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Sample records for earth fluoride complexes

  1. Preparation of rare earth fluorides from apatite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyarchuk, I.F.; Voloshchenko, M.V.; Zen'kovich, E.G.; Sumenkova, V.V.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Lit'ya)

    1980-01-01

    The processes of preparation of the rare earths element sum from apatite concentrate of the Khibins, connected with preliminary extraction of rare earth phosphates from nitric acid extract using solvent extraction or direct precipitation from the extract by solution of potassium and ammonium fluorides. The sequence of the processes of the first variant is the following: solvent extraction of rare earths by tributylphosphate from clarified nitric acid extract of apatite with subsequent reextraction of rare earths with water and precipitation of rare earth phosphates from aqueous solution during neutralization by ammonia. In case of fluoride preparation from rare earth phosphate the main attention is paid to precipitation and filtration of fluorides. Technological scheme and cost price of industry for the production of 1800 t of rare earth trifluorides a year are calculated. When taking account of TBP losses according to its solubility the industry cost price is 1O times lower the modern cost of rare earth fluorides

  2. Defect structure of cubic solid solutions of alkaline earth and rare earth fluorides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenHartog, HW

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we will consider the disorder in some cubic solid solutions consisting of one of the alkaline earth fluorides and one of the rare earth fluorides. This is an attractive group of model materials, because these materials have a rather simple overall cubic structure. We will discuss the

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Rare Earth Doped Fluoride Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. DeVol

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the synthesis, structure and applications of metal fluoride nanoparticles, with particular focus on rare earth (RE doped fluoride nanoparticles obtained by our research group. Nanoparticles were produced by precipitation methods using the ligand ammonium di-n-octadecyldithiophosphate (ADDP that allows the growth of shells around a core particle while simultaneously avoiding particle aggregation. Nanoparticles were characterized on their structure, morphology, and luminescent properties. We discuss the synthesis, properties, and application of heavy metal fluorides; specifically LaF3:RE and PbF2, and group IIA fluorides. Particular attention is given to the synthesis of core/shell nanoparticles, including selectively RE-doped LaF3/LaF3, and CaF2/CaF2 core/(multi-shell nanoparticles, and the CaF2-LaF3 system.

  4. Adsorption of fluoride ions onto naturally occurring earth materials ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Batch sorption system using two naturally occurring earth materials (EM) as adsorbents was investigated to remove fluoride ions from aqueous solution. The system variables studied include initial concentration of the sorbate, agitation time, adsorbent dose, pH, co-ions and temperature. The experimental data fitted well to ...

  5. Extraction of fluoride metal complexes by octanols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanova, I.V.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Il'in, E.G.; Majorov, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    The extraction of niobium(V) and tantalum(V) by octanols, including 1-octanol, 2-octanol, and iso-octanol (2-ethylhexanol), was studied. The composition of the octanols and their solubility in various aqueous solutions were evaluated. The capacity of the octanols for tantalum(V) and niobium(V), the extraction properties of the octanols, the viscosity of extracts under conditions of metal fluoride extraction, and the temperature dependence of the viscosity of the octanols were studied. The composition of the extracted complexes was studied by IR and NMR spectroscopy and chemical analysis, and the hydration-solvation mechanism of the extraction of tantalum(V) and niobium(V) was supported [ru

  6. Metathesis synthesis and characterization of complex metal fluoride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    V MANIVANNAN*, P PARHI and JONATHAN W KRAMER. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Campus Delivery 1374, Colorado State University, Fort Collins,. CO 80523, USA. MS received 30 April 2008. Abstract. Metathesis synthesis of complex metal fluorides using mechanochemical activation has been reported.

  7. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalescence® ... Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H 2 O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H 2 O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF 5 (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba 2 REF 7 (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Tb 3+ ) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba 2 LaF 7 :Yb, Tm(Er), Ba 2 REF 7 :Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed

  9. Spectroscopy and dynamics of rare earth doped fluorides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebens, Willem Omco

    1995-01-01

    The defect structure of RE doped Fluorides has been studied along with the conductivity properties, using a variety of techniques, both experimental and theoretical. Two systems have been studied in detail, which represent two kinds of defect states for RE doped SrFr. The system SrFr:CeF, has been

  10. Development of technology and equipment for manufacturing fluorides rare-earths via non-aqueous method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatalov, V.V.; Kozlov, O.I.; Machirev, V.P.; Zvonarev, E.N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The works on technology and equipment for rare earths (RE) fluorides are very scarce. Presently RE-fluorides are manufactured by various methods. Conventionally they can be divided into two main groups. The first group comprises methods based on precipitation of fluorides from soluble salts of corresponding metals by fluohydric acid (aqueous methods) with following thermal decomposition of aquatic fluorides obtained until anhydric state is reached. The second group (called dry, gaseous or non-aqueous) comprises methods based on direct fluorizating (by fluorine hydride, fluor or other fluorating agents) have several important advantages compared to the aqueous methods: the fluorides obtained are anhydrous; the operations of fluoride precipitation, washing, decantation, filtration are excluded as well as their drying and calcination. The process of calcination is, as a rule, accompanied by pyrohydrolysis. The products manufactured by precipitation are inferior to those obtained by the non-aqueous technique. The world production practice uses both groups of methods. Nevertheless, the method of gaseous hydrofluorination is preferable. In all non-aqueous processes the initial materials are oxides RE which interact with gaseous fluorine hydride. The initial materials - oxides are obtained by thermal decomposition of carbonates, hydroxides, oxalates and so on. One of the best type of apparatus for thermal decomposition processes is a horizontal ring shaped vibrating apparatus with direct heating. The RE - fluorides is synthesized by way of RE-oxide interacting with hydrogen fluoride at 200-550 deg C in single continuous operation: (RE) 2 O 3 + 6 HF → 2 (RE)F 3 + 3 H 2 0 The apparatus consists of a nickel horizontal two tube screw. Reaction time is varied from 2 to 6 hours; the productivity of reactor is defined by feed screw rotation and initial material bulk density. Hydrogen fluoride was passing the reactor opposite to the solid phase. The degree

  11. Development of novel rare earth doped fluoride and oxide scintillators for two-dimensional imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yoshikawa, A.; Yanagida, T.; Yokota, Y.; Kamada, K.; Kawaguchi, N.; Fukuda, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A.; Iguchi, T.; Boulon, G.; Nikl, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 12 (2011), s. 1178-1182 ISSN 1002-0721 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : scintillator * gamma-ray detection * neutron detection * fluoride * Ce * Eu * rare earth Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.901, year: 2011

  12. Comparison of La3+ and mixed rare earths-loaded magnetic chitosan beads for fluoride adsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Peng; An, Ruiqi; Li, Ruifen

    2018-01-01

    La3+ and mixed-rare earth magnetic chitosan beads (MCLB and MCLRB) were successfully prepared for fluoride removal, respectively. The adsorbents were characterized by scanning electron microscope and magnetic response. Batch experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorbent performance...

  13. Thermoluminescence of double fluorides doped with rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azorin N, J.; Sanchez R, A.; Khaidukov, N.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this work the thermoluminescent characteristics of double fluorides K 2 YF 5 , K 2 GdF 5 and K 2 LuF 5 doped are presented with Tb 3+ , studied in the interval of temperature from 30 to 400 C. The materials that presented better answer to the irradiation with particles beta and with ultraviolet light they were the K 2 YF 5 : Tb (1% at. Tb 3+ ) and the K 2 LuF 5 : Tb (1% at. Tb 3+ ); while the K 2 YF 5 : Tb to high concentrations (10% and 20% at. Tb 3+ ) and the K 2 LuF 5 : Tb (1% at. Tb 3+ ) and the K 2 LuF 5 : Tb (1% at. Tb 3+ ) they presented an acceptable answer in front of the gamma radiation. The intensity of the Tl answer induced in these materials is a decisive factor to continue studying its dosimetric characteristics, what allows to consider them as the base for the development of potential materials to use them in the dosimetry of beta particles, of the UV light of the gamma radiation using the thermoluminescence method. (Author)

  14. A problem in gravimetric method for the determination of rare earth elements as oxide after the fluoride separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Kunio

    1979-01-01

    For the gravimetric determination of lanthanum, it was precipitated as fluoride and converted to oxide by igniting (ca. 930 0 C) in a town gas flame. However, the oxidation of lanthanum fluoride by ignition was incomplete, the major part of the precipitate being converted to oxyfluoride (LaOF) and a mixture of oxide and oxyfluoride resulted. Therefore, analytical results were generally (5 -- 7)% higher than theoretically expected. The lanthanum fluoride became converted into the oxide by repeating ignition (ca. 1070 0 C) three times, each for (30 -- 40)min. However, the weight was lower than that of the corresponding sesquioxide, La 2 O 3 . Except for ytterbium and lutetium, gravimetric results as oxides for the other rare earth elements (Y, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd) were higher than theoretical values. Therefore, the precipitation of the rare earth elements as fluoride and the subsequent determination as oxide by ignition of the fluoride could not be recommended as the gravimetric method for the rare earths. In order to obtain accurate results for major to minor amounts of the rare earth elements, an EDTA titration at pH 6 should be used after the dissolution of fluoride in acid, if the fluoride precipitation separation is involved. (author)

  15. Factors controlling the thermoluminescence spectra of rare earth doped calcium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y., E-mail: wyfemail@gmail.com [School of Science, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Y. [School of Science, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); White, D. [Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Gawber Road, Barnsley S75 2EP (United Kingdom); Finch, A.A. [Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of St Andrews, Fife KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); Townsend, P.D. [Physics Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Thermoluminescence spectra of rare earth doped calcium fluoride samples, both powder and single crystal, were recorded over the temperature range from 25 K to 673 K. Although some broad band features exist, the spectra are dominated by the rare earth line transitions. The glow peak temperatures are slightly sensitive both to the ionic size of the dopants and the dopant concentration. By contrast, very considerable differences are generated by heat treatments, such as annealing followed by either fast or slow cooling. Comments are included on the reasons for such sensitivity in terms of association of dopant and intrinsic defect sites and why the results of dosimetry powder differ from those from single crystals.

  16. Molecular Fluoride-Bridged 3d-4f Complexes and Their Magnetic Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K. S.; Bendix, J.

    2016-01-01

    trifluorides with very high lattice enthalpies, building block approaches are not limited to robust systems and use of labile transition metal fluoride complexes has met with unexpected success. The physical properties of fluoride-bridged 3d-4f systems are crucially dependent on coordination geometries, which...... be utilized efficiently in tailored synthesis of polynuclear complexes and extended structures. In particular, the strong affinity of the lanthanides for fluoride makes it a good choice for directed synthesis of mixed lanthanide-transition metal complexes. Despite the competition from formation of lanthanide...

  17. Alkali metal cation complexation and solvent interactions by robust chromium(III) fluoride complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, T.; Magnussen, M.J.; Piligkos, Stergios

    2010-01-01

    )] have been synthesized from mer-[CrF3(py)(3)] and shown to precipitate sodium salts from solution, of which 3[CrF3(Me(3-)tacn)]center dot 2Na(Bph(4)).solv and 6[CrF3(terpy)]center dot 4Na(Bph(4)).solv have been crystallographically characterized. In these clusters, the neutral fluoride complexes bring...

  18. INTERACTION OF FLUORIDE COMPLEXES DERIVED FROM GLASS-IONOMER CEMENTS WITH HYDROXYAPATITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A study has been undertaken of the interaction of complexed fluoride extracted from glass-ionomer dental cements with synthetic hydroxyapatite powder. Extracts were prepared from two commercial glass-ionomers (Fuji IX and ChemFlex under both neutral and acidic conditions. They were analysed by ICP-OES and by fluoride-ion selective electrode with and without added TISAB to decomplex the fluoride. The pH of the acid extracts was 4, conditions under which fluoride complexes with protons as HF or HF2-, it also complexes with aluminium, which was found to be present in higher amounts in the acid extracts. Fluoride was found to be almost completely complexed in acid extracts, but not in neutral extracts, which contained free fluoride ions. Exposure of these extracts to synthetic hydroxyapatite powder showed that fluoride was taken up rapidly (within 5 minutes, whether or not it was complexed. SEM (EDAX study of recovered hydroxyapatite showed only minute traces of aluminium taken up under all conditions. This showed that aluminium interacts hardly at all with hydroxyapatite, and hence is probably not involved in the remineralisation process.

  19. Determination of the stability constants of a number of metal fluoride complexes and their rates of formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, R.R.

    1979-08-01

    The stability constants of the fluoride complexes of Al +3 , H 3 BO 3 , Cr +3 , Cr +6 , Fe +3 , Gd +3 , Nb +5 , UO 2 +2 , and Zr +4 were determined in 0.96 and 2.88 M HNO 3 solutions in the temperature range 25 to 60 0 C with a fluoride specific ion electrode. These data can be used to calculate the concentration of chemical species in solution and will be used to correlate solution properties with solution composition. The solubilities of some fluoride precipitates were also measured in nitric acid solutions. The rates of formation of the fluoborates, aluminum fluoride, and zirconium fluoride complexes were measured with a fluoride specific ion electrode at 25, 35, and 45 0 C. The rates of formation of all complexes, except BF 4 - , AlF +2 , and a fluoride complex with aluminum containing more than three fluorides associated with it, were too fast to measure with the instrumentation used

  20. Magnetic properties of 3d-transition metal and rare earth fluoride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, J.P.; Dupas, C.; Velu, E.; Jacobini, C.; Fonteneau, G.; Lucas, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ac susceptibility of fluoride glasses in the ternary systems PbF 2 -MnF 2 -FeF 3 , ThF 4 -BaF 2 -MnF 2 , ZnF 2 -BaF 2 -RF 3 (R = Dy-Ho) has been studied down to 0.3 K. The susceptibility of rare earth glasses exhibits a broad maximum strongly dependent on the measuring frequency ν while a spin glass transition with a sharp susceptibility cusp nearly independent on ν is observed in 3d-transition metal glasses. Magnetic after effects are observed below the spin freezing temperature. (orig.)

  1. Calculation of the electronic structure and contact hyperfine parameters of interstitial hydrogen in alkaline - earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.E.M.C. de.

    1976-01-01

    The electronic structure of the interstitial hydrogen atom in alkaline-earth fluorides has been studied using the self-consistent-field multiple-scattering Xα method. In the calculations a cluster constituted by the hydrogen atom and its first anion and cation neighbors has been used. The contact parameters with the proton and the fluorine nuclei have been evaluated. The agreement obtained with the experimental results is in general good and indicates that this method is also appropriate to study defects in ionic crystals. (author) [pt

  2. Chemical effects in the stopping cross sections of protons in rare earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, J.; Pineda, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Stopping cross sections were measured for 0.5-0.7 MeV protons impinging on selected rare earth fluorides using energy differences of ions backscattered by thin films. The surface approximation was employed to determine the stopping cross sections. Consideration of chemical effects through the enthalpy of formation of the target compounds, as suggested by Bauer and Semrad (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 182 (2001) 62), allows a much better agreement with the electronic stopping predictions of the SRIM code, the Montenegro et al. universal formula and the tables by Janni

  3. A terminal fluoride ligand generates axial magnetic anisotropy in dysprosium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norel, Lucie [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ Rennes, CNRS, ISCR (Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes) - UMR 6226, Rennes (France); Darago, Lucy E.; Chakarawet, Khetpakorn; Gonzalez, Miguel I.; Olshansky, Jacob H.; Long, Jeffrey R. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Le Guennic, Boris; Rigaut, Stephane [Univ Rennes, CNRS, ISCR (Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes) - UMR 6226, Rennes (France)

    2018-02-12

    The first dysprosium complexes with a terminal fluoride ligand are obtained as air-stable compounds. The strong, highly electrostatic dysprosium-fluoride bond generates a large axial crystal-field splitting of the J=15/2 ground state, as evidenced by high-resolution luminescence spectroscopy and correlated with the single-molecule magnet behavior through experimental magnetic susceptibility data and ab initio calculations. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Features of rare earth element (3) complexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, L.I.

    1991-01-01

    Reasons for nonobeyance to the regularity of tetrad ''W'' effect of rare earth chelate complex compounds are discussed in the review. The concept of metal-ligand ionic bond in rare earth complexes is put in the basis of the consideration. From this viewpoint mutual influence of ligands in lower, higher, polynuclear and different-ligand complexes, formed by the ligands of low, medium and high denticity, is discussed. Problems of intermolecular interaction of complexes with different structure are considered in relation to problems of variation of chelate volatility and selectivity in the processes of sublimation and precipitation

  5. Study of interaction of uranium, plutonium and rare earth fluorides with some metal oxides in fluoric salt melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, V.F.; Novoselov, G.P.; Ulanov, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Interaction of plutonium, uranium, and rare-earth elements (REE) fluorides with aluminium and calcium oxides in melts of eutectic mixture LiF-NaF has been studied at 800 deg C by X-ray diffraction method. It has been shown that tetravalent uranium and plutonium are coprecipitated by oxides as a solid solution UO 2 -PuO 2 . Trivalent plutonium in fluorides melts in not precipitated in the presence of tetravalent uranium which can be used for their separation. REE are precipitated from a salt melt by calcium oxide and are not precipitated by aluminium oxide. Thus, aluminium oxide in a selective precipitator for uranium and plutonium in presence of REE. Addition of aluminium fluoride retains trivalent plutonium and REE in a salt melt in presence of Ca and Al oxides. The mechanism of interacting plutonium and REE trifluorides with metal oxides in fluoride melts has been considered

  6. Efficient SN2 fluorination of primary and secondary alkyl bromides by copper(I) fluoride complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yanpin; Chen, Chaohuang; Li, Huaifeng; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Tan, Jianwei; Weng, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Copper(I) fluoride complexes ligated by phenanthroline derivatives have been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. These complexes adopt as either ionic or neutral forms in the solid state, depending on the steric bulkiness of the substituent groups on the phenanthroline ligands. These complexes react with primary and secondary alkyl bromides to produce the corresponding alkyl fluorides in modest to good yields. This new method is compatible with a variety of important functional groups such as ether, thioether, amide, nitrile, methoxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, ester, and heterocycle moieties. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Efficient SN2 fluorination of primary and secondary alkyl bromides by copper(I) fluoride complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Yanpin

    2013-11-11

    Copper(I) fluoride complexes ligated by phenanthroline derivatives have been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. These complexes adopt as either ionic or neutral forms in the solid state, depending on the steric bulkiness of the substituent groups on the phenanthroline ligands. These complexes react with primary and secondary alkyl bromides to produce the corresponding alkyl fluorides in modest to good yields. This new method is compatible with a variety of important functional groups such as ether, thioether, amide, nitrile, methoxyl, hydroxyl, ketone, ester, and heterocycle moieties. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 3. Heavy Lanthanides (Gd–Lu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, 03195 Warszawa (Poland); Gumiński, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02093 Warszawa (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2015-06-15

    This is the third part of the volume devoted to solubility data for the rare earth metal (REM) fluorides in water and in aqueous ternary and multicomponent systems. It covers experimental results of trivalent fluorides of Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu (so-called heavy lanthanides), since no quantitative data on solubilities of TbF{sub 4} and YbF{sub 2} (the most stable compounds at these valencies) are available. The related literature has been covered through the end of 2014. Compilations of all available papers with the solubility data are introduced for each REM fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such assessment contains a collection of all solubility results in aqueous solution, a selection of suggested solubility data, a solubility equation, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or double salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. General features of the systems, such as nature of the equilibrium solid phases, solubility as a function of temperature, influence of ionic strength, solution pH, mixed solvent medium on the solubility, quality of the solubility results, and the solubility as a function of REM atomic number, have already been presented in Part 1 of the volume.

  9. Novel rare earth quinolinolate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deacon, Glen B.; Forsyth, Craig M.; Junk, Peter C.; Kynast, Ulrich; Meyer, Gerd; Moore, Joanne; Sierau, Jennyfer; Urbatsch, Aron

    2008-01-01

    The reaction of europium 8-quinolinolate Eu(OQ) 3 with calcium 8-quinolinolate, Ca(OQ) 2 , in the flux 1,2,4,5-tetramethylbenzene (TMB) at 210 deg. C yields the bimetallic [Eu 2 Ca(OQ) 8 ], which is a linear tri-nuclear complex with two eight coordinate europium atoms flanking a six coordinate calcium atom bonded by six bridging phenolate oxygen atoms. A similar reaction between La(OQ) 3 and Co(OQ) 2 gave [LaCo 2 (OQ) 7 ], in which two six coordinate cobalt atoms flank an eight coordinate lanthanum atom with six bridging phenolate oxygen atoms and a terminal OQ group

  10. Ammonium boranes for the selective complexation of cyanide or fluoride ions in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnall, Todd W; Gabbaï, François P

    2007-10-03

    With the recognition of aqueous fluoride and cyanide ions as an objective, we have investigated the anion binding properties of two isomeric ammonium boranes, namely [p-(Mes2B)C6H4(NMe3)]+ ([1]+) and [o-(Mes2B)C6H4(NMe3)]+ ([2]+). These cationic boranes, which could be obtained by reaction of the known 4- and 2-dimesitylboryl-N,N-dimethylaniline with MeOTf, have been investigated both experimentally and computationally. They both react with fluoride and cyanide ions in organic solvents to afford the corresponding fluoroborate/ or cyanoborate/ammonium zwitterions 1F, 1CN, 2F, and 2CN. In aqueous solution, however, these cationic boranes behave as remarkably selective receptors. Indeed, [1]+ only complexes cyanide ions while [2]+ only complexes fluoride ions. In H2O/DMSO 60:40 vol (HEPES 6 mM, pH 7), the cyanide binding constant of [1]+ and the fluoride binding constant of [2]+ are respectively equal to 3.9 (+/-0.1) x 108 and 910 (+/-50) M-1. Structural and computational studies indicate that both steric and electronic effects contribute to the unusual selectivity displayed by these cationic boranes. Owing to favorable Coulombic effects, the para-derivative [1]+ has a very high affinity for cyanide; yet these effects are not sufficiently intense to allow complexation of the more efficiently hydrated and less basic fluoride anion. In the case of the ortho-derivative [2]+, the proximity of the ammonium moiety leads to an increase in the Lewis acidity of the boron center thus making fluoride binding possible. However, steric effects prevent cyanide coordination to the boron center of [2]+. Finally, cation [1]+ and [2]+ bind their dedicated anions reversibly and show a negligible response in the presence of other common anions including Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, OAc-, H2PO4-, and HSO4-.

  11. Synthesis of the Complex Fluoride LiBaF3 through a Solvothermal Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The complex fluoride LiBaF3 is solvothermally synthesized at 180℃ and characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and infrared spectroscopy. In the solvothermal process, the solvents, mole ratios of initial mixtures and reaction temperature play important roles in the growth of the single crystal.

  12. Formation of H a - hydrogen centers upon additive coloration of alkaline-earth fluoride crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzhabov, E. A.; Egranov, A. V.; Shendrik, R. Yu.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanism of coloration of alkaline-earth fluoride crystals CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2 in calcium vapors in an autoclave with a cold zone is studied. It was found that the pressure in the autoclave upon constant evacuation by a vacuum pump within the temperature range of 500-800°C increases due to evaporation of metal calcium. In addition to the optical-absorption bands of color centers in the additively colored undoped crystals or to the bands of divalent ions in the crystals doped with rare-earth Sm, Yb, and Tm elements, there appear intense bands in the vacuum ultraviolet region at 7.7, 7.0, and 6.025 eV in CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2, respectively. These bands belong to the Ha - hydrogen centers. The formation of hydrogen centers is also confirmed by the appearance of the EPR signal of interstitial hydrogen atoms after X-ray irradiation of the additively colored crystals. Grinding of the outer edges of the colored crystals leads to a decrease in the hydrogen absorption-band intensity with depth to complete disappearance. The rate of hydrogen penetration inside the crystal is lower than the corresponding rate of color centers (anion vacancies) by a factor of tens. The visible color density of the outer regions of the hydrogen-containing crystals is several times lower than that of the inner region due to the competition between the color centers and hydrogen centers.

  13. Defect complexes and thermoluminescence in lithium fluoride. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, S.W.S. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1984-01-01

    X-ray induced luminescence measurements indicate that the emission wavelength is dependent upon the aggregation state of Mg within the LiF lattice. This suggests a close association between Mg and Ti within a defect complex. Pulse annealing measurements indicate that peak 5 may be due to the dissociation of trimers, followed by charge release.

  14. Effect of fluoridated casein phospopeptide-amorphous-calcium phosphate complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Abdul Shahariyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium-phosphate (CPP-ACP complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strengths (SBSs of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: About sixty extracted healthy human premolar teeth with intact buccal enamel were divided into two equal groups to which brackets were bonded using self-etching primers (SEPs and conventional means respectively. These were further equally divided into three subgroups - (1 control (2 CPP-ACP (3 chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash. The SBSs were then measured using a universal testing machine. Results: SBS of the conventional group was significantly higher than the self-etching group. The intragroup differences were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: CPP-ACP, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash did not adversely affect SBS of orthodontic brackets irrespective of the method of conditioning. Brackets bonded with conventional technique showed greater bond strengths as compared to those bonded with SEP.

  15. Ionic liquid and solid HF equivalent amine-poly(hydrogen fluoride) complexes effecting efficient environmentally friendly isobutane-isobutylene alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Mathew, Thomas; Goeppert, Alain; Török, Béla; Bucsi, Imre; Li, Xing-Ya; Wang, Qi; Marinez, Eric R; Batamack, Patrice; Aniszfeld, Robert; Prakash, G K Surya

    2005-04-27

    Isoparaffin-olefin alkylation was investigated using liquid as well as solid onium poly(hydrogen fluoride) catalysts. These new immobilized anhydrous HF catalysts contain varied amines and nitrogen-containing polymers as complexing agents. The liquid poly(hydrogen fluoride) complexes of amines are typical ionic liquids, which are convenient media and serve as HF equivalent catalysts with decreased volatility for isoparaffin-olefin alkylation. Polymeric solid amine:poly(hydrogen fluoride) complexes are excellent solid HF equivalents for similar alkylation acid catalysis. Isobutane-isobutylene or 2-butene alkylation gave excellent yields of high octane alkylates (up to RON = 94). Apart from their excellent catalytic performance, the new catalyst systems significantly reduce environmental hazards due to the low volatility of complexed HF. They represent a new, "green" class of catalyst systems for alkylation reactions, maintaining activity of HF while minimizing its environmental hazards.

  16. A high resolution cross section transmission electron microscopy study of epitaxial rare earth fluoride/GaAs(111) interfaces prepared by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, C.J.; Bravman, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the HRXTEM study of epitaxial rare earth fluoride/GaAs(111) interfaces. Such interfaces are of interest because they are the starting point for growth of buried epitaxial rare earth/rare earth fluoride sandwich structures which exhibit interesting and non bulk-like magnetic properties. Also, the optical transitions in ultrathin epitaxial NdF 3 films may be influenced by strain and defects in the NdF 3 film and the nature of the interface to GaAs. The authors find that the rare earth fluoride/GaAs interfaces are semi-coherent but chemically abrupt with the transition taking place within 3 Angstrom. However, the interface is physically rough and multiple monolayer steps in the GaAs surface tend to tilt boundaries in the fluoride. The origin of these steps is believed to be thermal etching of the GaAs during the heat- cleaning stage prior to epitaxy. The surface of the fluoride film is much smoother than the initial GaAs surface indicating planarization during epitaxy

  17. Combined subchronic fluoride-lead intoxication and its attenuation with the help of a complex of bioprotectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsnelson, B A; Privalova, L I; Kireyeva, Y P; Yeremenko, O S; Sutunkova, M P; Valamina, I E; Varaksin, A N; Panov, V G; Kazmer, J I

    2012-01-01

    Combined toxicity of lead and fluoride has been studied insufficiently, and there is no known information about attempts to inhibit it with any bioprotectors. Lead acetate and sodium fluoride, administered separately or in combination, were injected i.p. to rats at isoeffective sublethal doses 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Some of the rats were exposed to the same combination against the background of oral administration of a bioprotector complex (BPC) comprising pectin, glutamate, and multivitamin/multimineral preparations. Following exposure, functional and biochemical indices and histopathological examinations of the femur of exposed and control rats were evaluated for signs of toxicity. We have shown that with regard to a number of effects on the organism level the combined toxicity of lead and fluoride may be evaluated as additive or even superadditive, but lead reduces fluoride accumulation in the bone, and pathological changes in the bone tissue proved to be less marked for combined exposure compared with separate exposures. The BPC has been demonstrated to attenuate a range of the combined harmful effects of lead and fluoride, including those on the bone tissue. In spite of the fact that fluoride and lead may reciprocally attenuate their harmful effects on the bone tissue in case of combined exposure, they prove to be more toxic for soft tissues just in combination than when administered separately. The development of combined intoxication may be substantially inhibited by means of the tested set of innocuous biologically active agents.

  18. Measurement of solubility of plutonium trifluoride and rare-earth fluorides in molten LiF-BeF2-ZrF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, V.S.; Bychkov, A.V.; Kormilitsyn, M.V.

    1996-12-01

    Data on behavior of plutonium fluoride and fission products (FP) dissolved in fuel composition are needed to calculate the duration of an operating cycle of the ADTT facility (Accelerator-Driver Transmutation Technologies) and to determine the effect of their equilibrium concentrations on nuclear-physical characteristics of reactor operation. The data on the FP fluoride solubility in the molten salts are of great important for some industrial processes (electrolytical metal deposition, development of physical-chemical mean for processes of chemical technology, etc.) As noted above, some information on this question is given in monography and articles. Data concerning fluoride salts are given in reports. However, it was impossible to make the substantial analysis of mutual solubility of fluoride melts. The primary investigation of CeF 3 and neodymium, samarium and lanthanum fluorides showed that the solubility of the melt LiF-BeF 2 and LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 was a linear function of reverse temperature and increases from lanthanum to samarium in the row of rare-earth elements. Disagreement in estimation of plutonium trifluoride solubility and incomplete data on the solubility of rare-earth elements prompted this study

  19. A new cell for high temperature EXAFS measurements in molten rare earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollet, Anne-Laure; Bessada, Catherine; Auger, Yannick; Melin, Philippe; Gailhanou, Marc; Thiaudiere, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    A new cell with simple design has been developed for high temperature X-rays absorption measurements in both solid and molten lanthanide fluorides. Two plates of pyrolitic boron nitride are fixed hermetically together around the samples in order to avoid any evaporation and atmosphere interaction. EXAFS spectra of molten mixtures of LiF-LaF 3 measured at the La L III absorption edge are reported up to 900 deg C, and show the ability of this cell to keep the salt and to perform long time acquisition improving the signal to noise ratio

  20. Method of purifying uranium tetrafluoride hydrate and preparing uranium (VI) peroxide hydrate using a fluoride complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreiro, A.J.; Lowe, C.M.T.; Lefever, J.A.; Pyman, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The annual production of phosphate rock, on the order of about 30-40 million tons yearly, represents several million pounds of uranium. The present invention provides a process of purifying uranium tetrafluoride hydrate to produce a uranium (VI) peroxide product meeting 'yellow cake' standards using a double precipitation procedure. A fluoride complexing agent is used in the precipitation

  1. Highly selective single-use fluoride ion optical sensor based on aluminum(III)-salen complex in thin polymeric film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr, Ibrahim H.A.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    A highly selective optical sensor for fluoride ion based on the use of an aluminum(III)-salen complex as an ionophore within a thin polymeric film is described. The sensor is prepared by embedding the aluminum(III)-salen ionophore and a suitable lipophilic pH-sensitive indicator (ETH-7075) in a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) film. Optical response to fluoride occurs due to fluoride extraction into the polymer via formation of a strong complex with the aluminum(III)-salen species. Co-extraction of protons occurs simultaneously, with protonation of the indicator dye yielding the optical response at 529 nm. Films prepared using dioctylsebacate (DOS) are shown to exhibit better response (e.g., linear range, detection limit, and optical signal stability) compared to those prepared using ortho-nitrophenyloctyl ether (o-NPOE). Films formulated with aluminum(III)-salen and ETH-7075 indicator in 2 DOS:1 PVC, exhibit a significantly enhanced selectivity for fluoride over a wide range of lipophilic anions including salicylate, perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate. The optimized films exhibit a sub-micromolar detection limit, using glycine-phosphate buffer, pH 3.00, as the test sample. The response times of the fluoride optical sensing films are in the range of 1-10 min depending on the fluoride ion concentration in the sample. The sensor exhibits very poor reversibility owing to a high co-extraction constant (log K = 8.5 ± 0.4), indicating that it can best be employed as a single-use transduction device. The utility of the aluminum(III)-salen based fluoride sensitive films as single-use sensors is demonstrated by casting polymeric films on the bottom of standard polypropylene microtiter plate wells (96 wells/plate). The modified microtiter plate optode format sensors exhibit response characteristics comparable to the classical optode films cast on quartz slides. The modified microtiter is utilized for the analysis of fluoride in diluted anti-cavity fluoride rinse

  2. Surface Complexation Modeling of Fluoride Adsorption by Soil and the Role of Dissolved Aluminum on Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhi, S.; Tokunaga, T.

    2017-12-01

    Adsorption of fluoride (F) on soil can control the mobility of F and subsequent contamination of groundwater. Hence, accurate evaluation of adsorption equilibrium is a prerequisite for understanding transport and fate of F in the subsurface. While there have been studies for the adsorption behavior of F with respect to single mineral constituents based on surface complexation models (SCM), F adsorption to natural soil in the presence of complexing agents needs much investigation. We evaluated the adsorption processes of F on a natural granitic soil from Tsukuba, Japan, as a function of initial F concentration, ionic strength, and initial pH. A SCM was developed to model F adsorption behavior. Four possible surface complexation reactions were postulated with and without including dissolved aluminum (Al) and Al-F complex sorption. Decrease in F adsorption with the increase in initial pH was observed in between the initial pH range of 4 to 9, and a decrease in the rate of the reduction of adsorbed F with respect to the increase in the initial pH was observed in the initial pH range of 5 to 7. Ionic strength variation in the range of 0 to 100mM had insignificant effect on F removal. Changes in solution pH were observed by comparing the solution before and after F adsorption experiments. At acidic pH, the solution pH increased, whereas at alkaline pH, the solution pH decreased after equilibrium. The SCM including dissolved Al and the adsorption of Al-F complex can simulate the experimental results quite successfully. Also, including dissolved Al and the adsorption of Al-F complex to the model explained the change in solution pH after F adsorption.

  3. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John L.; Hoffmann, Markus M.

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  4. Dymethyl sulfoxide complexes of rare earth perrhenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, V.K.L.; Kawano, Y.; Kuya, M.K.; Perrier, M.

    1980-01-01

    The complexes Ln(ReO 4 ) 3 .8dmso (Ln = La-Lu, Y) and La(ReO 4 ) 3 .8dmso-d 6 have been prepared and characterized by conductance, infrared and Raman measurements. All the complexes have structures involving complex cation and non-coordinated anions in the solid state. The conductance values in nitromethane solution indicate a behavior near to a 1:1 electrolyte type. A comparative study with the data accumulated on the literature shows that perrhenate anion has higher coordinating capacity than perchlorate and hexafluorophosphate ones. (Author) [pt

  5. Student Learning of Complex Earth Systems: Conceptual Frameworks of Earth Systems and Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Hannah H.; Holder, Lauren; Herbert, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Engaging students in authentic problem solving concerning environmental issues in near-surface complex Earth systems involves both developing student conceptualization of Earth as a system and applying that scientific knowledge using techniques that model those used by professionals. In this first paper of a two-part series, we review the state of…

  6. Pollution level and inhalation exposure of ambient aerosol fluoride as affected by polymetallic rare earth mining and smelting in Baotou, north China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Buqing; Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-10-01

    Airborne fluoride associated with total suspended particles (TSP) and respirable particulate (PM10) in the rare earth mining and smelting areas were analyzed during August 2012 and March 2013. In March, average concentrations of fluoride bound to TSP in the mining and smelting areas were 0.598 ± 0.626 μg/m3 and 3.615 ± 4.267 μg/m3, respectively, whereas that in August were 0.699 ± 0.801 μg/m3 and 1.917 ± 2.233 μg/m3, respectively. TSP samples were classified into four categories by different sampling periods and locations using Kohonen's self-organizing map, which demonstrates that high airborne fluoride concentrations in March in the smelting area were probably attributed to industrial emissions from smelting activities and wind-blown dust from tailings pond, influenced by meteorologic parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, precipitation and wind speed. The mean daily amount of fluoride inhaled in the mining and smelting areas were estimated to be in the range of 2.77-57.61 μg/day and 3.39-64.32 μg/day, respectively. These results indicate the high potential exposure level of fluoride inhaled for local residents in the polymetallic mining and smelting areas.

  7. Determination of the Magnetic Structure of Complex anti-Perovskite Fluorides by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Justin; Yeon, Jeongho; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    An unusual family of anti-perovskite fluorides consisting of complex ions as the A, B, and X building units has been synthesized as single crystals. This family of anti-perovskites provides a unique framework to probe the magnetic properties of transition metals. Presented here is the Fe endmember of the family: [Cu(H2O)4]3[FeF6]2. The iron member exhibits complex magnetic behavior at low temperatures, which has been probed by magnetometry and neutron diffraction experiments. Presented here are the results from the anisotropic magnetometry study as well as the magnetic spin structure as determined by neutron diffraction experiments. The materials presented here represent an interesting class of perovskites that are as-yet unexplored. Given the wide range of properties possible in perovskites and related structures, it is reasonable to expect that further exploration of these materials will reveal many interesting attributes; both chemical and physical. United States Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Award DE-SC0008664.

  8. Complexing in aqueous solutions of rare earth n-aminobenzoates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efremova, G.I.; Buchkova, R.T.; Lapitskaya, A.V.; Pirkes, S.B.

    1977-01-01

    Complexing in the system ''ion of a rare-earth metal - n-aminobenzoic acid'' has been investigated by the pH-metric method in the pH range of 3.5-5.5. In the La-Eu series, the stability of n-aminobenzoate complexes increases and attains the maximum value in the complex Eu (lg Ksub(st)=2.66). In the Gd-Lu series the stability of the complex particles decreases monotonically

  9. Thermoluminescence of double fluorides doped with rare earths; Termoluminiscencia de fluoruros dobles dopados con tierras raras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J.; Sanchez R, A. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Khaidukov, N.M. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In this work the thermoluminescent characteristics of double fluorides K{sub 2}YF{sub 5}, K{sub 2}GdF{sub 5} and K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5} doped are presented with Tb{sup 3+}, studied in the interval of temperature from 30 to 400 C. The materials that presented better answer to the irradiation with particles beta and with ultraviolet light they were the K{sub 2}YF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}) and the K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}); while the K{sub 2}YF{sub 5}: Tb to high concentrations (10% and 20% at. Tb{sup 3+}) and the K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}) and the K{sub 2}LuF{sub 5}: Tb (1% at. Tb{sup 3+}) they presented an acceptable answer in front of the gamma radiation. The intensity of the Tl answer induced in these materials is a decisive factor to continue studying its dosimetric characteristics, what allows to consider them as the base for the development of potential materials to use them in the dosimetry of beta particles, of the UV light of the gamma radiation using the thermoluminescence method. (Author)

  10. Fluoridated Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Fluoridated Water On This Page What is fluoride, and where is it found? What is water fluoridation? When did water fluoridation begin in the ...

  11. Cationic rare-earth metal SALEN complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiancai; Meermann, Christian; Görlitzer, Hans W; Runte, Oliver; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Sirsch, Peter; Törnroos, Karl W; Anwander, Reiner

    2008-11-28

    Complexes (Salpren(tBu,tBu))Y[N(SiHMe2)2](thf) and (SALEN(tBu,tBu))La[N(SiHMe2)2](thf) (SALEN(tBu,tBu) = Salcyc(tBu,tBu) and Salpren(tBu,tBu)) were prepared from Ln[N(SiHMe2)2]3(thf)2 and H2SALEN(tBu,tBu). The yttrium complex was characterized by X-ray crystallography revealing intrinsic solid-state structural features: the metal centre is displaced by 1.05 angstroms from the [N2O2] least squares plane of a highly bent Salpren(tBu,tBu) ligand (angle(Ph,Ph) dihedral angle of 80.4(1) degrees ) and is coordinated asymmetrically by the silylamide ligand exhibiting one significant Y---(HSi) beta-agostic interaction (Y-N1-Si1, 106.90(9) degrees; Y---Si1, 3.2317(6) angstroms). Complexes (SALEN(tBu,tBu))Ln[N(SiHMe2)2](thf)n (n = 1, Sc; n = 2, Y, La) react with ammonium tetraphenylborate to form the ion pairs [(SALEN(tBu,tBu))Ln(thf)n][BPh4]. The cationisation was proven by X-ray crystal structure analyses of [(Salpren(tBu,tBu))Sc(thf)2][B(C6H5)4].2(thf) and [(Salpren(tBu,tBu))Ln(thf)3][B(C6H5)4].4(thf) (Ln = Y, La), showing an octahedral and pentagonal-bipyramidal coordination geometry, respectively.

  12. Dissociation of gaseous complex fluorides MMnF3 and MMnF4 (M= Li - Cs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorov, L.N.; Gubarevich, V.D.

    1982-01-01

    Mass spectrometric determination of dissociation enthalpies of gaseous complex fluorides CsMnF 3 and CsMnF 4 into neutral and charged particles is carried out using techniques of isothermal evaporation, electron impact and study of ion-molecular equilibria. As a result formation enthalpy values of CsMnFsub(3 gas) and CsMnFsub(4 gas) at T=298 are obtained, being -285.4 and -359.9 kcal/mol respectively

  13. Application of membrane LaF3 electrode in the determination of stability constants of Uranyl Fluoride complex in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzakky; Iswani GS; Mintolo

    1996-01-01

    A membrane electrode LaF 3 has been applied in the determination of uranyl fluoride complex stability constant in solution. The determination is based on the detection of free F ion in solution as a result of hydrolysis reaction (process) of uranyl ions into the uranyl hydroxide form at low pH. The experiment results showed that there was no effect of ammonium carbonate 2 M titran, flow rate on the electrode response. The F release is optimum at pH 1. The free F ion in solution is calculated from the standard curve at pH 1, after the fluoride concentration at the same pH has been corrected. Using the plot of average number of ligand binding (n) versus minus log of free ligand (-log F) the value of β1 = 4.4, β2 = 7.48, β3=9.73, and β4 = 11.67

  14. Metal fluoride complexes of Na,K-ATPase: characterization of fluoride-stabilized phosphoenzyme analogues and their interaction with cardiotonic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Flemming; Mahmmoud, Yasser A; Toyoshima, Chikashi

    2011-08-26

    The Na,K-ATPase belongs to the P-type ATPase family of primary active cation pumps. Metal fluorides like magnesium-, beryllium-, and aluminum fluoride act as phosphate analogues and inhibit P-type ATPases by interacting with the phosphorylation site, stabilizing conformations that are analogous to specific phosphoenzyme intermediates. Cardiotonic steroids like ouabain used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and arrhythmias specifically inhibit the Na,K-ATPase, and the detailed structure of the highly conserved binding site has recently been described by the crystal structure of the shark Na,K-ATPase in a state analogous to E2·2K(+)·P(i) with ouabain bound with apparently low affinity (1). In the present work inhibition, and subsequent reactivation by high Na(+), after treatment of shark Na,K-ATPase with various metal fluorides are characterized. Half-maximal inhibition of Na,K-ATPase activity by metal fluorides is in the micromolar range. The binding of cardiotonic steroids to the metal fluoride-stabilized enzyme forms was investigated using the fluorescent ouabain derivative 9-anthroyl ouabain and compared with binding to phosphorylated enzyme. The fastest binding was to the Be-fluoride stabilized enzyme suggesting a preformed ouabain binding cavity, in accord with results for Ca-ATPase where Be-fluoride stabilizes the E2-P ground state with an open luminal ion access pathway, which in Na,K-ATPase could be a passage for ouabain. The Be-fluoride stabilized enzyme conformation closely resembles the E2-P ground state according to proteinase K cleavage. Ouabain, but not its aglycone ouabagenin, prevented reactivation of this metal fluoride form by high Na(+) demonstrating the pivotal role of the sugar moiety in closing the extracellular cation pathway.

  15. Microwave spectrum, dipole moment, and internal dynamics of the methyl fluoride-carbonyl sulfide weakly bound complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Michal M; Peebles, Sean A

    2008-02-21

    Rotational spectra for the normal and four isotopically substituted species of the 1:1 complex between methyl fluoride (H3CF) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) have been measured using Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in the 5-16 GHz frequency region. The observed spectra fit well to a semirigid Watson Hamiltonian, and an analysis of the rotational constants has allowed a structure to be determined for this complex. The dipole moment vectors of the H3CF and OCS monomers are aligned approximately antiparallel with a C...C separation of 3.75(3) A and with an ab plane of symmetry. The values of the Pcc planar moments were found to be considerably different from the expected rigid values for all isotopologues. An estimate of approximately 14.5(50) cm-1 for the internal rotation barrier of the CH3 group with respect to the framework of the complex has been made using the Pcc values for the H3CF-OCS and D3CF-OCS isotopic species. Two structures, very close in energy and approximately related by a 60 degrees rotation about the C3 axis of the methyl fluoride, were identified by ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level and provide reasonable agreement with the experimental rotational constants and dipole moment components.

  16. Structures and Heats of Formation of Simple Alkaline Earth Metal Compounds II: Fluorides, Chlorides, Oxides, and Hydroxides for Ba, Sr, and Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Hill, J Grant; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A

    2018-01-11

    Geometry parameters, vibrational frequencies, heats of formation, bond dissociation energies, cohesive energies, and selected fluoride affinities (difluorides) are predicted for the late alkaline earth (Sr, Ba, and Ra) oxides, fluorides, chlorides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory CCSD(T) level. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic and pseudopotential corrections, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were included to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation following the Feller-Peterson-Dixon methodology. The calculated values are compared to the experimental data where available. In some cases, especially for Ra compounds, there are no experimental results, or the experimental energetics and geometries are not reliable or have very large error bars. All of the Sr, Ba, and Ra difluorides, dichlorides, and dihydroxides are bent structures with the OMO bond angles decreasing going down the group. The cohesive energies of bulk Be dihalides are predicted to be quite low, while those of Ra are relatively large. The fluoride affinities show that the difluorides are moderately strong Lewis acids and that such trifluorides may form under the appropriate experimental conditions.

  17. Thermochemical properties of rare earth complexes with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xuwu; Sun Wujuan; Ke Congyu; Zhang Hangguo; Wang Xiaoyan; Gao Shengli

    2007-01-01

    Fourteen rare earth complexes with salicylic acid RE(HSal) 3 .nH 2 O (HSal = C 7 H 5 O 3 ; RE = La-Sm, n = 2; RE = Eu-Lu, n = 1) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, and their thermal decomposition mechanism were studied with TG-DTG technology. The constant-volume combustion energies of complexes, Δ c U, were determined by a precise rotating-bomb calorimeter at 298.15 K. Their standard molar enthalpies of combustion, Δ c H m 0 , and standard molar enthalpies of formation, Δ f H m o , were calculated

  18. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  19. Stability constants of the fluoride complexes of actinides in aqueous solution and their correlation with fundamental properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, N.K.; Sawant, R.M.

    1997-09-01

    Stability constants of the fluoride complexes of the actinides in different oxidation states measured by potentiometric method using fluoride ion selective electrode have been presented. Procedure and precautions required to overcome certain difficulties particular to actinide ions have been discussed. Literature data from various sources have been compiled. In order to have a reasonable comparison the stability constant (β 1 ) values obtained in diverse ionic strength media are converted to thermodynamic stability constant, β 1 0 , using Davies equation (a modification of Debye-Huckel equation). A correlation of the β 1 0 values with the fundamental properties of the actinide ions using various models available in the literature has been attempted. A semiempirical relation recently developed by Brown, Sylva and Ellis (BSE equation) appears to be most suitable. Using the values of ionic radii and best available values of the stability constants of a large number of metal ions from recent compilations a comparative study of the various models or relations available in the literature has been tried. For metal ions in general, the best correlation is obtained with the BSE equation. In an attempt to accommodate the unusual trend in the stability constants of the tetravalent actinides a modification in a parameter of the BSE equation has been proposed. Good agreement between the theoretically calculated and experimentally determined values for actinides in different oxidation states is then obtained in most of the cases. (author)

  20. Teleconnections in complex human-Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, K. V.; Edmonds, J.

    2017-12-01

    Human systems and physical Earth systems are closely coupled and interact in complex ways that are sometimes surprising. This presentation discusses a few examples of system interactions. We consider the coupled energy-water-land-economy systems. We show how reductions in fossil fuel emissions are inversely coupled to land rents, food prices and deforestation. We discuss how water shortages in one part of the world is propagated to other distant parts of the world. We discuss the sensitivity of international trade patterns to energy and land systems technology and markets, and the potentially unanticipated results that can emerge.

  1. Magnetic interactions through fluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Steen; Sigrist, Marc; Weihe, Høgni

    2014-01-01

    support the parameter values and resolve |E| ≈ 0.04 cm(-1). The exchange coupling constant (J) is 1 order of magnitude smaller than that found in comparable systems with linear oxide bridging but comparable to typical magnitudes through cyanide, thus underlining the potential of fluoride complexes......The nature of the magnetic interaction through fluoride in a simple, dinuclear manganese(III) complex (1), bridged by a single fluoride ion in a perfectly linear fashion, is established by experiment and density functional theory. The magnitude of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction...

  2. Synthesis and physicochemical investigation of complexes of rare earth, alkaline earth elements and copper with some β-diketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichiporuk, R.V.; Pechurova, N.I.; Snezhko, N.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Kaul', A.R.; Zanina, A.S.; Shergina, S.I.; Sokolov, I.E.

    1991-01-01

    Complexes of rare earth, alkaline earth elements and copper with 2-methoxy-2,6,6-trimethylheptanedion-3,5 as well as complexes of yttrium and barium with 2-methoxy-2,6-dimethylheptanedion-3,5 were synthesized. Prepared complexes were investigated by the methods of chemical, thermal, X-ray phase analyses, IR spectroscopy. Complex sublimation was studied at 10 -1 -10 -2 mm Hg. Complexes of rare earths and copper don't change their composition during sublimation, and sublimation of hydrated complexes of barium, strontium and calcium leads to formation of anhydrous complexes. All prepared complexes are able to transsublimate multiply and qualitatively without change of composition. All isolated complexes can be used for preparation of film oxide coatings by CVD method

  3. Chemical dissolution of spent fuel and cladding using complexed fluoride species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rance, P.J.W.; Freeman, G.A.; Mishin, V.; Issoupov, V.

    2001-01-01

    The dissolution of LWR fuel cladding using two fluoride ion donors, HBF 4 and K 2 ZrF 6 , in combination with nitric acid has been investigated as a potential reprocessing head-end process suitable for chemical decladding and fuel dissolution in a single process step. Maximum zirconium concentrations in the order of 0,75 to 1 molar have been achieved and dissolution found to continue to low F:Zr ratios albeit at ever decreasing rates. Dissolution rates of un-oxidised zirconium based fuel claddings are fast, whereas oxidised materials exhibit an induction period prior to dissolution. Data is presented relating to the rates of dissolution of cladding and UO 2 fuels under various conditions. (author)

  4. Investigation of holmium(5) complexing in hydrofluoric acid solutions in the presence of alkali metal and ammonium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsikaeva, D.V.; Agulyanskij, A.I.; Balabanov, Yu.I.; Kuznetsov, V.Ya.; Kalinnikov, V.T.

    1989-01-01

    Method of vibrational spectroscopy is used to study niobium-containing solutions of hydrofluoric acid in the presence of alkali metal and ammonium fluorides. It is shown that NbF 6 - and NbOF 5 2- ions co-exists in solutions, therewith, additions shift equilibrium to the second complex side. Methods of IR spectroscopy, roentgenometry, crystal optics and chemical analysis are used to identify precipitated from solutions solid phases. Three new phases, which composition by chemical analysis corresponds to M 3 Nb 2 OF 11 , where M=NH 4 , K, Rb, are detected. Their roentgenometric data displayed in tetragonal crystal system with a and c parameters equalling 15,710 and 7,744; 14,877 and 7,697; 15,511 and 7,785 A respectively, are presented

  5. Targeting heavy rare earth elements in carbonatite complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom-Fendley, S.; Wall, F.; Gunn, A. G.; Dowman, E.

    2012-04-01

    The world's main sources of the rare earth elements (REE) are concentrated in carbonatite complexes. These have the advantages of high grade and tonnage, combined with low thorium contents, yet they are generally enriched in light rare earths (LREE). The heavy rare earths (HREE, which include Eu-Lu and Y) are more highly sought after because of their role in new and green technologies. HREE are predominantly extracted from ion-adsorption clays in China. These are small, low grade deposits, which are often illegally mined by artisans. Increased government control, environmental legislation and local demand for REE in China have led to high prices and global concerns about the security of supply of the HREE. Alternative sources of the HREE are poorly documented. We present a review of such targets, including: (1) 'abnormal' carbonatites; (2) areas around LREE-rich complexes such as breccia, fenite and latter stage veins; and (3) weathered carbonatites. At Lofdal, Namibia, carbonatite dykes contain xenotime-(Y) together with LREE minerals. The original chemistry of the carbonatite magma, coupled with late-stage magma and fluid evolution, seem to be controlling factors [1, 2]. The Khibina carbonatite, Kola Peninsula, Russia, is an example of where early LREE carbonatites become increasing HREE-enriched as magmas evolve to carbo-hydrothermal fluids [3]. Around carbonatite complexes in Malawi HREE enrichment can be found in breccia and in fenite. Breccia around Songwe shows areas with high Y/La ratios within the matrix caused by narrow zones of xenotime enrichment. Fenite around Kangankunde and Chilwa Island has higher HREE:LREE ratios than the carbonatite [4]. At weathered complexes, such as at Mount Weld in Western Australia, changes in both HREE concentration and LREE:HREE ratios are observed. In currently unworked sections of the deposit, the HREE mineral churchite (YPO4.H2O) has formed concentrations due to groundwater flow [5]. These areas of enrichment are

  6. Phase- and size-controllable synthesis of hexagonal upconversion rare-earth fluoride nanocrystals through an oleic acid/ionic liquid two-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meng; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Chunlei; Ma, Jiebing; He, Rong; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-05-07

    Herein, we introduce a facile, user- and environmentally friendly (n-octanol-induced) oleic acid (OA)/ionic liquid (IL) two-phase system for the phase- and size-controllable synthesis of water-soluble hexagonal rare earth (RE = La, Gd, and Y) fluoride nanocrystals with uniform morphologies (mainly spheres and elongated particles) and small sizes (size are discussed in detail. More importantly, the mechanism of the (n-octanol-induced) OA/IL two-phase system, the formation of the RE fluoride nanocrystals, and the distinctive size- and morphology-controlling capacity of the system are presented. BmimPF(6) is versatile in term of crystal-phase manipulation, size and shape maintenance, and providing water solubility in a one-step reaction. The luminescent properties of Er(3+)-, Ho(3+)-, and Tm(3+)-doped LaF(3), NaGdF(4), and NaYF(4) nanocrystals were also studied. It is worth noting that the as-prepared products can be directly dispersed in water due to the hydrophilic property of Bmim(+) (cationic part of the IL) as a capping agent. This advantageous feature has made the IL-capped products favorable in facile surface modifications, such as the classic Stober method. Finally, the cytotoxicity evaluation of NaYF(4):Yb,Er nanocrystals before and after silica coating was conducted for further biological applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Visualization of Fluoride Ions In Vivo Using a Gadolinium(III)-Coumarin Complex-Based Fluorescence/MRI Dual-Modal Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Song, Renfeng; Feng, Huan; Guo, Ke; Meng, Qingtao; Chi, Haijun; Zhang, Run; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-12-16

    A new Gadolinium(III)-coumarin complex, DO3A-Gd- CA , was designed and prepared as a dual-modal probe for simultaneous fluorescence and relaxivity responses to fluoride ions (F - ) in aqueous media and mice. DO3A-Gd- CA was designed by using Gd(III) center as an MRI signal output unit and fluoride binding site, and the 4-(diethylamino)-coumarin-3-carboxylic acid ( CA ) as a fluorescence reporter. Upon the addition of fluoride ions to the solution of DO3A-Gd- CA , the liberation of the coordinated CA ligand led to a 5.7-fold fluorescence enhancement and a 75% increase in the longitudinal relaxivity ( r ₁). The fluorescent detection limit for fluoride ions was determined to be 8 μM based on a 3 σ / slope . The desirable features of the proposed DO3A-Gd- CA , such as high sensitivity and specificity, reliability at physiological pH and low cytotoxicity enable its application in visualization of fluoride ion in mice. The successful in vivo imaging indicates that DO3A-Gd- CA could be potentially used in biomedical diagnosis fields.

