Antropov, Vladimir; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kramer, Matthew J; Long, Christian; Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2014-09-15

    Advanced materials characterization techniques with ever-growing data acquisition speed and storage capabilities represent a challenge in modern materials science, and new procedures to quickly assess and analyze the data are needed. Machine learning approaches are effective in reducing the complexity of data and rapidly homing in on the underlying trend in multi-dimensional data. Here, we show that by employing an algorithm called the mean shift theory to a large amount of diffraction data in high-throughput experimentation, one can streamline the process of delineating the structural evolution across compositional variations mapped on combinatorial libraries with minimal computational cost. Data collected at a synchrotron beamline are analyzed on the fly, and by integrating experimental data with the inorganic crystal structure database (ICSD), we can substantially enhance the accuracy in classifying the structural phases across ternary phase spaces. We have used this approach to identify a novel magnetic phase with enhanced magnetic anisotropy which is a candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnet.

  12. On-the-fly machine-learning for high-throughput experiments: search for rare-earth-free permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusne, Aaron Gilad [University of Maryland; Gao, Tieren [University of Maryland; Mehta, Apurva [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Ke, Liqin [Ames Laboratory; Nguyen, Manh Cuong [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory; Antropov, Vladimir [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J [Ames Laboratory; Long, Christian [University of Maryland; Takeuchi, Ichiro [University of Maryland

    2014-09-15

    Advanced materials characterization techniques with ever-growing data acquisition speed and storage capabilities represent a challenge in modern materials science, and new procedures to quickly assess and analyze the data are needed. Machine learning approaches are effective in reducing the complexity of data and rapidly homing in on the underlying trend in multi-dimensional data. Here, we show that by employing an algorithm called the mean shift theory to a large amount of diffraction data in high-throughput experimentation, one can streamline the process of delineating the structural evolution across compositional variations mapped on combinatorial libraries with minimal computational cost. Data collected at a synchrotron beamline are analyzed on the fly, and by integrating experimental data with the inorganic crystal structure database (ICSD), we can substantially enhance the accuracy in classifying the structural phases across ternary phase spaces. We have used this approach to identify a novel magnetic phase with enhanced magnetic anisotropy which is a candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnet.

  13. Application of magnetomechanical hysteresis modeling to magnetic techniques for monitoring neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sablik, M.J.; Kwun, H.; Rollwitz, W.L.; Cadena, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the effects of neutron embrittlement and biaxial stress on magnetic properties in steels, using various magnetic measurement techniques. Interaction between experiment and modeling should suggest efficient magnetic measurement procedures for determining neutron embrittlement biaxial stress. This should ultimately assist in safety monitoring of nuclear power plants and of gas and oil pipelines. In the first six months of this first year study, magnetic measurements were made on steel surveillance specimens from the Indian Point 2 and D.C. Cook 2 reactors. The specimens previously had been characterized by Charpy tests after specified neutron fluences. Measurements now included: (1) hysteresis loop measurement of coercive force, permeability and remanence, (2) Barkhausen noise amplitude; and (3) higher order nonlinear harmonic analysis of a 1 Hz magnetic excitation. Very good correlation of magnetic parameters with fluence and embrittlement was found for specimens from the Indian Point 2 reactor. The D.C. Cook 2 specimens, however showed poor correlation. Possible contributing factors to this are: (1) metallurgical differences between D.C. Cook 2 and Indian Point 2 specimens; (2) statistical variations in embrittlement parameters for individual samples away from the stated men values; and (3) conversion of the D.C. Cook 2 reactor to a low leakage core configuration in the middle of the period of surveillance. Modeling using a magnetomechanical hysteresis model has begun. The modeling will first focus on why Barkhausen noise and nonlinear harmonic amplitudes appear to be better indicators of embrittlement than the hysteresis loop parameters.

  14. A experiment on radio location of objects in the near-Earth space with VLBI in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, M.; Antipenko, A.; Bezrukovs, V.; Bezrukov, D.; Dementjev, A.; Dugin, N.; Konovalenko, A.; Kulishenko, V.; Liu, X.; Nabatov, A.; Nesteruk, V.; Pupillo, G.; Reznichenko, A.; Salerno, E.; Shmeld, I.; Shulga, O.; Sybiryakova, Y.; Tikhomirov, Yu.; Tkachenko, A.; Volvach, A.; Yang, W.-J.

    An experiment on radar location of space debris objects using of the method of VLBI was carried out in April, 2012. The radar VLBI experiment consisted in irradiation of some space debris objects (4 rocket stages and 5 inactive satellites) with a signal of the transmitter with RT-70 in Evpatoria, Ukraine. Reflected signals were received by a complex of radio telescopes in the VLBI mode. The following VLBI stations took part in the observations: Ventspils (RT-32), Urumqi (RT-25), Medicina (RT-32) and Simeiz (RT-22). The experiment included measurements of the Doppler frequency shift and the delay for orbit refining, and measurements of the rotation period and sizes of objects by the amplitudes of output interferometer signals. The cross-correlation of VLBI-data is performed at a correlator NIRFI-4 of Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod). Preliminary data processing resulted in the series of Doppler frequency shifts, which comprised the information on radial velocities of the objects. Some results of the experiment are presented.

  15. Analysis of data from the plasma composition experiment on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE 1). Final report, 1 January 1990-31 May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennartsson, O.W.

    1994-05-01

    The Lockheed plasma composition experiment on the ISEE 1 spacecraft has provided one of the largest and most varied sets of data on earth's energetic plasma environment, covering both the solar wind, well beyond the bow shock, and the near equatorial magnetosphere to a distance of almost 23 earth radii. This report is an overview of the last four years of data analysis and archiving. The archiving for NSSDC includes most data obtained during the initial 28-months of instrument operation, from early November 1977 through the end of February 1980. The data products are a combination of spectra (mass and energy angle) and velocity moments. A copy of the data user's guide and examples of the data products are attached as appendix A. The data analysis covers three major areas: solar wind ions upstream and downstream of the day side bowshock, especially He(++) ions; terrestrial ions flowing upward from the auroral regions, especially H(+), O(+), and He(+) ions; and ions of both solar and terrestrial origins in the tail plasma sheet and lobe regions. Copies of publications are attached.

  16. Prebiotic Synthesis of Methionine and Other Sulfur-Containing Organic Compounds on the Primitive Earth: A Contemporary Reassessment Based on an Unpublished 1958 Stanley Miller Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eric T.; Cleaves, H. James; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Original extracts from an unpublished 1958 experiment conducted by the late Stanley L. Miller were recently found and analyzed using modern state-of-the-art analytical methods. The extracts were produced by the action of an electric discharge on a mixture of methane (CH4), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), ammonia (NH3), and carbon dioxide (CO2). Racemic methionine was farmed in significant yields, together with other sulfur-bearing organic compounds. The formation of methionine and other compounds from a model prebiotic atmosphere that contained H2S suggests that this type of synthesis is robust under reducing conditions, which may have existed either in the global primitive atmosphere or in localized volcanic environments on the early Earth. The presence of a wide array of sulfur-containing organic compounds produced by the decomposition of methionine and cysteine indicates that in addition to abiotic synthetic processes, degradation of organic compounds on the primordial Earth could have been important in diversifying the inventory of molecules of biochemical significance not readily formed from other abiotic reactions, or derived from extraterrestrial delivery.

  17. Thermal Orbital Environmental Parameter Study on the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) Using Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, John R.; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The natural thermal environmental parameters used on the Space Station Program (SSP 30425) were generated by the Space Environmental Effects Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) utilizing extensive data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), a series of satellites which measured low earth orbit (LEO) albedo and outgoing long-wave radiation. Later, this temporal data was presented as a function of averaging times and orbital inclination for use by thermal engineers in NASA Technical Memorandum TM 4527. The data was not presented in a fashion readily usable by thermal engineering modeling tools and required knowledge of the thermal time constants and infrared versus solar spectrum sensitivity of the hardware being analyzed to be used properly. Another TM was recently issued as a guideline for utilizing these environments (NASA/TM-2001-211221) with more insight into the utilization by thermal analysts. This paper gives a top-level overview of the environmental parameters presented in the TM and a study of the effects of implementing these environments on an ongoing MSFC project, the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS), compared to conventional orbital parameters that had been historically used.

  18. PREFACE: International Workshop on Multi-Rate Processes and Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortell, Michael P.; O'Malley, Robert E.; Pokrovskii, Alexei; Rachinskii, Dmitrii; Sobolev, Vladimir A.

    2008-07-01

    We are interested in singular perturbation problems and hysteresis as common strongly nonlinear phenomena that occur in many industrial, physical and economic systems. The wording `strongly nonlinear' means that linearization will not encapsulate the observed phenomena. Often these two types of phenomena are manifested for different stages of the same or similar processes. A number of fundamental hysteresis models can be considered as limit cases of time relaxation processes, or admit an approximation by a differential equation which is singular with respect to a particular parameter. However, the amount of interaction between practitioners of theories of systems with time relaxation and systems with hysteresis (and between the `relaxation' and `hysteresis' research communities) is still low, and cross-fertilization is small. In recent years Ireland has become a home for a series of prestigious International Workshops in Singular Perturbations and Hysteresis: International Workshop on Multi-rate Processes and Hysteresis (University College Cork, Ireland, 3-8 April 2006). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series, volume 55. See further information at http://euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2008.htm International Workshop on Hysteresis and Multi-scale Asymptotics (University College Cork, Ireland, 17-21 March 2004). Proceedings are published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series, volume 22. See further information at http://euclid.ucc.ie/murphys2006.htm International Workshop on Relaxation Oscillations and Hysteresis (University College Cork, Ireland, 1-6 April 2002). The related collection of invited lectures, was published as a volume Singular Perturbations and Hysteresis, SIAM, Philadelphia, 2005. See further information at http://euclid.ucc.ie/hamsa2004.htm International Workshop on Geometrical Methods of Nonlinear Analysis and Semiconductor Laser Dynamics (University College Cork, Ireland, 5-5 April 2001). A collection of invited papers has been

  19. Study of the advancing and receding contact angles: liquid sorption as a cause of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C N C; Wu, R; Li, D; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2002-02-25

    Two types of experiments were used to study the behavior of both advancing and receding contact angles, namely the dynamic one-cycle contact angle (DOCA) and the dynamic cycling contact angle (DCCA) experiments. For the preliminary study, DOCA measurements of different liquids on different solids were performed using an automated axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P). From these experimental results, four patterns of receding contact angle were observed: (1) time-dependent receding contact angle; (2) constant receding contact angle; (3) 'stick/slip'; (4) no receding contact angle. For the purpose of illustration, results from four different solid surfaces are shown. These solids are: FC-732-coated surface; poly(methyl methacrylate/n-butyl methacrylate) [P(MMA/nBMA)]; poly(lactic acid) (DL-PLA); and poly(lactic/glycolic acid) 50/50 (DL-PLGA 50/50). Since most of the surfaces in our studies exhibit time dependence in the receding contact angle, a more extended study was conducted using only FC-732-coated surfaces to better understand the possible causes of decreasing receding contact angle and contact angle hysteresis. Contact angle measurements of 21 liquids from two homologous series (i.e. n-alkanes and 1-alcohols) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCMTS) on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. It is apparent that the contact angle hysteresis decreases with the chain length of the liquid. It was found that the receding contact angle equals the advancing angle when the alkane molecules are infinitely large. These results strongly suggest that the chain length and size of the liquid molecule could contribute to contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Furthermore, DCCA measurements of six liquids from the two homologous series on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. With these experimental results, one can construe that the time dependence of contact angle hysteresis on relatively smooth and homogeneous surfaces is mainly caused by liquid retention