  8. Growth and characterization of fluoride monocrystalline fibres of the type LiY1-x RExF4 (RE=rare-earths)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espirito Santo, Ana Maria do

    2005-01-01

    In this work we present the growth and characterization of LiF pure and rare-earth doped (Er and Nd) yttrium-lithium tetra-fluoride (LiYF 4 or YLF) by the micropulling- down technique (muPD). The use of this technique is original for the present purpose. A mu-PD prototype in the resistive mode was firstly built to understand the most important operational parameters. A commercial equipment was later installed and specifically modified to grow fluoride fibres. Regular and transparent single-crystalline fibres of LiF (diameter of 0.6 mm and length up to 150 mm) were obtained. LiF crystalline fibres as a potential laser media presented the same spectroscopic properties of bulk crystals. The influence of capillary and crucible shapes, growth atmosphere and start composition stoichiometry on the growth process of YLF fibers were also investigated. In general, the fluorides are very sensitive to moisture contamination. The growth atmosphere plays an important role on the stoichiometry deviation. Since this fluoride melts incongruently, any compositional changes influences the solidification behavior of the material. Additionally, a limited pulling rate is required to the YLF phase formation and to the compositional homogeneity along the fiber. Homogeneous and regular section YLF fibres, with diameters between 0.5 to 0.8 mm and up to 60 mm in length, were obtained in a suitable and reproducible growth process. Er-doped (with nominal concentration of 10 and 40 mol%) and Nd-doped (with nominal concentration of 1.7 mol%) fibres were also successfully grown. Er-doped fibres were crack-free and the dopant concentration was practically uniform along the YLF phase. However, Nd-doped fibres presented a short initial transient in its concentration. The Nd distribution coefficient was evaluated as 0.58 for the YLF fibre. This value is greater than those estimated for YLF bulk crystals grown by normal freezing processes. The optical properties of the YLF:Nd fibres were similar to

  9. Multifunctional gold coated rare-earth hydroxide fluoride nanotubes for simultaneous wastewater purification and quantitative pollutant determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Da-Quan; Sun, Tian-Ying; Yu, Xue-Feng; Jia, Yue; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jia-Hong; Huang, Hao; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The morphology and properties of Ce-doped yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF:Ce NTs) were investigated. • YHF:Ce NTs were conjugated with Au nanoparticles to produce Au-YHF:Ce nanocomposites. • Au-YHF:Ce NTs showed excellent capability and efficiency in removing Congo red from solutions. • Au-YHF:Ce NTs were utilized to determine the concentration of Congo red based on SERS. - Abstract: Ce-doped yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF:Ce NTs) with large surface area are synthesized and conjugated with Au nanoparticles (NPs) to produce Au-YHF:Ce nanocomposites. The Au-YHF:Ce NTs have a hollow structure, rough surface, polymer coating, and good surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) properties. They are applied to wastewater treatment to remove Congo red as a typical pollutant. The materials not only remove pollutants rapidly from the wastewater, but also detect trace amounts of the pollutants quantitatively. The multifunctional Au-YHF:Ce NTs have commercial potential as nano-absorbents and nano-detectors in water treatment and environmental monitoring

  10. Multifunctional gold coated rare-earth hydroxide fluoride nanotubes for simultaneous wastewater purification and quantitative pollutant determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da-Quan; Sun, Tian-Ying [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Xue-Feng, E-mail: yxf@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Jia, Yue; Chen, Ming; Wang, Jia-Hong [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Huang, Hao [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-Structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The morphology and properties of Ce-doped yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF:Ce NTs) were investigated. • YHF:Ce NTs were conjugated with Au nanoparticles to produce Au-YHF:Ce nanocomposites. • Au-YHF:Ce NTs showed excellent capability and efficiency in removing Congo red from solutions. • Au-YHF:Ce NTs were utilized to determine the concentration of Congo red based on SERS. - Abstract: Ce-doped yttrium hydroxide fluoride nanotubes (YHF:Ce NTs) with large surface area are synthesized and conjugated with Au nanoparticles (NPs) to produce Au-YHF:Ce nanocomposites. The Au-YHF:Ce NTs have a hollow structure, rough surface, polymer coating, and good surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) properties. They are applied to wastewater treatment to remove Congo red as a typical pollutant. The materials not only remove pollutants rapidly from the wastewater, but also detect trace amounts of the pollutants quantitatively. The multifunctional Au-YHF:Ce NTs have commercial potential as nano-absorbents and nano-detectors in water treatment and environmental monitoring.

  11. Synthesis of an oxo trialkyl tungsten fluoride complex and its dual reactivity with silica dehydroxylated at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Merle, Nicolas

    2018-05-22

    The novel complex W (=O)Np3F has been prepared by fluorination of the corresponding chloride counterpart with AgBF4. The reactivity of this complex with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C afforded a well-defined silica supported monopodal tungsten oxo trialkyl surface species (≡SiO)W (=O)Np3. The reaction proceeds both through silanolysis of the W-F bond and opening of a siloxane bridge, with formation of a Si-F fragment, thanks to the affinity of silicon for fluoride. The resulting surface species was characterized by elemental analysis, DRIFT, solid state NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy. This material presenting fluorine on its surface shows an enhanced catalytic activity in propylene self-metathesis compared to its monopodal counterpart (≡SiO)W (=O)Np3 (prepared from W (=O)Np3Cl) suggesting that the Si-F in a close vicinity to the W decreases the electron density of the W and thus increases its reactivity towards the olefinic substrate.

  12. Synthesis of an oxo trialkyl tungsten fluoride complex and its dual reactivity with silica dehydroxylated at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Merle, Nicolas; Mazoyer, Etienne; Szeto, Kai C.; Rouge, Pascal; de Mallmann, Aimery; Berrier, Elise; Delevoye, Laurent; Gauvin, Ré gis M.; Nicholas, Christopher P.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Taoufik, Mostafa

    2018-01-01

    The novel complex W (=O)Np3F has been prepared by fluorination of the corresponding chloride counterpart with AgBF4. The reactivity of this complex with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C afforded a well-defined silica supported monopodal tungsten oxo trialkyl surface species (≡SiO)W (=O)Np3. The reaction proceeds both through silanolysis of the W-F bond and opening of a siloxane bridge, with formation of a Si-F fragment, thanks to the affinity of silicon for fluoride. The resulting surface species was characterized by elemental analysis, DRIFT, solid state NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy. This material presenting fluorine on its surface shows an enhanced catalytic activity in propylene self-metathesis compared to its monopodal counterpart (≡SiO)W (=O)Np3 (prepared from W (=O)Np3Cl) suggesting that the Si-F in a close vicinity to the W decreases the electron density of the W and thus increases its reactivity towards the olefinic substrate.

  13. Structures and heats of formation of simple alkaline earth metal compounds: fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides for Be, Mg, and Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliu, Monica; Feller, David; Gole, James L; Dixon, David A

    2010-09-02

    Geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are predicted for the simple alkaline earth (Be, Mg and Ca) fluorides, chlorides, oxides, and hydroxides at the coupled cluster theory [CCSD(T)] level including core-valence correlation with the aug-cc-pwCVnZ basis sets up to n = 5 in some cases. Additional corrections (scalar relativistic effects, vibrational zero-point energies, and atomic spin-orbit effects) were necessary to accurately calculate the total atomization energies and heats of formation. The calculated geometry parameters, frequencies, heats of formation, and bond dissociation energies are compared with the available experimental data. For a number of these alkaline earth compounds, the experimental geometries and energies are not reliable. MgF(2) and BeF(2) are predicted to be linear and CaF(2) is predicted to be bent. BeOH is predicted to be bent, whereas MgOH and CaOH are linear. The OBeO angle in Be(OH)(2) is not linear, and the molecule has C(2) symmetry. The heat of formation at 298 K for MgO is calculated to be 32.3 kcal/mol, and the bond dissociation energy at 0 K is predicted to be 61.5 kcal/mol.

  14. Iron corrosion inhibition by phosphonate complexes of rare earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu.I.; Raskol'nikov, A.F.; Starobinskaya, I.V.; Alekseev, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    Capability is shown of trivalent rare earth nitrilotrimethylphosphonates (R= Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Lu, Y) to retard steel corrosion in soft water due to the formation of slightly soluble hydroxides on steel surface. The protective film is produced as a result of electrophilic substitution of nascent iron cations for rare earth ions in near the surface layer. The introduction of rare earth cations into the protective film is ascertained by Auger spectroscopy in combination with the argon spraying. A quantitative interrelation between the protective effectiveness and solubility product of rare earth hydroxides is revealed

  15. Utilizing the σ-complex stability for quantifying reactivity in nucleophilic substitution of aromatic fluorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Liljenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A computational approach using density functional theory to compute the energies of the possible σ-complex reaction intermediates, the “σ-complex approach”, has been shown to be very useful in predicting regioselectivity, in electrophilic as well as nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In this article we give a short overview of the background for these investigations and the general requirements for predictive reactivity models for the pharmaceutical industry. We also present new results regarding the reaction rates and regioselectivities in nucleophilic substitution of fluorinated aromatics. They were rationalized by investigating linear correlations between experimental rate constants (k from the literature with a theoretical quantity, which we call the sigma stability (SS. The SS is the energy change associated with formation of the intermediate σ-complex by attachment of the nucleophile to the aromatic ring. The correlations, which include both neutral (NH3 and anionic (MeO− nucleophiles are quite satisfactory (r = 0.93 to r = 0.99, and SS is thus useful for quantifying both global (substrate and local (positional reactivity in SNAr reactions of fluorinated aromatic substrates. A mechanistic analysis shows that the geometric structure of the σ-complex resembles the rate-limiting transition state and that this provides a rationale for the observed correlations between the SS and the reaction rate.

  16. Interaction of cesium ions with calix[2]furan[4]pyrrole and its fluoride complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kříž, Jaroslav; Dybal, Jiří; Makrlík, E.; Kohnke, F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 541, 10 July (2012), s. 27-31 ISSN 0009-2614 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : calix[2]furan[4]pyrrole * Cs complex * NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.145, year: 2012

  17. Fluoride analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C S

    1963-01-01

    The methods and procedures for the detection and estimation of fluoride are varied and numerous. The problems of sampling, contamination, and loss in sampling waters, plant and animal tissues and atmospheres are discussed, along with brief descriptors of methods most commonly used. Techniques for separating fluorides from matrixes are discussed, as well as gravimetric, calorimetric, and spectrophotometric analytical techniques.

  18. On the capacity to the complexing of alkaline earth metal and magnesium chromates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orekhov, O.L.

    1978-01-01

    Considered is the capacity to the complexing of magnesium chromates and alkaline earth metal chromates with ammonium chromates in aqueous solutions. It has been established that the complexing of alkaline earth metal and magnesium chromates is effected by a nature of initial salts as well as their solubilities and the presence of crystallization water. Capacity of magnesium ions and alkaline rare earth metals to the complexing decreases in a series of Mg-Ca-Sr-Ba. Ca complexes exceed magnesium derivatives in respect of stability

  19. Mass spectra of alkaline earth salts with a FAB source. Complexation with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, J.

    1987-01-01

    With a liquid desorption FAB source it is possible to obtain alkaline earth metal ions complexed by a crown ether. Conditions for formation of these complexes ions are examined for selection of the complexing agent in function of cation size. Behaviour of alkaline and alkaline earth compounds are compared allowing the differentiation of ion extraction phenomena by liquid desorption ion source and solvent extraction [fr

  20. Density functional theory study on aqueous aluminum-fluoride complexes: exploration of the intrinsic relationship between water-exchange rate constants and structural parameters for monomer aluminum complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoyan; Qian, Zhaosheng; Lu, Bangmei; Yang, Wenjing; Bi, Shuping

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculation is carried out to investigate the structures, (19)F and (27)Al NMR chemical shifts of aqueous Al-F complexes and their water-exchange reactions. The following investigations are performed in this paper: (1) the microscopic properties of typical aqueous Al-F complexes are obtained at the level of B3LYP/6-311+G**. Al-OH(2) bond lengths increase with F(-) replacing inner-sphere H(2)O progressively, indicating labilizing effect of F(-) ligand. The Al-OH(2) distance trans to fluoride is longer than other Al-OH(2) distance, accounting for trans effect of F(-) ligand. (19)F and (27)Al NMR chemical shifts are calculated using GIAO method at the HF/6-311+G** level relative to F(H(2)O)(6)(-) and Al(H(2)O)(6)(3+) references, respectively. The results are consistent with available experimental values; (2) the dissociative (D) activated mechanism is observed by modeling water-exchange reaction for [Al(H(2)O)(6-i)F(i)]((3-i)+) (i = 1-4). The activation energy barriers are found to decrease with increasing F(-) substitution, which is in line with experimental rate constants (k(ex)). The log k(ex) of AlF(3)(H(2)O)(3)(0) and AlF(4)(H(2)O)(2)(-) are predicted by three ways. The results indicate that the correlation between log k(ex) and Al-O bond length as well as the given transmission coefficient allows experimental rate constants to be predicted, whereas the correlation between log k(ex) and activation free energy is poor; (3) the environmental significance of this work is elucidated by the extension toward three fields, that is, polyaluminum system, monomer Al-organic system and other metal ions system with high charge-to-radius ratio.

  1. Preparation and Property of Acrylic Acid Rare Earth Complex and Its Hydrosilylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Ming; Chen Haiyan; Chen Xiaosong; Dai Shaojun; Inoue Shinich; Okamoto Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Acrylic acid rare earth complex was prepared. Its chemical composition was determined by chemical and elemental analysis, and its structure as well as properties was characterized using IR, Fluorescence and UV spectrum, and its solubility was also investigated. Meanwhile a kind of elastic functional polymer with rare earth units in the side chains was produced. It is confirmed by IR spectrum that the Si-H bonds really react with acrylic acid rare earth.

  2. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... return on investment for community water fluoridation (including productivity losses) ranged from $4 in small communities of ... National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ...

  3. Determination of aminoglycoside antibiotics using complex compounds of chromotropic acid bisazoderivatives with rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alykov, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of complex formation of bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid with rare earth ions and aminoglycoside antibiotics have made it possible to choose carboxyarsenazo, orthanyl R and carboxynitrazo as highly sensitive reagents for determining aminoglycoside antibiotics. Conditions have been found for the formation of precipitates of different-ligand complexes containing rare earth ions, bisazo derivatives of chromotropic acid and aminogylcoside antibiotics. A procedure has been worked out of determining the antibiotics in biological samples with carboxyarsenazo [ru

  4. Study of alkaline-earth element complexes in anhydrous acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, N.

    1968-10-01

    We have studied the complexes of alkaline-earth elements in anhydrous acetic acid. Using glass-electrode potentiometry we have studied the titration of alkaline earth acetates with perchloric acid which is the strongest acid in anhydrous acetic acid. These titrations have shown that the basic strength of these acetates increases as follows: Mg 4 ); the mixed acetate-acid sulfate complex of barium: Ba (OAc)(HSO 4 ); the mixed acetate-chloride of barium: Ba (OAc)(Cl). (author) [fr

  5. Synthesis and physicochemical study of rare earth complexes with o-hydroxyphenoxymethylphosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alibaeva, Z.M.; Snezhko, N.I.; Pechurova, N.I.; Martynenko, L.I.; Alekseeva, N.A.; Bovin, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Rare earth complexes with o-hydroxyphenoxymethylphosphonic acid (C 7 H 9 PO 5 , N 2 L) of the HMl 2 xnH 2 O composition are synthesized. The compounds separated are studied by IR spectroscopy, X-ray phase and elementary analysis methods. The data obtained permit to suppose on the polymer structure of rare earth complexes, except HLaL 2 x2H 2 O which is evidently of the island structure

  6. Rare earth why complex life is uncommon in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Peter D

    2000-01-01

    n November 12, 2002, Dr. John Chambers of the NASA Ames - search Center gave a seminar to the Astrobiology Group at the OUniversity of Washington. The audience of about 100 listened with rapt attention as Chambers described results from a computer study of how planetary systems form. The goal of his research was to answer a dec- tively simple question: How often would newly forming planetary systems produce Earth-like planets, given a star the size of our own sun? By “Ear- like” Chambers meant a rocky planet with water on its surface, orbiting within a star’s “habitable zone. ” This not-too-hot and not-too-cold inner - gion, relatively close to the star, supports the presence of liquid water on a planet surface for hundreds of million of years—the time-span probably n- essary for the evolution of life. To answer the question of just how many Earth-like planets might be spawned in such a planetary system, Chambers had spent thousands of hours running highly sophisticated modeling p- grams through a...

  7. NMR study of rare earth and actinide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villardi de Montlaur de, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance studies of lanthanide shift reagents with olefin-transition metal complexes, monoamines and diamines as substrates are described. Shift reagents for olefins are reported: Lnsup(III)(fod) 3 can induce substantial shifts in the nmr spectra of a variety of olefins when silver 1-heptafluororobutyrate is used to complex the olefin. The preparation, properties and efficiency of such systems are described. Configurational aspects and exchange processes of Lnsup(III)(fod) 3 complexes with secondary and tertiary monoamines are analysed by means of dynamic nmr. Factors influencing the stability and the stoichiometry of these complexes and various processes such as nitrogen inversion and ligand exchange are discussed. At low temperature, ring inversion can be slow on an nmr time-scale for Lnsup(III)(fod) 3 -diamino chelates. Barriers to ring inversion in substituted ethylenediamines and propanediamines are obtained. Steric factors appear to play an important role in the stability and kinetics of these bidentate species. The synthesis of uranium-IV crown-ether and cryptate complexes is described. A conformational study of these compounds show evidence of an insertion of the paramagnetic cation as witnessed by the large induced shifts observed. The insertion of uranium in the macrocyclic ligand of a UCl 4 -dicyclohexyl-18-crown-6 complex is confirmed by an X-ray structural determination [fr

  8. Actinides and rare earths complexation with adenosine phosphate nucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostapha, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphorus compounds are important molecules in both nuclear industry and living systems fields. Indeed, several extractants of organophosphorus compounds (such as TBP, HDEHP) are used in the nuclear fuel cycle reprocessing and in the biological field. For instance, the nucleotides are organophosphates which play a very important role in various metabolic processes. Although the literature on the interactions of actinides with inorganic phosphate is abundant, published studies with organophosphate compounds are generally limited to macroscopic and / or physiological approaches. The objective of this thesis is to study the structure of several organophosphorus compounds with actinides to reach a better understanding and develop new specific buildings blocks. The family of the chosen molecules for this procedure consists of three adenine nucleotides mono, bi and triphosphate (AMP, adenosine monophosphate - ADP, adenosine diphosphate - ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and an amino-alkylphosphate (AEP O-phosphoryl-ethanolamine). Complexes synthesis was conducted in aqueous and weakly acidic medium (2.8-4) for several lanthanides (III) (Lu, Yb, Eu) and actinides (U (VI), Th (IV) and Am (III)). Several analytical and spectroscopic techniques have been used to describe the organization of the synthesized complexes: spectrometric analysis performed by FTIR and NMR were used to identify the functional groups involved in the complexation, analysis by ESI-MS and pH-metric titration were used to determine the solution speciation and EXAFS analyzes were performed on Mars beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, have described the local cation environment, for both solution and solid compounds. Some theoretical approaches of DFT were conducted to identify stable structures in purpose of completing the experimental studies. All solid complexes (AMP, ADP, ATP and AEP) have polynuclear structures, while soluble ATP complexes are mononuclear. For all synthesized complexes, it has been

  9. The utility of Earth system Models of Intermediate Complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    Intermediate-complexity models are models which describe the dynamics of the atmosphere and/or ocean in less detail than conventional General Circulation Models (GCMs). At the same time, they go beyond the approach taken by atmospheric Energy Balance Models (EBMs) or ocean box models by

  10. Scandium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, P.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    1997-01-01

    A new modification of scandium fluoride has been synthesised. The compound is deficient in fluorine, with the composition ScF 2.76 . It belongs to the tetragonal system, lattice parameters being a=3.792 and c=6.740 A and may be obtained at low temperatures by the decomposition of the precursor NH 4 ScF 4 . The reaction is topotactic, tetragonal parameters of the precursor are a=4.021 and c=6.744 A. Structural relationships with various fluorides and ammonium aminofluorides are discussed. This synthesis route with IR-assisted decomposition should be considered as a soft-chemistry approach. (orig.)

  11. Influence of a solvent on thermodynamics of electrolytic dissociation of simple and complex rare earth salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorodyskij, A.V.; Fialkov, Yu.Ya.; Chernyj, D.B. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii; Kievskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR))

    1982-03-01

    Influence of the double mixed solvent on thermodynamic characteristics of ionic migration of lanthanum, neodymium, europium and dysprosium chlorides as well as their phenanthroline complexes is considered. Decrease of lambdasub(c) of simple and complex rare earth salts in the lanthanum, neodymium-europium-dysprosium series as explained by increase of solvation degree, associated with lanthanum compression. It is shown that increase of methanol or propanol content results in exothermicity decrease of the ionic migration process. The temperature constituents of enthalpy and entropy of dissociation of the simple and complex rare earth salts are presented.

  12. Complex formation constant and hydration number change of aqua-rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, H.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: It is now well established that the inner-sphere hydration number of aqua-rare earth ions changes from nine to eight in the middle of the rare earth series. This hydration number change greatly affects the complex formation of rare earth ions as we observe irregular variations in most series behaviours of the complex formation constant (K) in aqueous solution systems when K being plotted against 1/r or r (r is ionic radius of rare earth ion). Furthermore, it shows very anomalous concentration dependence in the sense that nona-aqua Ln 3+ ion increases in number with increase in salt concentration in aqueous rare earth salt solution (salt chloride, perchlorate). In this report, a theoretical derivation of the formation constant (K) for the inner-sphere complex formation of rare earth ions with a monodentate ligand was made by taking account of both the hydration number change in the middle of the series and its anomalous salt concentration dependence. The series behaviour of the formation constant against 1/r (or r) is successfully explained with using the empirical finding that K varies almost linearly with 1/r (or r) in the region where only one hydration number dominates. This success is also taken as evidence that the anomalous salt concentration dependence of the hydration number change is caused by the outer-sphere complex formation of rare earth ions with the condition that nona-aqua rare earth ions form outer-sphere complexes more easily than octa-aqua ions

  13. Synthesis of complex plutonium oxides with alkaline-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasufumi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Yamawaki, Michio.

    1995-03-01

    Complex plutonium(IV) oxides with strontium and barium, SuPuO 3 and BaPuO 3 , were synthesized and their crystal structure was analyzed. Compacted mixture of plutonium dioxide powder and the carbonate of strontium or barium was heated in a stream of argon gas using a cell with a small orifice. The products obtained were found to be composed of a nearly single phase showing the structure of orthorhombic slightly distorted from cubic. (author)

  14. Complexes of rare earths with hydrazide of salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashmadze, M Sh; Pirtskhalava, N I; Kharitonov, Yu Ya; Machkhoshvili, R I [Tbilisskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR); AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii; Moskovskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1978-10-01

    Complex compounds M(HOC/sub 6/H/sub 4/CONNH/sub 2/)/sub 3/ xnH/sub 2/O, where M is one of the following metals and n=0 or 1, have been obtained in the reactions of salts (chlorides or nitrates) of praseodymium, neodymium, europium, gadolinium, erbium, thulium or lutecium with salicylic acid hydrazide in a weakly alkaline medium. Some properties and infrared absorption spectra of the compounds obtained have been studied.

  15. The Boring Billion, a slingshot for Complex Life on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Large, Ross R; Corkrey, Ross; Danyushevsky, Leonid V

    2018-03-13

    The period 1800 to 800 Ma ("Boring Billion") is believed to mark a delay in the evolution of complex life, primarily due to low levels of oxygen in the atmosphere. Earlier studies highlight the remarkably flat C, Cr isotopes and low trace element trends during the so-called stasis, caused by prolonged nutrient, climatic, atmospheric and tectonic stability. In contrast, we suggest a first-order variability of bio-essential trace element availability in the oceans by combining systematic sampling of the Proterozoic rock record with sensitive geochemical analyses of marine pyrite by LA-ICP-MS technique. We also recall that several critical biological evolutionary events, such as the appearance of eukaryotes, origin of multicellularity & sexual reproduction, and the first major diversification of eukaryotes (crown group) occurred during this period. Therefore, it appears possible that the period of low nutrient trace elements (1800-1400 Ma) caused evolutionary pressures which became an essential trigger for promoting biological innovations in the eukaryotic domain. Later periods of stress-free conditions, with relatively high nutrient trace element concentration, facilitated diversification. We propose that the "Boring Billion" was a period of sequential stepwise evolution and diversification of complex eukaryotes, triggering evolutionary pathways that made possible the later rise of micro-metazoans and their macroscopic counterparts.

  16. Preparation of new phthalocyanine complexes of some rare-earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Higashi, Teruaki; Mori, Masayasu

    1982-01-01

    The reaction of tris(1,3-diphenyl-1,3-propanedionato) complexes of heavier rare-earth elements, M 3+ (dbm) 3 and lithium phthalocyaninato (2-), Li 2 (pc) gave two types of new stable phthalocyanine complexes, [M 3+ (pc)(dbm)(dbmH)] and [M 3+ (pc)(dbm)] depending on the solvents used for the preparation. The structure of both types of complexes are tentatively proposed. (author)

  17. Study on rare earths complexes separation by means of different type of ion exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubicka, H.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of different types of ion exchangers for purification and separation of rare earths complexes has been examined. The experimental work has been carried out on 14 chelating ion exchangers. The investigation results proved the great usefulness chelating ion exchangers especially of amino acid and phosphorus-type. Application of that type ion exchangers in column chromatographic process gave the excellent rare earths separation as well as enabled to obtain their preparates of high purity. 218 refs, 21 figs, 27 tabs

  18. Using Google Earth Surface Metrics to Predict Plant Species Richness in a Complex Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Block

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Google Earth provides a freely available, global mosaic of high-resolution imagery from different sensors that has become popular in environmental and ecological studies. However, such imagery lacks the near-infrared band often used in studying vegetation, thus its potential for estimating vegetation properties remains unclear. In this study, we assess the potential of Google Earth imagery to describe and predict vegetation attributes. Further, we compare it to the potential of SPOT imagery, which has additional spectral information. We measured basal area, vegetation height, crown cover, density of individuals, and species richness in 60 plots in the oak forests of a complex volcanic landscape in central Mexico. We modelled each vegetation attribute as a function of surface metrics derived from Google Earth and SPOT images, and selected the best-supported linear models from each source. Total species richness was the best-described and predicted variable: the best Google Earth-based model explained nearly as much variation in species richness as its SPOT counterpart (R2 = 0.44 and 0.51, respectively. However, Google Earth metrics emerged as poor predictors of all remaining vegetation attributes, whilst SPOT metrics showed potential for predicting vegetation height. We conclude that Google Earth imagery can be used to estimate species richness in complex landscapes. As it is freely available, Google Earth can broaden the use of remote sensing by researchers and managers in low-income tropical countries where most biodiversity hotspots are found.

  19. Understanding Student Cognition about Complex Earth System Processes Related to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, K. S.; Libarkin, J.; Ledley, T. S.; Dutta, S.; Templeton, M. C.; Geroux, J.; Blakeney, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's climate system includes complex behavior and interconnections with other Earth spheres that present challenges to student learning. To better understand these unique challenges, we have conducted experiments with high-school and introductory level college students to determine how information pertaining to the connections between the Earth's atmospheric system and the other Earth spheres (e.g., hydrosphere and cryosphere) are processed. Specifically, we include psychomotor tests (e.g., eye-tracking) and open-ended questionnaires in this research study, where participants were provided scientific images of the Earth (e.g., global precipitation and ocean and atmospheric currents), eye-tracked, and asked to provide causal or relational explanations about the viewed images. In addition, the students engaged in on-line modules (http://serc.carleton.edu/eslabs/climate/index.html) focused on Earth system science as training activities to address potential cognitive barriers. The developed modules included interactive media, hands-on lessons, links to outside resources, and formative assessment questions to promote a supportive and data-rich learning environment. Student eye movements were tracked during engagement with the materials to determine the role of perception and attention on understanding. Students also completed a conceptual questionnaire pre-post to determine if these on-line curriculum materials assisted in their development of connections between Earth's atmospheric system and the other Earth systems. The pre-post results of students' thinking about climate change concepts, as well as eye-tracking results, will be presented.

  20. Spectral and thermal behaviours of rare earth element complexes with 3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANUSZ CHRUŚCIEL

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The conditions for the formation of rare earth element 3,5-dimethytoxybenzoates were studied and their quantitative composition and solubilities in water at 293 K were determined. The complexes are anhydrous or hydrated salts and their solubilities are of the orders of 10-5 – 10-4 mol dm-3. Their FTIR, FIR and X-ray spectra were recorded. The compounds were also characterized by thermogravimetric studies in air and nitrogen atmospheres and by magnetic measurements. All complexes are crystalline compounds. The carboxylate group in these complexes is a bidentate, chelating ligand. On heating in air to 1173 K, the 3,5-dimethoxybenzoates of rare earth elements decompose in various ways. The hydrated complexes first dehydrate to form anhydrous salts which then decompose in air to the oxides of the respective metals while in nitrogen to mixtures of carbon and oxides of the respective metals. The complexes are more stable in air than in nitrogen.

  1. Fabrication of Superhydrophobic and Luminescent Rare Earth/Polymer complex Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zefeng; Ye, Weiwei; Luo, Xinran; Wang, Zhonggang

    2016-04-18

    The motivation of this work is to create luminescent rare earth/polymer films with outstanding water-resistance and superhydrophobicity. Specifically, the emulsion polymerization of styrene leads to core particles. Then core-shell-structured polymer nanoparticles are synthesized by copolymerization of styrene and acrylic acid on the core surface. The coordination reaction between carboxylic groups and rare earth ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) generates uniform spherical rare earth/polymer nanoparticles, which are subsequently complexed with PTFE microparticles to obtain micro-/nano-scaled PTFE/rare earth films with hierarchical rough morphology. The films exhibit large water contact angle up to 161° and sliding angle of about 6°, and can emit strong red and green fluorescence under UV excitation. More surprisingly, it is found that the films maintain high fluorescence intensity after submersed in water and even in aqueous salt solution for two days because of the excellent water repellent ability of surfaces.

  2. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  3. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  4. Loan officers' perceptions concerning earth-sheltered housing: risk, complexity, and advantage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzai-Kashi, A; Combs, E R

    1984-01-01

    The lack of available financing is a major impediment to the construction of earth-sheltered housing. A broad-based study of lending institutions, this study describes the perceptions of loan officers toward earth-sheltered housing and their perception of their institution's lending policies in terms of their concerns. The survey finds that a majority of the loan officers perceive more stringent terms and larger down payments for earth-sheltered housing because of their concerns for financial risk, complexity, and relative advantage. Methods to reduce the risk and complexity and to increase the relative advantage would involve marketing research, certification and warranty programs, secondary mortgages markets, and other techniques. 8 references, 5 tables.

  5. Photophysical and physicochemical studies of rare earths complexes formed with calyx(n)arenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, F.M.; Varbanov, S.; Corine, C.; Muller, G.; Fatin-Rouge, N.; Scopelliti, R.; Bunzli J, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, some of the photophysical and physicochemical properties are presented which are observed in the rare earths complexes that are formed with diverse functionalized calyx(n)arenes receptors where n=4-6 designed with predetermined properties and synthesized by own methods. (Author)

  6. Application of NASA management approach to solve complex problems on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potate, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    The application of NASA management approach to solving complex problems on earth is discussed. The management of the Apollo program is presented as an example of effective management techniques. Four key elements of effective management are analyzed. Photographs of the Cape Kennedy launch sites and supporting equipment are included to support the discussions.

  7. Fluoride absorption: independence from plasma fluoride levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitford, G.M.; Williams, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The concept that there are physiologic mechanisms to homeostatically regulate plasma fluoride concentrations has been supported by results in the literature suggesting an inverse relationship between plasma fluoride levels and the absorption of the ion from the gastrointestinal tract of the rat. The validity of the relationship was questioned because of possible problems in the experimental design. The present work used four different methods to evaluate the effect of plasma fluoride levels on the absorption of the ion in rats: (i) the percentage of the daily fluoride intake that was excreted in the urine; (ii) the concentration of fluoride in femur epiphyses; (iii) the net areas under the time-plasma fluoride concentration curves after intragastric fluoride doses; and (iv) the residual amounts or fluoride in the gastrointestinal tracts after the intragastric fluoride doses. None of these methods indicated that plasma fluoride levels influence the rate or the degree or fluoride absorption. It was concluded that, unless extremely high plasma fluoride levels are involved (pharmacologic or toxic doses), the absorption of the ion is independent of plasma levels. The results provide further evidence that plasma fluoride concentrations are not homeostatically regulated

  8. Spectrofluorimetric characterization and study for the determination of rare earth carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, E.S.K.; Abrao, A.

    1982-01-01

    Some rare earths exhibit fluorescence in acid solution (HC1, H 2 SO 4 or HC10 4 ) when irradiated with ultraviolet radiation; however, analytical application of this property has not been proposed due to the lack of sensitivity resulted from the weakness of the fluorescence transitions. The rare earths are soluble in alkali carbonate solutions, forming anionic carbonate complexes (TR(CO 3 ) sup(n-) sub(x)); some of them have stronger absorption bands than those obtained in acid media. Using this property, the characterization and determination of the six rare earths which fluoresce in carbonate solution has been studied. The excitation and emission wavelengths are (in nm): Sm (406, 596); Eu (280,612); Gd (272,312); Tb (240,542); Dy (350, 576) and Tm (360, 450). Although Ce-III is highly fluorescent in acid media, when in carbonate solution it is easily oxidized to Ce-IV which does not fluoresce neither in acid nor in carbonate solutions. The other rare earths, although soluble in carbonate solution, do not fluoresce in this medium. A comparison is made, between the fluorescence of the fluorescing lanthanides, in acid and carbonate media. The precision and accuracy of this method, the detection limit of all rare earths studied and the mutual interference of some of them is also discussed. The method will be applied to the analytical control of the separation and purification of individual rare earths, now under development. (Author) [pt

  9. Studies on mixed ligand complexes of adenine and xanthine with some rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, P.R.; Singh, Mamta; Nayan, Ram

    1993-01-01

    Interactions of 6-aminopurine (adenine, HA) and 2,6-dihydroxypurine (xanthine, HB) with trivalent rare earth ions Y, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Tm, have been studied by pH-titration methods in aqueous solution at 20 o (μ = 0.1 M KNO 3 ). The ligands in their mixtures with tripositive rare earth ions (M 3+ ) form a number of mixed ligand complexes, M 3+ -adenine-xanthine, M 3+ -(adenine) 2 -xanthine, M 3+ -adenine-(xanthine) 2 in addition to the binary complexes, M 3+ -(adenine), M 3+ -(adenine) 2 , M 3+ -(adenine) 3 , M 3+ -(xanthine), M 3+ -(xanthine) 2 and M 3+ -(xanthine) 3 . The stability constants of these complexes have been evaluated and the results discussed. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Rare-earth element geochemistry in the Luanga Mafic-Ultramafic Complex, Para

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suita, M.T.F.; Nilson, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Six whole-rock samples (harzburgite, orthopyroxenic and norite) of the Luanga Mafic-Ultramafic Complex (Para) were analysed for rare-earth elements (REE) through plasma spectrometry. The Luanga Complex is a deformed and metamorphosed layered mafic-ultramafic body of Archaean age. The Complex underwent medium-grade metamorphism in three stages. The first stage (medium grade) involved local formation of tremolite and reduction of Ca content in plagioclase. The second stage (low grade) consisted of serpentinization of amphibole or ortopyroxene forming bastile and generation of albite + epidote + white mica + actinolite from plagioclase. The third stage involved renewed serpentinization and/or talcification of pre-existing minerals (including serpentine) along fracture and fault surfaces. The analysed rocks display light rare-earth element (LREE) enrichment up to sixty times the composition of the Leedly chondrite and La/Yb ratios from 6.2 to 20.0 they are low in medium rare-earth elements (MREE), displaying discrete to strong negative Eu anomaly even in plagioclase cumulates and are slightly enriched in heavy rare-earth elements (HREE), usually higher than chondrite values. The low MREE area related to the occurrence of orthopyroxene (bronzite) in a way similar to the pattern of alpine periodotites, while HREE enrichment is compatible with the presence of bronzite and Mg-olivine, probably an inherited igneous feature. (author) [pt

  11. Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eby, M.; Weaver, A. J.; Alexander, K.

    2013-01-01

    Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. Historical simulations start at 850 CE...... and continue through to 2005. The standard simulations include changes in forcing from solar luminosity, Earth's orbital configuration, CO2, additional greenhouse gases, land use, and sulphate and volcanic aerosols. In spite of very different modelled pre-industrial global surface air temperatures, overall 20...

  12. Study on silicon oxide coated on silver nanocrystal to enhance fluorescence intensity of rare earth complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Yan-rong; Lin, Xue-mei; Wang, Ai-ling; Wang, Zhong-xia; Kang, Jie; Chu, Hai-bin, E-mail: binghai99@gmail.com; Zhao, Yong-liang, E-mail: hxzhaoyl@163.com

    2014-10-15

    Twelve kinds of rare earth complexes were synthesized using halo-benzoic acid as anion ligand and Sm{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} as central ions, respectively. The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, rare earth coordination titration and electrospray ionization mass spectra, from which the compositions of the complexes were confirmed to be RE(p-FBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O, RE(p-ClBA){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O, RE(p-BrBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O, RE(o-FBA){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O, RE(o-ClBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O, RE(o-BrBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O (RE=Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}). Besides, IR spectra and UV–visible absorption spectroscopy indicated that the carboxyl oxygen atoms of ligands coordinated to the rare earth ions. Moreover, Ag@SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared via a modified Stöber method. The average diameters of silver cores were typically between 60 nm and 70 nm, and the thicknesses of the SiO{sub 2} shells were around 10 nm, 15 nm and 25 nm, respectively. The influence of Ag@SiO{sub 2} NPs on the luminescence properties of the rare earth complexes showed that the luminescence intensities of rare earth complexes were enhanced remarkably. As the thickness of SiO{sub 2} shell increases in the range of 10–25 nm, the effect of metal-enhanced fluorescence become obvious. The mechanism of the changes of the fluorescence intensity is also discussed. - Highlights: • Among 10–25 nm, the thicker the shell thickness, the better the fluorescence effect. • The strong the intensity of the pure complexes, the smaller the multiple enhanced. • The intensity of Sm(p-BrBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O is the strongest among Sm(p-XBA){sub 3}·nH{sub 2}O complexes. • The intensity of Dy(p-ClBA){sub 3}·2H{sub 2}O is the strongest among Dy(p-XBA){sub 3}·nH{sub 2}O complexes. • When halogen is in o-position, the intensity of RE(o-ClBA){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O is the strongest.

  13. Use of fluoride systems for some fission product separation from residues of fast reactor spent fuel fluorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkov, Yu.D.; Khomyakov, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Investigated has been a possibility of the use of fluoride systems (acid nitrozyl fluoride and molten salts) for americium extraction from residues of fluorination of irradiated fuel containing mainly fluorides of rare earth compounds, alkali and alkaline earth elements. At treatment of fission product fluorides by acid nitrozyl fluoride only cesium and uranium fluorides dissolve, while americium and rare earth fluorides are practically non-soluble in it. The solubility of cesium, strontium, barium and fluorides of some other rare earth elements in molten cryolite at the temperature of 1000 deg C, Li-NaF and LiF-CaF 2 of eutectic content at 750 and 800 deg C are respectively 15-77 %. Cerium fluoride presents an exception, its solubility in cryolite being only 0.73%. At treatment of mixture of americium and lanthanum fluorides by molten salts in the weight ratio of 1:1, approximately 50% of lanthanum and 65-70% of americium turn into melt independent of the type of melt. The maximum melt output of americium is obtained at treatment of lanthanum and americium fluoride mixture by cryolite melt at the temperature of 1000 deg C. It is shown that the presence of rare earth of fluorides, except lanthanum fluoride, effect significantly of americium distribution over phases in the process of fluoride processing by the fluoride molten salts

  14. Complex demodulation in VLBI estimation of high frequency Earth rotation components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, S.; Brzeziński, A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    The spectrum of high frequency Earth rotation variations contains strong harmonic signal components mainly excited by ocean tides along with much weaker non-harmonic fluctuations driven by irregular processes like the diurnal thermal tides in the atmosphere and oceans. In order to properly investigate non-harmonic phenomena a representation in time domain is inevitable. We present a method, operating in time domain, which is easily applicable within Earth rotation estimation from Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). It enables the determination of diurnal and subdiurnal variations, and is still effective with merely diurnal parameter sampling. The features of complex demodulation are used in an extended parameterization of polar motion and universal time which was implemented into a dedicated version of the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS. The functionality of the approach was evaluated by comparing amplitudes and phases of harmonic variations at tidal periods (diurnal/semidiurnal), derived from demodulated Earth rotation parameters (ERP), estimated from hourly resolved VLBI ERP time series and taken from a recently published VLBI ERP model to the terms of the conventional model for ocean tidal effects in Earth rotation recommended by the International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service (IERS). The three sets of tidal terms derived from VLBI observations extensively agree among each other within the three-sigma level of the demodulation approach, which is below 6 μas for polar motion and universal time. They also coincide in terms of differences to the IERS model, where significant deviations primarily for several major tidal terms are apparent. An additional spectral analysis of the as well estimated demodulated ERP series of the ter- and quarterdiurnal frequency bands did not reveal any significant signal structure. The complex demodulation applied in VLBI parameter estimation could be demonstrated a suitable procedure for the reliable reproduction of

  15. Estimation of stability of polynuclear rare earth complexes with EDTA in the presence of stable monocomplexonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ba Tkhun; Kupriyanova, G.N.; Smirnova, N.S.; Martynenko, L.I.; Evseeva, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Complexing in rare-earth-EDTA system at the mole ratio making up (M 3+ ):(H 2 A 2- )=1:1, 2:1, 5:1, (M=Nd, Yb), C H 2 A 2- =0.010, 0.015 mol/l, μ=0.5 (KCl) is studied in pH 1.6-3.0 interval by pH-metric titration technique using mathematical modelling method. A model containing MA - , MHA, M 2 A 2+ complexes for which stability constants, equalling respectively (lgK) to 15.66, 2.11, 1.06 (for neodymium complexes) and 18.70, 1.78, 0.45 (for ytterbium complexes) are determined by non-linear LSF, appears to be adequate. It is shown that binuclear complex concentration in solution with M 3+ excess is comparable to stable monocomplexonate concentration

  16. Synthesis of amino acid rare earth complexes and its application in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, G.-T.; Lian, P.; Hu, Y.H.; Guo, G.-R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The application of rare-earth compounds in agriculture has been widely reported. So far, most rare-earth compounds used in agriculture were inorganic salt and they were difficult to be absorbed by croup. The synthesis method and structure of amino acid rare-earth complexes have been reported. In this paper, we reported the preparation of mixed amino acids rare-earth complexes and their application in agriculture. The mixed amino acids were obtained by hydrolysis of waste natural protein. Rare earth was lanthanum oxide(99%). Mixed amino acids lanthanum complexes(MALa) was prepared according to the previous method. Investigation to the effect of croup by MALa, we have make tests of citrus, rice and mung bean. The results show as follows: 1) When the experiment group citrus was sprinkled twice 400ppm MALa at bouquet stage and young fruit stage, the sugar, morose, sucrose, soluble solid matter and vitamin C of fruit were increased 21%, 20%, 22%, 22% and 6% as compared to the control group, respectively. The area of leaf and foliage branch in Spring were also increased 4.6% and 2.2%. 2) When the rice was sprinkled 300ppm MALa at early tillering stage, the productively of rice was addition to 10-15%, and the relative effect of prevention was 45.61% for sheath and culm blight of rice. 3) In the test of mungbean growth, the low consistency of MALa ( 250ppm) retain from sprouting seed. As the same time, it was similar action to seeding growth. Preliminary results indicated MLAa could used as the plant growth regulation agent on the croup. Investigation to the effect of MALa on other croup and the mechanism of biological effect on the croup are still going on

  17. Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Carter, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This curriculum-based, easy-to-follow book teaches young readers about Earth as one of the eight planets in our solar system in astronomical terms. With accessible text, it provides the fundamental information any student needs to begin their studies in astronomy, such as how Earth spins and revolves around the Sun, why it's uniquely suitable for life, its physical features, atmosphere, biosphere, moon, its past, future, and more. To enhance the learning experience, many of the images come directly from NASA. This straightforward title offers the fundamental information any student needs to sp

  18. Crystallochemical analysis of rare-earth halogen-containing π-complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatova, O.A.; Blatov, V.A.; Serezhkin, V.N.

    2001-01-01

    Dependence of the size of Ln atom action in coordination polyhedrons LnC n X m (X = F, Cl, Br) on its nature, coordination number, oxidation state and number of Ln-X bonds, was studied using 96 halogen-containing π-complexes of rare earth and yttrium (Ln) by way of example. A method of estimating ligand sizes in coordination sphere using the Voronoi-Dirichlet molecular polyhedrons was suggested. Influence of the ligands sizes on stability of π-complexes and presence of specific interactions in their structure was analyzed [ru

  19. Comparative study of binary and ternary complexes of some rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhijani, S.D.; Sangal, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    Modified form of Irving and Rossotti's pH titration technique has been used to evaluate and compare the stability constants of the binary and ternary complexes of Sc(III), Y(III), La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III) and Sm(III) at 30 0 at an ionic strength of 0.2M NaClO 4 . For the study of ternary complexes, nitrilotriacetic acid has been used as a primary ligand and polyhydroxy phenols i.e. pyrocatechol (PYC), pyrogallol (PYG) and gallic acid (GA) as secondary ligands. The stability constants of the binary complexes were found to be more than those of the corresponding ternary complexes which can reasonably be explained on the basis of electrostatic force between primary complex (metal in the case of binary complex) and secondary ligand, and space available to accommodate the secondary ligand. The stability decreases with the increase in ionic radii, i.e. Sc(III)>Y(III)>Sm(III)>Nd(III)>Pr(III)>La(III). In terms of secondary ligand, it follows the order PYC>GA>PYG. Rare earths form only 1:1 binary complex, and 1:1:1 mixed ligand complex in all the cases. (author)

  20. Crystal structure of a dinuclear CoII complex with bridging fluoride ligands: di-μ-fluorido-bis{tris[(6-methylpyridin-2-ylmethyl]amine}dicobalt(II bis(tetrafluoridoborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Inomata

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of Co(BF42·6H2O with tris[(6-methylpyridin-2-ylmethyl]amiine in methanol results in a fluoride abstraction from BF4−, yielding the unexpected title compound, [Co2F2(C21H24N42](BF42. The complex cation consists of two inversion-related [Co(C21H24N4]2+ moieties bridged by a pair of fluoride ligands. The CoII cation is six-coordinated in a distorted octahedral geometry and forms a +II high-spin state. In the crystal, the complex cation and the BF4− anion are connected by C—H...F hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. An intramolecular C—H...F hydrogen bond is also observed.

  1. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, BJ; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  2. In the presence of fluoride, free Sc³⁺ is not a good predictor of Sc bioaccumulation by two unicellular algae: possible role of fluoro-complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémazy, Anne; Campbell, Peter G C; Fortin, Claude

    2014-08-19

    We investigated the effect of fluoride complexation on scandium accumulation by two unicellular algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. This trivalent metal was selected for its chemical similarities with aluminum and for its convenient radioisotope (Sc-46), which can be used as a tracer in short-term bioaccumulation studies. Scandium surface-bound concentrations (Sc(ads)) and uptake fluxes (J(int)) were estimated in the two algae over short-term (organisms.

  3. Inhibition of cellular oxidation by fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borei, H

    1945-01-01

    An attempt has been made to investigate the inhibition by fluoride of the oxidative processes which occur in the cell by way of the cytochrome oxidase-cytochrome system. Some chemical and physical properties of the fluoride ion are discussed, together with certain quantitative methods for the determination of fluoride. An exhaustive review of the literature concerning the effect of fluoride on enzymic processes has been compiled. The experiments have shown that the point of the attack by fluoride is to be found among the cytochromes. The inhibitory mechanism appears to be such that the haemoprotein is prevented from taking part in the preceding and succeeding links in the reaction chain. The blocking action leaves the prosthetic group of the haemoprotein completely unchanged. The experimental results indicate the formation of a fluorophosphoprotein complex, analogous to that found in the case of enolase. Magnesium may possibly play a part in this process.

  4. Making a report of a short trip in an ophiolitic complex with Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubret, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Plate tectonics is taught in French secondary school (lower and upper-sixth). According to the curriculum, the comprehension of plate-tectonic processes and concepts should be based on field data. For example, the Alpine's ocean history is studied to understand how mountain ranges are formed. In this context, Corsica is a great open-air laboratory, but unfortunately, the traffic conditions are very difficult in the island and despite the short distances, it's almost impossible for teachers to take their students to the remarkable geologic spots. The «défilé de l'Inzecca» is one of them: there you can see a part of the alpine's ophiolitic complex. The aim of this activity is to elaborate a « KMZ folder » in Google Earth as a report of a short trip thanks to the students' data field; it is also the occasion to enrich the Google Earth KMZ folder already available for our teaching.

  5. Calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, C.W.; Nestor, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A new process for producing large, single, oriented crystals of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) has been developed which overcomes the limitations of current growing methods. This process has been reduced to practice and has yielded oriented crystals 17.5 x 17.5 x 5 cm 3 . Currently nearing completion is a system for producing 35 x 35 x 7.5 cm 3 single crystals. A scale up to one-meter-square is considered feasible. This crystal growing process makes possible the fabrication of very large CaF 2 windows. Suitability for very high power lasers, however, requires attention to properties beyond mere size. A process to generate higher purity growth stock (starting material) was also developed. The additional purification of the growth stock contributes to lower bulk absorption, the absence of color centers and increased radiation hardness. Also identified were several specific impurities which correlate with radiation hardness. A correlation was found between color centers induced by laser radiation and ionizing radiation. Other CaF 2 crystal properties such as tensile strength, absorption and laser damage thresholds were studied and are discussed

  6. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed. PMID:24719570

  7. Student Learning of Complex Earth Systems: A Model to Guide Development of Student Expertise in Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Lauren N.; Scherer, Hannah H.; Herbert, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Engaging students in problem-solving concerning environmental issues in near-surface complex Earth systems involves developing student conceptualization of the Earth as a system and applying that scientific knowledge to the problems using practices that model those used by professionals. In this article, we review geoscience education research…

  8. CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2}. A new rare-earth metal(III) fluoride oxoselenate(IV) with sections of the ReO{sub 3}-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, Stefan; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2017-09-04

    A new representative of rare-earth metal(III) fluoride oxoselenates(IV) derivatized with alkali metals could be synthesized via solid-state reactions. Colorless single crystals of CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2} were obtained through the reaction of Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ScF{sub 3}, and SeO{sub 2} (molar ratio 1:1:3) with CsBr as reactant and fluxing agent. For this purpose, corundum crucibles embedded as liners into evacuated silica ampoules were applied as containers for these reactions at 700 C for seven days. The new quintenary compound crystallizes in the trigonal space group P3m1 with a = 565.34(4) and c = 1069.87(8) pm (c/a = 1.892) for Z = 1. The crystal structure of CsSc{sub 3}F{sub 6}[SeO{sub 3}]{sub 2} contains two crystallographically different Sc{sup 3+} cations. Each (Sc1){sup 3+} is surrounded by six fluoride anions as octahedron, while the octahedra about (Sc2){sup 3+} are formed by three fluoride anions and three oxygen atoms from three terminal [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} anions. The [(Sc1)F{sub 6}]{sup 3-} octahedra link via common F{sup -} vertices to six fac-[(Sc2)F{sub 3}O{sub 3}]{sup 6-} octahedra forming {sup 2}{sub ∞}{[Sc_3F_6O_6]"9"-} layers parallel to (001). These layers are separated by oxygen-coordinated Cs{sup +} cations (C.N. = 12), arranging for the charge compensation, while Se{sup 4+} cations within the layers surrounded by three oxygen atoms as ψ{sup 1}-tetrahedral [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} units complete the structure. EDX measurements confirmed the composition of the title compound and single-crystal Raman studies showed the typical vibrational modes of isolated [SeO{sub 3}]{sup 2-} anions with ideal C{sub 3v} symmetry. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Thermal expansion and magnetic properties of benzoquinone-bridged dinuclear rare-earth complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Jani O; Mansikkamäki, Akseli; Lahtinen, Manu; Guo, Fu-Sheng; Kalenius, Elina; Layfield, Richard A; Chibotaru, Liviu F

    2017-10-10

    The synthesis and structural characterization of two benzoquinone-bridged dinuclear rare-earth complexes [BQ(MCl 2 ·THF 3 ) 2 ] (BQ = 2,5-bisoxide-1,4-benzoquinone; M = Y (1), Dy (2)) are described. Of these reported metal complexes, the dysprosium analogue 2 is the first discrete bridged dinuclear lanthanide complex in which both metal centres reside in pentagonal bipyramidal environments. Interestingly, both complexes undergo significant thermal expansion upon heating from 120 K to 293 K as illustrated by single-crystal X-ray and powder diffraction experiments. AC magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal that 2 does not show the slow relation of magnetization in zero dc field. The absent of single-molecule behaviour in 2 arises from the rotation of the principal magnetic axis as compared to the pseudo-C 5 axis of the pentagonal bipyramidal environment as suggested by ab initio calculations. The cyclic voltammetry and chemical reduction experiments demonstrated that complexes 1 and 2 can be reduced to radical species containing [BQ 3 ˙ - ]. This study establishes efficient synthetic strategy to make bridged redox-active multinuclear lanthanide complexes with a pentagonal bipyramidal coordination environment that are potential precursors for single-molecule magnets.