  20. Room-temperature switching of magnetic hysteresis by reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal solvent exchange in imidazole-inspired Fe(ii) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Shen, Fuxing; Zhang, Ming; Wu, Dayu; Pan, Feifei; Sato, Osamu

    2016-10-14

    The recent upsurge in molecular magnetism reflects its application in the areas of sensors and molecular switches. Thermal hysteresis is crucial to the molecular bistability and information storage, a wide hysteresis near room temperature is expected to be of practical sense for the molecular compound. In this work, spin crossover iron(ii) complexes [Fe(Liq)2](BF4)2·(CH3CH2)2O (1-Et2O) and [Fe(Liq)2](BF4)2·3H2O (1-3H2O) were prepared and structurally and magnetically analysed. The single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) solvation transformation and the influence on the crystal structures and magnetic hysteresis were investigated in an etherification-hydration cycle. At room temperature, X-ray diffraction experiments indicated a transformation from one crystal (1-Et2O, P21212) to another crystal (1-3H2O, P212121) upon humidity exposure and reversible recovery of its crystallinity upon exposure to ether vapor. The etherified phase 1-Et2O exhibits room temperature spin crossover (T1/2 = 305 K) but negligible thermal hysteresis, however the hydrated phase 1-3H2O exhibits the apparent hysteresis loop (T1/2↑ = 346 K, T1/2↓ = 326 K) which expands to room temperature. This effect is associated with the change of intermolecular cooperativity in the etherification-hydration recyclability.

  1. An Experimental Study on Hysteresis Characteristics of a Pneumatic Braking System for a Multi-Axle Heavy Vehicle in Emergency Braking Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the hysteresis characteristics of a pneumatic braking system for multi-axle heavy vehicles (MHVs. Hysteresis affects emergency braking performance severely. The fact that MHVs have a large size and complex structure leads to more nonlinear coupling property of the pneumatic braking system compared to normal two-axle vehicles. Thus, theoretical analysis and simulation are not enough when studying hysteresis. In this article, the hysteresis of a pneumatic brake system for an eight-axle vehicle in an emergency braking situation is studied based on a novel test bench. A servo drive device is applied to simulate the driver’s braking intensions normally expressed by opening or moving speed of the brake pedal. With a reasonable arrangement of sensors and the NI LabVIEW platform, both the delay time of eight loops and the response time of each subassembly in a single loop are detected in real time. The outcomes of the experiment show that the delay time of each loop gets longer with the increase of pedal opening, and a quadratic relationship exists between them. Based on this, the pressure transient in the system is fitted to a first-order plus time delay model. Besides, the response time of treadle valve and controlling pipeline accounts for more than 80% of the loop’s total delay time, indicating that these two subassemblies are the main contributors to the hysteresis effect.

  2. Hysteresis suppression and synchronization near 3:1 subharmonic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahsi, Abdelhak [University Hassan II-Mohammadia, FSTM, Mohammadia (Morocco); Belhaq, Mohamed [University Hassan II-Casablanca, Laboratory of Mechanics, Casablanca (Morocco)], E-mail: mbelhaq@yahoo.fr

    2009-10-30

    Effect of a high-frequency excitation on hysteresis and synchronization area in a forced van der Pol-Duffing oscillator near the subharmonic 3:1 resonance is analyzed. By means of perturbation techniques, the 3:1 resonance area and the quasiperiodic modulation domain are captured. The results shown that adding a high-frequency excitation causes the backbone curves to shift and to bend from softening to hardening. The results also reveal that a high-frequency excitation significantly affects the resonance and the synchronization zones. Further, jump phenomenon occurring in a certain range of the forcing frequency suggesting that hysteresis near the 3:1 subharmonic resonance cannot be ignored in practical applications.

  3. Voltage hysteresis of lithium ion batteries caused by mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bo; Song, Yicheng; Zhang, Qinglin; Pan, Jie; Cheng, Yang-Tse; Zhang, Junqian

    2016-02-14

    The crucial role of mechanical stress in voltage hysteresis of lithium ion batteries in charge-discharge cycles is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A modified Butler-Volmer equation of electrochemical kinetics is proposed to account for the influence of mechanical stresses on electrochemical reactions in lithium ion battery electrodes. It is found that the compressive stress in the surface layer of active materials impedes lithium intercalation, and therefore, an extra electrical overpotential is needed to overcome the reaction barrier induced by the stress. The theoretical formulation has produced a linear dependence of the height of voltage hysteresis on the hydrostatic stress difference between lithiation and delithiation, under both open-circuit conditions and galvanostatic operation. Predictions of the electrical overpotential from theoretical equations agree well with the experimental data for thin film silicon electrodes.

  4. Hysteresis effects in the cores of particle accelerator magnets

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086181; Schoerling, Daniel

    A study of the hysteresis effects in the cores of particle accelerator magnets has been performed in the framework of the work presented in this thesis. This study has been focused on normal conducting particle accelerator magnets whose cores are manufactured using ferromagnetic materials. The magnetic circuits have been modelled using the developed models: one model for the magnetic circuit and one for the magnetization of the material in the core. The parameters of the magnetic circuit model have been identified with the help of simulations which rely on the finite element method (Opera 3D), while the parameters of the magnetic hysteresis model have been identified through experimental measurements performed using a method developed in the framework of this work. The modelling results have been validated by means of experimental measurements performed on two magnets: one small size magnet which has been specifically designed and manufactured, and one magnet which is currently used in a particle accelerator ...

  5. Analysis of the dynamic hysteresis characteristic of finger seal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI Yanni; CHEN Guoding

    2007-01-01

    The research about hysteresis characteristic of finger seal (FS), which was carried out based on the model with static loads, could not reflect the dynamics behavior of FS system when the rotor runs at high speed. To solve this problem, the relations between the dynamics parameters, structure parameters as well as working parameters in the system were given out through the analysis of finite element analysis result. A mass-spring-damper dynamics model of FS system was proposed and the hysteresis characteristic of the FS system was analyzed. This work shows that the dynamics characteristic analysis of the FS is necessary and the dynamics model proposed in this paper is valid. This dynamics model is the basis for the optimization design of FS system.

  6. Contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with nanowire clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying-Chih; Chiang, Cheng-Kun; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Nanowire arrays with various agglomeration patterns were synthesized by adjusting the solvent evaporation rates. Nanowires with 200 nm diameter and 2-25 microm in length were fabricated from an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous template. Various drying treatments were applied to develop nanostructured surfaces with topological differences. Due to surface tension forces, copper nanowires after thermal and evaporative drying treatments agglomerated into clusters, while supercritical drying technique provided excellent bundled-free and vertically-standing nanowire arrays. Although all dried surfaces exhibited hydrophobic nature, the contact angle hysteresis, or the difference between advancing and receding angles, was found to be larger on those surfaces with bundled nanowire clusters. To explain the difference, the wetted solid fraction on each surface was calculated using the Cassie-Baxter model to show that the hysteresis was contributed by liquid/solid contact area on the textured surfaces.

  7. Linear Stepper Actuation Driving Drop Resonance and Modifying Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katariya, Mayur; Huynh, So Hung; McMorran, Darren; Lau, Chun Yat; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-23

    In this work, 2 μL water drops are placed on substrates that are created to have a circular hydrophilic region bounded by superhydrophobicity so that they exhibit high contact angles. When the substrate is translated by a linear stepper actuator, the random force components present in the actuator are shown to cause the drop to rock resonantly. When the substrate is translated downward at inclination angles of up to 6° with respect to the horizontal, the contact angle hysteresis increases progressively to a limiting condition. When the substrate is moved up at inclined angles, alternatively, the contact angle hysteresis increases initially to the limiting condition before it is progressively restored to its static state. These behaviors are accounted for by the reversible micro-Cassie to Wenzel wetting state transformations that are made possible by the hierarchical microscale and nanoscale structures present in the superhydrophobic regions.

  8. Contact angle hysteresis generated by strong dilute defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Quéré, David

    2009-03-26

    Water on solid decorated with hydrophobic defects (such as micropillars) often stays at the top of the defects in a so-called fakir state, which explains the superhydrophobicity observed in such case, provided that the density of defects is small enough. Here we show that this situation provides an ideal frame for studying the contact angle hysteresis; the phase below the liquid is "perfect" and slippery (it is air), contrasting with pillars' tops whose edges form strong pining sites for the contact line. This model system thus allows us to study the hysteresis as a function of the density of defects and to compare it to the classical theory by Joanny and de Gennes, which is based on very similar hypothesis.

  9. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process.

  10. Signatures of thermal hysteresis in Tamm-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiadini, Francesco; Fiumara, Vincenzo; Mackay, Tom G.; Scaglione, Antonio; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2017-10-01

    We numerically solved the boundary-value problem for Tamm waves (which may also be classified as Uller-Zenneck waves here) guided by the planar interface of a homogeneous isotropic dissipative dielectric (HIDD) material and a periodically multilayered isotropic dielectric material. The HIDD material was chosen to be VO${}_2$ which, at optical wavelengths, has a temperature-dependent refractive index with a hysteresis feature, i.e., the temperature-dependence of its refractive index varies depending upon whether the temperature is increasing or decreasing. A numerical code was implemented to extract solutions of the dispersion equation at a fixed wavelength for both $p$- and $s$-polarization states over the temperature range [50,80] degrees. A multitude of Tamm waves of both linear polarization states were found, demonstrating a clear demarcation of the heating and cooling phases in terms of wavenumbers and propagation distances. Thereby, the signatures of thermal hysteresis in Tamm-wave propagation were revealed.

  11. New approach to the calculation of pistachio powder hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolipour, Hamid; Mokhtarian, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Moisture sorption isotherms for pistachio powder were determined by gravimetric method at temperatures of 15, 25, 35 and 40°C. A selected mathematical models were tested to determine the best suitable model to predict isotherm curve. The results show that Caurie model had the most satisfactory goodness of fit. Also, another purpose of this research was to introduce a new methodology to determine the amount of hysteresis at different temperatures by using best predictive model of isotherm curve based on definite integration method. The results demonstrated that maximum hysteresis is related to the multi-layer water (in the range of water activity 0.2-0.6) which corresponds to the capillary condensation region and this phenomenon decreases with increasing temperature.

  12. Transient Analysis of Hysteresis Queueing Model Using Matrix Geometric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajiha Shah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Various analytical methods have been proposed for the transient analysis of a queueing system in the scalar domain. In this paper, a vector domain based transient analysis is proposed for the hysteresis queueing system with internal thresholds for the efficient and numerically stable analysis. In this system arrival rate of customer is controlled through the internal thresholds and the system is analyzed as a quasi-birth and death process through matrix geometric method with the combination of vector form Runge-Kutta numerical procedure which utilizes the special matrices. An arrival and service process of the system follows a Markovian distribution. We analyze the mean number of customers in the system when the system is in transient state against varying time for a Markovian distribution. The results show that the effect of oscillation/hysteresis depends on the difference between the two internal threshold values.

  13. Charge metastability and hysteresis in the quantum Hall regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollanen, J.; Eisenstein, J. P.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2016-12-01

    We report simultaneous quasi-dc magnetotransport and high-frequency surface acoustic wave measurements on bilayer two-dimensional electron systems in GaAs. Near strong integer quantized Hall states, a strong magnetic-field-sweep hysteresis in the velocity of the acoustic waves is observed at low temperatures. This hysteresis indicates the presence of a metastable state with anomalously high conductivity in the interior of the sample. This nonequilibrium state is not revealed by conventional low-frequency transport measurements which are dominated by dissipationless transport at the edge of the two-dimensional system. We find that a field-cooling technique allows the equilibrium charge configuration within the interior of the sample to be established. A simple model for this behavior is discussed.

  14. Design Of A 65 Nm Cmos Comparator With Hysteresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vasjanov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The comparator can be described as one of the basic building blocks in electronics. It is implemented both as a discrete device and as a constituent of a complex circuit. In both cases, the circuits usually operate in conditions, where useful and unwanted (noise signals are present at the same time. In order to maintain the validity of output data, a hysteresis parameter is introduced to the comparator’s circuit. This article presents the results of a CMOS comparator with hysteresis design – the schematic, topology and simulation results are analyzed. The designed comparator is implemented in a zero voltage offset compensation circuit ADC in a multi-standard transceiver IC.

  15. Adaptive control of system with hysteresis using neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chuntao; Tan Yonghong

    2006-01-01

    An adaptive control scheme is developed for a class of single-input nonlinear systems preceded by unknown hysteresis, which is a non-differentiable and multi-value mapping nonlinearity. The controller based on the three-layer neural network (NN), whose weights are derived from Lyapunov stability analysis, guarantees closed-loop semiglobal stability and convergence of the tracking errors to a small residual set. An example is used to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  16. A Hydrodynamic Model of Dynamic Contact Angle Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    contact angle hysteresis is developed in terms of the interaction of capillary, viscous, and...used to obtain the equations which describe the contact angle region and thereby to define the dynamic contact angle . The analysis is limited to...velocity dependence of the receding contact angle and of the thickness of the deposited film of the receding interface of a wetting liquid are determined as functions of the capillary, viscous, and disjoining forces.

  17. Origins and mechanisms of hysteresis in organometal halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Guerrero, Antonio; Zhong, Yu; Huettner, Sven

    2017-05-01

    Inorganic-organic halide organometal perovskites, such as CH3NH3PbI3 and CsPbI3, etc, have been an unprecedented rising star in the field of photovoltaics since 2009, owing to their exceptionally high power conversion efficiency and simple fabrication processability. Despite its relatively short history of development, intensive investigations have been concentrating on this material; these have ranged from crystal structure analysis and photophysical characterization to performance optimization and device integration, etc. Yet, when applied in photovoltaic devices, this material suffers from hysteresis, that is, the difference of the current-voltage (I-V) curve during sweeping in two directions (from short-circuit towards open-circuit and vice versa). This behavior may significantly impede its large-scale commercial application. This Review will focus on the recent theoretical and experimental efforts to reveal the origin and mechanism of hysteresis. The proposed origins include (1) ferroelectric polarization, (2) charge trapping/detrapping, and (3) ion migration. Among them, recent evidence consistently supports the idea that ion migration plays a key role for the hysteretic behavior in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Hence, this Review will summarize the recent results on ion migration such as the migrating ion species, activation energy measurement, capacitive characterization, and internal electrical field modulation, etc. In addition, this Review will also present the devices with alleviation/elimination of hysteresis by incorporating either large-size grains or phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester molecules. In a different application, the hysteretic property has been utilized in photovoltaic and memristive switching devices. In sum, by examining these three possible mechanisms, it is concluded that the origin of hysteresis in PSCs is associated with a combination of effects, but mainly limited by ion/defect migration. This strong interaction between ion

  18. Quantum Mechanical Hysteresis and the Electron Transfer Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Etchegoin, P G

    2004-01-01

    We study a simple quantum mechanical symmetric donor-acceptor model for electron transfer (ET) with coupling to internal deformations. The model contains several basic properties found in biological ET in enzymes and photosynthetic centers; it produces tunnelling with hysteresis thus providing a simple explanation for the slowness of the reversed rate and the near 100% efficiency of ET in many biological systems. The model also provides a conceptual framework for the development of molecular electronics memory elements based on electrostatic architectures.

  19. Hysteresis in the Linearized Landau-Lifshitz Equation

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Amenda; Morris, Kirsten A.

    2015-01-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz equation describes the behaviour of magnetization inside a ferromagnetic object. It is known that the Landau-Lifshitz equation has an infinite number of stable equilibrium points. The existence of multiple stable equilibria is closely related to hysteresis. This is a phenomenon that is often characterized by a looping behaviour; however, the existence of a loop is not sufficient to identify hysteretic systems, but is defined more precisely as the presence of looping as the...

  20. A new vector Preisach-type model of hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adly, A.A.; Mayergoyz, I.D. (EE Department and Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States))

    1993-05-15

    New isotropic vector Preisach-type models of hysteresis are introduced. These new models contain additional unknown functions. This presents the opportunity to incorporate more experimental data in the identification process than in the case of previously suggested vector Preisach models, thus leading to more accurate models. The solution of the identification problem is discussed and some results of experimental testing of these models are reported.

  1. Origins and Mechanisms of Hysteresis in Organometal Halide Perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Guerrero, Antonio; Zhong, Yu; Huettner, Sven

    2017-02-23

    Inorganic-organic organometal halide perovskites, such as CH3NH3PbI3 or CsPbI3, etc., are an unprecedented rising star in the field of photovoltaics since 2009, owing to its exceptionally high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and simple fabrication processability. Despite its relatively short history of development, intensive investigations have been concentrating on this material, ranging from crystal structure analysis and photophysical characterization, to performance optimization and device integration, etc. Yet, applied in photovoltaic devices, this material is suffering from hysteresis, that is, the difference of the current-voltage (I-V) curve during sweeping in two directions (from short-circuit towards open-circuit and vice versa). This behavior may significantly impede the large-scale commercial application. This Review will focus on the recent theoretical and experimental efforts to reveal the origin and mechanism of hysteresis. The proposed origins include (1) ferroelectric polarization, (2) charge trapping/detrapping and (3) ion migration. Among them, recent evidences consistently support that ion migration plays a key role for the hysteretic behavior in perovskite solar cells (PSC). Hence, this Review will summarize the recent results on ion migration, such as the migrating ion species, activation energy measurement, capacitive characterization and internal electrical field modulation, etc. In addition, this Review will also present the devices with alleviation/elimination of hysteresis by incorporating either large size grains or phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) molecules. In a different application, the hysteretic property has been utilized in photovoltaic and memristive switching devices. In sum, by examining above three possible mechanisms, it is concluded that the origin of hysteresis of PSCs is associated with a combination of effects, both ion/defect migration and charge trapping/detrapping. This strong interaction between ion

  2. Degradation and capacitance: voltage hysteresis in CdTe devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, D. S.; Dhere, R. G.; Glynn, S. C.; del Cueto, J. A.; Metzger, W. K.

    2009-08-01

    CdS/CdTe photovoltaic solar cells were made on two different transparent conducting oxide (TCO) structures in order to identify differences in fabrication, performance, and reliability. In one set of cells, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to deposit a bi-layer TCO on Corning 7059 borosilicate glass consisting of a F-doped, conductive tin-oxide (cSnO2) layer capped by an insulating (undoped), buffer (iSnO2) layer. In the other set, a more advanced bi-layer structure consisting of sputtered cadmium stannate (Cd2SnO4; CTO) as the conducting layer and zinc stannate (Zn2SnO4; ZTO) as the buffer layer was used. CTO/ZTO substrates yielded higher performance devices however performance uniformity was worse due to possible strain effects associated with TCO layer fabrication. Cells using the SnO2-based structure were only slightly lower in performance, but exhibited considerably greater performance uniformity. When subjected to accelerated lifetime testing (ALT) at 85 - 100 °C under 1-sun illumination and open-circuit bias, more degradation was observed in CdTe cells deposited on the CTO/ZTO substrates. Considerable C-V hysteresis, defined as the depletion width difference between reverse and forward direction scans, was observed in all Cu-doped CdTe cells. These same effects can also be observed in thin-film modules. Hysteresis was observed to increase with increasing stress and degradation. The mechanism for hysteresis is discussed in terms of both an ionic-drift model and one involving majority carrier emission in the space-charge region (SCR). The increased generation of hysteresis observed in CdTe cells deposited on CTO/ZTO substrates suggests potential decomposition of these latter oxides when subjected to stress testing.

  3. First Results from Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE): Differential Flux Measurements of Energetic Particles in a Highly Inclined Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Palo, S. E.; Kohnert, R.; Gerhardt, D.; Blum, L. W.; Schiller, Q.; Turner, D. L.; Tu, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the National Science Foundation, scheduled for launch into a low-Earth, polar orbit after August 14th, 2012 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. The science objectives of CSSWE are to investigate the relationship of the location, magnitude, and frequency of solar flares to the timing, duration, and energy spectrum of solar energetic particles (SEP) reaching Earth, and to determine the precipitation loss and the evolution of the energy spectrum of radiation belt electrons. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a miniaturization of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). The REPT instrument will fly onboard the NASA/Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft scheduled to launch after August 23rd, 2012 that will go through the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination orbit. CSSWE's REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 10 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3 MeV. Such differential flux measurements have significant science value, and a number of engineering challenges were overcome to enable these clean measurements to be made under the mass and power limits of a CubeSat. The CSSWE is an ideal class project, providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project. We will report the first results from this exciting mission.