  10. Story of Fluoridation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Info Health Topics Fluoride Share The Story of Fluoridation It started as an observation, that ... this time using photospectrographic analysis, a more sophisticated technology than that used by McKay. Churchill asked an ...

  11. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  12. Synthesis and study of rare earth complexes with ortho-hydroxyphenyliminodiacetic acid containing lactone ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, L.I.; Mitrofanova, N.D.; Muratova, N.M.; Kurbatova, S.V.

    1978-01-01

    Solid complex compounds of o-oxyphenyliminodiacetic acid with rare earth elements of the composition of LnA 2 Clx6H 2 O and LnA 3 x5H 2 O (where Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Eu, Dy, Er, and Y) not described earlier, have been synthesized. The thermographic analysis of the compounds has been performed. It is shown by infrared spectroscopy that a lactone ring is retained in the dicomplex structure. The presence of the absorption bands of non-ionized COOH-groups in the infrared spectra of tricomplexonates of heavy r.e.e. points to opening of the lactone ring in the ligand part

  13. Dansyl - Substituted Aza Crown Ethers: Complexation with Alkali, Alkaline Earth Metal Ions and Ammonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiab, Shihab; Archibong, Edikan; Tasheva, Donka; Mochona, Bereket; Gangapuram, Madhavi; Redda, Kinfe

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the binding properties of four dansyl substituted aza-crown ethers with alkali, alkaline earth metal ions and ammonium. The influence of the solvent polarity and protonation on the photophysical properties of the compounds was studied by UV/Vis and fluorescence methods. The host species caused only slight changes on the absorption spectra of the ligands. The fluorescence changes were more pronounced and concentration dependent thus allowing to calculate the binding constants of the process. The most stable complex under our working conditions was the one between Ba2+ and DNS18C6. PMID:21738561

  14. Electroluminescent devices based on rare-earth tetrakis β-diketonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirino, W.G.; Legnani, C.; Santos, R.M.B. dos; Teixeira, K.C.; Cremona, M.; Guedes, M.A.; Brito, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the synthesis, photoluminescence and electroluminescence investigation of the novel tetrakis β-diketonate of rare-earth complexes such as, M[Eu(dbm) 4 ] and M[Tb(acac) 4 ] with a variety of cationic ligands, M = Li + , Na + and K + have been investigated. The emission spectra of the Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ complexes displayed characteristic narrow bands arising from intraconfigurational transitions of trivalent rare-earth ions and exhibited red color emission for the Eu 3+ ion ( 5 D 0 → 7 F J , J = 0-6) and green for the Tb 3+ ion ( 5 D 4 → 7 F J , J = 6-0). The lack of the broaden emission bands arising from the ligands suggests the efficient intramolecular energy transfer from the dbm and acac ligands to Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ ions, respectively. In accordance to the expected, the values of PL quantum efficiency (η) of the emitting 5 D 0 state of the tetrakis(β-diketonate) complexes of Eu 3+ were higher compared with those tris-complexes. Therefore, organic electroluminescent (EL) devices were fabricated with the structure as follows: indium tin oxide (ITO)/hole transport layer (HTL) NPB or MTCD/emitter layer M[RE(β-diketonate) 4 ] complexes)/Aluminum (Al). All the films were deposited by thermal evaporation carried out in a high vacuum environment system. The OLED light emission was independent of driving voltage, indicating that the combination of charge carriers generates excitons within the M[RE(β-diketonate) 4 ] layers, and the energy is efficiently transferred to RE 3+ ion. As a best result, a pure red and green electroluminescent emission was observed from the Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ devices, confirmed by (X,Y) color coordinates

  15. Fluoride metabolism in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, R; Shorthouse, M

    1964-04-04

    Grass seedlings exposed to inorganic fluoride solutions do not take up appreciable amounts of fluoride until concentrations of more than 1.0 mM (19 p.p.m.) are used. No formation of organic fluoride has been found, even with exposure to 15.75 mM fluoride, indicating that there is no formation of fluoroacetate or similar compounds. 8 references, 2 tables.

  16. Indirect Voltammetric Sensing Platforms For Fluoride Detection on Boron-Doped Diamond Electrode Mediated via [FeF6]3− and [CeF6]2− Complexes Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culková, Eva; Tomčík, Peter; Švorc, Ľubomír; Cinková, Kristína; Chomisteková, Zuzana; Durdiak, Jaroslav; Rievaj, Miroslav; Bustin, Dušan

    2014-01-01

    Very simple and sensitive electroanalytical technique based on synergistic combination of reaction electrochemistry (specificity) and bare boron-doped diamond electrode (sensitivity) for the detection of fluorides in drinking water was developed as variant based on dynamic electrochemistry to ISE analysis. It is based on the formation of electroinactive fluoride complexes with Fe(III) and Ce(IV) ions decreasing such diffusion current of free metal on boron-doped diamond electrode. Due to low background signal of boron-doped diamond electrode reasonably low detection limits of the order of 10 −6 mol L −1 for linear sweep voltammetric method using formation of [FeF 6 ] 3− and 10 −7 mol L −1 in a square-wave variant of this technique have been achieved. This is approximately 1–2 orders lower than in the case of platinum comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array. Linear sweep voltammetric method based on [CeF 6 ] 2− complex formation has lower sensitivity and may be suitable for samples with higher content of fluoride and not to analysis of drinking water

  17. Equilibrium studies on mixed ligand complexes of some tripositive rare earth ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vimal, Rashmi; Singh, Mamta; Ram Nayan

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of the rare earth ions, La 3+ , Ce 3+ , Pr 3+ , Nd 3+ , Sm 3+ and Eu 3+ with the pair of ligands 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid (an, H 2 A) and o-aminophenol (ap, HB) have been studied in aqueous solution at 25 degC (μ=0.1 M KNO 3 /NaCl). Equilibrium constants of the reactions involving the formations of the mixed ligand species MAB, MA 2 B 2- , MB 2 A - (M = metal ion) and the binary complexes containing up to three ligand molecules have been evaluated from the pH-metric data, and coordinating behaviour of the ligands in the formation of the mixed ligand complexes has been discussed. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  18. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  19. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.meyer@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  20. Effect of high-energy electron irradiation in an electron microscope column on fluorides of alkaline earth elements (CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaichik, V. I.; Sobolev, B. P.; Zaporozhets, M. A.; Avilov, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of high-energy (150 eV) electron irradiation in an electron microscope column on crystals of fluorides of alkaline earth elements CaF 2 , SrF 2 , and BaF 2 is studied. During structural investigations by electron diffraction and electron microscopy, the electron irradiation causes chemical changes in MF 2 crystals such as the desorption of fluorine and the accumulation of oxygen in the irradiated area with the formation of oxide MO. The fluorine desorption rate increases significantly when the electron-beam density exceeds the threshold value of ∼2 × 10 3 pA/cm 2 ). In BaF 2 samples, the transformation of BaO into Ba(OH) 2 was observed when irradiation stopped. The renewal of irradiation is accompanied by the inverse transformation of Ba(OH) 2 into BaO. In the initial stage of irradiation of all MF 2 compounds, the oxide phase is in the single-crystal state with a lattice highly matched with the MF 2 matrix. When the irradiation dose is increased, the oxide phase passes to the polycrystalline phase. Gaseous products of MF 2 destruction (in the form of bubbles several nanometers in diameter) form a rectangular array with a period of ∼20 nm in the sample.

  1. Bis(imidazolin-2-iminato) rare earth metal complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and catalytic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trambitas, Alexandra G; Melcher, Daniel; Hartenstein, Larissa; Roesky, Peter W; Daniliuc, Constantin; Jones, Peter G; Tamm, Matthias

    2012-06-18

    Reaction of anhydrous rare earth metal halides MCl(3) with 2 equiv of 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-imine (Im(Dipp)NH) and 2 equiv of trimethylsilylmethyl lithium (Me(3)SiCH(2)Li) in THF furnished the complexes [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)MCl(THF)(n)] (M = Sc, Y, Lu). The molecular structures of all three compounds were established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The coordination spheres around the pentacoordinate metal atoms are best described as trigonal bipyramids. Reaction of YbI(2) with 2 equiv of LiCH(2)SiMe(3) and 2 equiv of the imino ligand Im(Dipp)NH in tetrahydrofuran did not result in a divalent complex, but instead the Yb(III) complex [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)YbI(THF)(2)] was obtained and structurally characterized. Treatment of [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)MCl(THF)(n)] with 1 equiv of LiCH(2)SiMe(3) resulted in the formation of [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)M(CH(2)SiMe(3))(THF)(n)]. The coordination arrangement of these compounds in the solid state at the metal atoms is similar to that found for the starting materials, although the introduction of the neosilyl ligand induces a significantly greater distortion from the ideal trigonal-bipyramidal geometry. [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)Y(CH(2)SiMe(3))(THF)(2)] was used as precatalyst in the intramolecular hydroamination/cyclization reaction of various terminal aminoalkenes and of one aminoalkyne. The complex showed high catalytic activity and selectivity. A comparison with the previously reported dialkyl yttrium complex [(Im(Dipp)N)Y(CH(2)SiMe(3))(2)(THF)(3)] showed no clear tendency in terms of activity.

  2. Tetrahydropentalenyl-phosphazene constrained geometry complexes of rare-earth metal alkyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangaly, Noa K; Petrov, Alexander R; Elfferding, Michael; Harms, Klaus; Sundermeyer, Jörg

    2014-05-21

    Reactions of Cp™HPPh2 (1, diphenyl(4,4,6,6-tetramethyl-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropentalen-2-yl)phosphane) with the organic azides AdN3 and DipN3 (Ad = 1-adamantyl; Dip = 2,6-di-iso-propylphenyl) led to the formation of two novel CpPN ligands: P-amino-cyclopentadienylidene-phosphorane (Cp™PPh2NHAd; L(Ad)H) and P-cyclopentadienyl-iminophosphorane (Cp™HPPh2NDip; L(Dip)H). Both were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray structure analysis. For both compounds only one isomer was observed. Neither possesses any detectable prototropic or elementotropic isomers. Reactions of these ligands with [Lu(CH2SiMe3)3(thf)2] or with rare-earth metal halides and three equivalents of LiCH2SiMe3 produced the desired bis(alkyl) Cp™PN complexes: [{Cp™PN}M(CH2SiMe3)2] (M = Sc (1(Ad), 1(Dip)), Lu (2(Ad), 2(Dip)), Y (3(Ad), 3(Dip)), Sm (4(Ad)), Nd (5(Ad)), Pr (6(Ad)), Yb (7(Ad))). These complexes were characterized by extensive NMR studies for the diamagnetic and the paramagnetic complexes with full signal assignment. An almost mirror inverted order of the paramagnetic shifts has been observed for ytterbium complex 7(Ad) compared to 4(Ad), 5(Ad) and 6(Ad). For the assignment of the NMR signals [{η(1) : η(5)-C5Me4PMe2NAd}Yb(CH2SiMe3)2] 7 was synthesized, characterized and the (1)H NMR signals were compared to 7(Ad) and to other paramagnetic lanthanide complexes with the same ligand. 1(Ad), 2(Ad), 2(Dip), 3(Ad) and 3(Dip) were characterized by X-ray structure analysis revealing a sterically congested constrained geometry structure.

  3. Antiferromagnetic coupling between rare earth ions and semiquinones in a series of 1:1 complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneschi, Andrea; Dei, Andrea; Gatteschi, Dante; Poussereau, Sandrine; Sorace, Lorenzo

    2004-04-07

    We use the strategy of diamagnetic substitution for obtaining information on the crystal field effects in paramagnetic rare earth ions using the homologous series of compounds with the diamagnetic tropolonato ligand, Ln(Trp)(HBPz(3))(2), and the paramagnetic semiquinone ligand, Ln(DTBSQ)(HBPz(3))(2), (DTBSQ = 3,5-di-tert-butylsemiquinonato, Trp = tropolonate, HBPz(3)= hydrotrispyrazolylborate) for Ln = Sm(iii), Eu(iii), Gd(iii), Tb(iii), Dy(iii), Ho(iii), Er(iii) or Yb(iii). The X-ray crystal structure of a new form of tropolonate derivative is presented, which shows, as expected, a marked similarity with the structure of the semiquinonate derivative. The Ln(Trp)(HBPz(3))(2) derivatives were then used as a reference for the qualitative determination of crystal field effects in the exchange coupled semiquinone derivatives. Through magnetisation and susceptibility measurements this empirical diamagnetic substitution method evidenced for Er(iii), Tb(iii), Dy(iii) and Yb(iii) derivatives a dominating antiferromagnetic coupling. The increased antiferromagnetic contribution compared to other radical-rare earth metal complexes formed by nitronyl nitroxide ligands may be related to the increased donor strength of the semiquinone ligand.

  4. A major light rare-earth element (LREE) resource in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, southern Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Horton, Forrest; Buttleman, Kim; Scott, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid rise in world demand for the rare-earth elements (REEs) has expanded the search for new REE resources. We document two types of light rare-earth element (LREE)-enriched rocks in the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of southern Afghanistan: type 1 concordant seams of khanneshite-(Ce), synchysite-(Ce), and parisite-(Ce) within banded barite-strontianite alvikite, and type 2 igneous dikes of coarse-grained carbonatite, enriched in fluorine or phosphorus, containing idiomorphic crystals of khanneshite-(Ce) or carbocernaite. Type 1 mineralized barite-strontianite alvikite averages 22.25 wt % BaO, 4.27 wt % SrO, and 3.25 wt % ∑ LREE2O3 (sum of La, Ce, Pr, and Nd oxides). Type 2 igneous dikes average 14.51 wt % BaO, 5.96 wt % SrO, and 3.77 wt % ∑ LREE2O3. A magmatic origin is clearly indicated for the type 2 LREE-enriched dikes, and type 1 LREE mineralization probably formed in the presence of LREE-rich hydrothermal fluid. Both types of LREE mineralization may be penecontemporaneous, having formed in a carbonate-rich magma in the marginal zone of the central vent, highly charged with volatile constituents (i.e., CO2, F, P2O5), and strongly enriched in Ba, Sr, and the LREE. Based on several assumptions, and employing simple geometry for the zone of LREE enrichment, we estimate that at least 1.29 Mt (million metric tonnes) of LREE2O3 is present in this part of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex.

  5. Chemical mechanism of the fluoride-inhibition of fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburg, O; Christian, W

    1941-08-01

    Among the fluoride-sensitive fermentation elements, enolase is the most sensitive. An investigation was made, quantitatively, of fluoride inhibition for chemically pure magnesium-enolase using an optical enolase test. Data show that the effective compound for fluoride inhibition is a complex magnesium-fluoro-phosphate and that the magnesium-fluoro-phosphate inhibits fermentation by combining proportionally to its concentration with the ferment-protein in a dissociating manner.

  6. Method for identifying particulate fluoride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufts, B J

    1960-01-01

    A method is described for identifying particulates containing fluorides and other complex fluorine compounds such as fluorosilicate in samples collected on membrane filters. The filter is treated with lead chloride to precipitate lead chlorofluoride at each fluoride-containing spot. This microspot is identified by examination in a light microscope. Sulfate and phosphate, which also precipitate if present, can be distinguished and do not interfere. Calibrations are given for the fluorides and the more insoluble salts, relating the original particle size to the reaction site size. Thus, the mass of the particles can be calculated. Results of some field tests in an area of fluoride pollution are given, and compared with standard testing procedures.

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of fluoride with alizarin complexone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczenko, Z; Lenarczyk, L [Politechnika Warszawska (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    The modification of direct spectrophotometric method of fluoride determination by alizarin complexone has been developed. It was shown that the lanthanum alizarin complexone chelate is more convenient than that of cerium (3). The influence of acetone, dioxane and dimethyl sulphoxide in water solution on the increase of sensitivity of the method and the rate of colour reaction has been determined. The optimal pH ranges for the reaction with lanthanum and cerium (3) have been estimated. Some amines having a large molecule are useful for extraction of blue fluoride complex with isobutanol. Dioctylamine was applied in a new extraction spectrophotometric procedure of fluoride determination. Conditions in reagent have been established. Both variants of the method have been applied to the fluoride determination in several chemicals. The obtained results show a good precision and accuracy.

  8. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Private Wells Infant Formula Fluorosis Public Health Service Recommendation Water Operators & Engineers Water Fluoridation Additives Shortages of Fluoridation Additives Drinking Water Pipe Systems CDC-Sponsored Water Fluoridation Training Links to Other ...

  9. Advanced analysis of complex seismic waveforms to characterize the subsurface Earth structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tianxia

    2011-12-01

    This thesis includes three major parts, (1) Body wave analysis of mantle structure under the Calabria slab, (2) Spatial Average Coherency (SPAC) analysis of microtremor to characterize the subsurface structure in urban areas, and (3) Surface wave dispersion inversion for shear wave velocity structure. Although these three projects apply different techniques and investigate different parts of the Earth, their aims are the same, which is to better understand and characterize the subsurface Earth structure by analyzing complex seismic waveforms that are recorded on the Earth surface. My first project is body wave analysis of mantle structure under the Calabria slab. Its aim is to better understand the subduction structure of the Calabria slab by analyzing seismograms generated by natural earthquakes. The rollback and subduction of the Calabrian Arc beneath the southern Tyrrhenian Sea is a case study of slab morphology and slab-mantle interactions at short spatial scale. I analyzed the seismograms traversing the Calabrian slab and upper mantle wedge under the southern Tyrrhenian Sea through body wave dispersion, scattering and attenuation, which are recorded during the PASSCAL CAT/SCAN experiment. Compressional body waves exhibit dispersion correlating with slab paths, which is high-frequency components arrivals being delayed relative to low-frequency components. Body wave scattering and attenuation are also spatially correlated with slab paths. I used this correlation to estimate the positions of slab boundaries, and further suggested that the observed spatial variation in near-slab attenuation could be ascribed to mantle flow patterns around the slab. My second project is Spatial Average Coherency (SPAC) analysis of microtremors for subsurface structure characterization. Shear-wave velocity (Vs) information in soil and rock has been recognized as a critical parameter for site-specific ground motion prediction study, which is highly necessary for urban areas located

  10. Fluorometric determination of samarium and europium in rare earth minerals with. beta. -diketoneternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, H; Hiraki, K; Nishikawa, Y [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1981-07-01

    This communication reported the optimum conditions for the fluorometric determination of these ions, and the method was adopted in the simultaneous determination of samarium and europium in xenotime and monazite minerals. From the experimental results on the effect of diverse ions and the extraction pH of the aqueous phase, it became clear that TTA-TOPO hexane method was the best system for the determination of samarium and europium because of the highest fluorescence sensitivity of the ternary complex, and also because the lower extraction pH eliminated the effect of diverse ions. Moreover, the very high detection limit (2 ppb) of Sm was achieved by the use of a red sensitive photomultiplier. Which was used at 644 nm, and that of Eu (0.02 ppb) at 614 nm. The procedure was established as follows: The rare earth minerals (xenotime, monazite) sample was treated with hot conc. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and twice precipitated with 0.5 mol dm/sup -3/ oxalic acid (pH was adjusted to 2.0 -- 2.2). Then the precipitate was filtered and ignited to give the rare earth oxide. Fifty milligrams of the oxide was dissolved in HCl and diluted with water in order to obtain the solution containing 5 ..mu..g cm/sup -3/ rare earth oxide. An aliquot of the solution ((1.0 -- 3.0) cm/sup 3/) was adjusted to pH 5.5 with sodium acetate and shaken with 1 x 10/sup -4/ mol dm/sup -3/ TTA- 2 x 10/sup -2/ mol dm/sup -3/ TOPO hexane solution. Then the fluorescence intensity of the organic layer was measured at 644 nm for Sm and 614 nm for Eu. In this procedure, the recovery of Sm and Eu was found to be about 96%. Xenotime contained 0.70% of Sm and 0.004% of Eu, and monazite contained 1.84% of Sm and 0.003% of Eu.

  11. Process development for treatment of fluoride containing wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahesh; Kanvinde, V Y [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Many chemical and metallurgical industries generate liquid wastes containing high values of fluorides in association of nitrates and other metals. Due to harmful effects of fluorides these type of wastes can not be disposed off in the environment without proper treatment. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to develop a process scheme to fix the fluorides as non-leachable solid waste and fluoride free treated liquid waste for their disposal. To optimize the important parameters, simulated synthetic and actual wastes were used. For this study, three waste streams were collected from Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad. (author). 6 tabs., 1 fig.

  12. Application of the electromotive force method with fluoride-xon electrolyte for establishing of thermodynamic properties of oxyfluorides of yttrium and rare-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitskij, V.A.; Balak, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Cells of the type (-) O 2 , Pt β v , CaF 2 β v β v CaF 2 β v CaF 2 β v β v Pt, O 2 (+) have been used for the first time to study high-temperature thermodynamic properties of Y and Nb oxyfluorides of the composition. Using the method of e. m. f., X-ray phase and chemical analyses it has been established that Y 2 O 3 and Nd 2 O 3 in the range 960-1465 K coexist with ROF oxyfluorides which are similar in composition to stoichiometric ones. On the basis of dependences E=f(T) of the cells studied ΔG deg=f(T), ΔHsub( anti T) deg and ΔSsub(anti T) deg of the YOF and NdOF formation from simple substances and R 2 O 3 and RF 3 are determined. High stability and reproducibility of potentials of the cells with oxyfluoride electrodes as well as coincidence of thermodynamic results obtained on the basis of data for independent cells testifies to the prospects of application of the above cells for thermodynamical studies of rare earth and transition metals

  13. Sulfochlorphenol S as reagent for direct photometric determination of fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhashi, D.O.; Dedkova, V.P.; Savvin, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The system of zirconium-sulfochlorphenol S-fluoride was studied by the spectrophotometry method. The effect of pH, temperature and time on the formation of zirconium complexes with sulfochlorphenol S was investigated. A comparison of the above method of determining fluorides with other methods (using alizarinecomplexonate, quinalizarincomplexonate, cerium chelates, lanthanum, arsenazo 3) is presented. The sensitivity of determining fluorides with arsenazo 3 is lower than that with sulfochlorphenol S. The molar absorption coefficient is 3x10 4 , the reaction of determining fluorides with the aid of sulfochlorphenol S is highly selective. The method was used to determine fluorides in the supply water, zirconium solutions and electrolyzer cell. The range of concentration determination for fluorides is 0-3 μg/25 ml

  14. Emission Properties, Solubility, Thermodynamic Analysis and NMR Studies of Rare-Earth Complexes with Two Different Phosphine Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Iwanaga

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes novel molecular designs for rare-earth complexes involving the introduction of two different phosphine oxide structures into one rare-earth ion. These designs are effective for improving solubility and emission intensity. Additionally, the complexes are indispensable for realizing high performances in LEDs and security media. The thermodynamic properties of Eu(III complexes are correlated with the solubility. Correlations between coordination structures and emission intensity were explained by NMR analysis. The luminous flux of red LED devices with Eu(III complexes is very high (20 mA, 870 m lumen. A new white LED has its largest spectra intensity in the red region and a human look much more vividly under this light.

  15. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  16. The meganism behind internally generated centennial-to-millennial scale climate variability in an earth system model of intermediate complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, T.; Timmermann, A.; Menviel, L.; Elison Timm, O.; Mouchet, A.; Roche, D.M.V.A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism triggering centennial-to-millennial-scale variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM is investigated. It is found that for several climate boundary conditions such as low obliquity values (∼22.1 )

  17. State-Dependence of the Climate Sensitivity in Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Patrik L.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2017-10-01

    Growing evidence from general circulation models (GCMs) indicates that the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) depends on the magnitude of forcing, which is commonly referred to as state-dependence. We present a comprehensive assessment of ECS state-dependence in Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) by analyzing millennial simulations with sustained 2×CO2 and 4×CO2 forcings. We compare different extrapolation methods and show that ECS is smaller in the higher-forcing scenario in 12 out of 15 EMICs, in contrast to the opposite behavior reported from GCMs. In one such EMIC, the Bern3D-LPX model, this state-dependence is mainly due to the weakening sea ice-albedo feedback in the Southern Ocean, which depends on model configuration. Due to ocean-mixing adjustments, state-dependence is only detected hundreds of years after the abrupt forcing, highlighting the need for long model integrations. Adjustments to feedback parametrizations of EMICs may be necessary if GCM intercomparisons confirm an opposite state-dependence.

  18. Identification of rare earth elements by their fluorescence complexes with tetracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti-Cavazzoni, J.C.; Boveda V, J.C.; Abrao, A.

    1994-01-01

    A procedure for identification of rare earth elements (REE) based on the complex formation with tetracycline (TC) and visual observation under ultraviolet light is described. One micro drop of REE chloride is placed over the filter paper impregnated with tetracycline and previously dried before use. After dried (30-60 O C) the paper is examined under the UV light. In a second procedure for the identification of mixture of REE a drop of the analyte is added over a filter paper strip impregnated with TC followed by a chromatographic development using a 2:1:1:1 (vol/vol) ethanol, acetone, ether and 1% acetic acid mixture of pH 5,8. After dried, the strip is observed under UV light. Sc, Y, La, Dy, Ho and Lu exhibited high yellow fluorescence; Gd, Tm and Yb a weak yellow; Ce an intense violet; Pr, ND, Sm and Tb violet: Eu a high red fluorescence and Er a violet brown wish, not well defined. It is possible to identify for instance 0.3 ug Ce (concentration 6 mg/L) and 0.2 ug Er (concentration 6 mg/L). Preliminary experiments indicated that those REE-TC chelates can be used for the identification and determination of the REE by spectro fluorimetry. (author). 30 refs

  19. Rare earth element mineralogy, geochemistry, and preliminary resource assessment of the Khanneshin carbonatite complex, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Robert D.; Belkin, Harvey E.; Schulz, Klaus J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Buttleman, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    There is increased concern about the future availability of rare earth elements (REE) because of China's dominance as the supplier of more than 95 percent of world REE output, their decision to restrict exports of rare earth products, and the rapid increase in world-wide consumption of rare earth product. As a result, countries such as the United States, Japan, and member nations of the European Union face a future of tight supplies and high prices for rare earth products unless other sources of REE are found and developed (Long and others, 2010; U.S. Geological Survey, 2011, p. 128-129, 184-185). We report and describe a significant new deposit of light rare earth elements (LREE), estimated at 1 Mt, within the Khanneshin carbonatite complex of south Afghanistan. The potential resource is located in a remote and rugged part of the igneous complex in a region previously identified by Soviet geologists in the 1970s. This report reviews the geologic setting of LREE deposit, presents new geochemical data documenting the grade of LREE mineralization, briefly describes the mineralogy and mineralogical associations of the deposit, and presents a preliminary estimate of LREE resources based on our current understanding of the geology.

  20. Thermochemical analysis on rare earth complex of gadolinium with salicylic acid and 8-hydroxyquinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Sheng-Xiong, E-mail: 54xsx@163.com [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Rare-Precious Metals Compounds and Applications, Department of Chemistry and Life Science, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan Province (China); Li, Ai-Tao; Jiang, Jian-Hong; Huang, Shuang; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Qiang-Guo [Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Rare-Precious Metals Compounds and Applications, Department of Chemistry and Life Science, Xiangnan University, Chenzhou 423000, Hunan Province (China)

    2012-11-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new novel rare earth complex Gd(C{sub 7}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}(C{sub 9}H{sub 6}NO) was synthesized and characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dissolution enthalpies of the relevant substances were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enthalpy change of the reaction was determined to be (211.54 {+-} 0.69) kJ mol{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The standard molar enthalpy of formation of complex was -(1890.7 {+-} 3.1) kJ mol{sup -1}. - Abstract: The rare earth complex, Gd(C{sub 7}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}(C{sub 9}H{sub 6}NO), was synthesized by the reaction of Gadolinium nitrate hexahydrate with salicylic acid (C{sub 7}H{sub 6}O{sub 3}) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (C{sub 9}H{sub 7}NO). And it was characterized by elemental analysis, UV spectra, IR spectra, molar conductance and thermogravimetric analysis. In a optimalizing calorimetric solvent, the dissolution enthalpies were determined by an advanced solution-reaction isoperibol microcalorimeter, respectively: {Delta}{sub s}H{sub m}{sup {Theta}} [2 C{sub 7}H{sub 6}O{sub 3}(s) + C{sub 9}H{sub 7}NO(s), 298.15 K] = 41.95 {+-} 0.44 kJ mol{sup -1}, {Delta}{sub s}H{sub m}{sup {Theta}} [Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O(s), 298.15 K] = -29.11 {+-} 0.39 kJ mol{sup -1}, {Delta}{sub s}H{sub m}{sup {Theta}} [Gd(C{sub 7}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}(C{sub 9}H{sub 6}NO)(s), 298.15 K] = -46.99 {+-} 0.39 kJ mol{sup -1} and {Delta}{sub s}H{sub m}{sup {Theta}} [Solution D(aq), 298.15 K] = -90.33 {+-} 0.37 kJ mol{sup -1}. The enthalpy change of the synthesized reaction was estimated to be {Delta}{sub r}H{sub m}{sup {Theta}}=211.54{+-}0.69 kJ mol{sup -1}. From data in the literature, through Hess' law, the standard molar enthalpy of formation of Gd(C{sub 7}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}(C{sub 9}H{sub 7}NO)(s) was calculated to be {Delta}{sub f}H{sub m}{sup {Theta}} [Gd(C{sub 7}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}(C{sub 9}H

  1. Complex inner core of the Earth: The last frontier of global seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2015-03-01

    The days when the Earth's inner core (IC) was viewed as a homogeneous solid sphere surrounded by the liquid outer core (OC) are now behind us. Due to a limited number of data sampling the IC and a lack of experimentally controlled conditions in the deep Earth studies, it has been difficult to scrutinize competitive hypotheses in this active area of research. However, a number of new concepts linking IC structure and dynamics has been proposed lately to explain different types of seismological observations. A common denominator of recent observational work on the IC is increased complexity seen in IC physical properties such as its isotropic and anisotropic structure, attenuation, inner core boundary (ICB) topography, and its rotational dynamics. For example, small-scale features have been observed to exist as a widespread phenomenon in the uppermost inner core, probably superimposed on much longer-scale features. The characterization of small-scale features sheds light on the nature of the solidification process and helps in understanding seismologically observed hemispherical dichotomy of the IC. The existence of variations in the rate and level of solidification is a plausible physical outcome in an environment where vigorous compositional convection in the OC and variations in heat exchange across the ICB may control the process of crystal growth. However, further progress is hindered by the fact that the current traveltime data of PKIKP waves traversing the IC do not allow discriminating between variations in isotropic P wave velocity and velocity anisotropy. Future studies of attenuation in the IC might provide crucial information about IC structure, although another trade-off exists—that of the relative contribution of scattering versus viscoelastic attenuation and the connection with the material properties. Future installations of dense arrays, cross paths of waves that sample the IC, and corresponding array studies will be a powerful tool to image and

  2. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  3. Study of complexing of rare earths with ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid by the method of pH-metric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratova, N.M.; Martynenko, L.I.

    1979-01-01

    The pH-metric titration technique was used to study the possibility of formation of higher complexes between rare earth elements of the whole series and ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (L). The logarithms of stability constants were determined for LaL - (10.95), PrL - (11.30), NdL - (11.35), ErL 2 5- (4.10), TuL 2 5- (4.00), YbL 2 5- (4.25) and LnL 2 5- (4.8). In the concentrations studied only heavy lanthanides were forming unstable bis-ethylenediaminedisuccinates. Lighter rare earth elements did not form higher complexes even when the ligand was in four-fold excess; however, the complexes did appear in more concentrated solutions

  4. Potentiometric study of rare earth complexing with trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N'-dimalonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, T.I.; Gorelov, I.P.

    1980-01-01

    Complexing of rare earths (Ln) and yttrium with trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N, N'-dimalonic acid in aqueous solutions is studied using indirect potentiometric method with an aid of stationary mercury electrode and by the method of pH-potentiometric titration. It is shown that in the investigated solutions the LnL - and LnL 2 5- complexes are formed. At 25 deg C and ion force 0.1 stability constants of the complexes detected are determined [ru

  5. Responding to complex societal challenges: A decade of Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) interdisciplinary research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ignaciuk, A.; Rice, M.; Bogardi, J.; Canadell, J.G.; Dhakal, S.; Ingram, J.; Leemans, R.; Rosenberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Earth system is an integrated, self-regulating system under increasing pressure from anthropogenic transformation. The Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP), which was established by the international global environmental change research programs (i.e., DIVERSITAS, IGBP, IHDP and WCRP)

  6. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Kata Rošin-Grget; Kristina Peroš; Ivana Šutej; Krešimir Bašić

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F–) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard t...

  7. Organic-inorganic hybrid rare earth complexes based on polymolybdates with intrinsic photosensitive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan; Ma, Pengtao; Niu, Jingyang

    2015-03-14

    A series of organic–inorganic hybrid rare earth complexes {[RE2(PO)2(H2O)10][H2Mo36O112(OH2)12(PO)4]}·5PO·2(CH3CN)·nH2O [n = 23–42, RE(III) = Nd(III), 1; Sm(III), 2; Eu(III), 3; Gd(III), 4; Dy(III), 5; Er(III), 6; Tm(III), 7; Yb(III), 8; Lu(III), 9; Y(III), 10; PO = piperidin-2-one] have been synthesized and fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR spectra, thermogravimetric analysis and UV-vis spectra. Structural analysis reveals that compounds 1-10 are isostructural and crystallize in the monoclinic P2(1)/n space group. Each compound contains a centrosymmetric anionic cluster [Mo36O112(OH2)12(PO)4](8-), which could be described as the derivative of [Mo36O112(OH2)16](8-) with four water molecules substituted by organic PO molecules. Each {Mo18} subunit connects with one RE(III) ion via its two terminal O atoms from two independent {MoO6} octahedra. The eight coordinated RE(III) ion with a distorted tetragonal antiprism coordination geometry is also surrounded by another six oxygen atoms, five of them from five water molecules and the final one from one PO molecule. Compounds 1-10 show considerable photosensitive behavior under visible light excitation. In addition, compound 3 exhibits three emission bands at 580, 595 and 617 nm in the solid state, which could be assigned to (5)D0→(7)F0, (5)D0→(7)F1 and (5)D0→(7)F2 transitions of Eu(III) ions, respectively.

  8. Equivalence Testing of Complex Particle Size Distribution Profiles Based on Earth Mover's Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng; Jiang, Xiaohui; Absar, Mohammad; Choi, Stephanie; Kozak, Darby; Shen, Meiyu; Weng, Yu-Ting; Zhao, Liang; Lionberger, Robert

    2018-04-12

    Particle size distribution (PSD) is an important property of particulates in drug products. In the evaluation of generic drug products formulated as suspensions, emulsions, and liposomes, the PSD comparisons between a test product and the branded product can provide useful information regarding in vitro and in vivo performance. Historically, the FDA has recommended the population bioequivalence (PBE) statistical approach to compare the PSD descriptors D50 and SPAN from test and reference products to support product equivalence. In this study, the earth mover's distance (EMD) is proposed as a new metric for comparing PSD particularly when the PSD profile exhibits complex distribution (e.g., multiple peaks) that is not accurately described by the D50 and SPAN descriptor. EMD is a statistical metric that measures the discrepancy (distance) between size distribution profiles without a prior assumption of the distribution. PBE is then adopted to perform statistical test to establish equivalence based on the calculated EMD distances. Simulations show that proposed EMD-based approach is effective in comparing test and reference profiles for equivalence testing and is superior compared to commonly used distance measures, e.g., Euclidean and Kolmogorov-Smirnov distances. The proposed approach was demonstrated by evaluating equivalence of cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion PSDs that were manufactured under different conditions. Our results show that proposed approach can effectively pass an equivalent product (e.g., reference product against itself) and reject an inequivalent product (e.g., reference product against negative control), thus suggesting its usefulness in supporting bioequivalence determination of a test product to the reference product which both possess multimodal PSDs.

  9. Rare earths and rare earth alloys electrolytic preparation process and device for this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seon, F.; Barthole, G.

    1986-01-01

    Electrolysis of a molten salt of rare earth or rare earth alloy for preparation of the metal or alloy is described. The molten salt bath comprises at least a rare earth chloride, at least an alkaline or alkaline earth chloride and at least an alkaline or alkaline earth fluoride [fr

  10. Separation of rare earth mixtures by gas chromatography using dipivaloylmethane as complexing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubtsova, V.Yu.; Luchinkin, V.V.; Martynenko, L.I.; Murav'eva, I.A.; Sokolov, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    Possibility of using dipivaloylmethave for quantitative separation of rare earth element mixtures under the regime of chromatography for preparative and analytical purposes, is studied. Introduction of β-diketone surplus into the chromatographic solution is shown to remove the necessity of column conditioning. It is stated that chelate solution should have concentration above the threshold one. The developed method is applicable for quantitative separation of some rare earth mixtures for preparative purposes, as well as for the analysis of rare earth mixtures, containing components in equivalent quantities [ru

  11. Preparation of bromine fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domange, Pr; Duflo, J.

    1958-05-01

    This note addresses the preparation of bromine fluoride. It indicates the implemented process for the reaction, used products (fluorine and bromine), and column characteristics. It describes the operating mode. Apparatus drawing is provided

  12. Uranium fluorides analysis. Titanium spectrophotometric determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Titanium determination in uranium hexafluoride in the range 0.7 to 100 microgrammes after transformation of uranium fluoride in sulfate. Titanium is separated by extraction with N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine, reextracted by hydrochloric-hydrofluoric acid. The complex titanium-N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine is extracted by chloroform. Spectrophotometric determination at 400 nm [fr

  13. Western Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center--providing comprehensive earth science for complex societal issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David G.; Wallace, Alan R.; Schneider, Jill L.

    2010-01-01

    supports approximately 40 USGS research specialists who utilize cooperative agreements with universities, industry, and other governmental agencies to support their collaborative research and information exchange. Scientists of the WMERSC study how and where non-fuel mineral resources form and are concentrated in the earth's crust, where mineral resources might be found in the future, and how mineral materials interact with the environment to affect human and ecosystem health. Natural systems (ecosystems) are complex - our understanding of how ecosystems operate requires collecting and synthesizing large amounts of geologic, geochemical, biologic, hydrologic, and meteorological information. Scientists in the Center strive to understand the interplay of various processes and how they affect the structure, composition, and health of ecosystems. Such understanding, which is then summarized in publicly available reports, is used to address and solve a wide variety of issues that are important to society and the economy. WMERSC scientists have extensive national and international experience in these scientific specialties and capabilities - they have collaborated with many Federal, State, and local agencies; with various private sector organizations; as well as with foreign countries and organizations. Nearly every scientific and societal challenge requires a different combination of scientific skills and capabilities. With their breadth of scientific specialties and capabilities, the scientists of the WMERSC can provide scientifically sound approaches to a wide range of societal challenges and issues. The following sections describe examples of important issues that have been addressed by scientists in the Center, the methods employed, and the relevant conclusions. New directions are inevitable as societal needs change over time. Scientists of the WMERSC have a diverse set of skills and capabilities and are proficient in the collection and integration of

  14. Investigation of rare earth complexes with pyridoxalydenamino acids by optical methods. Structure of complexes on basis of hydrophobic amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolin, V.F.; Koreneva, L.G.; Serbinova, T.A.; Tsaryuk, V.I.

    1975-01-01

    The structure of pyridoxalidene amino acid complexes was studied by circular dichroism, magnetic circular dichroism and luminescence spectroscopy. It was shown that these are two-ligand complexes, whereby in the case of those based on valine, leucine and isoleucine the chromophores are almost perpendicular to one another. In the case of complexes based on glycine and alanine the co-ordination sphere is strongly deformed. (author)

  15. Absorption spectroscopy of complex rare earth ion doped hybrid materials over a broad wavelength range

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, R.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Stouwdam, J.W.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Driessen, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the present work we applied a measurement setup to determine several relevant properties of rare-earth doped nanoparticles dispersed in polymer slab waveguides in a single absorption measurement: background absorption of the polymer host material, water absorption, polymer composition (overtones), rare earth concentration, and ligand contribution (increase of exponential loss trend in the UV). Furthermore, nanoparticle size and concentration in case of a refractive index mismatch (1//spl l...

  16. Field method for estimation of fluoride in drinking groundwater by photometric measurement of spot on aluminium quinalizarin reagent paper

    OpenAIRE

    Zaher Barghouthi; Sameer Amereih

    2017-01-01

    A simple field method for determination of fluoride in drinking water using handmade fluoride reagent paper impregnated by aluminium quinalizarin complex was developed. Fluoride reacts with the impregnated reagent paper to release the free ligand with new colour, orange different from that of the complex. The change in the colour, which is proportional to the amount of fluoride, was measured by the Arsenator. The functionality of the Arsenator which is based on a photometric measurement of sp...

  17. Millennial total sea-level commitments projected with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goelzer, H; Huybrechts, P; Raper, S C B; Loutre, M-F; Goosse, H; Fichefet, T

    2012-01-01

    Sea-level is expected to rise for a long time to come, even after stabilization of human-induced climatic warming. Here we use simulations with the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM to project sea-level changes over the third millennium forced with atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations that stabilize by either 2000 or 2100 AD. The model includes 3D thermomechanical models of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets coupled to an atmosphere and an ocean model, a global glacier melt algorithm to account for the response of mountain glaciers and ice caps, and a procedure for assessing oceanic thermal expansion from oceanic heat uptake. Four climate change scenarios are considered to determine sea-level commitments. These assume a 21st century increase in greenhouse gases according to SRES scenarios B1, A1B and A2 with a stabilization of the atmospheric composition after the year 2100. One additional scenario assumes 1000 years of constant atmospheric composition from the year 2000 onwards. For our preferred model version, we find an already committed total sea-level rise of 1.1 m by 3000 AD. In experiments with greenhouse gas concentration stabilization at 2100 AD, the total sea-level rise ranges between 2.1 m (B1), 4.1 m (A1B) and 6.8 m (A2). In all scenarios, more than half of this amount arises from the Greenland ice sheet, thermal expansion is the second largest contributor, and the contribution of glaciers and ice caps is small as it is limited by the available ice volume of maximally 25 cm of sea-level equivalent. Additionally, we analysed the sensitivity of the sea-level contributions from an ensemble of nine different model versions that cover a large range of climate sensitivity realized by model parameter variations of the atmosphere–ocean model. Selected temperature indices are found to be good predictors for sea-level contributions from the different components of land ice and oceanic thermal expansion after 1000 years. (letter)

  18. Preparation of polymer-rare earth complex using salicylic acid-containing polystyrene and its fluorescence emission property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Baojiao, E-mail: gaobaojiao@126.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Zhang Wei; Zhang Zhengguo; Lei Qingjuan [Department of Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Salicylic acid (SA) was first bonded onto the side chains of polystyrene (PS), obtaining functional macromolecule SAPS. Using the salicylic acid-containing polystyrene as a macromolecular ligand, a polymer-rare earth complex, SAPS-Eu(III), was prepared. The structure of SAPS-Eu(III) was characterized, and the fluorescence properties of SAPS-Eu(III) were mainly investigated. The experimental results show that the complex SAPS-Eu(III) has fine chemical stability because of the bidentate chelating effect of salicylic acid ligand. More important, the ligand SA on the side chains of PS can strongly sensitize the fluorescence emission of the center ion, Eu{sup 3+} ion, and it enables the complex SAPS-Eu(III) to produce the apparent 'Antenna Effect'. In the diluted solution of the functional macromolecule SAPS, the formed complex SAPS-Eu(III) belongs to an intramolecular complex, or an intrachain complex. For the binary intramolecular complex SAPS-Eu(III), the apparent saturated coordination number of SA of SAPS towards Eu{sup 3+} ion is equal to 10, and here the binary intrachain complex SAPS-Eu(III) has the strongest fluorescence emission. On this basis, small-molecule 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) acting as a co-ligand is added and the ternary complex SAPS-Eu(III)-Phen will be formed. As long as a small amount of Phen is added (in the molar ratio 1:1 (n(Phen):n(Eu))), the coordination of the two kinds of ligands, SA of SAPS and Phen, to Eu{sup 3+} ion will reach complete saturation, and here the fluorescence emission of the ternary complex will be further enhanced via the complementary coordination effect in comparison with that of the binary complex SAPS-Eu(III). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We prepared the functional polystyrene, SAPS, on whose side chain salicylic acid ligand was bonded. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymer-rare earth complex, SAPS-Eu(III), was prepared and a stronger 'antenna effect' was produced. Black

  19. Preparation of polymer–rare earth complex using salicylic acid-containing polystyrene and its fluorescence emission property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Baojiao; Zhang Wei; Zhang Zhengguo; Lei Qingjuan

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) was first bonded onto the side chains of polystyrene (PS), obtaining functional macromolecule SAPS. Using the salicylic acid-containing polystyrene as a macromolecular ligand, a polymer–rare earth complex, SAPS–Eu(III), was prepared. The structure of SAPS–Eu(III) was characterized, and the fluorescence properties of SAPS–Eu(III) were mainly investigated. The experimental results show that the complex SAPS–Eu(III) has fine chemical stability because of the bidentate chelating effect of salicylic acid ligand. More important, the ligand SA on the side chains of PS can strongly sensitize the fluorescence emission of the center ion, Eu 3+ ion, and it enables the complex SAPS–Eu(III) to produce the apparent “Antenna Effect”. In the diluted solution of the functional macromolecule SAPS, the formed complex SAPS–Eu(III) belongs to an intramolecular complex, or an intrachain complex. For the binary intramolecular complex SAPS–Eu(III), the apparent saturated coordination number of SA of SAPS towards Eu 3+ ion is equal to 10, and here the binary intrachain complex SAPS–Eu(III) has the strongest fluorescence emission. On this basis, small-molecule 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) acting as a co-ligand is added and the ternary complex SAPS–Eu(III)–Phen will be formed. As long as a small amount of Phen is added (in the molar ratio 1:1 (n(Phen):n(Eu))), the coordination of the two kinds of ligands, SA of SAPS and Phen, to Eu 3+ ion will reach complete saturation, and here the fluorescence emission of the ternary complex will be further enhanced via the complementary coordination effect in comparison with that of the binary complex SAPS–Eu(III). - Highlights: ► We prepared the functional polystyrene, SAPS, on whose side chain salicylic acid ligand was bonded. ► The polymer-rare earth complex, SAPS–Eu(III), was prepared and a stronger “antenna effect” was produced. ► For the intramolecular complex SAPS–Eu(III), the apparent

  20. Synthesis of 2-deoxy-2,2-difluoro-α-maltosyl fluoride and its X-ray structure in complex with Streptomyces coelicolor GlgEI-V279S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanna, Sandeep; Lindenberger, Jared J.; Gaitonde, Vishwanath V.; Ronning, Donald R.; Sucheck, Steven J. (Toledo)

    2015-06-05

    Streptomyces coelicolor (Sco) GlgEI is a glycoside hydrolase involved in α-glucan biosynthesis and can be used as a model enzyme for structure-based inhibitor design targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) GlgE. The latter is a genetically validated drug target for the development of anti-Tuberculosis (TB) treatments. Inhibition of Mtb GlgE results in a lethal buildup of the GlgE substrate maltose-1-phosphate (M1P). However, Mtb GlgE is difficult to crystallize and affords lower resolution X-ray structures. Sco GlgEI-V279S on the other hand crystallizes readily, produces high resolution X-ray data, and has active site topology identical to Mtb GlgE. We report the X-ray structure of Sco GlgEI-V279S in complex with 2-deoxy-2,2-difluoro-α-maltosyl fluoride (α-MTF, 5) at 2.3 Å resolution. α-MTF was designed as a non-hydrolysable mimic of M1P to probe the active site of GlgE1 prior to covalent bond formation without disruption of catalytic residues. The α-MTF complex revealed hydrogen bonding between Glu423 and the C1F which provides evidence that Glu423 functions as proton donor during catalysis. Further, hydrogen bonding between Arg392 and the axial C2 difluoromethylene moiety of α-MTF was observed suggesting that the C2 position tolerates substitution with hydrogen bond acceptors. The key step in the synthesis of α-MDF was transformation of peracetylated 2-fluoro-maltal 1 into peracetylated 2,2-difluoro-α-maltosyl fluoride 2 in a single step via the use of Selectfluor®

  1. Recovery of protactinium from molten fluoride nuclear fuel compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Bamberger, C.; Ross, R.G.

    1973-12-25

    A method is provided for separating protactinium from a molten fluonlde salt composition consisting essentially of at least one alkali and alkaline earth metal fluoride and at least one soluble fluoride of uranium or thorium which comprises oxidizing the protactinium in said composition to the + 5 oxidation state and contacting said composition with an oxide selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal oxide, an alkaline earth oxide, thorium oxide, and uranium oxide, and thereafter isolating the resultant insoluble protactinium oxide product from said composition. (Official Gazette)

  2. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  3. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  4. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Rošin-Grget

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F– into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard tissue. The source of this fluoride could either be fluorapatite (formed due to the incorporation of fluoride into enamel or calcium fluoride (CaF2-like precipitates, which are formed on the enamel and in the plaque after application of topical fluoride. Calcium fluoride deposits are protected from rapid dissolution by a phosphate –protein coating of salivary origin. At lower pH, the coating is lost and an increased dissolution rate of calcium fluoride occurs. The CaF2, therefore, act as an efficient source of free fluoride ions during the cariogenic challenge. The current evidence indicates that fluoride has a direct and indirect effect on bacterial cells, although the in vivo implications of this are still not clear. Conclusion. A better understanding of the mechanisms of the action of fluoride is very important for caries prevention and control. The effectiveness of fluoride as a cariostatic agent depends on the availability of free fluoride in plaque during cariogenic challenge, i.e. during acid production. Thus, a constant supply of low levels of fluoride in biofilm/saliva/dental interference is considered the most beneficial in preventing dental caries.

  5. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rošin-Grget, Kata; Peroš, Kristina; Sutej, Ivana; Bašić, Krešimir

    2013-11-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F-) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard tissue. The source of this fluoride could either be fluorapatite (formed due to the incorporation of fluoride into enamel) or calcium fluoride (CaF2)-like precipitates, which are formed on the enamel and in the plaque after application of topical fluoride. Calcium fluoride deposits are protected from rapid dissolution by a phosphate -protein coating of salivary origin. At lower pH, the coating is lost and an increased dissolution rate of calcium fluoride occurs. The CaF2, therefore, act as an efficient source of free fluoride ions during the cariogenic challenge. The current evidence indicates that fluoride has a direct and indirect effect on bacterial cells, although the in vivo implications of this are still not clear. A better understanding of the mechanisms of the action of fluoride is very important for caries prevention and control. The effectiveness of fluoride as a cariostatic agent depends on the availability of free fluoride in plaque during cariogenic challenge, i.e. during acid production. Thus, a constant supply of low levels of fluoride in biofilm/saliva/dental interference is considered the most beneficial in preventing dental caries. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  6. Absorption spectroscopy of complex rare earth ion doped hybrid materials over a broad wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Stouwdam, J.W.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Driessen, A.

    2005-01-01

    In the present work we applied a measurement setup to determine several relevant properties of rare-earth doped nanoparticles dispersed in polymer slab waveguides in a single absorption measurement: background absorption of the polymer host material, water absorption, polymer composition

  7. Absorption spectroscopy of complex rare earth ion doped hybrid materials over a broad wavelength range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, R.; Worhoff, Kerstin; Stouwdam, J.W.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Driessen, A.

    In the present work we applied a measurement setup to determine several relevant properties of rare-earth doped nanoparticles dispersed in polymer slab waveguides in a single absorption measurement: background absorption of the polymer host material, water absorption, polymer composition

  8. Selective Complexation of Cyanide and Fluoride Ions with Ammonium Boranes: A Theoretical Study on Sensing Mechanism Involving Intramolecular Charge Transfer and Configurational Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Haamid R; Jha, Prakash C

    2017-05-18

    The anion binding selectivity and the recognition mechanism of two isomeric boranes, namely, 4-[bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)boranyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaniline ([p-(Mes 2 B)C 6 H 4 (NMe 3 )] + , 1, where "Mes" represents mesitylene and "Me" represents methyl) and 2-[bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)boranyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaniline ([o-(Mes 2 B)C 6 H 4 (NMe 3 )] + , 2) has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent-density functional theory (TD-DFT) methods. Natural population analysis indicates that the central boron atoms in 1 and 2 are the most active centers for nucleophilic addition of anions. The negative magnitude of free energy changes (ΔG) reveals that out of CN - , F - , Cl - , Br - , NO 3 - , and HSO 4 - only the binding of CN - and F - with 1 and 2 is thermodynamically feasible and spontaneous. In addition, the calculated binding energies reveal that the CN - is showing lesser binding affinity than F - both with 1 and 2, while other ions, viz. NO 3 - , HSO 4 - , Br - , and Cl - , either do not bind at all or show very insignificant binding energy. The first excited states (S 1 ) of 1 and 2 are shown to be the local excited states with π → σ* transition by frontier molecular orbital analysis, whereas fourth excited states (S 4 ) of 4-[bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)boranyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaniline cyanide ([p-(Mes 2 B)C 6 H 4 (NMe 3 )] CN, 1CN, the cyano form of 1) and 4-[bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)boranyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaniline fluoride ([p-(Mes 2 B)C 6 H 4 (NMe 3 )] F, 1F, the fluoro form of 1) and fifth excited state (S 5 ) of 2-[bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)boranyl]-N,N,N-trimethylaniline fluoride ([o-(Mes 2 B)C 6 H 4 (NMe 3 )] F, 2F, the fluoro form of 2) are charge separation states that are found to be responsible for the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process. The synergistic effect of ICT and partial configuration changes induce fluorescence quenching in 1CN, 1F, and 2F after a significant internal conversion (IC) from S 4 and

  9. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of tooth decay" on the label. The Controversy Over Fluoride Opponents of water fluoridation have questioned ... Us Contact Us Partners Editorial Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit ...