  4. Hysteresis response of daytime net ecosystem exchange during drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pingintha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE using the eddy-covariance method were made over an agricultural ecosystem in the southeastern US. During optimum environmental conditions, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR was the primary driver controlling daytime NEE, accounting for as much as 67 to 89% of the variation in NEE. However, soil water content became the dominant factor limiting the NEE-PAR response during the peak growth stage. NEE was significantly depressed when high PAR values coincided with very low soil water content. The presence of a counter-clockwise hysteresis of daytime NEE with PAR was observed during periods of water stress. This is a result of the stomatal closure control of photosynthesis at high vapor pressure deficit and enhanced respiration at high temperature. This result is significant since this hysteresis effect limits the range of applicability of the Michaelis-Menten equation and other related expressions in the determination of daytime NEE as a function of PAR. The systematic presence of hysteresis in the response of NEE to PAR suggests that the gap-filling technique based on a non-linear regression approach should take into account the presence of water-limited field conditions. Including this step is therefore likely to improve current evaluation of ecosystem response to increased precipitation variability arising from climatic changes.

  5. Hysteresis of the resonance frequency of magnetostrictive bending cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Michael; Kremer, Ramona; Sutor, Alexander; Lerch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    Magnetostrictive bending cantilevers are applicable for wirelessly measuring physical quantities such as pressure and strain. Exploiting the ΔE-effect, the resonance frequency of the cantilevers is shifted because of a change in the magnetic biasing field. The biasing field, in turn, depends on the applied pressure or strain, respectively. With a view to the application as a reliable sensor, maximum sensitivity but minimum hysteresis in the biasing field/resonance frequency dependence is preferred. In this contribution, monomorph bending cantilevers fabricated using magnetostrictive Fe49Co49V2 and Metglas 2605SA1 are investigated regarding their applicability for future sensors. For this purpose, the biasing field-dependent polarization of the magnetostrictive materials and bending of the cantilevers are determined. Furthermore, a setup to magnetically bias the cantilevers and determine the bending resonance frequency is presented. Here, the resonance frequency is identified by measuring the impulse response employing a laser Doppler vibrometer. The measurement results reveal that cantilevers made of Fe49Co49V2 possess a distinct hysteretic behaviour at low magnetic biasing field magnitudes. This is ascribed to the polarization and bending hysteresis. Cantilevers fabricated using Metglas 2605SA1 feature a lower resonance frequency shift compared to cantilevers with Fe49Co49V2, which would result in a lower sensitivity of the sensor. However, their resonance frequency hysteresis is almost negligible.

  6. Hysteresis in rf-driven large-area josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, O. H.; Samuelsen, Mogens Rugholm

    1986-01-01

    We have studied the effect of an applied rf signal on the radiation emitted from a large-area Josephson junction by means of a model based on the sine-Gordon equation. The rms value of the voltage of the emitted signal has been calculated and a hysteresis loop found. An analysis shows that the hy......We have studied the effect of an applied rf signal on the radiation emitted from a large-area Josephson junction by means of a model based on the sine-Gordon equation. The rms value of the voltage of the emitted signal has been calculated and a hysteresis loop found. An analysis shows...... that the hysteresis is due to the nonlinearity in the system, i.e., the dynamics of the lower branch can be described by a solution to the linearized system while the upper branch is described by a breather mode. These solutions are frequency locked to the driving signal. Various characteristics of the loop...

  7. Hysteresis and Wavenumber Vacillation in Unstable Baroclinic Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shih-Hung; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Hysteresis and wavenumber vacillation are studied numerically in a weakly stratified quasigeostrophic model. In general, the amplitude of the most unstable wave increases, as the flow becomes more unstable. When the wave becomes saturated, the next longer wave will grow at the expanse of the most unstable wave and becomes the dominant wave. However, once the longwave state is established, it may remain in that regime even as the instability is decreased beyond the threshold where it first developed, thus constituting a hysteresis loop. In a highly unstable case, the flow may not show a preference for any single wave. Instead, the dominant wave aperiodically varies among several long waves. This phenomenon is known as wavenumber vacillation. Hysteresis is further examined in terms of eddy heat flux. It is shown that total eddy heat flux increases as the flow becomes more unstable, but displays a sharp drop when transition to a longer wave occurs. However, in a longwave state, the heat flux always decreases with decreasing instability even pass the threshold when wave transition first occurs.

  8. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1 -2 μ m and length 100 -200 μ m is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  9. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1-2μm and length 100-200μm is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  10. Oscillating hysteresis in the q-neighbor Ising model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jȩdrzejewski, Arkadiusz; Chmiel, Anna; Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    We modify the kinetic Ising model with Metropolis dynamics, allowing each spin to interact only with q spins randomly chosen from the whole system, which corresponds to the topology of a complete graph. We show that the model with q≥3 exhibits a phase transition between ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases at temperature T*, which linearly increases with q. Moreover, we show that for q=3 the phase transition is continuous and that it is discontinuous for larger values of q. For q>3, the hysteresis exhibits oscillatory behavior-expanding for even values of q and shrinking for odd values of q. Due to the mean-field-like nature of the model, we are able to derive the analytical form of transition probabilities and, therefore, calculate not only the probability density function of the order parameter but also precisely determine the hysteresis and the effective potential showing stable, unstable, and metastable steady states. Our results show that a seemingly small modification of the kinetic Ising model leads not only to the switch from a continuous to a discontinuous phase transition, but also to an unexpected oscillating behavior of the hysteresis and a puzzling phenomenon for q=5, which might be taken as evidence for the so-called mixed-order phase transition.

  11. Unraveling viscosity effects on the hysteresis losses of magnetic nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, D; Lak, A; Yoshida, T; Materia, M E; Ortega, D; Ludwig, F; Guardia, P; Sathya, A; Pellegrino, T; Teran, F J

    2017-04-20

    Hysteresis losses in magnetic nanoparticles constitute the basis of magnetic hyperthermia for delivering a local thermal stress. Nevertheless, this therapeutic modality is only to be realised through a careful appraisal of the best possible intrinsic and extrinsic conditions to the nanoparticles for which they maximise and preserve their heating capabilities. Low frequency (100 kHz) hysteresis loops accurately probe the dynamical magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticles in a more reliable manner than calorimetry measurements, providing conclusive quantitative data under different experimental conditions. We consider here a set of iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanocubes of different sizes, through which we experimentally and theoretically study the influence of the viscosity of the medium on the low frequency hysteresis loops of magnetic colloids, and hence their ability to produce and dissipate heat to the surroundings. We analyse the role of nanoparticle size, size distribution, chemical composition, and field intensity in making the magnetisation dynamics sensitive to viscosity. Numerical simulations using the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation model the experimental observations in excellent agreement. These results represent an important contribution towards predicting viscosity effects and hence to maximise heat dissipation from magnetic nanoparticles regardless of the environment.

  12. Does adsorption in a single nanogroove exhibit hysteresis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2012-12-01

    A simple fluid, in a microscopic capillary capped at one end, is studied by means of fundamental measure density functional. The model represents a single, infinitely long nanogroove with long-range wall-fluid attractive (dispersion) forces. It is shown that the presence or absence of hysteresis in adsorption isotherms is determined by wetting properties of the wall as follows: Above wetting temperature, Tw, appropriate to a single wall of the groove, the adsorption is a continuous process corresponding to a rise of a meniscus from the capped to the open end of the groove. For a sufficiently deep capillary, the meniscus rise is shown to be a steep, yet continuous process taking place near the capillary condensation of a corresponding slit. However, for temperatures lower than Tw the condensation exhibits a first-order transition accompanied by hysteresis of the adsorption isotherm. Finally, it is shown that hysteresis may occur even for T > Tw as a consequence of prewetting on the side and bottom walls of the groove.

  13. Tuning size and thermal hysteresis in bistable spin crossover nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán-Mascarós, José Ramón; Coronado, Eugenio; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Monrabal-Capilla, María; Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Ceolin, Marcelo

    2010-06-21

    Nanoparticles of iron(II) triazole salts have been prepared from water-organic microemulsions. The mean size of the nanoparticles can be tuned down to 6 nm in diameter, with a narrow size distribution. A sharp spin transition from the low spin (LS) to the high spin (HS) state is observed above room temperature, with a 30-40-K-wide thermal hysteresis. The same preparation can yield second generation nanoparticles containing molecular alloys by mixing triazole with triazole derivatives, or from metallic mixtures of iron(II) and zinc(II). In these nanoparticles of 10-15 nm, the spin transition "moves" towards lower temperatures, reaching a 316 K limit for the cooling down transition and maintaining a thermal hysteresis over 15-20-K-wide. The nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering, TEM, and AFM, after deposition on gold or silicon surfaces. The spin transition was characterized by magnetic susceptibility measurements and EXAFS (in solid samples after solvent removal) and also by the color change between the LS (violet) and HS (colorless) states in an organic solvent suspension. The discovery of bistable magnetic nanoparticles of 6 nm with a wide thermal hysteresis above room temperature showcases the actual possibilities of spin crossover materials for nanotechnological applications.

  14. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  15. Asymmetric and speed-dependent contact angle hysteresis and relaxation of a suddenly stopped moving contact line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongshi; Wang, Yong Jian; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Tong, Penger

    We report direct atomic-force-microscope measurements of capillary force hysteresis and relaxation of a circular moving contact line (CL) formed on a long micron-sized hydrophobic fiber intersecting a water-air interface. The measured capillary force hysteresis and CL relaxation show a strong asymmetric speed dependence in the advancing and receding directions. A unified model based on force-assisted barrier-crossing is utilized to find the underlying energy barrier Eb and size λ associated with the defects on the fiber surface. The experiment demonstrates that the pinning (relaxation) and depinning dynamics of the CL can be described by a common microscopic frame-work, and the advancing and receding CLs are influenced by two different sets of relatively wetting and non-wetting defects on the fiber surface. Work supported in part by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  16. ISS COLUMBUS laboratory experiment `GeoFlow I and II' -fluid physics research in microgravity environment to study convection phenomena inside deep Earth and mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futterer, Birgit; Egbers, Christoph; Chossat, Pascal; Hollerbach, Rainer; Breuer, Doris; Feudel, Fred; Mutabazi, Innocent; Tuckerman, Laurette

    Overall driving mechanism of flow in inner Earth is convection in its gravitational buoyancy field. A lot of effort has been involved in theoretical prediction and numerical simulation of both the geodynamo, which is maintained by convection, and mantle convection, which is the main cause for plate tectonics. Especially resolution of convective patterns and heat transfer mechanisms has been in focus to reach the real, highly turbulent conditions inside Earth. To study specific phenomena experimentally different approaches has been observed, against the background of magneto-hydrodynamic but also on the pure hydrodynamic physics of fluids. With the experiment `GeoFlow' (Geophysical Flow Simulation) instability and transition of convection in spherical shells under the influence of central-symmetry buoyancy force field are traced for a wide range of rotation regimes within the limits between non-rotating and rapid rotating spheres. The special set-up of high voltage potential between inner and outer sphere and use of a dielectric fluid as working fluid induce an electro-hydrodynamic force, which is comparable to gravitational buoyancy force inside Earth. To reduce overall gravity in a laboratory this technique requires microgravity conditions. The `GeoFlow I' experiment was accomplished on International Space Station's module COLUM-BUS inside Fluid Science Laboratory FSL und supported by EADS Astrium, Friedrichshafen, User Support und Operations Centre E-USOC in Madrid, Microgravity Advanced Research and Support Centre MARS in Naples, as well as COLUMBUS Control Center COL-CC Munich. Running from August 2008 until January 2009 it delivered 100.000 images from FSL's optical diagnostics module; here more precisely the Wollaston shearing interferometry was used. Here we present the experimental alignment with numerical prediction for the non-rotating and rapid rotation case. The non-rotating case is characterized by a co-existence of several stationary supercritical