  10. Replicating the Ice-Volume Signal of the Early Pleistocene with a Complex Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, C. R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Pollard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Milankovitch theory proposes high-latitude summer insolation intensity paces the ice ages by controlling perennial snow cover amounts (Milankovitch, 1941). According to theory, the ~21 kyr cycle of precession should dominate the ice-volume records since it has the greatest influence on high-latitude summer insolation. Modeling experiments frequently support Milankovitch theory by attributing the majority of Northern Hemisphere high-latitude summer snowmelt to changes in the cycle of precession (e.g. Jackson and Broccoli, 2003). However, ice-volume proxy records, especially those of the Early Pleistocene (2.6-0.8 Ma), display variability with a period of ~41 kyr (Raymo and Lisiecki, 2005), indicative of insolation forcing from obliquity, which has a much smaller influence on summer insolation intensity than precession. Several hypotheses attempt to explain the discrepancies between Milkankovitch theory and the proxy records by invoking phenomena such as insolation gradients (Raymo and Nisancioglu, 2003), hemispheric offset (Raymo et al., 2006; Lee and Poulsen, 2009), and integrated summer energy (Huybers, 2006); however, all of these hypotheses contain caveats (Ruddiman, 2006) and have yet to be supported by modeling studies that use a complex GCM. To explore potential solutions to this '41 kyr problem,' we use an Earth system model composed of the GENESIS GCM and Land Surface model, the BIOME4 vegetation model, and the Pennsylvania State ice-sheet model. Using an asynchronous coupling technique, we run four idealized transient combinations of obliquity and precession, representing the orbital extremes of the Pleistocene (Berger and Loutre, 1991). Each experiment is run through several complete orbital cycles with a dynamic ice domain spanning North America and Greenland, and fixed preindustrial greenhouse-gas concentrations. For all orbital configurations, model results produce greater ice-volume spectral power at the frequency of obliquity despite significantly

  11. Thermodynamic and electrochemical properties of some rare earth cryptates and related complexes in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loufouilou, E.L.

    1986-03-01

    The stability of trivalent lanthanide complexes with [1]-cryptand 22 and [2]-cryptands 222 and 211 and also tris (3.6- dioxa heptyl) amine (TDHA) is studied in propylene carbonate solution by potentiometry with Ag + as an auxiliary cation. Complexation enthalpies and entropies are determined for other complexes of some trivalent lanthanides (La, Er, Pr and Eu) with ligands 222, 221, 211, 22, 21, 18C6 and TDHA. [1]- and [2]- crytands are complexing agents more powerful than TDHA and crown-ethers 15C6 and 18C6. For ligands containing nitrogen complexe stability increase with RE atomic number but decrease for crown-ethers. In propylene carbonate complexes are stabilized by enthalpic effects, entropic contribution is variable. Polarographic reduction of samarium cryptate with ligand 222, 221 and 22 in propylene carbonate is reversible as in more solvating solvents water and methanol. Mixed complexes are formed with chlorides and this cryptate system is more difficult to reduce [fr

  12. Fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride has been used as the most effective anti-caries agent for over five decades. It functions not only on the dental hard tissues, but also as an antimicrobial agent. It is known that oral bacteria are able to develop resistance to fluoride, which may affect the effectiveness of fluoride in

  13. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. AIM: To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare...... the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste....... After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. RESULTS...

  14. Application of infrared spectroscopy for study of chemical bonds in complexes of rare earth nitrates with alkylammonium nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, V.D.; Chudinov, Eh.G.

    1974-01-01

    The IR absorption spectra for the tri-n-octylamine, methyl-di-n-octylamine, their nitrates and complexes with the rare element nitrates are obtained. The IR spectra analysis of the complexes has suggested that the degree of covalent character bond of a nitrate with a metal grows with the atomic number of the element. Based on the comparison of the obtained data with those available in literature for various rare-earth complexes a conclusion is made that the bond character of a metal with nitrate groups is influenced by all ligands constituting the inner coordinating sphere. As the donor capacity of a ligand grows the covalent character of the metal-nitrate bond is enhanced. The replacement of the outer-sphere cations (trioctylammonium or methyldioctylammonium) only slightly affects the bond character of a metal with the nitrate group. The distribution coefficients in the rare-earth series are shown to decrease as the electrostatic part in the metal-nitrate declines. The phenomenon is attributed to the competition between nitrate and water for the metal bond as concurrently with the intensification of metal-nitrate covalent bond in the organic phase the strength of metal hydrates in aqueous phase grows much faster. (author)

  15. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  16. Trivalent rare earth complexes of some potential antiinflammatory and antipyretic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basak, Devashish

    1994-01-01

    Binary complexes of 2-aminobenzoic acid (2-ABA), 3-aminobenzoic acid (3-ABA) and 4-aminobenzoic acid (4-ABA) with La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III) and Gd(III) have been studied paper electrophoretically at different temperatures and a constant ionic strength. The stability constants of the complexes have been reported. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab

  17. Ligand extraction of rare earth elements from aquifer sediments: Implications for rare earth element complexation with organic matter in natural waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianwu; Johannesson, Karen H.

    2010-12-01

    The ability of organic matter as well as carbonate ions to extract rare earth elements (REEs) from sandy sediments of a Coastal Plain aquifer was investigated for unpurified organic matter from different sources (i.e., Mississippi River natural organic matter, Aldrich humic acid, Nordic aquatic fulvic acid, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Suwannee River natural organic matter) and for extraction solutions containing weak (i.e., CH 3COO -) or strong (i.e., CO32-) ligands. The experimental results indicate that, in the absence of strong REE complexing ligands in solution, the amount of REEs released from the sand is small and the fractionation pattern of the released REEs appears to be controlled by the surface stability constants for REE sorption with Fe(III) oxides/oxyhydroxides. In the presence of strong solution complexing ligands, however, the amount and the fractionation pattern of the released REEs reflect the strength and variation of the stability constants of the dominant aqueous REE species across the REE series. The varying amount of REEs extracted by the different organic matter employed in the experiments indicates that organic matter from different sources has different complexing capacity for REEs. However, the fractionation pattern of REEs extracted by the various organic matter used in our experiments is remarkable consistent, being independent of the source and the concentration of organic matter used, as well as solution pH. Because natural aquifer sand and unpurified organic matter were used in our experiments, our experimental conditions are more broadly similar to natural systems than many previous laboratory experiments of REE-humic complexation that employed purified humic substances. Our results suggest that the REE loading effect on REE-humic complexation is negligible in natural waters as more abundant metal cations (e.g., Fe, Al) out-compete REEs for strong binding sites on organic matter. More specifically, our results indicate that REE

  18. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  20. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  1. Thermodynamic stability of complexes of BF3, PF5 and AsF5 with chlorine fluorides, oxyfluorides, and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    1996-07-01

    The recent discovery of solid, water sensitive, arsenic-containing deposits in auxiliary process piping in the PGDP led to a search for explanations that could account for such accumulated material. A plausible explanation for the deposits is the formation of complexes of AsF 5 with one or more gases that may have been present as a result of cascade equipment cleanup activities. A literature search was performed. The target of the search was literature that would provide information on the dissociation pressure of complexes of AsF 5 or its hydrolysis products with any gases that may be (at least intermittently) present in the cascade location where the deposits were found. While the precise information sought (namely reliable, accurate dissociation pressures of such complexes at cascade temperatures) was not found in the detail desired. other information on these or similar complexes was obtained which permits prediction of the conditions under which the complexes might form, dissociate, or migrate, and how they might behave in the presence of atmospheric moisture. Information was gathered on potential AsF 5 complexes with ClF, ClF 3 , ClF 5 , ClF 3 O, ClO 2 F, and ClO 3 F. Information was also collected on many other related complexes as it was encountered, particularly for series of complexes which could assist in predicting chemical trends. Thermodynamic analysis and property estimation methods have been used to generate provisional estimates of the dissociation pressures of the two complexes ClF 3 *AsF 5 and ClO 2 F*AsF 5 . In addition, several hydrolysis species have been identified, and stability properties of the most relevant such complex (H 3 O*AsF 6 ) have similarly been estimated. While the predicted dissociation pressures are somewhat uncertain. they do lead to a tentative picture of the formation and behavior of such complexes in a cascade cleanup environment

  2. Investigation of complexing of vitamine B-6 with rare earth ions by PMR and luminescent spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buiklinskij, V.D.; Zelenov, V.I.; Zolin, V.F.; Koreneva, L.G.; Panyushkin, V.T.

    1981-01-01

    To investigate the complexing of pyridoxine (P), pyridoxal (PL) and pyridoxamine (PM) with lanthanide ions the changes of PMR spectra of ligands in the presence of cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, europium, gadolinium ions, as well as luminescence and absorption spectra of europium in the presence of ligands are used. Using the optical spectroscopy it has been shown that the PL and PM complexes do not have axial symmetry. The values of parameters of the crystalline field of the second order, determining the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of europium complexes are evaluated. With an aid of PMR and luminescence spectroscopy it is shown that lanthanide ions coordinate the hydroxy groups of ligands. In the case of P and especially PL oxygen of the substituent in position 4 takes part in the coordination. Using the PMR spectroscopy the difference of the substituent location near C4 in the PM complex from its location in the P and PL complexes as well as the difference in the position of lanthanide ion in the complexes of all the three ligands are detected. The reasons for the differences above are discussed [ru

  3. Rare earth(III) complexes for the development of new magnetic and luminescent probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonat, A.

    2007-10-01

    The simultaneous optimisation of the molecular parameters determining the relaxivity (number of coordinated water molecules, water-exchange, rotation dynamics of the whole complex, electronic relaxation, Gd(III)-proton distance) is essential to prepare efficient contrast agents. The aim of this work is on the one hand to design and study complexes with a high number of bound water molecules and to understand the influence of the coordination sphere on the stability and on the electronic relaxation and on the other hand, to use the ligand as a chromophore for the development of luminescent probes for biomedical imaging. We present the structure, the stability and the relaxivity of Gd(III) complexes of two series of tripodal ligands containing picolinate units based either on the 1,4,7-tri-aza-cyclononane ring or on a tertiary amine. These complexes show high relaxivity in water and in serum and can establish a non covalent interaction with serum albumin. The interpretation of the water proton relaxivity with the help of new relaxometric methods based on an auxiliary probe solute has allowed us to show that both the presence of the picolinate groups and the 1,4,7-tri-aza-cyclononane framework can lead to Gd(III) complexes with favourable electronic relaxation properties. This ligands have also been used for Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexation leading to strong luminescence in visible light. Other complexes derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline unit which display a very high luminescence in infrared are also studied. (author)

  4. Earth Girl Volcano: An Interactive Casual Game about Complex Volcanic Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlow, I.

    2017-12-01

    Earth Girl Volcano is an interactive casual strategy game for disaster preparedness. The project is designed for mainstream audiences, particularly for children, as an engaging and fun way to learn about volcano hazards, monitoring, and mitigation strategies. The game is deceptively simple but it provides a toolbox to address practically all volcanic hazards ranging from gas and ash fall to pyroclastic flows, lava and lahars. This presentation shows the basic dynamic to explore the area, assess the risk, choose the best-suited tools and execute a mitigation strategy within the available budget. This game is a real-time simulation of a crowd evacuation that allows players to intervene before and during the disaster.

  5. Mixed complexes formed by rare earths with nitrilotriacetic and malic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samir Abu Ali; Dobrynina, N.A.; Martynenko, L.I.; Borisova, L.I.

    1980-01-01

    The composition of the mixed ligand and homogeneous complexes, forming in the Ln 3+ system-nitrilotriacetic acid (H 3 X)-malic acid (H 2 Mal) is determined and stability constants are calculated according to the data of the spectrography and pH-metry with the help of the mathematical statistics. The LnHMal 2+ , LnX 0 , LnX 2 - 3 and LnXMal 2- complexes are found in the solutions with the LnCl 3 : H 3 X : H 2 Mal= 1 : 1 : 1 and 1 : 1 : 2 composition

  6. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  7. Industrial fluoride pollution: chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krook, L.; Maylin, G.A.

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973. Considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant was designated as the major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island. Cattle located on this island showed signs of chronic fluoride poisoning. This poisoning was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. This Cornwall Island herds study indicates that the established tolerance level of fluoride for performance of dairy and beef cattle is not valid since the tolerance level was set based on experiments with healthy calves which were exposed to dietary fluoride from 3 to 4 months of age and not on cattle which were chronically exposed to fluoride from conception to death. 56 references.

  8. Growth and characterization of fluoride monocrystalline fibres of the type LiY{sub 1-x} RE{sub x}F{sub 4} (RE=rare-earths); Crescimento e caracterizacao de fibras monocristalinas de fluoretos do tipo LiY{sub 1-x} TR{sub x}F{sub 4} (TR=terras raras)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espirito Santo, Ana Maria do

    2005-07-01

    In this work we present the growth and characterization of LiF pure and rare-earth doped (Er and Nd) yttrium-lithium tetra-fluoride (LiYF{sub 4} or YLF) by the micropulling- down technique (muPD). The use of this technique is original for the present purpose. A mu-PD prototype in the resistive mode was firstly built to understand the most important operational parameters. A commercial equipment was later installed and specifically modified to grow fluoride fibres. Regular and transparent single-crystalline fibres of LiF (diameter of 0.6 mm and length up to 150 mm) were obtained. LiF crystalline fibres as a potential laser media presented the same spectroscopic properties of bulk crystals. The influence of capillary and crucible shapes, growth atmosphere and start composition stoichiometry on the growth process of YLF fibers were also investigated. In general, the fluorides are very sensitive to moisture contamination. The growth atmosphere plays an important role on the stoichiometry deviation. Since this fluoride melts incongruently, any compositional changes influences the solidification behavior of the material. Additionally, a limited pulling rate is required to the YLF phase formation and to the compositional homogeneity along the fiber. Homogeneous and regular section YLF fibres, with diameters between 0.5 to 0.8 mm and up to 60 mm in length, were obtained in a suitable and reproducible growth process. Er-doped (with nominal concentration of 10 and 40 mol%) and Nd-doped (with nominal concentration of 1.7 mol%) fibres were also successfully grown. Er-doped fibres were crack-free and the dopant concentration was practically uniform along the YLF phase. However, Nd-doped fibres presented a short initial transient in its concentration. The Nd distribution coefficient was evaluated as 0.58 for the YLF fibre. This value is greater than those estimated for YLF bulk crystals grown by normal freezing processes. The optical properties of the YLF:Nd fibres were similar

  9. Complexes of macrocyclic dibenzo-18-crown-6 polyether with nitrates of some rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gren', A.I.; Zakhariya, N.F.; Vityuk, N.V.; Kalishevich, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation is to obtain and study the structure of complexes of macrocyclic polyether dibenzo-18-crown-6(D-18-C-6) with REE nitrates (Ln, Pr, Nd, Er). Synthesis has been realized by mixing the solutions 2 mol Ln(NO 3 ) 3 and 2 mmol D-18-C-6 into 30-50 ml acetonitrile and boiling during 40-60 minutes. Study on the prepared compounds by means of UV- and IR-spectroscopy proved formation of D-18-C-6 complexes with lanthanide nitrates-Ln(NO 3 ) 3 D-18-C-6. Based on studying IR-spectra a conclusion is made on deformation of D-18-C-6 structure under complexing. Distortion of the ring structure of macrocyclic polyether manifests itself in increase of CH 2 -O-CH 2 bond lengths with simultaneous reduction of four other types of bonds C 6 H 5 -O-CH 2 . Synthesized complexes are stated to have different solubility in acetonitrile which increases in the La 3 ) 3 xD-18-C-6 is noted

  10. Rare earth [beta]-diketonate and carboxylate metal complexes as precursors for MOCVD of oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmina, N.P. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); Martynenko, L.I. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); Tu, Z.A. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); Kaul, A.R. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); Girichev, G.V. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); Giricheva, N.I. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); Rykov, A.N. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); Korenev, Y.M. (Dept. of Chemistry, Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation))

    1993-08-01

    Volatile and thermostable complexes of lanthanide acetylacetonates and pivalates were obtained and investigated by different methods. These compounds were used for lanthanide oxide containing film producing and for fabrication of silica optical fibers doped by lanthanide oxide. The properties of these and already known volatile precursors are compared. (orig.).

  11. Rare earth β-diketonate and carboxylate metal complexes as precursors for MOCVD of oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmina, N.P.; Martynenko, L.I.; Tu, Z.A.; Kaul, A.R.; Girichev, G.V.; Giricheva, N.I.; Rykov, A.N.; Korenev, Y.M.

    1993-01-01

    Volatile and thermostable complexes of lanthanide acetylacetonates and pivalates were obtained and investigated by different methods. These compounds were used for lanthanide oxide containing film producing and for fabrication of silica optical fibers doped by lanthanide oxide. The properties of these and already known volatile precursors are compared. (orig.)

  12. Determination of the stability constants for the complexes of rare-earth elements and tetracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiki, M.; Lima, F.W.

    1977-01-01

    Stability constants for the lanthanide elements complexes with tetracycline were determined by the methods of average number of ligands, the two parameters and by weighted least squares. The technique of solvent extraction was applied to obtain the values of the parameters required for the determination of the constants [pt

  13. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Saurabh [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands); Krishnan, Sunderrajan [INREM Foundation (India); Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep [Akvo Foundation (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l{sup −1}. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  14. Monitoring of fluoride in water samples using a smartphone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Saurabh; Krishnan, Sunderrajan; Rajkumar, Samuel; Halery, Nischal; Balkunde, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    In several parts of India, groundwater is the only reliable, year round source for drinking water. Prevention of fluorosis, a chronic disease resulting from excess intake of fluoride, requires the screening of all groundwater sources for fluoride in endemic areas. In this paper, the authors present a field deployable colorimetric analyzer based on an inexpensive smartphone embedded with digital camera for taking photograph of the colored solution as well as an easy-fit, and compact sample chamber (Akvo Caddisfly). Phones marketed by different smartphone makers were used. Commercially available zirconium xylenol orange reagent was used for determining fluoride concentration. A software program was developed to use with the phone for recording and analyzing the RGB color of the picture. Linear range for fluoride estimation was 0–2 mg l"−"1. Around 200 samples, which consisted of laboratory prepared as well as field samples collected from different locations in Karnataka, India, were tested with Akvo Caddisfly. The results showed a significant positive correlation between Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method and Akvo Caddisfly (Phones A, B and C), with correlation coefficient ranging between 0.9952 and 1.000. In addition, there was no significant difference in the mean fluoride content values between ISE and Phone B and C except for Phone A. Thus the smartphone method is economical and suited for groundwater fluoride analysis in the field. - Highlights: • Fluoride is an inorganic pollutant in ground water, affecting human health. • A colorimetric method for measurement of fluoride in drinking water with smartphone • Measurement is by mixing water with zirconyl xylenol orange complex reagent. • Results are comparable with laboratory-based ion selective fluoride electrode method.

  15. Peculiarities of different-ligand complexing of rare earths with nitrilotriacetate and adenosine-5'-triphosphate according to the mathematical simulation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlova, I.E.; Dobrynina, N.A.; Smirnova, N.S.; Martynenko, L.I.; Evseev, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    By the method of pH-metric titration using mathematical simulation different-ligand complexing of rare earths with nitrilotriacetate and adenosine-5'-triphosphate is studied. It is shown that the ligands interact with the formation of protonated associates. The composition of different complexes is determined, their stability constants are calculated, their existence regions are found

  16. Spectral determination of individual rare earths in different classes of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, L.I.; Fadeeva, L.A.; Shevchenko, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    The conditions are found allowing to analyze various inorganic compounds for rare-earth elements without separation from non-rare-earth components. The influence of the plasma composition on the intensity of spectral lines of rare-earth elements is studied. The relative intensity of homologous spectral lines of various rare-earth elements remains constant regardless of the plasma composition. The conditions are found for the determination of individual rare-earth elements acting as both alloying additives (Csub(n) -- n x 10 -1 -n x 10 -3 %), and basic components (up to tens of per cent) in different classes of inorganic compounds of 1-7 elements. The general method is developed for the determination of individual rare-earth elements in mixtures of oxides of rare-earth elements, complex fluorides of rare-earth elements and elements of group 2, gallates, borates, germanates, vanadates of rare-earth elements and aluminium; zirconates-titanates of lead and barium, containing modifying additives of rare-earth elements, complex chalcogenides of rare-earth elements and elements of group 5

  17. Method for routine determination of fluoride in urine by selective ion- electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Bellintani, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    A simple, fast and sensitive method is outlined for determining fluoride in urine of workers who handle fluoride compounds. The determination is based on the measurement of fluoride by ion selective electrode. Cationic interferents like Ca ++ , Mg ++ , Fe +++ and Al +++ are complexed by EDTA and citric acid. Common anions present in urine, such as Cl - , PO --- 4 and SO -- 4 do not interfere in the method. (Author) [pt

  18. Rare earth mineralisation in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, northern Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, A. S.; Hughes, H. S. R.; Goodenough, K. M.; Gunn, A. G.; Lacinska, A.

    2012-04-01

    Due to growing global concerns about security of rare earth element (REE) supply, there is considerable interest in identifying new deposits and in understanding the processes responsible for their formation. Ongoing studies by BGS on potential indigenous resources have focused on the Caledonian alkaline intrusive complexes of north-west Scotland. The highest values of total rare earth oxide (TREO) have been found in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Complex in Sutherland. The Loch Loyal Syenite Complex comprises three intrusions: Ben Loyal, Beinn Stumanadh and Cnoc nan Cuilean. The Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion, which covers an area of about 3 km2, can be subdivided into two zones: a Mixed Syenite Zone (MSZ) and a later Massive Leucosyenite Zone (MLZ). Evidence from field mapping and 3D-modelling suggests that the melasyenites were passively emplaced to form a lopolith concordant with the Moine and Lewisian country rocks. A later episode of leucosyenitic magmatism caused mixing and mingling with the melasyenite forming the MSZ. Continued intrusion of leucosyenite melts then formed the MLZ [1]. The melasyenites are enriched in TREO relative to the leucosyenites with average values of 3800 ppm and 1400 ppm respectively. The highest contents, up to 20 000 ppm TREO, are found in narrow biotite-magnetite-rich veins identified in a single stream section near the eastern margin of the intrusion. All lithologies are light rare earth element (LREE) dominated with high concentrations of Ba and Sr and low levels of Nb and Ta. Various REE-bearing minerals are present but allanite is dominant, being present in all major magmatic lithologies and the biotite-magnetite veins. Three generations of allanite have been identified: a late-magmatic phase rimming apatite; allanite micro veinlets cross-cutting the syenite; and a third phase only observed in the biotite-magnetite veins. TREO concentrations of the different allanite generations are similar, averaging 22%. The

  19. Fluoride ion recognition by chelating and cationic boranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnall, Todd W; Chiu, Ching-Wen; Gabbaï, François P

    2009-02-17

    Because of the ubiquity of fluoride ions and their potential toxicity at high doses, researchers would like to design receptors that selectively detect this anion. Fluoride is found in drinking water, toothpaste, and osteoporosis drugs. In addition, fluoride ions also can be detected as an indicator of uranium enrichment (via hydrolysis of UF(6)) or of the chemical warfare agent sarin, which releases the ion upon hydrolysis. However, because of its high hydration enthalpy, the fluoride anion is one of the most challenging targets for anion recognition. Among the various recognition strategies that are available, researchers have focused a great deal of attention on Lewis acidic boron compounds. These molecules typically interact with fluoride anions to form the corresponding fluoroborate species. In the case of simple triarylboranes, the fluoroborates are formed in organic solvents but not in water. To overcome this limitation, this Account examines various methods we have pursued to increase the fluoride-binding properties of boron-based receptors. We first considered the use of bifunctional boranes, which chelate the fluoride anion, such as 1,8-diborylnaphthalenes or heteronuclear 1-boryl-8-mercurio-naphthalenes. In these molecules, the neighboring Lewis acidic atoms can cooperatively interact with the anionic guest. Although the fluoride binding constants of the bifunctional compounds exceed those of neutral monofunctional boranes by several orders of magnitude, the incompatibility of these systems with aqueous media limits their utility. More recently, we have examined simple triarylboranes whose ligands are decorated by cationic ammonium or phosphonium groups. These cationic groups increase the electrophilic character of these boranes, and unlike their neutral analogs, they are able to complex fluoride in aqueous media. We have also considered cationic boranes, which form chelate complexes with fluoride anions. Our work demonstrates that Coulombic and chelate

  20. White OLED using {beta}-diketones rare earth binuclear complex as emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirino, W.G. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Legnani, C. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Cremona, M. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil)]. E-mail: cremona@fis.puc-rio.br; Lima, P.P. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil); Junior, S.A. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil); Malta, O.L. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil)

    2006-01-03

    In this work, the fabrication and the characterization of a white triple-layer OLED using a {beta}-diketones binuclear complex [Eu(btfa){sub 3}phenterpyTb(acac){sub 3}] as the emitting layer is reported. The devices were assembled using a heterojunction between three organic molecular materials: the N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine (NPB) as hole-transporting layer, the {beta}-diketones binuclear complex and the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) as the electron transporting layer. All the organic layers were sequentially deposited under high vacuum environment by thermal evaporation onto ITO substrates and without breaking vacuum. Continuous electroluminescence emission was obtained varying the applied bias voltage from 10 to 22 V showing a wide emission band from 400 to 700 nm with about 100 cd/m{sup 2} of luminance. The white emission results from a combined action between the binuclear complex, acting as hole blocking and emitting layer, blue from NPB and the typical Alq{sub 3} green emission. The intensity ratio of the peaks is determined by the layer thickness and by the bias voltage applied to the OLED, allowing us to obtain a color tunable light source.

  1. White OLED using β-diketones rare earth binuclear complex as emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirino, W.G.; Legnani, C.; Cremona, M.; Lima, P.P.; Junior, S.A.; Malta, O.L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the fabrication and the characterization of a white triple-layer OLED using a β-diketones binuclear complex [Eu(btfa) 3 phenterpyTb(acac) 3 ] as the emitting layer is reported. The devices were assembled using a heterojunction between three organic molecular materials: the N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine (NPB) as hole-transporting layer, the β-diketones binuclear complex and the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq 3 ) as the electron transporting layer. All the organic layers were sequentially deposited under high vacuum environment by thermal evaporation onto ITO substrates and without breaking vacuum. Continuous electroluminescence emission was obtained varying the applied bias voltage from 10 to 22 V showing a wide emission band from 400 to 700 nm with about 100 cd/m 2 of luminance. The white emission results from a combined action between the binuclear complex, acting as hole blocking and emitting layer, blue from NPB and the typical Alq 3 green emission. The intensity ratio of the peaks is determined by the layer thickness and by the bias voltage applied to the OLED, allowing us to obtain a color tunable light source

  2. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhar Vineet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  3. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Vineet; Bhatnagar, Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralization of bone and teeth. At high levels it has been known to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis. There are suggested effects of very high levels of fluoride on various body organs and genetic material. The purpose of this paper is to review the various aspects of fluoride and its importance in human life.

  4. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag formed in the production of metallic uranium by the reduction of depleted uranium tetrafluoride with metallic magnesium in a retort wherein the slag contains the free metals magnesium and uranium and also oxides and fluorides of the metals. The slag having a radioactivity level of at least about 7,000 rhoCi/gm. The method comprises the steps of: grinding the slag to a median particle size of about 200 microns; contacting the ground slag in a reaction zone with an acid having a strength of from about 0.5 to 1.5 N for a time of from about 4 to about 20 hours in the presence of a catalytic amount of iron; removing the liquid product; treating the particulate solid product; repeating the last two steps at least one more time to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 rhoCi/gm

  5. Physiology and toxicity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar Vineet; Bhatnagar Maheep

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride has been described as an essential element needed for normal development and growth of animals and extremely useful for human beings. Fluoride is abundant in the environment and the main source of fluoride to humans is drinking water. It has been proved to be beneficial in recommended doses, and at the same time its toxicity at higher levels has also been well established. Fluoride gets accumulated in hard tissues of the body and has been know to play an important role in mineralizat...

  6. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of novel Schiff base type polymer-rare earth complexes containing furfural-based bidentate Schiff base ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Baojiao; Zhang, Dandan; Li, Yanbin

    2018-03-01

    Luminescent polymer-rare earth complexes are an important class of photoluminescence and electroluminescence materials. Via molecular design, two furfural-based bidentate Schiff base ligands, furfural-aniline (FA) type ligand and furfural-cyclohexylamine (FC) type ligand, were bonded on the side chains of polysulfone (PSF), respectively, forming two functionalized macromolecules, PSF-FA and PSF-FC. And then through respective coordination reactions of the two functionalized macromolecules with Eu(Ⅲ) ion and Tb(Ⅲ) ion, novel luminescent binary and ternary (with 1,10-phenanthroline as the second ligand) polymer-rare earth complexes were synthesized. For these complexes, on basis of the characterization of their chemical structures, they photoluminescence properties were main researched, and the relationship between their luminescent properties and structures was explored. The experimental results show that the complexes coming from PSF-FA and Eu(Ⅲ) ion including binary and ternary complexes emit strong red luminescence, indicating that the bonded bidentate Schiff base ligand FA can sensitize the fluorescence emission of Eu(III) ion. While the complexes coming from PSF-FC and Tb(Ⅲ) ion produce green luminescence, displaying that the bonded bidentate Schiff base ligand FC can sensitize the fluorescence emission of Tb(Ⅲ) ion. The fluorescence emission intensities of the ternary complexes were stronger than that of binary complexes, reflecting the important effect of the second ligand. The fluorescence emission of the solid film of complexes is much stronger than that of the solutions of complexes. Besides, by comparison, it is found that the furfural (as a heteroaromatic compound)-based Schiff base type polymer-rare earth complexes have stronger fluorescence emission and higher energy transfer efficiency than salicylaldehyde (as a common aromatic compound)-based Schiff base type polymer-rare earth complexes.

  7. Nutritional and water effect on fluoride uptake and respiration of bean seedlings. [Phaseolus vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Applegate, H G; Adams, D F

    1960-01-01

    Bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris) were grown in an atmosphere containing 2.0 +/- 0.21 g F /mT (1.6 ppb). The effect of N, P, K, Fe, and Ca deficiencies and the effect of osmotic pressures of 0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 and 7.5 pounds on fluoride uptake and fluoride-mediated respiration were studied. The data showed that P deficient plants took up more fluoride than plants deficient in any of the other elements studied. Fluoride-mediated respiration was phosphorous dependent, however. Plants low in Fe or K showed increased uptake of fluoride. Nitrogen had no effect on fluoride uptake under the conditions of this experiment. Plants low in Fe showed inhibition of oxygen uptake. This inhibition was accentuated by fluoride. The interactions of N, K and Ca with fluoride on respiration were complex. Neither fluoride uptake nor fluoride-mediated respiration appeared to be linked directly to the water economy of the plants. 14 references, 6 tables.

  8. Formation of ammonia complexes of alkaline earth elements in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padar, T.G.; Stupko, T.V.; Isaev, I.D.; Pashkov, G.L.; Mironov, V.E.

    1990-01-01

    Coefficients of ammonia distribution between aqueous solutions of calcium, strontium, barium and ammonium perchlorate mixtures at ionic strength - 0.50; 1.0 and 1.5 at 298.2 K and ammonia concentrations 0.2-10 mol/dm 3 are measured. Formation of ammonia complexes of M(NH 3 ) n 2+ composition is shown. Logarithms of stepped stability constants for solutions with zero ionic strength for Ca 2+ are: -0.13; -0.25; -0.52 and -0.77, where n=1-4; for Sr 2+ : -0.04; -0.42 and -0.70, where n=1-3 and for Ba 2+ : -0.11; -0.50 and 0.76, where n=1-3

  9. The Ghost in the Machine: Fracking in the Earth's Complex Brittle Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    This paper discusses in the impact of complex rock properties on practical applications like fracking and its associated seismic emissions. A variety of borehole measurements show that the complex physical properties of the upper crust cannot be characterized by averages on any scale. Instead they appear to follow 3 empirical rule: a power law distribution in physical scales, a lognormal distribution in populations, and a direct relation between changes in porosity and log(permeability). These rules can be directly related to the presence of fluid rich and seismically active fractures - from mineral grains to fault segments. (These are the "ghosts" referred to in the title.) In other physical systems, such behaviors arise on the boundaries of phase changes, and are studied as "critical state physics". In analogy to the 4 phases of water, crustal rocks progress upward from a un-fractured, ductile lower crust to nearly cohesionless surface alluvium. The crust in between is in an unstable transition. It is in this layer methods such as hydrofracking operate - be they in Oil and Gas, geothermal, or mining. As a result, nothing is predictable in these systems. Crustal models have conventionally been constructed assuming that in situ permeability and related properties are normally distributed. This approach is consistent with the use of short scale-length cores and logs to estimate properties. However, reservoir-scale flow data show that they are better fit to lognormal distributions. Such "long tail" distributions are observed for well productivity, ore vein grades, and induced seismic signals. Outcrop and well-log data show that many rock properties also show a power-law-type variation in scale lengths. In terms of Fourier power spectra, if peaks per km is k, then their power is proportional to 1/k. The source of this variation is related to pore-space connectivity, beginning with grain-fractures. We then show that a passive seismic method, Tomographic Fracture

  10. Novel synergism by complex ligands in solvent extraction of rare earth metals(III) with β-diketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, H.; Ebisawa, M.; Kato, M.; Ohashi, K.

    2006-01-01

    The extraction of rare earth metals(III) (RE) with hexafluoroacetylacetone (Hhfa) and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) was studied in the presence of some cobalt(III) chelates such as tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt(III), tris(4-isopropyltropolonato)cobalt(III), tris(8-quinolinolato)cobalt(III), tris(8-quinolinethiolato)cobalt(III), and tris(diethyldithiocarbamato)cobalt(III) in benzene or toluene. The synergistic enhancement of the extraction of RE, especially of lanthanum(III) was found in all the systems. Therefore, those cobalt(III) chelates act as synergists or complex ligands. The equilibrium analysis and IR spectroscopic study were performed to evaluate the present synergistic mechanism. It was found that the RE-β-diketone chelates form 1:1 adducts, i.e., binuclear complexes, with the cobalt(III) chelates in the organic phase. The formation constants (β s,1 ) were determined and compared with those reported previously. The spectroscopic studies demonstrated that adducts have two different structures with inner- and outer-sphere coordination. In the former the cobalt(III) chelate directly coordinated to the RE ion and displaced the coordinated water molecules. In the latter the hydrogen-bonding was formed between the coordinating oxygen or sulfur atoms of cobalt(III) chelate and hydrogen atoms of the coordinated water molecules in the RE-β-diketone chelate. The types of the adducts are mainly due to the steric factors of the RE-β-diketone chelates and the cobalt(III) chelates

  11. Molecular mechanisms of fluoride toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Olivier; Arreola-Mendoza, Laura; Del Razo, Luz María

    2010-11-05

    Halfway through the twentieth century, fluoride piqued the interest of toxicologists due to its deleterious effects at high concentrations in human populations suffering from fluorosis and in in vivo experimental models. Until the 1990s, the toxicity of fluoride was largely ignored due to its "good reputation" for preventing caries via topical application and in dental toothpastes. However, in the last decade, interest in its undesirable effects has resurfaced due to the awareness that this element interacts with cellular systems even at low doses. In recent years, several investigations demonstrated that fluoride can induce oxidative stress and modulate intracellular redox homeostasis, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content, as well as alter gene expression and cause apoptosis. Genes modulated by fluoride include those related to the stress response, metabolic enzymes, the cell cycle, cell-cell communications and signal transduction. The primary purpose of this review is to examine recent findings from our group and others that focus on the molecular mechanisms of the action of inorganic fluoride in several cellular processes with respect to potential physiological and toxicological implications. This review presents an overview of the current research on the molecular aspects of fluoride exposure with emphasis on biological targets and their possible mechanisms of involvement in fluoride cytotoxicity. The goal of this review is to enhance understanding of the mechanisms by which fluoride affects cells, with an emphasis on tissue-specific events in humans. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Method for fluoride routine determination in urine of personnel exposed, by ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, M.A.F.; Bellintani, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    A simple, fast and sensible method is outlined for the determination of fluoride in urine of workers that handle fluorine compounds. The determination is based on the measurement of fluoride by ion selective electrode. Cationic interference like Ca ++ , Mg ++ , Fe +++ and Al +++ are complexed by EDTA and citric acid. (Author) [pt

  13. Preparation of sodium fluoride agglomerates for selective adsorption of uranium hexafluoride (U F6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.; Maximiano, C.; Shimba, R.; Silva, E.R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (U F 6 ) and Sodium Fluoride (NaF) reacts reversibly to form a solid complex. Such reversibility accounts for the great interest in using Sodium Fluoride (NaF) to separate Uranium Hexafluoride (U F 6 ) from other gases. Therefore a chemical trap offers an alternative to the cryogenic trapping device. (author). 3 refs, 1 fig, 4 tabs

  14. Mie scattering in heavy-metal fluoride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgar, A.

    1996-01-01

    Heavy-metal fluoride glasses comprise mixtures of heavy-cation fluorides such as those of zirconium, barium, and lanthanum together with some stabilising fluorides such as AlF 3 . For particular relative proportions, the mixtures form a glass rather than a polycrystalline material when quenched from the melt. The particularly useful features of these glasses are the wide spectral region (∼200nm-8000nm) over which they are transparent, the low minimum attenuation at the centre of the spectral window, and the ease with which optically-active rare-earth ions can be incorporated, leading to potential applications in passive and active fibre optics. The minimal attenuation, which is potentially lower than for silica fibre, is generally limited by wavelength-independent scattering by particle and gas bubble inclusions. We have observed a new wavelength-dependent scattering effect in fluoride glass of the well-known composition ZLABN20. In this paper, we report on work in progress on the optical extinction and scattering spectrum of the fluoride glasses, and discuss the spectra in terms of Mie's scattering theory. The chemical nature of the scattering centres in these nominally 'pure' glasses is at present a puzzle, and relative merits of various possible models will be compared

  15. Preparation and luminescent properties of the novel polymer-rare earth complexes composed of Poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) and Europium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuewen; Hao, Haixia; Wu, Qingyao; Gao, Zihan; Xie, Hongde

    2018-06-01

    A series of novel polymer-rare earth complexes with Eu3+ ions have been synthesized and investigated successfully, including the binary complexes containing the single ligand poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) (EAA) and the ternary complexes using 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), dibenzoylmethane (DBM) or thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) as the second ligand. Their structures have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD), which confirm that both EAA and small molecules participate in the coordination reaction with rare earth ions, and they can disperse homogeneously in the polymer matrixes. Both ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and photoluminescence tests for the complexes have been recorded. The relationship between fluorescence intensity of polymer-rare earth complexes and the quantity of ligand EAA has been studied and discussed. The films casted from the complexes solution can emit strong characteristic red light under UV light excitation. All these results suggest that the complexes possess potential application as luminescent materials.

  16. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned in...

  17. Growth of fluoride treated Kalanchoe pinnata plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H N; Applegate, H G

    1962-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata plants can absorb fluoride through roots. The absorption is related to the amount of fluoride applied to the soil. There appeared to be a relationship between the amount of fluoride adsorbed and the subsequent growth of the plants. Plants which adsorbed the largest amounts of fluoride had the greatest increase in growth.

  18. Utility of Lithium in Rare-Earth Metal Reduction Reactions to Form Nontraditional Ln2+ Complexes and Unusual [Li(2.2.2-cryptand)]1+ Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Daniel N; Darago, Lucy E; Ziller, Joseph W; Evans, William J

    2018-02-19

    The utility of lithium compared to other alkali metals in generating Ln 2+ rare-earth metal complexes via reduction of Ln 3+ precursors in reactions abbreviated as LnA 3 /M (Ln = rare-earth metal; A = anionic ligand; M = alkali metal) is described. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Ln (Cp' = C 5 H 4 SiMe 3 ; Ln = Y, Tb, Dy, Ho) under Ar in the presence of 2.2.2-cryptand (crypt) forms new examples of crystallographically characterizable Ln 2+ complexes of these metals, [Li(crypt)][Cp' 3 Ln]. In each complex, lithium is found in an N 2 O 4 donor atom coordination geometry that is unusual for the cryptand ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data on these new examples of nontraditional divalent lanthanide complexes are consistent with 4f n 5d 1 electronic configurations. The Dy and Ho complexes have exceptionally high single-ion magnetic moments, 11.35 and 11.67 μ B , respectively. Lithium reduction of Cp' 3 Y under N 2 at -35 °C forms the Y 2+ complex (Cp' 3 Y) 1- , which reduces dinitrogen upon warming to room temperature to generate the (N 2 ) 2- complex [Cp' 2 Y(THF)] 2 (μ-η 2 :η 2 -N 2 ). These results provide insight on the factors that lead to reduced dinitrogen complexes and/or stable divalent lanthanide complexes as a function of the specific reducing agent and conditions.

  19. The mechanism behind internally generated centennial-to-millennial scale climate variability in an earth system model of intermediate complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Friedrich

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism triggering centennial-to-millennial-scale variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC in the earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM is investigated. It is found that for several climate boundary conditions such as low obliquity values (~22.1° or LGM-albedo, internally generated centennial-to-millennial-scale variability occurs in the North Atlantic region. Stochastic excitations of the density-driven overturning circulation in the Nordic Seas can create regional sea-ice anomalies and a subsequent reorganization of the atmospheric circulation. The resulting remote atmospheric anomalies over the Hudson Bay can release freshwater pulses into the Labrador Sea and significantly increase snow fall in this region leading to a subsequent reduction of convective activity. The millennial-scale AMOC oscillations disappear if LGM bathymetry (with closed Hudson Bay is prescribed or if freshwater pulses are suppressed artificially. Furthermore, our study documents the process of the AMOC recovery as well as the global marine and terrestrial carbon cycle response to centennial-to-millennial-scale AMOC variability.

  20. Accomplishing simple, solubility-based separations of rare earth elements with complexes bearing size-sensitive molecular apertures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Justin A; Cole, Bren E; Boreen, Michael A; Lippincott, Connor A; Manor, Brian C; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2016-12-27

    Rare earth (RE) metals are critical components of electronic materials and permanent magnets. Recycling of consumer materials is a promising new source of rare REs. To incentivize recycling, there is a clear need for the development of simple methods for targeted separations of mixtures of RE metal salts. Metal complexes of a tripodal hydroxylaminato ligand, TriNOx 3- , featured a size-sensitive aperture formed of its three η 2 -(N,O) ligand arms. Exposure of cations in the aperture induced a self-associative equilibrium comprising RE(TriNOx)THF and [RE(TriNOx)] 2 species. Differences in the equilibrium constants K dimer for early and late metals enabled simple separations through leaching. Separations were performed on RE1/RE2 mixtures, where RE1 = La-Sm and RE2 = Gd-Lu, with emphasis on Eu/Y separations for potential applications in the recycling of phosphor waste from compact fluorescent light bulbs. Using the leaching method, separations factors approaching 2,000 were obtained for early-late RE combinations. Following solvent optimization, >95% pure samples of Eu were obtained with a 67% recovery for the technologically relevant Eu/Y separation.

  1. Application of fluorides as reagents in exothermal reducing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, A.I.; Maksimov, Yu.M.; Dedov, N.V.; Malyutina, V.M.; Avramchik, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations were made and the process of calcium-thermic reduction of titanium and zirconium tetrafluorides and their mixtures was experimentally studied. Compound TiF 4 and its mixture with ZrF 4 in amount no more than 34.3 % are reduced producing a well-formed ingot. When ZrF 4 content is exceeded in the mixture to be reduced as well as during reduction of pure ZrF 4 and the mixture of unseparated rare earth metal fluorides, metal and alloys are produced as embedded particles in solidified slag. Additional heat should be brought to produce qualitative ingot during the reducing process. Qualitative ingots of metal in weight up to 10 kg were produced during calcium-thermic reduction of zirconium and rare earth fluorides with application of high-frequency induction heating [ru

  2. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bandlapalli Pavani; Mandava Ragini; David Banji; Otilia J F Banji; N Gouri Pratusha

    2011-01-01

    There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflec...

  3. Molten fluoride fuel salt chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, L.M.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dai, S.; Metcalf, D.H.

    1995-01-01

    The chemistry of molten fluorides is traced from their development as fuels in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment with important factors in their selection being discussed. Key chemical characteristics such as solubility, redox behavior, and chemical activity are explained as they relate to the behavior of molten fluoride fuel systems. Development requirements for fitting the current state of the chemistry to modern nuclear fuel system are described. It is concluded that while much is known about molten fluoride behavior which can be used effectively to reduce the amount of development required for future systems, some significant molten salt chemical questions must still be addressed. copyright American Institute of Physics 1995

  4. Strontium-90 fluoride data sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a compilation of available data and appropriate literature references on the properties of strontium-90 fluoride and nonradioactive strontium fluoride. The objective of the document is to compile in a single source pertinent data to assist potential users in the development, licensing, and use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/-fueled radioisotope heat sources for terrestrial power conversion and thermal applications. The report is an update of the Strontium-90 Fluoride Data Sheet (BNWL-2284) originally issued in April 1977.

  5. Accomplishing simple, solubility-based separations of rare earth elements with complexes bearing size-sensitive molecular apertures

    OpenAIRE

    Bogart, Justin A.; Cole, Bren E.; Boreen, Michael A.; Lippincott, Connor A.; Manor, Brian C.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Rare earth metals, La���Lu, Sc, and Y, are essential components of electronic materials and permanent magnets in diverse technologies. But, their mining and separations chemistry are unsustainable and plagued with supply problems. Recycling of consumer materials containing rare earths is a promising new source of these critical materials but similarly requires efficient separations. We report the use of a tripodal hydroxylaminato ligand, TriNOx3���, with rare earth cations that enable fast, e...

  6. Matrix supported tailored polymer for solid phase extraction of fluoride from variety of aqueous streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Neha; Kumar, Sanjukta A.; Wagh, D.N.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, Ashok K.; Kumar, Sangita D.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Th complexed with poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) as tailored polymer membranes. ► Membranes offered high capacity and selectivity for fluoride in aqueous media. ► Quantitative uptake (80 ± 5%) of fluoride. ► Fast sorption kinetics. ► Reusability of polymer membranes. - Abstract: Fluoride related health hazards (fluorosis) are a major environmental problem in many regions of the world. It affects teeth; skeleton and its accumulation over a long period can lead to changes in the DNA structure. It is thus absolutely essential to bring down the fluoride levels to acceptable limits. Here, we present a new inorganic–organic hybrid polymer sorbent having tailored fixed-sites for fluoride sorption. The matrix supported poly (bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyl]phosphate) was prepared by photo-initiator induced graft-polymerization in fibrous and microporous (sheet) host poly(propylene) substrates. These substrates were conditioned for selective fluoride sorption by forming thorium complex with phosphate groups on bis[2-methacryloyloxy)-ethyl] phosphate (MEP). These tailored sorbents were studied for their selectivity towards fluoride in aqueous media having different chemical conditions. The fibrous sorbent was found to take up fluoride with a faster rate (15 min for ≈76% sorption) than the sheet sorbent. But, the fluoride loading capacity of sheet sorbent (4320 mg kg −1 ), was higher than fibrous and any other sorbent reported in the literature so far. The sorbent developed in the present work was found to be reusable after desorption of fluoride using NaOH solution. It was tested for solid phase extraction of fluoride from natural water samples.

  7. Absolute band structure determination on naturally occurring rutile with complex chemistry: Implications for mineral photocatalysis on both Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Yanzhang; Ding, Cong; Wu, Jing; Lu, Anhuai; Ding, Hongrui; Qin, Shan; Wang, Changqiu

    2018-05-01

    Rutile is the most common and stable form of TiO2 that ubiquitously existing on Earth and other terrestrial planets like Mars. Semiconducting mineral such as rutile-based photoredox reactions have been considered to play important roles in geological times. However, due to the inherent complexity in chemistry, the precision determination on band structure of natural rutile and the theoretical explanation on its solar-driven photochemistry have been hardly seen yet. Considering the multiple minor and trace elements in natural rutile, we firstly obtained the single-crystal crystallography, mineralogical composition and defects characteristic of the rutile sample by using both powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the band gap was accurately determined by synchrotron-based O K-edge X-ray absorption and emission spectra, which was firstly applied to natural rutile due to its robustness on compositions and defects. The absolute band edges of the rutile sample was calculated by considering the electronegativity of the atoms, band gap and point of zero charge. Besides, after detecting the defect energy levels by photoluminescence spectra, we drew the schematic band structure of natural rutile. The band gap (2.7 eV) of natural rutile was narrower than that of synthetic rutile (3.0 eV), and the conduction and valence band edges of natural rutile at pH = pHPZC were determined to be -0.04 V and 2.66 V (vs. NHE), respectively. The defect energy levels located at nearly the middle position of the forbidden band. Further, we used theoretical calculations to verify the isomorphous substitution of Fe and V for Ti gave rise to the distortion of TiO6 octahedron and created vacancy defects in natural rutile. Based on density functional theory, the narrowed band gap was interpreted to the contribution of Fe-3d and V-3d orbits, and the defect energy state was formed by hybridization of O-2p and Fe/V/Ti-3d

  8. Studies on the rare earth complexes with pyridine derivatives and their N-oxide(II) - Synthesis and properties of fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minyu, T.; Ning, T.; Yingli, Z.; Jiyuan, B.

    1985-01-01

    The solid complexes of rare earth nitrates perchlorates and thiocyanates with 2,2'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide (bipyO/sub 2/) have been reported. However, the corresponding complexes of other rear earth chlorides have not been investigated except lanthanum, cerium and yttrium. As an extension of our previous work on the synthesis of complexes of praseodymium and neodymium chlorides wiht bipoyO/sub 2/, the authors have now prepared fluorescent solid complexes of samarium, europium, gadolium and terbium chlorides with biphyO/sub 2/, using methanol as a reaction medium. The new synthesized compounds have been identified by means of elemental analysis, infrared spectrometry, conductometry, differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG) and X-ray powder diffraction

  9. Beryllium production using beryllium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, Carlos Henrique

    1993-01-01

    This work presents the beryllium production by thermal decomposition of the ammonium beryllium fluoride, followed by magnesium reduction, obtained in the small pilot plant of the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - Nuclear Engineering Institute

  10. Enhanced luminescence of rare-earth complexes Tb(1-x)Eu(x)(m-NBA)3Phen in ZnS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yuguang; Zhang, Jingchang; Cao, Weiliang; Song, Lin; Xu, Zheng

    2008-07-01

    Rare-earth ternary complexes Tb(1-x)Eu(x)(m-NBA)(3)Phen (X=1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0) were synthesized and characterized by IR, DTA-TG, UV, fluorescent spectra and elemental analysis. It was found that luminescence of Eu(3+) complex was enhanced by doped with Tb(3+). It is proved by TG curve that the complexes are stable, ranging from ambient temperature to 360 degrees C in air. The organic-inorganic combined structural device was fabricated, and the electroluminescence intensity of the combined structural device was improved compared with the device of the purely organic components.

  11. Enhanced luminescence of rare-earth complexes Tb 1- xEu x( m-NBA) 3Phen in ZnS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yuguang; Zhang, Jingchang; Cao, Weiliang; Song, Lin; Xu, Zheng

    2008-07-01

    Rare-earth ternary complexes Tb 1- xEu x( m-NBA) 3Phen ( X = 1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0) were synthesized and characterized by IR, DTA-TG, UV, fluorescent spectra and elemental analysis. It was found that luminescence of Eu 3+ complex was enhanced by doped with Tb 3+. It is proved by TG curve that the complexes are stable, ranging from ambient temperature to 360 °C in air. The organic-inorganic combined structural device was fabricated, and the electroluminescence intensity of the combined structural device was improved compared with the device of the purely organic components.

  12. Behavior of new complexes of tetrakis(4-methoxylphenyl)porphyrin with heavy rare earth elements in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Feng; Wang, Hong; Hou, An-Xin; Wang, Chang-Fa; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2004-08-01

    An HPLC method has been developed for the separation of new complexes of tetrakis(4-methoxylphenyl)porphyrin (TMOPP) with four heavy rare earth elements (RE = Y, Er, Tm, and Yb). The function of amine and acid in the mobile phase has been investigated and a reasonable explanation is presented. Successful separation of the RE-TMOPP-Cl complexes is accomplished in 10 min with a mobile phase consisting of methanol-water-acetic acid-triethanolamine. The detection limits (S/N= 3) for the four complexes are 0.01 microg/mL. This method is rapid, sensitive, and simple.

  13. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enam...

  14. Optical Detection of Sodium Salts of Fluoride, Acetate and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Optical Detection of Sodium Salts of Fluoride, Acetate and Phosphate by a Diacylhydrazine. Ligand via the Formation of a Colour Alkali Metal Complex. Purnandhu Bose, Ranjan Dutta, I. Ravikumar and Pradyut Ghosh. ∗. Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A & 2B Raja ...

  15. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate by a diacylhydrazine ligand by the formation of a colour alkali metal complex. Purnandhu Bose Ranjan Dutta I ... Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A and 2B Raja S C Mullick Road, Kolkata 700032, India ...

  16. From the Earliest Evidence of Life to Complex Single-cell Organisms: The First 3 Gyr on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buick, Roger

    2006-12-01

    Life has probably been present on Earth since the time of the oldest sedimentary rock record 3.8 Gyr ago, as indicated by graphite with light carbon isotope ratios consistent with derivation from organic matter. But certain evidence for life appears only at 3.52 Gyr, in the form of kerogen (insoluble organic matter) in sedimentary carbonate showing a -25‰ carbon isotope fractionation identical to that imparted by biological carbon fixation. Soon after, at 3.48 Gyr, the first visible evidence for life appears as stromatolites (sediment mounds constructed by microbes), as well as the first evidence for a specific metabolism (large negative sulfur isotope fractionations indicating microbial sulfate reduction). By 2.7 Gyr ago, molecular biomarkers (hydrocarbons derived from biomolecules with distinctive carbon skeletons such as steroids) indicate that all 3 Domains of life: bacteria, eukaryotes (organisms with compartmentalized cells like us) and archaea (bacteria-like organisms with different biochemistry, often inhabiting extreme environments); had evolved. The first multicellular eukaryotes appeared by 1.84 Gyr in the form of fossilized filamentous algae, after the atmosphere changed from anoxic to moderately oxygenated at 2.4 Gyr and following a series of extreme “Snowball Earth” glaciations between 2.4-2.2 Gyr. Planktonic algae diversified thereafter and modern algal groups arose 1.2 Gyr ago, apparently at the end of a prolonged period of ocean anoxia when the deep sea was sulfidic and presumably toxic. Animal evolution was delayed until 0.65 Gyr ago when biomarkers for sponges first appear in the record, evidently after a further rise in atmospheric oxygen to modern levels but surprisingly pre-dating the last of another series of “Snowball Earth” glaciations. These sponges co-existed with an enigmatic extinct group of large flat marine organisms called “Ediacaran fossils” that may have been ancestral to modern animal groups but might also have been

  17. Long-term ice sheet-climate interactions under anthropogenic greenhouse forcing simulated with a complex Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizcaino, Miren [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); University of California, Department of Geography, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Maier-Reimer, Ernst [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Groeger, Matthias [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); Schurgers, Guy [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Lund University, Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund (Sweden); Winguth, Arne M.E. [Center for Climatic Research, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Madison (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Several multi-century and multi-millennia simulations have been performed with a complex Earth System Model (ESM) for different anthropogenic climate change scenarios in order to study the long-term evolution of sea level and the impact of ice sheet changes on the climate system. The core of the ESM is a coupled coarse-resolution Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model (AOGCM). Ocean biogeochemistry, land vegetation and ice sheets are included as components of the ESM. The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) decays in all simulations, while the Antarctic ice sheet contributes negatively to sea level rise, due to enhanced storage of water caused by larger snowfall rates. Freshwater flux increases from Greenland are one order of magnitude smaller than total freshwater flux increases into the North Atlantic basin (the sum of the contribution from changes in precipitation, evaporation, run-off and Greenland meltwater) and do not play an important role in changes in the strength of the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (NAMOC). The regional climate change associated with weakening/collapse of the NAMOC drastically reduces the decay rate of the GrIS. The dynamical changes due to GrIS topography modification driven by mass balance changes act first as a negative feedback for the decay of the ice sheet, but accelerate the decay at a later stage. The increase of surface temperature due to reduced topographic heights causes a strong acceleration of the decay of the ice sheet in the long term. Other feedbacks between ice sheet and atmosphere are not important for the mass balance of the GrIS until it is reduced to 3/4 of the original size. From then, the reduction in the albedo of Greenland strongly accelerates the decay of the ice sheet. (orig.)

  18. Fluoride in groundwater: toxicological exposure and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, S K; Singh, R K; Damodaran, T; Mishra, V K; Sharma, D K; Rai, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical element that is found most frequently in groundwater and has become one of the most important toxicological environmental hazards globally. The occurrence of fluoride in groundwater is due to weathering and leaching of fluoride-bearing minerals from rocks and sediments. Fluoride when ingested in small quantities (dental health by reducing dental caries, whereas higher concentrations (>1.5 mg/L) may cause fluorosis. It is estimated that about 200 million people, from among 25 nations the world over, may suffer from fluorosis and the causes have been ascribed to fluoride contamination in groundwater including India. High fluoride occurrence in groundwaters is expected from sodium bicarbonate-type water, which is calcium deficient. The alkalinity of water also helps in mobilizing fluoride from fluorite (CaF2). Fluoride exposure in humans is related to (1) fluoride concentration in drinking water, (2) duration of consumption, and (3) climate of the area. In hotter climates where water consumption is greater, exposure doses of fluoride need to be modified based on mean fluoride intake. Various cost-effective and simple procedures for water defluoridation techniques are already known, but the benefits of such techniques have not reached the rural affected population due to limitations. Therefore, there is a need to develop workable strategies to provide fluoride-safe drinking water to rural communities. The study investigated the geochemistry and occurrence of fluoride and its contamination in groundwater, human exposure, various adverse health effects, and possible remedial measures from fluoride toxicity effects.

  19. Dynamics of ligand exchange and association processes in solutions of transition 3d-metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazmutdinova, G.A.; Shtyrlin, V.G.; Zakharov, A.V.; Sal'nikov, Yu.I.

    1993-01-01

    By 19 NMR in combination with ESR spectroscopy rate constants and activation parameters of fluoride-ion exchange reactions in solutions of VOF 5 3- and FeF 6 3- complexes were determined. Associative character of the studied reactions of ligand exchange is shown. Dependence of fluoride complex reactivity on the charge, electron structure of the central ion and formation of hydrogen bonds of coordinated F - ions with solvent molecules was demonstrated. Stability constants, rates of formation and dissociation of intercomplex associates in fluoride solutions were ascertained

  20. Ferroelectric fluoride compositions and methods of making and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasyamani, P Shiv; Chang, Hong-Young

    2015-04-07

    A method for synthesis of a ferroelectric material characterized by the general formula A.sub.xB.sub.yF.sub.z where A is an alkaline earth metal, B is transition metal or a main group metal, x and y each range from about 1 to about 5, and z ranges from about 1 to about 20 comprising contacting an alkaline earth metal fluoride, a difluorometal compound and a fluoroorganic acid in a medium to form a reaction mixture; and subjecting the reaction mixture to conditions suitable for hydrothermal crystal growth.

  1. Fluoride-associated ultrastructural changes and apoptosis in human renal tubule: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadri, J A; Sarwar, S; Sinha, A; Kalaivani, M; Dinda, A K; Bagga, A; Roy, T S; Das, T K; Shariff, A

    2018-01-01

    The susceptibility of the kidneys to fluoride toxicity can largely be attributed to its anatomy and function. As the filtrate moves along the complex tubular structure of each nephron, it is concentrated in the proximal and distal tubules and collecting duct. It has been frequently observed that the children suffering from renal impairments also have some symptoms of dental and skeletal fluorosis. The findings suggest that fluoride somehow interferes with renal anatomy and physiology, which may lead to renal pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride-associated nephrotoxicity. A total of 156 patients with childhood nephrotic syndrome were screened and it was observed that 32 of them had significantly high levels ( p ≤ 0.05) of fluoride in urine (4.01 ± 1.83 ppm) and serum (0.1 ± 0.013 ppm). On the basis of urinary fluoride concentration, patients were divided into two groups, namely group 1 (G-1) ( n = 32) containing normal urine fluoride (0.61 ± 0.17 ppm) and group 2 (G-2) ( n = 32) having high urine fluoride concentration (4.01 ± 1.83 ppm). Age-matched healthy subjects ( n = 33) having normal levels of urinary fluoride (0.56 ± 0.15 ppm) were included in the study as control (group 0 (G-0)). Kidney biopsies were taken from G-1 and G-2 only, who were subjected to ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) and apoptotic (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling) analysis. Various subcellular ultrastructural changes including nuclear disintegration, chromosome condensation, cytoplasmic ground substance lysis, and endoplasmic reticulum blebbing were observed. Increased levels of apoptosis were observed in high fluoride group (G-2) compared to normal fluoride group (G-1). Various degrees of fluoride-associated damages to the architecture of tubular epithelia, such as cell swelling and lysis, cytoplasmic vacuolation, nuclear condensation, apoptosis, and necrosis, were observed.

  2. Rare earth metal bis(amide) complexes bearing amidinate ancillary ligands: synthesis, characterization, and performance as catalyst precursors for cis-1,4 selective polymerization of isoprene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunjie; Fan, Shimin; Yang, Jianping; Fang, Jianghua; Xu, Ping

    2011-03-28

    A family of rare earth metal bis(amide) complexes bearing monoanionic amidinate [RC(N-2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))(2)](-) (R = cyclohexyl (Cy), phenyl (Ph)) as ancillary ligands were synthesized and characterized. One-pot salt metathesis reaction of anhydrous LnCl(3) with one equivalent of amidinate lithium [RC(N-2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))(2)]Li, following the introduction of two equivalents of NaN(SiMe(3))(2) in THF at room temperature afforded the neutral and unsolvated mono(amidinate) rare earth metal bis(amide) complexes [RC(N-2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))(2)]Y[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2) (R = Cy (1); R = Ph (2)), and the "ate" mono(amidinate) rare earth metal bis(amide) complex [CyC(N-2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))(2)]Lu[N(SiMe(3))(2)](2)(μ-Cl)Li(THF)(3) (3) in 61-72% isolated yields. These complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and X-ray single crystal diffraction. Single crystal structural determination revealed that the central metal in complexes 1 and 2 adopts a distorted tetrahedral geometry, and in complex 3 forms a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. In the presence of AlMe(3), and in combination with one equimolar amount of [Ph(3)C][B(C(6)F(5))(4)], complexes 1 and 2 showed high activity towards isoprene polymerization to give high molecular weight polyisoprene (M(n) > 10(4)) with good cis-1,4 selectivity (>90%).

  3. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, B.D.; Binning, Philip John; Sloan, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process...... leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal...... diminishes. Column tests also show that pH control is important for optimizing fluoride removal with the mass removed increasing with decreasing pH. Barrier pH can be regulated by CO2 addition with the point of injection being critical for optimising the remediation performance. Experimental and model...

  4. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Richardson, John D. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lugaz, Noé, E-mail: liuxying@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux-rope-like configuration with an embedded concave-outward shock front, a maximum magnetic field strength deviating from the flux rope axis, and convex-outward field lines ahead of the shock. While the reconstruction results are consistent with the picture of CME-CME interactions, a magnetic cloud-like structure without clear signs of CME interactions is anticipated when the merging process is finished.

  5. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ying D.; Yang, Zhongwei; Wang, Rui; Luhmann, Janet G.; Richardson, John D.; Lugaz, Noé

    2014-01-01

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric imaging and in situ observations. The first CME, which occurred on 2012 September 25, is a slow event and shows an acceleration followed by a nearly invariant speed in the whole Sun-Earth space. The second event, launched from the Sun on 2012 September 27, exhibits a quick acceleration, then a rapid deceleration, and finally a nearly constant speed, a typical Sun-to-Earth propagation profile for fast CMEs. These two CMEs interacted near 1 AU as predicted by the heliospheric imaging observations and formed a complex ejecta observed at Wind, with a shock inside that enhanced the pre-existing southward magnetic field. Reconstruction of the complex ejecta with the in situ data indicates an overall left-handed flux-rope-like configuration with an embedded concave-outward shock front, a maximum magnetic field strength deviating from the flux rope axis, and convex-outward field lines ahead of the shock. While the reconstruction results are consistent with the picture of CME-CME interactions, a magnetic cloud-like structure without clear signs of CME interactions is anticipated when the merging process is finished

  6. Metal Fluorides, Metal Chlorides and Halogenated Metal Oxides as Lewis Acidic Heterogeneous Catalysts. Providing Some Context for Nanostructured Metal Fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, David; Winfield, John M

    2017-01-28

    Aspects of the chemistry of selected metal fluorides, which are pertinent to their real or potential use as Lewis acidic, heterogeneous catalysts, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to β-aluminum trifluoride, aluminum chlorofluoride and aluminas γ and η, whose surfaces become partially fluorinated or chlorinated, through pre-treatment with halogenating reagents or during a catalytic reaction. In these cases, direct comparisons with nanostructured metal fluorides are possible. In the second part of the review, attention is directed to iron(III) and copper(II) metal chlorides, whose Lewis acidity and potential redox function have had important catalytic implications in large-scale chlorohydrocarbons chemistry. Recent work, which highlights the complexity of reactions that can occur in the presence of supported copper(II) chloride as an oxychlorination catalyst, is featured. Although direct comparisons with nanostructured fluorides are not currently possible, the work could be relevant to possible future catalytic developments in nanostructured materials.

  7. Band gaps and photocurrent responses of two novel alkaline earth metal(II) complexes based on 4,5-di(4′-carboxylphenyl)benzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Jiang Ping; Yan, Zhi Shuo; Long, Ji Ying [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Gong, Yun, E-mail: gongyun7211@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Lin, Jian Hua, E-mail: jhlin@pku.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-01-15

    By using a rigid dicarboxylate ligand, 4,5-di(4′-carboxylphenyl)benzene (H{sub 2}L), two complexes formulated as SrL(DMF)(H{sub 2}O)·(CH{sub 3}CN) (DMF=N,N′-dimethylformamide) (1) and BaL(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (2) were solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Complexes 1 and 2 display two-dimensional (2D) layer structures. The two complexes exhibit different electrochemical and photoelectrochemical properties. Their thermal stabilities, cyclic voltammograms, UV–vis absorption and diffuse reflectance spectra and photoluminescence properties have been investigated. The band structures, the total density of states (TDOS) and partial density of states (PDOS) of the two complexes were calculated by CASTEP program. Complex 2 exhibits much higher photocurrent density than complex 1. The Mott–Schottky plots reveal that complexes 1 and 2 both are p-type semiconductors, which are in agreement with their band structure calculations. - Graphical abstract: Two alkaline earth metal(II) complexes with 2D layer structures are p-type semiconductors, they possess different band structures and density of states. And the Ba(II) complex 2 exhibits much higher photocurrent density than the Sr(II) complex 1.

  8. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  9. Acute toxicity of ingested fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    This chapter discusses the characteristics and treatment of acute fluoride toxicity as well as the most common sources of overexposure, the doses that cause acute toxicity, and factors that can influence the clinical outcome. Cases of serious systemic toxicity and fatalities due to acute exposures are now rare, but overexposures causing toxic signs and symptoms are not. The clinical course of systemic toxicity from ingested fluoride begins with gastric signs and symptoms, and can develop with alarming rapidity. Treatment involves minimizing absorption by administering a solution containing calcium, monitoring and managing plasma calcium and potassium concentrations, acid-base status, and supporting vital functions. Approximately 30,000 calls to US poison control centers concerning acute exposures in children are made each year, most of which involve temporary gastrointestinal effects, but others require medical treatment. The most common sources of acute overexposures today are dental products - particularly dentifrices because of their relatively high fluoride concentrations, pleasant flavors, and their presence in non-secure locations in most homes. For example, ingestion of only 1.8 ounces of a standard fluoridated dentifrice (900-1,100 mg/kg) by a 10-kg child delivers enough fluoride to reach the 'probably toxic dose' (5 mg/kg body weight). Factors that may influence the clinical course of an overexposure include the chemical compound (e.g. NaF, MFP, etc.), the age and acid-base status of the individual, and the elapsed time between exposure and the initiation of treatment. While fluoride has well-established beneficial dental effects and cases of serious toxicity are now rare, the potential for toxicity requires that fluoride-containing materials be handled and stored with the respect they deserve. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Light rare earth element systematics as a tool for investigating the petrogenesis of phoscorite-carbonatite associations, as exemplified by the Phalaborwa Complex, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Lorenzo; Bolhar, Robert; Frei, Dirk; Harlov, Daniel E.; Samuel, Vinod O.

    2017-12-01

    In-situ trace element analyses of fluorapatite, calcite, dolomite, olivine, and phlogopite have been undertaken on representative phoscorite and carbonatite rocks of the Palaeoproterozoic Phalaborwa Complex. Textural and compositional characterization reveals uniformity of fluorapatite and calcite among most of the intrusions, and seems to favor a common genetic origin for the phoscorite-carbonatite association. Representing major repositories for rare earth elements (REE), fluorapatite and calcite exhibit tightly correlated light REE (LREE) abundances, suggesting that partitioning of LREE into these rock forming minerals was principally controlled by simple igneous differentiation. However, light rare earth element distribution in apatite and calcite cannot be adequately explained by equilibrium and fractional crystallization and instead favors a complex crystallization history involving mixing of compositionally distinct magma batches, in agreement with previously reported mineral isotope variability that requires open-system behaviour.

  11. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  12. Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, M; Twetman, S; Hultgren Talvilahti, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste. Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study. Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years...

  13. Water Fluoridation Reporting System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  14. ADSORPTIVE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM WATER USING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Currently available treatment methods for removal of excess fluoride from water are broadly divided into three ... the application of nanoparticles as sorbents for fluoride removal. Sundaram [26] studied the ... Characterization of adsorbent.

  15. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of complexation of alkaline-earth and lanthanide cations by poly-amino-carboxylate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, S.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on lanthanide(III) and alkaline-earth(II) complexes with poly-amino-carboxylates (ethylene-diamino-tetra-acetate EDTA 4- , ethylene-diamino-tri-acetate-acetic acid EDTA(H) 3- , tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane-tetra-acetate DOTA 4- , methylene-imidine-acetate MIDA 2- ) are reported. First, a consistent set of Lennard-Jones parameters for La 3+ , Eu 3+ and Lu 3+ cations has been derived from free energy calculations in aqueous solution. Observed differences in hydration free energies, coordination distances and hydration numbers are reproduced. Then, the solution structures of 1:1 complexes of alkaline-earth and/or lanthanide cations with EDTA 4- , EDTA(H) 3- , DOTA 4- and 1:2 complexes of lanthanide cations with MIDA 2- were studied by MD in water. In addition, free energy calculations were performed to study, for each ligand, the relative thermodynamic stabilities of complexes with Ca 2+ vs Sr 2+ and vs Ba 2+ on the one hand, and with La 3+ vs Eu 3+ and vs Lu 3+ on the other hand. Model does not take into account explicitly polarization and charge transfer. However, the results qualitatively agree with experimental complexation data (structure and selectivities). (author)

  16. No Calcium-Fluoride-Like Deposits Detected in Plaque Shortly after a Sodium Fluoride Mouthrinse

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, G.L.; Tenuta, L.M.A.; Schumacher, G.E.; Chow, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Plaque ‘calcium-fluoride-like’ (CaF2-like) and fluoride deposits held by biological/bacterial calcium fluoride (Ca-F) bonds appear to be the source of cariostatic concentrations of fluoride in plaque fluid. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of plaque fluoride held in these reservoirs after a sodium fluoride rinse. 30 and 60 min after a 228 μg/g fluoride rinse, plaque samples were collected from 11 volunteers. Each sample was homogenized, split into 2 aliquots (aliquots 1 and 2...

  17. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO 2 F 2 ) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF 6 and UO 2 F 2 exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF 6 , UO 2 F 2 , and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Effects of fluorides on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, F

    1975-11-01

    Fluorine compounds known to be air pollutants, such as hydrogen fluoride and silicon tetrachloride, are highly poisonous to plants even at ppm - ppb levels. As solid microparticles, acidic sodium fluoride and cryolite cause problems by adhering to plant leaves and absorbing into plant bodies. Plants are classified by their susceptibility to hydrogen fluoride: gladiolus, apricot, buckwheat, turnip and Vaccinium vitis-idaea are most susceptible showing slight injury at less than 5 ppb for 7-9 days; maize, pepper, and dahlia are fairly susceptible, followed by azalea, rose, lilac, and alfalfa, then by oak and tomato. Gladiolus is used as an indicator plant. The exposure factor for one species was known. The symptoms of plants exposed to gaseous fluorine compounds are described in detail at various concentrations. The causal mechanism of the injuries due to fluorine compounds is described in detail, with the method of determining the fluorine content of plant parts. 7 references.

  19. Photosynthesis of ammonium uranous fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fekey, S.A.; Zaki, M.R.; Farah, M.Y.

    1975-01-01

    This study pertains to utilisation of solar energy for ethanol photosynthesis of ammonium uranous fluoride, that satisfies nuclear specifications needed for calcio- or magnesiothermy. Insolation in autumn using 4-10% ethanol in 5-20 g uranium/litre at initial pH 3.25 gave practically 99.8% yield in two hours, independant of 1.0 to 2.0 stoichiometric NH 4 F. With ultraviolet light, the yield varied between 30 and 60%, even after four hours irradiation. Stirring and heating to 60 0 C raised the tap density of the dried double fluorides from 1.48 at 30 0 C, to 1.85 g/cm 3 at 60 0 C. The texture increased also in fineness to 100% 50μ aggregates. The powders satisfy nuclear purity specifications. Thermograms indicated preferential decomposition of double fluoride at 375 0 C in controlled atmosphere to obtain nuclear pure anhydrous uranium tetrafluoride

  20. Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    1972-06-26

    It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

  1. Organoboron compounds as Lewis acid receptors of fluoride ions in polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jańczyk, Martyna; Adamczyk-Woźniak, Agnieszka; Sporzyński, Andrzej; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2012-07-06

    Newly synthesized organoboron compounds - 4-octyloxyphenylboronic acid (OPBA) and pinacol ester of 2,4,6-trifluorophenylboronic acid (PE-PBA) - were applied as Lewis acid receptors of fluoride anions. Despite enhanced selectivity, the polymer membrane electrodes containing the lipophilic receptor OPBA exhibited non-Nernstian slopes of the responses toward fluoride ions in acidic conditions. Such behavior was explained by the lability of the B-O bond in the boronic acids, and the OH(-)/F(-) exchange at higher fluoride content in the sample solution. In consequence, the stoichiometry of the OPBA-fluoride complexes in the membrane could vary during the calibration, changing the equilibrium concentration of the primary anion in membrane and providing super-Nernstian responses. The proposed mechanism was supported by (19)F NMR studies, which indicated that the fluoride complexation proceeds more effectively in acidic solution leading mainly to PhBF(3)(-) species. Finally, the performances of the membranes based on the phenylboronic acid pinacol ester, with a more stable B-O bond, were tested. As it was expected, Nernstian fluoride responses were recorded for such membranes with worsened fluoride selectivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. SBIR-Long fluoride fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Raymond E.; Vacha, Lubos J.

    1987-08-01

    This report summarizes results obtained under a program aimed at developing new techniques for fabricating long lengths of heavy metal fluoride glass (HMFG) optical fiber. A new method for overcladding conventional HMFG preforms with a low melting oxide glass was developed, and improvements in the rotational casting method were made to increase preform length. The resulting composite glass canes consist of a fluoride glass overcoat layer to enhance strength and chemical durability. To show feasibility, prototype optical fiber preforms up to 1.6 cm in diameter with lengths of 22 cm were fabricated. These were drawn into optical fibers with lengths up to 900 meters.

  3. Complex Cloud and Radiative Processes Unfolding at the Earth's Terminator: A Unique Perspective from the Proposed Deep Space Gateway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. B.; Marshak, A.

    2018-02-01

    The Deep Space Gateway offers a unique vantage for Earth observation using reflected sunlight: day/night or night/day terminators slowly marching across the disc. It's an opportunity to improve our understanding of clouds at that key moment in their daily cycle.

  4. Preparation, thermodynamic property and antimicrobial activity of some rare-earth (III) complexes with 3-bromo-5-iodobenzoic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-Yu [Testing and Analysis Center, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); College of Chemistry and Material Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Ren, Ning [Department of Chemistry, Handan College, Handan 056005 (China); Zhang, Jian-Jun, E-mail: jjzhang6@126.com [Testing and Analysis Center, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); College of Chemistry and Material Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China); Zhang, Cun-Ying [No.1 High School of Shijiazhuang, Shijiazhuang 050011 (China)

    2013-10-20

    Graphical abstract: Four new rare-earth complexes of general formula [Ln(3-Br-5-IBA){sub 3}phen]{sub 2} [Ln = Er (1), Tb (2), Dy (3) and Ho (4); 3-Br-5-IBA = 3-bromo-5-iodobenzoate; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline] were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV and TG/DSC-FTIR technology. Heat capacities of the four complexes were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were tested using disc diffusion method. - Highlights: • Four new complexes [Ln(3-Br-5-IBA){sub 3}phen]{sub 2} were synthesized and characterized. • The non-isothermal kinetics of the first stage for the complexes was studied. • The heat capacities of the complexes were measured by differential scanning calorimeter. • The antimicrobial activities for these complexes were tested. • The fluorescence properties of the complexes 2 and 3 were studied. - Abstract: Four new rare-earth complexes of general formula [Ln(3-Br-5-IBA){sub 3}phen]{sub 2} (Ln(III) = Er (1), Tb (2), Dy (3) and Ho (4); 3-Br-5-IBA = 3-bromo-5-iodobenzoate; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) were synthesized by solution-precipitation method, and investigated using elemental analysis, infrared spectra, ultraviolet spectra and TG/DSC-FTIR technology. The non-isothermal kinetics of the first stage for the complexes was studied by using non-linear integral isoconversional method and double equal-double steps method. The heat capacities of the complexes were measured between 263.15 and 485.55 K by means of differential scanning calorimeter, and the values of the experimental heat capacities were fitted to a polynomial equation with the least-squares method. And the thermodynamic functions [H{sub T} − H{sub 298.15}], [S{sub T} − S{sub 298.15}] and [G{sub T} − G{sub 298.15}] were also derived based on the fitted polynomials and thermodynamic relationships with temperature interval of 10 K. Moreover, the

  5. Mixed ligand complexes of alkaline earth metals: Part XII. Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II complexes with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde or hydroxyaromatic ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITHLESH AGRAWAL

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of alkaline earth metal chlorides with 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been carried out in 1 : 1 : 1 mole ratio and the mixed ligand complexes of the type MLL’(H2O2 (where M = Mg(II, Ca(II, Sr(II and Ba(II, HL = 5-chlorosalicylaldehyde and HL’ = salicylaldehyde, 2-hydroxyacetophenone or 2-hydroxypropiophenone have been isolated. These complexes were characterized by TLC, conductance measurements, IR and 1H-NMR spectra.

  6. Decadal predictions of Southern Ocean sea ice : testing different initialization methods with an Earth-system Model of Intermediate Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunz, Violette; Goosse, Hugues; Dubinkina, Svetlana

    2013-04-01

    The sea ice extent in the Southern Ocean has increased since 1979 but the causes of this expansion have not been firmly identified. In particular, the contribution of internal variability and external forcing to this positive trend has not been fully established. In this region, the lack of observations and the overestimation of internal variability of the sea ice by contemporary General Circulation Models (GCMs) make it difficult to understand the behaviour of the sea ice. Nevertheless, if its evolution is governed by the internal variability of the system and if this internal variability is in some way predictable, a suitable initialization method should lead to simulations results that better fit the reality. Current GCMs decadal predictions are generally initialized through a nudging towards some observed fields. This relatively simple method does not seem to be appropriated to the initialization of sea ice in the Southern Ocean. The present study aims at identifying an initialization method that could improve the quality of the predictions of Southern Ocean sea ice at decadal timescales. We use LOVECLIM, an Earth-system Model of Intermediate Complexity that allows us to perform, within a reasonable computational time, the large amount of simulations required to test systematically different initialization procedures. These involve three data assimilation methods: a nudging, a particle filter and an efficient particle filter. In a first step, simulations are performed in an idealized framework, i.e. data from a reference simulation of LOVECLIM are used instead of observations, herein after called pseudo-observations. In this configuration, the internal variability of the model obviously agrees with the one of the pseudo-observations. This allows us to get rid of the issues related to the overestimation of the internal variability by models compared to the observed one. This way, we can work out a suitable methodology to assess the efficiency of the

  7. Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  8. Colorimetric determination of the fluoride ion - application to uranium metal and to uranous fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, H.; Hure, J.; Legrand, S.

    1949-12-01

    In the determination described for fluoride in U metal, the U is brought into H 2 SO 4 solution by anodic oxidation, the fluo-silicic acid is distilled by entrainment in water vapor, and the F ion is determined in the distillate by using the fact that it complexes Zr and thus prevents the formation of the Zr-alizarin S lake. For F ion in UF 4 , the compound is dissolved in a Na 2 CO 3 -H 2 O 2 mixture, and F is determined in the solution by the colorimetric method described. (author)

  9. Rare Earth Electrochemical Property Measurements and Phase Diagram Development in a Complex Molten Salt Mixture for Molten Salt Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinsuo; Guo, Shaoqiang

    2018-03-30

    Pyroprocessing is a promising alternative for the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel (UNF) that uses electrochemical methods. Compared to the hydrometallurgical reprocessing method, pyroprocessing has many advantages such as reduced volume of radioactive waste, simple waste processing, ability to treat refractory material, and compatibility with fast reactor fuel recycle. The key steps of the process are the electro-refining of the spent metallic fuel in the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, which can be integrated with an electrolytic reduction step for the reprocessing of spent oxide fuels. During the electro-refining process, actinides and active fission products such rare earth (RE) elements are dissolved into the molten salt from the spent fuel at an anode basket. Then U and Pu are electro-deposited on the cathodes while REs with relatively negative reduction potentials are left in the molten salt bath. However, with the accumulation of lanthanides in the salt, the reduction potentials of REs will approach the values for U and Pu, affecting the recovery efficiency of U and Pu. Hence, RE drawdown is necessary to reduce salt waste after uranium and minor actinides recovery, which can also be performed by electrochemical separations. To separate various REs and optimize the drawdown process, physical properties of REs in LiCl-KCl salt and their concentration dependence are essential. Thus, the primary goal of present research is to provide fundamental data of REs and deduce phase diagrams of LiCl-KCl-RECl3 based complex molten salts. La, Nd and Gd are three representative REs that we are particularly interested in due to the high ratio of La and Nd in UNF, highest standard potential of Gd among all REs, and the existing literature data in dilute solution. Electrochemical measurements are performed to study the thermodynamics and transport properties of LaCl3, GdCl3, NdCl3, and NdCl2 in LiCl-KCl eutectic in the temperature range 723-823 K. Test are conducted in LiCl-KCl melt

  10. Structural investigation of molten fluorides of nuclear interest by NMR and XAFS spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauvert, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of the renewal of the different nuclear plans, the molten salt reactor is one of the six concepts of reactors of 4. generation. This reactor has the particularity to use a liquid fuel based on LiF-ThF 4 mixtures. In order to develop and to optimize this concept, it is important to characterize the structure of the melt and to describe its physical and chemical properties. Our work has been based on the study of the system MF-ZrF 4 (M = Li, Na, K) selected as a model of ThF 4 based systems. We have combined two spectroscopic techniques, the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and the X-ray Absorption at high temperature, with molecular dynamics calculations. We particularly focused on the local environments of the fluorine and the zirconium. In order to interpret the NMR data obtain in the molten state, we performed a preliminary study on zirconium halides and rare earth and alkali fluoro zirconates using the 91 Zr solid-state NMR at very high magnetic fields. New correlations between structural parameters and NMR data have been established. At high temperature, in MF-ZrF 4 melts we have shown the coexistence of three different kind of Zr-based complexes with different proportions depending on the amount of ZrF 4 and on the nature of the alkali. Depending on the ZrF 4 content, three kinds of fluorine have been characterized: form free fluorines at low amount of zirconium fluorides, fluorines involved in Zr-based complexes and bridging fluorines at higher ZrF 4 content. This original and innovative approach of molten fluorides mixtures, combining NMR and EXAFS at high temperature with molecular dynamics calculations, is very efficient to describe their speciation and thus their fluoro-acidity. (author)

  11. Silver diamine fluoride: a caries "silver-fluoride bullet".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, A; Stamford, T C M; Niederman, R

    2009-02-01

    The antimicrobial use of silver compounds pivots on the 100-year-old application of silver nitrate, silver foil, and silver sutures for the prevention and treatment of ocular, surgical, and dental infections. Ag(+) kills pathogenic organisms at concentrations of linings, water purification systems, hospital gowns, and caries prevention. To distill the current best evidence relative to caries, this systematic review asked: Will silver diamine fluoride (SDF) more effectively prevent caries than fluoride varnish? A five-database search, reference review, and hand search identified 99 human clinical trials in three languages published between 1966 and 2006. Dual review for controlled clinical trials with the patient as the unit of observation, and excluding cross-sectional, animal, in vitro studies, and opinions, identified 2 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The trials indicated that SDF's lowest prevented fractions for caries arrest and caries prevention were 96.1% and 70.3%, respectively. In contrast, fluoride varnish's highest prevented fractions for caries arrest and caries prevention were 21.3% and 55.7%, respectively. Similarly, SDF's highest numbers needed to treat for caries arrest and caries prevention were 0.8 (95% CI=0.5-1.0) and 0.9 (95% CI=0.4-1.1), respectively. For fluoride varnish, the lowest numbers needed to treat for caries arrest and prevention were 3.7 (95% CI=3.4-3.9) and 1.1 (95% CI=0.7-1.4), respectively. Adverse events were monitored, with no significant differences between control and experimental groups. These promising results suggest that SDF is more effective than fluoride varnish, and may be a valuable caries-preventive intervention. As well, the availability of a safe, effective, efficient, and equitable caries-preventive agent appears to meet the criteria of both the WHO Millennium Goals and the US Institute of Medicine's criteria for 21st century medical care.

  12. Accumulation of fluoride by plants and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njenga, L.W.; Kariuki, D.N.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride in plant and vegetable samples has been determined using ion selective electrode. The analysis was carried out after ashing the sample on an open flame, adding perchloric acid and allowing the hydrogen fluoride to diffuse into sodium hydroxide layer.The results obtained show that kale and pumpkins can accumulate more than ten times their normal values of fluoride while plants were found to accumulate upto 100μg/g fluoride when exposed to highlevels of fluoride in water or soil. (author)

  13. Toxic effects of fluoride on organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Huan; Chen, Liang; Kong, Ming; Qiu, Lipeng; Lü, Peng; Wu, Peng; Yang, Yanhua; Chen, Keping

    2018-04-01

    Accumulation of excess fluoride in the environment poses serious health risks to plants, animals, and humans. This endangers human health, affects organism growth and development, and negatively impacts the food chain, thereby affecting ecological balance. In recent years, numerous studies focused on the molecular mechanisms associated with fluoride toxicity. These studies have demonstrated that fluoride can induce oxidative stress, regulate intracellular redox homeostasis, and lead to mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress and alter gene expression. This paper reviews the present research on the potential adverse effects of overdose fluoride on various organisms and aims to improve our understanding of fluoride toxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  15. Implementing a geographical information system to assess endemic fluoride areas in Lamphun, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerawasttanasiri, Nonthaphat; Taneepanichskul, Surasak; Pingchai, Wichain; Nimchareon, Yuwaree; Sriwichai, Sangworn

    2018-01-01

    Many studies have shown that fluoride can cross the placenta and that exposure to high fluoride during pregnancy may result in premature birth and/or a low birth weight. Lamphun is one of six provinces in Thailand where natural water fluoride (WF) concentrations >10.0 mg/L were found, and it was also found that >50% of households used water with high fluoride levels. Nevertheless, geographical information system (GIS) and maps of endemic fluoride areas are lacking. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of village water supplies to assess endemic fluoride areas and present GIS with maps in Google Maps. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 2016 to January 2017. Purpose sampling was used to identify villages of districts with WF >10.0 mg/L in the Mueang Lamphun, Pasang, and Ban Thi districts. Water samples were collected with the geolocation measured by Smart System Info. Fluoride was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode instrument using a total ionic strength adjustment buffer. WF >0.70 mg/L was used to identify unsafe drinking water and areas with high endemic fluoride levels. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the findings, and MS Excel was used to create the GIS database. Maps were created in Google Earth and presented in Google Maps. We found that WF concentrations ranged between 0.10-13.60 mg/L. Forty-four percent (n=439) of samples were at unsafe levels (>0.70 mg/L), and. 54% (n=303) of villages and 46% (n=79,807) of households used the unsafe drinking water. Fifty percent (n=26) of subdistricts were classified as being endemic fluoride areas. Five subdistricts were endemic fluoride areas, and in those, there were two subdistricts in which every household used unsafe drinking water. These findings show the distribution of endemic fluoride areas and unsafe drinking water in Lamphun. This is useful for health policy authorities, local governments, and villagers and enables collaboration to resolve these issues. The GIS data are

  16. Lithological Influences on Occurrence of High-Fluoride Waters in The Central Kenya Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaka, L. A.; Musolff, A.; Mulch, A.; Olago, D.; Odada, E. O.

    2013-12-01

    Within the East African rift, groundwater recharge results from the complex interplay of geology, land cover, geomorphology, climate and on going volcano-tectonic processes across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. The interrelationships between these factors create complex patterns of water availability, reliability and quality. The hydrochemical evolution of the waters is further complex due to the different climatic regimes and geothermal processes going on in this area. High fluoridic waters within the rift have been reported by few studies, while dental fluorosis is high among the inhabitants of the rift. The natural sources of fluoride in waters can be from weathering of fluorine bearing minerals in rocks, volcanic or fumarolic activities. Fluoride concentration in water depends on a number of factors including pH, temperature, time of water-rock formation contact and geochemical processes. Knowledge of the sources and dispersion of fluoride in both surface and groundwaters within the central Kenya rift and seasonal variations between wet and dry seasons is still poor. The Central Kenya rift is marked by active tectonics, volcanic activity and fumarolic activity, the rocks are majorly volcanics: rhyolites, tuffs, basalts, phonolites, ashes and agglomerates some are highly fractured. Major NW-SE faults bound the rift escarpment while the rift floor is marked by N-S striking faults We combine petrographic, hydrochemistry and structural information to determine the sources and enrichment pathways of high fluoridic waters within the Naivasha catchment. A total of 120 water samples for both the dry season (January-February2012) and after wet season (June-July 2013) from springs, rivers, lakes, hand dug wells, fumaroles and boreholes within the Naivasha catchment are collected and analysed for fluoride, physicochemical parameters and stable isotopes (δ2 H, δ18 O) in order to determine the origin and evolution of the waters. Additionally, 30 soil and

  17. Leaching of complex ores with radioactive impurities, e.g. monazite, followed by rare earth solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballhorn, R.; Brodt, P.

    1987-01-01

    Pre-crushing plays a decisive role in the chemical development of monazite, the orthophosphate of the rare earth elements. Various mineralogical investigation methods - mineral-optical investigations, diffractometric surveys, thermoluminescence investigations - were applied in accordance with various grinding methods, with the aim of studying the possible effect of physically produced grid flows on the effectiveness of leaching. To obtain 95% of the rare earth elements, individual parameters such as grinding intensity, HNO 3 concentration, acid-concentrate ratio, temperature, duration of leaching and foreign ion admixture were varied, and the whole process was optimized. The recently developed method is compared with older methods with regard to profitability, the extraction of marketable uranium and thorium, etc., with a low accumulation of radioactive residues. (RB) [de

  18. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lencova Erika

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054 mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084 mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010 and 0.018 (SD 0.008 mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake

  19. El fluoruro en aguas de consumo y su asociación con variables geológicas y geográficas de Cuba Fluoride in drinking water in Cuba and its association with geological and geographical variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Cuéllar Luna

    2003-11-01

    . RESULTS: In 83.1% of the localities, the water samples were collected from wells and springs, and the remaining 16.9% came from dams and rivers. Of the 753 localities studied, 675 of them (89.6% had low or medium fluoride concentrations (under 0.7 mg/L. The eastern region of the country was the one most affected by high fluoride concentrations in the waters, followed by the central region of the country. The majority of the localities with high natural fluoride concentrations were in areas located on Cretaceous volcanic arc rocks. The presence of fluoride in the drinking waters was related to the alignments with the earth's crust, in rock complexes of volcanic-sedimentary origin and of intrusive origin and also in carbonate rocks. However, the highest fluoride concentrations generally coincided with rock complexes of volcanic-sedimentary origin and of intrusive origin. All the localities with high fluoride concentrations in the water were associated with wells. CONCLUSIONS: The fluoride concentration is low or medium in the drinking water sources for 89.6% of the Cuban localities with at least 1 000 inhabitants. Geological and geographical characteristics can help identify areas with optimal or high concentrations of the fluoride ion in the drinking water.

  20. Dipotassium hydrogencarbonate fluoride monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Kahlenberg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound, K2(HCO3F·H2O, were obtained as a secondary product after performing flux synthesis experiments aimed at the preparation of potassium rare earth silicates. The basic building unit of the structure is an [(HCO3(H2OF]2− zigzag chain running parallel to [001]. Both types of anions as well as the water molecules reside on mirror planes perpendicular to [010] at y = 0.25 and y = 0.75, respectively. Linkage between the different constituents of the chains is provided by O—H...O and O—H...F hydrogen bonding. The K+ cations are located between the chains and are coordinated by two F and five O atoms in form of a distorted monocapped trigonal prism.

  1. Rare earth(III) complexes for the development of new magnetic and luminescent probes; Complexes de lanthanides(III) pour le developpement de nouvelles sondes magnetiques et luminescentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonat, A

    2007-10-15

    The simultaneous optimisation of the molecular parameters determining the relaxivity (number of coordinated water molecules, water-exchange, rotation dynamics of the whole complex, electronic relaxation, Gd(III)-proton distance) is essential to prepare efficient contrast agents. The aim of this work is on the one hand to design and study complexes with a high number of bound water molecules and to understand the influence of the coordination sphere on the stability and on the electronic relaxation and on the other hand, to use the ligand as a chromophore for the development of luminescent probes for biomedical imaging. We present the structure, the stability and the relaxivity of Gd(III) complexes of two series of tripodal ligands containing picolinate units based either on the 1,4,7-tri-aza-cyclononane ring or on a tertiary amine. These complexes show high relaxivity in water and in serum and can establish a non covalent interaction with serum albumin. The interpretation of the water proton relaxivity with the help of new relaxometric methods based on an auxiliary probe solute has allowed us to show that both the presence of the picolinate groups and the 1,4,7-tri-aza-cyclononane framework can lead to Gd(III) complexes with favourable electronic relaxation properties. This ligands have also been used for Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexation leading to strong luminescence in visible light. Other complexes derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline unit which display a very high luminescence in infrared are also studied. (author)

  2. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal studies of some transition and rare earth metal complexes of N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.K. Chondhekar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The solid complexes of Cu(II, Co(II, Mn(II, La(III and Ce(III were prepared from bidentate Schiff base, N-benzylidene-2-hydroxybenzohydrazide. The Schiff base ligand was synthesized from 2-hyhdroxybenzohydrazide and benzaldehyde. These metal complexes were characterized by molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, FTIR, 1H-NMR, UV-Vis and mass spectroscopy. The analytical data of these metal complexes showed metal:ligand ratio of 1:2. The physico-chemical study supports the presence of square planar geometry around Cu(II and octahedral geometry around Mn(II, Co(II, La(III and Ce(III ions. The IR spectral data reveal that the ligand behaves as bidentate with ON donor atom sequence towards central metal ion. The molar conductance values of metal complexes suggest their non-electrolyte nature. The X-ray diffraction data suggest monoclinic crystal system for these complexes. Thermal behavior (TG/DTA and kinetic parameters calculated by Coats-Redfern method are suggestive of more ordered activated state in complex formation. The ligand and their metal complexes were screened for antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and fungicidal activity against Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma.

  4. Confrontation of thermoluminescence models in lithium fluoride with experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewiadomski, T.

    1976-12-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of lithium fluoride depend on numerous factors and are much more complex than those of other phosphors. The so far developed fragmentary models are meant to explain the relationships between crystal defect structure and the processes involved in TL. An attempt has been made to compare these models with the veryfied experimental data and to point out the observations which are inconsistant with the models. (author)

  5. Electrolytic coloration of air-grown sodium fluoride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Hongen; Han Li; Song Cuiying; Guo Meili; Wang Na

    2007-01-01

    Air-grown sodium fluoride crystals were colored electrolytically by using a pointed cathode at various temperatures and electric field strengths, which should mainly benefit appropriate coloration temperatures and electric field strengths. O 2 - , F, M, N 1 , N 2 color centers and O 2- -F + complexes were produced in the colored crystals. Current-time curves for the electrolytic colorations were given, and activation energy for the V color center migration was determined. The formation of the color centers was explained

  6. Isca, v1.0: a framework for the global modelling of the atmospheres of Earth and other planets at varying levels of complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.; Colyer, Greg; Geen, Ruth; Gerber, Edwin; Jucker, Martin; Maher, Penelope; Paterson, Alexander; Pietschnig, Marianne; Penn, James; Thomson, Stephen I.

    2018-03-01

    Isca is a framework for the idealized modelling of the global circulation of planetary atmospheres at varying levels of complexity and realism. The framework is an outgrowth of models from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, USA, designed for Earth's atmosphere, but it may readily be extended into other planetary regimes. Various forcing and radiation options are available, from dry, time invariant, Newtonian thermal relaxation to moist dynamics with radiative transfer. Options are available in the dry thermal relaxation scheme to account for the effects of obliquity and eccentricity (and so seasonality), different atmospheric optical depths and a surface mixed layer. An idealized grey radiation scheme, a two-band scheme, and a multiband scheme are also available, all with simple moist effects and astronomically based solar forcing. At the complex end of the spectrum the framework provides a direct connection to comprehensive atmospheric general circulation models. For Earth modelling, options include an aquaplanet and configurable continental outlines and topography. Continents may be defined by changing albedo, heat capacity, and evaporative parameters and/or by using a simple bucket hydrology model. Oceanic Q fluxes may be added to reproduce specified sea surface temperatures, with arbitrary continental distributions. Planetary atmospheres may be configured by changing planetary size and mass, solar forcing, atmospheric mass, radiation, and other parameters. Examples are given of various Earth configurations as well as a giant planet simulation, a slowly rotating terrestrial planet simulation, and tidally locked and other orbitally resonant exoplanet simulations. The underlying model is written in Fortran and may largely be configured with Python scripts. Python scripts are also used to run the model on different architectures, to archive the output, and for diagnostics, graphics, and post-processing. All of these features are publicly

  7. Enrichment of Rare Earth Elements during magmatic and post-magmatic processes: a case study from the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, northern Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, A. S.; Goodenough, K. M.; Hughes, H. S. R.; Roberts, N. M. W.; Gunn, A. G.; Rushton, J.; Lacinska, A.

    2013-10-01

    Concern about security of supply of critical elements used in new technologies, such as the Rare Earth Elements (REE), means that it is increasingly important to understand the processes by which they are enriched in crustal settings. High REE contents are found in syenite-dominated alkaline complexes intruded along the Moine Thrust Zone, a major collisional zone in north-west Scotland. The most northerly of these is the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, which comprises three separate intrusions. One of these, the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion, contains two mappable zones: a Mixed Syenite Zone in which mafic melasyenite is mixed and mingled with leucosyenite and a Massive Leucosyenite Zone. Within the Mixed Syenite Zone, hydrothermal activity is evident in the form of narrow altered veins dominated by biotite and magnetite; these are poorly exposed and their lateral extent is uncertain. The REE mineral allanite is relatively abundant in the melasyenite and is extremely enriched in the biotite-magnetite veins, which have up to 2 % total rare earth oxides in bulk rock analyses. An overall model for development of this intrusion can be divided into three episodes: (1) generation of a Light Rare Earth Element (LREE)-enriched parental magma due to enrichment of the mantle source by subduction of pelagic carbonates; (2) early crystallisation of allanite in melasyenite, due to the saturation of the magma in the LREE; and (3) hydrothermal alteration, in three different episodes identified by petrography and mineral chemistry, generating the intense enrichment of REE in the biotite-magnetite veins. Dating of allanite and titanite in the biotite-magnetite veins gives ages of c. 426 Ma, overlapping with previously published crystallisation ages for zircon in the syenite.

  8. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  9. Groundwater fluoride contamination: A reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Banerjee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution of fluorite (CaF2 and/or fluorapatite (FAP [Ca5(PO43F], pulled by calcite precipitation, is thought to be the dominant mechanism responsible for groundwater fluoride (F− contamination. Here, one dimensional reactive–transport models are developed to test this mechanism using the published dissolution and precipitation rate kinetics for the mineral pair FAP and calcite. Simulation results correctly show positive correlation between the aqueous concentrations of F− and CO32− and negative correlation between F− and Ca2+. Results also show that precipitation of calcite, contrary to the present understanding, slows down the FAP dissolution by 106 orders of magnitude compared to the FAP dissolution by hydrolysis. For appreciable amount of fluoride contamination rock–water interaction time must be long and of order 106 years.

  10. Effects of hydrogen fluoride on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazoe, F

    1970-07-15

    Symptoms of fluorosis in plants are chlorotic markings around the tip or edges of young leaves. Examples of damage to plants and livestock by fluorides are listed, including the retarded growth of silkworms fed on mulberry leaves polluted by more than 30 ppm fluorides. Plants can be classified into six groups according to their resistance to hydrogen fluoride. Threshold values of the fluoride concentration range from 5-10 ppb for the plants. Gladiolus is normally employed as a plant indicator for hydrogen fluoride and silkworms as indicator insects. The relationship between plant damage by fluorides and exposure time, density, soil, fertilizer, meteorology and location are examined. Several preventive measures are listed, including the spraying of water or lime on plant leaves. It is concluded that the establishment of an environmental standard is difficult because of the extremely high sensitivity of the plants to the gas. 8 references.

  11. Synthesis, structural, thermal and optical studies of rare earth coordinated complex: Tb(Sal){sub 3}Phen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Dwivedi, Y. [Laser and Spectroscopy Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Rai, S.B., E-mail: sbrai49@yahoo.co.in [Laser and Spectroscopy Laboratory, Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: {yields} RE coordinated complex of Tb(Sal){sub 3}Phen in crystalline phases were synthesized. {yields} Enhancement in luminescence of Tb{sup 3+} was observed in complex on 355 nm excitation. {yields} Fluorescence enhancement is due to the efficient energy transfer from Sal to Tb{sup 3+}. {yields} An observed increase in lifetime of Tb{sup 3+} is due to encapsulation in Sal/Phen network. {yields} The present system is a deserving candidate for LSC when coupled with solar cells. - Abstract: Complexes of salicylic acid (Sal) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) were synthesized coordinated with terbium ion (Tb{sup 3+}) in crystalline phases. The structural characterizations of the lanthanide complex were made using FT-IR, NMR ({sup 1}H and {sup 13}C) and XRD techniques. These measurements confirm the formation of Tb(Sal){sub 3}Phen complex structure. The thermal aspects of the complex were examined using DTA and TGA techniques. An enhancement in luminescence intensity of Tb{sup 3+} ion bands were observed in Tb(Sal){sub 3}Phen complex as compared to TbCl{sub 3} crystals on 355 nm laser excitation. Enhancement is reported due to the efficient energy transfer process from Sal to Tb{sup 3+} ions. This is also confirmed by the time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy with increase in lifetime of Tb{sup 3+} ions due to encapsulation in Sal/Phen network. Our system in itself can be a deserving candidate for luminescent solar collector material when coupled with solar cells.

  12. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF 4 and UF 6 , including UF 4 (solid and gas), U 4 F 17 (solid), U 2 F 9 (solid), UF 5 (solid and gas), U 2 F 10 (gas), and UF 6 (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior

  13. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by pumice: case study on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    conditions, the fluoride removal efficiency from Kuhbonan water by 2.8 mg/L fluoride was 74.64%. Eventually ... industrial wastewater containing fluoride is a key ..... solution using silica ceramic: Adsorption kinetics and equilibrium studies.

  14. Purification process of uranium hexafluoride containing traces of plutonium fluoride and/or neptunium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, J.; Bethuel, L.; Carles, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this process impure uranium hexafluoride is contacted with a metallic fluoride chosen in the group containing lead fluoride PbF 2 , uranium fluorides UFsub(4+x) (0 3 at a temperature such as plutonium and/or neptunium are reduced and pure uranium hexafluoride is recovered. Application is made to uranium hexafluoride purification in spent fuel reprocessing [fr

  15. On some derived compounds of fluorides of Cerium III or IV: defined compounds and non stoichiometric phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse, Jean-Pierre

    1968-01-01

    This research study addresses the study of rare earth fluorides. It reports the preparation and study of new fluoro-cerates (IV) in order to complete the set of already known compounds (ammonium fluoro-cerate, and alkaline earth compounds), the study of binary CeF 3 binary systems, monovalent and divalent fluorides, and CeF 3 -NF 2 -N'F ternary systems, and the study of non stoichiometric phases in CeF 3 oxides, sulphides and selenides [fr

  16. Fluoride ions vs removal technologies: A study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Jagvir; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Literature reported that drinking water is a precious and scarce resource and it has to be protected and kept free from any kind of contamination. Further, it has to be used carefully without wasting. Literature also reported that fluoride bearing rocks are abundant in India, as a result, fluoride leaches out and contaminates the adjacent water and soil resources. A high concentration of fluoride ions in ground water increases up to more than 30 mg/L. This high concentration of fluoride ions ...

  17. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James W.; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in B. subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound...

  18. Metal–organic layers stabilize earth-abundant metal–terpyridine diradical complexes for catalytic C–H activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zekai; Thacker, Nathan C.; Sawano, Takahiro; Drake, Tasha; Ji, Pengfei; Lan, Guangxu; Cao, Lingyun; Liu, Shubin; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Wenbin (UNC); (UC); (Xiamen)

    2017-10-30

    Metal–organic layers stabilize FeIIor CoII-terpyridine diradical complexes to catalyze alkylazide Csp3–H amination and benzylic C–H borylation, respectively.

  19. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  20. Fluoride barriers in Nb/Pb Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, H.; Tanabe, K.; Michikami, O.; Igarashi, M.; Beasley, M. R.

    1985-03-01

    Josephson tunnel junctions are fabricated using a new class of artificial barriers, metal fluorides (Al fluoride and Zr fluoride). These fluoride barriers are deposited on the surface of a Nb base electrode, which are previously cleaned using a CF4 cleaning process, and covered by a Pb counterelectrode. The junctions with both Al fluoride and Zr fluoride barriers exhibit good tunneling characteristics and have low specific capacitance. In the case of Zr fluoride, it is observed that reasonable resistances are obtained even at thickness greater than 100 A. This phenomenon might be explained by tunneling via localized states in Zr fluoride.

  1. Method of converting uranium fluoride to intermediate product for uranium oxide manufacture with recycling or reusing valuable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, V.; Moltasova, J.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium fluoride is acted upon by water with nitrate containing a cation capable of binding fluoride ions. The uranium is extracted, for instance, with tributyl phosphate with the generated organic phase containing the prevalent proportion of uranium and representing the required intermediate product and the aqueous phase from which is isolated the fluorine component which may be used within the fuel cycle. The nitrate component of the aqueous phase is recycled following treatment. It is also possible to act on uranium fluoride directly with an aqueous solution. Here the cations of nitrate form with the fluorides soluble nondissociated complexes and reduce the concentration of free fluoride ions. The nitrate +s mostly used in an amount corresponding to its solubility in the system prior to the introduction of UF 6 . The uranium from the solution with the reduced concentration of free fluoride ions is extracted into the reaction system under such conditions as to make the prevalent majority of fluorides and an amount of uranium smaller than 5x10 -2 mol/l remain in the aqueous phase and that such an amount of fluorides should remain in the organic phase which is smaller than corresponds to the fluorine/uranium molar ratio in the organic phase. Uranium contained in the organic phase is processed into uranium oxide, with advantage into UO 2 . From the isolated compounds of fluorine and the cation of the nitrate gaseous HF is released which is used either inside or outside of the fuel cycle. (J.P.)