  17. NOISE AND HYSTERESIS IN CHARGED STRIPE, CHECKERBOARD, AND CLUMP FORMING SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reichhardt, Cynthia J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bishop, Alan R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2007-05-07

    We numerically examine noise fluctuations and hysteresis phenomena in charged systems that form stripe, labyrinth or clump patterns. It is believed that charge inhomogeneities of this type arise in two-dimensional (2D) quantum hall systems and in electron crystal structures in high temperature superconductors, while related patterns appear in manganites and type-I superconductors. Recent noise and transport experiments in twodimensional electron gases and high temperature superconducting samples revealed both 1/ fα. noise signatures and hysteretic phenomena. Using numerical simulations we show that 1/ fα. noise fluctuations and hysteresis are generic features that occur in charge systems which undergo a type of phase separation that results in stripes, clumps, checkerboards, or other inhomogeneous patterns. We find that these systems exhibit 1/ fα. fluctuations with 1.2 < α < 1.8, rather than simple 1/ f or 1/ f 2 fluctuations. We also propose that the 2D metal insulator transition may be associated with a clump electron glass phase rather than a Wigner glass phase.

  18. Resisting and pinning of a nanodrop by trenches on a hysteresis-free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-10-01

    The encounter of a nanodrop with a trench on a hysteresis-free surface is explored by many-body dissipative particle dynamics to show the effect of surface roughness on droplet wetting. A free nanodrop exhibits Brownian motion and the diffusivity decays exponentially with the liquid-solid contact area. In contrast, as the nanodrop sits on a trench, its random motion is constrained. Work must be done to overcome the energy barriers for the transition between free and trapped states. The potential energy landscape is thus constructed based on the force-displacement plot. It is shown that the trench acts as a hydrophobic blemish for capture but like a hydrophilic blemish for escape. A drop always breaks up after detachment from a hydrophilic trench. Therefore, the drop tends to bypass a small trench when it meets one. The macroscopic experiments are performed by fabricating liquid-infused surfaces with extremely low contact angle hysteresis. The experimental observations agree qualitatively with simulation outcomes.

  19. Online optimized hysteresis-based steering feel model for steer-by-wire systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kirli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In rubber-wheeled road vehicles, the mechanical connection between steering wheel and front wheels provides steering-related feedback to the driver. The torque fed back to the driver through the steering linkages and steering wheel, which is called steering feel, helps the driver in controlling the vehicle. The torque feedback is reproduced via artificial methods in steer-by-wire systems due to the lack of mechanical connection. In this work, in order to minimize the physical workload and the lateral acceleration under the consideration of handling performance, optimization of a hysteresis-based steering feel has been studied. A 2-degree-of-freedom bicycle model based on the magic formula tire model has been used for simulations and hardware-in-the-loop experiments. A mathematical model is proposed in order to create an adaptive model-based optimization of the hysteresis parameters simultaneously while driving. A hardware-in-the-loop experimental setup has been used for the driving tests. The weave and the double-lane change tests have been performed with different drivers in order to demonstrate and quantify the optimization methods that are presented in this work.

  20. Critical energy barrier for capillary condensation in mesopores: Hysteresis and reversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Tatsumasa; Tanaka, Hideki; Miyahara, Minoru T.

    2016-04-01

    Capillary condensation in the regime of developing hysteresis occurs at a vapor pressure, Pcond, that is less than that of the vapor-like spinodal. This is because the energy barrier for the vapor-liquid transition from a metastable state at Pcond becomes equal to the energy fluctuation of the system; however, a detailed mechanism of the spontaneous transition has not been acquired even through extensive experimental and simulation studies. We therefore construct accurate atomistic silica mesopore models for MCM-41 and perform molecular simulations (gauge cell Monte Carlo and grand canonical Monte Carlo) for argon adsorption on the models at subcritical temperatures. A careful comparison between the simulation and experiment reveals that the energy barrier for the capillary condensation has a critical dimensionless value, Wc* = 0.175, which corresponds to the thermal fluctuation of the system and depends neither on the mesopore size nor on the temperature. We show that the critical energy barrier Wc* controls the capillary condensation pressure Pcond and also determines a boundary between the reversible condensation/evaporation regime and the developing hysteresis regime.

  1. Contact Angle Hysteresis on Graphene Surfaces and Hysteresis-free Behavior on Oil-infused Graphite Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Li, Yueh-Feng; Woon, Wei-Yen; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-11-01

    Contact angle hysteresis (CAH) on graphitic surfaces, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, reduced electrophoretic deposition (EPD) graphene, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and polished graphite sheet, has been investigated. The hysteresis loops of water drops on the first three samples are similar but the receding contact angle is particularly small for the polished graphite sheet.The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and HOPG associated with atom-scale roughness has to be attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis (surface relaxation), instead of roughness or defects.The difference of the wetting behavior among those four graphitic samples has been further demonstrated by hexadecane drops. On the surface of HOPG or CVD graphene,the contact line expands continuously with time, indicating total wetting for which the contact angle does not exist and contact line pinning disappears. In contrast, on the surface of reduced EPD graphene, spontaneous spreading is halted by spikes on it and partial wetting with small contact angle (θ≈4°) is obtained. On the surface of polished graphite sheet, the superlipophilicity and porous structure are demonstrated by imbibition and capillary rise of hexadecane. Consequently, an oil-infused graphite surface can be fabricated and the ultralow CAH of water (∆θ≈2°) is achieved.

  2. Hydrothermal simulation experiments as a tool for studies of the origin of life on Earth and other terrestrial planets: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Nils G; Andersson, Eva

    2005-08-01

    The potential of life's origin in submarine hydrothermal systems has been evaluated by a number of investigators by conducting high temperature-high pressure experiments involving organic compounds. In the majority of these experiments little attention has been paid to the importance of constraining important parameters, such as the pH and the redox state of the system. This is particularly revealed in the apparent difficulties in interpreting experimental data from hydrothermal organic synthesis and stability studies. However, in those cases where common mineral assemblages have been used in an attempt to buffer the pH and redox conditions to geologically and geochemically realistic values, theoretical and experimental data seem to converge. The use of mineral buffer assemblages provides a convenient way by which to constrain the experimental conditions. Studies at high temperatures and pressure in the laboratory have revealed a number of reactions that proceed rapidly in hydrothermal fluids, including the Strecker synthesis of amino acids. In other cases, the verification of postulated abiotic reaction mechanisms has not been possible, at least for large molecules such as large fatty acids and hydrocarbons. This includes the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction. High temperature-high pressure experimental methods have been developed and used successfully for a long time in, for example, mineral solubility studies under hydrothermal conditions. By taking advantage of this experimental experience new and, at times, unexpected directions can be taken in bioorganic geochemistry, one being, for instance, primitive two-dimensional information coding. This article critically reviews some of the organic synthesis and stability experiments that have been conducted under simulated submarine hydrothermal conditions. We also discuss some of the theoretical and practical considerations that apply to hydrothermal laboratory studies of organic molecules related to the origin of

  3. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  4. "UV-olution, a photochemistry experiment in Low Earth Orbit": investigation of the photostability of carboxylic acids exposed to Mars surface UV radiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Noblet, Audrey; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Macari, Frederique; Raulin, Francois; Chaput, Didier; Cottin, Hervé

    The detection and identification of organics at Mars are necessary to establish the existence of a possible ancient prebiotic chemistry or even a biological activity. Excepted methane, no organic matter was detected. The harsh environmental conditions on the surface could explain this non detection but only rare studies tested this hypothesis. To investigate the nature, abundance, and stability of organics that could survive under such conditions, we exposed in low Earth orbit organic molecules with martian astrobiological relevance to solar UV radiation ¿ 200 nm during 12 days, during the UVolution experiment, onboard the BIOPAN ESA module which was set outside a Russian Foton capsule. We also studied the photostability of these molecules in laboratory. Indeed we developed a laboratory experiment, MOMIE (Martian Organic Material Irradiation and Evolution) in order to investigate the behaviour of material related to Mars under UV radiation. The targeted molecules (AIB, mellitic, phthalic and trimesic acids) have been exposed with and without an analogous martian soil. Here, we present results with regard to the impact of solar UV radiation on the targeted molecules. Our results show that no sample seems to resist to UVs if directly exposed to them. Moreover, the presence of a mineral matrix seems to increases the photodestruction rate. These molecules should then not be considered as primary targets for in situ molecular analyses during future surface missions if samples are only collected at the top of the surface.

  5. `Teaching What I Learned': Exploring students' Earth and Space Science learning experiences in secondary school with a particular focus on their comprehension of the concept of `geologic time'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sae Yeol; Peate, David W.

    2015-06-01

    According to the national survey of science education, science educators in the USA currently face many challenges such as lack of qualified secondary Earth and Space Science (ESS) teachers. Less qualified teachers may have difficulty teaching ESS because of a lack of conceptual understanding, which leads to diminished confidence in content knowledge. More importantly, teachers' limited conceptual understanding of the core ideas automatically leads to a lack of pedagogical content knowledge. This mixed methods study aims to explore the ways in which current secondary schooling, especially the small numbers of highly qualified ESS teachers in the USA, might influence students' learning of the discipline. To gain a better understanding of the current conditions of ESS education in secondary schools, in the first phase, we qualitatively examined a sample middle and high school ESS textbook to explore how the big ideas of ESS, particularly geological time, are represented. In the second phase, we quantitatively analyzed the participating college students' conceptual understanding of geological time by comparing those who had said they had had secondary school ESS learning experience with those who did not. Additionally, college students' perceptions on learning and teaching ESS are discussed. Findings from both the qualitative and quantitative phases indicate participating students' ESS learning experience in their secondary schools seemed to have limited or little influence on their conceptual understandings of the discipline. We believe that these results reflect the current ESS education status, connected with the declining numbers of highly qualified ESS teachers in secondary schools.