  2. Introduction to crystal structure determination methods using x-ray diffraction: application to some rare earth complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, M.A. de.

    1986-01-01

    This work is composed by a theoretical introduction studying crystal concept, interaction between X-ray and crystal medium, and methods for determining small molecular structures applied in solution of crystal structures of praseodymium, neodymium and europium complexes with perrhenate and trans - 1,4 - dithiane - 1,4 - dioxide, (TDTD), which general formula is [ Ln (H sub(2) O) sub(4) (η-TDTD) (η'Re O sub(4)) (μ-η sup(2)-TDTD)] sub(n) (Re O sub(4)) sub(2n). nTDTD, where, Ln = Eu, Pr, Nd and methyl-2,6-anhydrous-3-azido-4-0-benzoyl-3-deoxy-α-D-iodo pyranoside. The structure of C sub(14) H sub(15) N sub(3) O sub(5) organic complex was determined using direct methods. (M.C.K.)

  3. Synthesis and crystal structure of rare earth complexes with o-nitrobenzoic acid and N, N-dimethylformamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifang; Chen, Yashao; Bao, Lin

    2010-03-01

    The rare-earth compound [Ce 0.5Sm 0.5( o-NBA) 3(DMF) 2] 2 (where o-NBA = o-nitrobenzoic acid, DMF = N, N-dimethylformamide) has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The crystal structure of the compound is characterized by Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), fluorescent emission spectroscopy (FES) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results show that the compound crystallizes in a triclinic system, space group P-1 with a = 11.8284 (6) Å, b = 12.5082 (7) Å, c = 13.0203 (7) Å, α = 63.9650 (10)°, β = 66.3900 (10)°, γ = 71.7380 (10)°, V = 1563.7 (14) Å 3, Dc = 1.677 g/cm 3, Z = 1, F(0 0 0) = 790. Each Ln (III) atom is bridged by four o-nitro-benzoates and chelated by one o-nitrobenzoate. The Ln (III) atom is eight-coordinated by six oxygen atoms from five o-nitro-benzoates and two oxygen atoms from two DMF molecules. Hydrogen bonds and aromatic π⋯ π stacking interactions assemble the compound into a three-dimensional network. Luminescence measurement shows that the compound emits fluorescence.

  4. Expanding rare-earth oxidation state chemistry to molecular complexes of holmium(II) and erbium(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Matthew R; Bates, Jefferson E; Fieser, Megan E; Ziller, Joseph W; Furche, Filipp; Evans, William J

    2012-05-23

    The first molecular complexes of holmium and erbium in the +2 oxidation state have been generated by reducing Cp'(3)Ln [Cp' = C(5)H(4)SiMe(3); Ln = Ho (1), Er (2)] with KC(8) in the presence of 18-crown-6 in Et(2)O at -35 °C under argon. Purification and crystallization below -35 °C gave isomorphous [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Ln] [Ln = Ho (3), Er (4)]. The three Cp' ring centroids define a trigonal-planar geometry around each metal ion that is not perturbed by the location of the potassium crown cation near one ring with K-C(Cp') distances of 3.053(8)-3.078(2) Å. The metrical parameters of the three rings are indistinguishable within the error limits. In contrast to Ln(2+) complexes of Eu, Yb, Sm, Tm, Dy, and Nd, 3 and 4 have average Ln-(Cp' ring centroid) distances only 0.029 and 0.021 Å longer than those of the Ln(3+) analogues 1 and 2, a result similar to that previously reported for the 4d(1) Y(2+) complex [(18-crown-6)K][Cp'(3)Y] (5) and the 5d(1) La(2+) complex [K(18-crown-6)(Et(2)O)][Cp″(3)La] [Cp″ = 1,3-(Me(3)Si)(2)C(5)H(3)]. Surprisingly, the UV-vis spectra of 3 and 4 are also very similar to that of 5 with two broad absorptions in the visible region, suggesting that 3-5 have similar electron configurations. Density functional theory calculations on the Ho(2+) and Er(2+) species yielded HOMOs that are largely 5d(z(2)) in character and supportive of 4f(10)5d(1) and 4f(11)5d(1) ground-state configurations, respectively.

  5. Some metallic materials and fluoride salts for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosnedl, P.; Hron, M.; Matal, O.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a special Ni base alloy MONICR for high temperature applications in fluoride salt environments developed in the framework of the complex R and D program for the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) - SPHINX (SPent Hot fuel Incinerator by Neutron fluX) concept development in the Czech Republic. Selected results of MONICR alloy tests and results of semi products fabrication from this alloy are discussed in the paper. The results of the structural materials tests are applied on semi-products and for the design of the testing devices as the autoclave in loop arrangement for high temperature fluoride salts applications. Material properties other Ni base alloys are compared to those of MONICR. Corrosion test results of the alloy A686 in the LiF - NaF - ZrF 4 molten salt are provided and compared to the measured values of the polarizing resistance. (author)

  6. Some new protonated ternary complexes of rare-earths with CDTA/DTPA and keto-glutaric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.P.; Chaturvedi, G.K.; Sharma, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Potentiometric evidences have been cited for the formation of 1:1:1, M(III)-CDTA/DTPA-H 2 KGA ternary complexes in the solution equilibria (where M(III)=LA(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Gd(III) or Dy(III); CDTA=1,2-diaminocyclohexanetetra-acetic acid; DTPA=diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid and H 2 KGA= β-ketoglutaric acid). Indications have been cited for the formation of protonated mixed ligand complexes at low pH as intermediate products, which undergo deprotonation at comparatively high pH forming 1:1:1, ternary species. The formation constants (log Ksub(MLL')) for the protonated ternary species, formed by simultaneous addition of both the ligands to metal ion and their deprotonation constants - log Ksub(A)sup(H) have been evaluated. The following order in the relative stabilities of the resulting complexes in terms of metal ions, La(III) < Pr(III) < Nd(III) < Gd(III) < Dy(III), has been observed. (author)

  7. Dynamics of simple defect clusters in alkaline earth fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haridasan, T.M.; Sekar, P.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of isolated F - vacancies and interstitials on the Dobye Waller Factors of their neighbours is studied. The perturbation due to the introduction of the defect is calculated using the scattering theory. The critical jump amplitude in the diffusion process is fitted to reproduce the experimental migration energy. The diffusion coefficient for the vacancy mechanism is estimated to be larger than that for the interstitialcy mechanism in the superionic region. (author). 21 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Controllable solvothermal synthesis and photocatalytic properties of complex (oxy)fluorides K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5}, K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} and K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Jie [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Tang Kaibin, E-mail: kbtang@ustc.edu.cn [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Cheng Wei; Wang Junli; Nie Yanxiang; Yang Qing [Division of Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2009-11-15

    Complex (oxy)fluorides K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}, K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} and K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} have been successfully synthesized for the first time through a controllable solvothermal route involving different solvents, for example, methanol, methanol-H{sub 2}O and methanol-H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, N{sub 2} surface area adsorption, scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis absorption spectra and X-ray fluorescence. The influences of reaction conditions such as the ratio of methanol to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or methanol to H{sub 2}O, reaction temperature on the phase, crystallizability and purity of the (oxy)fluorides products were discussed in detail. Meanwhile, the photocatalytic behaviors of the as-prepared K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}, K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4}, K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} and K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} were evaluated by degradation of rhodamine B molecules, and the results showed that all of the products possessed photocatalytic activities in the order of K{sub 2}TiOF{sub 4} > K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6} > K{sub 7}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 4}F{sub 7} > K{sub 3}TiOF{sub 5} at room temperature under the UV light.

  9. Analytical study, by modelling methods, of the alkali and alkaline earth cations influence on the stability and the reactivity of aluminium (III) oxides or halides complexes; Etude analytique, par des techniques de modelisation, de l`influence de cations alcalins ou alcalino-terreux sur la stabilite et la reactivite de complexes de l`aluminium(III) avec des ions halogenures ou oxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouyer, F

    1995-10-05

    The electric power consumption in aluminium production and electrorefining processes is high. A study of the electrochemical processes can be very useful for a better understanding of phenomena in electrolytic baths and then for reducing the production costs. A structural and vibrational analysis of species which exist in ionic solutions has been carried out with software based on the functional density theory. Concerning the electrolyte used for the aluminium refining, the anions study has shown that the aluminium chloro-fluoride complexes are preferentially tetrahedral. Moreover, the aluminium oxyfluoride complexes structures (which come from the alumina dissolution in cryolitic media) have been analyzed in the same way and the preferential coordination numbers for aluminium and oxygen have been shown clearly. The anionic model (which is limited to the nearest aluminium neighbours) does not allow to account for the thermodynamics of the cryolitic media. A more elaborated model has then been found to obtain the cryolite structure. The reactions enthalpies have been estimated and have lead to the calculus of species concentration gradients in liquid phase. The counterions effects as for instance sodium and calcium have been investigated. A model for the gaseous phase allowing to know the preferential species has been given. At last, a statistic thermochemistry program has been conceived and developed. It gives the thermodynamical functions at all temperature for the different complexes and allows to reckon the reactions coefficients in gaseous phase as well as the partial pressures profiles with those of calcium and sodium fluorides. (O.M.) 204 refs.

  10. Evaluation and economics aspects of the lying of rare earth and iron-alloys in the Seis Lagos Carbonatite Complex-Amazonas-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetterle Bonow, C. de; Issler, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    New data on rare earth mineralization and iron-alloys as well as other rare elements in the Seis Lagos Carbonatite Complex are described. Drilling and field work data have permited to define in surface, subsidence zones (subsurface collapses), in the interval of 14.65 to 73.10 meters depth a carbonaceous clay sequence, sapropelic, neogenic, highly enriched in Re, Nb, Th, V, Zn and Be as well as Sc, Y, Ga, Co and Sn as by-products were detected. Sedimentogenic aspects of the enrichment of detect elements, the scintillometric survey, the reserve calculation, the detected elements, the by-products and the complementary study for the deposit are discussed and finaly a value of US$ 6.7 x 10 9 is estimated for the detect deposit. (Author) [pt

  11. The in vitro effect of fluoridated milk in a bacterial biofilm--enamel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Forer, Stefan; Heesen, Joerg; Yudovich, Keren; Steinberg, Doron; Gaengler, Peter

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of milk and fluoridated milk on bacterially induced caries-like lesions. Extracted impacted human molars were cut in half and covered with a varnish leaving a 4*4 mm window. The samples were coated with biofilm of S. sobrinus and were further divided into three experimental groups of S. sobrinus, S. sobrinus and milk and S. sobrinus and fluoridated milk. As negative controls served teeth incubated in saline. Of twenty tooth halves serial ground sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarization light microscopy (PLM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX element analysis. The PLM photographs were used for 3D reconstruction, volumetric assessment and determination of the extension of the lesion zones. Of eight tooth halves the biofilm on the enamel surface was studied with SEM and EDX element analysis. Volumetric assessment showed a statistically significant difference in the volume of the body of the lesion and the translucent zone between the milk group and fluoridated milk group. Quantitative element analysis demonstrated significant differences between sound enamel and the superficial layer in the fluoridated milk group. The biofilm on the enamel surface showed an increased Ca content in the milk group and fluoridated milk group. Milk as a common nutrient seems to play a complex role in in-vitro biofilm--enamel interactions stimulating bacterial demineralization on one hand, and, as effective fluoride carrier, inhibits caries-like demineralization.

  12. FLUORIDE LEVELS IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE RICE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    2013-05-05

    May 5, 2013 ... Rice is one of the commonly consumed cereals for more than half of the ... also used as flour, for making rice wine, as ingredient for beer and liquor, ... Fluoride is a necessary element to human health, and a moderate amount of fluoride intake ... For Ethiopian red rice (ERR) Fogera was selected to collect.

  13. Biomonitoring Equivalents for interpretation of urinary fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, L L; Hays, S M; Vezina, A; Deveau, M; St-Amand, A; Nong, A

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to fluoride is widespread due to its natural occurrence in the environment and addition to drinking water and dental products for the prevention of dental caries. The potential health risks of excess fluoride exposure include aesthetically unacceptable dental fluorosis (tooth mottling) and increased skeletal fragility. Numerous organizations have conducted risk assessments and set guidance values to represent maximum recommended exposure levels as well as recommended adequate intake levels based on potential public health benefits of fluoride exposure. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are estimates of the average biomarker concentrations corresponding to such exposure guidance values. The literature on daily urinary fluoride excretion rates as a function of daily fluoride exposure was reviewed and BE values corresponding to the available US and Canadian exposure guidance values were derived for fluoride in urine. The derived BE values range from 1.1 to 2.1mg/L (1.2-2.5μg/g creatinine). Concentrations of fluoride in single urinary spot samples from individuals, even under exposure conditions consistent with the exposure guidance values, may vary from the predicted average concentrations by several-fold due to within- and across-individual variation in urinary flow and creatinine excretion rates and due to the rapid elimination kinetics of fluoride. Thus, the BE values are most appropriately applied to screen population central tendency estimates for biomarker concentrations rather than interpretation of individual spot sample concentrations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Fluoride ions vs removal technologies: A study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagvir Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Literature reported that drinking water is a precious and scarce resource and it has to be protected and kept free from any kind of contamination. Further, it has to be used carefully without wasting. Literature also reported that fluoride bearing rocks are abundant in India, as a result, fluoride leaches out and contaminates the adjacent water and soil resources. A high concentration of fluoride ions in ground water increases up to more than 30 mg/L. This high concentration of fluoride ions causes many harmful and dangerous effects on our datum. Fluoride ions in larger quantities i.e. 20–80 mg/day taken over a period of 10–20 years result in crippling and skeletal fluorosis, severely damaging the bone. In the present scenario, there is a continuously increasing worldwide concern for the development of fluoride treatment technologies. Possibilities of reducing the high fluorine content in groundwater are by defluorination process/dilution with the surface water which is a very simple technique but the addition of Ca2+ ions to a solution in contact with fluorite when experimented in distilled water caused an appreciable decrease in fluoride concentration. In this review article, we emphasized the relationship between high concentrations of fluoride ions and their compounds and their health impact.

  15. The effect of fluoride on the scavenging of organophosphates by human butyrylcholinesterase in buffer solutions and human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashani, Yacov; Segev, Omri; Balan, Ayala

    2004-01-01

    Fluoride ion is a reversible inhibitor of human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) that is a viable drug candidate against organophosphates (OPs) toxicity. Since large numbers of communities in many countries are occasionally exposed to relatively high amount of fluoride, its effect on the kinetics of inhibition of HuBChE by OPs was investigated. In saline phosphate, pH 7.4, fluoride in the lower millimolar range significantly slowed the inhibition of HuBChE by paraoxon, DFP, echothiophate, soman, sarin, and VX. The kinetics of the inhibition was found consistent with the formation of a reversible fluoride-HuBChE complex that is at least 25-fold less active towards phosphorylation or phosphonylation than the free enzyme. Heat inactivation experiments indicate that the binding of fluoride to HuBChE probably involves enhanced cross-domain interaction via hydrogen bonds formation that may decrease enzyme activity. In spite of distinct structural differences among the OP used, the dissociation constants of the fluoride-HuBChE reversible complex varied over a narrow range (K F , 0.31-0.70 mM); however, K F in human plasma increased to 2.75-3.40 mM. 19 F-NMR spectroscopy revealed that fluoride ion is complexed to plasma components, an observation that explains in part the apparent increase in K F . Results suggest that an estimate of the relative decrease in the rate of OPs sequestration in presence of fluoride can be obtained from the fraction of the free HuBChE (1 + [F]/K F ) -1 . Considering K F values in human plasma, it is concluded that the scavenging efficacy of OPs by HuBChE is not compromised by the normal concentration range of circulating fluoride ions

  16. Diethylenetriaminium hexafluoridotitanate(IV fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lhoste

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C6H21N4[TiF6]F, was synthesized by the reaction of TiO2, tris(2-aminoethylamine, HF and ethanol at 463 K in a microwave oven. The crystal structure consists of two crystallographically independent [TiF6]2− anions, two fluoride anions and two triply-protonated tris(2-aminoethylamine cations. The Ti atoms are coordinated by six F atoms within slightly distorted octahedra. The anions and cations are connected by intermolecular N—H...F hydrogen bonds.

  17. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  18. Niobium electrodeposition from molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, A.F.

    1987-01-01

    Niobium electrodeposition from molten alkali fluorides has been studied aiming the application of this technic to the processes of electrorefining and galvanotechnic of this metal. The effects of current density, temperature, niobium concentration in the bath, electrolysis time, substrate nature, ratio between anodic and cathodic areas, electrodes separation and the purity of anodes were investigated in relation to the cathodic current efficiency, electrorefining, electroplating and properties of the deposit and the electrolytic solution. The work also gives the results of the conctruction and operation of a pilot plant for refractory metals electrodeposition and shows the electrorefining and electroplating compared to those obtained at the laboratory scale. (author) [pt

  19. Measurement of fluoride in bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; Harrision, J.E.; Hancock, R.; McNeill, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    The fluorine concentration in bone biopsy samples was measured by neutron activation analysis. The fluorine content was expressed in terms of the calcium content. Samples were irradiated in a reactor to induce the 19 F(n,γ) 20 F and 48 Ca(n,γ) 49 Ca reactions and after rapid transport from the reactor the resulting activities were measured with a Ge(Li) detector. Reproducibility was better than 10% for the F/Ca ratio. The detection limit for F is 50 μg. This nondestructive technique will be used to assess the effect of fluoride therapy on bone metabolism of patients with idiopathic osteoporosis. (author)

  20. Preparation and chemical crystallographic study of new hydrides and hydro-fluorides of ionic character; Preparation et etude cristallochimique de nouveaux hydrures et fluorohydrures a caractere ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung-Ho

    1988-07-22

    Within the context of a growing interest in the study of reversible hydrides with the perspective of their application in hydrogen storage, this research thesis more particularly addressed the case of ternary hydrides and fluorides, and of hydro-fluorides. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of alkaline hydrides, of alkaline earth hydrides and of europium hydride, and then the elaboration of ternary hydrides. He addresses the preparation of caesium fluorides and of calcium or nickel fluorides, of Europium fluorides, and of ternary fluorides. Then, he addresses the preparation of hydro-fluorides (caesium, calcium, europium fluorides, and caesium and nickel fluorides). The author presents the various experimental techniques: chemical analysis, radio-crystallographic analysis, volumetric mass density measurement, magnetic measurements, ionic conductivity measurements, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance. He reports the crystallographic study of some ternary alkaline and alkaline-earth hydrides (KH-MgH{sub 2}, RbH-CaH{sub 2}, CsH-CaH{sub 2}, RbH-MgH{sub 2} and CsH-MgH{sub 2}) and of some hydro-fluorides (CsCaF{sub 2}H, EuF{sub 2}H, CsNiF{sub 2}H) [French] Dans une premiere partie, de nouveaux hydrures ternaires ont ete prepares et caracterises. Les systemes etudies sont AH-MH 2 (A = K, Rb, Cs et M = Mg, Ca). Dans les systemes AH-MgH 2 l'evolution structurale a ete discutee en fonction du caractere iono-covalent de la liaison magnesium-hydrogene. Dans une deuxieme partie, plusieurs nouveaux fluorohydrures ont ete mis en evidence. L'effet de la substitution de l'hydrogene au fluor dans ces phases a ete etudiee en utilisant la RMN, la spectroscopie Moessbauer, la conductivite ionique et les mesures magnetiques.

  1. Determination of Fluoride in Different Toothpaste Formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamau, N.G.; Njoroge, M.; Njau, M.

    1998-01-01

    Fluoride ion selective electrode was used to determine fluoride ion concentrations in seven brands of toothpaste. These were the only available formulations found in Kenya. The brands were classified into three groups-fluoridated, non fluoridated or not indicated. However, there was no independent indication of their quantitative composition. The analysed brands had fluoride content between 0.0033% and 0.096%. These values compared favourably with those obtained elsewhere. The calculated lowest limit of detection (LLD) was 0.01 ppmF- . The mean calibration curve gave a slope of of -50.0mV. which was not significantly different from the theoretical value of 5.88mV at 23 degrees celsius at 95% confidence level

  2. Rapid analysis of some rare earth magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoot, K.N.; Raoot, Sarala; Rukmani Desikan, N.

    1978-01-01

    A simple complexometric method for the quick analysis of the constituent elements in some quaternary rare earth magnets of the type RE-Co-Cu-Fe and RE-Ni-Cu-Fe is described. The technique is based on a total titration, subsequent release of EDTA from rare earth with ammonium fluoride and that from copper (II) with ascorbic acid and thiourea followed by determination of the excess and liberated EDTA by lead nitrate in a weak acid medium using xylenol orange indicator. In another, aliquot iron (III) and rare earth are first masked with sodium fluoride, and copper (II) with ascorbic acid and thiourea before cobalt (II) or nickel (II) is estimated by back titration. Iron is calculated by difference. The new method yields accurate and reproducible results with error not exceeding 1%. A set of three samples can conveniently be analysed in two hours. (author)

  3. Rapid analysis of some rare earth magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raoot, K N; Raoot, S; Rukmani Desikan, N [Defence Metallurgical Research Lab., Hyderabad (India)

    1978-12-01

    A simple complexometric method for the quick analysis of the constituent elements in some quaternary rare earth magnets of the type RE-Co-Cu-Fe and RE-Ni-Cu-Fe is described. The technique is based on a total titration, subsequent release of EDTA from rare earth with ammonium fluoride and that from copper (II) with ascorbic acid and thiourea followed by determination of the excess and liberated EDTA by lead nitrate in a weak acid medium using xylenol orange indicator. In another, aliquot iron (III) and rare earth are first masked with sodium fluoride, and copper (II) with ascorbic acid and thiourea before cobalt (II) or nickel (II) is estimated by back titration. Iron is calculated by difference. The new method yields accurate and reproducible results with error not exceeding 1%. A set of three samples can conveniently be analysed in two hours.

  4. On fluorozirconates and fluorohafnates of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Yu.M.; Antipov, P.I.; Novoselova, A.V.

    1980-01-01

    It has been shown by the method of X-ray phase analysis that on interaction between rare-earth fluorides and zirconium and hafnium tetrafluorides, compounds with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 molar ratios of components are formed. Compounds of the LnHfF 4 type are prepared for all rare-earths. Fluoro-metals of the LnHf 2 F 11 composition are typical only of light lanthanides from lanthanum to neodymium, while pentafluorated salts Ln(EF 5 ) 3 are formed in the reaction between EF 4 with fluorides of heavy rare-earth elements from samarium to lutecium, as well as with yttrium trifluoride. Parameters of unit cells of heptafluohafnates and pentafluometallates are determined

  5. TEMPERATURE TRENDS OF THE PERMITTIVITY IN COMPLEX OXIDES OF RARE-EARTH ELEMENTS WITH PEROVSKITE-TYPE STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G.Belous

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic materials based on complex oxides with both the perovskite structure (Ln2/3Nb2O6 and the structure of tetragonal tungsten bronze (Ba6-xLn8+2x/3Ti18O54 have been investigated over a wide frequency and temperature ranges. The results obtained for certain structures denote the presence of the temperature anomalies of dielectric parameters (ε, tanδ. These anomalies occur over the wide frequency range including submilimeter (SMM wavelength range, and are related neither with the processing peculiarities nor with the presence of the phase transitions. Temperature behavior of the permittivity has been considered in terms of the polarization mechanism based on the elastic-strain lattice oscillations. It has been assumed that the observed anomalies could be ascribed to a superposition of harmonic and anharmonic contribution to lattice oscillations that determines τε sign and magnitude.

  6. Studies on the comparative effect of sodium fluoride on collagen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride is an essential element for the normal development and growth of human beings. The main source of fluoride for humans is the intake of groundwater. At high levels, fluoride causes dental and skeletal fluorosis. In this study, control and sodium fluoride (NaF) treated groups of rats had significant (p < 0.05) higher ...

  7. Study of conformational and acid-base properties of norbadione A and pulvinic derivatives: Consequences on their complexation properties of alkaline and alkaline earth cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuad, P.

    2006-01-01

    This work deals with the study of norbadione A, a pigment extracted from mushrooms and known to complex cesium cations. The study of the acid-base properties of norbadione A has allowed to determine the relative acidity of the seven protonable functions of the molecule and to reveal a reversible isomerization of the double exocyclic bond of the pulvinic moieties. The observed change of configuration is induced by a hydrogen bond of the H-O-H type and by electrostatic interactions. Moreover, the microscopic protonation mechanism of the norbadione A has been analyzed, considering three different study media where the acid-base properties of the norbadione A are compared. In the presence of 0.15 mol.l -1 of NaCl, it has been observed a remarkable cooperativity in the protonation of the enol groups. At last, the use of different analytical methods (NMR, potentiometry and calorimetry) has allowed to study the complexing properties of the norbadione A towards cesium and other alkaline and rare earth cations. (O.M.)

  8. Earth modeling and estimation of the local seismic ground motion due to site geology in complex volcanoclastic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Di Fiore

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic areas often show complex behaviour as far as seismic waves propagation and seismic motion at surface are concerned. In fact, the finite lateral extent of surface layers such as lava flows, blocks, differential welding and/or zeolitization within pyroclastic deposits, introduces in the propagation of seismic waves effects such as the generation of surface waves at the edge, resonance in lateral direction, diffractions and scattering of energy, which tend to modify the amplitude as well as the duration of the ground motion. The irregular topographic surface, typical of volcanic areas, also strongly influences the seismic site response. Despite this heterogeneity, it is unfortunately a common geophysical and engineering practice to evaluate even in volcanic environments the subsurface velocity field with monodimensional investigation method (i.e. geognostic soundings, refraction survey, down-hole, etc. prior to the seismic site response computation which in a such cases is obviously also made with 1D algorithms. This approach often leads to highly inaccurate results. In this paper we use a different approach, i.e. a fully 2D P-wave Çturning rayÈ tomographic survey followed by 2D seismic site response modeling. We report here the results of this approach in three sites located at short distance from Mt. Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei and characterized by overburdens constituted by volcanoclastic deposits with large lateral and vertical variations of their elastic properties. Comparison between 1D and 2D Dynamic Amplification Factor shows in all reported cases entirely different results, both in terms of peak period and spectral contents, as expected from the clear bidimensionality of the geological section. Therefore, these studies suggest evaluating carefully the subsoil geological structures in areas characterized by possible large lateral and vertical variations of the elastic properties in order to reach correct seismic site response

  9. Evaluation of toxic action of fluorides on agricultural plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Grishko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxicity of potassium fluoride, sodium fluoride and ammonium fluoride for pea, maize, oat and onion was studied. It was found that the level of the toxic influence had grown with increase of fluoride concentration in the media of growth (from 5 to 100 mg of F–/l. By increase of the toxic influence the agricultural crops are disposed in the following row: oat < onion < maize < pea. Ammonium fluoride demonstrates lesser toxicity, than potassium and sodium fluorides. Under low concentrations of fluoride compounds (5 and 10 mg of F–/l stimulation of roots growth is noted only for the oat.

  10. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  11. Physiologic conditions affect toxicity of ingested industrial fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerheber, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity from ingestion is distinct from fully soluble toxic industrial fluorides. The toxicity of fluoride is determined by environmental conditions and the positive cations present. At a pH typical of gastric juice, fluoride is largely protonated as hydrofluoric acid HF. Industrial fluoride ingested from treated water enters saliva at levels too low to affect dental caries. Blood levels during lifelong consumption can harm heart, bone, brain, and even developing teeth enamel. The widespread policy known as water fluoridation is discussed in light of these findings.

  12. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J. [UJV - Nuclear Research Institute, Research Centre Rez, CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 130 (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  13. Thermodynamics of the conversion of calcium and magnesium fluorides to the parent metal oxides and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

    1997-02-01

    The authors have used thermodynamic modeling to examine the reaction of calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and magnesium fluoride (MgF 2 ) with water (H 2 O) at elevated temperatures. The calculated, equilibrium composition corresponds to the global free-energy minimum for the system. Optimum, predicted reaction temperatures and reactant mole ratios are reported for the recovery of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a valuable industrial feedstock. Complete conversion of MgF 2 is found at 1,000 C and a ratio of 40 moles of H 2 O per 1 mole of MgF 2 . For CaF 2 , temperatures as high as 1,400 C are required for complete conversion at a corresponding mole ratio of 40 moles of H 2 O per 1 mole of CaF 2 . The authors discuss the presence of minor chemical constituents as well as the stability of various potential container materials for the pyrohydrolysis reactions at elevated temperatures. CaF 2 and MgF 2 slags are available as wastes at former uranium production facilities within the Department of Energy Complex and other facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recovery of HF from these wastes is an example of environmental remediation at such facilities

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of fluoride treated rat bone provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of fluoride toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanli; Wang, Nanlan; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhao, Danqing; Zhao, Yuxi; Iqbal, Javed; Shen, Liming

    2018-07-01

    Long-term excessive intake of fluoride (F) could lead to chronic fluorosis. To explore the underlying molecular mechanisms, present study is designed to elucidate the effect of fluoride on proteome expression of bone in sodium fluoride (NaF)-treated SD rats. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used to determine the severity of osteofluorosis, and bone samples were submitted for iTRAQ analysis. The results showed that the cortical thickness and trabecular area of femur bone in medium- and high-dose groups were higher than in control group. Contrary to this, trabecular area was reduced in the low-dose group, indicating that the bone mass was increased in medium- and high-dose groups, and decreased in the low-dose group. Thirteen (13), 35, and 34 differentially expressed proteins were identified in low-, medium-, and high-dose group, respectively. The medium- and high-dose groups shared a more similar protein expression pattern. These proteins were mainly associated with collagen metabolism, proteoglycans (PGs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), etc. The results suggested that the effect of NaF on SD rats is in a dose-dependent manner. Some key proteins found here may be involved in affecting the bone tissues and bone marrow or muscle, and account for the complex pathology and clinical symptoms of fluorosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ka King [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A series of organometallic compounds containing the tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand are described. The potassium carbanions KC(SiHMe2)3 and KC(SiHMe2})3TMEDA are synthesized by deprotonation of the hydrocarbon HC(SiHMe2)3 with potassium benzyl. KC(SiHMe2)3TMEDA crystallizes as a dimer with two types of three-center-two-electron KH- Si interactions. Homoleptic Ln(III) tris(silylalkyl) complexes containing β-SiH groups M{C(SiHMe2)3}3 (Ln = Y, Lu, La) are synthesized from salt elimination of the corresponding lanthanide halide and 3 equiv. of KC(SiHMe2)3. The related reactions with Sc yield bis(silylalkyl) ate-complexes containing either LiCl or KCl. The divalent calcium and ytterbium compounds M{C(SiHMe2)3}2L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF2 or TMEDA) are prepared from MI2 and 2 equiv of KC(SiHMe2)3. The compounds M{C(SiHMe2)3}2L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF2 or TMEDA) and La{C(SiHMe2)3}3 react with 1 equiv of B(C6F5)3 to give 1,3- disilacyclobutane {Me2Si-C(SiHMe2)2}2 and MC(SiHMe2)3HB(C6F5)3L, and La{C(SiHMe2)3}2HB(C6F5)3, respectively. The corresponding reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe2)3}3 (Ln = Y, Lu) give the β-SiH abstraction product [{(Me2HSi)3C}2LnC(SiHMe2)2SiMe2][HB(C6F5)3] (Ln = Y, Lu), but the silene remains associated with the Y or Lu center. The abstraction reactions of M{C(SiHMe2)3}2L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF2or TMEDA) and Ln{C(SiHMe2)3}3 (Ln = Y, Lu, La) and 2 equiv of B(C6

  16. Application of Titanium Compounds to Reduce Fluoride Ion in Water Resources with High Fluoride Ion Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Riahi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes studies on the sorption of fluoride ions from water by titanium compounds used in water treatment to reduce fluoride content in water resources. There are different methods of reducing fluoride ion in water, each associated with specific problems such as secondary contamination, environmental contamination, high costs, or the need for primary and secondary treatment. In this study, application of titanium sulfate and Metatitanic acid produced from titanium ore concentrate (ileminite is investigated in the removal of fluoride ion and the possibility of complete purification of fluorine containing wastewater is examined to determine the optimal conditions. Metatitanic acid has a great sorption property for fluoride ion. Also titanium sulfate is a suitable and more effective material for this purpose. Efficiency of this material in reducing fluoride ion content is 99.9% and it is possible to refresh sorbet material for reuse without problems arising from Ti+4 ion contamination.

  17. New Insight on the Response of Bacteria to Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Breaker, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biolog...

  18. Physiologic Conditions Affect Toxicity of Ingested Industrial Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Sauerheber

    2013-01-01

    The effects of calcium ion and broad pH ranges on free fluoride ion aqueous concentrations were measured directly and computed theoretically. Solubility calculations indicate that blood fluoride concentrations that occur in lethal poisonings would decrease calcium below prevailing levels. Acute lethal poisoning and also many of the chronic effects of fluoride involve alterations in the chemical activity of calcium by the fluoride ion. Natural calcium fluoride with low solubility and toxicity ...

  19. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Rizwan Ullah; Muhammad Sohail Zafar; Nazish Shahani

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, tox...

  20. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Although fluoride is plentiful in the environment and is commonly used at high concentrations in oral hygiene products, little has been known about how biological systems overcome the toxic effects of this anion. We demonstrate that a protein called FEX in many fungi is essential for cell survival in the presence of high fluoride concentrations. The protein is required for the rapid expulsion of cytoplasmic fluoride, indicating that many eukaryotic species that carry FEX genes likely avoid fl...

  1. No calcium-fluoride-like deposits detected in plaque shortly after a sodium fluoride mouthrinse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, G L; Tenuta, L M A; Schumacher, G E; Chow, L C

    2010-01-01

    Plaque 'calcium-fluoride-like' (CaF(2)-like) and fluoride deposits held by biological/bacterial calcium fluoride (Ca-F) bonds appear to be the source of cariostatic concentrations of fluoride in plaque fluid. The aim of this study was to quantify the amounts of plaque fluoride held in these reservoirs after a sodium fluoride rinse. 30 and 60 min after a 228 microg/g fluoride rinse, plaque samples were collected from 11 volunteers. Each sample was homogenized, split into 2 aliquots (aliquots 1 and 2), centrifuged, and the recovered plaque fluid combined and analyzed using microelectrodes. The plaque mass from aliquot 1 was retained. The plaque mass from aliquot 2 was extracted several times with a solution having the same fluoride, calcium and pH as the plaque fluid in order to extract the plaque CaF(2)-like deposits. The total fluoride in both aliquots was then determined. In a second experiment, the extraction completeness was examined by applying the above procedure to in vitro precipitates containing known amounts of CaF(2)-like deposits. Nearly identical fluoride concentrations were found in both plaque aliquots. The extraction of the CaF(2)-like precipitates formed in vitro removed more than 80% of these deposits. The results suggest that either CaF(2)-like deposits were not formed in plaque or, if these deposits had been formed, they were rapidly lost. The inability to form persistent amounts of CaF(2)-like deposits in plaque may account for the relatively rapid loss of plaque fluid fluoride after the use of conventional fluoride dentifrices or rinses. (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets by fluoride-releasing composite containing nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary A S; Morais, Weslanny A; Passos, Vanara F; Lima, Juliana P M; Rodrigues, Lidiany K A

    2014-05-01

    Fluoride-containing materials have been suggested to control enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets during the treatment with fixed appliances. The improvement of their properties has been made through innovations, such as the application of nanotechnology by incorporation of nanofillers. This in vitro study evaluated the capacity of fluoride releasing and enamel demineralization inhibition of fluoride-releasing nanofilled cement around orthodontic brackets using an artificial caries biofilm model. Forty bovine enamel discs were selected by evaluating surface microhardness and randomized into four groups (n = 10): non-fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, fluoride-releasing microfilled composite, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGI), and fluoride-releasing nanofilled composite (FN). After brackets bonding in each disc, the specimens were subjected to a cariogenic challenge through a Streptococcus mutans biofilm model. After the experimental period, the biofilm formed around the brackets was collected for fluoride analysis and the mineral loss around the brackets was determined by integrated demineralization via cross-sectional microhardness measurement at 20 and 70 μm from the bracket margin. Additionally, samples of each group were subjected to energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis examined under a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). ANOVA followed by Tukey test were applied for fluoride concentration and mineral loss data, respectively. At both distances, only RMGI statistically differed from the other groups presenting the lowest demineralization, although there was a trend to a lower demineralization of enamel around brackets in FN group. Similar condition was found to fluoride concentration and EDX/SEM analysis. Under the cariogenic exposure condition of this study, the fluoride-releasing nanofilled material had similar performance to fluoride-releasing microfilled materials. The presence of nanofillers in the fluoride

  3. Fluoride exposure and indicators of thyroid functioning in the Canadian population: implications for community water fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberio, Amanda M; Hosein, F Shaun; Quiñonez, Carlos; McLaren, Lindsay

    2017-10-01

    There are concerns that altered thyroid functioning could be the result of ingesting too much fluoride. Community water fluoridation (CWF) is an important source of fluoride exposure. Our objectives were to examine the association between fluoride exposure and (1) diagnosis of a thyroid condition and (2) indicators of thyroid functioning among a national population-based sample of Canadians. We analysed data from Cycles 2 and 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Logistic regression was used to assess associations between fluoride from urine and tap water samples and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between fluoride exposure and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level (low/normal/high). Other available variables permitted additional exploratory analyses among the subset of participants for whom we could discern some fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products. There was no evidence of a relationship between fluoride exposure (from urine and tap water) and the diagnosis of a thyroid condition. There was no statistically significant association between fluoride exposure and abnormal (low or high) TSH levels relative to normal TSH levels. Rerunning the models with the sample constrained to the subset of participants for whom we could discern some source(s) of fluoride exposure from drinking water and/or dental products revealed no significant associations. These analyses suggest that, at the population level, fluoride exposure is not associated with impaired thyroid functioning in a time and place where multiple sources of fluoride exposure, including CWF, exist. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Detection of trace fluoride in serum and urine by online membrane-based distillation coupled with ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Chaoyan; Guo, Dandan; Wang, Nani; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2017-06-02

    An online membrane-based distillation (MBD) coupled with ion chromatography (IC) method was proposed for automatic detection of trace fluoride (F - ) in serum and urine samples. The system consisted of a sample vessel, a lab-made membrane module and an ion chromatograph. Hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) hollow fiber membrane was used in MBD which was directly performed in serum and urine samples to eliminate the matrix interferences and enrich fluoride, while enabling automation. The determination of fluoride in biological samples was carried out by IC with suppressed conductometric detection. The proposed method feasibly determined trace fluoride in serum and urine matrices with the optimized parameters, such as acid concentration, distillation temperature, and distillation time, etc. Fluoride exhibited satisfactory linearity in the range of 0.01-5.0mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992. The limit of detection (LOD, S/N=3) and limit of quantification (LOQ, S/N=10) were 0.78μg/L and 2.61μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations of peak area and peak height were all less than 5.15%. The developed method was validated for the determination of fluoride in serum and urine with good spiked recoveries ranging between 97.1-101.9%. This method also can be proposed as a suitable alternative for the analysis of fluoride in other complex biological samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuta, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF 6 . This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm -1 for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm -1 can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods

  6. Manufacturing of Dysprosium-Iron Alloys by Electrolysis in Fluoride-Based Electrolytes: Oxide Solubility Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana Maria; Støre, Anne; Osen, Karen Sende

    2018-04-01

    Electrolytic production of light rare earth elements and alloys takes place in a fluoride-based electrolyte using rare earth oxides as raw material. The optimization of this method, mainly in terms of the energy efficiency and environmental impact control, is rather challenging. Anode effects, evolution of fluorine-containing compounds, and side cathode reactions could largely be minimized by a good control of the amount of rare earth oxide species dissolved in the fluoride-based electrolyte and their dissolution rate. The oxide content of the fluoride melts REF3-LiF (RE = Nd, Dy) at different compositions and temperatures were experimentally determined by carbothermal analysis of melt samples. The highest solubility values of oxide species, added as Dy2O3 and Dy2(CO3)3, were obtained to be of ca. 3 wt pct (expressed as Dy2O3) in the case of the equimolar DyF3-LiF melt at 1323 K (1050 °C). The oxide saturation values increased with the amount of REF3 present in the molten bath and the working temperature.

  7. Removal of fluoride from aqueous nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruett, D.J.; Howerton, W.B.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    Several methods for removing fluoride from aqueous nitric acid were investigated and compared with the frequently used aluminum nitrate-calcium nitrate (Ca 2+ -Al 3+ ) chemical trap-distillation system. Zirconium oxynitrate solutions were found to be superior in preventing volatilization of fluoride during distillation of the nitric acid, producing decontamination factors (DFs) on the order of 2 x 10 3 (vs approx. 500 for the Ca 2+ -Al 3+ system). Several other metal nitrate systems were tested, but they were less effective. Alumina and zirconia columns proved highly effective in removing HF from HF-HNO 3 vapors distilled through the columns; fluoride DFs on the order of 10 6 and 10 4 , respectively, were obtained. A silica gel column was very effective in adsorbing HF from HF-HNO 3 solutions, producing a fluoride DF of approx. 10 4

  8. Implementing a geographical information system to assess endemic fluoride areas in Lamphun, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerawasttanasiri N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonthaphat Theerawasttanasiri,1,2 Surasak Taneepanichskul,1 Wichain Pingchai,3 Yuwaree Nimchareon,4 Sangworn Sriwichai5 1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Health, Health Promotion Center Region 1, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Mueang Lamphun District Public Health Office, 4Pasang District Public Health Office, 5Ban Thi District Public Health Office, Lamphun, Thailand Introduction: Many studies have shown that fluoride can cross the placenta and that exposure to high fluoride during pregnancy may result in premature birth and/or a low birth weight. Lamphun is one of six provinces in Thailand where natural water fluoride (WF concentrations >10.0 mg/L were found, and it was also found that >50% of households used water with high fluoride levels. Nevertheless, geographical information system (GIS and maps of endemic fluoride areas are lacking. We aimed to measure the fluoride level of village water supplies to assess endemic fluoride areas and present GIS with maps in Google Maps.Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 2016 to January 2017. Purpose sampling was used to identify villages of districts with WF >10.0 mg/L in the Mueang Lamphun, Pasang, and Ban Thi districts. Water samples were collected with the geolocation measured by Smart System Info. Fluoride was analyzed with an ion-selective electrode instrument using a total ionic strength adjustment buffer. WF >0.70 mg/L was used to identify unsafe drinking water and areas with high endemic fluoride levels. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the findings, and MS Excel was used to create the GIS database. Maps were created in Google Earth and presented in Google Maps.Results: We found that WF concentrations ranged between 0.10–13.60 mg/L. Forty-four percent (n=439 of samples were at unsafe levels (>0.70 mg/L, and. 54% (n=303 of villages and 46% (n=79,807 of households used the unsafe drinking water. Fifty percent

  9. The use of Multiple Representations to Enhance Student Mental Model Development of a Complex Earth System in an Introductory Geoscience Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, K. S.; Heather, M. R.; Herbert, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    Exposing earth system science (ESS) concepts into introductory geoscience courses may present new and unique cognitive learning issues for students including understanding the role of positive and negative feedbacks in system responses to perturbations, spatial heterogeneity, and temporal dynamics, especially when systems exhibit complex behavior. Implicit learning goals of typical introductory undergraduate geoscience courses are more focused on building skill-sets and didactic knowledge in learners than developing a deeper understanding of the dynamics and processes of complex earth systems through authentic inquiry. Didactic teaching coupled with summative assessment of factual knowledge tends to limit student¡¦s understanding of the nature of science, their belief in the relevancy of science to their lives, and encourages memorization and regurgitation; this is especially true among the non-science majors who compose the majority of students in introductory courses within the large university setting. Students organize scientific knowledge and reason about earth systems by manipulating internally constructed mental models. This pilot study focuses on characterizing the impact of inquiry-based learning with multiple representations to foster critical thinking and mental model development about authentic environmental issues of coastal systems in an introductory geoscience course. The research was conducted in nine introductory physical geology laboratory sections (N ˜ 150) at Texas A&M University as part of research connected with the Information Technology in Science (ITS) Center. Participants were randomly placed into experimental and control groups. Experimental groups were exposed to multiple representations including both web-based learning materials (i.e. technology-supported visualizations and analysis of multiple datasets) and physical models, whereas control groups were provided with the traditional ¡workbook style¡" laboratory assignments

  10. Fluoride method for silicon determination i silicovadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarnitskaya, N.N.; Sergeev, K.I.; Shamraj, Z.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    The method used was based on formation of a silicon-potassium fluoride-sodium sediment in strongly acid medium in the presence of excess potassium chloride which decreased the sediment solubility. The sediment was dissolved in hot water to titrate the resultant hydrofluoric acid with a caustic potash solution in the presence of phenolphthalein. Gravity hydrochloric and volumetric fluoride methods were used to compare the results of silicon estimation

  11. Fluoride removal from water by nano filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bejaoui, Imen; Mnif, Amine; Hamrouni, Bechir

    2009-01-01

    As any oligo element, fluoride is necessary and beneficial for human health to low concentrations, but an excess amount of fluoride ions in drinking water has been known to cause undesirable effects, especially tooth and bones fluoro sis. The maximum acceptable concentration of fluoride in drinking water was fixed by the World Health Organization according to the climate in the range of 1 mg.L -1 to 1,2 mg.L -1 . Many methods have been used to remove fluoride from water such as precipitation, adsorption, electrocoagulation and membrane processes. Technologies using membrane processes are being used in many applications, particularly for brackish water desalination. Nano filtration seems to be the best process for a good selective defluorination of fluorinated waters. The main objective of this work was to investigate the retention of fluoride anions by nano filtration. The first part of this study deals with the characterisation of the NF HL2514TF membrane. The influence of various experimental parameters such as initial fluoride content, feed pressure, permeate flux, ionic strength, type of cation associated to fluoride and pH were studied in the second part. Results show that the retention order for the salts tested was TR(Na 2 SO 4 ) > TR(CaCl 2 ) > TR(NaCl), showing a retention sequence inversely proportional to the salt diffusion coefficients in water. It was also shown that charge effects could not be neglected, and a titration experiments confirmed that the NF membrane carry a surplus of negatively charged groups. Fluoride retention exceeds 60 pour cent, and increases with increasing concentration, where the rejection mechanism is related to the dielectric effects. Speigler-Kedem model was applied to experimental results in the aim to determine phenomenological parametersσand P s respectively, the reflexion coefficient of the membrane and the solute permeability of ions. The convective and diffusive parts of the mass transfer were quantified with

  12. Recovery of fluoride ion selective electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, R.P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A recovery procedure of fluoride ion selective electrode based upon the body radiography of inactive electrode and introduction of suitable internal regeneration solution, is developed. The recovered electrode was tested in standard solutions of fluoride ions (10 sup5) to 10 -1M showing as good performance as the new one. The fluor determination by potentiometric measurements with selective electrode is used in nuclear fuel cycle for quality control of thorium and uranium mixed oxide pellets and pellets of uranium dioxides. (author) [pt

  13. Grid-Free 2D Plasma Simulations of the Complex Interaction Between the Solar Wind and Small, Near-Earth Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Poppe, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a new grid-free 2D plasma simulation code applied to a small, unmagnetized body immersed in the streaming solar wind plasma. The body was purposely modeled as an irregular shape in order to examine photoemission and solar wind plasma flow in high detail on the dayside, night-side, terminator and surface-depressed 'pocket' regions. Our objective is to examine the overall morphology of the various plasma interaction regions that form around a small body like a small near-Earth asteroid (NEA). We find that the object obstructs the solar wind flow and creates a trailing wake region downstream, which involves the interplay between surface charging and ambipolar plasma expansion. Photoemission is modeled as a steady outflow of electrons from illuminated portions of the surface, and under direct illumination the surface forms a non-monotonic or ''double-sheath'' electric potential upstream of the body, which is important for understanding trajectories and equilibria of lofted dust grains in the presence of a complex asteroid geometry. The largest electric fields are found at the terminators, where ambipolar plasma expansion in the body-sized night-side wake merges seamlessly with the thin photoelectric sheath on the dayside. The pocket regions are found to be especially complex, with nearby sunlit regions of positive potential electrically connected to unlit negative potentials and forming adjacent natural electric dipoles. For objects near the surface, we find electrical dissipation times (through collection of local environmental solar wind currents) that vary over at least 5 orders of magnitude: from 39 Micro(s) inside the near-surface photoelectron cloud under direct sunlight to less than 1 s inside the particle-depleted night-side wake and shadowed pocket regions

  14. A systemic study of stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc2O3 to Lu2O3 mediated by alkaline chlorides as complex former

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yanhui; He Peng; Chen Huani

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study has been carried out for the stepwise chlorination-chemical vapor transport (SC-CVT) characteristics of pure rare earth oxides from Sc 2 O 3 to Lu 2 O 3 mediated by the vapor complexes KLnCl 4 and NaLnCl 4 (Ln = Sc, Y and La-Lu) used NaCl and KCl as complex former, respectively. The results showed that the SC-CVT characteristics are similarly for NaCl and KCl as complex former, the main deposition temperature of the rare earth chlorides LnCl 3 is in the increasing order ScCl 3 3 3 , and then with a systematically decreasing trend from the early lanthanide chlorides to the end one. The results also showed that the total transported amount of the produced chlorides is YCl 3 > ScCl 3 , and they are much higher than that of most lanthanoid chlorides. For lanthanoids, the total transported amount of chloride increases systematically from the early lanthanoid chlorides to the end one except for EuCl 3 and GdCl 3 mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, respectively, which showed the divergence effect of Gd in the total transport efficiency. But there are some differences in SC-CVT characteristics of pure rare earth oxide mediated by KCl and NaCl as complex former, that is the main deposition temperature region for the same rare earth element was lower for KCl than that for NaCl as complex former except for LaCl 3 , CeCl 3 , YbCl 3 and LuCl 3 , while the total transport amount of rare earth chloride for KCl as complex former is higher than that for NaCl except for LaCl 3 and EuCl 3 . More over, the discussion was carried out for Sc and Y on the one hand and the lanthanides contain 4f electron as another hand based on the 4f electron hybridization assumption. Further more, the transport characteristics of rare earth oxides with alkaline chlorides as complex former in this study were compared to that with AlCl 3 as complex former

  15. Heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis: a Cu/Sm/Schiff base complex for syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Shinya; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2010-04-07

    The full details of a catalytic asymmetric syn-selective nitro-Mannich reaction promoted by heterobimetallic Cu/Sm/dinucleating Schiff base complexes are described, demonstrating the effectiveness of the heterobimetallic transition metal/rare earth metal bifunctional catalysis. The first-generation system prepared from Cu(OAc)(2)/Sm(O-iPr)(3)/Schiff base 1a = 1:1:1 with an achiral phenol additive was partially successful for achieving the syn-selective catalytic asymmetric nitro-Mannich reaction. The substrate scope and limitations of the first-generation system remained problematic. After mechanistic studies on the catalyst prepared from Sm(O-iPr)(3), we reoptimized the catalyst preparation method, and a catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) showed broader substrate generality as well as higher reactivity and stereoselectivity compared to Sm(O-iPr)(3). The optimal system with Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13) was applicable to various aromatic, heteroaromatic, and isomerizable aliphatic N-Boc imines, giving products in 66-99% ee and syn/anti = >20:1-13:1. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of nemonapride is also demonstrated using the catalyst derived from Sm(5)O(O-iPr)(13).

  16. Spatial Dynamics of the Communities and the Role of Major Countries in the International Rare Earths Trade: A Complex Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xibo; Ge, Jianping; Wei, Wendong; Li, Hanshi; Wu, Chen; Zhu, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Rare earths (RE) are critical materials in many high-technology products. Due to the uneven distribution and important functions for industrial development, most countries import RE from a handful of suppliers that are rich in RE, such as China. However, because of the rapid growth of RE exploitation and pollution of the mining and production process, some of the main suppliers have gradually tended to reduce the RE production and exports. Especially in the last decade, international RE trade has been changing in the trade community and trade volume. Based on complex network theory, we built an unweighted and weighted network to explore the evolution of the communities and identify the role of the major countries in the RE trade. The results show that an international RE trade network was dispersed and unstable because of the existence of five to nine trade communities in the unweighted network and four to eight trade communities in the weighted network in the past 13 years. Moreover, trade groups formed due to the great influence of geopolitical relations. China was often associated with the South America and African countries in the same trade group. In addition, Japan, China, the United States, and Germany had the largest impacts on international RE trade from 2002 to 2014. Last, some policy suggestions were highlighted according to the results.

  17. Automatic Ship Detection in Remote Sensing Images from Google Earth of Complex Scenes Based on Multiscale Rotation Dense Feature Pyramid Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ship detection has been playing a significant role in the field of remote sensing for a long time, but it is still full of challenges. The main limitations of traditional ship detection methods usually lie in the complexity of application scenarios, the difficulty of intensive object detection, and the redundancy of the detection region. In order to solve these problems above, we propose a framework called Rotation Dense Feature Pyramid Networks (R-DFPN which can effectively detect ships in different scenes including ocean and port. Specifically, we put forward the Dense Feature Pyramid Network (DFPN, which is aimed at solving problems resulting from the narrow width of the ship. Compared with previous multiscale detectors such as Feature Pyramid Network (FPN, DFPN builds high-level semantic feature-maps for all scales by means of dense connections, through which feature propagation is enhanced and feature reuse is encouraged. Additionally, in the case of ship rotation and dense arrangement, we design a rotation anchor strategy to predict the minimum circumscribed rectangle of the object so as to reduce the redundant detection region and improve the recall. Furthermore, we also propose multiscale region of interest (ROI Align for the purpose of maintaining the completeness of the semantic and spatial information. Experiments based on remote sensing images from Google Earth for ship detection show that our detection method based on R-DFPN representation has state-of-the-art performance.

  18. Spatial Dynamics of the Communities and the Role of Major Countries in the International Rare Earths Trade: A Complex Network Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Wang

    Full Text Available Rare earths (RE are critical materials in many high-technology products. Due to the uneven distribution and important functions for industrial development, most countries import RE from a handful of suppliers that are rich in RE, such as China. However, because of the rapid growth of RE exploitation and pollution of the mining and production process, some of the main suppliers have gradually tended to reduce the RE production and exports. Especially in the last decade, international RE trade has been changing in the trade community and trade volume. Based on complex network theory, we built an unweighted and weighted network to explore the evolution of the communities and identify the role of the major countries in the RE trade. The results show that an international RE trade network was dispersed and unstable because of the existence of five to nine trade communities in the unweighted network and four to eight trade communities in the weighted network in the past 13 years. Moreover, trade groups formed due to the great influence of geopolitical relations. China was often associated with the South America and African countries in the same trade group. In addition, Japan, China, the United States, and Germany had the largest impacts on international RE trade from 2002 to 2014. Last, some policy suggestions were highlighted according to the results.