  6. Return of target material ions leads to a reduced hysteresis in reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadlec, Stanislav; Čapek, Jiří

    2017-05-01

    A tendency to disappearing hysteresis in reactive High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS) has been reported previously without full physical explanation. An analytical model of reactive pulsed sputtering including HiPIMS is presented. The model combines a Berg-type model of reactive sputtering with the global HiPIMS model of Christie-Vlček. Both time and area averaging is used to describe the macroscopic steady state, especially the reactive gas balance in the reactor. The most important effect in the presented model is covering of reacted parts of target by the returning ionized metal, effectively lowering the target coverage by reaction product at a given partial pressure. The return probability of ionized sputtered metal has been selected as a parameter to quantify the degree of HiPIMS effects. The model explains the reasons for reduced hysteresis in HiPIMS. The critical pumping speed was up to a factor of 7 lower in reactive HiPIMS compared to the mid-frequency magnetron sputtering. The model predicts reduced hysteresis in HiPIMS due to less negative slope of metal flux to substrates and of reactive gas sorption as functions of reactive gas partial pressure. Higher deposition rate of reactive HiPIMS compared to standard reactive sputtering is predicted for some parameter combinations. Comparison of the model with experiment exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement for three material combinations, namely, Ti-O2, Al-O2, and Ti-N2.

  7. The Burst and Transient Source Experiment(BATSE)Earth Occultation Catalog of Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Sources. Short title: BATSE Earth Occultation Catalog v2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Connaughton, V.; Henze, W.; Paciesas, W. S.; Finger, M. H.; McCollough, M. L.; Sahi, M.; Peterson, B.

    2003-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), provided a record of the low-energy gamma-ray sky (approx. 20-1000 keV) between 1991 April and 2000 May (9.1y). BATSE monitored the high energy sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT) for point sources whose emission extended for times on the order of the CGRO orbital period (approx. 92m) or greater. Using the EOT to extract flux - 2 - information, a catalog of sources using data from the BATSE large area detectors has been prepared. The first part of the catalog consists of results from the all-sky monitoring of 58 sources, mostly Galactic, with intrinsic variability on timescales of hours to years. For these sources, we have included tables of flux and spectral data, and outburst times for transients. Light curves (or flux histories) covering the entire nine mission are being placed on the world wide web. We then performed a deep-sampling of these 58 objects, plus a selection of 121 more objects, combining data from the entire 9.ly BATSE dataset. Source types considered were primarily accreting binaries, but a small number of representative active galaxies, X-ray-emitting stars, and supernova remnants were also included. The sample represents a compilation of sources monitored and/or discovered with BATSE and other high energy instruments between 1991 and 2000, known sources taken from the HEAO 1 A-4 (Levine et al. 1984) and Macomb and Gehrels (1999) catalogs. The deep sample results include definite detections of 82 objects and possible detections of 36 additional objects. The definite detections spanned three classes of sources: accreting black hole and neutron star binaries, active galaxies and supernova remnants. The average fluxes measured for the fourth class, the X-ray emitting stars, were below the confidence limit for definite detection. Flux data for the deep sample are presented in four energy bands: 20-40, 40-70, 70-160, and 160-430 keV. The

  8. Application of Design of Experiments and Surrogate Modeling within the NASA Advanced Concepts Office, Earth-to-Orbit Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwack, Mathew R.; Dees, Patrick D.; Holt, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Decisions made during early conceptual design have a large impact upon the expected life-cycle cost (LCC) of a new program. It is widely accepted that up to 80% of such cost is committed during these early design phases. Therefore, to help minimize LCC, decisions made during conceptual design must be based upon as much information as possible. To aid in the decision making for new launch vehicle programs, the Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides rapid turnaround pre-phase A and phase A concept definition studies. The ACO team utilizes a proven set of tools to provide customers with a full vehicle mass breakdown to tertiary subsystems, preliminary structural sizing based upon worst-case flight loads, and trajectory optimization to quantify integrated vehicle performance for a given mission. Although the team provides rapid turnaround for single vehicle concepts, the scope of the trade space can be limited due to analyst availability and the manpower requirements for manual execution of the analysis tools. In order to enable exploration of a broader design space, the ACO team has implemented an advanced design methods (ADM) based approach. This approach applies the concepts of design of experiments (DOE) and surrogate modeling to more exhaustively explore the trade space and provide the customer with additional design information to inform decision making. This paper will first discuss the automation of the ACO tool set, which represents a majority of the development effort. In order to fit a surrogate model within tolerable error bounds a number of DOE cases are needed. This number will scale with the number of variable parameters desired and the complexity of the system's response to those variables. For all but the smallest design spaces, the number of cases required cannot be produced within an acceptable timeframe using a manual process. Therefore, automation of the tools was a key enabler for the successful

  9. Effect of hydraulic hysteresis on the stability of infinite slopes under steady infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Mirus, Benjamin B.; Lu, Ning; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic hysteresis, including capillary soil water retention (SWR), air entrapment SWR, and hydraulic conductivity, is a common phenomenon in unsaturated soils. However, the influence of hydraulic hysteresis on suction stress, and subsequently slope stability, is generally ignored. This paper examines the influence of each of these three types of hysteresis on slope stability using an infinite slope stability analysis under steady infiltration conditions. First, hypothetical slopes for representative silty and sandy soils are examined. Then a monitored hillslope in the San Francisco Bay Area, California is assessed, using observed rainfall conditions and measured hydraulic and geotechnical properties of the colluvial soil. Results show that profiles of suction stress and the corresponding factor of safety are generally strongly affected by hydraulic hysteresis. Results suggest that each of the three types of hydraulic hysteresis may play a major role in the occurrence of slope failure, indicating that ignoring hydraulic hysteresis will likely lead to underestimates of failure potential and hence to inaccurate slope stability analysis.

  10. Research on the Hysteresis Effect on Positioning the System with Flexible Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Čereška

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the hysteresis phenomenon of positioning systems with flexible elements for transmitting motion of which piezoelectric actuators are used. The article investigates the influence of hysteresis on the accuracy of positioning systems. A special test bench for conducting research and stand-up methodology for carrying out experimental researches have been used. The test bench includes a computer piezo controller, an inductive displacement sensor and a dynamic data collector used for gathering data and transmitting it to the software package. Mathematical modelling of hysteresis using Matlab/Simulink software package has been done. The performed research has shown that the hysteresis model of maximum dispersion error compared to experimental results makes less than 5%. Thus, it can be stated that the selected method for hysteresis modelling is suitable for precision positioning systems having deformable elements and controlled employing piezoelectric actuators to model hysteresis.

  11. Application of Fractal Theory in Simulation of Ferromagnetic Elements' Hysteresis Loop in Transformer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕军; 付梦印; 张宇河

    2003-01-01

    The simulation of the transformer transient is one of the indispensable qualifications for improving the performance of transformer protection, the key technique of the transformer's transient simulation is the treatment of ferromagnetic elements' loop. Thus the shapes of the primary hysteresis loop and each internal secondary hysteresis loop in the identical magnetism conducting are analyzed, and then it is proposed that there are some fractal characteristics in the relation between them. The fractal phenomenon of the ferromagnetic elements' hysteresis loop in the transformer's transient simulation is first brought forward, the mutuality between the ferromagnetic elements' primary hysteresis loop and its secondary hysteresis loops is revealed in mechanism by using the fractal theory. According to the iterated function system of fractal theory, the secondary hysteresis loops can be generated by the iterative calculation of the primary loop. The simulation results show the validity of this idea.

  12. Analysis of the Hysteresis Behavior of Perovskite Solar Cells with Interfacial Fullerene Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles-Pelarda, Marta; Hames, Bruno Clasen; García-Benito, Inés; Almora, Osbel; Molina-Ontoria, Agustin; Sánchez, Rafael S; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Martín, Nazario; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-11-17

    The use of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of fullerene derivatives reduces the hysteresis of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We have investigated three different fullerene derivatives observing a decrease on hysteresis for all the cases. Several processes can contribute to the hysteresis behavior on PSCs. We have determined that the reduced hysteresis observed for devices with SAMs is produced by a decrease of the capacitive hysteresis. In addition, with an appropriated functionalization, SAMs can increase photocurrent even when no electron selective contact (ESC) is present and a SAM is deposited just on top of the transparent conductive oxide. Appropriated functionalization of the fullerene derivative, as introducing -CN groups, can enhance cell performance and reduce hysteresis. This work paves the way for a future enhancement of PSCs by a tailored design of the fullerene molecules that could actuate as an ESC by themselves.

  13. Adaptive Hysteresis Band Current Control for Transformerless Single-Phase PV Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vázquez, Gerardo; Rodriguez, Pedro; Ordoñez, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Current control based on hysteresis algorithms are widely used in different applications, such as motion control, active filtering or active/reactive power delivery control in distributed generation systems. The hysteresis current control provides to the system a fast and robust dynamic response......, and requires a simple implementation in standard digital signal platforms. On the other hand, the main drawback of classical hysteresis current control lies in the fact that the switching frequency is variable, as the hysteresis band is fixed. In this paper a variable band hysteresis control algorithm...... will be presented. As it will be shown, this variable band permits overcoming the aforementioned problem giving rise to an almost constant switching frequency. The performance of this algorithm, together with classical hysteresis controls and proportional resonant (PR) controllers, has been evaluated in three...

  14. Evidence for ion migration in hybrid perovskite solar cells with minimal hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Philip; Telford, Andrew M; Bryant, Daniel; Li, Xiaoe; Nelson, Jenny; O'Regan, Brian C; Barnes, Piers R F

    2016-12-22

    Ion migration has been proposed as a possible cause of photovoltaic current-voltage hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells. A major objection to this hypothesis is that hysteresis can be reduced by changing the interfacial contact materials; however, this is unlikely to significantly influence the behaviour of mobile ionic charge within the perovskite phase. Here, we show that the primary effects of ion migration can be observed regardless of whether the contacts were changed to give devices with or without significant hysteresis. Transient optoelectronic measurements combined with device simulations indicate that electric-field screening, consistent with ion migration, is similar in both high and low hysteresis CH3NH3PbI3 cells. Simulation of the photovoltage and photocurrent transients shows that hysteresis requires the combination of both mobile ionic charge and recombination near the perovskite-contact interfaces. Passivating contact recombination results in higher photogenerated charge concentrations at forward bias which screen the ionic charge, reducing hysteresis.

  15. Tuning the hysteresis voltage in 2D multilayer MoS2 FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Zhouming; Guo, Junjie

    2016-10-01

    The hysteresis tuning is of great significance before the two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field-effect transistors (FETs) can be practically used in the next-generation nanoelectronic devices. In this paper, a simple and effective annealing method was developed to tune the hysteresis voltage in 2D MoS2 transistors. It was found that high temperature (175 °C) annealing in air could increase the hysteresis voltage from 8.0 V (original device) to 28.4 V, while a next vacuum annealing would reduce the hysteresis voltage to be only 2.0 V. An energyband diagram model based on electron trapping/detrapping due to oxygen adsorption is proposed to understand the hysteresis mechanism in multilayer MoS2 FET. This simple method for tuning the hysteresis voltage of MoS2 FET can make a significant step toward 2D nanoelectronic device applications.

  16. Impact of back-gate bias on the hysteresis effect in partially depleted SOI MOSFETs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Jie-Xin; Chen Jing; Zhou Jian-Hua; Wu Qing-Qing; Chai Zhan; Yu Tao; Wang Xi

    2012-01-01

    The hysteresis effect in the output characteristics,originating from the floating body effect,has been measured in partially depleted(PD)silicon-on-insulator(SOl)MOSFETs at different back-gate biases.ID hysteresis has been developed to clarify the hysteresis characteristics.The fabricated devices show the positive and negative peaks in the ID hysteresis.The experimental results show that the ID hysteresis is sensitive to the back gate bias in 0.13μm PD SOI MOSFETs and does not vary monotonously with the back-gate bias.Based on the steady-state Shoclley-Read Hall(SRH)recombination theory,we have successfully interpreted the impact of the back-gate bias on the hysteresis effect in PD SOl MOSFETs.

  17. Evidence for ion migration in hybrid perovskite solar cells with minimal hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Philip; Telford, Andrew M.; Bryant, Daniel; Li, Xiaoe; Nelson, Jenny; O'Regan, Brian C.; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-12-01

    Ion migration has been proposed as a possible cause of photovoltaic current-voltage hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells. A major objection to this hypothesis is that hysteresis can be reduced by changing the interfacial contact materials; however, this is unlikely to significantly influence the behaviour of mobile ionic charge within the perovskite phase. Here, we show that the primary effects of ion migration can be observed regardless of whether the contacts were changed to give devices with or without significant hysteresis. Transient optoelectronic measurements combined with device simulations indicate that electric-field screening, consistent with ion migration, is similar in both high and low hysteresis CH3NH3PbI3 cells. Simulation of the photovoltage and photocurrent transients shows that hysteresis requires the combination of both mobile ionic charge and recombination near the perovskite-contact interfaces. Passivating contact recombination results in higher photogenerated charge concentrations at forward bias which screen the ionic charge, reducing hysteresis.

  18. Dynamic magnetic hysteresis and nonlinear susceptibility of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Yuri P.; Ouari, Bachir; Titov, Serguey V.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear ac stationary response of antiferromagnetic nanoparticles subjected to both external ac and dc fields of arbitrary strength and orientation is investigated using Brown's continuous diffusion model. The nonlinear complex susceptibility and dynamic magnetic hysteresis (DMH) loops of an individual antiferromagnetic nanoparticle are evaluated and compared with the linear regime for extensive ranges of the anisotropy, the ac and dc magnetic fields, damping, and the specific antiferromagnetic parameter. It is shown that the shape and area of the DMH loops of antiferromagnetic particles are substantially altered by applying a dc field that permits tuning of the specific magnetic power loss in the nanoparticles.

  19. Hysteresis in the melting kinetics of Bi nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haro-Poniatowski, E.; Serna, R.; Afonso, C.N.; Jouanne, M.; Morhange, J.F.; Bosch, P.; Lara, V.H

    2004-04-01

    Structural properties as a function of temperature of bismuth nanocrystals embedded in amorphous germanium thin films, synthesised by laser ablation are investigated by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition to temperature anharmonic effects, Raman spectroscopy results reveal a melting solidification hysteresis, which takes place below the melting point of bulk bismuth. Furthermore, preliminary X-ray diffraction results suggest that the nanocrystals change in structure upon heating until melting occurs. However, the nanocrystals recover their original structure once the sample is cooled at room temperature.

  20. Internal hysteresis experienced on a high pressure syn gas compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidan, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A vibration instability phenomenon experienced in operating high pressure syn gas centrifugal compressors in two ammonia plants is described. The compressors were monitored by orbit and spectrum analysis for changes from baseline readings. It is found that internal hysteresis was the major destabilizing force; however, the problem was further complicated by seal lockup at the suction end of the compressor. A coupling lockup problem and a coupling fit problem, which frettage of the shaft, are also considered as contributors to the self excited vibrations.

  1. ACTIVE VIBRATION SUPPRESSION VIA LINEARIZING HYSTERESIS OF PIEZOCERAMIC ACTUATORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hong; SHI Hongyan; BEN MRAD Ridha

    2007-01-01

    A novel active Vibration control technique on the basis of linearized piezoelectric actuators is presented. An experimental apparatus consisting of a cantilever beam to which are attached strain patches and piezoceramic actuators to be used for active Vibration suppression is described. A dynamical model of the cantilever beam using Lagrange's equation and two coordinate Systems are presented. Based on the Lyapunov's direct method, an active Vibration Controller with hysteresis compensation is designed. The Controller is designed so that it guarantees the global stability of the overall System. The Controller developed is assessed experimentally.

  2. One-phase flow in porous media with hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botkin, N.D.; Brokate, M.; El Behi-Gornostaeva, E.G., E-mail: elena.gornostaeva@ma.tum.de

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of one phase flow through a porous medium showing a hysteretic relation between the capillary pressure and the saturation of the phase. The flow model used is based on mass conservation principle and Darcy's law. Boundary conditions of Neumann and Signorini type are imposed. The hysteretic relation between the capillary pressure and the saturation is described by a Preisach hysteresis operator. A numerical algorithm for the treatment of the arising system of equations is proposed. Results of numerical simulations are presented.

  3. The modified Cassie’s equation and contact angle hysteresis

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xianmin

    2012-08-29

    In this paper, we derive a modified Cassie\\'s equation for wetting on chemically patterned surfaces from a homogenization approach. The derivation reveals that effective contact angle is a local average of the static contact angle along the contact line which describes all possible equilibrium states including the local minimum of the free energy of the system. The usual Cassie\\'s state which corresponds to the global minimum is only a special case. We then discuss the contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned surfaces. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  4. The environmental Kuznets curve when the environment exhibits hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjan, Ram [Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Florida, FL (United States); Shortle, James [Agricultural and Environmental Economics, the Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Penn State University, PA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The relevance and implications of the environmental Kuznets hypothesis are examined in the presence of stock effects and non-linearities associated with pollution generation. Stock effects lead to hysteresis and irreversibilities in environmental quality that are overlooked when emphasis is placed on the flow effects of pollutants only. It is demonstrated here that an optimal growth plan in the presence of stock effects shifts the focus away from prescribing economic growth as a panacea for environmental ills. Implications for currently industrializing economies are discussed. (author)

  5. OBTAINING HYSTERESIS LOOPS AT LOW FREQUENCY FOR CHARACTERIZATION OF MATERIALS TO BE USED IN BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atika Arshad

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The promising development of magnetic sensors in biomedical field demands an appropriate level of understanding of the magnetic properties of the materials used in their fabrication. To date only few of the types of magnetic materials are encountered where their magnetic properties, characterization techniques and magnetization behavior are yet to be explored more suitably in the light of their applications. This research work studies the characterization of materials by using a cost effective and simple circuit consisting of inductive transducer and an OP-AMP as a voltage integrator. In this approach the circuit was simulated using PSPICE and experiments have been conducted to achieve the desired results. The simulation and experimental results are obtained for three test materials namely iron, steel and plastic. The novelty lies in applying the simple circuit for material testing and characterization via obtaining simulation results and validating these results through experiment. The magnetic properties in low external magnetic field are studied with materials under test. The magnetization effect of a magneto-inductive sensor is detected in low frequency range for different magnetic core materials. The results have shown magnetization behaviour of magnetic materials due to the variation of permeability and magnetism. The resulted hysteresis loops appeared to have different shapes for different materials. The magnetic hysteresis loop found for iron core demonstrated a bigger coercive force and larger reversals of magnetism than these of steel core, thus obtaining its magnetic saturation at a larger magnetic field strength. The shape of the hysteresis loop itself is found to be varying upon the nature of the material in use. The resulted magnetization behaviors of the materials proved their possible applicability for use in sensing devices. The key concern of this work is found upon selecting the appropriate magnetic materials at the desired

  6. New Viscosity Data for CuO-water Nanofluid -The Hysteresis Phenomenon Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Tam, Nguyen; Galanis, Nicolas; Maré, Thierry; Eveillard, Erwan

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In the present work, we have experimentally investigated the stability and hysteresis behaviors of CuO-water nanofluid when submitted to a repeated heating and cooling process. Data has shown that for a low particle volume concentration, 1.6% in particular, the hysteresis phenomenon did not occur for the temperature range considered. For a higher particle concentration, 5% in particular, the hysteresis behaviour was clearly observed when fluid temperature exceeded 52ºC...

  7. Hysteresis-free and submillisecond-response polymer network liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Han; Gou, Fangwang; Peng, Fenglin; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrate a polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) with negligible hysteresis while keeping submillisecond response time. By doping about 1% dodecyl acrylate (C12A) into the liquid crystal/monomer precursor, both hysteresis and residual birefringence are almost completely eliminated. The operating voltage and scattering properties remain nearly intact, but the tradeoff is enhanced double relaxation. This hysteresis-free PNLC should find applications in spatial light modulators, laser beam control, and optical communications in infrared region.

  8. E and S hysteresis model for two-dimensional magnetic properties

    CERN Document Server

    Soda, N

    2000-01-01

    We define an effective hysteresis model of two-dimensional magnetic properties for the magnetic field analysis. Our hysteresis model is applicable to both alternating and rotating flux conditions. Moreover, we compare the calculated results with the measured ones, and verify the accuracy of this model. We can calculate iron losses in the magnetic materials exactly. As a result, it is shown that the hysteresis model is generally applicable to two-dimensional magnetic properties of some kinds of magnetic materials.

  9. Magnetic field analysis of electric machines taking ferromagnetic hysteresis into account

    OpenAIRE

    Saitz, Július

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the magnetic field analysis of electric machines by means of the finite element method taking the ferromagnetic hysteresis into account. The hysteresis is considered through a vector Preisach model, consisting of scalar Preisach models distributed along a finite number of angular directions. The incorporation of the vector hysteresis model into a two-dimensional time-stepping field solution in terms of the magnetic vector potential is accomplished by the Fixed-Point ite...

  10. Enhancement of a dynamic porous model considering compression-release hysteresis behavior: application to graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, B.; Seisson, G.; Hébert, D.; Bertron, I.; Boustie, M.; Berthe, L.

    2016-08-01

    Because of their shock wave attenuation properties, porous materials and foams are increasingly used for various applications such as graphite in the aerospace industry and polyurethane (PU) foams in biomedical engineering. For these two materials, the absence of residual compaction after compression and release cycles limits the efficiency of the usual numerical dynamic porous models such as P-α and POREQST. In this paper, we suggest a simple enhancement of the latter in order to take into account the compression-release hysteresis behavior experimentally observed for the considered materials. The new model, named H-POREQST, was implemented into a Lagrangian hydrocode and tested for simulating plate impact experiments at moderate pressure onto a commercial grade of porous graphite (EDM3). It proved to be in far better agreement with experimental data than the original model which encourages us to pursue numerical tests and developments.