  19. Fluoride loaded polymeric nanoparticles for dental delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sanko; Escudero, Carlos; Sediqi, Nadia; Smistad, Gro; Hiorth, Marianne

    2017-06-15

    The overall aim of the present paper was to develop fluoride loaded nanoparticles based on the biopolymers chitosan, pectin, and alginate, for use in dental delivery. First, the preparation of nanoparticles in the presence of sodium fluoride (NaF) as the active ingredient by ionic gelation was investigated followed by an evaluation of their drug entrapment and release properties. Chitosan formed stable, spherical, and monodisperse nanoparticles in the presence of NaF and tripolyphoshate as the crosslinker, whereas alginate and pectin were not able to form any definite nanostructures in similar conditions. The fluoride loading capacity was found to be 33-113ppm, and the entrapment efficiency 3.6-6.2% for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2-0.4% (w/w) NaF, respectively. A steady increase in the fluoride release was observed for chitosan nanoparticles prepared in 0.2% NaF both in pH5 and 7 until it reached a maximum at time point 4h and maintained at this level for at least 24h. Similar profiles were observed for formulations prepared in 0.4% NaF; however the fluoride was released at a higher level at pH5. The low concentration, but continuous delivery of fluoride from the chitosan nanoparticles, with possible expedited release in acidic environment, makes these formulations highly promising as dental delivery systems in the protection against caries development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Well Waters Fluoride in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISI Ogbu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal fluoride levels in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. To determine the fluoride content of well waters in Enugu, southeastern Nigeria, water samples from 50 artisan wells chosen by multistage sampling procedure from the 5 zones of Enugu municipality were analyzed in duplicates for their fluoride content. The zonal mean values were 0.60, 0.70, 0.62, 0.62, and 0.63 mg/L for Abakpa Nike, Achara Layout, Obiagu/ Ogui, Trans Ekulu and Uwani, respectively (p<0.05. The mean value for the whole city was 0.63 mg/L. Although, the mean level of fluoride recorded in this study is currently within safe limits (1.5 mg/L, WHO 2011, it is important to monitor continuously the fluoride content of well waters in the municipality in view of the increasing industrial activities going on in the city and heavy reliance on well water for domestic purposes and the widespread use of consumer products containing fluoride.

  1. THE USE OF FLUORIDE AND ITS EFFECT ON HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Kanduti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual’s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment and is always present in our lives. However, the concentration differs from area to area. Exposure can occur through diet, respiration and fluoride supplements. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Drinking water in Slovenia is not fluoridated; the amount of naturally present fluoride is very low. Fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralisation and demineralisation of tooth enamel. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their cariostatic effect. 

  2. Chemisorption of uranium hexa-fluoride on sodium fluoride pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalburgi, A K; Sanyal, A; Puranik, V D; Bhattacharjee, B [Chemical Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    This paper comprises kinetics of chemical reaction or rather chemisorption of uranium hexafluoride gas on sodium fluoride pellets. The chemisorption is essentially irreversible at room temperature, while the process reverses at high temperature above 280 deg C. This chemisorption process was experimentally conducted in static condition at room temperature and its kinetics was studied. In the experiments, practically pure UF{sub 6} was used and the effects of gas pressure and weight of NaF pellets, were studied. In this heterogenous reaction, in which diffusion through ash layer is followed by chemical reaction, the reaction part is instantaneous and is first order with respect to gas concentration. Since the process of chemisorption is not only pure chemical reaction but also gas diffusion through ash layer, the rate constant depreciates with the percentage loading of UF{sub 6} on NaF pellets. The kinetic equation for the above process has been established for a particular size of NaF pellets and pellet porosity. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Facile synthesis of highly biocompatible folic acid-functionalised SiO2 nanoparticles encapsulating rare-earth metal complexes, and their application in targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiuling; Hu, Fan; Shuai, Qi

    2017-11-14

    Mesoporous silica core-shell nanospheres encapsulating a rare-earth metal complex (RC) were first synthesised through a facile W/O (water in oil) inverse microemulsion method. In order to achieve targeted complex delivery, folic acid (FA) was used as the targeting component due to its high affinity for over-expressed folate receptors (FRs) in cancer cells. The RC 2 @SiO 2 -FA nanospheres were characterised via ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis spectroscopy), dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A microwave method was used to synthesise five RC cores based on 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid, and their crystal structures were further confirmed using X-ray diffraction. The five RC cores have the following chemical formulae: [Er 2 (p-CPA) 6 (H 2 O) 6 ] RC 1 , [Ho 2 (p-CPA) 6 (H 2 O) 6 ] RC 2 , [Sm(p-CPA) 3 (H 2 O)] RC 3 , [Pr(p-CPA) 3 (H 2 O)]·3H 2 O RC 4 and [Ce(p-CPA) 3 (H 2 O) 2 ]·2H 2 O RC 5 . The carboxyl groups showed two kinds of coordination modes, namely μ 2 -η 1 :η 1 and μ 2 -η 1 :η 2 , among RC 1 -RC 5 . The flexible -OCH 2 COO- spacer group, which can undergo rotation of its C-O and C-C bonds, offered great potential for structural diversity. In vivo experiments revealed that the nanospheres exhibited no obvious cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells and 293 T cells, even at concentrations of up to 80 μg mL -1 . Nevertheless, all of the RC cores showed a certain degree of anti-tumour efficacy; in particular, RC 2 showed the strongest cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells. Interestingly, the cytotoxicity of all of the RC 2 @SiO 2 -FA nanospheres was higher than that of lone RC 2 . These types of FA-targeted mesoporous silica nanocarriers can be used for the delivery of anti-tumour RC, and provide a basis for the further study of affordable non-platinum-based complexes.

  4. Fluoride release and recharge abilities of contemporary fluoride-containing restorative materials and dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Koliniotou-Koumpia, Eugenia; Helvatzoglou-Antoniades, Maria; Kotsanos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of five fluoride-releasing restorative materials and three dental adhesives, before and after NaF solution treatment. Five restorative materials (Fuji IX GP, GC Corp.; Ketac N100, 3M ESPE; Dyract Extra, Dentsply; Beautifil II, Shofu Inc.; Wave, SDI) and three dental adhesives (Stae, SDI; Fluorobond II - Shofu Inc.; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) were investigated before and after NaF solution treatment. A fluoride ion-selective electrode was to measure fluoride concentrations. During the 86-day period before NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP released the highest amount of fluoride among the restorative materials while Prime & Bond NT was the highest among the dental adhesives. After NaF solution treatment, Fuji IX GP again ranked the highest in fluoride release among the restorative materials while Fluorobond II ranked the highest among dental adhesives. It was concluded that the compositions and setting mechanisms of fluoride-containing dental materials influenced their fluoride release and recharge abilities.

  5. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a

  6. Daily Fluoride Intake from Iranian Green Tea: Evaluation of Various Flavorings on Fluoride Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Maleki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With increased awareness of the health benefits of the compounds in green tea, especially polyphenols, its consumption is rising. The main purpose of this study is to determine the effect of different additives on the released fluoride into tea liquor and also daily fluoride intake. The concentrations of fluoride, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride were measured in 15 different flavored green teas (Refah-Lahijan. The fluoride and other anion concentrations were measured by ion chromatography method. The data were analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16.0. The results showed that the minimum and maximum concentrations of fluoride in the green tea infusions were 0.162 mg/L (cinnamon-flavored green tea and 3.29 mg/L (bagged peach-flavored green tea, respectively. The mean concentration of fluoride in the green tea leaves was 52 mg/kg, and approximately 89% of the fluoride was released from the green tea leaves into the infusions after brewing. The fluoride concentrations varied significantly among the examined green teas ( P 0.05. Finally, drinking of the studied green teas cannot make a significant contribution to the daily dietary intake of F for consumers.

  7. Fluoride release, recharge and flexural properties of polymethylmethacrylate containing fluoridated glass fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bakri, I A; Swain, M V; Naoum, S J; Al-Omari, W M; Martin, E; Ellakwa, A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoridated glass fillers on fluoride release, recharge and the flexural properties of modified polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Specimens of PMMA denture base material with various loading of fluoridated glass fillers (0%, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 10% by weight) were prepared. Flexural properties were evaluated on rectangular specimens (n = 10) aged in deionized water after 24 hours, 1 and 3 months. Disc specimens (n = 10) were aged for 43 days in deionized water and lactic acid (pH 4.0) and fluoride release was measured at numerous intervals. After ageing, specimens were recharged and fluoride re-release was recorded at 1, 3 and 7 days after recharge. Samples containing 2.5%, 5% and 10% glass fillers showed significantly (p glass fillers specimens. All experimental specimens exhibited fluoride release in both media. The flexural strength of specimens decreased in proportion to the percentage filler inclusion with the modulus of elasticity values remaining within ISO Standard 1567. The modified PMMA with fluoridated glass fillers has the ability to release and re-release fluoride ion. Flexural strength decreased as glass filler uploading increased. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, M.Y.; Sandham, A.; Rumachik, E.N.; Ruben, J.L.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. METHODS: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  9. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  10. Oral fluoride levels 1 h after use of a sodium fluoride rinse: effect of sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Gerald L; Schumacher, Gary E; Chow, Laurence C; Tenuta, Livia M A

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the concentration of free fluoride in oral fluids is an important goal in the use of topical fluoride agents. Although sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is a common dentifrice ingredient, the influence of this ion on plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of SLS on these parameters and to examine the effect of this ion on total (or whole) plaque fluoride, an important source of plaque fluid fluoride after a sufficient interval following fluoride administration, and on total salivary fluoride, a parameter often used as a surrogate measure of salivary fluid fluoride. Ten subjects accumulated plaque for 48 h before rinsing with a 12 mmol/l NaF (228 µg/g F) rinse containing or not containing 0.5% (w/w) SLS. SLS had no statistically significant effect on total plaque and total saliva fluoride but significantly increased salivary fluid and plaque fluid fluoride (by 147 and 205%, respectively). These results suggest that the nonfluoride components of topical agents can be manipulated to improve the fluoride release characteristics from oral fluoride reservoirs and that statistically significant change may be observed in plaque fluid and salivary fluid fluoride concentrations that may not be observed in total plaque and total saliva fluoride concentrations.

  11. Widespread genetic switches and toxicity resistance proteins for fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jenny L; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Weinberg, Zasha; Roth, Adam; Stockbridge, Randy B; Breaker, Ronald R

    2012-01-13

    Most riboswitches are metabolite-binding RNA structures located in bacterial messenger RNAs where they control gene expression. We have discovered a riboswitch class in many bacterial and archaeal species whose members are selectively triggered by fluoride but reject other small anions, including chloride. These fluoride riboswitches activate expression of genes that encode putative fluoride transporters, enzymes that are known to be inhibited by fluoride, and additional proteins of unknown function. Our findings indicate that most organisms are naturally exposed to toxic levels of fluoride and that many species use fluoride-sensing RNAs to control the expression of proteins that alleviate the deleterious effects of this anion.

  12. Influence of the method of fluoride administration on toxicity and fluoride concentrations in Japanese quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Schuler, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Young Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were administered NaF for 16 d either in their diet or by esophageal intubation. Based on the total fluoride ion (Emg F-) intake over the l6-d experimental period, fluoride administered by intubation was at least six times more toxic than that fed in the diet. Dietary concentrations of 1,000 ppm F- (Emg F- for 16 d = approx. 144) produced no mortality, whereas intubated doses produced 73% or greater mortality in all groups administered 54 mg F- /kg/d or more (Emg F- for 16 d _ approx. 23 mg). GraphIc companson of the regression of log F- ppm in femurs/mg F- intake showed that fluoride levels in the femurs of quail administered fluoride by intubation were higher than in those administered fluoride in the diet.

  13. Structure-solubility relationships in fluoride-containing phosphate based bioactive glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharyar, Yaqoot

    The dissolution of fluoride-containing bioactive glasses critically affects their biomedical applications. Most commercial fluoride-releasing bioactive glasses have been designed in the soda-lime-silica system. However, their relatively slow chemical dissolution and the adverse effect of fluoride on their bioactivity are stimulating the study of novel biodegradable materials with higher bioactivity, such as biodegradable phosphate-based bioactive glasses, which can be a viable alternative for applications where a fast release of active ions is sought. In order to design new biomaterials with controlled degradability and high bioactivity, it is essential to understand the connection between chemical composition, molecular structure, and solubility in physiological fluids.Accordingly, in this work we have combined the strengths of various experimental techniques with Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, to elucidate the impact of fluoride ions on the structure and chemical dissolution of bioactive phosphate glasses in the system: 10Na2O - (45-x) CaO - 45P2O5 - xCaF2, where x varies between 0 -- 10 mol.%. NMR and MD data reveal that the medium-range atomic-scale structure of thse glasses is dominated by Q2 phosphate units followed by Q1 units, and the MD simulations further show that fluoride tends to associate with network modifier cations to form alkali/alkaline-earth rich ionic aggregates. On a macroscopic scale, we find that incorporating fluoride in phosphate glasses does not affect the rate of apatite formation on the glass surface in simulated body fluid (SBF). However, fluoride has a marked favorable impact on the glass dissolution in deionized water. Similarly, fluoride incorporation in the glasses results in significant weight gain due to adsorption of water (in the form of OH ions). These macroscopic trends are discussed on the basis of the F effect on the atomistic structure of the glasses, such as the F-induced phosphate network re-polymerization, in a

  14. Assessment of Fluoride Concentration of Soil and Vegetables in Vicinity of Zinc Smelter, Debari, Udaipur, Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Nagesh; Jain, Sandeep; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Mridula; Shinde, Kushal; Singh, Anukriti; Gandhi, Neha; Gupta, Vivek Vardhan

    2015-10-01

    As of late, natural contamination has stimulated as a reaction of mechanical and other human exercises. In India, with the expanding industrialization, numerous unsafe substances are utilized or are discharged amid generation as cleans, exhaust, vapours and gasses. These substances at last are blended in the earth and causes health hazards. To determine concentration of fluoride in soils and vegetables grown in the vicinity of Zinc Smelter, Debari, Udaipur, Rajasthan. Samples of vegetables and soil were collected from areas situated at 0, 1, 2, 5, and 10 km distance from the zinc smelter, Debari. Three samples of vegetables (i.e. Cabbage, Onion and Tomato) and 3 samples of soil {one sample from the upper layer of soil (i.e. 0 to 20 cm) and one from the deep layer (i.e. 20 - 40 cm)} at each distance were collected. The soil and vegetable samples were sealed in clean polythene bags and transported to the laboratory for analysis. One sample each of water and fertilizer from each distance were also collected. The mean fluoride concentration in the vegetables grown varied between 0.36 ± 0.69 to 0.71 ± 0.90 ppm. The fluoride concentration in fertilizer and water sample from various distances was found to be in the range of 1.4 - 1.5 ppm and 1.8 - 1.9 ppm respectively. The fluoride content of soil and vegetables was found to be higher in places near to the zinc smelter.

  15. Geophysical interpretation of U, Th, and rare earth element mineralization of the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, Anne E.; Stoeser, Douglas B.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    A prospectivity map for rare earth element (REE) mineralization at the Bokan Mountain peralkaline granite complex, Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska, was calculated from high-resolution airborne gamma-ray data. The map displays areas with similar radioelement concentrations as those over the Dotson REE-vein-dike system, which is characterized by moderately high %K, eU, and eTh (%K, percent potassium; eU, equivalent parts per million uranium; and eTh, equivalent parts per million thorium). Gamma-ray concentrations of rocks that share a similar range as those over the Dotson zone are inferred to locate high concentrations of REE-bearing minerals. An approximately 1300-m-long prospective tract corresponds to shallowly exposed locations of the Dotson zone. Prospective areas of REE mineralization also occur in continuous swaths along the outer edge of the pluton, over known but undeveloped REE occurrences, and within discrete regions in the older Paleozoic country rocks. Detailed mineralogical examinations of samples from the Dotson zone provide a means to understand the possible causes of the airborne Th and U anomalies and their relation to REE minerals. Thorium is sited primarily in thorite. Uranium also occurs in thorite and in a complex suite of ±Ti±Nb±Y oxide minerals, which include fergusonite, polycrase, and aeschynite. These oxides, along with Y-silicates, are the chief heavy REE (HREE)-bearing minerals. Hence, the eU anomalies, in particular, may indicate other occurrences of similar HREE-enrichment. Uranium and Th chemistry along the Dotson zone showed elevated U and total REEs east of the Camp Creek fault, which suggested the potential for increased HREEs based on their association with U-oxide minerals. A uranium prospectivity map, based on signatures present over the Ross-Adams mine area, was characterized by extremely high radioelement values. Known uranium deposits were identified in the U-prospectivity map, but the largest tract occurs

  16. Emissions of fluorides from welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyńska, Małgorzata; Pągowska, Emilia; Pyrzyńska, Krystyna

    2015-11-01

    The levels of fluoride airborne particulates emitted from welding processes were investigated. They were sampled with the patented IOM Sampler, developed by J. H. Vincent and D. Mark at the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), personal inhalable sampler for simultaneous collection of the inhalable and respirable size fractions. Ion chromatography with conductometric detection was used for quantitative analysis. The efficiency of fluoride extraction from the cellulose filter of the IOM sampler was examined using the standard sample of urban air particle matter SRM-1648a. The best results for extraction were obtained when water and the anionic surfactant N-Cetyl-N-N-N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were used in an ultrasonic bath. The limits of detection and quantification for the whole procedure were 8μg/L and 24μg/L, respectively. The linear range of calibration was 0.01-10mg/L, which corresponds to 0.0001-0.1mg of fluorides per m(3) in collection of a 20L air sample. The concentration of fluorides in the respirable fraction of collected air samples was in the range of 0.20-1.82mg/m(3), while the inhalable fraction contained 0.23-1.96mg/m(3) of fluorides during an eight-hour working day in the welding room. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project.

  18. Thermodynamic data-base for metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Hyung; Lee, Byung Gik; Kang, Young Ho and others

    2001-05-01

    This study is aimed at collecting useful data of thermodynamic properties of various metal fluorides. Many thermodynamic data for metal fluorides are needed for the effective development, but no report of data-base was published. Accordingly, the objective of this report is to rearrange systematically the existing thermodynamic data based on metal fluorides and is to use it as basic data for the development of pyrochemical process. The physicochemical properties of various metal fluorides and metals were collected from literature and such existing data base as HSC code, TAPP code, FACT code, JANAF table, NEA data-base, CRC handbook. As major contents of the thermodynamic data-base, the physicochemical properties such as formation energy, viscosity, density, vapor pressure, etc. were collected. Especially, some phase diagrams of eutectic molten fluorides are plotted and thermodynamic data of liquid metals are also compiled. In the future, the technical report is to be used as basic data for the development of the pyrochemical process which is being carried out as a long-term nuclear R and D project

  19. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Zhou, Zhiyuan; Breaker, Ronald R

    2014-07-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in Bacillus subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound is potentiated by fluoride. Polymyxin B, another membrane-targeting antibiotic with a different mechanism of action, shows no such improvement. These results, along with previous findings, indicate that certain compounds that destabilize bacterial cell envelopes can enhance the toxicity of fluoride. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Ullah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, toxic effects, and management of fluoride toxicity. The main aim of this review is to highlight the potential adverse effects of fluoride overdose and poorly understood toxicity. In addition, the related clinical significance of fluoride overdose and toxicity has been discussed.

  1. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Rizwan; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Shahani, Nazish

    2017-08-01

    The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, toxic effects, and management of fluoride toxicity. The main aim of this review is to highlight the potential adverse effects of fluoride overdose and poorly understood toxicity. In addition, the related clinical significance of fluoride overdose and toxicity has been discussed.

  2. comparative study of fluoride in alcornea cordifolia and commercial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantum

    2013-07-31

    Jul 31, 2013 ... fluoride than the tender stem. Hence, the hard stem is a cheap source of fluoride when compared to commercial ... The importance of addition of 10% zinc .... 1st edition, Prentice Hall, Education Limited, Publisher, Edinburgh.

  3. State and National Water Fluoridation System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  4. Use of EDTA for potentiometric back titration of rare earths and analysis of their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayed, M.A.; Rizk, M.S.; Khalifa, H.; Omer, W.F.

    1987-01-01

    Advantage was taken of the stoichiometric reaction between mercury(II), rare earths, alkaline earths, heavy metal ions and EDTA in urotropine buffered media to determine rare earths by back-titration of excess EDTA in the course of estimating a variety of lanthanides or analysing their binary mixture with one of the alkaline earth metals by selective control of pH; or analysing their binary mixtures with heavy metals using fluoride as a good masking agent for rare earths; or analysing their ternary mixtures with both heavy and alkaline earth metals in two steps, one by selective control of pH and the other by masking of rare earths with fluoride at lower pH to estimate the heavy metal. The procedures given are simple, rapid and extremely reliable. 19 refs. (author)

  5. Non-ferrous metals, anorganic and organic materials resistent to fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauffe, K.

    1986-01-01

    Aluminium and its alloys are resistant in fluoride solutions up to 400 K. Aluminium is also a suitable reactor material for the thermal decomposition of acidic fluorides between 750 and 825 K. Brass corrodes at room temperature in a 0,1 m KF solution with and without inhibitors very slowly ( -1 ). Nickel and the nickel alloys Inconel 600, Hastelloy N and Monel 500 are the most resistant materials against fluoride solutions and melts. A similar behavior exhibit zirconium-titanium-iron and zirconium-titanium-molybdenum alloys, respectively. From the inorganic compounds, compressed graphite, Al 2 O 3 and hexaborides of earth and rare earth metals, particularly LaB 6 , are extraordinarily resistant against fluorine ions at high temperatures. If the reaction temperature remains below 370 K, then polymers and resins, e.g. polyolefines, PVC, acrylic and epoxy resins and fluorcarbon resins can be employed as coating or compound material (resin + carbon fibers) resistant against fluorine ions up to 370 K. (orig.) [de

  6. A simple and colorimetric fluoride receptor and its fluoride-responsive organogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Xudong, E-mail: 081022009@fudan.edu.cn [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Li Yajuan [College of Science, Hebei University of Science and Technology, Yuhua Road 70, Shijiazhuang 050080 (China); Yin Yaobing; Yu Decai [College of Science, Hebei University of Engineering, 199 South street of Guangming, Handan 056038 (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a new p-nitrophenylhydrozine-based anion receptor 1 containing cholesterol group had been designed and synthesized. It could selectively recognize fluoride among different anions tested with color changes from pale yellow to red for visual detection. Simultaneously, it could gel in cyclohexane, and the gel was also fluoride-responsive. When treated with TBAF (tetra-n-butylammonium fluoride), the gel could undergo gel-sol transition accompanied by color, morphology and surface changes. The binding mechanism had been investigated by UV-vis and {sup 1}HNMR (proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra) titrations. From SEM (scanning electron microscope), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), IR (Infrared Spectroscopy) and CA (contact angle) experiments, it was indicated that the addition of F{sup -} could destroy the molecule assembly of host 1 in the gel state, thus resulting in the gel-to-sol transition due to the binding site competition effect. To the best of our knowledge, this was the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel kind receptor for selective recognition of fluoride had been designed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Its organogel was also fluoride-responsive. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the simplest fluoride-responsive organogel with high selectivity.

  7. FLUORIDE: A REVIEW OF USE AND EFFECTS ON HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanduti, Domen; Sterbenk, Petra; Artnik, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual's health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. The aim of our research was to review the literature about fluoride toxicity and to inform physicians, dentists and public health specialists whether fluoride use is expedient and safe. Data we used in our review were systematically searched and collected from web pages and documents published from different international institutions. Fluoride occurs naturally in our environment but we consume it in small amounts. Exposure can occur through dietary intake, respiration and fluoride supplements. The most important factor for fluoride presence in alimentation is fluoridated water. Methods, which led to greater fluoride exposure and lowered caries prevalence, are considered to be one of the greatest accomplishments in the 20th century`s public dental health. During pregnancy, the placenta acts as a barrier. The fluoride, therefore, crosses the placenta in low concentrations. Fluoride can be transmitted through the plasma into the mother's milk; however, the concentration is low. The most important action of fluoride is topical, when it is present in the saliva in the appropriate concentration. The most important effect of fluoride on caries incidence is through its role in the process of remineralization and demineralization of tooth enamel. Acute toxicity can occur after ingesting one or more doses of fluoride over a short time period which then leads to poisoning. Today, poisoning is mainly due to unsupervised ingestion of products for dental and oral hygiene and over-fluoridated water. Even though fluoride can be toxic in extremely high concentrations, it`s topical use is safe. The European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) recommends a preventive topical use of fluoride supplements because of their cariostatic effect.

  8. The effective use of fluorides in public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    , systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on......Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research...

  9. Yttrium separation of Xenotime waste in Pitinga (Brazil), in order to obtain rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo.

    1996-01-01

    The xenotime (YPO 4 and rare earth elements) found in the mine of Pitinga, Amazonas State, Brazil, has its origin in a primal depository ('eluvio' kind) of cassiterite, having considerable quantities of zirconite, ilmenite, topaz and niobates-tantalates. This xenotime has different characteristics in relation of the depositories that exist in other countries for presenting more concentration of rare earth heavy oxides. The mineralization of this cassiterite is problematic, because of the high level of radioactive elements. In the present work, we will process only the xenotime. The separation of rare earth elements is very difficult due to their great chemical similarity. For a more exactly determination, it is necessary to separate them at least of the macron constituents of the sample. As the Yttrium is considerate one of the rare earth elements, due to its chemical similarity, we can understand the difficulty of a chemical separation, mainly when this one is also a macro constituent of the sample, as in the case of xenotime. The process of separation will be based on the little difference that exists between the constants of complexation and the fluoride. (authors). 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  10. Fluoride in dental biofilm and saliva

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Line Staun

    Dette ph.d.-projekt bidrager med ny viden om fordelingen af fluorid i dental biofilm og saliva. For at udforske koncentrationen af fluorid i naturlig (in vivo) biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og i saliva, blev der udført to meget forskellige kliniske studier. Resultaterne fra tværsnitsstudiet (Studie...... I), hos en stor gruppe mennesker (n=42) der konsulterede en tandklinik for behandling, bekræfter tidligere viden, at der findes en naturlig biologisk variation i fluoridkoncentrationerne i biofilm fra forskellige intra-orale regioner samt mellem biofilmvæske, biofilmsediment og saliva...... fluoridkoncentrationer i underkæbefronten, intermediære koncentrationer i alle tre overkæberegioner og de laveste koncentrationer i underkæbemolarregionerne. Begge studier viser at biofilmsedimentet indeholder størstedelen af fluorid i biofilm. Set i et bredere perspektiv viser fundene at der er et omvendt forhold...

  11. Effect of atmospheric fluoride on plant metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suketa, Y; Yamamoto, T

    1971-05-01

    Studies on the relationship between the exposure factor and foliar deposition of fluoride, or foliar burn, are introduced. Photosynthesis is adversely affected by atmospheric fluoride. The photosynthesis of a strawberry deteriorated by 50% when the strawberry was exposed to 48 ppb hydrofluoric acid for one hour. The effect of fluoride on the respiratory organs of plants is also reported. Soy beans exposed to 0.03 ppm HF had metabolic abnormalities. The total sugar quantity of leaves decreased from 242-253 mg/100 g to 111-141 mg/100 g and the non-reduced sugar/reduced sugar ratio decreased from 4.6-8.7 to 0.8-1.6. 30 references, 3 figures, 14 tables.

  12. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  13. Purification method for calcium fluoride containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogami, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    Calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) containing uranium is heated in an electrolytic bath having a cathode and an anode to form a molten salt, and the molten salt is electrolytically reduced to form metal uranium deposited on the surface of the cathode. The calcium fluoride molten salt separated by the deposition of generated metal uranium on the surface of the cathode is solidified by cooling. The solidified calcium fluoride is recovered. When metal uranium is deposited on the surface of the cathode by the electrolytic reduction of the molten salt, impurities such as plutonium and neptunium are also deposited on the surface of the anodes entrained by the metal uranium. Impurities having high vapor pressures such as americium and strontium are evaporated and removed from the molten salts. Then, nuclides such as uranium can thus be separated and recovered, and residual CaF 2 can be recovered in a state easily storable and reutilizable. (T.M.)

  14. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, Elian

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi....../L and 95 and 400 mg F/L respectively in natural and synthetic solutions. The fluoride removal capacities observed were 4.6 mg F/g bone char for the column system and 2.7 mg F/g bone char for the batch system in case of synthetic magadi solution. It is however concluded that the batch system is the best...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  15. Preparation of uranium ingots from double fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Boulbin, E.

    1967-05-01

    A simple method has been developed for the preparation of uranium double fluorides and has given a new impetus to the study of the reduction of these compounds with a view to obtaining very pure uranium ingots. This reduction can be carried out using calcium or magnesium as the reducing agent, this latter metal being very interesting from the practical point of view. A comparative study of the heat balances of the reduction processes for the double fluorides and for uranium tetrafluoride has shown that reduction of the double fluorides is possible. The exact experimental conditions for these reductions have been determined. Our study has shown in particular that the reduction of the double salt UF 4 , CaF 2 by magnesium leads to the production of small (20 to 500 g) samples of high-purity uranium with a yield of 99 per cent. (author) [fr

  16. Fluoride levels in commercially available rice in Ethiopia | Tegegne ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alkaline fusion was used for sample preparation of six varieties for both the raw rice and rice cooked with tap water and fluoridated water. Fluoride levels ranged from 0.1-5.5 mg/kg in raw rice sample. Rice which was cooked with different fluoride levels of water showed increment depending on the method of cooking.

  17. Health effects of fluoride pollution caused by coal burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tadano, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Tamura, K.; Chen, X. [Regional Environment Division, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, 305-0083 Ibaraki (Japan); Asanuma, S. [Japan Institute of Rural Medicine, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Saku Central Hospital, Usuda, Nagano (Japan); Kondo, T. [Matsumoto Dental College, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Sakurai, S. [Otsuma Women' s University, Tama, Tokyo (Japan); Ji, R.; Liang, C.; Cao, S. [Institute of Environmental Health and Engineering, Beijing (China); Hong, Z. [Shanxi Maternity and Children' s Hospital, Taiyuan (China)

    2001-04-23

    Recently a huge amount of fluoride in coal has been released into indoor environments by the combustion of coal and fluoride pollution seems to be increasing in some rural areas in China. Combustion of coal and coal bricks is the primary source of gaseous and aerosol fluoride and these forms of fluoride can easily enter exposed food products and the human respiratory tract. Major human fluoride exposure was caused by consumption of fluoride contaminated food, such as corn, chilies and potatoes. For each diagnostic syndrome of dental fluorosis, a log-normal distribution was observed on the logarithm of urinary fluoride concentration in students in China. Urinary fluoride content was found to be a primary health indicator of the prevalence of dental fluorosis in the community. In the fluorosis areas, osteosclerosis in skeletal fluorosis patients was observed with a high prevalence. A biochemical marker of bone resorption, urinary deoxypyridinoline content was much higher in residents in China than in residents in Japan. It was suggested that bone resorption was stimulated to a greater extent in residents in China and fluoride may stimulate both bone resorption and bone formation. Renal function especially glomerular filtration rate was very sensitive to fluoride exposure. Inorganic phosphate concentrations in urine were significantly lower in the residents in fluorosis areas in China than in non-fluorosis area in China and Japan. Since airborne fluoride from the combustion of coal pollutes extensively both the living environment and food, it is necessary to reduce fluoride pollution caused by coal burning.

  18. Fluoride removal performance of phosphoric acid treated lime ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fluoride in drinking water above permissible levels is responsible for dental and skeletal fluorosis. In this study, removal of fluoride ions from water using phosphoric acid treated lime was investigated in continuous and point-of-use system operations. In the continuous column operations, fluoride removal performance was ...

  19. Fluoride removal from aqueous solution by pumice: case study on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fluoride removal from synthetic water by pumice was studied at batch experiments in this study. The effect of pH, contact time, fluoride concentration and adsorbent dose on the fluoride sequestration was investigated. The optimum conditions were studied on Kuhbonan water as a case study. The results showed that ...

  20. Coprecipitation of iron and silver with barium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopilova, N.V.; Khamidov, B.O.; Kashina, Z.A.; Ikrami, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    Distribution of trace contaminants of iron and silver at coprecipitation of barium fluoride is studied in present work. It is defined that iron almost completely coprecipitated with barium fluoride in wide range of ph 5.5-12. Silver coprecipitated with barium fluoride in ph range 4-7. The value of coprecipitation varies from 94% to 100%.

  1. Prospecting for safe (low fluoride groundwater in the Eastern African Rift: the Arumeru District (Northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ghiglieri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A multidisciplinary research effort, including geological, hydrogeological, hydro-chemical, geophysical and hydrological investigations, was aimed at locating a source of safe groundwater for a district of northern Tanzania, within the western branch of the East Africa Rift Valley, where water shortage is common and much of the surface water carries unacceptable levels of dissolved fluoride. The 440 km2 study area lies in the northern part of Arumeru district and is dominated by Mt. Meru (4565 m a.s.l.. The local climate is semi-arid, with distinct wet and dry seasons. Four hydrogeological complexes were identified, occurring within different volcanic formations, either alone or superimposed upon one another. The groundwater flow system was interpreted from the spatial distribution of the springs, combined with a lithology- and geometry-based reconstruction of the aquifers. The dominant pattern consists of a multi-directional flow from the higher elevations in the south towards the lower areas in the north, but this is complicated by structures such as grabens, faults, lava domes and tholoids. After the identification of the major fluoride source, an interference pattern between groundwater and high fluoride surface water was drawn. Finally, vertical electrical soundings were performed to define the location of aquifers in regions where release of fluoride was prevented. The methodological approach for the prospecting of safe water in a semi-arid, fluoride polluted region was validated by the drilling of a 60 m deep well capable of supplying at least 3.8 l/s of low fluoride, drinkable water.

  2. Estimating concentration of fluoride in edible leaves locally grown around Raipur, Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhuti Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fluorine is the 13th most abundant element in the earth crust and is available in various environmental, clinical, and food samples in varied concentrations. Aim: To estimate concentration of fluoride in five medicinal and five nonmedicinal edible leaves locally grown around Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India. Materials and Methods: Samples of ten medicinal and nonmedicinal edible leaves, namely, spinach (Spinacia oleracea, coriander leaves (Coriandrum sativum, chawli bhaji (Amaranthus spinach, lal bhaji (Alternanthera bettzickiana, mooli bhaji (Raphanus sativus, neem (Azadirachta indica, tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum, mint leaves (Mentha longifolia, betel leaves (Piper betle, and bael leaves (Aegle marmelos were collected in the clean polyethene bags. After thorough washing with water, leaves were left to dry in ambient temperature and crushed into powder using a mixer grinder. One gram of each of the powdered samples was taken and analyzed for fluoride concentration using a 2-(4-sulfophenylazo 1,8-dihydroxy-3,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid trisodium salt spectrophotometric method. Results: The presence of fluoride in varied concentrations in locally grown edible leaves were analyzed. The highest concentration of fluoride was reported in tulsi (6.0 μg/g and lowest in mint leaves (1.1 μg/g. Two edible leaves, neem and bael, showed fluoride concentration below detection limit. Conclusion: Knowledge regarding the importance of edible leaves may be lost in the near future unless efforts are made to educate younger generations about their importance. Hence, the time has come to make good use of centuries-old knowledge through modern approaches for their better economic and therapeutic utilization.

  3. Complexometric determination of aluminium and scandium using fluorides as masking agent at low pH value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, V.N.

    1978-01-01

    A complexometric method is suggested to determine Al and Sc by back titration of Bi(NO 3 ) 3 solution with xylenol orange indicator at low pH values. To increase selectivity fluoride additions were used which were masked by boron acid at the end titration point. EDTA was used as a complexing agent. Metals which create at low pH values stable complexes with EDTA undestroyed by fluoride, do not interfere with Al and Sc determination. Scandium is shown to be determined more selectively than aluminium

  4. Fabrication of dense panels in lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcy, P.; Roger, J.; Pointud, R.

    1958-04-01

    The authors report a study aimed at the fabrication of large and dense lithium fluoride panels. This sintered lithium fluoride is then supposed to be used for the construction of barriers of protection against a flow of thermal neutrons. They briefly present the raw material which is used under the form of chamotte obtained through a pre-sintering process which is also described. Grain size measurements and sample preparation are indicated. Shaping, drying, and thermal treatment are briefly described, and characteristics of the sintered product are indicated

  5. Stability of rare earth complexes with 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole in aqueous-dioxane medium. Ustojchivost' kompleksnykh soedinenij RZEh s 2-(o-oksifenil)benzimidazolom v vodno-dioksanovoj srede

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhrimenko, Z M; Panyushkin, V T; Fedorova, M V [Kubanskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., Krasnodar (USSR)

    1990-01-01

    Method of potentiometric titration was used to determine protonation constants of 2-(-hydroxyphenyl)benzimidazole (pK{sub 1}=4.5; pK{sub 2}=11.30) and stability constants of Pr,Nd,Sm,Eu,Tb,Dy complexes with this ligand. Nonmonotonous change of lgK{sub 1} with increase of ordinal number of rare earth element was revealed.

  6. Geochemistry of ground water and the source of contamination of fluoride in the drinking water of the Naranji area, district Swabi, NWFP, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danishwar, S.; Shah, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    Inhabitants of the Naranji village are known for their yellow coloration of teeth throughout the Mardan division. A general survey of the area shows prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis of varied degree in the village. A detailed geochemical analysis of ground water of the village indicates fluoride concentration of 13.5 mg l-1 which is about 9 times more than WHO's maximum contaminant level. The source of high fluoride in drinking water is considered to be the alkaline rocks of Koga Complex. Tube well water should be supplied to the area in order to avoid the fluoride contamination. (author)

  7. Comparative evaluation of fluoride release from PRG-composites and compomer on application of topical fluoride: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhull K

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer, using different topical fluoride regimes, and to compare the amount of fluoride release from giomer with that of compomer. Materials and Method: Forty-eight specimens of each giomer and compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralizing solution for six hours and remineralizing solution for 18 hours. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralizing solution and remineralizing solution daily for seven days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralizing solution to that released in remineralizing solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be more in Giomer when compared to Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly greater in the acidic demineralizing solution than in the neutral remineralizing solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from the giomer and compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of giomer and compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice daily > fluoridated dentifrice once daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once daily > control group. It was found that the giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake than the compomer.

  8. Molybdenum carbide coating electrodeposited from molten fluoride bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topor, D.C.; Selman, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide has been recently considered as a candidate material for the protection of common steel-based substrates in high-temperature high-sulfur activity applications. Methods to produce coatings of materials such as Mo/sub 2/C are scarce and only the electrodeposition from molten salts can yield dense, pore-free layers on various metallic profiles. Recently Stern reported the deposition of a Mo/sub 2/C coating on nickel substrate form, FLINAK + K/sub 2/MoCl/sub 6/ + Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture at 850 0 C. Electrodeposition of Mo/sub 2/C on a cathode surface proceeds according to a rather complicated mechanism which may involve simultaneous reduction of carbonate to C, of molybdate to Mo and a subsequent chemical reaction between both species. The deposit grows further as a coherent coating. Reduction of CO/sub 2/ or carbonate to carbon in a fused salt medium could follow different paths but Li/sup +/ ions or other highly polarizing ions must be present. A similar situation in which a polyatomic anion discharges at the cathode is encountered when molybdates are used as source of molybdenum. In fluoride melts the chemistry of Mo(VI) species is considered to be much simpler due to the hard fluoride ions. These ions form strong complexes with molybdenum and the resulting solution is more stable

  9. Review on fluoride-releasing restorative materials--fluoride release and uptake characteristics, antibacterial activity and influence on caries formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Annette; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the fluoride release and recharge capabilities, and antibacterial properties, of fluoride-releasing dental restoratives, and discuss the current status concerning the prevention or inhibition of caries development and progression. Information from original scientific full papers or reviews listed in PubMed (search term: fluoride release AND (restorative OR glass-ionomer OR compomer OR polyacid-modified composite resin OR composite OR amalgam)), published from 1980 to 2004, was included in the review. Papers dealing with endodontic or orthodontic topics were not taken into consideration. Clinical studies concerning secondary caries development were only included when performed in split-mouth design with an observation period of at least three years. Fluoride-containing dental materials show clear differences in the fluoride release and uptake characteristics. Short- and long-term fluoride releases from restoratives are related to their matrices, setting mechanisms and fluoride content and depend on several environmental conditions. Fluoride-releasing materials may act as a fluoride reservoir and may increase the fluoride level in saliva, plaque and dental hard tissues. However, clinical studies exhibited conflicting data as to whether or not these materials significantly prevent or inhibit secondary caries and affect the growth of caries-associated bacteria compared to non-fluoridated restoratives. Fluoride release and uptake characteristics depend on the matrices, fillers and fluoride content as well as on the setting mechanisms and environmental conditions of the restoratives. Fluoride-releasing materials, predominantly glass-ionomers and compomers, did show cariostatic properties and may affect bacterial metabolism under simulated cariogenic conditions in vitro. However, it is not proven by prospective clinical studies whether the incidence of secondary caries can be significantly reduced by the fluoride release of

  10. Study on recovering directly the commercial cerium oxide and total of residue rare earths from Dongpao bastnasite concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Trong Hung; Nguyen Thanh Chung; Luu Xuan Dinh

    2003-01-01

    A technology for decomposition roasting and sequential leaching processes of Dong Pao bastnasite concentrate to recover directly commercial cerium oxide and total of residue rare earth elements from the leaching solution of the roasted product have been investigated. The bastnasite concentrate is initially roasted at temperature range of 600 - 650 degC and for time of 4 hrs in order to decompose and convert the hardly soluble carbonate forms of ore into easily soluble oxide. The roasted solid is then leached with sulfuric acid solution of 6N at 60 degC for 4 hrs to convert rare earths in oxide and fluoride form into rare earth sulfate. The recovery yield of rare earths of these stages is more than 95%. The attention has especially been paid on recovering directly the commercial cerium oxide and total of residue rare earth element from the above leaching solution. Complex ions of CeSO 4 2+ , Ce(SO 4 ) 2 , Ce(SO 4 ) 3 2- and Ce(SO 4 ) 4 4- exist in aqueous solution of cerium (IV) sulfate. Based on the property, the method of ion - sieve with DOWEX cation resin column has been applied to estimating separation of the ceric complex anions from Ln(III). The survey showed that most of the ceric complex anions are separated from total of residue rare earths. The latter which are absorbed in the cation column are recovered by elution of HCl of 4N. The recovery yield of cerium can only be reached 20% but the purity of that is very high, can be reached 99.6%. About 5 kg of CeO 2 of high grade and 5 kg of TREO of commercial specification have been produced. (author)

  11. Risk perception, psychological heuristics and the water fluoridation controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrella, Andrea M L; Kiss, Simon J

    2015-04-29

    Increasingly, support for water fluoridation has come under attack. We seek an explanation, focusing on the case of Waterloo, Ontario, where a 2010 referendum overturned its water fluoridation program. In particular, we test whether individuals perceive the risks of water fluoridation based not on 'hard' scientific evidence but on heuristics and cultural norms. A sample of 376 residents in Waterloo were surveyed in June 2012 using random digit dialing. We use factor analysis, OLS regression, as well as t-tests to evaluate a survey experiment to test the credibility hypothesis. Perceptions of fluoride as a risk are lower among those who perceive fluoride's benefits (B = .473, p < 0.001) and those whose cultural view is 'egalitarian' (B = .156, p < 0.05). The experiment shows a lower level of perception of fluoride's benefits among respondents who are told that water fluoridation is opposed by a national advocacy group (Group A) compared to those who are told that the government and the World Health Organization support fluoridation (Group B) (t = 1.6547, p < 0.05), as well as compared to the control group (t = 1.8913, p < 0.05). There is no difference between Group B and the control, possibly because people's already general support for fluoridation is less prone to change when told that other public organizations also support fluoridation. Public health officials should take into account cultural norms and perceptions when individuals in a community appear to rise up against water fluoridation, with implications for other public health controversies.

  12. Estimation of atmospheric fluoride by limed filter papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.R.

    1988-09-01

    The limed filter paper method of static sampling of atmospheric fluoride is reviewed in this report. Use of the technique, in conjunction with precise measurement of the absorbed fluoride and calibration with dynamic air sampling techniques, to estimate atmospheric fluoride levels, is considered to give only qualitative data (± 50%). The limed filter paper method is site specific due to variations in meteorological conditions. Its main value is to indicate seasonal and annual trends in fluoride exposure of vegetation. Subject to these considerations, the lower and upper limits of atmospheric fluoride exposure and the applicability to atmospheric fluoride estimation under routine or emergency fluoride release conditions are discussed, with special emphasis on the limiting factors

  13. FLUORIDE CONTENT OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE SOY MILK PRODUCTS IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, Opas; Rirattanapong, Praphasri

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. In Thailand, the consumption of soy milk products is common but there is limited data about their fluoride content. The purpose of this study was to es- timate the fluoride content of soy milk products available in Thailand. Fluoride content was determined for 76 brands of soy milk using a F-ion-specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.78 μg/ml. The fluoride content was not related to sugar content, soy bean content or the sterilization process. Among 3 brands of soy milk containing tea powder extract, the fluoride content was high (1.25 to 3.78 μg/ml). Most brands of soy milk tested in our study had fluoride content below the optimal daily intake but brands containing tea powder extract if consumed by children may increase their risk for fluorosis.

  14. New Insight on the Response of Bacteria to Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biology, which has implications for a number of issues that are central to the use of fluoride for dental care. Below I provide a summary of our findings, comment on some of the key prospects for expanding our understanding of fluoride's effects on biology, and propose some future uses of this knowledge. PMID:22327376

  15. New insight on the response of bacteria to fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, R R

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biology, which has implications for a number of issues that are central to the use of fluoride for dental care. Below I provide a summary of our findings, comment on some of the key prospects for expanding our understanding of fluoride's effects on biology, and propose some future uses of this knowledge. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Adverse effects of fluoride towards thyroid hormone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enggar Abdullah Idris MZ

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An easily ionized fluoride compound like Sodium Fluoride (NaF has been used thus far as a dental caries prevention substance. However, fluoride ions also have a negative effect because it is very toxic. Several types of research on the effect of fluoride on guinea pigs and human beings indicate the presence synthesis obstruction of T3 and T4 that causes declined production, known as hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism condition may obstruct tissue growth process and metabolism so as to impact various body organ systems. Preventive efforts against hypothyroidism caused by fluoride include avoiding diffusible fluoride compound intake, like NaF, in a long run systemic use, whereas efforts to overcome fluoride intoxication include consuming food that is rich in calcium, vitamin D, and antioxidant.

  17. Fluoride concentration in urine after silver diamine fluoride application on tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, D. L.; Bahar, A.; Gunawan, H. A.; Adiatman, M.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Toptanci, I. R.; Yavuz, I.

    2017-08-01

    Silver Diammine Fluoride (SDF), which contains fluoride, is known to inhibit tooth enamel demineralization and increase fluoride concentrations in saliva and urine. The aim of this study is to analyze the fluoride concentration in urine after application of SDF on tooth enamel. Urine from four subjects was collected prior to, 30 minutes after, and two and three hours after the application of SDF, and an ion-selective electrode was used to measure the fluoride concentrations. There was no significant difference between time 1 and time 2, time 1 and time 3, time 1 and time 4, time 2 and 3 (p > 0.05), and there was a significant difference between time 2 and time 4 as well as time 3 and time 4 (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in the concentration of fluoride ions in urine from the baseline to 30 minutes after application, and an increase from baseline to two and three hours after the application of SDF.

  18. Unconventional fluoride conversion coating preparation and characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drábiková, J.; Fintová, Stanislava; Tkacz, J.; Doležal, P.; Wasserbauer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 6 (2017), s. 613-619 ISSN 0003-5599 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : fluoride conversion coating * magnesium * corrosion Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 0.364, year: 2016 http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ACMM-02-2017-1757

  19. Diffusion of fluoride in bovine enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flim, G.J.; Arends, J.; Kolar, Z.

    1976-01-01

    The uptake of 18 F and the penetration of both F and 18 F in bovine enamel was investigated. Sodium fluoride solutions buffered at pH 7 were employed. The uptake of 18 F was measured by a method described by R. Duckworth and M. Braden, Archs. Oral. Biol., 12(1967), pp. 217-230. The penetration concentration profiles of fluoride (F, 18 F) in the enamel were measured by a sectioning technique. The 18 F uptake in enamel was proportional to approximately tsup(3/4); t being the uptake time. The 18 F concentration as a function of the position in the enamel can be described by: c*(x,t) = c 0 *(t)exp[-α*(t)x]. After correction for the initial fluoride concentration in enamel, for unlabelled fluoride the same dependency is obtained. A model based on simultaneous diffusion and chemical reaction in the pores and diffusion into the hydroxyapatite crystallites will be presented. The results show that diffusion coefficients of the pores are approximately equal to 10 -10 cm 2 s -1 and in the apatite crystallites approximately equal to 10 -17 cm 2 s -1 . The limitations and the approximations of the model are discussed

  20. CORRELATION AMONG FLUORIDE AND METALS IN IRRIGATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    The levels of fluoride and selected metals in Ethiopian Rift Valley soils and irrigation water in the nearby sources were ... exhaust fumes, process waters and waste from various industrial processes [1]. The uses of ... into four sub-systems: Lake Rudolf, Chew Bahir, the Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and the Afar. The seismically ...

  1. Polyvinylidene fluoride film as a capacitor dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematos, H. V.

    1981-01-01

    Thin strips of polyvinylidene fluoride film (PVDF) with vacuum deposited electrodes were made into capacitors by conventional winding and fabrication techniques. These devices were used to identify and evaluate the performance characteristics offered by the PVDF in metallized film capacitors. Variations in capacitor parameters with temperature and frequence were evaluated and compared with other dielectric films. Their impact on capacitor applications is discussed.

  2. IMPACT OF FLUORIDE ON DENTAL HEALTH QUALITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjedovic, Eida; Medjedovic, Senad; Deljo, Dervis; Sukalo, Aziz

    2015-12-01

    Fluoride is natural element that strengthens teeth and prevents their decay. Experts believe that the best way to prevent cavities is the use of fluoride from multiple sources. Studies even show that in some cases, fluoride can stop already started damage of the teeth. In children younger than 6 years fluoride is incorporated into the enamel of permanent teeth, making the teeth more resistant to the action of bacterial and acids in food. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of improving the health status of teeth after six months treatment with the use of topical fluoridation 0.5% NaF, and the level and quality of the impact of treatment with chemical 0.5% NaF on the dental health of children at age from 8 to 15 years, in relation to gender and chronological age. This study included school children aged 8 to 15 years who visited health and dental services dependent in Mostar. It is obvious that after the implementation of treatment with 5% NaF by the method of topical fluoridation, health status of subjects from the experimental group significantly improved, so that at the final review 89.71% or 61 subjects of the experimental group had healthy (cured teeth), tooth with dental caries only 5.88% or 4 respondents tooth with dental caries and filling 4.41% or 3 respondents, extracted baby tooth 14.71% or 10 respondents, while for 13.24% of respondents was identified state with still unerupted teeth. Our findings are indirectly confirmed that the six-month treatment of fluoridation with 5% NaF, contributed to statistically significant improvement in overall oral health of the experimental group compared to the control group which was not treated by any dental treatment. It can be concluded that there is a statistically significant difference in the evaluated parameters of oral health of children in the control group compared to the studied parameters of oral health the experimental group of children at the final dental examination.

  3. Oral fluoride retention after professional topical application in children with caries activity: comparison between 1.23% fluoride foam and fluoride gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Claudia Costa Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated fluoride retention in the saliva of children with caries activity after topical fluoride application in the form of gel and foam. Methods: A cross-sectional, blind and randomized study, conducted with ten caries-active children aged between 8 and 10 years, in two stage, with a washout interval of two weeks between them. The treatments consisted of: a application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the gel type in a mold and b application of 2mL acidulated phosphate fluoride of the foam type in a mold. After the washout, the treatments were inverted. Non-stimulated saliva was collected from the children at the times of 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes after topical fluoride application. For statistical analysis the Student’s-t test was used, with a level of significance of 5%. Results: Saliva analysis was performed using a fluoride-specific electrode (ISE25F/ Radiometer, Copenhagen, Denmark at the Aquatic Science Center of the Federal University of Marana, which revealed differences after 5 minutes (p=0.0055 and 15 minutes (p=0.0208. The topical application of fluoride in the gel form revealed a higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva. Conclusion: There were differences in the retention of fluoride in the saliva of children with caries activity after the topical application of fluoride gel and the topical application of fluoride foam after 5 and 15 minutes of their application. The topical application of fluoride foam is recommended, on the basis of the lower probability of toxicity during its use.

  4. Evaluation of complexing agents and column temperature in ion chromatographic separation of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metals ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Pandey, Ashish; Name, Anil B.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Mohd Afzal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of ion chromatography method development is the resolution of all metal ions of interests. Resolution can be improved by changing the selectivity. Selectivity in chromatography can be altered by changes in mobile phase (eg eluent type, eluent strength) or through changes in stationary phase. Temperature has been used in altering the selectivity of particularly in reversed phase liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography. Present paper describe the retention behaviour of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions on a silica based carboxylate function group containing analyte column. Alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and transition metal ions were detected by ion conductivity and UV-VIS detectors respectively

  5. Towards Rational Design of Functional Fluoride and Oxyfluoride Materials from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Nenian

    Complex transition metal compounds (TMCs) research has produced functional materials with a range of properties, including ferroelectricity, colossal magnetoresistance, nonlinear optical activity and high-temperature superconductivity. Conventional routes to tune properties in transition metal oxides, for example, have relied primarily on cation chemical substitution and interfacial effects in thin film heterostructures. In heteroanionic TMCs, exhibiting two chemically distinct anions coordinating the same or different cations, engineering of the anion sub-lattice for property control is a promising alternative approach. The presence of multiple anions provides additional design variables, such as anion order, that are absent in homoanionic counterparts. The more complex structural and chemical phase space of heteroanionic materials provides a unique opportunity to realize enhanced or unanticipated electronic, optical, and magnetic responses. Although there is growing interest in heteroanionic materials, and synthetic and characterization advances are occurring for these materials, the crystal-chemistry principles for realizing structural and property control are only slowing emerging. This dissertation employs anion engineering to investigate phenomena in transition metal fluorides and oxyfluorides compounds using first principles density functional theory calculations. Oxyfluorides are particularly intriguing owing their tendency to stabilize highly ordered anion sublattices as well as the potential to combine the advantageous properties of transition metal oxides and fluorides. This work 1) addresses the challenges of studying fluorides and oxyfluorides using first principles calculations; 2) evaluates the feasibility of using external stimuli, such as epitaxial strain and hydrostatic pressure, to control properties of fluorides and oxyfluorides; and 3) formulates a computational workflow based on multiple levels of theory and computation to elucidate structure

  6. Fluoride-releasing restorative materials and secondary caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, John; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Donly, Kevin; Flaitz, Catherine

    2003-03-01

    Secondary caries is responsible for 60 percent of all replacement restorations in the typical dental practice. Risk factors for secondary caries are similar to those for primary caries development. Unfortunately, it is not possible to accurately predict which patients are at risk for restoration failure. During the past several decades, fluoride-releasing dental materials have become a part of the dentist's armamentarium. Considerable fluoride is released during the setting reaction and for periods up to eight years following restoration placement. This released fluoride is readily taken up by the cavosurface tooth structure, as well as the enamel and root surfaces adjacent to the restoration. Resistance against caries along the cavosurface and the adjacent smooth surface has been shown in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Fluoride-releasing dental materials provide for improved resistance against primary and secondary caries in coronal and root surfaces. Plaque and salivary fluoride levels are elevated to a level that facilitates remineralization. In addition, the fluoride released to dental plaque adversely affects the growth of lactobacilli and mutans streptococci by interference with bacterial enzyme systems. Fluoride recharging of these dental materials is readily achieved with fluoridated toothpastes, fluoride mouthrinses, and other sources of topical fluoride. This allows fluoride-releasing dental materials to act as intraoral fluoride reservoirs. The improvement in the properties of dental materials with the ability to release fluoride has improved dramatically in the past decade, and it is anticipated that in the near future the vast majority of restorative procedures will employ fluoride-releasing dental materials as bonding agents, cavity liners, luting agents, adhesives for orthodontic brackets, and definitive restoratives.

  7. Water fluoridation in 40 Brazilian cities: 7 year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba MOIMAZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Fluoride levels in the public water supplies of 40 Brazilian cities were analyzed and classified on the basis of risk/benefit balance. Material and Methods Samples were collected monthly over a seven-year period from three sites for each water supply source. The samples were analyzed in duplicate in the laboratory of the Center for Research in Public Health - UNESP using an ion analyzer coupled to a fluoride-specific electrode. Results A total of 19,533 samples were analyzed, of which 18,847 were artificially fluoridated and 686 were not artificially fluoridated. In samples from cities performing water fluoridation, 51.57% (n=9,720 had fluoride levels in the range of 0.55 to 0.84 mg F/L; 30.53% (n=5,754 were below 0.55 mg F/L and 17.90% (n=3,373 were above 0.84 mg F/L (maximum concentration=6.96 mg F/L. Most of the cities performing fluoridation that had a majority of samples with fluoride levels above the recommended parameter had deep wells and more than one source of water supply. There was some variability in the fluoride levels of samples from the same site and between collection sites in the same city. Conclusions The majority of samples from cities performing fluoridation had fluoride levels within the range that provides the best combination of risks and benefits, minimizing the risk of dental fluorosis while preventing dental caries. The conduction of studies about water distribution systems is suggested in cities with high natural fluoride concentrations in order to optimize the use of natural fluoride for fluoridation costs and avoid the risk of dental fluorosis.

  8. Effects of fluoridated milk on root dentin remineralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang H Arnold

    Full Text Available The prevalence of root caries is increasing with greater life expectancy and number of retained teeth. Therefore, new preventive strategies should be developed to reduce the prevalence of root caries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of fluoridated milk on the remineralization of root dentin and to compare these effects to those of sodium fluoride (NaF application without milk.Thirty extracted human molars were divided into 6 groups, and the root cementum was removed from each tooth. The dentin surface was demineralized and then incubated with one of the following six solutions: Sodium chloride NaCl, artificial saliva, milk, milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Serial sections were cut through the lesions and investigated with polarized light microscopy and quantitative morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The data were statistically evaluated using a one-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons.The depth of the lesion decreased with increasing fluoride concentration and was the smallest after incubation with artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. SEM analysis revealed a clearly demarcated superficial remineralized zone after incubation with milk+2.5 ppm fluoride, milk+10 ppm fluoride and artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride. Ca content in this zone increased with increasing fluoride content and was highest after artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride incubation. In the artificial saliva+10 ppm fluoride group, an additional crystalline layer was present on top of the lesion that contained elevated levels of F and Ca.Incubation of root dentin with fluoridated milk showed a clear effect on root dentin remineralization, and incubation with NaF dissolved in artificial saliva demonstrated a stronger effect.

  9. Rare earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranstone, D A

    1979-01-01

    Rare earth elements are commonly extracted from the minerals monazite, bastnaesite, and xenotine. New uses for these elements are constantly developing; they have found applications in glass polishing, television tube phosphors, high-strength low-alloy steels, magnets, catalysts, refractory ceramics, and hydrogen sponge alloys. In Canada, rare earths have been produced as byproducts of the uranium mining industry, but there was no production of rare earths in 1978 or 1979. The world sources of and markets for the rare earth elements are discussed.

  10. Fluoride uptake into the developing enamel and dentine of sheep incisors following daily ingestion of fluoridated milk or water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttress, T.W.; Suckling, G.W.; Gao, J.; Coote, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The caries preventive action of fluoride is common knowledge, although some of the mechanisms involved remain equivocal. At present, raised local levels of fluoride at, or in, the surface of tooth enamel is the most commonly accepted explanation of the anti-cariogenic action of fluoride. However, fluoride incorporated as fluorapatite into the tooth during its formation remains a possible alternative or complementary anti-cariogenic mechanism. If so, regular ingestion of fluoride during tooth formation is beneficial. Although use of fluoridated water is the preferred method in public health programmes, access to suitable potable water is required, and often this in not feasible. Fresh, preserved, or dried cow's milk products are widely used as nutritional and dietary items in most populations, particularly for young children. Milk is a practical, controllable means for regular delivery of fluoride. Processing of milk is commonly centralised and uses standardised conditions, allowing easy supplementation of fluoride for distribution to communities. The purpose of this study was to resolve the question of availability of fluoride ingested in milk compared with fluoride ingested in water by measuring fluoride deposition in the developing permanent incisors of young sheep. Incisors were analysed using a proton microprobe. (author). 18 refs., 1 tabs., 3 figs

  11. Earth as art three

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    For most of us, deserts, mountains, river valleys, coastlines even dry lakebeds are relatively familiar features of the Earth's terrestrial environment. For earth scientists, they are the focus of considerable scientific research. Viewed from a unique and unconventional perspective, Earth's geographic attributes can also be a surprising source of awe-inspiring art. That unique perspective is space. The artists for the Earth as Art Three exhibit are the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, which orbit approximately 705 kilometers (438 miles) above the Earth's surface. While studying the images these satellites beam down daily, researchers are often struck by the sheer beauty of the scenes. Such images inspire the imagination and go beyond scientific value to remind us how stunning, intricate, and simply amazing our planet's features can be. Instead of paint, the medium for these works of art is light. But Landsat satellite sensors don't see light as human eyes do; instead, they see radiant energy reflected from Earth's surface in certain wavelengths, or bands, of red, green, blue, and infrared light. When these different bands are combined into a single image, remarkable patterns, colors, and shapes emerge. The Earth as Art Three exhibit provides fresh and inspiring glimpses of different parts of our planet's complex surface. The images in this collection were chosen solely based on their aesthetic appeal. Many of the images have been manipulated to enhance color variations or details. They are not intended for scientific interpretation only for your viewing pleasure. Enjoy!

  12. The industry of metallic rare earths (R.E.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, P.

    1979-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed: rare earths resources (rare earths abondance and world reserves, main ores). Rare earths separation and purification (ionic exchange, solvent extraction). Metallic rare earths and their mixtures, metallothermic reduction of oxides or fluorides (Ca, Mg, Al, Si or rare earth metals), Co-reduction process for intermetallic compounds (SmCo 5 ). Industrial applications of metallic rare earths (traditional applications such as flints, nodular cast iron, steel refining, magnesium industrie, applications under development such as rare earths/cobalt magnets, LaNi 5 for hydrogen storage, special alloys (automotive post combustion), magnetostrictive alloys). Economical problems: rare earth are elements relatively abundant and often at easily accessible prices. However, this group of 15 elements are liable to certain economical restraints. It is difficult to crack ore for only one rare earth. Availability of one given rare earth must be associated with the other corresponding rare earths to absorb all the other rare earths in other applications. Rare-earth industry has a strong expanding rate. 20% per year average for 6 years with Rhone-Poulenc. Thanks to their exceptional, specific characteristics rare earths have a bright future particularly for their metals

  13. Indirect complexometric determination of thorium(IV) using sodium fluoride as masking agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, N.V.; Nazareth, R.A.; Narayana, B.; Hegde, P.; Manjunatha, B.R.

    2002-01-01

    A complexometric method for the determination of thorium(IV) in presence of other metal ions based on the selective masking ability of sodium fluoride towards thorium is described. Thorium(IV) present in a given sample solution is first complexed with a known excess of EDTA and the surplus EDTA is titrated against bismuth nitrate solution at pH 2-3 using xylenol orange as indicator. A known excess of sodium fluoride (5 %) is then added and the EDTA released from the Th-EDTA complex is titrated against standard bismuth nitrate solution. Reproducible and accurate results are obtained for 5 mg to 280 mg of thorium with relative errors ±0.65 % and standard deviations /leq 0.75 mg. The interference of various ions was studied. (author)

  14. On the Eu{sup 2+} luminescence in some perovskite fluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsare, P. D., E-mail: pankajbelsare@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Priyadarshini Institute of Engineering and Technology, Nagpur-440019 (India); Joshi, C. P. [Department of Physics, Shri Ramdeobaba C.O.E.M., Katol Road, Nagpur-440013 (India); Moharil, S. V., E-mail: svmoharil@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, R.T.M. Nagpur University Nagpur-440010 (India); Omanwar, S. K. [Department of Physics, S.G.B.Amravati University, Amravati-444602 (India)

    2015-08-28

    In the recent years due to their various optical and technological applications fluoride materials have attracted attention of several researchers. When these materials are doped with rare earth ions they show properties favorable for many optical applications such as high quantum efficiencies. The perovskite type fluorides of formula ABF{sub 3} where A= Alkali earth metal (Li,Na,K,Rb,Cs) and B= Alkaline earth metal (Mg,Ca,Ba,Sr) are of special interest to the research workers because of their wide range of applications that includes these materials as thermoluminescence detector, laser material, scintillator, X-ray imaging and storage phosphor, quantum cutter for VUV applications etc. Due to the high symmetry and technological efficiency of the growth process these crystals are good model objects for fundamental studies and in some cases they are of great practical value. This paper reports photoluminescence properties of UV emitting KMgF{sub 3}, NaMgF{sub 3} and LiBaF{sub 3} phosphors prepared by reactive atomospheric process. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence characteristics of these phosphors are also mentioned.

  15. Community water fluoridation on the Internet and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Aaron; Allukian, Myron

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, 95 percent of teens and 85 percent of adults use the Internet. Two social media outlets, Facebook and Twitter, reach more than 150 billion users. This study describes anti-fluoridation activity and dominance on the Internet and social media, both of which are community water fluoridation (CWF) information sources. Monthly website traffic to major fluoridation websites was determined from June 2011 to May 2012. Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube fluoridation activity was categorized as "proCWF" or "anti-CWF." Twitter's anti-CWF tweets were further subcategorized by the argument used against CWF. Anti-CWF website traffic was found to exceed proCWF activity five- to sixty-fold. Searching "fluoride" and "fluoridation" on Facebook resulted in 88 to 100 percent anti-CWF groups and pages; "fluoridation" on Twitter and YouTube resulted in 64 percent anti-CWF tweets and 99 percent anti-CWF videos, respectively. "Cancer, " "useless, " and "poisonous" were the three major arguments used against fluoridation. Anti-fluoridation information significantly dominates the Internet and social media. Thousands of people are being misinformed daily about the safety, health, and economic benefits of fluoridation.

  16. Toxicity of fluoride to microorganisms in biological wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; Banihani, Qais; León, Glendy; Khatri, Chandra; Field, James A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2009-07-01

    Fluoride is a common contaminant in a variety of industrial wastewaters. Available information on the potential toxicity of fluoride to microorganisms implicated in biological wastewater treatment is very limited. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fluoride towards the main microbial populations responsible for the removal of organic constituents and nutrients in wastewater treatment processes. The results of short-term batch bioassays indicated that the toxicity of sodium fluoride varied widely depending on the microbial population. Anaerobic microorganisms involved in various metabolic steps of anaerobic digestion processes were found to be very sensitive to the presence of fluoride. The concentrations of fluoride causing 50% metabolic inhibition (IC(50)) of propionate- and butyrate-degrading microorganisms as well as mesophilic and thermophilic acetate-utilizing methanogens ranged from 18 to 43 mg/L. Fluoride was also inhibitory to nitrification, albeit at relatively high levels (IC(50)=149 mg/L). Nitrifying bacteria appeared to adapt rapidly to fluoride, and a near complete recovery of their metabolic activity was observed after only 4d of exposure to high fluoride levels (up to 500 mg/L). All other microbial populations evaluated in this study, i.e., glucose fermenters, aerobic glucose-degrading heterotrophs, denitrifying bacteria, and H(2)-utilizing methanogens, tolerated fluoride at very high concentrations (>500 mg/L).

  17. Effects of different amine fluoride concentrations on enamel remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, E A; Niemann, N; Aretz, L; Arnold, W H

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of decreasing fluoride concentrations on repeated demineralizing challenges on human enamel. In 24 teeth, 3mm×3mm windows were prepared on the buccal and lingual sides and treated in a cycling demineralization-remineralization model. Remineralization was achieved with 100, 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride from anime fluoride. Coronal sections were cut through the artificial lesions, and three sections per tooth were investigated using polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with quantitative element analysis. The morphology of the lesions was studied, and the extensions of the superficial layer and the body of the lesion were measured. Using element analysis, the Ca, P and F content were determined. The body of the lesion appeared remineralized after application of 100 ppm fluoride, while remineralization of the lesion was less successful after application of 10 and 0.1 ppm fluoride. The thickness of the superficial layer increased with decreasing fluoride concentrations, and also the extension of the body of the lesion increased. Ca and P content increased with increasing fluoride concentrations. The effectiveness of fluoride in enamel remineralization increased with increasing fluoride concentration. A consistently higher level of fluoride in saliva should be a goal in caries prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Laboratory investigations into the potential anticaries efficacy of fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Frank; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Martinez-Mier, Esperanza Angeles; Zero, Domenick T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential anticaries efficacy of fluoride varnishes (FVs) by studying their ability to reharden and deliver fluoride to carious lesions and to release fluoride into saliva. Enamel carious lesions were created and allocated to 24 groups (11 FVs with two FV incubation times and two control groups) based on Knoop microhardness test values. FVs were applied to lesions, which were incubated in artificial saliva for two or six hours, with saliva being renewed hourly. FV was removed and lesions were remineralized in artificial saliva for 22 hours. Microhardness was measured and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU) was determined. Saliva samples (six-hour groups) were analyzed to determine fluoride release characteristics. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. FVs differed considerably in their ability to reharden and deliver fluoride to carious lesions and in their fluoride release characteristics. Little consistency was found between investigated study variables for virtually all tested FVs. For example, a particular FV showed the highest EFU and fluoride release values but the lowest rehardening value. A longer FV contact time led to increased EFU for five of the 11 FVs. Some FVs delivered more fluoride to lesions in two hours than others did in six hours. Fluoride varnishes differ greatly in their in vitro anticaries efficacy.

  19. How life shaped Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael

    2015-10-05

    Earth is much more complex than all the other solar system objects that we know. Thanks to its rich and diverse geology, our planet can offer habitats to a wide range of living species. Emerging insights suggest that this is not just a happy coincidence, but that life itself has in many ways helped to shape the planet.

  20. Metathesis synthesis and characterization of complex metal fluoride ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Sivakumar et al 2004; Mandal and Gopalakrishnan 2005). Although metathesis reactions may initiate spontane- ously .... cal lithography are needed (Sahnoun et al 2005). KMF3 materials with perovskite structures are ... (Knox 1961; Machin et al 1963; Pari et al 1994) and shown in figure 5. The KMF3 compounds are anti-.

  1. Exposure to Sodium Fluoride Produces Signs of Apoptosis in Rat Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrit Suástegui-Domínguez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is naturally present in the earth's crust and can be found in rocks, coal, and clay; thus, it can be found in small quantities in water, air, plants, and animals. Therefore, humans are exposed to fluoride through food, drinking water, and in the air they breathe. Flouride is essential to maintain bone strength and to protect against dental decay, but if it is absorbed too frequently, it can cause tooth decay, osteoporosis, and damage to kidneys, bones, nerves, and muscles. Therefore, the present work was aimed at determining the effect of intake of sodium fluoride (NaF as an apoptosis inducer in leukocytes of rats treated for eight weeks with 1 or 50 parts per million (ppm NaF. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspade-3 were used as apoptotic and general metabolism indicators of leukocyte-like indicators of the (INT oxidation system. Male rats were exposed to NaF (1 and 500 ppm for eight weeks, and then sacrificed weekly to obtain blood samples. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspase-3 were determined in leukocytes by Western blot, and general metabolism of leukocytes was analyzed with a commercial kit. We found changes in the expression of the proteins described, especially when the animals received 50 ppm of NaF. These results indicate that NaF intoxication can be an apoptosis inducer in rat leukocytes treated with the compound for eight weeks.

  2. Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Chitta R; Shahnawaz, Khijmatgar; Kumari, Divya; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Bedi, Raman; Lynch, Edward; Harding, Stewart; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-11-01

    (1) To estimate the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water throughout different zones and districts of the state of Karnataka. (2) To investigate the variation of fluoride concentration in drinking water from different sources, and its relationships to daily temperature and rainfall status in the regional districts. (3) To develop an updated fluoride concentration intensity map of the state of Karnataka, and to evaluate these data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis and their prevalence. Aqueous standard solutions of 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm fluoride (F - ) were prepared with analytical grade Na + /F - and a buffer; TISAB II was incorporated in both calibration standard and analysis solutions in order to remove the potentially interfering effects of trace metal ions. This analysis was performed using an ion-selective electrode (ISE), and mean determination readings for n = 5 samples collected at each Karnataka water source were recorded. The F - concentration in drinking water in Karnataka state was found to vary substantially, with the highest mean values recorded being in the north-eastern zone (1.61 ppm), and the lowest in the south-western one (only 0.41 ppm). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there were very highly significant 'between-zone' and 'between-districts-within-zones' sources of variation (p water source F - levels within this state. The southern part of Karnataka has low levels of F - in its drinking water, and may require fluoridation treatment in order to mitigate for dental caries and further ailments related to fluoride deficiency. However, districts within the north-eastern region have contrastingly high levels of fluoride, an observation which has been linked to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This highlights a major requirement for interventional actions in order to ensure maintenance of the recommended range of fluoride concentrations (0.8-1.5 ppm) in Karnataka's drinking water

  3. Solid-state emissive triarylborane-based BODIPY dyes: photophysical properties and fluorescent sensing for fluoride and cyanide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guang-Liang; Pan, Hong; Zhao, Yi-Hong; Zhao, Cui-Hua

    2011-12-07

    We disclose two novel BODIPY dyes, which contain the bulky substituent, [(4-dimesitylboryl)phenyl]ethynyl at 2- and 2,6-positions. The steric bulkiness of the boryl group is effective to suppress the intermolecular interaction in the solid state and thus these two compounds display intense fluorescence not only in solution but also in the solid state. In addition, the BODIPY dyes display sensitive fluorescence responses to fluoride and cyanide anions through the complexation with the boron center of the boryl group and the subsequent decomposition of the BODIPY core, illustrating their potential uses for the fluorescence sensing of fluoride and cyanide ions.

  4. The Effect of Calcium Pre-Rinse on Salivary Fluoride After 900 ppm Fluoride Mouthwash: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Ramazani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Calcium fluoride deposit during fluoride application. Uptake and retention of fluoride by saliva depends generally on the concentration of calcium. In this study, the ef-fect of calcium pre-rinse on salivary fluoride concentration after a 900 ppm fluoride mouthwash was investigated.Materials and Methods: This cross-over double-blind randomized clinical trial was con-ducted in a girls' dormitory in Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, southeast Iran. In this study, 42 female dental students were chosen using simple randomization. During the first phase, 21 subjects (group A used fluoride rinse (F regimen and the remaining (group B used calcium pre-rinse followed immediately by fluoride rinse (Ca + F regi-men. In the second phase, participants rinsed using the mouthwashes not previously used. Prior to each phase prophylaxis was performed and no fluoridated product was used dur-ing a two-week interval between the phases. Salivary samples were taken immediately be-fore (baseline, 1 and 12 hours after rinsing. The salivary fluoride concentration was de-termined using fluoride sensitive electrode. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for sta-tistical analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05.Results: There was significant difference between fluoride concentrations at different time points (P< 0.001. Significant differences were observed when the different time points of two regimens were examined. In contrast to this, the baseline before using F regimen and the baseline before using Ca + F regimen did not show any significance (P= 0.070.Conclusion: Pre-rinsing with calcium before fluoride is recommended because of signifi-cant increases in salivary fluoride concentration.

  5. Coupling NMR with Synchrotron radiation at high temperature for the study of molten fluorides : applied to zirconium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksoud, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Molten fluorides are used in Molten Salt Reactors MSR such as the non moderated fast reactor MSFR, where the molten salt LiF-ThF 4 is the fuel and the coolant. The formation of fission products (FP) such as lanthanides, during the reactor operation, possibly modifies the physicochemical properties of the melt. It is therefore important to characterize the melt from the structural and the dynamics point of view in order to determine its properties. Because of problems related to the radioactivity of thorium, as well as requirements related to spectroscopic methods, the system studied in this thesis is the LiF-ZrF 4 -LaF 3 (zirconium and lanthanum are possible FP). The approach followed in this thesis combines measurements by NMR spectroscopy and EXAFS at 850 C with molecular dynamics simulations. In the molten salt, we have shown the existence of zirconium and lanthanum complexes with different coordination numbers, whose proportions depend on the composition. Depending on the content of ZrF 4 , [ZrF 7 ] 3- species are dominant but change slightly and are further connected between each other's via bridging fluorine. The addition of LaF 3 to the mixture stabilizes the 7 coordination number around the zirconium and tends to enrich the environment of lanthanum with fluorides. A medium-range order is established between the various complexes containing zirconium and lanthanum due to bridging fluorine. Species dynamics is slower when the amount of either ZrF 4 or LaF 3 is higher. We noted a significant effect on the structure and dynamics of species starting 10 mol% LaF 3 added to the medium. The data obtained by this novel approach concerning the chemistry of the molten salt in MSR containing FP, are fundamental to improve the separation of these products and optimize the process. (author)

  6. Rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The conference was held from September 12 to 13, 1984 in Jetrichovice, Czechoslovakia. The participants heard 16 papers of which 4 were inputted in INIS. These papers dealt with industrial separation processes of rare earths, the use of chemical methods of separation from the concentrate of apatite and bastnesite, the effect of the relative permittivity of solvents in the elution of rare earth elements from a cation exchanger, and the determination of the content of different rare earth elements using X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. (E.S.)

  7. Fluoridation and tooth wear in Irish adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, F M

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of tooth wear in adults in Ireland and its relationship with water fluoridation. The National Survey of Adult Oral Health was conducted in 2000\\/2001. Tooth wear was determined using a partial mouth examination assessing the upper and lower anterior teeth. A total of 2456 subjects were examined. In this survey, increasing levels and severity of tooth wear were associated with ageing. Men were more affected by tooth wear and were more likely to be affected by severe tooth wear than women. It was found that age, and gender were significant predictors of tooth wear (P < 0.01). Overall, there was no significant relationship between fluoridation and tooth wear in this study.

  8. Production of sintered porous metal fluoride pellets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, L.W.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1973-12-25

    Porous pellets characterized by a moderately reactive crust and a softer core of higher reactivity are produced by forming agglomerates containing a metal fluoride powder and a selected amount ofwater. The metal fluoride is selected to be sinterable and essentially non-reactive with gaseous fluorinating agents. The agglomerates are contacted with a gaseous fluorinating agent under controlled conditions whereby the heat generated by localized reaction of the agent and water is limited to values effccting bonding by localized sintering. Porous pellets composed of cryolite (Na/sub 3/AlF/sub 6/) can be used to selectively remove trace quantities of niobium pentafluoride from a feed gas consisting predominantly of uranium hexafluoride. (Official Gazette)

  9. Encyclopedia of earth system science

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nierenberg, William Aaron

    1992-01-01

    .... The very diversity of the articles attests to the complexity of earth system science as a unique interdisciplinary venture to place humanity in a position to move wisely to protect the global habitat...

  10. High Fluoride Dentifrices for Elderly and Vulnerable Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Kim Rud

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this work is to present the available evidence that toothpastes containing >1,500 ppm fluoride (2,500-2,800 and 5,000 ppm F) provide an additional caries preventive effect on root caries lesions in elderly patients compared to traditional dentifrices (1,000-1,450 ppm F......). The secondary aim of this paper is to discuss why high fluoride dentifrices in general should perform better than traditional F-containing toothpaste. When examining the few studies that have considered the preventive benefits of high fluoride products on root caries the relative risk appears to be around 0.......5, and the risk can thus be halved by exchanging traditional F-containing toothpaste for toothpaste containing 5,000 ppm F. There is reasonable evidence that high fluoride dentifrices significantly increase the fluoride concentration in saliva during the day and the fluoride concentration in plaque compared...

  11. Rare earths: harvesting basic research for technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagatap, B.N.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, rare earths are increasingly becoming a versatile platform for basic research that presents enormous technological potentials. A variety of nano-sized inorganic matrices varying from oxides, phosphates, gallates and aluminates, tungstates, stannates, vanadates to fluorides doped with different lanthanide ions have been synthesized and their optical properties have been investigated in the Chemistry Group, BARC. Another interesting application is laser cooling of solids using rare earth doped glasses with potential applications in remote cooling of electronic devices. Combining the luminescence properties of rare earths with photonic crystals is yet another potent area with wide ranging applications. In this presentation we provide an overview of these developments with examples from the R and D programs of the Chemistry Group, BARC

  12. Thermogravimetric study of rare earth concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delyagejd, V.V.; Anisimova, V.N.; Eremenko, Z.V.; Kutsev, V.S.

    1974-01-01

    Methods of thermogravimetric, chemical and phase analysis were used in measuring the concentration of rare-earth elements of different origins. At temperatures 400-800 deg C a gradual decomposition of fluorocarbonates takes place leading to the formation of derivatives of corresponding oxides and oxyfluorides. For concentrates containing siderite the process takes place at 550-600 deg C followed by oxidation of bivalent iron into trivalent state. Reaction of rare-earth elements with sodium carbonate and the increase in the concentration of the latter results in a narrowing down of the interval of temperatures at which decomposition takes place. Under these conditions an intense reaction and a fusion take place leading to the formation of eutectic at 500-600 deg C and further synthesis of sodium fluoride and oxyfluoride derivatives of calcium and rare-earth elements

  13. Recovery of plutonium from nitric acid containing oxalate and fluoride by a macroporous bifunctional phosphinic acid resin (MPBPA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal Chetty, K.; Godbole, A.G.; Swarup, R.; Vaidya, V.N.; Venugopal, V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption of Pu from nitric acid solutions containing oxalate/fluoride was studied using an indigenously available macroporous bifunctional phosphinic acid (MPBPA) resin. Batch experiments were carried out to obtain the distribution data of Pu(IV) with a view to optimize conditions for its recovery from nitric acid waste solutions containing oxalate or fluoride ions. The measurements showed high distribution ratio (D) values even in the presence of strong complexing ions, like oxalate and fluoride, indicating the possibility of recovery of Pu from these types of waste solution. Column studies were carried out using this resin to recover Pu from the oxalate supernatant waste solution, which showed that up to 99% of Pu could be adsorbed on the resin. Elution of Pu loaded on the resin was studied using different eluting agents. (author)

  14. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  15. FLUORIDE: A REVIEW OF USE AND EFFECTS ON HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Kanduti, Domen; Sterbenk, Petra; Artnik, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Appropriate oral health care is fundamental for any individual?s health. Dental caries is still one of the major public health problems. The most effective way of caries prevention is the use of fluoride. Aim: The aim of our research was to review the literature about fluoride toxicity and to inform physicians, dentists and public health specialists whether fluoride use is expedient and safe. Methods: Data we used in our review were systematically searched and collected from web...

  16. Modification of radiation effect by sodium fluoride in Tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Guminska, M.; Huczkowski, J.; Kuternozinska, W.

    1988-01-01

    Frequency of somatic mutations in the Tradescantia stamen hairs served as a measure of biological effect of gamma irradiation with single and split doses and of modifications caused by sodium fluoride. It was found that treatment of plants with fluoride before irradiation affects considerably radiation-induced mutations. The changed peak mutation frequency in plants treated with fluoride suggests that it vitally influences the repair processes of DNA and possibly modifies the mutation spectrum. 14 refs., 3 figs. (author)

  17. Combinatorial Effects of Arginine and Fluoride on Oral Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, X.; Cheng, X.; Wang, L.; Qiu, W.; Wang, S.; Zhou, Y.; Li, M.; Li, Y.; Cheng, L.; Li, J.; Zhou, X.; Xu, X.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the microbial disequilibrium between acidogenic/aciduric pathogens and alkali-generating commensal residents within the dental plaque. Fluoride is a widely used anticaries agent, which promotes tooth hard-tissue remineralization and suppresses bacterial activities. Recent clinical trials have shown that oral hygiene products containing both fluoride and arginine possess a greater anticaries effect compared with those containing fluoride alone, indicati...

  18. Density and surface tension of melts of zirconium and hafnium fluorides with lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katyshev, S.F.; Artemov, V.V.; Desyatnik, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the temperature dependence of the density and surface tension of melts of LiF-ZrF 4 and LiF-HfF 4 . Density and surface tension were determined by the method of maximum pressure in an argon bubble. On the basis of experimental data over the entire concentration range the molar volumes and their relative deviations from the additive molar volumes were calculated for 1100 0 K. The positive deviations of the molar volumes from additivity in the LiF-HfF 4 system (22.45%) were greater than in the LiF-ZrF 4 system (15.75%). This indicated that the reaction with lithium fluoride is intensified with the switch to the hafnium fluoride. Results also demonstrated that the fluorides are surface-active components in the molten mixtures

  19. Approaches to the accurate characterization of high purity metal fluorides and fluoride glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beary, E. S.; Paulsen, P. J.; Rains, T. C.; Ewing, K. J.; Jaganathan, J.; Aggarwal, I.

    1990-11-01

    The analytical challenges posed by the measurement of trace contaminants in high purity metal fluorides require that innovative chemical preparation procedures be used to enhance existing instrumental techniques. The instrumental techniques used to analyze these difficult matrices must be sensitive enough to detect extremely low levels of trace impurities, and the background interferences derived from the matrix (metal fluoride or glass) must be minimized. A survey of analytical techniques that have the necessary characteristics to analyze these materials will be given. In addition, means of controlling the chemical blank will be presented. Mass and atomic spectrometric techniques will be discussed, specifically graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Analytical procedures using GFAAS and ICP-MS have been developed to determine sub ppb (part per billion) levels of contaminants in high purity fluoride materials.

  20. 4-phenylbutyrate Mitigates Fluoride-Induced Cytotoxicity in ALC Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Suzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fluoride over-exposure during pre-eruptive enamel development can cause dental fluorosis. Severe dental fluorosis is characterized by porous, soft enamel that is vulnerable to erosion and decay. The prevalence of dental fluorosis among the population in the USA, India and China is increasing. Other than avoiding excessive intake, treatments to prevent dental fluorosis remain unknown. We previously reported that high-dose fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and oxidative stress in ameloblasts. Cell stress induces gene repression, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. An aromatic fatty acid, 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA is a chemical chaperone that interacts with misfolded proteins to prevent ER stress. We hypothesized that 4PBA ameliorates fluoride-induced ER stress in ameloblasts. To determine whether 4PBA protects ameloblasts from fluoride toxicity, we analyzed gene expression of Tgf-β1, Bcl2/Bax ratio and cytochrome-c release in vitro. In vivo, we measured fluorosis levels, enamel hardness and fluoride concentration. Fluoride treated Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC had decreased Tgf-β1 expression and this was reversed by 4PBA treatment. The anti-apoptotic Blc2/Bax ratio was significantly increased in ALC cells treated with fluoride/4PBA compared to fluoride treatment alone. Fluoride treatment induced cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into the cytosol and this was inhibited by 4PBA treatment. These results suggest that 4PBA mitigates fluoride-induced gene suppression, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage in vitro. In vivo, C57BL/6J mice were provided fluoridated water for six weeks with either fluoride free control-chow or 4PBA-containing chow (7 g/kg 4PBA. With few exceptions, enamel microhardness, fluorosis levels, and fluoride concentrations of bone and urine did not differ significantly between fluoride treated animals fed with control-chow or 4PBA-chow. Although 4PBA mitigated high-dose fluoride toxicity in vitro, a diet

  1. 4-phenylbutyrate Mitigates Fluoride-Induced Cytotoxicity in ALC Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Maiko; Everett, Eric T; Whitford, Gary M; Bartlett, John D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic fluoride over-exposure during pre-eruptive enamel development can cause dental fluorosis. Severe dental fluorosis is characterized by porous, soft enamel that is vulnerable to erosion and decay. The prevalence of dental fluorosis among the population in the USA, India and China is increasing. Other than avoiding excessive intake, treatments to prevent dental fluorosis remain unknown. We previously reported that high-dose fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress in ameloblasts. Cell stress induces gene repression, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. An aromatic fatty acid, 4-phenylbutyrate (4PBA) is a chemical chaperone that interacts with misfolded proteins to prevent ER stress. We hypothesized that 4PBA ameliorates fluoride-induced ER stress in ameloblasts. To determine whether 4PBA protects ameloblasts from fluoride toxicity, we analyzed gene expression of Tgf -β 1, Bcl2 / Bax ratio and cytochrome-c release in vitro . In vivo , we measured fluorosis levels, enamel hardness and fluoride concentration. Fluoride treated Ameloblast-lineage cells (ALC) had decreased Tgf -β 1 expression and this was reversed by 4PBA treatment. The anti-apoptotic Blc2 / Bax ratio was significantly increased in ALC cells treated with fluoride/4PBA compared to fluoride treatment alone. Fluoride treatment induced cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into the cytosol and this was inhibited by 4PBA treatment. These results suggest that 4PBA mitigates fluoride-induced gene suppression, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage in vitro . In vivo , C57BL/6J mice were provided fluoridated water for six weeks with either fluoride free control-chow or 4PBA-containing chow (7 g/kg 4PBA). With few exceptions, enamel microhardness, fluorosis levels, and fluoride concentrations of bone and urine did not differ significantly between fluoride treated animals fed with control-chow or 4PBA-chow. Although 4PBA mitigated high-dose fluoride toxicity in vitro , a diet rich

  2. Atmospheric fluoride levels in some Ontario peach orchards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drowley, W B; Rayner, A C; Jephcott, C M

    1963-10-01

    As a result of suture injury to peaches, a survey was taken to determine monthly atmospheric fluoride levels in the soft fruit-growing area of the Niagara Peninsula of Ontario. Although the injury was confined to a few orchards, it was found necessary to locate stations for fluoride sampling over a wide area. The limed-paper candle method was used for fluoride collection. Unwashed and washed peach leaves were analyzed for fluoride content. Fluoride was separated from all samples by the Willard-Winter distillation procedure and estimated colorimetrically. It was found that a general background level of atmospheric fluoride existed in the whole surveyed area and that the levels were highest in and near the area of peach injury. The fluoride content of peach leaves was also highest in this area. The coincidence of high fluoride levels and suture injury to peaches suggests that atmospheric fluoride was the causal agent. When lime sprays were applied to peach trees in the damaged area, a reduction in the incidence of suture injury was observed.

  3. Utility of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the evaluation of postoperative pain following surgical spine fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouldar, D; Bakshian, S; Matthews, R; Rao, V; Manzano, M; Dardashti, S

    2017-08-01

    A retrospective case review of patients who underwent 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging of the spine with postoperative pain following vertebral fusion. To determine the benefit of 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of persistent pain in the postoperative spine. The diagnosis of pain generators in the postoperative spine has proven to be a diagnostic challenge. The conventional radiologic evaluation of persistent pain after spine surgery with the use of plain radiographs, MRI, and CT can often fall short of diagnosis in the complex patient. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging is an alternative tool to accurately identify a patient's source of pain in the difficult patient. This retrospective study looked at 25 adult patients who had undergone 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT imaging. All patients had persistent or recurrent back pain over the course of a 15-month period after having undergone spinal fusion surgery. All patients had inconclusive dedicated MRI. The clinical accuracy of PET/CT in identifying the pain generator and contribution to altering the decision making process was compared to the use of CT scan alone. Of the 25 patients studied, 17 patients had increased uptake on the 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT fusion images. There was a high-level correlation of radiotracer uptake to the patients' pain generator. Overall 88% of the studies were considered beneficial with either PET/CT altering the clinical diagnosis and treatment plan of the patient or confirming unnecessary surgery. 18F sodium fluoride PET/CT proves to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of complex spine pathology of the postoperative patients. In varied cases, a high correlation of metabolic activity to the source of the patient's pain was observed.

  4. Preparation of high crystalline nanoparticles of rare-earth based complex pervoskites and comparison of their structural and magnetic properties with bulk counterparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basith, M. A.; Islam, M. A.; Ahmmad, Bashir

    2017-01-01

    of crystalline and amorphous phases. FESEM images demonstrate the formation of nanoparticles with average particle size in the range of 50–100 nm for both ultrasonication and 4 h (h) of ball milling. The bulk materials and nanoparticles synthesized by both ultrasonication and 4 h ball milling exhibit...... of the nanoparticles due to ball milling particularly for milling time exceeding 8 h. This investigation demonstrates the potential of ultrasonication as a simple route to prepare high crystalline rare-earth based manganite nanoparticles with improved control compared to the traditional ball milling technique....

  5. The effects of fluoride, strontium, theobromine and their combinations on caries lesion rehardening and fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Frank

    2017-08-01

    The aim was to investigate the effects of fluoride, strontium, theobromine and their combinations on caries lesion rehardening and fluoridation (EFU) under pH cycling conditions. Human enamel specimens were demineralized at 37°C for 24h using a pH 5.0 solution containing 50mM lactic acid and 0.2% Carbopol 907 which was 50% saturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. Lesions were assigned to nine treatment groups (n=16) based on Knoop surface microhardness indentation length. aqueous solutions were: placebo, 11.9mM sodium fluoride (F), 23.8mM sodium fluoride (2×F), 1.1mM strontium chloride hexahydrate (Sr), 1.1mM F theobromine, Sr+theobromine, F+Sr, F+theobromine, F+Sr+theobromine. Lesions were pH cycled for 5d (daily protocol: 3×1min-treatment; 2×60min-demineralization; 4×60min & overnight-artificial saliva). Knoop indentation length was measured again and%surface microhardness recovery (%SMHr) calculated. EFU was determined using the acid-etch technique. Data were analysed using ANOVA. Model showed fluoride dose-response for both variables (2×F>F>placebo). For%SMHr, F+Sr+/-theobromine resulted in more rehardening than F, however less than 2×F. F+theobromine was similar to F. For EFU, F+Sr was inferior to F, F+theobromine and F+Sr+theobromine which were similar and inferior to 2×F. In absence of fluoride, Sr, theobromine or Sr+theobromine were virtually indistinguishable from placebo and inferior to F. It can be concluded that a) strontium aids rehardening but not EFU and only in presence of fluoride; b) theobromine does not appear to offer any anti-caries benefits in this model; c) there are no synergistic effects between strontium and theobromine in the presence or absence of fluoride. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Data on fluoride concentration level in villages of Asara (Alborz, Iran) and daily fluoride intake based on drinking water consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Giti; Dobaradaran, Sina; Borazjani, Jaleh Mohajeri

    2016-12-01

    In the present data article, fluoride concentration levels of drinking water (with spring or groundwater sources) in 10 villages of Asara area located in Alborz province were determined by the standard SPADNS method using a spectrophotometer (DR/2000 Spectrophotometer, USA). Daily fluoride intakes were also calculated based on daily drinking water consumption. The fluoride content were compared with EPA and WHO guidelines for drinking water.

  7. Enhanced Fluoride Over-Coated Al Mirrors for FUV Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; DelHoyo, Javier; Rice, Steve; Threat, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Astronomical observations in the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) spectral region are some of the more challenging due to the very distant and faint objects that are typically searched for in cosmic origin studies such as origin of large scale structure, the formation, evolution, and age of galaxies and the origin of stellar and planetary systems. These challenges are driving the need to improve the performance of optical coatings over a wide spectral range that would increase reflectance in mirrors and reduced absorption in dielectric filters used in optical telescope for FUV observations. This paper will present recent advances in reflectance performance for Al+MgF2 mirrors optimized for Lyman-alpha wavelength by performing the deposition of the MgF2 overcoat at elevated substrate temperatures. We will also present optical characterization of little studied rare-earth fluorides such as GdF3 and LuF3 that exhibit low-absorption over a wide wavelength range and could therefore be used as high refractive index alternatives for dielectric coatings at FUV wavelengths.

  8. Thermoluminescence studies of natural and doped calcium fluoride phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Kolaly, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The various aspects of thermoluminescence (TL) of calcium fluoride phosphors obtained both from natural and laboratory-grown CaF 2 crystals have been investigated in the temperature range from room temperature to 750 deg C. Dopants used in these studies were Mn, Y and lanthanide series rare earths. The aspects which have been investigated are : (1) effect of single and double doping on TL glow curves and TL emission spectra after gamma irradiation, (2) TL traps : their kinetics including evaluation of the activation energy using different techniques, their decay kinetics and their behaviour under partially filled conditions, and (3) effect of temperature on emission of intensity of X-ray induced luminescence and TL. During the course of these investigations, a new glow peak was observed at 650 deg C in natural CaF 2 . It was found that this peak could also be produced in synthetic CaF 2 doped with (Y + Sm). A new model for the TL trap has also been proposed. (M.G.B.)

  9. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of complexation of alkaline-earth and lanthanide cations by poly-amino-carboxylate ligands; Simulations par mecanique quantique et dynamique moleculaire de la complexation de cations alcalino-terreux et lanthanides par des ligands polyaminocarboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, S

    1999-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on lanthanide(III) and alkaline-earth(II) complexes with poly-amino-carboxylates (ethylene-diamino-tetra-acetate EDTA{sup 4-}, ethylene-diamino-tri-acetate-acetic acid EDTA(H){sup 3-}, tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane-tetra-acetate DOTA{sup 4-}, methylene-imidine-acetate MIDA{sup 2-}) are reported. First, a consistent set of Lennard-Jones parameters for La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Lu{sup 3+} cations has been derived from free energy calculations in aqueous solution. Observed differences in hydration free energies, coordination distances and hydration numbers are reproduced. Then, the solution structures of 1:1 complexes of alkaline-earth and/or lanthanide cations with EDTA{sup 4-}, EDTA(H){sup 3-}, DOTA{sup 4-} and 1:2 complexes of lanthanide cations with MIDA{sup 2-} were studied by MD in water. In addition, free energy calculations were performed to study, for each ligand, the relative thermodynamic stabilities of complexes with Ca{sup 2+} vs Sr{sup 2+} and vs Ba{sup 2+} on the one hand, and with La{sup 3+} vs Eu{sup 3+} and vs Lu{sup 3+} on the other hand. Model does not take into account explicitly polarization and charge transfer. However, the results qualitatively agree with experimental complexation data (structure and selectivities). (author)

  10. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF STRONTIUM FLUORIDE POWDERS ACTIVATED BY NEODYMIUM FLUORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kuznetsov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Study. The paper deals with preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry. Method. Nitrate of strontium, neodymium nitrate hexahydrate, with the content equal to 99. 99 % of the basic substance and ammonium fluoride were used as the source of substances. Activated powders of strontium fluoride were obtained by the method of deposition from aqueous solutions by washing the precipitate with a solution of ammonium fluoride, taken over 114 - 120% from stoichiometry. The washed precipitate was centrifuged for 5-7 min, dried in the air at 30-350 C. Heat treatment of the dried precipitate was carried out in two stages: the first stage at the temperature of 200- 2500 C for 0.5-1 hour, the second one at 550- 6000 C for 2-3 hours. X-ray analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out on a Bruker D8 Advance diffractometer, radiation Cu K. The size and shape measuring of the particles of activated strontium fluoride was carried out by means of electron microscope Carl Zeiss NVision 40. The content of neodymium in activated powders of strontium fluoride was determined by the method of spectral emission analysis on the device LEA - S500. Chemical analysis for determination of ammonium ion (NH4+ content in the obtained samples was performed by the method of Kjeldahl. Calculations of lattice parameters, size of coherent scattering regions and the values of micro-deformations were carried out by TOPAS program. Main Results. Preparation processes of ultradisperse, homogeneous powder Sr1-хNdхF2+х (х= 0.003-0.2, with use of ammonium fluoride as the fluorinating agent taken over 114-120 % from stoichiometry, provides obtaining the firm solution Sr1-x-yNdx(NH4yF2+x-y of the cubic fluorite structure. It has been found out that the morphology and size of the resulting product depend on the quantity of

  11. Antibacterial Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride on Cariogenic Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yali; Darvell, Brain W; Botelho, Michael G

    2018-05-01

    To screen the possible antimicrobial activity of a range of clinically used, silver-based compounds on cariogenic organisms: silver diamine fluoride (SDF), silver fluoride, and silver nitrate. Preliminary screening disk-diffusion susceptibility tests were conducted on Mueller-Hinton agar plates inoculated with Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Actinomyces naeslundii, organisms known to be cariogenic. In order to identify which component of the silver compounds was responsible for any antibacterial (AB) effect, and to provide controls, the following were also investigated at high and low concentrations: sodium fluoride, ammonium fluoride, ammonium chloride, sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, and sodium nitrate, as well as deionized water as control. A volume of 10 pL of a test solution was dispensed onto a paper disk resting on the inoculated agar surface, and the plate incubated anaerobically at 37°C for 48 hours. The zones of inhibition were then measured. Silver diamine fluoride, silver fluoride, silver nitrate, and ammonium fluoride had significant AB effect (p effect at low concentration; the remaining other compounds had no effect. Silver ions appear to be the principal AB agent at both high and low concentration; fluoride ions only have an AB effect at high concentration, while ammonium, nitrate, chloride and sodium ions have none. The anticaries effect of topical silver solutions appears restricted to that of the silver ions. Silver compounds, such as SDF, silver fluoride, and silver nitrate have AB effect against cariogenic organisms and these may have clinical impact in arresting or preventing dental decay. Sodium fluoride did not have AB effect under the conditions tested.

  12. Preparation of polycrystalline lithium-yttrium fluoride for subsequent mono crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, E.; Radomski, J.; Diduszko, R.; Iwanejko, J.; Kowalczyk, Z.; Grasza, K.

    1994-01-01

    High purity lithium-yttrium (YLF) doped with rare earth elements (Nd, Pr, Ho or Tm) was obtained in a two-stage synthesis consisting of (1) reaction of ammonium fluoride with a mixture of lithium carbonate, yttrium oxide, and oxides of lanthanides, and (2) heating of the obtained reaction products at a temperature of about 700 C in an inert gas atmosphere. The phase and chemical purities of the obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry techniques. Single crystal growth tests were carried out by means of the Bridgman method. The results showed that the proposed method for manufacture of polycrystalline YLF doped with rare earth elements is appropriate in principle but some parameters of the preparation process are to be more strictly defined. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  13. Preparation of polycrystalline lithium-yttrium fluoride for subsequent mono crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, E.; Radomski, J.; Diduszko, R.; Iwanejko, J. [Institute of Vacuum Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Z. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland); Grasza, K. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. Fizyki

    1994-12-31

    High purity lithium-yttrium (YLF) doped with rare earth elements (Nd, Pr, Ho or Tm) was obtained in a two-stage synthesis consisting of (1) reaction of ammonium fluoride with a mixture of lithium carbonate, yttrium oxide, and oxides of lanthanides, and (2) heating of the obtained reaction products at a temperature of about 700 C in an inert gas atmosphere. The phase and chemical purities of the obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction and mass spectrometry techniques. Single crystal growth tests were carried out by means of the Bridgman method. The results showed that the proposed method for manufacture of polycrystalline YLF doped with rare earth elements is appropriate in principle but some parameters of the preparation process are to be more strictly defined. (author). 9 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab.

  14. Application of multiple parallel perfused microbioreactors: Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity testing of the novel rare earth complexes with indole acid as a ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qing-Lin; Xing, Yong-Heng; Liu, Jing; Wei, Wen-Juan; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xuan; Bai, Feng-Ying

    2013-11-01

    Three novel complexes, [La(phen)2(IAA)2]·NO3 (1), [Sm(phen)2(IAA)2]·NO3 (2) and [Sm(IBA)3(phen)]·phen·HNO3·H2O (3) (phen: 1,10-phenanthroline, IAA: indole-3-acetic acid, IBA: indole-3-butyric acid), were synthesized and characterized with spectroscopy (infrared and UV-visible), X-ray crystal diffraction and elemental analysis. Structural analysis revealed that each lanthanide atom in complexes 1-3 held a distorted tricapped trigonal prism geometry in a nine-coordinate mode. There were two types of coordination modes of the IAA ligand in complexes 1 and 2: a μ2-η(1):η(2) bridging mode linking two lanthanide atoms and a μ2-η(1):η(1) double monodentate bridging mode. There were three types of coordination modes of the IBA ligand: a μ2-η(1):η(1) double monodentate bridging mode, a μ1-η(2) bridging mode and a μ2-η(1):η(2) bridging mode linking two lanthanide atoms. Adjacent Sm atoms were linked via the μ2-bridging carboxylate groups of the IBA ligands to generate a binuclear building unit. The biological activity of the complexes was evaluated in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hADSCs) and Chang liver cells using a multiple parallel perfused microbioreactor. The results showed that cytotoxicity increased as the concentrations of complexes 1-3 increased. © 2013.

  15. Earth Systems Science: An Analytic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Fred N.; Nam, Younkeyong; Oughton, John

    2011-01-01

    Earth Systems Science (ESS) is emerging rapidly as a discipline and is being used to replace the older earth science education that has been taught as unrelated disciplines--geology, meteorology, astronomy, and oceanography. ESS is complex and is based on the idea that the earth can be understood as a set of interacting natural and social systems.…

  16. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  17. Experimental study of very low frequency radiation of the loop antenna installed aboard the Mir-Progress-28-Soyuz TM-2 orbital complex in the Earth ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armand, N.A.; Semenov, Yu.P.; Chertok, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    The cosmic experiment on studying electromagnetic waves of very low frequency (VLF) (5kHz) in the Earth ionosphere, using two loop antennas, each 20 m in diameter, unfolded aboard the Progress-28 cargoship, and a reception of these waves aboard the Mir orbital station is carried out for the first time from the 26th to 28th of March, 1987. Characteristics of such antennas in the ionosphere are invesigated experimentally; VLF signal recording at distances from 1 to 40 km from the radiation is carried out. The reactance of the electrically small loop antenna in the ionospheric plasma under conditions of the experiment out (the antenna current does not exceed 80A) is established to have practically no difference from the reactance in free space. Analysis of experimental data obtained has shown that they agree satsfactorily with the results of calculations carried out on the basis of the linear theory for a cold plasma model

  18. Synthesis and study of heteroligand rare earth element complexes containing N,N'-tetraethyl-N''-(trichloracetyl)phospho triamide and hexamethylphospho triamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirkhanov, V.M.; Ovchinnikov, V.A.; Rekhta, A.N.; Grytskiv, A.Ya.; Skopenko, V.V.

    1998-01-01

    Two series of the coordination compounds of the [LnL(Hmpa) 4 ](BPh) 2 and [LnL 2 (Hmpa) 2 ]BPh 4 composition, where Ln = La, Ce-Nd, Sm-Yb, Y; HL CCl 3 C(O)N(H)P(O)(NEt 2 ) 2 ; Hmpa = O=P[N(CH 3 ) 2 ] 3 ], are synthesized. The conclusion is made on the deformed-octahedral structure of the compounds on the basis of the data obtained through the IR-, NMR 1 H- and 31 P- and electron spectroscopy. It is shown that L - anions are coordinated bidentately by rare earth atom (through oxygen atoms of the phosphoryl and carbonyl groups) and the Hmpa molecules - monodentately (through the oxygen atom of the phosphoryl group) [ru

  19. Detection of nanocrystallinity by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in thin film transition metal/rare-earth atom, elemental and complex oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edge, L.F.; Schlom, D.G.; Stemmer, S.; Lucovsky, G.; Luning, J.

    2006-01-01

    Nanocrystallinity has been detected in the X-ray absorption spectra of transition metal and rare-earth oxides by (i) removal of d-state degeneracies in the (a) Ti and Sc L 3 spectra of TiO 2 and LaScO 3 , respectively, and (b) O K 1 spectra of Zr(Hf)O 2 , Y 2 O 3 , LaScO 3 and LaAlO 3 , and by the (ii) detection of the O-atom vacancy in the O K 1 edge ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 alloys. Spectroscopic detection is more sensitive than X-ray diffraction with a limit of ∼2 nm as compared to >5 mm. Other example includes detection of ZrO 2 nanocrystallinity in phase-separated Zr(Hf) silicate alloys

  20. Structural and thermodynamic study of rare earth(III) complexation by poly-hydroxylated carboxylic acids: synthesis of new extractants and outlook for the extraction of these cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aury, S.

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this work is: to improve the knowledge on the binding sites of the poly-hydroxylated carboxylic acids with the trivalent lanthanide(III) ions by comparing them to gluconic acid (previously studied) and to molecules with different configuration and with a variable number of OH functions (threonic acid, glyceric acid, 2-hydroxy-butanoic acid, 3-hydroxy-butanoic acid). To find the best complexing agent among different acids (aldonic acids, aldaric acids, di-hydroxybenzoic acids) (determination of the set of complexes and their stability constants by potentiometry, NMR and UV-Visible spectroscopy). To synthesize hydrophobic monoamides from one lactone form of saccharic acid, to study their complexing power and their capacity to extract the trivalent lanthanide(III) ions. (author)