  11. Minor hysteresis loops model based on exponential parameters scaling of the modified Jiles-Atherton model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamimid, M., E-mail: Hamimid_mourad@hotmail.com [Laboratoire de modelisation des systemes energetiques LMSE, Universite de Biskra, BP 145, 07000 Biskra (Algeria); Mimoune, S.M., E-mail: s.m.mimoune@mselab.org [Laboratoire de modelisation des systemes energetiques LMSE, Universite de Biskra, BP 145, 07000 Biskra (Algeria); Feliachi, M., E-mail: mouloud.feliachi@univ-nantes.fr [IREENA-IUT, CRTT, 37 Boulevard de l' Universite, BP 406, 44602 Saint Nazaire Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    In this present work, the minor hysteresis loops model based on parameters scaling of the modified Jiles-Atherton model is evaluated by using judicious expressions. These expressions give the minor hysteresis loops parameters as a function of the major hysteresis loop ones. They have exponential form and are obtained by parameters identification using the stochastic optimization method 'simulated annealing'. The main parameters influencing the data fitting are three parameters, the pinning parameter k, the mean filed parameter {alpha} and the parameter which characterizes the shape of anhysteretic magnetization curve a. To validate this model, calculated minor hysteresis loops are compared with measured ones and good agreements are obtained.

  12. Control of Linear Systems with Preisach Hysteresis Output with Application to Damage Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barradas Berglind, Jose de Jesus; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work is on the Preisach hysteresis operator which has been widely used in fields such as ferromagnetics, phase transitions, filtration through porous media, and shape memory alloys. The main purpose is to incorporate discrete linear time invariant systems with discretized Preisach...... hysteresis output into the mixed logical dynamical (MLD) systems framework, such that the Preisach hysteresis can be included in control settings. Subsequently, an application to damage reduction is presented, where the Preisach hysteresis is used as an online fatigue damage estimator for a simplified wind...

  13. Hysteresis modelling and experimental verification of a Fe–Ga alloy magnetostrictive actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhu; Lei Xiang, Bian; Gangli, Chen; Shuxin, Liu; Qinbo, Zhou; Xiaoting, Rui

    2017-03-01

    In order to accurately describe the asymmetric rate-bias-dependent hysteresis of a Fe–Ga alloy magnetostrictive actuator, a comprehensive model, which is composed of a phenomenon model, describing hysteresis by the modified Bouc–Wen hysteresis operator, and a theoretical model, representing the dynamics characteristics, is put forward. The experimental system is setup to verify the performance of the comprehensive model. Results show that the modified Bouc–Wen model can effectively describe the dynamics and hysteresis characteristics of the Fe–Ga alloy magnetostrictive actuator. The results highlight significantly improved accuracy in the modelling of the magnetostrictive actuator.

  14. Fabrication of surfaces with extremely high contact angle hysteresis from polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Wei, Jingjing; Su, Zhaohui

    2011-12-20

    High contact angle hysteresis on polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) ion-paired with hydrophobic perfluorooctanoate anions is reported. Both the bilayer number of PEMs and the ionic strength of deposition solutions have significant influence on contact angle hysteresis: higher ionic strength and greater bilayer number cause increased contact angle hysteresis values. The hysteresis values of ~100° were observed on smooth PEMs and pinning of the receding contact line on hydrophilic defects is implicated as the cause of hysteresis. Surface roughness can be used to further tune the contact angle hysteresis on the PEMs. A surface with extremely high contact angle hysteresis of 156° was fabricated when a PEM was deposited on a rough substrate coated with submicrometer scale silica spheres. It was demonstrated that this extremely high value of contact angle hysteresis resulted from the penetration of water into the rough asperities on the substrate. The same substrate hydrophobized by chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane exhibits high advancing contact angle and low hysteresis.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Pressure Drop Hysteresis in a Cocurrent Gas-Liquid Upflow Packed Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐红彬; 毛在砂

    2001-01-01

    Extensive experimental work on hysteresis in a cocurrent gas-liquid upflow packed bed was carried out with three kinds of packings and the air-water system. However, only when packed with small glass beads (φ1.4 mm) was the bed pressure drop hysteresis observed. Two more liquids with different liquid properties were employed to further examine the influence of parameters on pressure drop hysteresis. The similarity of pressure drop hysteresis in packed beds was concluded in combination of experimental evidence reported in literature.

  16. UVolution, a Photochemistry Experiment in Low Earth Orbit: Investigation of the Photostability of Carboxylic Acids Exposed to Mars Surface UV Radiation Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Macari, Frédérique; Raulin, François; Chaput, Didier; Cottin, Hervé

    2010-05-01

    The detection and identification of organic molecules on Mars are of prime importance to establish the existence of a possible ancient prebiotic chemistry or even a biological activity. To date, however, no complex organic compounds have been detected on Mars. The harsh environmental conditions at the surface of Mars are commonly advocated to explain this nondetection, but few studies have been implemented to test this hypothesis. To investigate the nature, abundance, and stability of organic molecules that could survive under such environmental conditions, we exposed, in low Earth orbit, organic molecules of martian astrobiological relevance to solar UV radiation (>200 nm). The experiment, called UVolution, was flown on board the Biopan ESA module, which was situated outside a Russian Foton automated capsule and exposed to space conditions for 12 days in September 2007. The targeted organic molecules [α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), mellitic acid, phthalic acid, and trimesic acid] were exposed with, and without, an analogous martian soil. Here, we present experimental results of the impact of solar UV radiation on the targeted molecules. Our results show that none of the organic molecules studied seemed to be radiotolerant to the solar UV radiation when directly exposed to it. Moreover, the presence of a mineral matrix seemed to increase the photodestruction rate. AIB, mellitic acid, phthalic acid, and trimesic acid should not be considered as primary targets for in situ molecular analyses during future surface missions if samples are only collected from the first centimeters of the top surface layer.

  17. Systematic study of the fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in odd-{ital A} rare earth nuclei investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nord, A.; Schiller, A.; Eckert, T.; Beck, O.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Fischer, R.; Herzberg, R.; Jaeger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H.H.; Rittner, M.; Zilges, A. [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Allmandring 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)]|[Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments were performed on the rare earth nuclei {sup 155}Gd and {sup 159}Tb to study the fragmentation of the {ital M}1 {ital scissors} {ital mode} in {ital odd} deformed nuclei and to establish a kind of systematics. Using the bremsstrahlung photon beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron (end point energy 4.1 MeV) and high resolution Ge-{gamma} spectrometers detailed information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios. The results are compared to those observed recently for the neighboring odd nuclei {sup 161,163}Dy and {sup 157}Gd. Whereas in the odd Dy isotopes the dipole strength is rather concentrated, both Gd isotopes show a strong fragmentation of the strength into about 25 ({sup 155}Gd) and 90 transitions ({sup 157}Gd) in the energy range 2{endash}4 MeV. The nucleus {sup 159}Tb linking the odd Dy and Gd isotopes exhibits an intermediate strength fragmentation. In general the observed total strength in the odd nuclei is reduced by a factor of 2{endash}3 as compared to their neighboring even-even isotopes. The different fragmentation behavior of the dipole strengths in the odd Dy and Gd isotopes is unexplained up to now. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Systematic study of the fragmentation of low-lying dipole strength in odd-A rare earth nuclei investigated in nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nord, A.; Schiller, A.; Eckert, T.; Beck, O.; Besserer, J.; von Brentano, P.; Fischer, R.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Jäger, D.; Kneissl, U.; Margraf, J.; Maser, H.; Pietralla, N.; Pitz, H. H.; Rittner, M.; Zilges, A.

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments were performed on the rare earth nuclei 155Gd and 159Tb to study the fragmentation of the M1 scissors mode in odd deformed nuclei and to establish a kind of systematics. Using the bremsstrahlung photon beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron (end point energy 4.1 MeV) and high resolution Ge-γ spectrometers detailed information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios. The results are compared to those observed recently for the neighboring odd nuclei 161,163Dy and 157Gd. Whereas in the odd Dy isotopes the dipole strength is rather concentrated, both Gd isotopes show a strong fragmentation of the strength into about 25 (155Gd) and 90 transitions (157Gd) in the energy range 2-4 MeV. The nucleus 159Tb linking the odd Dy and Gd isotopes exhibits an intermediate strength fragmentation. In general the observed total strength in the odd nuclei is reduced by a factor of 2-3 as compared to their neighboring even-even isotopes. The different fragmentation behavior of the dipole strengths in the odd Dy and Gd isotopes is unexplained up to now.

  19. Development of response models for the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) sensors. Part 1: Dynamic models and computer simulations for the ERBE nonscanner, scanner and solar monitor sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Nesim; Choi, Sang H.; Chrisman, Dan A., Jr.; Samms, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Dynamic models and computer simulations were developed for the radiometric sensors utilized in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). The models were developed to understand performance, improve measurement accuracy by updating model parameters and provide the constants needed for the count conversion algorithms. Model simulations were compared with the sensor's actual responses demonstrated in the ground and inflight calibrations. The models consider thermal and radiative exchange effects, surface specularity, spectral dependence of a filter, radiative interactions among an enclosure's nodes, partial specular and diffuse enclosure surface characteristics and steady-state and transient sensor responses. Relatively few sensor nodes were chosen for the models since there is an accuracy tradeoff between increasing the number of nodes and approximating parameters such as the sensor's size, material properties, geometry, and enclosure surface characteristics. Given that the temperature gradients within a node and between nodes are small enough, approximating with only a few nodes does not jeopardize the accuracy required to perform the parameter estimates and error analyses.

  20. UVolution, a photochemistry experiment in low earth orbit: investigation of the photostability of carboxylic acids exposed to mars surface UV radiation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalport, Fabien; Guan, Yuan Yong; Coll, Patrice; Szopa, Cyril; Macari, Frédérique; Raulin, François; Chaput, Didier; Cottin, Hervé

    2010-05-01

    The detection and identification of organic molecules on Mars are of prime importance to establish the existence of a possible ancient prebiotic chemistry or even a biological activity. To date, however, no complex organic compounds have been detected on Mars. The harsh environmental conditions at the surface of Mars are commonly advocated to explain this nondetection, but few studies have been implemented to test this hypothesis. To investigate the nature, abundance, and stability of organic molecules that could survive under such environmental conditions, we exposed, in low Earth orbit, organic molecules of martian astrobiological relevance to solar UV radiation (>200 nm). The experiment, called UVolution, was flown on board the Biopan ESA module, which was situated outside a Russian Foton automated capsule and exposed to space conditions for 12 days in September 2007. The targeted organic molecules [alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), mellitic acid, phthalic acid, and trimesic acid] were exposed with, and without, an analogous martian soil. Here, we present experimental results of the impact of solar UV radiation on the targeted molecules. Our results show that none of the organic molecules studied seemed to be radiotolerant to the solar UV radiation when directly exposed to it. Moreover, the presence of a mineral matrix seemed to increase the photodestruction rate. AIB, mellitic acid, phthalic acid, and trimesic acid should not be considered as primary targets for in situ molecular analyses during future surface missions if samples are only collected from the first centimeters of the top surface layer.